Science.gov

Sample records for active sampling method

  1. Neutron activation analysis of certified samples by the absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, F.; Belouadah, N.; Idiri, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear reactions analysis technique is mainly based on the relative method or the use of activation cross sections. In order to validate nuclear data for the calculated cross section evaluated from systematic studies, we used the neutron activation analysis technique (NAA) to determine the various constituent concentrations of certified samples for animal blood, milk and hay. In this analysis, the absolute method is used. The neutron activation technique involves irradiating the sample and subsequently performing a measurement of the activity of the sample. The fundamental equation of the activation connects several physical parameters including the cross section that is essential for the quantitative determination of the different elements composing the sample without resorting to the use of standard sample. Called the absolute method, it allows a measurement as accurate as the relative method. The results obtained by the absolute method showed that the values are as precise as the relative method requiring the use of standard sample for each element to be quantified.

  2. Empirical comparison of neutron activation sample analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillenwalters, Elizabeth

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a research reactor used mainly for neutron activation of samples, which are then shipped to industrial customers. Accurate nuclide identification and activity determination are crucial to remain in compliance with Code of Federal Regulations guidelines. This facility utilized a Canberra high purity germanium detector (HPGe) coupled with Canberra Genie(TM) 2000 (G2K) software for gamma spectroscopy. This study analyzed the current method of nuclide identification and activity determination of neutron activated materials utilized by the USGS reactor staff and made recommendations to improve the method. Additionally, analysis of attenuators, effect of detector dead time on nuclide identification, and validity of activity determination assumptions were investigated. The current method of activity determination utilized the G2K software to obtain ratio of activity per nuclide identified. This determination was performed without the use of geometrically appropriate efficiency calibration curves. The ratio of activity per nuclide was used in conjunction with an overall exposure rate in mR/h obtained via a Fluke Biomedical hand-held ion chamber. The overall exposure rate was divided into individual nuclide amounts based on the G2K nuclide ratios. A gamma energy of 1 MeV and a gamma yield of 100% was assumed for all samples. Utilizing the gamma assumption and nuclide ratios, a calculation was performed to determine total sample activity in muCi (microCuries). An alternative method was proposed, which would eliminate the use of exposure rate and rely solely on the G2K software capabilities. The G2K software was energy and efficiency calibrated with efficiency curves developed for multiple geometries. The USGS reactor staff were trained to load appropriate calibration data into the G2K software prior to sample analysis. Comparison of the current method and proposed method demonstrated that the activity value calculated with the 1 Me

  3. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coes, Alissa L.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Foreman, William T.; Iverson, Jana L.; Alvarez, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19–23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method.

  4. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Coes, Alissa L; Paretti, Nicholas V; Foreman, William T; Iverson, Jana L; Alvarez, David A

    2014-03-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19-23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method. PMID:24419241

  5. Active Search on Carcasses versus Pitfall Traps: a Comparison of Sampling Methods.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, N I; Camina, R; Visciarelli, E C; Centeno, N D

    2016-04-01

    The study of insect succession in cadavers and the classification of arthropods have mostly been done by placing a carcass in a cage, protected from vertebrate scavengers, which is then visited periodically. An alternative is to use specific traps. Few studies on carrion ecology and forensic entomology involving the carcasses of large vertebrates have employed pitfall traps. The aims of this study were to compare both sampling methods (active search on a carcass and pitfall trapping) for each coleopteran family, and to establish whether there is a discrepancy (underestimation and/or overestimation) in the presence of each family by either method. A great discrepancy was found for almost all families with some of them being more abundant in samples obtained through active search on carcasses and others in samples from traps, whereas two families did not show any bias towards a given sampling method. The fact that families may be underestimated or overestimated by the type of sampling technique highlights the importance of combining both methods, active search on carcasses and pitfall traps, in order to obtain more complete information on decomposition, carrion habitat and cadaveric families or species. Furthermore, a hypothesis advanced on the reasons for the underestimation by either sampling method showing biases towards certain families. Information about the sampling techniques indicating which would be more appropriate to detect or find a particular family is provided. PMID:26732526

  6. Qualitative Elemental Analyses of a Meteorite Sample Found in Turkey by Photo-activation Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertugay, C.; Boztosun, I.; Ozmen, S. F.; Dapo, H.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a meteorite sample provided from TÜBITAK National Observatory found in Turkey has been investigated by using a clinical linear accelerator that has endpoint energy of 18 MeV, and a high purity Germanium detector for qualitative elemental analysis within photo-activation analysis method. 21 nuclei ranging from 24Na to 149Nd have been identified in the meteorite sample.

  7. A Rapid Method for Assaying Thiaminase I Activity in Diverse Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Clifford E.; Gordon, Eric R. L.; Angert, Esther R.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiencies can lead to neurological disorders, reproductive failure and death in wild and domestic animal populations. In some cases, disease is brought about by the consumption of foods high in thiaminase I activity. Levels of thiaminase activity in these foods are highly variable and the factors leading to production of this enzyme are poorly understood. Here we describe improvements in a spectrophotometric thiaminase I activity assay that measures the disappearance of 4-nitrothiophenol, a favored nucleophile co-substrate that replaces the thiazole portion of thiamine during the inactivation of thiamine by the enzyme. Scalable sample processing protocols and a 96-well microtiter plate format are presented that allow the rapid evaluation of multiple, replicated samples in the course of only a few hours. Observed levels of activity in bacterial culture supernatant, fish, ferns and molluscs using this colorimetric assay were similar to previously published reports that employed a radiometric method. Organisms devoid of thiaminase I, based upon previous work, showed no activity with this assay. In addition, activity was found in a variety of fishes and one fern species from which this enzyme had not previously been reported. Overall, we demonstrate the suitability of this technique for measuring thiaminase I activity within small amounts of tissue and environmental samples with replication levels that were heretofore prohibitive. The assay provides a considerable improvement in the ability to examine and understand the properties of an enzyme that has a substantial influence on organism and ecosystem health. PMID:24675843

  8. A novel method for measuring aromatase activity in tissue samples by determining estradiol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tinwell, H; Rascle, J B; Colombel, S; Al Khansa, I; Freyberger, A; Bars, R

    2011-07-01

    Increasing scrutiny of endocrine disrupters has led to changes to European pesticide and biocide legislation and to the introduction of the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program by the US EPA. One element of endocrine disrupter identification is to determine its effects on aromatase, but most available assays are limited as they depend on tritiated water production to indicate enzyme activity. Whilst acceptable for determining aromatase effects using a cell-free approach, this method is unreliable for cell or tissue-based investigations as other cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme activities can similarly produce tritiated water and consequently confound interpretation of the aromatase data. To address this lack of specificity an assay directly measuring the final estrogen product by incubating rat tissue protein with testosterone and measuring the resultant estradiol concentration was developed. Using this approach we demonstrated marked increases in enzyme activity in pregnant rat ovary samples and dose-related inhibitions when incubating non-pregnant rat ovary samples with known aromatase inhibitors. Hepatic aromatase activity was investigated using our method and by tritiated water production with microsomes from rats dosed with the antiandrogen 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4 chlorophenyl)ethane. Additional cytochrome P-450s were also measured. Treatment-related increased tritiated water production and general hepatic enzyme activity were recorded but estradiol was not increased, indicating that the increased tritiated water was due to general enzyme activity and not aromatase activity. A simple and specific method has been developed that can detect aromatase inhibition and induction, which when applied to tissue samples, provides a means of generating relevant animal data concerning chemical effects on the aromatase enzyme. PMID:21259292

  9. Application of passive (SPATT) and active sampling methods in the profiling and monitoring of marine biotoxins.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Moira; van Pelt, Frank N A M; Bane, Vaishali; O'Halloran, John; Furey, Ambrose

    2014-10-01

    Solid phase adsorbent and toxin tracking (SPATT) enables temporally and spatially integrated monitoring of biotoxins in aquatic environments. Monitoring using two adsorbent resins was performed over a four-month period at Lough Hyne Marine Reserve, Ireland. A range of Diarhettic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxins were detected from SPATT extracts throughout the study period. The majority of biotoxins were detected in the top 20-30 m of the water column and a spike in toxin accumulation was measured during August 2010. Phytoplankton analysis confirmed the presence of toxin-producing species Dinophysis acuta and Dinophysis acuminata during the bloom. SPATT has the potential to provide useful information on phycotoxin distribution in the water column; enabling evidence-based decisions regarding appropriate depths for obtaining phytoplankton and shellfish samples in marine biotoxin monitoring programmes. Active sampling was performed continuously over 7-days and high quantities of toxins were successfully accumulated in the HP-20 resin, okadaic acid (∼13 mg), dinophysis toxin-2 (∼29 mg), pectenotoxin-2 (∼20 mg) and pectenotoxin-2-seco acid (∼6 mg) proving this an effective method for accumulating DSP toxins from the marine environment. The method has potential application as a tool for assessing toxin profiles at proposed shellfish harvesting sites. PMID:25064272

  10. Large loop conformation sampling using the activation relaxation technique, ART-nouveau method.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-07-01

    We present an adaptation of the ART-nouveau energy surface sampling method to the problem of loop structure prediction. This method, previously used to study protein folding pathways and peptide aggregation, is well suited to the problem of sampling the conformation space of large loops by targeting probable folding pathways instead of sampling exhaustively that space. The number of sampled conformations needed by ART nouveau to find the global energy minimum for a loop was found to scale linearly with the sequence length of the loop for loops between 8 and about 20 amino acids. Considering the linear scaling dependence of the computation cost on the loop sequence length for sampling new conformations, we estimate the total computational cost of sampling larger loops to scale quadratically compared to the exponential scaling of exhaustive search methods. PMID:22488731

  11. Rapid Active Sampling Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    A field-deployable, battery-powered Rapid Active Sampling Package (RASP), originally designed for sampling strong materials during lunar and planetary missions, shows strong utility for terrestrial geological use. The technology is proving to be simple and effective for sampling and processing materials of strength. Although this originally was intended for planetary and lunar applications, the RASP is very useful as a powered hand tool for geologists and the mining industry to quickly sample and process rocks in the field on Earth. The RASP allows geologists to surgically acquire samples of rock for later laboratory analysis. This tool, roughly the size of a wrench, allows the user to cut away swaths of weathering rinds, revealing pristine rock surfaces for observation and subsequent sampling with the same tool. RASPing deeper (.3.5 cm) exposes single rock strata in-situ. Where a geologist fs hammer can only expose unweathered layers of rock, the RASP can do the same, and then has the added ability to capture and process samples into powder with particle sizes less than 150 microns, making it easier for XRD/XRF (x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence). The tool uses a rotating rasp bit (or two counter-rotating bits) that resides inside or above the catch container. The container has an open slot to allow the bit to extend outside the container and to allow cuttings to enter and be caught. When the slot and rasp bit are in contact with a substrate, the bit is plunged into it in a matter of seconds to reach pristine rock. A user in the field may sample a rock multiple times at multiple depths in minutes, instead of having to cut out huge, heavy rock samples for transport back to a lab for analysis. Because of the speed and accuracy of the RASP, hundreds of samples can be taken in one day. RASP-acquired samples are small and easily carried. A user can characterize more area in less time than by using conventional methods. The field-deployable RASP used a Ni

  12. Sampling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  13. Monitoring airborne fungal spores in an experimental indoor environment to evaluate sampling methods and the effects of human activity on air sampling.

    PubMed Central

    Buttner, M P; Stetzenbach, L D

    1993-01-01

    Aerobiological monitoring was conducted in an experimental room to aid in the development of standardized sampling protocols for airborne microorganisms in the indoor environment. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the relative efficiencies of selected sampling methods for the retrieval of airborne fungal spores and to determine the effect of human activity on air sampling. Dry aerosols containing known concentrations of Penicillium chrysogenum spores were generated, and air samples were taken by using Andersen six-stage, Surface Air System, Burkard, and depositional samplers. The Andersen and Burkard samplers retrieved the highest numbers of spores compared with the measurement standard, an aerodynamic particle sizer located inside the room. Data from paired samplers demonstrated that the Andersen sampler had the highest levels of sensitivity and repeatability. With a carpet as the source of P. chrysogenum spores, the effects of human activity (walking or vacuuming near the sampling site) on air sampling were also examined. Air samples were taken under undisturbed conditions and after human activity in the room. Human activity resulted in retrieval of significantly higher concentrations of airborne spores. Surface sampling of the carpet revealed moderate to heavy contamination despite relatively low airborne counts. Therefore, in certain situations, air sampling without concomitant surface sampling may not adequately reflect the level of microbial contamination in indoor environments. PMID:8439150

  14. Azocasein Substrate for Determination of Proteolytic Activity: Reexamining a Traditional Method Using Bromelain Samples.

    PubMed

    Coêlho, Diego F; Saturnino, Thais Peron; Fernandes, Fernanda Freitas; Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Silveira, Edgar; Tambourgi, Elias Basile

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of protease's worldwide market, the determination of optimum conditions and the development of a standard protocol are critical during selection of a reliable method to determine its bioactivity. This paper uses quality control theory to validate a modified version of a method proposed by Charney and Tomarelli in 1947. The results obtained showed that using azocasein substrate bromelain had its optimum at 45°C and pH 9 (Glycine-NaOH 100 mM). We also quantified the limit of detection (LoD) and limit of quantification (LoQ) in the above-mentioned optimum (0.072 and 0.494 mg·mL(-1) of azocasein, resp.) and a calibration curve that correlates optical density with the amount of substrate digested. In all analysed samples, we observed a significant decrease in response after storage (around 17%), which suggests its use must be immediately after preparation. Thus, the protocol presented in this paper offers a significant improvement, given that subjective definitions are commonly used in the literature and this simple mathematical approach makes it clear and concise. PMID:26925415

  15. Azocasein Substrate for Determination of Proteolytic Activity: Reexamining a Traditional Method Using Bromelain Samples

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Priscila Gava

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of protease's worldwide market, the determination of optimum conditions and the development of a standard protocol are critical during selection of a reliable method to determine its bioactivity. This paper uses quality control theory to validate a modified version of a method proposed by Charney and Tomarelli in 1947. The results obtained showed that using azocasein substrate bromelain had its optimum at 45°C and pH 9 (Glycine-NaOH 100 mM). We also quantified the limit of detection (LoD) and limit of quantification (LoQ) in the above-mentioned optimum (0.072 and 0.494 mg·mL−1 of azocasein, resp.) and a calibration curve that correlates optical density with the amount of substrate digested. In all analysed samples, we observed a significant decrease in response after storage (around 17%), which suggests its use must be immediately after preparation. Thus, the protocol presented in this paper offers a significant improvement, given that subjective definitions are commonly used in the literature and this simple mathematical approach makes it clear and concise. PMID:26925415

  16. Inorganic fractions in extracellular polymeric substance extracted from activated sludge and biofilm samples by different methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leiyan; Geng, Jinju; Ding, Lili; Ren, Hongqiang

    2012-01-01

    This study highlighted the inorganic fractions in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extract from two activated sludges and one biofilm. Nine EPS extraction methods (centrifugation, sonication, cation exchange resin (CER) + sonication, CER, heating, formaldehyde + heating, formaldehyde + NaOH, ethanol and EDTA) were used in the study. The EPS extracts had large inorganic fractions, which ranged from 28% to 94% of the EPS dry weight. The EPS inorganic fraction was dependent on the source of the sludge and wastewater, the kinds of bacteria and the extraction method. The EPS extracts obtained by heating and sonication had smaller inorganic fractions than those obtained by centrifugation. The compositions of the inorganic fraction of EPS extracts obtained with CER and sonication + CER showed similar trends. The chemical extraction methods could contaminate the inorganic composition of EPS extracts by impurities, carrying over of the extractant itself or by changing the pH of the solution. Ethanol was the most effective extractant for obtaining inorganic ions. PMID:22828296

  17. Fluid Sampling from Oceanic Borehole Observatories: Design and Methods for CORK Activities (1990-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. G.; Jannasch, H. W.; Kastner, M.; Hulme, S.; Cowen, J. P.; Edwards, K. J.; Orcutt, B. N.; Glazer, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid sampling capabilities associated with borehole observatories (CORKs) are currently the best mechanism to collect fluids from subsurface hydrologic zones for evaluating the composition, evolution and consequence of fluid circulation in oceanic crust. These capabilities have evolved over the past two decades spanning the Ocean Drilling Program and the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Fluid sampling capabilities of the original CORK had a single Teflon tube that connected a valve at the seafloor and ended at depth in the formation. Through successes and disappointments coupled with community desires and efforts, significant iterations in CORK design and capabilities have led to a range of crustal fluid sampling systems. These iterations continue today with the development of new borehole capabilities, sensors and samplers. We present major iterations and transitions, highlighting the pros and cons of various designs, materials, and decisions. Although this evolution has taken years because of the infrequency of CORK deployments and sample recovery operations, we as a community are now in the position to provide groundbreaking results to enhance our understanding of subseafloor hydrogeology, crustal evolution, geochemical fluxes, microbial ecology and biogeochemical processes as indicated by the wealth of work to date and the complexity and flexibility of present and future designs.

  18. Final Project Report for the Development of an Active Soil Gas Sampling Method

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged by Congress with protecting the nation's natural resources. Under the mandate of national environmental laws, the EPA strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and ...

  19. Improved Sampling Method Reduces Isokinetic Sampling Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karels, Gale G.

    The particulate sampling system currently in use by the Bay Area Air Pollution Control District, San Francisco, California is described in this presentation for the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. The method represents a practical, inexpensive tool that can…

  20. Sampling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Decker, David L; Lyles, Brad F; Purcell, Richard G; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2014-05-20

    An apparatus and method for supporting a tubing bundle during installation or removal. The apparatus includes a clamp for securing the tubing bundle to an external wireline. The method includes deploying the tubing bundle and wireline together, The tubing bundle is periodically secured to the wireline using a clamp.

  1. Elaborating transition interface sampling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Erp, Titus S. van . E-mail: bolhuis@science.uva.nl

    2005-05-01

    We review two recently developed efficient methods for calculating rate constants of processes dominated by rare events in high-dimensional complex systems. The first is transition interface sampling (TIS), based on the measurement of effective fluxes through hypersurfaces in phase space. TIS improves efficiency with respect to standard transition path sampling (TPS) rate constant techniques, because it allows a variable path length and is less sensitive to recrossings. The second method is the partial path version of TIS. Developed for diffusive processes, it exploits the loss of long time correlation. We discuss the relation between the new techniques and the standard reactive flux methods in detail. Path sampling algorithms can suffer from ergodicity problems, and we introduce several new techniques to alleviate these problems, notably path swapping, stochastic configurational bias Monte Carlo shooting moves and order-parameter free path sampling. In addition, we give algorithms to calculate other interesting properties from path ensembles besides rate constants, such as activation energies and reaction mechanisms.

  2. Direct determination of ECD in ECD Kit: a solid sample quantitation method for active pharmaceutical ingredient in drug product.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ming-Yu; Liu, Kung-Tien; Hsia, Yi-Chih; Liao, Mei-Hsiu; Shen, Lie-Hang

    2011-01-01

    Technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m-ECD) is an essential imaging agent used in evaluating the regional cerebral blood flow in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. Determination of active pharmaceutical ingredient, that is, L-Cysteine, N, N'-1,2-ethanediylbis-, diethyl ester, dihydrochloride (ECD) in ECD Kit is a relevant requirement for the pharmaceutical quality control in processes of mass fabrication. We here presented a direct solid sample determination method of ECD in ECD Kit without sample dissolution to avoid the rapid degradation of ECD. An elemental analyzer equipped with a nondispersive infrared detector and a calibration curve of coal standard was used for the quantitation of sulfur in ECD Kit. No significant matrix effect was found. The peak area of coal standard against the amount of sulfur was linear over the range of 0.03-0.10 mg, with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9993. Method validation parameters were achieved to demonstrate the potential of this method. PMID:21687539

  3. SOIL AND SEDIMENT SAMPLING METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response's (OSWER) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) needs innovative methods and techniques to solve new and difficult sampling and analytical problems found at the numerous Superfund sites throughout th...

  4. Active submarine volcano sampled

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.

    1983-01-01

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh lava were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean, from the water depths of 1,200 and 2,700 feet. the shallower dredge site was within 0.5 mile of the active submarine vent shown at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano that has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978; but, in each case, it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982. 

  5. A novel near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics method for rapid analysis of several chemical components and antioxidant activity of mint (Mentha haplocalyx Briq.) samples.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjiang; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2014-01-01

    A novel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method has been researched and developed for the simultaneous analyses of the chemical components and associated properties of mint (Mentha haplocalyx Briq.) tea samples. The common analytes were: total polysaccharide content, total flavonoid content, total phenolic content, and total antioxidant activity. To resolve the NIRS data matrix for such analyses, least squares support vector machines was found to be the best chemometrics method for prediction, although it was closely followed by the radial basis function/partial least squares model. Interestingly, the commonly used partial least squares was unsatisfactory in this case. Additionally, principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were able to distinguish the mint samples according to their four geographical provinces of origin, and this was further facilitated with the use of the chemometrics classification methods-K-nearest neighbors, linear discriminant analysis, and partial least squares discriminant analysis. In general, given the potential savings with sampling and analysis time as well as with the costs of special analytical reagents required for the standard individual methods, NIRS offered a very attractive alternative for the simultaneous analysis of mint samples. PMID:24480282

  6. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  7. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Schalla, Ronald; Smith, Ronald M.; Hall, Stephen H.; Smart, John E.; Gustafson, Gregg S.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  8. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

    1995-10-24

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

  9. Quantifying Isoniazid Levels in Small Hair Samples: A Novel Method for Assessing Adherence during the Treatment of Latent and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gerona, Roy; Wen, Anita; Chin, Aaron T.; Koss, Catherine A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Metcalfe, John; Gandhi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from an infectious pathogen worldwide and the most prevalent opportunistic infection in people living with HIV. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) reduces the incidence of active TB and reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients independently of antiretroviral therapy. However, treatment of latent or active TB is lengthy and inter-patient variability in pharmacokinetics and adherence common. Current methods of assessing adherence to TB treatment using drug levels in plasma or urine assess short-term exposure and pose logistical challenges. Drug concentrations in hair assess long-term exposure and have demonstrated pharmacodynamic relevance in HIV. Methods A large hair sample from a patient with active TB was obtained for assay development. Methods to pulverize hair and extract isoniazid were optimized and then the drug detected by liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS). The method was validated for specificity, accuracy, precision, recovery, linearity and stability to establish the assay’s suitability for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Hair samples from patients on directly-observe isoniazid-based latent or active TB therapy from the San Francisco Department of Public Health TB clinic were then tested. Results Our LC/MS-MS-based assay detected isoniazid in quantities as low as 0.02ng/mg using 10–25 strands hair. Concentrations in spiked samples demonstrated linearity from 0.05–50ng/mg. Assay precision and accuracy for spiked quality-control samples were high, with an overall recovery rate of 79.5%. In 18 patients with latent or active TB on treatment, isoniazid was detected across a wide linear dynamic range. Conclusions An LC-MS/MS-based assay to quantify isoniazid levels in hair with performance characteristics suitable for TDM was developed and validated. Hair concentrations of isoniazid assess long-term exposure and may be useful for monitoring adherence to

  10. Apparatus and method for handheld sampling

    DOEpatents

    Staab, Torsten A.

    2005-09-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus, and corresponding method, for taking a sample. The apparatus is built around a frame designed to be held in at least one hand. A sample media is used to secure the sample. A sample media adapter for securing the sample media is operated by a trigger mechanism connectively attached within the frame to the sample media adapter.

  11. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  12. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  13. Characterization of Soil Samples of Enzyme Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    Described are nine enzyme essays for distinguishing soil samples. Colorimetric methods are used to compare enzyme levels in soils from different sites. Each soil tested had its own spectrum of activity. Attention is drawn to applications of this technique in forensic science and in studies of soil fertility. (Author/AJ)

  14. An improved sampling method of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qi; Ding, Xintong; Pan, Feng; Li, Weixing

    2014-12-01

    Sampling subnet is an important topic of complex network research. Sampling methods influence the structure and characteristics of subnet. Random multiple snowball with Cohen (RMSC) process sampling which combines the advantages of random sampling and snowball sampling is proposed in this paper. It has the ability to explore global information and discover the local structure at the same time. The experiments indicate that this novel sampling method could keep the similarity between sampling subnet and original network on degree distribution, connectivity rate and average shortest path. This method is applicable to the situation where the prior knowledge about degree distribution of original network is not sufficient.

  15. Toward cost-efficient sampling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Peng; Li, Yongli; Wu, Chong; Zhang, Guijie

    2015-09-01

    The sampling method has been paid much attention in the field of complex network in general and statistical physics in particular. This paper proposes two new sampling methods based on the idea that a small part of vertices with high node degree could possess the most structure information of a complex network. The two proposed sampling methods are efficient in sampling high degree nodes so that they would be useful even if the sampling rate is low, which means cost-efficient. The first new sampling method is developed on the basis of the widely used stratified random sampling (SRS) method and the second one improves the famous snowball sampling (SBS) method. In order to demonstrate the validity and accuracy of two new sampling methods, we compare them with the existing sampling methods in three commonly used simulation networks that are scale-free network, random network, small-world network, and also in two real networks. The experimental results illustrate that the two proposed sampling methods perform much better than the existing sampling methods in terms of achieving the true network structure characteristics reflected by clustering coefficient, Bonacich centrality and average path length, especially when the sampling rate is low.

  16. Subrandom methods for multidimensional nonuniform sampling.

    PubMed

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-08-01

    Methods of nonuniform sampling that utilize pseudorandom number sequences to select points from a weighted Nyquist grid are commonplace in biomolecular NMR studies, due to the beneficial incoherence introduced by pseudorandom sampling. However, these methods require the specification of a non-arbitrary seed number in order to initialize a pseudorandom number generator. Because the performance of pseudorandom sampling schedules can substantially vary based on seed number, this can complicate the task of routine data collection. Approaches such as jittered sampling and stochastic gap sampling are effective at reducing random seed dependence of nonuniform sampling schedules, but still require the specification of a seed number. This work formalizes the use of subrandom number sequences in nonuniform sampling as a means of seed-independent sampling, and compares the performance of three subrandom methods to their pseudorandom counterparts using commonly applied schedule performance metrics. Reconstruction results using experimental datasets are also provided to validate claims made using these performance metrics. PMID:27301071

  17. Subrandom methods for multidimensional nonuniform sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-08-01

    Methods of nonuniform sampling that utilize pseudorandom number sequences to select points from a weighted Nyquist grid are commonplace in biomolecular NMR studies, due to the beneficial incoherence introduced by pseudorandom sampling. However, these methods require the specification of a non-arbitrary seed number in order to initialize a pseudorandom number generator. Because the performance of pseudorandom sampling schedules can substantially vary based on seed number, this can complicate the task of routine data collection. Approaches such as jittered sampling and stochastic gap sampling are effective at reducing random seed dependence of nonuniform sampling schedules, but still require the specification of a seed number. This work formalizes the use of subrandom number sequences in nonuniform sampling as a means of seed-independent sampling, and compares the performance of three subrandom methods to their pseudorandom counterparts using commonly applied schedule performance metrics. Reconstruction results using experimental datasets are also provided to validate claims made using these performance metrics.

  18. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-04-19

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples is described. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium. 6 figures.

  19. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOEpatents

    Odell, Daniel M. C.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium.

  20. Mixed Methods Sampling: A Typology with Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teddlie, Charles; Yu, Fen

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a discussion of mixed methods (MM) sampling techniques. MM sampling involves combining well-established qualitative and quantitative techniques in creative ways to answer research questions posed by MM research designs. Several issues germane to MM sampling are presented including the differences between probability and…

  1. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    NELSEN LA

    2009-01-30

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

  2. SAMPLING AND DATA HANDLING METHODS FOR INHALABLE PARTICULATE SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report reviews the objectives of a research program on sampling and measuring particles in the inhalable particulate (IP) size range in emissions from stationary sources, and describes methods and equipment required. A computer technique was developed to analyze data on parti...

  3. Sample normalization methods in quantitative metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiman; Li, Liang

    2016-01-22

    To reveal metabolomic changes caused by a biological event in quantitative metabolomics, it is critical to use an analytical tool that can perform accurate and precise quantification to examine the true concentration differences of individual metabolites found in different samples. A number of steps are involved in metabolomic analysis including pre-analytical work (e.g., sample collection and storage), analytical work (e.g., sample analysis) and data analysis (e.g., feature extraction and quantification). Each one of them can influence the quantitative results significantly and thus should be performed with great care. Among them, the total sample amount or concentration of metabolites can be significantly different from one sample to another. Thus, it is critical to reduce or eliminate the effect of total sample amount variation on quantification of individual metabolites. In this review, we describe the importance of sample normalization in the analytical workflow with a focus on mass spectrometry (MS)-based platforms, discuss a number of methods recently reported in the literature and comment on their applicability in real world metabolomics applications. Sample normalization has been sometimes ignored in metabolomics, partially due to the lack of a convenient means of performing sample normalization. We show that several methods are now available and sample normalization should be performed in quantitative metabolomics where the analyzed samples have significant variations in total sample amounts. PMID:26763302

  4. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation

    DOEpatents

    Benner, Henry W.; Dzenitis, John M.

    2016-06-21

    Provided herein are fluidics platforms and related methods for performing integrated sample collection and solid-phase extraction of a target component of the sample all in one tube. The fluidics platform comprises a pump, particles for solid-phase extraction and a particle-holding means. The method comprises contacting the sample with one or more reagents in a pump, coupling a particle-holding means to the pump and expelling the waste out of the pump while the particle-holding means retains the particles inside the pump. The fluidics platform and methods herein described allow solid-phase extraction without pipetting and centrifugation.

  5. Dynamic Method for Identifying Collected Sample Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John

    2008-01-01

    G-Sample is designed for sample collection missions to identify the presence and quantity of sample material gathered by spacecraft equipped with end effectors. The software method uses a maximum-likelihood estimator to identify the collected sample's mass based on onboard force-sensor measurements, thruster firings, and a dynamics model of the spacecraft. This makes sample mass identification a computation rather than a process requiring additional hardware. Simulation examples of G-Sample are provided for spacecraft model configurations with a sample collection device mounted on the end of an extended boom. In the absence of thrust knowledge errors, the results indicate that G-Sample can identify the amount of collected sample mass to within 10 grams (with 95-percent confidence) by using a force sensor with a noise and quantization floor of 50 micrometers. These results hold even in the presence of realistic parametric uncertainty in actual spacecraft inertia, center-of-mass offset, and first flexibility modes. Thrust profile knowledge is shown to be a dominant sensitivity for G-Sample, entering in a nearly one-to-one relationship with the final mass estimation error. This means thrust profiles should be well characterized with onboard accelerometers prior to sample collection. An overall sample-mass estimation error budget has been developed to approximate the effect of model uncertainty, sensor noise, data rate, and thrust profile error on the expected estimate of collected sample mass.

  6. Innovative methods for inorganic sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Essling, A.M.; Huff, E.A.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1992-04-01

    Procedures and guidelines are given for the dissolution of a variety of selected materials using fusion, microwave, and Parr bomb techniques. These materials include germanium glass, corium-concrete mixtures, and zeolites. Emphasis is placed on sample-preparation approaches that produce a single master solution suitable for complete multielement characterization of the sample. In addition, data are presented on the soil microwave digestion method approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Advantages and disadvantages of each sample-preparation technique are summarized.

  7. Systems and methods for sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Guangtao; Li, Xin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2015-01-13

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for sample analysis. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system for analyzing a sample that includes a probe including a material connected to a high voltage source, a device for generating a heated gas, and a mass analyzer.

  8. Systems and methods for sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Guangtao; Li, Xin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2015-10-20

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for sample analysis. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system for analyzing a sample that includes a probe including a material connected to a high voltage source, a device for generating a heated gas, and a mass analyzer.

  9. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    DOEpatents

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  10. An Active Tutorial on Distance Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Alice

    2007-01-01

    The technique of distance sampling is widely used to monitor biological populations. This paper documents an in-class activity to introduce students to the concepts and the mechanics of distance sampling in a simple situation that is relevant to their own experiences. Preparation details are described. Variations and extensions to the activity are…

  11. Assessment of estrogenic activity in PM₁₀ air samples with the ERE-CALUX bioassay: Method optimization and implementation at an urban location in Flanders (Belgium).

    PubMed

    Croes, Kim; Debaillie, Pieterjan; Van den Bril, Bo; Staelens, Jeroen; Vandermarken, Tara; Van Langenhove, Kersten; Denison, Michael S; Leermakers, Martine; Elskens, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals represent a broad class of compounds, are widespread in the environment and can pose severe health effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the overall estrogen activating potential of PM10 air samples at an urban location with high traffic incidence in Flanders, using a human in vitro cell bioassay. PM10 samples (n = 36) were collected on glass fiber filters every six days between April 2013 and January 2014 using a high-volume sampler. Extraction was executed with a hexane/acetone mixture before analysis using a recombinant estrogen-responsive human ovarian carcinoma (BG1Luc4E2) cell line. In addition, several samples and procedural blanks were extracted with ultra-pure ethanol or acetonitrile to compare extraction efficiencies. Results were expressed as bioanalytical equivalents (BEQs) in femtogram 17β-estradiol equivalent (fg E2-Eq) per cubic meter of air. High fluctuations in estrogenic activity were observed during the entire sampling period, with mean and median BEQs of 50.7 and 35.9 fg E2-Eq m(-)(3), respectively. Estrogenic activity was measured in more than 70% of the samples and several sample extracts showed both high BEQs and high cytotoxicity, which could not be related to black carbon, PM10 or heavy metal concentrations. At this moment, it remains unclear which substances cause this toxicity, but comparison of results obtained with different extraction solvents indicated that acetone/hexane extracts contained more compounds that were cytotoxic and suppressive of responses than those extracted using ultra-pure ethanol. Although more research is needed, the use of a more polar extraction solvent seems to be advisable. PMID:26383266

  12. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S C; McCulloch, M; Thomas, B L; Riley, R G; Sklarew, D S; Mong, G M; Fadeff, S K

    1994-04-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) provides applicable methods in use by. the US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories for sampling and analyzing constituents of waste and environmental samples. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) of the DOE. This document contains chapters and methods that are proposed for use in evaluating components of DOE environmental and waste management samples. DOE Methods is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities that will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), or others.

  13. Apparatus and method for time-integrated, active sampling of contaminants in fluids demonstrated by monitoring of hexavalent chromium in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Roll, Isaac B; Driver, Erin M; Halden, Rolf U

    2016-06-15

    Annual U.S. expenditures of $2B for site characterization invite the development of new technologies to improve data quality while reducing costs and minimizing uncertainty in groundwater monitoring. This work presents a new instrument for time-integrated sampling of environmental fluids using in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE). The In Situ Sampler (IS2) is an automated submersible device capable of extracting dissolved contaminants from water (100s-1000smL) over extended periods (hours to weeks), retaining the analytes, and rejecting the processed fluid. A field demonstration of the IS2 revealed 28-day average concentration of hexavalent chromium in a shallow aquifer affected by tidal stresses via sampling of groundwater as both liquid and sorbed composite samples, each obtained in triplicate. In situ SPE exhibited 75±6% recovery and an 8-fold improvement in reporting limit. Relative to use of conventional methods (100%), beneficial characteristics of the device and method included minimal hazardous material generation (2%), transportation cost (10%), and associated carbon footprint (2%). The IS2 is compatible with commercial SPE resins and standard extraction methods, and has been certified for more general use (i.e., inorganics and organics) by the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) of the U.S. Department of Defense. PMID:26971208

  14. [Spectrum recovery methods for nonuniform sampling interferogram].

    PubMed

    Yao, Tao; Lü, Qun-Bo; Xiangli, Bin; Yuan, Yan

    2010-05-01

    The interferogram acquired by imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) can't be used directly and must be recovered. The spectrum recovery processes based on fast Fourier transform (FFT) is the traditional method which is used widely. For some IFTS, the nonuniform sampling of the interferogram is often occurrs. When the aliasing is neglected, the spectrum recovered by traditional method is often distorted. When the spectrum recovery processes based on Fourier transform are used, the precision of the recovered spectrum can be ensured, but the real-time processing requirement can't be satisfied. In order to acquire the precise recovered spectrum of the nonuniform sampled interferogram, the interpolation method and nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) method were adopted. For the oversampled interferogram and partial undersampled interferogram, the spectrum recovery methods based on interpolation and NUFFT were presented respectively, and the applicability of these two methods is given. Finally, the computer simulation was performed, and the results indicate that NUFFT method is preferable to interpolation method not for undersampled interferogram but for oversampled interferogram. PMID:20672649

  15. Bayesian individualization via sampling-based methods.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, J

    1996-02-01

    We consider the situation where we wish to adjust the dosage regimen of a patient based on (in general) sparse concentration measurements taken on-line. A Bayesian decision theory approach is taken which requires the specification of an appropriate prior distribution and loss function. A simple method for obtaining samples from the posterior distribution of the pharmacokinetic parameters of the patient is described. In general, these samples are used to obtain a Monte Carlo estimate of the expected loss which is then minimized with respect to the dosage regimen. Some special cases which yield analytic solutions are described. When the prior distribution is based on a population analysis then a method of accounting for the uncertainty in the population parameters is described. Two simulation studies showing how the methods work in practice are presented. PMID:8827585

  16. Rapid screening methods for beta-emitters in food samples.

    PubMed

    Vos van Avezathe, A; Brandhoff, P N; van Bourgondiën, M J; Krijger, G C

    2015-03-01

    In case of a nuclear emergency, many samples need to be measured in a short time period. Therefore, it is of vital importance to have a quick and reliable (screening)method. Most methods to determine total beta activity are time-consuming because of extensive sample preparation, such as ashing. In this article three different rapid screening methods for beta emitting nuclides in agriculture, livestock and fishery products were tested and compared to each other, and to an accurate but more time consuming reference method. The goal was to find the method with the optimal trade-off between accuracy, speed and minimal detectable activity (MDA). All of the methods rely on liquid scintillation counting (LSC) or Cerenkov counting, and differ mainly in sample preparation. For matrices with little or no colour, the direct LSC-method is the most accurate and fastest option, while for darker coloured samples this method is not suitable because of high colour quenching. For such samples, two additional methods using a microwave digestion during sample preparation, produced good results. PMID:25577324

  17. Magnificent Ground Water Connection. [Sample Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    Water conservation and usage is an important concept in science. This document, geared specifically to New England, provides many activities for protecting and discussing ground water situations. Sample activities for grades K-6 include: (1) All the Water in the World; (2) The Case of the Disappearing Water; (3) Deep Subjects--Wells and Ground…

  18. [Identification of hashish samples with inductively coupled high-frequency plasma emission spectrometry and neutron activation analysis and data handling with neuronal networks. 1. Methods for the quantitative determination of characteristic trace elements].

    PubMed

    Lahl, H; Henke, G

    1997-11-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were used to quantify the relative contents of Fe, Sc, Ce, Pa, Cr, Co, respectively the absolute contents of Cr, Zn, Mn, Fe, Mg, Al, Cu, Ti, Ca, Sr in hashish samples, seized in different countries. The samples were processed after dry ashing by means of instrumental NAA and after wet mineralization by means of ICP-AES. For determination of the sampling and measurement errors, one of the samples was analyzed repeatedly with both methods. Classifying hashish samples with regard to concentration of certain elements could be done by artificial neural networks with a modified backpropagation algorithm. By this way, identity and non identity of one unknown sample with one of many different samples as data pool can be ascertained, on principle. PMID:9446107

  19. Methods for sampling of airborne viruses.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2008-09-01

    To better understand the underlying mechanisms of aerovirology, accurate sampling of airborne viruses is fundamental. The sampling instruments commonly used in aerobiology have also been used to recover viruses suspended in the air. We reviewed over 100 papers to evaluate the methods currently used for viral aerosol sampling. Differentiating infections caused by direct contact from those caused by airborne dissemination can be a very demanding task given the wide variety of sources of viral aerosols. While epidemiological data can help to determine the source of the contamination, direct data obtained from air samples can provide very useful information for risk assessment purposes. Many types of samplers have been used over the years, including liquid impingers, solid impactors, filters, electrostatic precipitators, and many others. The efficiencies of these samplers depend on a variety of environmental and methodological factors that can affect the integrity of the virus structure. The aerodynamic size distribution of the aerosol also has a direct effect on sampler efficiency. Viral aerosols can be studied under controlled laboratory conditions, using biological or nonbiological tracers and surrogate viruses, which are also discussed in this review. Lastly, general recommendations are made regarding future studies on the sampling of airborne viruses. PMID:18772283

  20. Methods for Sampling of Airborne Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Daniel; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Summary: To better understand the underlying mechanisms of aerovirology, accurate sampling of airborne viruses is fundamental. The sampling instruments commonly used in aerobiology have also been used to recover viruses suspended in the air. We reviewed over 100 papers to evaluate the methods currently used for viral aerosol sampling. Differentiating infections caused by direct contact from those caused by airborne dissemination can be a very demanding task given the wide variety of sources of viral aerosols. While epidemiological data can help to determine the source of the contamination, direct data obtained from air samples can provide very useful information for risk assessment purposes. Many types of samplers have been used over the years, including liquid impingers, solid impactors, filters, electrostatic precipitators, and many others. The efficiencies of these samplers depend on a variety of environmental and methodological factors that can affect the integrity of the virus structure. The aerodynamic size distribution of the aerosol also has a direct effect on sampler efficiency. Viral aerosols can be studied under controlled laboratory conditions, using biological or nonbiological tracers and surrogate viruses, which are also discussed in this review. Lastly, general recommendations are made regarding future studies on the sampling of airborne viruses. PMID:18772283

  1. Flow cytometric detection method for DNA samples

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi,Shanavaz; Langlois, Richard G.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.

    2011-07-05

    Disclosed herein are two methods for rapid multiplex analysis to determine the presence and identity of target DNA sequences within a DNA sample. Both methods use reporting DNA sequences, e.g., modified conventional Taqman.RTM. probes, to combine multiplex PCR amplification with microsphere-based hybridization using flow cytometry means of detection. Real-time PCR detection can also be incorporated. The first method uses a cyanine dye, such as, Cy3.TM., as the reporter linked to the 5' end of a reporting DNA sequence. The second method positions a reporter dye, e.g., FAM.TM. on the 3' end of the reporting DNA sequence and a quencher dye, e.g., TAMRA.TM., on the 5' end.

  2. Flow cytometric detection method for DNA samples

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz; Langlois, Richard G.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.

    2006-08-01

    Disclosed herein are two methods for rapid multiplex analysis to determine the presence and identity of target DNA sequences within a DNA sample. Both methods use reporting DNA sequences, e.g., modified conventional Taqman.RTM. probes, to combine multiplex PCR amplification with microsphere-based hybridization using flow cytometry means of detection. Real-time PCR detection can also be incorporated. The first method uses a cyanine dye, such as, Cy3.TM., as the reporter linked to the 5' end of a reporting DNA sequence. The second method positions a reporter dye, e.g., FAM, on the 3' end of the reporting DNA sequence and a quencher dye, e.g., TAMRA, on the 5' end.

  3. EVALUATION OF SAMPLING METHODS FOR GASEOUS ATMOSPHERIC SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research program was conducted to test and evaluate several alternatives for collecting and transferring samples from the collection site to the laboratory for the analysis of a variety of toxic organic pollutants by gas chromatography (GC). Sample storage media included three ...

  4. Field evaluation of a VOST sampling method

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.D.; Johnson, L.D.; Fuerst, R.G.; McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    The VOST (SW-846 Method 0030) specifies the use of Tenax{reg_sign} and a particular petroleum-based charcoal (SKC Lot 104, or its equivalent), that is no longer commercially available. In field evaluation studies of VOST methodology, a replacement petroleum-based charcoal has been used: candidate replacement sorbents for charcoal were studied, and Anasorb{reg_sign} 747, a carbon-based sorbent, was selected for field testing. The sampling train was modified to use only Anasorb{reg_sign} in the back tube and Tenax{reg_sign} in the two front tubes to avoid analytical difficulties associated with the analysis of the sequential bed back tube used in the standard VOST train. The standard (SW-846 Method 0030) and the modified VOST methods were evaluated at a chemical manufacturing facility using a quadruple probe system with quadruple trains. In this field test, known concentrations of the halogenated volatile organic compounds, that are listed in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Title 3, were introduced into the VOST train and the modified VOST train, using the same certified gas cylinder as a source of test compounds. Statistical tests of the comparability of methods were performed on a compound-by-compound basis. For most compounds, the VOST and modified VOST methods were found to be statistically equivalent.

  5. Method and apparatus for sampling low-yield wells

    DOEpatents

    Last, George V.; Lanigan, David C.

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus and method for collecting a sample from a low-yield well or perched aquifer includes a pump and a controller responsive to water level sensors for filling a sample reservoir. The controller activates the pump to fill the reservoir when the water level in the well reaches a high level as indicated by the sensor. The controller deactivates the pump when the water level reaches a lower level as indicated by the sensors. The pump continuously activates and deactivates the pump until the sample reservoir is filled with a desired volume, as indicated by a reservoir sensor. At the beginning of each activation cycle, the controller optionally can select to purge an initial quantity of water prior to filling the sample reservoir. The reservoir can be substantially devoid of air and the pump is a low volumetric flow rate pump. Both the pump and the reservoir can be located either inside or outside the well.

  6. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Thomas, B.L.; Riley, R.G.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mong, G.M.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1994-10-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities for the evaluation of environmental and waste management samples from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE Methods is the result of extensive cooperation from all DOE analytical laboratories. All of these laboratories have contributed key information and provided technical reviews as well as significant moral support leading to the success of this document. DOE Methods is designed to encompass methods for collecting representative samples and for determining the radioisotope activity and organic and inorganic composition of a sample. These determinations will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or others. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Analytical Services Division of DOE. Unique methods or methods consolidated from similar procedures in the DOE Procedures Database are selected for potential inclusion in this document. Initial selection is based largely on DOE needs and procedure applicability and completeness. Methods appearing in this document are one of two types, {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes}. {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} methods that have been reviewed internally and show potential for eventual verification are included in this document, but they have not been reviewed externally, and their precision and bias may not be known. {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes} methods in DOE Methods have been reviewed by volunteers from various DOE sites and private corporations. These methods have delineated measures of precision and accuracy.

  7. Use of a novel radiometric method to assess the inhibitory effect of donepezil on acetylcholinesterase activity in minimally diluted tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Okamura, Toshimitsu; Arai, Takuya; Obata, Takayuki; Fukushi, Kiyoshi; Irie, Toshiaki; Shiraishi, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cholinesterase inhibitors have been widely used for the treatment of patients with dementia. Monitoring of the cholinesterase activity in the blood is used as an indicator of the effect of the cholinesterase inhibitors in the brain. The selective measurement of cholinesterase with low tissue dilution is preferred for accurate monitoring; however, the methods have not been established. Here, we investigated the effect of tissue dilution on the action of cholinesterase inhibitors using a novel radiometric method with selective substrates, N-[14C]methylpiperidin-4-yl acetate ([14C]MP4A) and (R)-N-[14C]methylpiperidin-3-yl butyrate ([14C]MP3B_R), for AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) respectively. Experimental approach: We investigated the kinetics of hydrolysis of [14C]-MP4A and [14C]-MP3B_R by cholinesterases, and evaluated the selectivity of [14C]MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R for human AChE and BChE, respectively, compared with traditional substrates. Then, IC50 values of cholinesterase inhibitors in minimally diluted and highly diluted tissues were measured with [14C]MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R. Key results: AChE and BChE activities were selectively measured as the first-order hydrolysis rates of [14C]-MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R respectively. The AChE selectivity of [14C]MP4A was an order of magnitude higher than traditional substrates used for the AChE assay. The IC50 values of specific AChE and BChE inhibitors, donepezil and ethopropazine, in 1.2-fold diluted human whole blood were much higher than those in 120-fold diluted blood. In addition, the IC50 values of donepezil in monkey brain were dramatically decreased as the tissue was diluted. Conclusions and implications: This method would effectively monitor the activity of cholinesterase inhibitors used for therapeutics, pesticides and chemical warfare agents. PMID:20401964

  8. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS METHODS FOR AMBIENT PM-10 AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are described for obtaining ambient PM-10 aerosol data for use in receptor models. haracteristics of PM-10 sampling devices, filter media and laboratory analysis procedures are described. he latter include x-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, optical spectroscopy, pyro...

  9. Investigation of In Vitro Activity of Five Antifungal Drugs against Dermatophytes Species Isolated from Clinical Samples Using the E-Test Method

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ayse Esin; Yigit, Nimet; Aktas, Akin; Gozubuyuk, Sultan Gamze

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Dermatomycosis is an infection with fungi related to the skin: glabrous skin, hair and/or nails. Oral treatment of fungal infections in dermatology has become a preferred modality for the management of these very common conditions. Although there are increasing numbers of antifungals available for treatment of dermatophytes, some cases and relapses have been unresponsive to treatment. The determination of fungus in-vitro antifungal susceptibility has been reported to be important for the ability to eradicate dermatophytes. It is necessary to perform antifungal susceptibility testing of dermatophytes. E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden) is a rapid, easy-to-perform in-vitro antifungal susceptibility test. The aim of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of the different species of dermatophyte strains isolated clinical specimens to five antifungal agents using the E-test method. Materials and Methods: A total of 66 specimens were collected from the nails, feet, inguinal region, trunk and hands. These strains tested MIC endpoints of E-test for amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, caspofungin, and ketoconazole were read after 72, and 96 hours incubation for each strain on RPMI 1640 agar. Results: The dermatophytes tested included Trichophyton rubrum 43 (65.1%), Trichophyton mentagrophytes 7 (10.7%), Microsporum canis 5 (7.6%), Trichophyton tonsurans 5 (7.6%), Epidermophyton floccosum 4 (6.0%) and Trichophyton violaceum 2 (3.0%). The most active agent against all dermatophytes species was caspofungin with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) range (μg/mL−1) (0.02–3, 0.032–4, 0.125–0.50, 0.032–2, 0.25–0.50, 0.125–0.50) and it raconazole with an MIC range (μg/mL−1) (0.038–1.5, 0.094–1.5, 1–32, 0.016–0.50, 0.25–0.50, 0.125–0.50). The least active agent was fluconazole with an MIC range (μg/mL−1) (0, 19–48, 2–256, 2–8, 256, 256, 8–24). Conclusion: E-test seems to be an alternative method to MIC

  10. System and Method for Isolation of Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye (Inventor); Wu, Honglu (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods for isolating samples are provided. The system comprises a first membrane and a second membrane disposed within an enclosure. First and second reservoirs can also be disposed within the enclosure and adapted to contain one or more reagents therein. A first valve can be disposed within the enclosure and in fluid communication with the first reservoir, the second reservoir, or both. The first valve can also be in fluid communication with the first or second membranes or both. The first valve can be adapted to selectively regulate the flow of the reagents from the first reservoir, through at least one of the first and second membranes, and into the second reservoir.

  11. Bacillus polymachus sp. nov., with a broad range of antibacterial activity, isolated from forest topsoil samples by using a modified culture method.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Manh; Kim, Jaisoo

    2015-02-01

    A new, modified culture method that utilizes a transwell plate with a 0.4 µm pore-size microporous membrane was developed. This system allows only trace nutrients from the soil into the liquid culture through the microporous membrane. The method is a more powerful tool for the discovery of novel species from soils than are traditional methods. Such newly identified species could potentially produce useful metabolites. A bacterial strain, T515(T), was isolated using this modified culture method. Growth of strain T515(T) occurred at pH 4-9 in a temperature range between 20 °C and 40 °C and in the presence of 0-2 % (w/v) NaCl on R2A agar. Colonies on the agar plates were tiny, white, and convex after 5 days incubation at 28 °C. Comparative analysis of the nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain T515(T) revealed close pairwise similarity with species of the genus Bacillus, and strain T515(T) was most closely related to Bacillus panaciterrae Gsoil 1517(T) (96.7 %) and Bacillus funiculus NAF001(T) (96.0 %). The major quinone of strain T515(T) was menaquinone-7 (MK-7) and the major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 (45.5 %), anteiso-C15 : 0 (23.2 %) and C16 : 0 (10.9 %). The predominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. Strain T515(T) was sensitive to streptomycin and tetracycline, but resistant to rifampicin (0.125 µg ml(-1)), ampicillin (0.5 µg ml(-1)) and chloramphenicol (1 µg ml(-1)). The strain showed antimicrobial activities against the six strains tested: Bacillus subtilis KEMB 51201-001, Staphylococcus aureus KEMB 4659, Pseudomonas aeruginosa KACC 10185, Staphylococcus epidermidis KACC 13234, Paenibacillus larvae KACC 14031 and Escherichia coli KEMB 212-234. Based on these results, strain T515(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus with the proposed name, Bacillus polymachus sp. nov. The type strain is T515(T) ( = KEMB 9005-168(T) = KACC 18242(T) = NBRC 110614(T)). PMID

  12. Battery equalization active methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Lozano, Javier; Romero-Cadaval, Enrique; Milanes-Montero, M. Isabel; Guerrero-Martinez, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Many different battery technologies are available for the applications which need energy storage. New researches are being focused on Lithium-based batteries, since they are becoming the most viable option for portable energy storage applications. As most of the applications need series battery strings to meet voltage requirements, battery imbalance is an important matter to be taken into account, since it leads the individual battery voltages to drift apart over time, and premature cells degradation, safety hazards, and capacity reduction will occur. A large number of battery equalization methods can be found, which present different advantages/disadvantages and are suitable for different applications. The present paper presents a summary, comparison and evaluation of the different active battery equalization methods, providing a table that compares them, which is helpful to select the suitable equalization method depending on the application. By applying the same weight to the different parameters of comparison, switch capacitor and double-tiered switching capacitor have the highest ratio. Cell bypass methods are cheap and cell to cell ones are efficient. Cell to pack, pack to cell and cell to pack to cell methods present a higher cost, size, and control complexity, but relatively low voltage and current stress in high-power applications.

  13. The Halving Method for Sample Quartiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joarder, Anwar H.

    2003-01-01

    An attempt is made to put the notion of sample quartiles on a mathematical footing in the light of ranks of observations, and equisegmentation property that the quartiles divide ordered sample observations into four segments leaving the same number of observations in each if all the observations are distinct. Sample quartiles provided by the…

  14. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  15. Neutron activation analysis of wheat samples.

    PubMed

    Galinha, C; Anawar, H M; Freitas, M C; Pacheco, A M G; Almeida-Silva, M; Coutinho, J; Maçãs, B; Almeida, A S

    2011-11-01

    The deficiency of essential micronutrients and excess of toxic metals in cereals, an important food items for human nutrition, can cause public health risk. Therefore, before their consumption and adoption of soil supplementation, concentrations of essential micronutrients and metals in cereals should be monitored. This study collected soil and two varieties of wheat samples-Triticum aestivum L. (Jordão/bread wheat), and Triticum durum L. (Marialva/durum wheat) from Elvas area, Portugal and analyzed concentrations of As, Cr, Co, Fe, K, Na, Rb and Zn using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to focus on the risk of adverse public health issues. The low variability and moderate concentrations of metals in soils indicated a lower significant effect of environmental input on metal concentrations in agricultural soils. The Cr and Fe concentrations in soils that ranged from 93-117 and 26,400-31,300mg/kg, respectively, were relatively high, but Zn concentration was very low (below detection limit <22mg/kg) indicating that soils should be supplemented with Zn during cultivation. The concentrations of metals in roots and straw of both varieties of wheat decreased in the order of K>Fe>Na>Zn>Cr>Rb>As>Co. Concentrations of As, Co and Cr in root, straw and spike of both varieties were higher than the permissible limits with exception of a few samples. The concentrations of Zn in root, straw and spike were relatively low (4-30mg/kg) indicating the deficiency of an essential micronutrient Zn in wheat cultivated in Portugal. The elemental transfer from soil to plant decreases with increasing growth of the plant. The concentrations of various metals in different parts of wheat followed the order: Root>Straw>Spike. A few root, straw and spike samples showed enrichment of metals, but the majority of the samples showed no enrichment. Potassium is enriched in all samples of root, straw and spike for both varieties of wheat. Relatively to the seed used for cultivation, Jord

  16. Well fluid isolation and sample apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Schalla, Ronald; Smith, Ronald M.; Hall, Stephen H.; Smart, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. A seal may be positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Purged well fluid is stored in a riser above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  17. The experience sampling method: Investigating students' affective experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Jayson M.; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Improving non-cognitive outcomes such as attitudes, efficacy, and persistence in physics courses is an important goal of physics education. This investigation implemented an in-the-moment surveying technique called the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) [1] to measure students' affective experience in physics. Measurements included: self-efficacy, cognitive efficiency, activation, intrinsic motivation, and affect. Data are presented that show contrasts in students' experiences (e.g., in physics vs. non-physics courses).

  18. System and method for extracting a sample from a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary; Covey, Thomas

    2015-06-23

    A system and method is disclosed for extracting a sample from a sample surface. A sample is provided and a sample surface receives the sample which is deposited on the sample surface. A hydrophobic material is applied to the sample surface, and one or more devices are configured to dispense a liquid on the sample, the liquid dissolving the sample to form a dissolved sample material, and the one or more devices are configured to extract the dissolved sample material from the sample surface.

  19. Automatic method for inspecting plywood shear samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avent, R. R., III; Conners, Richard W.

    1991-03-01

    A plywood panel is composed of several layers of wood bonded together by glue. The adhesive integrity of the glue formulation employed must surpass the structural integrity of wood used to make the panel. The American Plywood Association (APA) regularly tests plywood from manufacturing plants to ensure that this performance requirement is met. One of the procedures used is to saw a panel into a number of 1 X 3- 1/4 inch blocks called samples. These samples are then subjected to a number of treatments to simulate natural aging. The treated samples are then sheared into two halves. A 1 X 1 inch area on each of the two halves is then visually inspected to determine the percent wood failure that occurred during the shear. Roughly speaking a region of solid wood or a region of wood fibers embedded in glue is considered to be a region of wood failure while a region of glue is considered to be a region of glue failure. If the percent wood failure of sample from a significant number or panels from a plant is too low, the right to use the APA trademarks is withdrawn. The number of samples inspected annually by the APA is in the millions. The human inspectors are well trained, typically having years of experience, and are regularly tested. As in any human endeavor, the inspectors are subject to fatigue, boredom, etc. For these and other reasons an automatic inspection system could aid the APA in better performing its regulatory role.

  20. COAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS: METHODS AND MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides information on coal sampling and analysis (CSD) techniques and procedures and presents a statistical model for estimating SO2 emissions. (New Source Performance Standards for large coal-fired boilers and certain State Implementation Plans require operators to ...

  1. Topics in Research Methods: Survey Sampling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Tony; Rushton, Brian S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews a computer-assisted learning package (available from CONDUIT) which introduces survey and sampling techniques by pretending that the user is a pollster asking one of six questions of a more or less political nature. Documentation and performance are rated fair while ease of use is considered excellent. (JN)

  2. Measuring Book Availability: A Monthly Sampling Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Mick; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Demonstrates that by using barcodes to identify random lists of books, taking small monthly samples, and updating a simple control chart, one can effectively: (1) pinpoint reasons why library books are unavailable; (2) gauge if corrective actions or changes in procedure are needed; and (3) determine if such actions are successful. Contains two…

  3. 7 CFR 58.245 - Method of sample analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Service, Dairy Programs, or Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Analytical Chemists or... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Method of sample analysis. 58.245 Section 58.245... Procedures § 58.245 Method of sample analysis. Samples shall be tested according to the applicable methods...

  4. METHODS FOR SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF BREATH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research program surveyed and evaluated the methods and procedures used to identify and quantitate chemical constituents in human breath. Methods have been evaluated to determine their ease and rapidity, as well as cost, accuracy, and precision. During the evaluation, a secon...

  5. [DOE method for evaluating environmental and waste management samples: Revision 1, Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    The US Dapartment of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental and waste management (EM) sampling and analysis activities require that large numbers of samples be analyzed for materials characterization, environmental surveillance, and site-remediation programs. The present document, DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods), is a supplemental resource for analyzing many of these samples.

  6. 19 CFR 151.70 - Method of sampling by Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Method of sampling by Customs. 151.70 Section 151.70 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... Method of sampling by Customs. A general sample shall be taken from each sampling unit, unless it is...

  7. A Comparison of EPI Sampling, Probability Sampling, and Compact Segment Sampling Methods for Micro and Small Enterprises

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Li-Wei; Szrek, Helena; Peltzer, Karl; Ramlagan, Shandir; Fleming, Peter; Leite, Rui; Magerman, Jesswill; Ngwenya, Godfrey B.; Pereira, Nuno Sousa; Behrman, Jere

    2011-01-01

    Finding an efficient method for sampling micro- and small-enterprises (MSEs) for research and statistical reporting purposes is a challenge in developing countries, where registries of MSEs are often nonexistent or outdated. This lack of a sampling frame creates an obstacle in finding a representative sample of MSEs. This study uses computer simulations to draw samples from a census of businesses and non-businesses in the Tshwane Municipality of South Africa, using three different sampling methods: the traditional probability sampling method, the compact segment sampling method, and the World Health Organization’s Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) sampling method. Three mechanisms by which the methods could differ are tested, the proximity selection of respondents, the at-home selection of respondents, and the use of inaccurate probability weights. The results highlight the importance of revisits and accurate probability weights, but the lesser effect of proximity selection on the samples’ statistical properties. PMID:22582004

  8. Potassium bromide method of infrared sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milkey, R.G.

    1958-01-01

    In the preparation of potassium bromide pressed windows for use in the infrared analysis of solids, severe grinding of the potassium bromide powder may produce strong absorption bands that could interfere seriously with the spectra of the sample. These absorption bands appear to be due to some crystal alteration of the potassium bromide as a result of the grinding process. They were less apt to occur when the coarser powder, which had received a relatively gentle grinding, was used. Window blanks prepared from the coarser powders showed smaller adsorbed water peaks and generally higher over-all transmittance readings than windows pressed from the very fine powders.

  9. Modified electrokinetic sample injection method in chromatography and electrophoresis analysis

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, J. Courtney; Balch, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    A sample injection method for horizontal configured multiple chromatography or electrophoresis units, each containing a number of separation/analysis channels, that enables efficient introduction of analyte samples. This method for loading when taken in conjunction with horizontal microchannels allows much reduced sample volumes and a means of sample stacking to greatly reduce the concentration of the sample. This reduction in the amount of sample can lead to great cost savings in sample preparation, particularly in massively parallel applications such as DNA sequencing. The essence of this method is in preparation of the input of the separation channel, the physical sample introduction, and subsequent removal of excess material. By this method, sample volumes of 100 nanoliter to 2 microliters have been used successfully, compared to the typical 5 microliters of sample required by the prior separation/analysis method.

  10. A method for sampling waste corn

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, R.B.; Klaas, E.E.; Baldassarre, G.A.; Reinecke, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    Corn had become one of the most important wildlife food in the United States. It is eaten by a wide variety of animals, including white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus ), raccoon (Procyon lotor ), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus , wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo ), and many species of aquatic birds. Damage to unharvested crops had been documented, but many birds and mammals eat waste grain after harvest and do not conflict with agriculture. A good method for measuring waste-corn availability can be essential to studies concerning food density and food and feeding habits of field-feeding wildlife. Previous methods were developed primarily for approximating losses due to harvest machinery. In this paper, a method is described for estimating the amount of waste corn potentially available to wildlife. Detection of temporal changes in food availability and differences caused by agricultural operations (e.g., recently harvested stubble fields vs. plowed fields) are discussed.

  11. Evaluation of Sampling Methods and Development of Sample Plans for Estimating Predator Densities in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cost-reliability of five sampling methods (visual search, drop cloth, beat bucket, shake bucket and sweep net) was determined for predatory arthropods on cotton plants. The beat bucket sample method was the most cost-reliable while the visual sample method was the least cost-reliable. The beat ...

  12. Surface sampling methods for Bacillus anthracis spore contamination.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Wayne T; Hein, Misty J; Taylor, Lauralynn; Curwin, Brian D; Kinnes, Gregory M; Seitz, Teresa A; Popovic, Tanja; Holmes, Harvey T; Kellum, Molly E; McAllister, Sigrid K; Whaley, David N; Tupin, Edward A; Walker, Timothy; Freed, Jennifer A; Small, Dorothy S; Klusaritz, Brian; Bridges, John H

    2002-10-01

    During an investigation conducted December 17-20, 2001, we collected environmental samples from a U.S. postal facility in Washington, D.C., known to be extensively contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores. Because methods for collecting and analyzing B. anthracis spores have not yet been validated, our objective was to compare the relative effectiveness of sampling methods used for collecting spores from contaminated surfaces. Comparison of wipe, wet and dry swab, and HEPA vacuum sock samples on nonporous surfaces indicated good agreement between results with HEPA vacuum and wipe samples. However, results from HEPA vacuum sock and wipe samples agreed poorly with the swab samples. Dry swabs failed to detect spores >75% of the time when they were detected by wipe and HEPA vacuum samples. Wipe samples collected after HEPA vacuum samples and HEPA vacuum samples collected after wipe samples indicated that neither method completely removed spores from the sampled surfaces. PMID:12396930

  13. 7 CFR 58.812 - Methods of sample analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Methods of sample analysis. 58.812 Section 58.812... Procedures § 58.812 Methods of sample analysis. Samples shall be tested according to the applicable methods of laboratory analysis contained in either DA Instruction 918-RL, as issued by the USDA,...

  14. 7 CFR 58.245 - Method of sample analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of sample analysis. 58.245 Section 58.245... Procedures § 58.245 Method of sample analysis. Samples shall be tested according to the applicable methods of laboratory analysis contained in either DA Instruction 918-RL as issued by the USDA, Agricultural...

  15. 7 CFR 58.812 - Methods of sample analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Marketing Service, Dairy Programs, or the Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Methods of sample analysis. 58.812 Section 58.812... Procedures § 58.812 Methods of sample analysis. Samples shall be tested according to the applicable...

  16. Active Learning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    Present generation students are primarily active learners with varied learning experiences and lecture courses may not suit all their learning needs. Effective learning involves providing students with a sense of progress and control over their own learning. This requires creating a situation where learners have a chance to try out or test their…

  17. Microfluidic DNA sample preparation method and device

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Mariella, Raymond P.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    Manipulation of DNA molecules in solution has become an essential aspect of genetic analyses used for biomedical assays, the identification of hazardous bacterial agents, and in decoding the human genome. Currently, most of the steps involved in preparing a DNA sample for analysis are performed manually and are time, labor, and equipment intensive. These steps include extraction of the DNA from spores or cells, separation of the DNA from other particles and molecules in the solution (e.g. dust, smoke, cell/spore debris, and proteins), and separation of the DNA itself into strands of specific lengths. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a phenomenon whereby polarizable particles move in response to a gradient in electric field, can be used to manipulate and separate DNA in an automated fashion, considerably reducing the time and expense involved in DNA analyses, as well as allowing for the miniaturization of DNA analysis instruments. These applications include direct transport of DNA, trapping of DNA to allow for its separation from other particles or molecules in the solution, and the separation of DNA into strands of varying lengths.

  18. Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W.; Wise, Barry M.

    2003-08-12

    Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

  19. Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Wise, Barry M [Manson, WA

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

  20. Method for sampling sub-micron particles

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.; McMillan, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method steps for collecting sub-micron sized particles include a collection chamber and cryogenic cooling. The cooling is accomplished by coil tubing carrying nitrogen in liquid form, with the liquid nitrogen changing to the gas phase before exiting from the collection chamber in the tubing. Standard filters are used to filter out particles of diameter greater than or equal to 0.3 microns; however the present invention is used to trap particles of less than 0.3 micron in diameter. A blower draws air to said collection chamber through a filter which filters particles with diameters greater than or equal to 0.3 micron. The air is then cryogenically cooled so that moisture and sub-micron sized particles in the air condense into ice on the coil. The coil is then heated so that the ice melts, and the liquid is then drawn off and passed through a Buchner funnel where the liquid is passed through a Nuclepore membrane. A vacuum draws the liquid through the Nuclepore membrane, with the Nuclepore membrane trapping sub-micron sized particles therein. The Nuclepore membrane is then covered on its top and bottom surfaces with sheets of Mylar.RTM. and the assembly is then crushed into a pellet. This effectively traps the sub-micron sized particles for later analysis.

  1. 7 CFR 29.110 - Method of sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Method of sampling. 29.110 Section 29.110 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Inspectors, Samplers, and Weighers § 29.110 Method of sampling. In sampling...

  2. 7 CFR 29.110 - Method of sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of sampling. 29.110 Section 29.110 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Inspectors, Samplers, and Weighers § 29.110 Method of sampling. In sampling...

  3. 19 CFR 151.83 - Method of sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Method of sampling. 151.83 Section 151.83 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Cotton § 151.83 Method of sampling. For determining the staple length of any lot...

  4. Artifact free denuder method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuška, P.; Vecera, Z.; Broškovicová, A.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past decade, a growing attention has been focused on the carbonaceous aerosols. Although they may account for 30--60% of the total fine aerosol mass, their concentration and formation mechanisms are not well understood, particularly in comparison with major fine particle inorganic species. The deficiency in knowledge of carbonaceous aerosols results from their complexity and because of problems associated with their collection. Conventional sampling techniques of the carbonaceous aerosols, which utilize filters/backup adsorbents suffer from sampling artefacts. Positive artifacts are mainly due to adsorption of gas-phase organic compounds by the filter material or by the already collected particles, whereas negative artifacts arise from the volatilisation of already collected organic compounds from the filter. Furthermore, in the course of the sampling, the composition of the collected organic compounds may be modified by oxidants (O_3, NO_2, PAN, peroxides) that are present in the air passing through the sampler. It is clear that new, artifact free, method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols is needed. A combination of a diffusion denuder and a filter in series is very promising in this respect. The denuder is expected to collect gaseous oxidants and gas-phase organic compounds from sample air stream prior to collection of aerosol particles on filters, and eliminate thus both positive and negative sampling artifacts for carbonaceous aerosols. This combination is subject of the presentation. Several designs of diffusion denuders (cylindrical, annular, parallel plate, multi-channel) in combination with various types of wall coatings (dry, liquid) were examined. Special attention was given to preservation of the long-term collection efficiency. Different adsorbents (activated charcoal, molecular sieve, porous polymers) and sorbents coated with various chemical reagents (KI, Na_2SO_3, MnO_2, ascorbic acid) or chromatographic stationary phases (silicon oils

  5. Photoacoustic sample vessel and method of elevated pressure operation

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, Tom; Yonker, Clement R.

    2004-05-04

    An improved photoacoustic vessel and method of photoacoustic analysis. The photoacoustic sample vessel comprises an acoustic detector, an acoustic couplant, and an acoustic coupler having a chamber for holding the acoustic couplant and a sample. The acoustic couplant is selected from the group consisting of liquid, solid, and combinations thereof. Passing electromagnetic energy through the sample generates an acoustic signal within the sample, whereby the acoustic signal propagates through the sample to and through the acoustic couplant to the acoustic detector.

  6. METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF METALS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirteen analytical methods covering 36 analytes which may be present in a ariety of environmental sample types are described in detail. hree of these methods are sample preparation procedures that require a separate determinate step found in other methods in this manual or elsew...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 261 - Representative Sampling Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Representative Sampling Methods I Appendix I to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pt. 261, App. I Appendix I to Part 261—Representative Sampling Methods The methods...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 261 - Representative Sampling Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Representative Sampling Methods I Appendix I to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pt. 261, App. I Appendix I to Part 261—Representative Sampling Methods The methods...

  9. Sample classroom activities based on climate science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miler, T.

    2009-09-01

    We present several activities developed for the middle school education based on a climate science. The first activity was designed to teach about the ocean acidification. A simple experiment can prove that absorption of CO2 in water increases its acidity. A liquid pH indicator is suitable for the demonstration in a classroom. The second activity uses data containing coordinates of a hurricane position. Pupils draw a path of a hurricane eye in a tracking chart (map of the Atlantic ocean). They calculate an average speed of the hurricane, investigate its direction and intensity development. The third activity uses pictures of the Arctic ocean on September when ice extend is usually the lowest. Students measure the ice extend for several years using a square grid printed on a plastic foil. Then they plot a graph and discuss the results. All these activities can be used to improve the natural science education and increase the climate change literacy.

  10. Systems and methods for self-synchronized digital sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, Jr., John R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Systems and methods for self-synchronized data sampling are provided. In one embodiment, a system for capturing synchronous data samples is provided. The system includes an analog to digital converter adapted to capture signals from one or more sensors and convert the signals into a stream of digital data samples at a sampling frequency determined by a sampling control signal; and a synchronizer coupled to the analog to digital converter and adapted to receive a rotational frequency signal from a rotating machine, wherein the synchronizer is further adapted to generate the sampling control signal, and wherein the sampling control signal is based on the rotational frequency signal.

  11. A method for selecting training samples based on camera response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leihong; Li, Bei; Pan, Zilan; Liang, Dong; Kang, Yi; Zhang, Dawei; Ma, Xiuhua

    2016-09-01

    In the process of spectral reflectance reconstruction, sample selection plays an important role in the accuracy of the constructed model and in reconstruction effects. In this paper, a method for training sample selection based on camera response is proposed. It has been proved that the camera response value has a close correlation with the spectral reflectance. Consequently, in this paper we adopt the technique of drawing a sphere in camera response value space to select the training samples which have a higher correlation with the test samples. In addition, the Wiener estimation method is used to reconstruct the spectral reflectance. Finally, we find that the method of sample selection based on camera response value has the smallest color difference and root mean square error after reconstruction compared to the method using the full set of Munsell color charts, the Mohammadi training sample selection method, and the stratified sampling method. Moreover, the goodness of fit coefficient of this method is also the highest among the four sample selection methods. Taking all the factors mentioned above into consideration, the method of training sample selection based on camera response value enhances the reconstruction accuracy from both the colorimetric and spectral perspectives.

  12. Passive Samplers for Investigations of Air Quality: Method Description, Implementation, and Comparison to Alternative Sampling Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Paper covers the basics of passive sampler design, compares passive samplers to conventional methods of air sampling, and discusses considerations when implementing a passive sampling program. The Paper also discusses field sampling and sample analysis considerations to ensu...

  13. Comparison of Methods for Sampling Psocids in Stored Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Psocids are an emerging problem in stored grain and in grain processing facilities in the United States. We compared several methods for sampling psocids in wheat stored in steel bins – grain trier samples, cardboard refuges on the surface of the grain and near the bin hatch, and automated sampling ...

  14. Uniform Sampling Table Method and its Applications II--Evaluating the Uniform Sampling by Experiment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yibin; Chen, Jiaxi; Chen, Xuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A new method of uniform sampling is evaluated in this paper. The items and indexes were adopted to evaluate the rationality of the uniform sampling. The evaluation items included convenience of operation, uniformity of sampling site distribution, and accuracy and precision of measured results. The evaluation indexes included operational complexity, occupation rate of sampling site in a row and column, relative accuracy of pill weight, and relative deviation of pill weight. They were obtained from three kinds of drugs with different shape and size by four kinds of sampling methods. Gray correlation analysis was adopted to make the comprehensive evaluation by comparing it with the standard method. The experimental results showed that the convenience of uniform sampling method was 1 (100%), odds ratio of occupation rate in a row and column was infinity, relative accuracy was 99.50-99.89%, reproducibility RSD was 0.45-0.89%, and weighted incidence degree exceeded the standard method. Hence, the uniform sampling method was easy to operate, and the selected samples were distributed uniformly. The experimental results demonstrated that the uniform sampling method has good accuracy and reproducibility, which can be put into use in drugs analysis. PMID:26525264

  15. The Political Is Personal: A Sample Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Molly Murphy

    1988-01-01

    Presents an oral history activity in which students discuss the relationship between historical events and their own lives, reflecting on their potential for influencing history. Points out that history flows in two directions, showing how events affect individual lives, and how individuals can impact on history. (LS)

  16. Sparse sampling: theory, methods and an application in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Oñativia, Jon; Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    2015-02-01

    The current methods used to convert analogue signals into discrete-time sequences have been deeply influenced by the classical Shannon-Whittaker-Kotelnikov sampling theorem. This approach restricts the class of signals that can be sampled and perfectly reconstructed to bandlimited signals. During the last few years, a new framework has emerged that overcomes these limitations and extends sampling theory to a broader class of signals named signals with finite rate of innovation (FRI). Instead of characterising a signal by its frequency content, FRI theory describes it in terms of the innovation parameters per unit of time. Bandlimited signals are thus a subset of this more general definition. In this paper, we provide an overview of this new framework and present the tools required to apply this theory in neuroscience. Specifically, we show how to monitor and infer the spiking activity of individual neurons from two-photon imaging of calcium signals. In this scenario, the problem is reduced to reconstructing a stream of decaying exponentials. PMID:25452206

  17. In-depth analysis of sampling optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Habets, Boris; Buhl, Stefan; Guhlemann, Steffen; Rößiger, Martin; Bellmann, Enrico; Kim, Seop

    2016-03-01

    High order overlay and alignment models require good coverage of overlay or alignment marks on the wafer. But dense sampling plans are not possible for throughput reasons. Therefore, sampling plan optimization has become a key issue. We analyze the different methods for sampling optimization and discuss the different knobs to fine-tune the methods to constraints of high volume manufacturing. We propose a method to judge sampling plan quality with respect to overlay performance, run-to-run stability and dispositioning criteria using a number of use cases from the most advanced lithography processes.

  18. Method and apparatus for imaging a sample on a device

    DOEpatents

    Trulson, Mark; Stern, David; Fiekowsky, Peter; Rava, Richard; Walton, Ian; Fodor, Stephen P. A.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for imaging a sample are provided. An electromagnetic radiation source generates excitation radiation which is sized by excitation optics to a line. The line is directed at a sample resting on a support and excites a plurality of regions on the sample. Collection optics collect response radiation reflected from the sample I and image the reflected radiation. A detector senses the reflected radiation and is positioned to permit discrimination between radiation reflected from a certain focal plane in the sample and certain other planes within the sample.

  19. GROUND WATER PURGING AND SAMPLING METHODS: HISTORY VS. HYSTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been over 10 years since the low-flow ground water purging and sampling method was initially reported in the literature. The method grew from the recognition that well purging was necessary to collect representative samples, bailers could not achieve well purging, and high...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF SAMPLING METHODS FOR SOURCE PM10 EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an investigation of the needs and available techniques for in-stack PM-10 sampling. Discussion includes the conceptualization, development, documentation, and testing of two candidate methods. The first method, Constant Sampling Rate (CSR), is a procedural ap...

  1. Rapid method for sampling metals for materials identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, L. E.

    1971-01-01

    Nondamaging process similar to electrochemical machining is useful in obtaining metal samples from places inaccessible to conventional sampling methods or where methods would be hazardous or contaminating to specimens. Process applies to industries where metals or metal alloys play a vital role.

  2. Engineering Study of 500 ML Sample Bottle Transportation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-08-25

    This engineering study reviews and evaluates all available methods for transportation of 500-mL grab sample bottles, reviews and evaluates transportation requirements and schedules and analyzes and recommends the most cost-effective method for transporting 500-mL grab sample bottles.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 261 - Representative Sampling Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Appendix I to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pt. 261, App. I Appendix I to Part 261—Representative Sampling Methods The methods and equipment used for sampling waste materials will vary with...

  4. A method and fortran program for quantitative sampling in paleontology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tipper, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    The Unit Sampling Method is a binomial sampling method applicable to the study of fauna preserved in rocks too well cemented to be disaggregated. Preliminary estimates of the probability of detecting each group in a single sampling unit can be converted to estimates of the group's volumetric abundance by means of correction curves obtained by a computer simulation technique. This paper describes the technique and gives the FORTRAN program. ?? 1976.

  5. Evaluation of common methods for sampling invertebrate pollinator assemblages: net sampling out-perform pan traps.

    PubMed

    Popic, Tony J; Davila, Yvonne C; Wardle, Glenda M

    2013-01-01

    Methods for sampling ecological assemblages strive to be efficient, repeatable, and representative. Unknowingly, common methods may be limited in terms of revealing species function and so of less value for comparative studies. The global decline in pollination services has stimulated surveys of flower-visiting invertebrates, using pan traps and net sampling. We explore the relative merits of these two methods in terms of species discovery, quantifying abundance, function, and composition, and responses of species to changing floral resources. Using a spatially-nested design we sampled across a 5000 km(2) area of arid grasslands, including 432 hours of net sampling and 1296 pan trap-days, between June 2010 and July 2011. Net sampling yielded 22% more species and 30% higher abundance than pan traps, and better reflected the spatio-temporal variation of floral resources. Species composition differed significantly between methods; from 436 total species, 25% were sampled by both methods, 50% only by nets, and the remaining 25% only by pans. Apart from being less comprehensive, if pan traps do not sample flower-visitors, the link to pollination is questionable. By contrast, net sampling functionally linked species to pollination through behavioural observations of flower-visitation interaction frequency. Netted specimens are also necessary for evidence of pollen transport. Benefits of net-based sampling outweighed minor differences in overall sampling effort. As pan traps and net sampling methods are not equivalent for sampling invertebrate-flower interactions, we recommend net sampling of invertebrate pollinator assemblages, especially if datasets are intended to document declines in pollination and guide measures to retain this important ecosystem service. PMID:23799127

  6. A Mixed Methods Sampling Methodology for a Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Julia L.; Mobley, Catherine; Hammond, Cathy; Withington, Cairen; Drew, Sam; Stringfield, Sam; Stipanovic, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The flexibility of mixed methods research strategies makes such approaches especially suitable for multisite case studies. Yet the utilization of mixed methods to select sites for these studies is rarely reported. The authors describe their pragmatic mixed methods approach to select a sample for their multisite mixed methods case study of a…

  7. Comparison of uranium determination in some Syrian geologic samples using three reactor based methods

    PubMed

    Jubeli

    2000-04-01

    A set of 25 samples of soil, sediments, carbonate and phosphate rocks from Syria were analysed for uranium, using three reactor based methods; instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC) and one cycle of irradiation utilizing the cyclic activation system (CAS). Although the three methods are capable of irradiation samples, the last method is the least established for U determination in rocks. The measurements obtained by the three methods are compared. The results show good agreement, with a distinct linear relationship and significant positive correlation coefficients. It was concluded that the CAS method could reliably be used to rapidly determine uranium in geological samples. PMID:10800739

  8. Application of the SAMR method to high magnetostrictive samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, P.; Lopez, E.; Trujillo, M. C. Sanchez; Aroca, C.

    1988-12-01

    Magnetostriction measurement by using the small angle magnetization rotation method (SAMR) has been performed in high magnetostrictive amorphous samples. To apply the SAMR method to these samples, a theoritical model about the influence of the internal stresses and magnetization distribution has been proposed. The dependence of the magnetostriction, λ s, with the temperature and applied stress was measured in as-cast and in different annealed samples. In the as-cast samples the existence of a stray field and a dependence of λ s with the applied stress has been observed.

  9. Method for using polarization gating to measure a scattering sample

    DOEpatents

    Baba, Justin S.

    2015-08-04

    Described herein are systems, devices, and methods facilitating optical characterization of scattering samples. A polarized optical beam can be directed to pass through a sample to be tested. The optical beam exiting the sample can then be analyzed to determine its degree of polarization, from which other properties of the sample can be determined. In some cases, an apparatus can include a source of an optical beam, an input polarizer, a sample, an output polarizer, and a photodetector. In some cases, a signal from a photodetector can be processed through attenuation, variable offset, and variable gain.

  10. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Sampling and Analysis Methods Manual (Methods Manual) provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program). This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP.

  11. A random spatial sampling method in a rural developing nation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonrandom sampling of populations in developing nations has limitations and can inaccurately estimate health phenomena, especially among hard-to-reach populations such as rural residents. However, random sampling of rural populations in developing nations can be challenged by incomplete enumeration of the base population. Methods We describe a stratified random sampling method using geographical information system (GIS) software and global positioning system (GPS) technology for application in a health survey in a rural region of Guatemala, as well as a qualitative study of the enumeration process. Results This method offers an alternative sampling technique that could reduce opportunities for bias in household selection compared to cluster methods. However, its use is subject to issues surrounding survey preparation, technological limitations and in-the-field household selection. Application of this method in remote areas will raise challenges surrounding the boundary delineation process, use and translation of satellite imagery between GIS and GPS, and household selection at each survey point in varying field conditions. This method favors household selection in denser urban areas and in new residential developments. Conclusions Random spatial sampling methodology can be used to survey a random sample of population in a remote region of a developing nation. Although this method should be further validated and compared with more established methods to determine its utility in social survey applications, it shows promise for use in developing nations with resource-challenged environments where detailed geographic and human census data are less available. PMID:24716473

  12. Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

  13. Methods for collection and analysis of water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainwater, Frank Hays; Thatcher, Leland Lincoln

    1960-01-01

    This manual contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to collect, preserve, and analyze water samples. Throughout, the emphasis is on obtaining analytical results that accurately describe the chemical composition of the water in situ. Among the topics discussed are selection of sampling sites, frequency of sampling, field equipment, preservatives and fixatives, analytical techniques of water analysis, and instruments. Seventy-seven laboratory and field procedures are given for determining fifty-three water properties.

  14. Methods for sample size determination in cluster randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Rutterford, Clare; Copas, Andrew; Eldridge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of cluster randomized trials (CRTs) is increasing, along with the variety in their design and analysis. The simplest approach for their sample size calculation is to calculate the sample size assuming individual randomization and inflate this by a design effect to account for randomization by cluster. The assumptions of a simple design effect may not always be met; alternative or more complicated approaches are required. Methods: We summarise a wide range of sample size methods available for cluster randomized trials. For those familiar with sample size calculations for individually randomized trials but with less experience in the clustered case, this manuscript provides formulae for a wide range of scenarios with associated explanation and recommendations. For those with more experience, comprehensive summaries are provided that allow quick identification of methods for a given design, outcome and analysis method. Results: We present first those methods applicable to the simplest two-arm, parallel group, completely randomized design followed by methods that incorporate deviations from this design such as: variability in cluster sizes; attrition; non-compliance; or the inclusion of baseline covariates or repeated measures. The paper concludes with methods for alternative designs. Conclusions: There is a large amount of methodology available for sample size calculations in CRTs. This paper gives the most comprehensive description of published methodology for sample size calculation and provides an important resource for those designing these trials. PMID:26174515

  15. Field evaluation of personal sampling methods for multiple bioaerosols.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Hsun; Chen, Bean T; Han, Bor-Cheng; Liu, Andrew Chi-Yeu; Hung, Po-Chen; Chen, Chih-Yong; Chao, Hsing Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Ambient bioaerosols are ubiquitous in the daily environment and can affect health in various ways. However, few studies have been conducted to comprehensively evaluate personal bioaerosol exposure in occupational and indoor environments because of the complex composition of bioaerosols and the lack of standardized sampling/analysis methods. We conducted a study to determine the most efficient collection/analysis method for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. The sampling efficiencies of three filters and four samplers were compared. According to our results, polycarbonate (PC) filters had the highest relative efficiency, particularly for bacteria. Side-by-side sampling was conducted to evaluate the three filter samplers (with PC filters) and the NIOSH Personal Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. According to the results, the Button Aerosol Sampler and the IOM Inhalable Dust Sampler had the highest relative efficiencies for fungi and bacteria, followed by the NIOSH sampler. Personal sampling was performed in a pig farm to assess occupational bioaerosol exposure and to evaluate the sampling/analysis methods. The Button and IOM samplers yielded a similar performance for personal bioaerosol sampling at the pig farm. However, the Button sampler is more likely to be clogged at high airborne dust concentrations because of its higher flow rate (4 L/min). Therefore, the IOM sampler is a more appropriate choice for performing personal sampling in environments with high dust levels. In summary, the Button and IOM samplers with PC filters are efficient sampling/analysis methods for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. PMID:25799419

  16. Method of soil sampling following subsurface banding of solid manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil sampling guidelines do not exist for fields fertilized with solid manures applied in bands. The objective of this work was to describe the distribution of mineral nutrients and total C and propose a method of taking soil samples that reflects the fertility level of a field following manure app...

  17. Nominal Weights Mean Equating: A Method for Very Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, Ben; Albano, Anthony; Raymond, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The authors introduced nominal weights mean equating, a simplified version of Tucker equating, as an alternative for dealing with very small samples. The authors then conducted three simulation studies to compare nominal weights mean equating to six other equating methods under the nonequivalent groups anchor test design with sample sizes of 20,…

  18. Field Evaluation of Personal Sampling Methods for Multiple Bioaerosols

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Hsun; Chen, Bean T.; Han, Bor-Cheng; Liu, Andrew Chi-Yeu; Hung, Po-Chen; Chen, Chih-Yong; Chao, Hsing Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Ambient bioaerosols are ubiquitous in the daily environment and can affect health in various ways. However, few studies have been conducted to comprehensively evaluate personal bioaerosol exposure in occupational and indoor environments because of the complex composition of bioaerosols and the lack of standardized sampling/analysis methods. We conducted a study to determine the most efficient collection/analysis method for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. The sampling efficiencies of three filters and four samplers were compared. According to our results, polycarbonate (PC) filters had the highest relative efficiency, particularly for bacteria. Side-by-side sampling was conducted to evaluate the three filter samplers (with PC filters) and the NIOSH Personal Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. According to the results, the Button Aerosol Sampler and the IOM Inhalable Dust Sampler had the highest relative efficiencies for fungi and bacteria, followed by the NIOSH sampler. Personal sampling was performed in a pig farm to assess occupational bioaerosol exposure and to evaluate the sampling/analysis methods. The Button and IOM samplers yielded a similar performance for personal bioaerosol sampling at the pig farm. However, the Button sampler is more likely to be clogged at high airborne dust concentrations because of its higher flow rate (4 L/min). Therefore, the IOM sampler is a more appropriate choice for performing personal sampling in environments with high dust levels. In summary, the Button and IOM samplers with PC filters are efficient sampling/analysis methods for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. PMID:25799419

  19. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: risk assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Marc S; Chapman, Peter M; Allan, Ian J; Anderson, Kim A; Apitz, Sabine E; Beegan, Chris; Bridges, Todd S; Brown, Steve S; Cargill, John G; McCulloch, Megan C; Menzie, Charles A; Shine, James P; Parkerton, Thomas F

    2014-04-01

    This paper details how activity-based passive sampling methods (PSMs), which provide information on bioavailability in terms of freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree ), can be used to better inform risk management decision making at multiple points in the process of assessing and managing contaminated sediment sites. PSMs can increase certainty in site investigation and management, because Cfree is a better predictor of bioavailability than total bulk sediment concentration (Ctotal ) for 4 key endpoints included in conceptual site models (benthic organism toxicity, bioaccumulation, sediment flux, and water column exposures). The use of passive sampling devices (PSDs) presents challenges with respect to representative sampling for estimating average concentrations and other metrics relevant for exposure and risk assessment. These challenges can be addressed by designing studies that account for sources of variation associated with PSMs and considering appropriate spatial scales to meet study objectives. Possible applications of PSMs include: quantifying spatial and temporal trends in bioavailable contaminants, identifying and evaluating contaminant source contributions, calibrating site-specific models, and, improving weight-of-evidence based decision frameworks. PSM data can be used to assist in delineating sediment management zones based on likelihood of exposure effects, monitor remedy effectiveness, and, evaluate risk reduction after sediment treatment, disposal, or beneficial reuse after management actions. Examples are provided illustrating why PSMs and freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree ) should be incorporated into contaminated sediment investigations and study designs to better focus on and understand contaminant bioavailability, more accurately estimate exposure to sediment-associated contaminants, and better inform risk management decisions. Research and communication needs for encouraging broader use are discussed. PMID

  20. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Risk assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Marc S; Chapman, Peter M; Allan, Ian J; Anderson, Kim A; Apitz, Sabine E; Beegan, Chris; Bridges, Todd S; Brown, Steve S; Cargill, John G; McCulloch, Megan C; Menzie, Charles A; Shine, James P; Parkerton, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    This paper details how activity-based passive sampling methods (PSMs), which provide information on bioavailability in terms of freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree), can be used to better inform risk management decision making at multiple points in the process of assessing and managing contaminated sediment sites. PSMs can increase certainty in site investigation and management, because Cfree is a better predictor of bioavailability than total bulk sediment concentration (Ctotal) for 4 key endpoints included in conceptual site models (benthic organism toxicity, bioaccumulation, sediment flux, and water column exposures). The use of passive sampling devices (PSDs) presents challenges with respect to representative sampling for estimating average concentrations and other metrics relevant for exposure and risk assessment. These challenges can be addressed by designing studies that account for sources of variation associated with PSMs and considering appropriate spatial scales to meet study objectives. Possible applications of PSMs include: quantifying spatial and temporal trends in bioavailable contaminants, identifying and evaluating contaminant source contributions, calibrating site-specific models, and, improving weight-of-evidence based decision frameworks. PSM data can be used to assist in delineating sediment management zones based on likelihood of exposure effects, monitor remedy effectiveness, and, evaluate risk reduction after sediment treatment, disposal, or beneficial reuse after management actions. Examples are provided illustrating why PSMs and freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree) should be incorporated into contaminated sediment investigations and study designs to better focus on and understand contaminant bioavailability, more accurately estimate exposure to sediment-associated contaminants, and better inform risk management decisions. Research and communication needs for encouraging broader use are discussed. Integr

  1. A cryopreservation method for Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Melody K.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    A cryopreservation method and improved isolation techniques for detection of Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples were developed. Wetland water samples were collected in the field, diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, final concentration 10%), and frozen at -180 C in a liquid nitrogen vapor shipper. Frozen samples were transported to the laboratory where they were subsequently thawed and processed in Pasteurella multocida selective broth (PMSB) to isolate P. multocida. This method allowed for consistent isolation of 2 to 18 organisms/ml from water seeded with known concentrations of P. multocida. The method compared favorably with the standard mouse inoculation method and allowed for preservation of the samples until they could be processed in the laboratory.

  2. A cryopreservation method for Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples.

    PubMed

    Moore, M K; Shadduck, D J; Goldberg, D R; Samuel, M D

    1998-01-01

    A cryopreservation method and improved isolation techniques for detection of Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples were developed. Wetland water samples were collected in the field, diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, final concentration 10%), and frozen at -180 C in a liquid nitrogen vapor shipper. Frozen samples were transported to the laboratory where they were subsequently thawed and processed in Pasteurella multocida selective broth (PMSB) to isolate P. multocida. This method allowed for consistent isolation of 2 to 18 organisms/ml from water seeded with known concentrations of P. multocida. The method compared favorably with the standard mouse inoculation method and allowed for preservation of the samples until they could be processed in the laboratory. PMID:9476245

  3. Progress toward maturity of DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    SciTech Connect

    Cosby, W.C.; Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.

    1994-07-01

    The document DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) has been in circulation since October 1992. DOE Methods is a living document, being updated twice each year. It contains both sampling and analytical methods in support of US Department of Energy/environmental restoration and waste management (DOE/EM) activities. Guidance on how to carry out sampling and analysis activities, focusing of EM needs, is also included in DOE Methods. This guidance applies to all aspects of sampling and analysis for EM. Methods from traditional standard methods documents often cannot provide needed characterization data because of radioactivity or complexity of the matrix. The intent of DOE Methods is to provide an alternative source of methods to meet this need. Efforts are underway to expand the use of DOE Methods throughout all DOE/EM programs. Copies of DOE Methods are available free of charge. The April 1994 update of the document includes 42 methods, of which 13 are new. In October 1994, Revision 2 of DOE Methods will be distributed. It will include additional guidance on how to plan sampling and analysis activities and will also include several new methods. DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division of DOE. It is a vehicle for transgressing new technology for characterization capability within the environmental restoration (ER) and/or waste management (WM) community. As DOE Methods continues to evolve, its use and application will continue to grow.

  4. Neutron activation analysis for antimetabolites. [in food samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Determination of metal ion contaminants in food samples is studied. A weighed quantity of each sample was digested in a concentrated mixture of nitric, hydrochloric and perchloric acids to affect complete solution of the food products. The samples were diluted with water and the pH adjusted according to the specific analysis performed. The samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis, polarography, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The solid food samples were also analyzed by neutron activation analysis for increased sensitivity and lower levels of detectability. The results are presented in tabular form.

  5. Probability Sampling Method for a Hidden Population Using Respondent-Driven Sampling: Simulation for Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    When there is no sampling frame within a certain group or the group is concerned that making its population public would bring social stigma, we say the population is hidden. It is difficult to approach this kind of population survey-methodologically because the response rate is low and its members are not quite honest with their responses when probability sampling is used. The only alternative known to address the problems caused by previous methods such as snowball sampling is respondent-driven sampling (RDS), which was developed by Heckathorn and his colleagues. RDS is based on a Markov chain, and uses the social network information of the respondent. This characteristic allows for probability sampling when we survey a hidden population. We verified through computer simulation whether RDS can be used on a hidden population of cancer survivors. According to the simulation results of this thesis, the chain-referral sampling of RDS tends to minimize as the sample gets bigger, and it becomes stabilized as the wave progresses. Therefore, it shows that the final sample information can be completely independent from the initial seeds if a certain level of sample size is secured even if the initial seeds were selected through convenient sampling. Thus, RDS can be considered as an alternative which can improve upon both key informant sampling and ethnographic surveys, and it needs to be utilized for various cases domestically as well. PMID:26107223

  6. Method and apparatus for imaging a sample on a device

    DOEpatents

    Trulson, Mark; Stern, David; Fiekowsky, Peter; Rava, Richard; Walton, Ian; Fodor, Stephen P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and systems for detecting a labeled marker on a sample located on a support. The imaging system comprises a body for immobilizing the support, an excitation radiation source and excitation optics to generate and direct the excitation radiation at the sample. In response, labeled material on the sample emits radiation which has a wavelength that is different from the excitation wavelength, which radiation is collected by collection optics and imaged onto a detector which generates an image of the sample.

  7. Soil separator and sampler and method of sampling

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Barry H [Idaho Falls, ID; Ritter, Paul D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-16

    A soil sampler includes a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample. The fluidized bed may be in communication with a vacuum for drawing air through the fluidized bed and suspending particulate matter of the soil sample in the air. In a method of sampling, the air may be drawn across a filter, separating the particulate matter. Optionally, a baffle or a cyclone may be included within the fluidized bed for disentrainment, or dedusting, so only the finest particulate matter, including asbestos, will be trapped on the filter. The filter may be removable, and may be tested to determine the content of asbestos and other hazardous particulate matter in the soil sample.

  8. System and method for measuring fluorescence of a sample

    DOEpatents

    Riot, Vincent J

    2015-03-24

    The present disclosure provides a system and a method for measuring fluorescence of a sample. The sample may be a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) array, a loop-mediated-isothermal amplification array, etc. LEDs are used to excite the sample, and a photodiode is used to collect the sample's fluorescence. An electronic offset signal is used to reduce the effects of background fluorescence and the noises from the measurement system. An integrator integrates the difference between the output of the photodiode and the electronic offset signal over a given period of time. The resulting integral is then converted into digital domain for further processing and storage.

  9. Convenient mounting method for electrical measurements of thin samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, L. G.; Summers, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A method for mounting thin samples for electrical measurements is described. The technique is based on a vacuum chuck concept in which the vacuum chuck simultaneously holds the sample and established electrical contact. The mounting plate is composed of a glass-ceramic insulating material and the surfaces of the plate and vacuum chuck are polished. The operation of the vacuum chuck is examined. The contacts on the sample and mounting plate, which are sputter-deposited through metal masks, are analyzed. The mounting method was utilized for van der Pauw measurements.

  10. A quantitative evaluation of two methods for preserving hair samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roon, David A.; Waits, L.P.; Kendall, K.C.

    2003-01-01

    Hair samples are an increasingly important DNA source for wildlife studies, yet optimal storage methods and DNA degradation rates have not been rigorously evaluated. We tested amplification success rates over a one-year storage period for DNA extracted from brown bear (Ursus arctos) hair samples preserved using silica desiccation and -20C freezing. For three nuclear DNA microsatellites, success rates decreased significantly after a six-month time point, regardless of storage method. For a 1000 bp mitochondrial fragment, a similar decrease occurred after a two-week time point. Minimizing delays between collection and DNA extraction will maximize success rates for hair-based noninvasive genetic sampling projects.

  11. Active sampling technique to enhance chemical signature of buried explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, John S.; French, Patrick D.

    2004-09-01

    Deminers and dismounted countermine engineers commonly use metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and probes to locate mines. Many modern landmines have a very low metal content, which severely limits the effectiveness of metal detectors. Canines have also been used for landmine detection for decades. Experiments have shown that canines smell the explosives which are known to leak from most types of landmines. The fact that dogs can detect landmines indicates that vapor sensing is a viable approach to landmine detection. Several groups are currently developing systems to detect landmines by "sniffing" for the ultra-trace explosive vapors above the soil. The amount of material that is available to passive vapor sensing systems is limited to no more than the vapor in equilibrium with the explosive related chemicals (ERCs) distributed in the surface soils over and near the landmine. The low equilibrium vapor pressure of TNT in the soil/atmosphere boundary layer and the limited volume of the boundary layer air imply that passive chemical vapor sensing systems require sensitivities in the picogram range, or lower. ADA is working to overcome many of the limitations of passive sampling methods, by the use of an active sampling method that employs a high-powered (1,200+ joules) strobe lamp to create a highly amplified plume of vapor and/or ERC-bearing fine particulates. Initial investigations have demonstrated that this approach can amplify the detectability of TNT by two or three orders of magnitude. This new active sampling technique could be used with any suitable explosive sensor.

  12. Neutron activation analysis of an Egyptian monazite ore sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, E. A.; Rofail, N. B.; Ashmawy, L. S.; Hassan, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    The absolute sensitivity of a gamma-ray line following thermal or epithermal neutron activation is expressed as a product of four terms, namely, the intrinsic, irradiation, decay and measurement factors. The total absolute sensitivity is the sum of the absolute sensitivities due to thermal and epithermal activation. A. FORTRAN computer program was prepared on the TANDY 3000 NL PCA to calculate the total absolute sensitivity of the intensive gamma-ray lines from the thermal and epithermal neutron activation of all the naturally occurring nuclides. Another program was prepared for the determination of the total absolute sensitivity for gammarays emitted by radioactive daughters such as233Pa from233Th and239Np from239U. Long time irradiation periods (about 48 hours) for specimens of the monazite ore sample were carried out at the (ET-RR-1) reactor core periphery. The monazite ore sample was separated from the associating minerals in the sand of Abou-Khashaba of Rashied (Rosetta) area on the Mediterranean (North of Egypt). The separated monazite ore sample was provided by the Nuclear Material Authority of Egypt. The cadmium difference method was applied to thin gold foils for absolute thermal and epithermal neutron flux determination. The gamma-ray spectra were measured using a spectrometer with a HPGe coaxial detector. The evaluated absolute sensitivity tables were helpful in identifying the radioisotopes contributing to the gamma- ray spectra and in evaluating the elemental concentration of the monazite constitutents. Most of the rare earth elements were observed and their concentrations are reported. La, Ce, Nd, Sd and Th were found as major elements, U, Tb, Hf and Eu as minor elements.

  13. The alias method: A fast, efficient Monte Carlo sampling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rathkopf, J.A.; Edwards, A.L. ); Smidt, R.K. )

    1990-11-16

    The alias method is a Monte Carlo sampling technique that offers significant advantages over more traditional methods. It equals the accuracy of table lookup and the speed of equal probable bins. The original formulation of this method sampled from discrete distributions and was easily extended to histogram distributions. We have extended the method further to applications more germane to Monte Carlo particle transport codes: continuous distributions. This paper presents the alias method as originally derived and our extensions to simple continuous distributions represented by piecewise linear functions. We also present a method to interpolate accurately between distributions tabulated at points other than the point of interest. We present timing studies that demonstrate the method's increased efficiency over table lookup and show further speedup achieved through vectorization. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Extending the alias Monte Carlo sampling method to general distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, A.L.; Rathkopf, J.A. ); Smidt, R.K. )

    1991-01-07

    The alias method is a Monte Carlo sampling technique that offers significant advantages over more traditional methods. It equals the accuracy of table lookup and the speed of equal probable bins. The original formulation of this method sampled from discrete distributions and was easily extended to histogram distributions. We have extended the method further to applications more germane to Monte Carlo particle transport codes: continuous distributions. This paper presents the alias method as originally derived and our extensions to simple continuous distributions represented by piecewise linear functions. We also present a method to interpolate accurately between distributions tabulated at points other than the point of interest. We present timing studies that demonstrate the method's increased efficiency over table lookup and show further speedup achieved through vectorization. 6 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. COMPARISON OF MACROINVERTEBRATE SAMPLING METHODS FOR NONWADEABLE STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioassessment of nonwadeable streams in the United States is increasing, but methods for these systems are not as well developed as for wadeable streams. In this study, we compared six benthic macroinvertebrate field sampling methods for nonwadeable streams based on those us...

  16. The Circle-Arc Method for Equating in Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Samuel A.; Kim, Sooyeon

    2009-01-01

    This article suggests a method for estimating a test-score equating relationship from small samples of test takers. The method does not require the estimated equating transformation to be linear. Instead, it constrains the estimated equating curve to pass through two pre-specified end points and a middle point determined from the data. In a…

  17. The Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression Sample Size Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.; Barcikowski, Robert S.

    The general purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of the Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression (PEAR) method for choosing appropriate sample sizes in regression studies used for precision. The PEAR method, which is based on the algebraic manipulation of an accepted cross-validity formula, essentially uses an effect size to…

  18. Standard methods for sampling North American freshwater fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonar, Scott A.; Hubert, Wayne A.; Willis, David W.

    2009-01-01

    This important reference book provides standard sampling methods recommended by the American Fisheries Society for assessing and monitoring freshwater fish populations in North America. Methods apply to ponds, reservoirs, natural lakes, and streams and rivers containing cold and warmwater fishes. Range-wide and eco-regional averages for indices of abundance, population structure, and condition for individual species are supplied to facilitate comparisons of standard data among populations. Provides information on converting nonstandard to standard data, statistical and database procedures for analyzing and storing standard data, and methods to prevent transfer of invasive species while sampling.

  19. SNS Sample Activation Calculator Flux Recommendations and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    McClanahan, Tucker C.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Lu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses the Sample Activation Calculator (SAC) to calculate the activation of a sample after the sample has been exposed to the neutron beam in one of the SNS beamlines. The SAC webpage takes user inputs (choice of beamline, the mass, composition and area of the sample, irradiation time, decay time, etc.) and calculates the activation for the sample. In recent years, the SAC has been incorporated into the user proposal and sample handling process, and instrument teams and users have noticed discrepancies in the predicted activation of their samples. The Neutronics Analysis Team validated SAC by performing measurements on select beamlines and confirmed the discrepancies seen by the instrument teams and users. The conclusions were that the discrepancies were a result of a combination of faulty neutron flux spectra for the instruments, improper inputs supplied by SAC (1.12), and a mishandling of cross section data in the Sample Activation Program for Easy Use (SAPEU) (1.1.2). This report focuses on the conclusion that the SAPEU (1.1.2) beamline neutron flux spectra have errors and are a significant contributor to the activation discrepancies. The results of the analysis of the SAPEU (1.1.2) flux spectra for all beamlines will be discussed in detail. The recommendations for the implementation of improved neutron flux spectra in SAPEU (1.1.3) are also discussed.

  20. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  1. Sample preparation methods for determination of drugs of abuse in hair samples: A review.

    PubMed

    Vogliardi, Susanna; Tucci, Marianna; Stocchero, Giulia; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Favretto, Donata

    2015-02-01

    Hair analysis has assumed increasing importance in the determination of substances of abuse, both in clinical and forensic toxicology investigations. Hair analysis offers particular advantages over other biological matrices (blood and urine), including a larger window of detection, ease of collection and sample stability. In the present work, an overview of sample preparation techniques for the determination of substances of abuse in hair is provided, specifically regarding the principal steps in hair sample treatment-decontamination, extraction and purification. For this purpose, a survey of publications found in the MEDLINE database from 2000 to date was conducted. The most widely consumed substances of abuse and psychotropic drugs were considered. Trends in simplification of hair sample preparation, washing procedures and cleanup methods are discussed. Alternative sample extraction techniques, such as head-space solid phase microextraction (HS-SPDE), supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are also reported. PMID:25604816

  2. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas

  3. Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    McManus, G.J.; Motes, B.G.; Bird, S.K.; Kotter, D.K.

    1996-03-26

    Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, is composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method is described for obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant. 3 figs.

  4. Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    McManus, Gary J.; Motes, Billy G.; Bird, Susan K.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method of obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant.

  5. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  6. Characterizing lentic freshwater fish assemblages using multiple sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jesse R.; Quist, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing fish assemblages in lentic ecosystems is difficult, and multiple sampling methods are almost always necessary to gain reliable estimates of indices such as species richness. However, most research focused on lentic fish sampling methodology has targeted recreationally important species, and little to no information is available regarding the influence of multiple methods and timing (i.e., temporal variation) on characterizing entire fish assemblages. Therefore, six lakes and impoundments (48–1,557 ha surface area) were sampled seasonally with seven gear types to evaluate the combined influence of sampling methods and timing on the number of species and individuals sampled. Probabilities of detection for species indicated strong selectivities and seasonal trends that provide guidance on optimal seasons to use gears when targeting multiple species. The evaluation of species richness and number of individuals sampled using multiple gear combinations demonstrated that appreciable benefits over relatively few gears (e.g., to four) used in optimal seasons were not present. Specifically, over 90 % of the species encountered with all gear types and season combinations (N = 19) from six lakes and reservoirs were sampled with nighttime boat electrofishing in the fall and benthic trawling, modified-fyke, and mini-fyke netting during the summer. Our results indicated that the characterization of lentic fish assemblages was highly influenced by the selection of sampling gears and seasons, but did not appear to be influenced by waterbody type (i.e., natural lake, impoundment). The standardization of data collected with multiple methods and seasons to account for bias is imperative to monitoring of lentic ecosystems and will provide researchers with increased reliability in their interpretations and decisions made using information on lentic fish assemblages.

  7. Comparison of pigment content of paint samples using spectrometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzcińska, Beata; Kowalski, Rafał; Zięba-Palus, Janina

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the paper was to evaluate the influence of pigment concentration and its distribution in polymer binder on the possibility of colour identification and paint sample comparison. Two sets of paint samples: one containing red and another one green pigment were prepared. Each set consisted of 13 samples differing gradually in the concentration of pigment. To obtain the sets of various colour shades white paint was mixed with the appropriate pigment in the form of a concentrated suspension. After solvents evaporation the samples were examined using spectrometric methods. The resin and main filler were identified by IR method. Colour and white pigments were identified on the base of Raman spectra. Colour of samples were compared based on Vis spectrometry according to colour theory. It was found that samples are homogenous (parameter measuring colour similarity ΔE < 3). The values of ΔE between the neighbouring samples in the set revealed decreasing linear function and between the first and following one - a logarithmic function.

  8. Off-axis angular spectrum method with variable sampling interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Hae; Byun, Chun-Won; Oh, Himchan; Pi, Jae-Eun; Choi, Ji-Hun; Kim, Gi Heon; Lee, Myung-Lae; Ryu, Hojun; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2015-08-01

    We proposed a novel off-axis angular spectrum method (ASM) for simulating free space wave propagation with a large shifted destination plane. The off-axis numerical simulation took wave propagation between a parallel source and a destination plane, but a destination plane was shifted from a source plane. The shifted angular spectrum method was proposed for diffraction simulation with a shifted destination plane and satisfied the Nyquist condition for sampling by limiting a bandwidth of a propagation field to avoid an aliasing error due to under sampling. However, the effective sampling number of the shifted ASM decreased when the shifted distance of the destination plane was large which caused a numerical error in the diffraction simulation. To compensate for the decrease of an effective sampling number for the large shifted destination plane, we used a variable sampling interval in a Fourier space to maintain the same effective sampling number independent of the shifted distance of the destination plane. As a result, our proposed off-axis ASM with a variable sampling interval can produce simulation results with high accuracy for nearly every shifted distance of a destination plane when an off-axis angle is less than 75°. We compared the performances of the off-axis ASM using the Chirp Z transform and non-uniform FFT for implementing a variable spatial frequency in a Fourier space.

  9. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN EMERGENCY MILK SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-07-17

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of Sr-90 within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than previous method that use calcination or cation exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta interferences. When a 100 ml sample aliquot is used, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq/L, well below generic emergency action levels.

  10. Activated sampling in complex materials at finite temperature: The properly obeying probability activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, Henk; Chubynsky, M. V.; Barkema, G. T.; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-12-01

    While the dynamics of many complex systems is dominated by activated events, there are very few simulation methods that take advantage of this fact. Most of these procedures are restricted to relatively simple systems or, as with the activation-relaxation technique (ART), sample the conformation space efficiently at the cost of a correct thermodynamical description. We present here an extension of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART), that obeys detailed balance and samples correctly the thermodynamic ensemble. Testing POP-ART on two model systems, a vacancy and an interstitial in crystalline silicon, we show that this method recovers the proper thermodynamical weights associated with the various accessible states and is significantly faster than molecular dynamics in the simulations of a vacancy below 700 K.

  11. Activated sampling in complex materials at finite temperature: the properly obeying probability activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Vocks, Henk; Chubynsky, M V; Barkema, G T; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-12-22

    While the dynamics of many complex systems is dominated by activated events, there are very few simulation methods that take advantage of this fact. Most of these procedures are restricted to relatively simple systems or, as with the activation-relaxation technique (ART), sample the conformation space efficiently at the cost of a correct thermodynamical description. We present here an extension of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART), that obeys detailed balance and samples correctly the thermodynamic ensemble. Testing POP-ART on two model systems, a vacancy and an interstitial in crystalline silicon, we show that this method recovers the proper thermodynamical weights associated with the various accessible states and is significantly faster than molecular dynamics in the simulations of a vacancy below 700 K. PMID:16396563

  12. [Progress in sample preparation and analytical methods for trace polar small molecules in complex samples].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianchun; Luo, Xialin; Li, Gongke; Xiao, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Small polar molecules such as nucleosides, amines, amino acids are important analytes in biological, food, environmental, and other fields. It is necessary to develop efficient sample preparation and sensitive analytical methods for rapid analysis of these polar small molecules in complex matrices. Some typical materials in sample preparation, including silica, polymer, carbon, boric acid and so on, are introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the applications and developments of analytical methods of polar small molecules, such as reversed-phase liquid chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, etc., are also reviewed. PMID:26753274

  13. Evaluation of Stress Loaded Steel Samples Using Selected Electromagnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.

    2004-02-26

    In this paper the magnetic leakage flux and eddy current method were used to evaluate changes of materials' properties caused by stress. Seven samples made of ferromagnetic material with different level of applied stress were prepared. First, the leakage magnetic fields were measured by scanning the surface of the specimens with GMR gradiometer. Next, the same samples were evaluated using an eddy current sensor. A comparison between results obtained from both methods was carried out. Finally, selected parameters of the measured signal were calculated and utilized to evaluate level of the applied stress. A strong coincidence between amount of the applied stress and the maximum amplitude of the derivative was confirmed.

  14. On the Exploitation of Sensitivity Derivatives for Improving Sampling Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Yanzhao; Hussaini, M. Yousuff; Zang, Thomas A.

    2003-01-01

    Many application codes, such as finite-element structural analyses and computational fluid dynamics codes, are capable of producing many sensitivity derivatives at a small fraction of the cost of the underlying analysis. This paper describes a simple variance reduction method that exploits such inexpensive sensitivity derivatives to increase the accuracy of sampling methods. Three examples, including a finite-element structural analysis of an aircraft wing, are provided that illustrate an order of magnitude improvement in accuracy for both Monte Carlo and stratified sampling schemes.

  15. NEW COLUMN SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY URINE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S; Brian Culligan, B

    2007-08-28

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2007 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2007. A new rapid column separation method was applied directly to the NRIP 2007 emergency urine samples, with only minimal sample preparation to reduce preparation time. Calcium phosphate precipitation, previously used to pre-concentrate actinides and Sr-90 in NRIP 2006 urine and water samples, was not used for the NRIP 2007 urine samples. Instead, the raw urine was acidified and passed directly through the stacked resin columns (TEVA+TRU+SR Resins) to separate the actinides and strontium from the NRIP urine samples more quickly. This improvement reduced sample preparation time for the NRIP 2007 emergency urine analyses significantly. This approach works well for small volume urine samples expected during an emergency response event. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and strontium-90 analyses for NRIP 2007 urine samples.

  16. Detection of autoinducer (AI-2)-like activity in food samples.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Kirthiram K; Jesudhasan, Palmy R; Pillai, Suresh D

    2011-01-01

    The contamination, survival, and possible foodborne disease outbreaks are major issues confronting the food industry. However, from a microbial perspective, any food whether natural or processed is just another environmental niche that is available for colonization. Quorum sensing or cell-cell communication is a process by which microorganisms are thought to communicate with each other using a variety of small molecules termed autoinducers. The autoinducer AI-2 is thought to be a universal signaling molecule due to its ability to modulate the gene expression of a number of different bacterial species and genera. Pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio anguillarum, Streptococcus sp., and Burkholderia cepacia form biofilms on a variety of man-made and natural surfaces using cell-cell mechanisms. It is important to detect and study autoinducers and their activities in foods, since a better understanding of these molecules in food and food ingredients may help in designing new approaches to thwart microbial persistence and biofilm formation. The autoinducer AI-2 is thought to be involved in microbial attachment and biofilm formation leading to food spoilage. To better understand microbial cell-cell signaling in foods especially as it relates to pathogen persistence, biofilm formation, and food spoilage, methods to process, extract, and purify autoinducer molecules need to be developed. This chapter details methods to process food samples to obtain cell-free supernatants (CFS), which could subsequently be tested for the presence of AI-2 or "AI-2-like activity" in the extracted CFS using autoinducer bioassays. Additionally, the method of synthesizing AI-2 in the laboratory is also provided. The methods that are presented in this chapter are based on previously published research articles from the authors' laboratory. PMID:21031305

  17. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY WATER AND URINE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-08-27

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2008 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2008. A new rapid column separation method was used for analysis of actinides and {sup 90}Sr the NRIP 2008 emergency water and urine samples. Significant method improvements were applied to reduce analytical times. As a result, much faster analysis times were achieved, less than 3 hours for determination of {sup 90}Sr and 3-4 hours for actinides. This represents a 25%-33% improvement in analysis times from NRIP 2007 and a {approx}100% improvement compared to NRIP 2006 report times. Column flow rates were increased by a factor of two, with no significant adverse impact on the method performance. Larger sample aliquots, shorter count times, faster cerium fluoride microprecipitation and streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation were also employed. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and {sup 90}Sr analyses for NRIP 2008 emergency urine samples. High levels of potential matrix interferences may be present in emergency samples and rugged methods are essential. Extremely high levels of {sup 210}Po were found to have an adverse effect on the uranium results for the NRIP-08 urine samples, while uranium results for NRIP-08 water samples were not affected. This problem, which was not observed for NRIP-06 or NRIP-07 urine samples, was resolved by using an enhanced {sup 210}Po removal step, which will be described.

  18. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  19. Comparative analysis of ACTH and corticosterone sampling methods in rats.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Torsten P; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Ostrander, Michelle M; Dolgas, C Mark; Elfers, Eileen E; Seeley, Randy J; D'Alessio, David A; Herman, James P

    2005-11-01

    A frequently debated question for studies involving the measurement of stress hormones in rodents is the optimal method for collecting blood with minimal stress to the animal. Some investigators prefer the implantation of indwelling catheters to allow for frequent sampling. Others argue that the implantation of a catheter creates a chronic stress to the animal that confounds stress hormone measures and therefore rely on tail vein sampling. Moreover, some investigators measure hormones in trunk blood samples obtained after anesthesia, a practice that may itself raise hormone levels. To address these controversies, we 1) compared plasma ACTH and corticosterone (Cort) concentrations in pre- and poststress rat blood samples obtained via previously implanted vena cava catheters, tail vein nicks, or clipping the tip off the tail and 2) compared plasma ACTH and Cort in rat blood samples obtained by decapitation with and without anesthesia. Rats sampled via indwelling catheters displayed lower prestress ACTH levels than those sampled by tail vein nick if the time to acquire samples was not limited; however, elevated basal ACTH was not observed in samples obtained by tail clip or tail nick when the samples were obtained within 3 min. Baseline Cort levels were similar in all groups. After restraint stress, the profile of the plasma ACTH and Cort responses was not affected by sampling method. Decapitation with prior administration of CO2 or pentobarbital sodium increased plasma ACTH levels approximately 13- and 2-fold, respectively, when compared with decapitation without anesthesia. These data indicate that tail vein nicking, tail clipping, or indwelling venous catheters can be used for obtaining plasma for ACTH and Cort during acute stress studies without confounding the measurements. However, the elevation in basal ACTH seen in the tail vein nick group at baseline suggests that sampling needs to be completed rapidly (<3 min) to avoid the initiation of the pituitary stress

  20. Spectrum recovery method analysis on nonuniform sampling interference data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fengzhen; Li, Jingzhen; Cao, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Temporally and Spatially Modulated Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometer (TSMFTIS) is a new imaging spectrometer without moving mirrors and slits. The interferogram of the target point can be consisted by sequentially arranging the interference information extracted from the same target point of the sequential images, and the spectrum can be recovered by using fast Fourier transform. In the practical application, there is nonuniform sampling in the interference data, and many researchers have carried out researches on nonuniform sampling with the fast Fourier transform algorithm. As to the issue of interference data in the nonuniform sampling, the nonuniform sampling degree's impact on the recovered spectrum precision is currently and mainly analyzed. This paper has adapted several typical nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) methods, carried out spectrum recovery precision comparison on the interferogram of the nonuniform sampling point with the above methods, and further analyzed the impact of kernel function type, oversampling ratio and kernel function width's on spectrum recovery precision in the above mentioned methods. The experiment result indicates that, when the oversampling ratio is 4 and the kernel function width is 4, the spectrum recovery precision with NUFFT based on Blackman type kernel function is optimal, however, the Gaussian kernel function is stable.

  1. Global metabolite analysis of yeast: evaluation of sample preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Villas-Bôas, Silas G; Højer-Pedersen, Jesper; Akesson, Mats; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-10-30

    Sample preparation is considered one of the limiting steps in microbial metabolome analysis. Eukaryotes and prokaryotes behave very differently during the several steps of classical sample preparation methods for analysis of metabolites. Even within the eukaryote kingdom there is a vast diversity of cell structures that make it imprudent to blindly adopt protocols that were designed for a specific group of microorganisms. We have therefore reviewed and evaluated the whole sample preparation procedures for analysis of yeast metabolites. Our focus has been on the current needs in metabolome analysis, which is the analysis of a large number of metabolites with very diverse chemical and physical properties. This work reports the leakage of intracellular metabolites observed during quenching yeast cells with cold methanol solution, the efficacy of six different methods for the extraction of intracellular metabolites, and the losses noticed during sample concentration by lyophilization and solvent evaporation. A more reliable procedure is suggested for quenching yeast cells with cold methanol solution, followed by extraction of intracellular metabolites by pure methanol. The method can be combined with reduced pressure solvent evaporation and therefore represents an attractive sample preparation procedure for high-throughput metabolome analysis of yeasts. PMID:16240456

  2. Extravehicular Activity Asteroid Exploration and Sample Collection Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipila, Stephanie A.; Scoville, Zebulon C.; Bowie, Jonathan T.; Buffington, Jesse A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenging primary objectives associated with NASA's Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) is to demonstrate deep space Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and tools and to obtain asteroid samples to return to Earth for further study. Prior Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) spacewalks have benefited from engineered EVA interfaces which have been designed and manufactured on Earth. Rigid structurally mounted handrails, and tools with customized interfaces and restraints optimize EVA performance. For ARCM, EVA complexity increases due to the uncertainty of the asteroid properties. The variability of rock size, shape and composition, as well as behavior of the asteroid capture mechanism will complicate EVA translation, tool restraint, and body stabilization. The unknown asteroid hardness and brittleness will complicate tool use. The rock surface will introduce added safety concerns for cut gloves and debris control. Feasible solutions to meet ARCM EVA objectives were identified using experience gained during Apollo, Shuttle, and ISS EVAs, terrestrial mountaineering practices, NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 16 mission, and during Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory testing in the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) suit. This paper will summarize the overall operational concepts for conducting EVAs for the ARCM mission including translation paths and body restraint methods, potential tools used to extract the samples, design implications for the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) for EVA, and the results of early development testing of potential EVA tasks.

  3. FEASIBILITY OF DEVELOPING SOURCE SAMPLING METHODS FOR ASBESTOS EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this program was to determine the feasibility of developing methods for sampling asbestos in the emissions of major asbestos sources: (1) ore production and taconite production, (2) asbestos-cement production, (3) asbestos felt and paper production, and (4) the p...

  4. METHODS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF CARPET SAMPLES FOR ASBESTOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing asbestos fiber contamination in a carpet is complicated by the nature of the carpeting – because of the pile’s rough surface and thickness, samples cannot be collected directly from carpet for analysis by TEM. Two indirect methods are currently used by laboratories when...

  5. A General Linear Method for Equating with Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albano, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Research on equating with small samples has shown that methods with stronger assumptions and fewer statistical estimates can lead to decreased error in the estimated equating function. This article introduces a new approach to linear observed-score equating, one which provides flexible control over how form difficulty is assumed versus estimated…

  6. Periodicity detection method for small-sample time series datasets.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Time series of gene expression often exhibit periodic behavior under the influence of multiple signal pathways, and are represented by a model that incorporates multiple harmonics and noise. Most of these data, which are observed using DNA microarrays, consist of few sampling points in time, but most periodicity detection methods require a relatively large number of sampling points. We have previously developed a detection algorithm based on the discrete Fourier transform and Akaike's information criterion. Here we demonstrate the performance of the algorithm for small-sample time series data through a comparison with conventional and newly proposed periodicity detection methods based on a statistical analysis of the power of harmonics.We show that this method has higher sensitivity for data consisting of multiple harmonics, and is more robust against noise than other methods. Although "combinatorial explosion" occurs for large datasets, the computational time is not a problem for small-sample datasets. The MATLAB/GNU Octave script of the algorithm is available on the author's web site: http://www.cbrc.jp/%7Etominaga/piccolo/. PMID:21151841

  7. Development of an automated data processing method for sample to sample comparison of seized methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Choe, Sanggil; Lee, Jaesin; Choi, Hyeyoung; Park, Yujin; Lee, Heesang; Pyo, Jaesung; Jo, Jiyeong; Park, Yonghoon; Choi, Hwakyung; Kim, Suncheun

    2012-11-30

    The information about the sources of supply, trafficking routes, distribution patterns and conspiracy links can be obtained from methamphetamine profiling. The precursor and synthetic method for the clandestine manufacture can be estimated from the analysis of minor impurities contained in methamphetamine. Also, the similarity between samples can be evaluated using the peaks that appear in chromatograms. In South Korea, methamphetamine was the most popular drug but the total seized amount of methamphetamine whole through the country was very small. Therefore, it would be more important to find the links between samples than the other uses of methamphetamine profiling. Many Asian countries including Japan and South Korea have been using the method developed by National Research Institute of Police Science of Japan. The method used gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), DB-5 column and four internal standards. It was developed to increase the amount of impurities and minimize the amount of methamphetamine. After GC-FID analysis, the raw data have to be processed. The data processing steps are very complex and require a lot of time and effort. In this study, Microsoft Visual Basic Application (VBA) modules were developed to handle these data processing steps. This module collected the results from the data into an Excel file and then corrected the retention time shift and response deviation generated from the sample preparation and instruments analysis. The developed modules were tested for their performance using 10 samples from 5 different cases. The processed results were analyzed with Pearson correlation coefficient for similarity assessment and the correlation coefficient of the two samples from the same case was more than 0.99. When the modules were applied to 131 seized methamphetamine samples, four samples from two different cases were found to have the common origin and the chromatograms of the four samples were appeared visually identical

  8. Extravehicular Activity Asteroid Exploration and Sample Collection Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoville, Zebulon; Sipila, Stephanie; Bowie, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) is challenged with primary mission objectives of demonstrating deep space Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and tools, and obtaining asteroid samples to return to Earth for further study. Although the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) is used for the EVAs, it has limited mobility which increases fatigue and decreases the crews' capability to perform EVA tasks. Furthermore, previous Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) spacewalks have benefited from EVA interfaces which have been designed and manufactured on Earth. Rigid structurally mounted handrails, and tools with customized interfaces and restraints optimize EVA performance. For ARCM, some vehicle interfaces and tools can leverage heritage designs and experience. However, when the crew ventures onto an asteroid capture bag to explore the asteroid and collect rock samples, EVA complexity increases due to the uncertainty of the asteroid properties. The variability of rock size, shape and composition, as well as bunching of the fabric bag will complicate EVA translation, tool restraint and body stabilization. The unknown asteroid hardness and brittleness will complicate tool use. The rock surface will introduce added safety concerns for cut gloves and debris control. Feasible solutions to meet ARCM EVA objectives were identified using experience gained during Apollo, Shuttle, and ISS EVAs, terrestrial mountaineering practices, NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 16 mission, and during Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory testing in the MACES suit. The proposed concept utilizes expandable booms and integrated features of the asteroid capture bag to position and restrain the crew at the asteroid worksite. These methods enable the capability to perform both finesse, and high load tasks necessary to collect samples for scientific characterization of the asteroid. This paper will explore the design trade space and options that were examined for EVA, the

  9. Comparison of DNA preservation methods for environmental bacterial community samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Michael A.; Pratte, Zoe A.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2013-01-01

    Field collections of environmental samples, for example corals, for molecular microbial analyses present distinct challenges. The lack of laboratory facilities in remote locations is common, and preservation of microbial community DNA for later study is critical. A particular challenge is keeping samples frozen in transit. Five nucleic acid preservation methods that do not require cold storage were compared for effectiveness over time and ease of use. Mixed microbial communities of known composition were created and preserved by DNAgard™, RNAlater®, DMSO–EDTA–salt (DESS), FTA® cards, and FTA Elute® cards. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and clone libraries were used to detect specific changes in the faux communities over weeks and months of storage. A previously known bias in FTA® cards that results in lower recovery of pure cultures of Gram-positive bacteria was also detected in mixed community samples. There appears to be a uniform bias across all five preservation methods against microorganisms with high G + C DNA. Overall, the liquid-based preservatives (DNAgard™, RNAlater®, and DESS) outperformed the card-based methods. No single liquid method clearly outperformed the others, leaving method choice to be based on experimental design, field facilities, shipping constraints, and allowable cost.

  10. Comparison of aquatic macroinvertebrate samples collected using different field methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenz, Bernard N.; Miller, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Government agencies, academic institutions, and volunteer monitoring groups in the State of Wisconsin collect aquatic macroinvertebrate data to assess water quality. Sampling methods differ among agencies, reflecting the differences in the sampling objectives of each agency. Lack of infor- mation about data comparability impedes data shar- ing among agencies, which can result in duplicated sampling efforts or the underutilization of avail- able information. To address these concerns, com- parisons were made of macroinvertebrate samples collected from wadeable streams in Wisconsin by personnel from the U.S. Geological Survey- National Water Quality Assessment Program (USGS-NAWQA), the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR), the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Forest Service (USDA-FS), and volunteers from the Water Action Volunteer-Water Quality Monitoring Program (WAV). This project was part of the Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality (ITFM) Wisconsin Water Resources Coordination Project. The numbers, types, and environmental tolerances of the organ- isms collected were analyzed to determine if the four different field methods that were used by the different agencies and volunteer groups provide comparable results. Additionally, this study com- pared the results of samples taken from different locations and habitats within the same streams.

  11. Sample Collection Method Bias Effects in Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Kanshin, Evgeny; Tyers, Michael; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Current advances in selective enrichment, fractionation, and MS detection of phosphorylated peptides allowed identification and quantitation of tens of thousands phosphosites from minute amounts of biological material. One of the major challenges in the field is preserving the in vivo phosphorylation state of the proteins throughout the sample preparation workflow. This is typically achieved by using phosphatase inhibitors and denaturing conditions during cell lysis. Here we determine if the upstream cell collection techniques could introduce changes in protein phosphorylation. To evaluate the effect of sample collection protocols on the global phosphorylation status of the cell, we compared different sample workflows by metabolic labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cultures. We identified highly similar phosphopeptides for cells harvested in ice cold isotonic phosphate buffer, cold ethanol, trichloroacetic acid, and liquid nitrogen. However, quantitative analyses revealed that the commonly used phosphate buffer unexpectedly activated signaling events. Such effects may introduce systematic bias in phosphoproteomics measurements and biochemical analysis. PMID:26040406

  12. A flexible importance sampling method for integrating subgrid processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, E. K.; Larson, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical models of weather and climate need to compute grid-box-averaged rates of physical processes such as microphysics. These averages are computed by integrating subgrid variability over a grid box. For this reason, an important aspect of atmospheric modeling is spatial integration over subgrid scales. The needed integrals can be estimated by Monte Carlo integration. Monte Carlo integration is simple and general but requires many evaluations of the physical process rate. To reduce the number of function evaluations, this paper describes a new, flexible method of importance sampling. It divides the domain of integration into eight categories, such as the portion that contains both precipitation and cloud, or the portion that contains precipitation but no cloud. It then allows the modeler to prescribe the density of sample points within each of the eight categories. The new method is incorporated into the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS). The resulting method is tested on drizzling cumulus and stratocumulus cases. In the cumulus case, the sampling error can be considerably reduced by drawing more sample points from the region of rain evaporation.

  13. A flexible importance sampling method for integrating subgrid processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Raut, E. K.; Larson, V. E.

    2016-01-29

    Numerical models of weather and climate need to compute grid-box-averaged rates of physical processes such as microphysics. These averages are computed by integrating subgrid variability over a grid box. For this reason, an important aspect of atmospheric modeling is spatial integration over subgrid scales. The needed integrals can be estimated by Monte Carlo integration. Monte Carlo integration is simple and general but requires many evaluations of the physical process rate. To reduce the number of function evaluations, this paper describes a new, flexible method of importance sampling. It divides the domain of integration into eight categories, such as the portion that containsmore » both precipitation and cloud, or the portion that contains precipitation but no cloud. It then allows the modeler to prescribe the density of sample points within each of the eight categories. The new method is incorporated into the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS). The resulting method is tested on drizzling cumulus and stratocumulus cases. In the cumulus case, the sampling error can be considerably reduced by drawing more sample points from the region of rain evaporation.« less

  14. New Methods of Sample Preparation for Atom Probe Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kimberly, R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Ward, Jennifer R.; Wishard, James L.; Martens, Richard L.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetite is a common conductive mineral found on Earth and Mars. Disk-shaped precipitates approximately 40 nm in diameter have been shown to have manganese and aluminum concentrations. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) is the only technique that can potentially quantify the composition of these precipitates. APFIM will be used to characterize geological and planetary materials, analyze samples of interest for geomicrobiology; and, for the metrology of nanoscale instrumentation. Prior to APFIM sample preparation was conducted by electropolishing, the method of sharp shards (MSS), or Bosch process (deep reactive ion etching) with focused ion beam (FIB) milling as a final step. However, new methods are required for difficult samples. Many materials are not easily fabricated using electropolishing, MSS, or the Bosch process, FIB milling is slow and expensive, and wet chemistry and the reactive ion etching are typically limited to Si and other semiconductors. APFIM sample preparation using the dicing saw is commonly used to section semiconductor wafers into individual devices following manufacture. The dicing saw is a time-effective method for preparing high aspect ratio posts of poorly conducting materials. Femtosecond laser micromachining is also suitable for preparation of posts. FIB time required is reduced by about a factor of 10 and multi-tip specimens can easily be fabricated using the dicing saw.

  15. A flexible importance sampling method for integrating subgrid processes

    SciTech Connect

    Raut, E. K.; Larson, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical models of weather and climate need to compute grid-box-averaged rates of physical processes such as microphysics. These averages are computed by integrating subgrid variability over a grid box. For this reason, an important aspect of atmospheric modeling is spatial integration over subgrid scales.

    The needed integrals can be estimated by Monte Carlo integration. Monte Carlo integration is simple and general but requires many evaluations of the physical process rate. To reduce the number of function evaluations, this paper describes a new, flexible method of importance sampling. It divides the domain of integration into eight categories, such as the portion that contains both precipitation and cloud, or the portion that contains precipitation but no cloud. It then allows the modeler to prescribe the density of sample points within each of the eight categories.

    The new method is incorporated into the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS). The resulting method is tested on drizzling cumulus and stratocumulus cases. In the cumulus case, the sampling error can be considerably reduced by drawing more sample points from the region of rain evaporation.

  16. A flexible importance sampling method for integrating subgrid processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Raut, E. K.; Larson, V. E.

    2016-01-29

    Numerical models of weather and climate need to compute grid-box-averaged rates of physical processes such as microphysics. These averages are computed by integrating subgrid variability over a grid box. For this reason, an important aspect of atmospheric modeling is spatial integration over subgrid scales. The needed integrals can be estimated by Monte Carlo integration. Monte Carlo integration is simple and general but requires many evaluations of the physical process rate. To reduce the number of function evaluations, this paper describes a new, flexible method of importance sampling. It divides the domain of integration into eight categories, such as the portion that containsmore » both precipitation and cloud, or the portion that contains precipitation but no cloud. It then allows the modeler to prescribe the density of sample points within each of the eight categories. The new method is incorporated into the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS). Here, the resulting method is tested on drizzling cumulus and stratocumulus cases. In the cumulus case, the sampling error can be considerably reduced by drawing more sample points from the region of rain evaporation.« less

  17. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Suermann, J.F.

    1996-04-01

    This Methods Manual provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. The procedures in this Methods Manual are comprehensive and detailed and are designed to provide the necessary guidance for the preparation of site-specific procedures. With some analytical methods, such as Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, the Methods Manual procedures may be used directly. With other methods, such as nondestructive characterization, the Methods Manual provides guidance rather than a step-by-step procedure. Sites must meet all of the specified quality control requirements of the applicable procedure. Each DOE site must document the details of the procedures it will use and demonstrate the efficacy of such procedures to the Manager, National TRU Program Waste Characterization, during Waste Characterization and Certification audits.

  18. A method for sampling microbial aerosols using high altitude balloons.

    PubMed

    Bryan, N C; Stewart, M; Granger, D; Guzik, T G; Christner, B C

    2014-12-01

    Owing to the challenges posed to microbial aerosol sampling at high altitudes, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and extent of microbial taxa in the Earth-atmosphere system. To directly address this knowledge gap, we designed, constructed, and tested a system that passively samples aerosols during ascent through the atmosphere while tethered to a helium-filled latex sounding balloon. The sampling payload is ~ 2.7 kg and comprised of an electronics box and three sampling chambers (one serving as a procedural control). Each chamber is sealed with retractable doors that can be commanded to open and close at designated altitudes. The payload is deployed together with radio beacons that transmit GPS coordinates (latitude, longitude and altitude) in real time for tracking and recovery. A cut mechanism separates the payload string from the balloon at any desired altitude, returning all equipment safely to the ground on a parachute. When the chambers are opened, aerosol sampling is performed using the Rotorod® collection method (40 rods per chamber), with each rod passing through 0.035 m3 per km of altitude sampled. Based on quality control measurements, the collection of ~ 100 cells rod(-1) provided a 3-sigma confidence level of detection. The payload system described can be mated with any type of balloon platform and provides a tool for characterizing the vertical distribution of microorganisms in the troposphere and stratosphere. PMID:25455021

  19. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY SOIL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

    2009-11-09

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for samples up to 2 grams in emergency response situations. The actinides in soil method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha sources are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency soil samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinides in soil results were reported within 4-5 hours with excellent quality.

  20. A Mixed Methods Investigation of Mixed Methods Sampling Designs in Social and Health Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Jiao, Qun G.

    2007-01-01

    A sequential design utilizing identical samples was used to classify mixed methods studies via a two-dimensional model, wherein sampling designs were grouped according to the time orientation of each study's components and the relationship of the qualitative and quantitative samples. A quantitative analysis of 121 studies representing nine fields…

  1. Evaluation of sample preservation methods for poultry manure.

    PubMed

    Pan, J; Fadel, J G; Zhang, R; El-Mashad, H M; Ying, Y; Rumsey, T

    2009-08-01

    When poultry manure is collected but cannot be analyzed immediately, a method for storing the manure is needed to ensure accurate subsequent analyses. This study has 3 objectives: (1) to investigate effects of 4 poultry manure sample preservation methods (refrigeration, freezing, acidification, and freeze-drying) on the compositional characteristics of poultry manure; (2) to determine compositional differences in fresh manure with manure samples at 1, 2, and 3 d of accumulation under bird cages; and (3) to assess the influence of 14-d freezing storage on the composition of manure when later exposed to 25 degrees C for 7 d as compared with fresh manure. All manure samples were collected from a layer house. Analyses performed on the manure samples included total Kjeldahl nitrogen, uric acid nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, and urea nitrogen. In experiment 1, the storage methods most similar to fresh manure, in order of preference, were freezing, freeze-drying, acidification, and refrigeration. Thoroughly mixing manure samples and compressing them to 2 to 3 mm is important for the freezing and freeze-dried samples. In general, refrigeration was found unacceptable for nitrogen analyses. A significant effect (P < 0.0001) of time for refrigeration was found on uric acid nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen. In experiment 2, the total Kjeldahl nitrogen and uric acid nitrogen were significantly lower (P < 0.05) for 1, 2, and 3 d of accumulation compared with fresh manure. Manure after 1, 2, and 3 d of accumulation had similar nitrogen compositions. The results from experiment 3 show that nitrogen components from fresh manure samples and thawed samples from 14 d of freezing are similar at 7 d but high variability of nitrogen compositions during intermediate times from 0 to 7 d prevents the recommendation of freezing manure for use in subsequent experiments and warrants future experimentation. In conclusion, fresh poultry manure can be frozen for accurate subsequent nitrogen

  2. A direct method for e-cigarette aerosol sample collection.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Pablo; Navas-Acien, Ana; Hess, Catherine; Jarmul, Stephanie; Rule, Ana

    2016-08-01

    E-cigarette use is increasing in populations around the world. Recent evidence has shown that the aerosol produced by e-cigarettes can contain a variety of toxicants. Published studies characterizing toxicants in e-cigarette aerosol have relied on filters, impingers or sorbent tubes, which are methods that require diluting or extracting the sample in a solution during collection. We have developed a collection system that directly condenses e-cigarette aerosol samples for chemical and toxicological analyses. The collection system consists of several cut pipette tips connected with short pieces of tubing. The pipette tip-based collection system can be connected to a peristaltic pump, a vacuum pump, or directly to an e-cigarette user for the e-cigarette aerosol to flow through the system. The pipette tip-based system condenses the aerosol produced by the e-cigarette and collects a liquid sample that is ready for analysis without the need of intermediate extraction solutions. We tested a total of 20 e-cigarettes from 5 different brands commercially available in Maryland. The pipette tip-based collection system condensed between 0.23 and 0.53mL of post-vaped e-liquid after 150 puffs. The proposed method is highly adaptable, can be used during field work and in experimental settings, and allows collecting aerosol samples from a wide variety of e-cigarette devices, yielding a condensate of the likely exact substance that is being delivered to the lungs. PMID:27200479

  3. Novel sample preparation method for molecular detection of Mollicutes in cell culture samples.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, David; Jouette, Sébastien; Olivieri, Frédéric; Laborde, Sandra; Rofel, Céline; Simon, Emmanuelle; Metz, Didier; Felden, Luc; Ribault, Sébastien

    2010-02-01

    Research laboratories, raw materials and media suppliers as well as the biopharmaceutical industry face recurrent contamination with Mollicutes. Culture-based detection methods are very slow (28 days) and could ideally be replaced by nucleic acid testing (NAT) for rapid result. These methods are nonetheless hampered by their companion sample preparation methods. They are limited by the volume tested (0.1 to 5 mL), the protein/nucleic acid content they can accommodate and are generally performed in an open environment. The processing of low volumes of complex matrices is associated to several issues such as poor representativeness, low sensitivity, inhibition and false positives. The novel sample preparation method described in this study has been developed to overcome these limitations and to process 20-mL samples containing high loads of eukaryotic cells. A dual-membrane device is coupled to magnetic bead purification. In one single and closed device, eukaryotic cells and microorganisms are separated, contaminants are concentrated, lysed and corresponding nucleic acids are collected. This novel sample preparation method has been tested with 9 different Mollicutes. The ability to detect the contaminants down to 0.6 CFU/mL by real-time PCR among hundreds of millions of CHO-S cells (Chinese hamster ovary cells, adapted to serum-free suspension culture), without biological pre-enrichment, has been demonstrated. The novel device has been compared to manual silica spin columns, which remain the gold standard in most laboratories. These columns failed to yield the same limit of detection and reproducible results without separating mammalian cells from contaminants. Co-culture experiments have shown that the novel method allows detection of Mollicutes grown for days in presence of mammalian cells, despite the fact that these microorganisms can adhere to eukaryotic cells or invade them. The co-culture data also suggest that the novel sample preparation device might improve

  4. A new method for vitrifying samples for cryoEM.

    PubMed

    Razinkov, Ivan; Dandey, Venkata P; Wei, Hui; Zhang, Zhening; Melnekoff, David; Rice, William J; Wigge, Christoph; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-08-01

    Almost every aspect of cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) has been automated over the last few decades. One of the challenges that remains to be addressed is the robust and reliable preparation of vitrified specimens of suitable ice thickness. We present results from a new device for preparing vitrified samples. The successful use of the device is coupled to a new "self-blotting" grid that we have developed to provide a method for spreading a sample to a thin film without the use of externally applied filter paper. This new approach has the advantage of using small amounts of protein material, resulting in large areas of ice of a well defined thickness containing evenly distributed single particles. We believe that these methods will in the future result in a system for vitrifying grids that is completely automated. PMID:27288865

  5. Calibrated propensity score method for survey nonresponse in cluster sampling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Kwang; Kwon, Yongchan; Paik, Myunghee Cho

    2016-01-01

    Weighting adjustment is commonly used in survey sampling to correct for unit nonresponse. In cluster sampling, the missingness indicators are often correlated within clusters and the response mechanism is subject to cluster-specific nonignorable missingness. Based on a parametric working model for the response mechanism that incorporates cluster-specific nonignorable missingness, we propose a method of weighting adjustment. We provide a consistent estimator of the mean or totals in cases where the study variable follows a generalized linear mixed-effects model. The proposed method is robust in the sense that the consistency of the estimator does not require correct specification of the functional forms of the response and outcome models. A consistent variance estimator based on Taylor linearization is also proposed. Numerical results, including a simulation and a real-data application, are presented.

  6. EVALUATION OF STATIONARY SOURCE PARTICULATE MEASUREMENT METHODS. VOLUME III. GAS TEMPERATURE CONTROL DURING METHOD 5 SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to measure changes in gas temperature along the length of a Method 5 sampling train due to variations in stack gas temperature, sampling rate, filter box temperature and method for controlling the probe heating element. For each run condition, temperatures w...

  7. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  8. Neutron Activation Analysis of Soil Samples from Different Parts of Edirne in Turkey*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaim, N.; Dogan, C.; Camtakan, Z.

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of constituent elements were determined in soil samples collected from different parts of the Maritza Basin, Edirne, Turkey. Neutron activation analysis, an extremely accurate technique, and the comparator method (using a standard) were applied for the first time in this region. After preparing the soil samples for neutron activation analysis, they were activated with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor, TRIGA-MARK II, at Istanbul Technical University. The activated samples were analyzed using a high-efficiency high-purity germanium detector, and gamma spectrometry was employed to determine the elemental concentration in the samples. Eight elements (chromium, manganese, cobalt, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, cadmium, and barium) were qualitatively and quantitatively identified in 36 samples. The concentrations of some elements in the soil samples were high compared with values reported in the literature.

  9. Improvement of impedance spectroscopy methods: resonance analysis of samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmus, Sorin-Bogdan; Ciomaga, Cristina E.; Horchidan, Nadejda; Mitoseriu, Liliana; Dumitru, Ioan

    2015-06-01

    An impedance spectroscopy method, using an Agilent E4991A RF Impedance/Material Analyzer, was employed for the investigation of radiofrequency and microwave dielectric characteristics for some ceramic materials with high dielectric permittivity. Experimental observations recorded single, double and even triple resonances in the permittivity spectra, while for the selected samples significantly different values of permittivity from the ones found in existing literature were directly measured and observed in the frequency range of 100 MHz-1 GHz. The specified material analyzer is designed to work within certain permittivity-frequency domains; working outside these limits leads to significant errors when carrying out direct measurements of permittivity. Having observed that the resonance measurements are not associated with the intrinsic material properties but with the sample resonances, we proposed a dielectric resonance cavity model for sample purposes and we determined the dielectric permittivity at different resonance frequencies. A scaling procedure, based on the computed values of permittivity, was applied in order to correct the directly measured permittivity spectra where the frequency was outside the resonance domains. The corrected data are in good agreement with those measured using other techniques and suggest that the proposed procedure extends the spectroscopy method currently used for high permittivity measurements. The sources of error for the proposed method were investigated.

  10. Recent advances in sample preparation techniques for effective bioanalytical methods.

    PubMed

    Kole, Prashant Laxman; Venkatesh, Gantala; Kotecha, Jignesh; Sheshala, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent developments in bioanalysis sample preparation techniques and gives an update on basic principles, theory, applications and possibilities for automation, and a comparative discussion on the advantages and limitation of each technique. Conventional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), protein precipitation (PP) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques are now been considered as methods of the past. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of novel sample preparation techniques in bioanalysis. Developments in SPE techniques such as selective sorbents and in the overall approach to SPE, such as hybrid SPE and molecularly imprinted polymer SPE, have been addressed. Considerable literature has been published in the area of solid-phase micro-extraction and its different versions, e.g. stir bar sorptive extraction, and their application in the development of selective and sensitive bioanalytical methods. Techniques such as dispersive solid-phase extraction, disposable pipette extraction and micro-extraction by packed sorbent offer a variety of extraction phases and provide unique advantages to bioanalytical methods. On-line SPE utilizing column-switching techniques is rapidly gaining acceptance in bioanalytical applications. PP sample preparation techniques such as PP filter plates/tubes offer many advantages like removal of phospholipids and proteins in plasma/serum. Newer approaches to conventional LLE techniques (salting-out LLE) are also covered in this review article. PMID:21154887

  11. Simplified sample preparation method for triclosan and methyltriclosan determination in biota and foodstuff samples.

    PubMed

    Canosa, P; Rodríguez, I; Rubí, E; Ramil, M; Cela, R

    2008-04-25

    An improved method for the determination of triclosan (TCS) and methyltriclosan (MTCS) in fish and foodstuff samples is presented. Analytes were simultaneously extracted and purified using the matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) technique, and then selectively determined by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Several combinations of dispersants, clean-up co-sorbents and extraction solvents were tested in order to obtain lipid-free extracts and quantitative recoveries for TCS and MTCS. Under optimised conditions, 0.5 g samples were dispersed using 1.5 g of neutral silica in a mortar with a pestle, and transferred to a polypropylene cartridge containing 3 g of silica impregnated with 10% of sulphuric acid (SiO2-H2SO4, 10%, w/w). Analytes were recovered with 10 mL of dichloromethane whereas lipids were oxidized in the layer of acidic silica. The extract was concentrated to dryness and re-constituted with 1 mL of ethyl acetate. Then, a fraction of 0.5 mL was mixed with 50 microL of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and injected in the GC-MS/MS system. The developed method provided absolute recoveries between 77 and 120% for different samples spiked at the low ng g(-1) level, quantification limits in the range of 1-2 ng g(-1) and a considerable simplicity in comparison with previously developed sample preparation approaches. Experiments carried out placing sliced food samples in direct contact with TCS-treated kitchenware surfaces showed the capability of the biocide to migrate into foodstuffs. PMID:18329035

  12. Sediment sampling and processing methods in Hungary, and possible improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamas, Eniko Anna; Koch, Daniel; Varga, Gyorgy

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the monitoring of sediment processes is unquestionable: sediment balance of regulated rivers suffered substantial alterations in the past century, affecting navigation, energy production, fish habitats and floodplain ecosystems alike; infiltration times to our drinking water wells have shortened, exposing them to an eventual pollution event and making them vulnerable; and sediment-attached contaminants accumulate in floodplains and reservoirs, threatening our healthy environment. The changes in flood characteristics and rating curves of our rivers are regularly being researched and described, involving state-of-the-art measurement methods, modeling tools and traditional statistics. Sediment processes however, are much less known. Unlike the investigation of flow processes, sediment-related research is scarce, which is partly due to the outdated methodology and poor database background in the specific field. Sediment-related data, information and analyses form an important and integral part of Civil engineering in relation to rivers all over the world. In relation to the second largest river of Europe, the Danube, it is widely known in expert community and for long discussed at different expert forums that the sediment balance of the river Danube has changed drastically over the past century. Sediment monitoring on the river Danube started as early as the end of the 19th century, with scattered measurements carried out. Regular sediment sampling was developed in the first half of the 20th century all along the river, with different station density and monitoring frequencies in different countries. After the first few decades of regular sampling, the concept of (mainly industrial) development changed along the river and data needs changed as well, furthermore the complicated and inexact methods of sampling bed load on the alluvial reach of the river were not developed further. Frequency of suspended sediment sampling is very low along the river

  13. Sediment sampling and processing methods in Hungary, and possible improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamas, Eniko Anna; Koch, Daniel; Varga, Gyorgy

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the monitoring of sediment processes is unquestionable: sediment balance of regulated rivers suffered substantial alterations in the past century, affecting navigation, energy production, fish habitats and floodplain ecosystems alike; infiltration times to our drinking water wells have shortened, exposing them to an eventual pollution event and making them vulnerable; and sediment-attached contaminants accumulate in floodplains and reservoirs, threatening our healthy environment. The changes in flood characteristics and rating curves of our rivers are regularly being researched and described, involving state-of-the-art measurement methods, modeling tools and traditional statistics. Sediment processes however, are much less known. Unlike the investigation of flow processes, sediment-related research is scarce, which is partly due to the outdated methodology and poor database background in the specific field. Sediment-related data, information and analyses form an important and integral part of Civil engineering in relation to rivers all over the world. In relation to the second largest river of Europe, the Danube, it is widely known in expert community and for long discussed at different expert forums that the sediment balance of the river Danube has changed drastically over the past century. Sediment monitoring on the river Danube started as early as the end of the 19th century, with scattered measurements carried out. Regular sediment sampling was developed in the first half of the 20th century all along the river, with different station density and monitoring frequencies in different countries. After the first few decades of regular sampling, the concept of (mainly industrial) development changed along the river and data needs changed as well, furthermore the complicated and inexact methods of sampling bed load on the alluvial reach of the river were not developed further. Frequency of suspended sediment sampling is very low along the river

  14. [Determination of hyaluronidase activity by the rivanol clot method].

    PubMed

    Azarenok, K S; Generalov, I I

    1994-01-01

    A method for hyaluronidase activity measurement in various biologic samples is suggested, based on rivanol capacity to form a clot with hyaluronic acid inversely proportional to this acid depolymerization under the effect of hyaluronidase. This method sensitivity is ten times higher than that of the mucin clot method; any colorimetric or fluorometric method can be used for detection. The method has been adapted to measurements of commercial hyaluronidase preparations and of blood serum hyaluronidase activity. PMID:7850237

  15. Cool walking: a new Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-01-15

    Effective relaxation processes for difficult systems like proteins or spin glasses require special simulation techniques that permit barrier crossing to ensure ergodic sampling. Numerous adaptations of the venerable Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) algorithm have been proposed to improve its sampling efficiency, including various hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) schemes, and methods designed specifically for overcoming quasi-ergodicity problems such as Jump Walking (J-Walking), Smart Walking (S-Walking), Smart Darting, and Parallel Tempering. We present an alternative to these approaches that we call Cool Walking, or C-Walking. In C-Walking two Markov chains are propagated in tandem, one at a high (ergodic) temperature and the other at a low temperature. Nonlocal trial moves for the low temperature walker are generated by first sampling from the high-temperature distribution, then performing a statistical quenching process on the sampled configuration to generate a C-Walking jump move. C-Walking needs only one high-temperature walker, satisfies detailed balance, and offers the important practical advantage that the high and low-temperature walkers can be run in tandem with minimal degradation of sampling due to the presence of correlations. To make the C-Walking approach more suitable to real problems we decrease the required number of cooling steps by attempting to jump at intermediate temperatures during cooling. We further reduce the number of cooling steps by utilizing "windows" of states when jumping, which improves acceptance ratios and lowers the average number of cooling steps. We present C-Walking results with comparisons to J-Walking, S-Walking, Smart Darting, and Parallel Tempering on a one-dimensional rugged potential energy surface in which the exact normalized probability distribution is known. C-Walking shows superior sampling as judged by two ergodic measures. PMID:12483676

  16. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY AIR FILTER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Noyes, G.; Culligan, B.

    2010-02-03

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and strontium in air filter samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations. The actinides and strontium in air filter method utilizes a rapid acid digestion method and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and Sr Resin cartridges. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha emitters are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency air filter samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in air filter results were reported in {approx}4 hours with excellent quality.

  17. Method for actinides and Sr-90 determination in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A; Navarro, N

    1996-01-01

    The primary goal of radiation protection in decommissioning and decontamination of the old nuclear facilities of the CIEMAT is to monitor and minimize exposure of personnel. Monitoring programs include determination of actinides and 90Sr in biological samples. A technique for the sequential measurement of low levels of 239Pu, 241Am and 90Sr in urine samples has been developed. The method involves coprecipitation of these radionuclides as phosphates from bulk urine sample. Separation of Plutonium is carried out using a conventional anion exchange technique. Americium and strontium isolations are achieved sequentially by chromatographic extraction (Tru.Spec and Sr.Spec columns) from the load and rinse solutions coming from the anion exchange column. Plutonium and Americium measurements are performed by alpha spectrometry. The mean recovery obtained is 80% and the detection limit for 24 h urine sample (1.41) is 0.6 mBq L-1. 90Sr determination is made by liquid scintillation counting. The detection limit in this case is 1.1 E-01 Bq/L. PMID:8976042

  18. Hand held sample tube manipulator, system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kenny, Donald V [Liberty Township, OH; Smith, Deborah L [Liberty Township, OH; Severance, Richard A [late of Columbus, OH

    2001-01-01

    A manipulator apparatus, system and method for measuring analytes present in sample tubes. The manipulator apparatus includes a housing having a central bore with an inlet end and outlet end; a plunger mechanism with at least a portion thereof slideably disposed for reciprocal movement within the central bore, the plunger mechanism having a tubular gas channel with an inlet end and an outlet end, the gas channel inlet end disposed in the same direction as said inlet end of the central bore, wherein the inlet end of said plunger mechanism is adapted for movement so as to expel a sample tube inserted in the bore at the outlet end of the housing, the inlet end of the plunger mechanism is adapted for connection to gas supply; a first seal is disposed in the housing for sealing between the central bore and the plunger mechanism; a second seal is disposed at the outlet end of the housing for sealing between the central bore and a sample tube; a holder mounted on the housing for holding the sample tube; and a biasing mechanism for returning the plunger mechanism to a starting position.

  19. Novel Method for Pairing Wood Samples in Choice Tests

    PubMed Central

    Oberst, Sebastian; Evans, Theodore A.; Lai, Joseph C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Choice tests are a standard method to determine preferences in bio-assays, e.g. for food types and food additives such as bait attractants and toxicants. Choice between food additives can be determined only when the food substrate is sufficiently homogeneous. This is difficult to achieve for wood eating organisms as wood is a highly variable biological material, even within a tree species due to the age of the tree (e.g. sapwood vs. heartwood), and components therein (sugar, starch, cellulose and lignin). The current practice to minimise variation is to use wood from the same tree, yet the variation can still be large and the quantity of wood from one tree may be insufficient. We used wood samples of identical volume from multiple sources, measured three physical properties (dry weight, moisture absorption and reflected light intensity), then ranked and clustered the samples using fuzzy c-means clustering. A reverse analysis of the clustered samples found a high correlation between their physical properties and their source of origin. This suggested approach allows a quantifiable, consistent, repeatable, simple and quick method to maximize control over similarity of wood used in choice tests. PMID:24551173

  20. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally "direct" involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  1. A Novel Method for Sampling Alpha-Helical Protein Backbones

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fain, Boris; Levitt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel technique of sampling the configurations of helical proteins. Assuming knowledge of native secondary structure, we employ assembly rules gathered from a database of existing structures to enumerate the geometrically possible 3-D arrangements of the constituent helices. We produce a library of possible folds for 25 helical protein cores. In each case the method finds significant numbers of conformations close to the native structure. In addition we assign coordinates to all atoms for 4 of the 25 proteins. In the context of database driven exhaustive enumeration our method performs extremely well, yielding significant percentages of structures (0.02%--82%) within 6A of the native structure. The method's speed and efficiency make it a valuable contribution towards the goal of predicting protein structure.

  2. A Sample Science Education Activity in Multicultural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onder, Ismail; Kaplan, Aysun Oztuna; Besoluk, Senol

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a sample activity developed in the workshops called "Science education in multicultural environment" of the program "Integrative teaching in multicultural environment" was presented. Workshops about varied subjects were carried out by participants representing four countries and participants developed teaching materials by getting…

  3. Sample collection and preparation methods affecting mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.; Lewtas, J.

    1983-07-01

    Reports by several investigators describing the biological activity of coal fly ash have presented a variety of results which in some cases are conflicting. The biological activity of coal fly ash may differ because of one or more of the following factors: (1) the samples studied were from different sources; (2) the samples were prepared for bioassay differently; (3) the sampling method differed, and, therefore, collected samples were different in chemical or physical properties which affect the biological activity. Several variables involved in coal fly ash studies -- source, sample collection land preparation methods, bioassay method -- are undoubtedly responsible for the diversity of biological effects observed. The objectives of this study were to examine the sample preparation and collection factors which may affect the observed biological activity caused by coal fly ash and to evaluate the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) fly ash from experimental and commercial units. The bioassays used in this study were the Ames Salmonella plate incorporation test for mutagenicity and the rabbit alveolar macrophage (RAM) system for cytotoxicity.

  4. A DIRECT METHOD TO ASSAY NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct photometric method for assaying neurotoxic esterase (NTE) activity of chicken brain microsomal preparation has been developed using 4-nitrophenyl esters as substrates. Paired samples of the microsomal preparation were preincubated for 20 min. with paraoxon plus either (a...

  5. Survey of predators and sampling method comparison in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Musser, Fred R; Nyrop, Jan P; Shelton, Anthony M

    2004-02-01

    Natural predation is an important component of integrated pest management that is often overlooked because it is difficult to quantify and perceived to be unreliable. To begin incorporating natural predation into sweet corn, Zea mays L., pest management, a predator survey was conducted and then three sampling methods were compared for their ability to accurately monitor the most abundant predators. A predator survey on sweet corn foliage in New York between 1999 and 2001 identified 13 species. Orius insidiosus (Say), Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer), and Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) were the most numerous predators in all years. To determine the best method for sampling adult and immature stages of these predators, comparisons were made among nondestructive field counts, destructive counts, and yellow sticky cards. Field counts were correlated with destructive counts for all populations, but field counts of small insects were biased. Sticky cards underrepresented immature populations. Yellow sticky cards were more attractive to C. maculata adults than H. axyridis adults, especially before pollen shed, making coccinellid population estimates based on sticky cards unreliable. Field counts were the most precise method for monitoring adult and immature stages of the three major predators. Future research on predicting predation of pests in sweet corn should be based on field counts of predators because these counts are accurate, have no associated supply costs, and can be made quickly. PMID:14998137

  6. Vadose Zone Sampling Methods for Detection of Preferential Pesticides Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peranginangin, N.; Richards, B. K.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2003-12-01

    Leaching of agricultural applied chemicals through the vadose zone is a major cause for the occurrence of agrichemicals in groundwater. Accurate soil water sampling methods are needed to ensure meaningful monitoring results, especially for soils that have significant preferential flow paths. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability and the effectiveness of various soil water sampling methods in detecting preferential transport of pesticides in a strongly-structured silty clay loam (Hudson series) soil. Soil water sampling devices tested were wick pan and gravity pan lysimeters, tile lines, porous ceramic cups, and pipe lysimeters; all installed at 45 to105 cm depth below the ground surface. A reasonable worse-case scenario was tested by applying a simulated rain storm soon after pesticides were sprayed at agronomic rates. Herbicides atrazine (6-chloro-N2-ethyl-N4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and 2,4-D (2,4-dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid) were chosen as model compounds. Chloride (KCl) tracer was used to determine spatial and temporal distribution of non-reactive solute and water as well as a basis for determining the retardation in pesticides movement. Results show that observed pesticide mobility was much greater than would be predicted by uniform flow. Under relatively high soil moisture conditions, gravity and wick pan lysimeters had comparably good collection efficiencies, whereas the wick samplers had an advantage over gravity driven sampler when the soil moisture content was below field capacity. Pipe lysimeters had breakthrough patterns that were similar to pan samplers. At small plot scale, tile line samplers tended to underestimate solute concentration because of water dilution around the samplers. The use of porous cup samplers performed poorly because of their sensitivity to local profile characteristics: only by chance can they intercept and sample the preferential flow paths that are critical to transport. Wick sampler had the least

  7. INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

    2008-09-30

    Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S&GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively

  8. Several methods for concentrating bacteria in fluid samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The sensitivities of the firefly luciferase - ATP flow system and luminol flow system were established as 300,000 E. coli per milliliter and 10,000 E. coli per milliliter respectively. To achieve the detection limit of 1,000 bacteria per milliliter previously established, a method of concentrating microorganisms using a sartorius membrane filter system is investigated. Catalase in 50% ethanol is found to be a stable luminol standard and can be used up to 24 hours with only a 10% loss of activity. The luminol reagent is also stable over a 24 hour period. A method of preparing relatively inexpensive luciferase from desiccated firefly tails is developed.

  9. Methods of scaling threshold color difference using printed samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min; Cui, Guihua; Liu, Haoxue; Luo, M. Ronnier

    2012-01-01

    A series of printed samples on substrate of semi-gloss paper and with the magnitude of threshold color difference were prepared for scaling the visual color difference and to evaluate the performance of different method. The probabilities of perceptibly was used to normalized to Z-score and different color differences were scaled to the Z-score. The visual color difference was got, and checked with the STRESS factor. The results indicated that only the scales have been changed but the relative scales between pairs in the data are preserved.

  10. Drum plug piercing and sampling device and method

    DOEpatents

    Counts, Kevin T.

    2011-04-26

    An apparatus and method for piercing a drum plug of a drum in order to sample and/or vent gases that may accumulate in a space of the drum is provided. The drum is not damaged and can be reused since the pierced drum plug can be subsequently replaced. The apparatus includes a frame that is configured for engagement with the drum. A cylinder actuated by a fluid is mounted to the frame. A piercer is placed into communication with the cylinder so that actuation of the cylinder causes the piercer to move in a linear direction so that the piercer may puncture the drum plug of the drum.

  11. A microRNA isolation method from clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Rahbar Saadat, Yalda; Mohammadi, Somayeh; Samadi, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: microRNAs (miRNAs) are considered to be novel molecular biomakers that could be exploited in the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases. The present study aimed to develop an efficient miRNA isolation method from different clinical specimens. Methods: Total RNAs were isolated by Trizol reagent followed by precipitation of the large RNAs with potassium acetate (KCH3COOH), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 and 6000, and lithium chloride (LiCl). Then, small RNAs were enriched and recovered from the supernatants by applying a combination of LiCl and ethanol. The efficiency of the method was evaluated through the quality, quantity, and integrity of the recovered RNAs using the A260/280 absorbance ratio, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR). Results: Comparison of different RNA isolation methods based on the precipitation of DNA and large RNAs, high miRNA recovery and PCR efficiency revealed that applying potassium acetate with final precipitation of small RNAs using 2.5 M LiCl plus ethanol can provide high yield and quality small RNAs that can be exploited for clinical purposes. Conclusion: The current isolation method can be applied for most clinical samples including cells, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and even body fluids with a wide applicability in molecular biology investigations. PMID:27340621

  12. Benthic flux sampling device. Operations, methods, and procedures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, D.B.; Stanley, S.D.

    1993-02-01

    As part of the Navy's clean up program, the Installation Restoration (IR) Program, methods are evaluated to better assess suitable remediation and restoration strategies for sites that contain sediments contaminated with toxic compounds. Toward this goal, we have developed a Benthic Flux Sampling Device (BFSD) to quantify mobility of toxicants from contaminated sediments. The BFSD is a remote instrument for in-situ measurement of toxicant flux rates from sediments. A flux out of or into the sediment is measured by isolating a volume of water above the sediment, drawing off samples from this volume over time, and analyzing these samples for increase or decrease in toxicant concentration. Increasing concentrations indicate that the toxicant is fluxing out of the sediment. Decreasing concentrations indicate that the toxicant is fluxing into the sediment. Initial tests carried out in conjunction with Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Research Laboratory (Newport, OR) show that the system is capable of measuring a variety of contaminant and nutrient fluxes.... Marine chemistry, Benthic flux.

  13. Eigenvector method for umbrella sampling enables error analysis.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Erik H; Van Koten, Brian; Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R

    2016-08-28

    Umbrella sampling efficiently yields equilibrium averages that depend on exploring rare states of a model by biasing simulations to windows of coordinate values and then combining the resulting data with physical weighting. Here, we introduce a mathematical framework that casts the step of combining the data as an eigenproblem. The advantage to this approach is that it facilitates error analysis. We discuss how the error scales with the number of windows. Then, we derive a central limit theorem for averages that are obtained from umbrella sampling. The central limit theorem suggests an estimator of the error contributions from individual windows, and we develop a simple and computationally inexpensive procedure for implementing it. We demonstrate this estimator for simulations of the alanine dipeptide and show that it emphasizes low free energy pathways between stable states in comparison to existing approaches for assessing error contributions. Our work suggests the possibility of using the estimator and, more generally, the eigenvector method for umbrella sampling to guide adaptation of the simulation parameters to accelerate convergence. PMID:27586912

  14. Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants. 2 figs.

  15. Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants.

  16. BMAA extraction of cyanobacteria samples: which method to choose?

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Burian, Alfred; Rasmussen, Ulla; Costa, Pedro Reis; Annadotter, Heléne; Godhe, Anna; Rydberg, Sara

    2016-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxin reportedly produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates, is proposed to be linked to the development of neurological diseases. BMAA has been found in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, both in its phytoplankton producers and in several invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that bioaccumulate it. LC-MS/MS is the most frequently used analytical technique in BMAA research due to its high selectivity, though consensus is lacking as to the best extraction method to apply. This study accordingly surveys the efficiency of three extraction methods regularly used in BMAA research to extract BMAA from cyanobacteria samples. The results obtained provide insights into possible reasons for the BMAA concentration discrepancies in previous publications. In addition and according to the method validation guidelines for analysing cyanotoxins, the TCA protein precipitation method, followed by AQC derivatization and LC-MS/MS analysis, is now validated for extracting protein-bound (after protein hydrolysis) and free BMAA from cyanobacteria matrix. BMAA biological variability was also tested through the extraction of diatom and cyanobacteria species, revealing a high variance in BMAA levels (0.0080-2.5797 μg g(-1) DW). PMID:26304815

  17. Comparison of blood chemistry values for samples collected from juvenile chinook salmon by three methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Congleton, J.L.; LaVoie, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Thirteen blood chemistry indices were compared for samples collected by three commonly used methods: caudal transection, heart puncture, and caudal vessel puncture. Apparent biases in blood chemistry values for samples obtained by caudal transection were consistent with dilution with tissue fluids: alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), triglyceride, and K+ were increased and Na+ and Cl- were decreased relative to values for samples obtained by caudal vessel puncture. Some enzyme activities (ALT, AST, LDH) and K+ concentrations were also greater in samples taken by heart puncture than in samples taken by caudal vessel puncture. Of the methods tested, caudal vessel puncture had the least effect on blood chemistry values and should be preferred for blood chemistry studies on juvenile salmonids.

  18. Automated Aqueous Sample Concentration Methods for in situ Astrobiological Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, A. D.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    2009-12-01

    The era of wet chemical experiments for in situ planetary science investigations is upon us, as evidenced by recent results from the surface of Mars by Phoenix’s microscopy, electrochemistry, and conductivity analyzer, MECA [1]. Studies suggest that traditional thermal volatilization methods for planetary science in situ investigations induce organic degradation during sample processing [2], an effect that is enhanced in the presence of oxidants [3]. Recent developments have trended towards adaptation of non-destructive aqueous extraction and analytical methods for future astrobiological instrumentation. Wet chemical extraction techniques under investigation include subcritical water extraction, SCWE [4], aqueous microwave assisted extraction, MAE, and organic solvent extraction [5]. Similarly, development of miniaturized analytical space flight instruments that require aqueous extracts include microfluidic capillary electrophoresis chips, μCE [6], liquid-chromatography mass-spectrometrometers, LC-MS [7], and life marker chips, LMC [8]. If organics are present on the surface of Mars, they are expected to be present at extremely low concentrations (parts-per-billion), orders of magnitude below the sensitivities of most flight instrument technologies. Therefore, it becomes necessary to develop and integrate concentration mechanisms for in situ sample processing before delivery to analytical flight instrumentation. We present preliminary results of automated solid-phase-extraction (SPE) sample purification and concentration methods for the treatment of highly saline aqueous soil extracts. These methods take advantage of the affinity of low molecular weight organic compounds with natural and synthetic scavenger materials. These interactions allow for the separation of target organic analytes from unfavorable background species (i.e. salts) during inline treatment, and a clever method for selective desorption is utilized to obtain concentrated solutions on the order

  19. INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    JG DOUGLAS; HK MEZNARICH, PHD; JR OLSEN; GA ROSS PHD; M STAUFFER

    2009-02-13

    Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively

  20. 19 CFR 151.70 - Method of sampling by Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.70... feasible to obtain a representative general sample of the wool or hair in a sampling unit or to test such...

  1. 19 CFR 151.70 - Method of sampling by Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.70... feasible to obtain a representative general sample of the wool or hair in a sampling unit or to test such...

  2. 19 CFR 151.70 - Method of sampling by Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.70... feasible to obtain a representative general sample of the wool or hair in a sampling unit or to test such...

  3. 19 CFR 151.70 - Method of sampling by Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.70... feasible to obtain a representative general sample of the wool or hair in a sampling unit or to test such...

  4. Clustering Methods with Qualitative Data: a Mixed-Methods Approach for Prevention Research with Small Samples.

    PubMed

    Henry, David; Dymnicki, Allison B; Mohatt, Nathaniel; Allen, James; Kelly, James G

    2015-10-01

    Qualitative methods potentially add depth to prevention research but can produce large amounts of complex data even with small samples. Studies conducted with culturally distinct samples often produce voluminous qualitative data but may lack sufficient sample sizes for sophisticated quantitative analysis. Currently lacking in mixed-methods research are methods allowing for more fully integrating qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques. Cluster analysis can be applied to coded qualitative data to clarify the findings of prevention studies by aiding efforts to reveal such things as the motives of participants for their actions and the reasons behind counterintuitive findings. By clustering groups of participants with similar profiles of codes in a quantitative analysis, cluster analysis can serve as a key component in mixed-methods research. This article reports two studies. In the first study, we conduct simulations to test the accuracy of cluster assignment using three different clustering methods with binary data as produced when coding qualitative interviews. Results indicated that hierarchical clustering, K-means clustering, and latent class analysis produced similar levels of accuracy with binary data and that the accuracy of these methods did not decrease with samples as small as 50. Whereas the first study explores the feasibility of using common clustering methods with binary data, the second study provides a "real-world" example using data from a qualitative study of community leadership connected with a drug abuse prevention project. We discuss the implications of this approach for conducting prevention research, especially with small samples and culturally distinct communities. PMID:25946969

  5. COMPARISON OF SAMPLING METHODS FOR SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANIC CARBON ASSOCIATED WITH PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates the influence of denuder sampling methods and filter collection media on the measurement of semi-volatile organic carbon (SVOC) associated with PM2.5. Two types of collection media, charcoal (activated carbon) and XAD, were used both in diffusion denuders ...

  6. Experience-Sampling Research Methods and Their Potential for Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Sabrina; Garcia, Julie A.; Murphy, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Experience-sampling methods (ESM) enable us to learn about individuals' lives in context by measuring participants' feelings, thoughts, actions, context, and/or activities as they go about their daily lives. By capturing experience, affect, and action "in the moment" and with repeated measures, ESM approaches allow researchers…

  7. Assessment of anti-Salmonella activity of boot dip samples.

    PubMed

    Rabie, André J; McLaren, Ian M; Breslin, Mark F; Sayers, Robin; Davies, Rob H

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of pathogens from the external environment into poultry houses via the boots of farm workers and visitors presents a significant risk. The use of boot dips containing disinfectant to help prevent this from happening is common practice, but the effectiveness of these boot dips as a preventive measure can vary. The aim of this study was to assess the anti-Salmonella activity of boot dips that are being used on poultry farms. Boot dip samples were collected from commercial laying hen farms in the UK and tested within 24 hours of receipt at the laboratory to assess their anti-Salmonella activity. All boot dip samples were tested against a field strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis using three test models: pure culture, paper disc surface matrix and yeast suspension model. Of the 112 boot dip samples tested 83.6% were effective against Salmonella in pure culture, 37.3% in paper disc surface matrix and 44.5% in yeast suspension model. Numerous factors may influence the efficacy of the disinfectants. Disinfectants used in the dips may not always be fully active against surface or organic matter contamination; they may be inaccurately measured or diluted to a concentration other than that specified or recommended; dips may not be changed regularly or may have been exposed to rain and other environmental elements. This study showed that boot dips in use on poultry farms are frequently ineffective. PMID:25650744

  8. A comparison of methods for representing sparsely sampled random quantities.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Vicente Jose; Swiler, Laura Painton; Urbina, Angel; Mullins, Joshua

    2013-09-01

    This report discusses the treatment of uncertainties stemming from relatively few samples of random quantities. The importance of this topic extends beyond experimental data uncertainty to situations involving uncertainty in model calibration, validation, and prediction. With very sparse data samples it is not practical to have a goal of accurately estimating the underlying probability density function (PDF). Rather, a pragmatic goal is that the uncertainty representation should be conservative so as to bound a specified percentile range of the actual PDF, say the range between 0.025 and .975 percentiles, with reasonable reliability. A second, opposing objective is that the representation not be overly conservative; that it minimally over-estimate the desired percentile range of the actual PDF. The presence of the two opposing objectives makes the sparse-data uncertainty representation problem interesting and difficult. In this report, five uncertainty representation techniques are characterized for their performance on twenty-one test problems (over thousands of trials for each problem) according to these two opposing objectives and other performance measures. Two of the methods, statistical Tolerance Intervals and a kernel density approach specifically developed for handling sparse data, exhibit significantly better overall performance than the others.

  9. Cognitive anxiety: a method of content analysis for verbal samples.

    PubMed

    Viney, L L; Westbrook, M T

    1976-04-01

    The work of such psychologists as Kelly, McReynolds, Epstein, and Lazarus suggested the need for a measure of cognitive anxiety and provided a definition of that construct. A method of content analysis of verbal samples was devised and found to have adequate interjudge reliability. Normative data for five groups of subjects were provided. The validity of the measure as representative of a reaction to being unable to anticipate and integrate experience meaningfully was demonstrated in (a) the higher scores of groups of subjects who were currently coping with new experiences than those who were not, (b) the significant correlation of its scores with a state rather than trait anxiety measures, (c) the variability of its scores over time as observed in a generalizeability study, and (d) the higher scores of subjects when they were dealing with experiences for which meaningful anticipation was relatively difficult. PMID:16367387

  10. MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO POSTERIOR SAMPLING WITH THE HAMILTONIAN METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    K. HANSON

    2001-02-01

    The Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique provides a means for drawing random samples from a target probability density function (pdf). MCMC allows one to assess the uncertainties in a Bayesian analysis described by a numerically calculated posterior distribution. This paper describes the Hamiltonian MCMC technique in which a momentum variable is introduced for each parameter of the target pdf. In analogy to a physical system, a Hamiltonian H is defined as a kinetic energy involving the momenta plus a potential energy {var_phi}, where {var_phi} is minus the logarithm of the target pdf. Hamiltonian dynamics allows one to move along trajectories of constant H, taking large jumps in the parameter space with relatively few evaluations of {var_phi} and its gradient. The Hamiltonian algorithm alternates between picking a new momentum vector and following such trajectories. The efficiency of the Hamiltonian method for multidimensional isotropic Gaussian pdfs is shown to remain constant at around 7% for up to several hundred dimensions. The Hamiltonian method handles correlations among the variables much better than the standard Metropolis algorithm. A new test, based on the gradient of {var_phi}, is proposed to measure the convergence of the MCMC sequence.

  11. Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Uymin, G.; Moncet, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The large volume of existing and planned infrared observations of Mars have prompted the development of a new martian radiative transfer model that could be used in the retrievals of atmospheric and surface properties. The model is based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method [1]. The method is a fast and accurate monochromatic technique applicable to a wide range of remote sensing platforms (from microwave to UV) and was originally developed for the real-time processing of infrared and microwave data acquired by instruments aboard the satellites forming part of the next-generation global weather satellite system NPOESS (National Polarorbiting Operational Satellite System) [2]. As part of our on-going research related to the radiative properties of the martian polar caps, we have begun the development of a martian OSS model with the goal of using it to perform self-consistent atmospheric corrections necessary to retrieve caps emissivity from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra. While the caps will provide the initial focus area for applying the new model, it is hoped that the model will be of interest to the wider Mars remote sensing community.

  12. Comprehensive method to analyze thick insulating samples using PIXE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, I. M.; Rihawy, M. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we present a new method to analyze thick insulating samples by PIXE technique. The method is based on the use of both an electron flood gun to compensate the charge build-up at the insulating surface and a beam profile monitor (BPM) to provide a precise indirect measurement of the beam current and accumulated charge. A filament extracted from an ordinary flashlight lamp was used as an electron flood gun. While, a commercial BPM has been adapted in order to carry out charge measurements. The results have revealed the convenience of using BPM for measuring the charge in PIXE measurements. The use of the electron flood gun has given very satisfactory results in term of preventing charge build-up and reducing its contribution to the bremsstrahlung background in the PIXE spectra. The applicability and efficiency of the overall system for elemental analysis were successfully verified using IAEA-Soil-7 reference material where both accuracy and precision were found to be better than 10% in most cases.

  13. A comparison of two sampling methods for global sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantola, Stefano; Becker, William; Zeitz, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    We compare the convergence properties of two different quasi-random sampling designs - Sobol's quasi-Monte Carlo, and Latin supercube sampling in variance-based global sensitivity analysis. We use the non-monotonic V-function of Sobol' as base case-study, and compare the performance of both sampling strategies at increasing sample size and dimensionality against analytical values. The results indicate that in almost all cases investigated here, the Sobol' design performs better. This, coupled with the fact that effective Latin supercube sampling requires a priori knowledge of the interaction properties of the function, leads us to recommend Sobol' sampling in most practical cases.

  14. Sampling methods for assessing social wasps species diversity in a eucalyptus plantation.

    PubMed

    De Souza, A R; Venâncio, D F A; Zanuncio, J C; Prezoto, F

    2011-06-01

    Social wasps were collected in a eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urograndis, a genetically enhanced eucalyptus) plantation in Juiz de Fora, state of Minas Gerais, southwestern of Brazil, by using a variety of sampling methods, including active capture and baited traps set at two microhabitats. Six new records of social wasps for this region were obtained during the study: Brachygastra lecheguana Latreille, Polybia ignobilis Haliday, Polybia occidentalis Olivier, Polybia platycephala (Richards), Protonectarina sylveirae Saussure, and Protopolybia exigua Saussure (Hymenoptera: Vespidae). The active capture method sampled the greatest number of species. Baited traps installed in the canopy sampled agreater number of individuals of social wasps than those set on the trunks of eucalyptus trees. Fruit based baits captured a greater number of social wasp species than those baited with a protein derivative. Once no method was able to sample all species, we concluded that the efficiency of a survey can be maximized by using traps with a variety of different baits, in combination with active capture methods. PMID:21735938

  15. Sequential sampling: a novel method in farm animal welfare assessment.

    PubMed

    Heath, C A E; Main, D C J; Mullan, S; Haskell, M J; Browne, W J

    2016-02-01

    Lameness in dairy cows is an important welfare issue. As part of a welfare assessment, herd level lameness prevalence can be estimated from scoring a sample of animals, where higher levels of accuracy are associated with larger sample sizes. As the financial cost is related to the number of cows sampled, smaller samples are preferred. Sequential sampling schemes have been used for informing decision making in clinical trials. Sequential sampling involves taking samples in stages, where sampling can stop early depending on the estimated lameness prevalence. When welfare assessment is used for a pass/fail decision, a similar approach could be applied to reduce the overall sample size. The sampling schemes proposed here apply the principles of sequential sampling within a diagnostic testing framework. This study develops three sequential sampling schemes of increasing complexity to classify 80 fully assessed UK dairy farms, each with known lameness prevalence. Using the Welfare Quality herd-size-based sampling scheme, the first 'basic' scheme involves two sampling events. At the first sampling event half the Welfare Quality sample size is drawn, and then depending on the outcome, sampling either stops or is continued and the same number of animals is sampled again. In the second 'cautious' scheme, an adaptation is made to ensure that correctly classifying a farm as 'bad' is done with greater certainty. The third scheme is the only scheme to go beyond lameness as a binary measure and investigates the potential for increasing accuracy by incorporating the number of severely lame cows into the decision. The three schemes are evaluated with respect to accuracy and average sample size by running 100 000 simulations for each scheme, and a comparison is made with the fixed size Welfare Quality herd-size-based sampling scheme. All three schemes performed almost as well as the fixed size scheme but with much smaller average sample sizes. For the third scheme, an overall

  16. COMPARISON OF USEPA FIELD SAMPLING METHODS FOR BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) macroinvertebrate sampling protocols were compared in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region. The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) wadeable streams protocol results in a single composite sample from nine transects...

  17. A direct comparison of scan and focal sampling methods for measuring wild chimpanzee feeding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Gilby, Ian C; Pokempner, Amy A; Wrangham, Richard W

    2010-01-01

    Focal sampling is the most accurate method for measuring primate activity budgets but is sometimes impractical. An alternative is scan sampling, in which the behaviour of the group is recorded at regular intervals. The simplest technique is to record whether at least 1 animal is engaged in the behaviour of interest. By direct comparison with focal data collected simultaneously on the same population, we assess the validity of this simple group level sampling method for studying chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) feeding behaviour. In a 13-month study at Kanyawara, Kibale National Park, Uganda, group level scan sampling provided statistically similar measures of broad diet composition to those produced by focal data, despite considerable seasonal variation. Monthly means of the percentage of time spent consuming non-fig fruit calculated from group level scan sampling were highly correlated with those from focal sampling. This validates previous methodology used to identify periods of high energy availability. However, group level scans tended to overestimate the percentage of observation time spent feeding, particularly for adult males. We conclude that this method of group level scan sampling provides valuable data for characterizing broad diet choice in chimpanzees and other species, but may be of limited use for estimating individual feeding time. PMID:21196752

  18. Sparse feature learning for instrument identification: Effects of sampling and pooling methods.

    PubMed

    Han, Yoonchang; Lee, Subin; Nam, Juhan; Lee, Kyogu

    2016-05-01

    Feature learning for music applications has recently received considerable attention from many researchers. This paper reports on the sparse feature learning algorithm for musical instrument identification, and in particular, focuses on the effects of the frame sampling techniques for dictionary learning and the pooling methods for feature aggregation. To this end, two frame sampling techniques are examined that are fixed and proportional random sampling. Furthermore, the effect of using onset frame was analyzed for both of proposed sampling methods. Regarding summarization of the feature activation, a standard deviation pooling method is used and compared with the commonly used max- and average-pooling techniques. Using more than 47 000 recordings of 24 instruments from various performers, playing styles, and dynamics, a number of tuning parameters are experimented including the analysis frame size, the dictionary size, and the type of frequency scaling as well as the different sampling and pooling methods. The results show that the combination of proportional sampling and standard deviation pooling achieve the best overall performance of 95.62% while the optimal parameter set varies among the instrument classes. PMID:27250124

  19. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessels and photoacoustic spectroscopy methods for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.

    2006-02-14

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically positioned near the sample cells. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  20. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of volcanic samples: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Finnegan, D.L.; Crowe, B.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of volcanic emissions have been collected between and during eruptions of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes during the last three years. Airborne particles have been collected on Teflon filters and acidic gases on base-impregnated cellulose filters. Chemically neutral gas-phase species are collected on charcoal-coated cellulose filters. The primary analytical technique used is nondestructive neutron activation analysis, which has been used to determine the quantities of up to 35 elements on the different filters. The use of neutron activation analysis makes it possible to analyze for a wide range of elements in the different matrices used for the collection and to learn about the distribution between particles and gas phases for each of the elements.

  1. Comparison of adult corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, R J; Wilde, G E; Shufran, R A; Milliken, G A

    2002-02-01

    Studies were conducted in Kansas corn and soybean fields during 1997 to compare various sampling methods, traps, and trap components for capturing three species of adult corn rootworms: western (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Leconte), southern (D. undecimpunctata howardi Barber), and northern (D. barberi Smith & Lawrence). Lure constituents affected the species of beetle attracted to the trap. Traps with a lure containing 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde attracted more western corn rootworms, those with a lure containing eugenol were more attractive to northern corn rootworms, and those containing trans-cinnamaldehyde were most attractive to southern corn rootworms. Multigard sticky traps caught more beetles than did Pherocon AM sticky traps. In corn, a newly designed lure trap caught more beetles than did sticky traps on most occasions. Also, lure-baited sticky traps caught more beetles than did nonbaited sticky traps. Varying the color of the lure trap bottom did not affect the number caught. In soybeans, the new lure traps captured more beetles than did the nonbaited Multigard or Pherocon AM sticky traps. Results of this study suggest the new lure trap may provide a more accurate assessment of corn rootworm populations than traditional monitoring techniques and may be more esthetically pleasing to growers and consultants. PMID:11942770

  2. Rapid-Viability PCR Method for Detection of Live, Virulent Bacillus anthracis in Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Létant, Sonia E.; Murphy, Gloria A.; Alfaro, Teneile M.; Avila, Julie R.; Kane, Staci R.; Raber, Ellen; Bunt, Thomas M.; Shah, Sanjiv R.

    2011-01-01

    In the event of a biothreat agent release, hundreds of samples would need to be rapidly processed to characterize the extent of contamination and determine the efficacy of remediation activities. Current biological agent identification and viability determination methods are both labor- and time-intensive such that turnaround time for confirmed results is typically several days. In order to alleviate this issue, automated, high-throughput sample processing methods were developed in which real-time PCR analysis is conducted on samples before and after incubation. The method, referred to as rapid-viability (RV)-PCR, uses the change in cycle threshold after incubation to detect the presence of live organisms. In this article, we report a novel RV-PCR method for detection of live, virulent Bacillus anthracis, in which the incubation time was reduced from 14 h to 9 h, bringing the total turnaround time for results below 15 h. The method incorporates a magnetic bead-based DNA extraction and purification step prior to PCR analysis, as well as specific real-time PCR assays for the B. anthracis chromosome and pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids. A single laboratory verification of the optimized method applied to the detection of virulent B. anthracis in environmental samples was conducted and showed a detection level of 10 to 99 CFU/sample with both manual and automated RV-PCR methods in the presence of various challenges. Experiments exploring the relationship between the incubation time and the limit of detection suggest that the method could be further shortened by an additional 2 to 3 h for relatively clean samples. PMID:21764960

  3. Transformation-cost time-series method for analyzing irregularly sampled data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozken, Ibrahim; Eroglu, Deniz; Stemler, Thomas; Marwan, Norbert; Bagci, G. Baris; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Irregular sampling of data sets is one of the challenges often encountered in time-series analysis, since traditional methods cannot be applied and the frequently used interpolation approach can corrupt the data and bias the subsequence analysis. Here we present the TrAnsformation-Cost Time-Series (TACTS) method, which allows us to analyze irregularly sampled data sets without degenerating the quality of the data set. Instead of using interpolation we consider time-series segments and determine how close they are to each other by determining the cost needed to transform one segment into the following one. Using a limited set of operations—with associated costs—to transform the time series segments, we determine a new time series, that is our transformation-cost time series. This cost time series is regularly sampled and can be analyzed using standard methods. While our main interest is the analysis of paleoclimate data, we develop our method using numerical examples like the logistic map and the Rössler oscillator. The numerical data allows us to test the stability of our method against noise and for different irregular samplings. In addition we provide guidance on how to choose the associated costs based on the time series at hand. The usefulness of the TACTS method is demonstrated using speleothem data from the Secret Cave in Borneo that is a good proxy for paleoclimatic variability in the monsoon activity around the maritime continent.

  4. A novel sampling method for the investigation of gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Quintanilha, Alina Guimarães; Zilberstein, Bruno; Santos, Manoel A A; Pajecki, Denis; Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux; Alves, Paulo Roberto Arruda; Maluf-Filho, Fauze; Cecconello, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: In order to characterize the qualitative and quantitative microorganisms in different sites of the lower digestive tract (LDT) in healthy volunteers, a specific technique was developed for collecting mucous of the distal ileum, colon and rectum. METHODS: A polyethylene tube was designed to go through the colonoscope channel with a No. 8 French tube. In order to avoid internal contamination, the distal extremity was protected with a membrane of microfilm after being sterilized in ethilene oxid. To facilitate the aspiration of a precise volume, its interior was coated with silicone. One hundred microlliter (0.1 mL) sample of mucous was collected and transferred into an Eppenddorff tube containing nine hundred microlliter (0.9 mL) of VMGA-3 (viable medium of Goteborg). This procedure was repeated at each site of the LDT with a new sterilized catheter. RESULTS: All sites revealed the “non pathogenic” anaerobic bacteria Veillonella sp (average 105 colony forming units/mL-CFU/mL), allowing to conclude an environment of low oxidation-reduction potential (redox) in the LDT. It was also characterized the presence of Klebisiella sp with significant statistical predominance (SSP) in the ileum. Enterobacter sp was found with SSP in the sigmoid colon, Bacteroides sp non-pigmented (npg) and E.coli with SSP in the sigmoid colon and rectum, Enterococcus sp and Lactobacillus sp with SSP in the rectum, all in a mean concentration of 105 CFU/mL. CONCLUSION: This procedure is feasible and efficient and can point out a similar distribution of the aerobic and anaerobic bacteria with the presence of biological markers of normal microbiota in the LDT. PMID:17663516

  5. Acoustically levitated droplets: a contactless sampling method for fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Jork; Grabolle, Markus; Rurack, Knut; Resch-Genger, Ute; Ziegler, Jan; Nann, Thomas; Panne, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic levitation is used as a new tool to study concentration-dependent processes in fluorescence spectroscopy. With this technique, small amounts of liquid and solid samples can be measured without the need for sample supports or containers, which often limits signal acquisition and can even alter sample properties due to interactions with the support material. We demonstrate that, because of the small sample volume, fluorescence measurements at high concentrations of an organic dye are possible without the limitation of inner-filter effects, which hamper such experiments in conventional, cuvette-based measurements. Furthermore, we show that acoustic levitation of liquid samples provides an experimentally simple way to study distance-dependent fluorescence modulations in semiconductor nanocrystals. The evaporation of the solvent during levitation leads to a continuous increase of solute concentration and can easily be monitored by laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:18596335

  6. Estimating Activity Duration by Momentary Time-Sampling of Part or All of the Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansell, Jim; Beadle-Brown, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Background: Studies of engagement in meaningful activity often focus on a short period during the afternoon. The question arises whether this produces different results from studies covering the whole day. Methods: Data collected for 18 individuals using a 20-s momentary time-sample from 08:00 to 19:00 over a number of days for each person were…

  7. Associations between Physical Activity and Health-Related Factors in a National Sample of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinger, Mary K.; Brittain, Danielle R.; Hutchinson, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine associations between meeting the current moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) recommendation and health-related factors in a national sample of college students. Participants: Participants (N = 67,861) completed the National College Health Assessment II during the Fall 2008/Spring 2009 academic year. Methods:…

  8. Evaluation of sampling methods for toxicological testing of indoor air particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Tirkkonen, Jenni; Täubel, Martin; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Leppänen, Hanna; Lindsley, William G; Chen, Bean T; Hyvärinen, Anne; Huttunen, Kati

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for toxicity tests capable of recognizing indoor environments with compromised air quality, especially in the context of moisture damage. One of the key issues is sampling, which should both provide meaningful material for analyses and fulfill requirements imposed by practitioners using toxicity tests for health risk assessment. We aimed to evaluate different existing methods of sampling indoor particulate matter (PM) to develop a suitable sampling strategy for a toxicological assay. During three sampling campaigns in moisture-damaged and non-damaged school buildings, we evaluated one passive and three active sampling methods: the Settled Dust Box (SDB), the Button Aerosol Sampler, the Harvard Impactor and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to particle suspensions and cell metabolic activity (CMA), production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) were determined after 24 h of exposure. The repeatability of the toxicological analyses was very good for all tested sampler types. Variability within the schools was found to be high especially between different classrooms in the moisture-damaged school. Passively collected settled dust and PM collected actively with the NIOSH Sampler (Stage 1) caused a clear response in exposed cells. The results suggested the higher relative immunotoxicological activity of dust from the moisture-damaged school. The NIOSH Sampler is a promising candidate for the collection of size-fractionated PM to be used in toxicity testing. The applicability of such sampling strategy in grading moisture damage severity in buildings needs to be developed further in a larger cohort of buildings. PMID:27569522

  9. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 2, Sample preparation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for sample preparation methods. Covered are: acid digestion for metals analysis, fusion of Hanford tank waste solids, water leach of sludges/soils/other solids, extraction procedure toxicity (simulate leach in landfill), sample preparation for gamma spectroscopy, acid digestion for radiochemical analysis, leach preparation of solids for free cyanide analysis, aqueous leach of solids for anion analysis, microwave digestion of glasses and slurries for ICP/MS, toxicity characteristic leaching extraction for inorganics, leach/dissolution of activated metal for radiochemical analysis, extraction of single-shell tank (SST) samples for semi-VOC analysis, preparation and cleanup of hydrocarbon- containing samples for VOC and semi-VOC analysis, receiving of waste tank samples in onsite transfer cask, receipt and inspection of SST samples, receipt and extrusion of core samples at 325A shielded facility, cleaning and shipping of waste tank samplers, homogenization of solutions/slurries/sludges, and test sample preparation for bioassay quality control program.

  10. Activation energy for a model ferrous-ferric half reaction from transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Activation parameters for the model oxidation half reaction of the classical aqueous ferrous ion are compared for different molecular simulation techniques. In particular, activation free energies are obtained from umbrella integration and Marcus theory based thermodynamic integration, which rely on the diabatic gap as the reaction coordinate. The latter method also assumes linear response, and both methods obtain the activation entropy and the activation energy from the temperature dependence of the activation free energy. In contrast, transition path sampling does not require knowledge of the reaction coordinate and directly yields the activation energy [C. Dellago and P. G. Bolhuis, Mol. Simul. 30, 795 (2004), 10.1080/08927020412331294869]. Benchmark activation energies from transition path sampling agree within statistical uncertainty with activation energies obtained from standard techniques requiring knowledge of the reaction coordinate. In addition, it is found that the activation energy for this model system is significantly smaller than the activation free energy for the Marcus model, approximately half the value, implying an equally large entropy contribution.

  11. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel and photoacoustic spectroscopy method for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.; Green, David

    2005-03-29

    Methods and apparatus for analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically coupled with the vessel body. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  12. Field sampling method for quantifying odorants in humid environments.

    PubMed

    Trabue, Steven L; Scoggin, Kenwood D; Li, Hong; Burns, Robert; Xin, Hongwei

    2008-05-15

    Most air quality studies in agricultural environments use thermal desorption analysis for quantifying semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) associated with odor. The objective of this study was to develop a robust sampling technique for measuring SVOCs in humid environments. Test atmospheres were generated at ambient temperatures (23 +/- 1.5 degrees C) and 25, 50, and 80% relative humidity (RH). Sorbent material used included Tenax, graphitized carbon, and carbon molecular sieve (CMS). Sorbent tubes were challenged with 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 L of air at various RHs. Sorbent tubes with CMS material performed poorly at both 50 and 80% RH dueto excessive sorption of water. Heating of CMS tubes during sampling or dry-purging of CMS tubes post sampling effectively reduced water sorption with heating of tubes being preferred due to the higher recovery and reproducibility. Tenaxtubes had breakthrough of the more volatile compounds and tended to form artifacts with increasing volumes of air sampled. Graphitized carbon sorbent tubes containing Carbopack X and Carbopack C performed best with quantitative recovery of all compounds at all RHs and sampling volumes tested. The graphitized carbon tubes were taken to the field for further testing. Field samples taken from inside swine feeding operations showed that butanoic acid, 4-methylphenol, 4-ethylphenol, indole, and 3-methylindole were the compounds detected most often above their odor threshold values. Field samples taken from a poultry facility demonstrated that butanoic acid, 3-methylbutanoic acid, and 4-methylphenol were the compounds above their odor threshold values detected most often, relative humidity, CAFO, VOC, SVOC, thermal desorption, swine, poultry, air quality, odor. PMID:18546717

  13. Analytical instrument with apparatus and method for sample concentrating

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, S.

    1986-08-04

    A system for analysis of trace concentrations of contaminants in air includes a portable liquid chromatograph and a preconcentrator for the contaminants to be analyzed. The preconcentrator includes a sample bag having an inlet valve and an outlet valve for collecting an air sample. When the sample is collected the sample bag is connected in series with a sorbing apparatus in a recirculation loop. The sorbing apparatus has an inner gas-permeable container containing a sorbent material and an outer gas-impermeable container. The sample is circulated through the outer container and around the inner container for trapping and preconcentrating the contaminants in the sorbent material. The sorbent material may be a liquid having the same composition as the mobile phase of the chromatograph for direct injection thereinto. Alternatively, the sorbent material may be a porous, solid body, to which mobile phase liquid is added after preconcentration of the contaminants for dissolving the contaminants, the liquid solution then being withdrawn for injection into the chromatograph.

  14. Method for preconcentrating a sample for subsequent analysis

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    1990-01-01

    A system for analysis of trace concentration of contaminants in air includes a portable liquid chromatograph and a preconcentrator for the contaminants to be analyzed. The preconcentrator includes a sample bag having an inlet valve and an outlet valve for collecting an air sample. When the sample is collected the sample bag is connected in series with a sorbing apparatus in a recirculation loop. The sorbing apparatus has an inner gas-permeable container containing a sorbent material and an outer gas-impermeable container. The sample is circulated through the outer container and around the inner container for trapping and preconcentrating the contaminants in the sorbent material. The sorbent material may be a liquid having the same composition as the mobile phase of the chromatograph for direct injection thereinto. Alternatively, the sorbent material may be a porous, solid body, to which mobile phase liquid is added after preconcentration of the contaminants for dissolving the contaminants, the liquid solution then being withdrawn for injection into the chromatograph.

  15. Statistical Methods and Tools for Hanford Staged Feed Tank Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to technically evaluate the current approach to staged feed sampling of high-level waste (HLW) sludge to meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for transfer from tank farms to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The current sampling and analysis approach is detailed in the document titled Initial Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria, 24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014, Revision 0 (Arakali et al. 2011). The goal of this current work is to evaluate and provide recommendations to support a defensible, technical and statistical basis for the staged feed sampling approach that meets WAC data quality objectives (DQOs).

  16. Apparatus and method for centrifugation and robotic manipulation of samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vellinger, John C. (Inventor); Ormsby, Rachel A. (Inventor); Kennedy, David J. (Inventor); Thomas, Nathan A. (Inventor); Shulthise, Leo A. (Inventor); Kurk, Michael A. (Inventor); Metz, George W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A device for centrifugation and robotic manipulation of specimen samples, including incubating eggs, and uses thereof are provided. The device may advantageously be used for the incubation of avian, reptilian or any type of vertebrate eggs. The apparatus comprises a mechanism for holding samples individually, rotating them individually, rotating them on a centrifuge collectively, injecting them individually with a fixative or other chemical reagent, and maintaining them at controlled temperature, relative humidity and atmospheric composition. The device is applicable to experiments involving entities other than eggs, such as invertebrate specimens, plants, microorganisms and molecular systems.

  17. Sample Selection in Randomized Experiments: A New Method Using Propensity Score Stratified Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Hedges, Larry; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael; Borman, Geoffrey; Sullivan, Kate; Caverly, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Randomized experiments are often seen as the "gold standard" for causal research. Despite the fact that experiments use random assignment to treatment conditions, units are seldom selected into the experiment using probability sampling. Very little research on experimental design has focused on how to make generalizations to well-defined…

  18. Review of the Subliminal Psychodynamic Activation Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Janice Sue

    The subliminal psychodynamic activation method (SPA), used in testing psychoanalytic propositions, has been subject to recent criticisms regarding methodological weaknesses. A review of the literature relating to this method can be helpful in determining the validity of these criticisms and the potential usefulness of the SPA method in testing…

  19. Development and validation by accuracy profile of a method for the analysis of monoterpenes in indoor air by active sampling and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marlet, Christelle; Lognay, Georges

    2010-09-15

    The technique of thermal desorption (TD)-GC/MS was evaluated for the measurement of monoterpenes in indoor air. The validation strategy was intentionally oriented towards routine use and the reliability of the method rather than extreme performance. For this reason, validation by accuracy profile was chosen. The accuracy profile procedure, which is based on the concept of total error (bias+standard deviation), guarantees that a known proportion of future results obtained with the method will be within acceptance limits. For all the compounds tested in the present study, alpha-pinene, alpha-terpineol, beta-pinene, d-limonene, Delta(3)-carene, camphene, 1,8-cineole, p-cymene, linalool, but not in the case of carvone, the accuracy profile procedure established that at least 95% of the future results obtained would be within the +/-15% acceptance limits of the validated method over the whole defined concentration range. Other parameters, such as selectivity, recovery, repeatability, stability of the molecules of interest and the effect of temperature, were also determined. The performance of the described method was finally evaluated by the analysis of indoor air from new timber frame constructions. PMID:20801323

  20. SAMSAN- MODERN NUMERICAL METHODS FOR CLASSICAL SAMPLED SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    SAMSAN was developed to aid the control system analyst by providing a self consistent set of computer algorithms that support large order control system design and evaluation studies, with an emphasis placed on sampled system analysis. Control system analysts have access to a vast array of published algorithms to solve an equally large spectrum of controls related computational problems. The analyst usually spends considerable time and effort bringing these published algorithms to an integrated operational status and often finds them less general than desired. SAMSAN reduces the burden on the analyst by providing a set of algorithms that have been well tested and documented, and that can be readily integrated for solving control system problems. Algorithm selection for SAMSAN has been biased toward numerical accuracy for large order systems with computational speed and portability being considered important but not paramount. In addition to containing relevant subroutines from EISPAK for eigen-analysis and from LINPAK for the solution of linear systems and related problems, SAMSAN contains the following not so generally available capabilities: 1) Reduction of a real non-symmetric matrix to block diagonal form via a real similarity transformation matrix which is well conditioned with respect to inversion, 2) Solution of the generalized eigenvalue problem with balancing and grading, 3) Computation of all zeros of the determinant of a matrix of polynomials, 4) Matrix exponentiation and the evaluation of integrals involving the matrix exponential, with option to first block diagonalize, 5) Root locus and frequency response for single variable transfer functions in the S, Z, and W domains, 6) Several methods of computing zeros for linear systems, and 7) The ability to generate documentation "on demand". All matrix operations in the SAMSAN algorithms assume non-symmetric matrices with real double precision elements. There is no fixed size limit on any matrix in any

  1. Tick community composition in Midwestern US habitats in relation to sampling method and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Rynkiewicz, Evelyn C; Clay, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The ranges of many tick species are changing due to climate change and human alteration of the landscape. Understanding tick responses to environmental conditions and how sampling method influences measurement of tick communities will improve our assessment of human disease risk. We compared tick sampling by three collection methods (dragging, CO2 trapping and rodent surveys) in adjacent forested and grassland habitats in the lower Midwest, USA, and analyzed the relationship between tick abundance and microclimate conditions. The study areas were within the overlapping ranges of three tick species, which may provide conditions for pathogen exchange and spread into new vectors. Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick) was found using all methods, Amblyomma americanum (lonestar tick) was found by dragging and CO2 trapping and Ixodes scapularis (blacklegged deer tick) was found only on rodents. Proportion of each species differed significantly among sampling methods. More ticks were found in forests compared to open habitats. Further, more ticks were collected by dragging and from rodents in hotter, drier conditions. Our results demonstrate that multiple sampling methodologies better measure the tick community and that microclimate conditions strongly influence the abundance and activity of individual tick species. PMID:24705853

  2. A Method for Evaluating Writing Samples. Technical Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humes, Ann

    The discrepancy in the application of terminology in labeling systems for scoring writing samples is discussed in this paper and current scoring systems that exclude frequency counts of writing features are described. Two-thirds of the paper discusses and gives examples of general impression, marking, analytic scale scoring, and primary trait…

  3. A rapid wire-based sampling method for DNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Catcheside, David E A; Stephenson, Alice; Hefford, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Burgoyne, Leigh A

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a commission to develop a field deployable rapid short tandem repeat (STR)-based DNA profiling system to enable discrimination between tissues derived from a small number of individuals. Speed was achieved by truncation of sample preparation and field deployability by use of an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyser(TM). Human blood and tissues were stabbed with heated stainless steel wire and the resulting sample dehydrated with isopropanol prior to direct addition to a PCR. Choice of a polymerase tolerant of tissue residues and cycles of amplification appropriate for the amount of template expected yielded useful profiles with a custom-designed quintuplex primer set suitable for use with the Bioanalyser(TM). Samples stored on wires remained amplifiable for months, allowing their transportation unrefrigerated from remote locations to a laboratory for analysis using AmpFlSTR(®) Profiler Plus(®) without further processing. The field system meets the requirements for discrimination of samples from small sets and retains access to full STR profiling when required. PMID:22211864

  4. Improved sample management in the cylindrical-tube microelectrophoresis method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to an analytical microelectrophoresis system is described that improves the manipulation of the sample particles and fluid. The apparatus modification and improved operational procedure should yield more accurate measurements of particle mobilities and permit less skilled operators to use the apparatus.

  5. METHODS TO SAMPLE AIR BORNE PROPAGULES OF ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several techniques (cyclone samplers, filter samplers and rotorods) were evaluated for detection of airborne Aspergillus flavus Link propagules in a cultivated region of southwest Arizona. Cyclone samplers operated continuously for 168 h (7 d) collected a dry sample that was ideal for quantificatio...

  6. Comparison of methods for sampling plant bugs on cotton in South Texas (2010)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 26 cotton fields were sampled by experienced and inexperienced samplers at 3 growth stages using 5 methods to compare the most efficient and accurate method for sampling plant bugs in cotton. Each of the 5 methods had its own distinct advantages and disadvantages as a sampling method (too...

  7. Prevalence of Mixed-Methods Sampling Designs in Social Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathleen M. T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to document the prevalence of sampling designs utilised in mixed-methods research and to examine the interpretive consistency between interpretations made in mixed-methods studies and the sampling design used. Classification of studies was based on a two-dimensional mixed-methods sampling model. This…

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL METHODS APPLIED TO THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fundamental principles of electroanalytical methods based on potentiometry, coulometry, conductance, and voltammetry are reviewed, and examples are given of applications to environmental analyses.

  9. Cellulase activity screening using pure carboxymethylcellulose: application to soluble cellulolytic samples and to plant tissue prints.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hanne R; Krause, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Reliable, rapid and inexpensive detection of cellulolytic enzymes that can be used for a wide variety of biological and environmental samples are currently in high demand. Here, a new cellulase detection protocol is described that circumvents problems observed with popular agar-based methods by exploiting the ability of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to form gel-like surfaces on its own. These pure CMC-layers are sensitive to cellulolytic degradation and stainable by Gram's iodine without showing unwelcome reactions with other enzymes. The staining intensity negatively correlates with the enzyme activity and can be used for quantification. Cellulase activities are not obstructed by high sugar contents (e.g., in plant material) which limit the applicability of other quantification methods, making our new method particularly attractive for screening of plant extracts. A useful variant of this new method is its applicability to plant tissue prints for spatial mapping of the cellulolytic activity in a zymogram-like fashion. PMID:24413752

  10. Ant colony optimization as a method for strategic genotype sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simulation study was carried out to develop an alternative method of selecting animals to be genotyped and to compare the proposed method to other known procedures. The simulated pedigrees included 5,000 animals and were assigned genotypes for a bi-allelic gene based on assumed allelic frequencie...

  11. EVALUATION OF SAMPLING AND FIELD FILTRATION METHODS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF TRACE METALS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selected groundwater sampling and filtering methods were evaluated to determine their effects on field parameters and trace metal concentrations in samples collected under several types of field conditions. he study focused on sampling in conventional standpipe monitoring wells u...

  12. A new method of snowmelt sampling for water stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penna, D.; Ahmad, M.; Birks, S. J.; Bouchaou, L.; Brencic, M.; Butt, S.; Holko, L.; Jeelani, G.; Martinez, D. E.; Melikadze, G.; Shanley, J.B.; Sokratov, S. A.; Stadnyk, T.; Sugimoto, A.; Vreca, P.

    2014-01-01

    We modified a passive capillary sampler (PCS) to collect snowmelt water for isotopic analysis. Past applications of PCSs have been to sample soil water, but the novel aspect of this study was the placement of the PCSs at the ground-snowpack interface to collect snowmelt. We deployed arrays of PCSs at 11 sites in ten partner countries on five continents representing a range of climate and snow cover worldwide. The PCS reliably collected snowmelt at all sites and caused negligible evaporative fractionation effects in the samples. PCS is low-cost, easy to install, and collects a representative integrated snowmelt sample throughout the melt season or at the melt event scale. Unlike snow cores, the PCS collects the water that would actually infiltrate the soil; thus, its isotopic composition is appropriate to use for tracing snowmelt water through the hydrologic cycle. The purpose of this Briefing is to show the potential advantages of PCSs and recommend guidelines for constructing and installing them based on our preliminary results from two snowmelt seasons.

  13. Mass spectrometric detection of ricin and its activity in food and clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Barr, John R

    2009-03-15

    Ricin is a potent toxin capable of inhibiting protein synthesis and causing death or respiratory failure. Because of its high availability and lethality, ricin is considered a likely agent for bioterrorism. Rapidly determining contamination of food product with ricin and human exposure to ricin is therefore an important public health goal. In this work, we report the development of a method that detects ricin and its activity in food or clinical samples. This method involves immunocapture of the toxin, an examination of the activity of the ricin protein upon a DNA substrate that mimics the toxin's natural RNA target, and analysis of tryptic fragments of the toxin itself. It is the combination of these three techniques, all performed on the same sample, which allows for a sensitive and selective analysis of ricin isolated from a food or clinical sample. This measurement includes a measure of the toxin's activity. The utility of this method was demonstrated on ricin spiked into food and clinical samples consisting of milk, apple juice, serum, and saliva. PMID:19228034

  14. A comparative analysis of malodor samples between direct (olfactometry) and indirect (instrumental) methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Park, Shin-Young

    The relationship between direct (olfactometry) and indirect (instrumental) methods for odor detection was assessed using a total of 70 odor samples collected from several industrial sectors. To this end, a number of instrumental techniques have been employed to measure the concentrations of major odorant groups, including reduced sulfur compounds (RSC), volatile organic compounds (VOC), aldehydes, and nitrogenous compounds. The odorant data obtained by the indirect methods were then converted into the following three modified odor indices: (1) the (algebraic) sum of odor concentration (SOC), (2) the sum of odor quotient (SOQ) by considering the relation between odorant concentration and threshold value, and (3) the sum of odor intensity (SOI) based on suprathreshold olfactometry. These derivatized indices were then compared against the results of the direct method, i.e., dilution to the threshold ( D/T) ratio via olfactometry such as air dilution sensory (ADS) test. When the relationship was investigated between D/T ratios and those three derivatized indices, the results of 70 samples were strongly correlated with the Pearson coefficients ( r) of 0.671 for SOC ( P=1.92E-10), 0.866 for SOQ ( P=2.74E-22), and 0.852 for SOI ( P=6.53E-21). It thus confirms that the odorant concentration data measured by instrumental method can be used effectively to account for the odor intensity estimated by the sensory method for samples collected under strong source activities.

  15. A method for simultaneous determination of 210Pb and 212Pb in drinking water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guogang; Torri, G.; Leandro, M.

    2012-04-01

    A sensitive and accurate method for determination of 210Pb and 212Pb in drinking water samples was developed. In the method Pb was pre-concentrated as hydroxides, separated from alkaline earth elements as PbS precipitate, purified by an anion exchange resin chro-matography column, precipitated as PbSC4 for source preparation and counted by a low background β-counter. The procedure was checked with a reference material supplied by the IAEA, and the obtained data were in good agreement with the recommended values, showing the recommended procedure can provide reliable results. The minimum detectable activity of the method was 0.039 mBq L-1 for 210Pb and 0.033 mBq L-1 for 212Pb if a 48 liter of water sample was analyzed. Seventeen drinking water samples were analyzed with a Pb recovery of 88.8 ± 5.5%, and the typical activity concentration was in the range of 0.191-15.1 mBq L-1 for 210Pb and of 1.12-5.77 mBq L-1 for 212Pb.

  16. Analytical methods for the determination of personal care products in human samples: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Díaz, I; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ballesteros, O; Navalón, A

    2014-11-01

    Personal care products (PCPs) are organic chemicals widely used in everyday human life. Nowadays, preservatives, UV-filters, antimicrobials and musk fragrances are widely used PCPs. Different studies have shown that some of these compounds can cause adverse health effects, such as genotoxicity, which could even lead to mutagenic or carcinogenic effects, or estrogenicity because of their endocrine disruption activity. Due to the absence of official monitoring protocols, there is an increasing demand of analytical methods that allow the determination of those compounds in human samples in order to obtain more information regarding their behavior and fate in the human body. The complexity of the biological matrices and the low concentration levels of these compounds make necessary the use of advanced sample treatment procedures that afford both, sample clean-up, to remove potentially interfering matrix components, as well as the concentration of analytes. In the present work, a review of the more recent analytical methods published in the scientific literature for the determination of PCPs in human fluids and tissue samples, is presented. The work focused on sample preparation and the analytical techniques employed. PMID:25127618

  17. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  18. A method for reducing sampling jitter in digital control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O.; HURBD W. J.; Hurd, W. J.

    1969-01-01

    Digital phase lock loop system is designed by smoothing the proportional control with a low pass filter. This method does not significantly affect the loop dynamics when the smoothing filter bandwidth is wide compared to loop bandwidth.

  19. Capture-recapture and removal methods for sampling closed populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Gary C.; Anderson, David R.; Burnham, Kenneth P.; Otis, David L.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of estimating animal abundance is common in wildlife management and environmental impact asessment. Capture-recapture and removal methods are often used to estimate population size. Statistical Inference From Capture Data On Closed Animal Populations, a monograph by Otis et al. (1978), provides a comprehensive synthesis of much of the wildlife and statistical literature on the methods, as well as some extensions of the general theory. In our primer, we focus on capture-recapture and removal methods for trapping studies in which a population is assumed to be closed and do not treat open-population models, such as the Jolly-Seber model, or catch-effort methods in any detail. The primer, written for students interested in population estimation, is intended for use with the more theoretical monograph.

  20. 7 CFR 31.400 - Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF WOOL AND WOOL TOP SAMPLES § 31.400 Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the...

  1. 7 CFR 32.402 - Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. 32... STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF GREASE MOHAIR AND MOHAIR TOP SAMPLES § 32.402 Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the official standards of...

  2. 7 CFR 32.402 - Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. 32... STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF GREASE MOHAIR AND MOHAIR TOP SAMPLES § 32.402 Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the official standards of...

  3. 7 CFR 31.400 - Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF WOOL AND WOOL TOP SAMPLES § 31.400 Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the...

  4. 7 CFR 31.400 - Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF WOOL AND WOOL TOP SAMPLES § 31.400 Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the...

  5. 7 CFR 31.400 - Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF WOOL AND WOOL TOP SAMPLES § 31.400 Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the...

  6. 7 CFR 32.402 - Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. 32... STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF GREASE MOHAIR AND MOHAIR TOP SAMPLES § 32.402 Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the official standards of...

  7. 7 CFR 32.402 - Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. 32... STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF GREASE MOHAIR AND MOHAIR TOP SAMPLES § 32.402 Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the official standards of...

  8. 7 CFR 31.400 - Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of... STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF WOOL AND WOOL TOP SAMPLES § 31.400 Samples for wool and wool top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the...

  9. 7 CFR 32.402 - Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. 32... STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS PURCHASE OF GREASE MOHAIR AND MOHAIR TOP SAMPLES § 32.402 Samples of mohair top grades; method of obtaining. Samples certified as representative of the official standards of...

  10. Detecting spatial structures in throughfall data: the effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and variogram estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Beate; Zimmermann, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    In the last three decades, an increasing number of studies analyzed spatial patterns in throughfall to investigate the consequences of rainfall redistribution for biogeochemical and hydrological processes in forests. In the majority of cases, variograms were used to characterize the spatial properties of the throughfall data. The estimation of the variogram from sample data requires an appropriate sampling scheme: most importantly, a large sample and an appropriate layout of sampling locations that often has to serve both variogram estimation and geostatistical prediction. While some recommendations on these aspects exist, they focus on Gaussian data and high ratios of the variogram range to the extent of the study area. However, many hydrological data, and throughfall data in particular, do not follow a Gaussian distribution. In this study, we examined the effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and calculation methods on variogram estimation of throughfall data. For our investigation, we first generated non-Gaussian random fields based on throughfall data with heavy outliers. Subsequently, we sampled the fields with three extents (plots with edge lengths of 25 m, 50 m, and 100 m), four common sampling designs (two grid-based layouts, transect and random sampling), and five sample sizes (50, 100, 150, 200, 400). We then estimated the variogram parameters by method-of-moments and residual maximum likelihood. Our key findings are threefold. First, the choice of the extent has a substantial influence on the estimation of the variogram. A comparatively small ratio of the extent to the correlation length is beneficial for variogram estimation. Second, a combination of a minimum sample size of 150, a design that ensures the sampling of small distances and variogram estimation by residual maximum likelihood offers a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency. Third, studies relying on method-of-moments based variogram estimation may have to employ at least

  11. Detecting spatial structures in throughfall data: The effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and variogram estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Beate; Zimmermann, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    In the last decades, an increasing number of studies analyzed spatial patterns in throughfall by means of variograms. The estimation of the variogram from sample data requires an appropriate sampling scheme: most importantly, a large sample and a layout of sampling locations that often has to serve both variogram estimation and geostatistical prediction. While some recommendations on these aspects exist, they focus on Gaussian data and high ratios of the variogram range to the extent of the study area. However, many hydrological data, and throughfall data in particular, do not follow a Gaussian distribution. In this study, we examined the effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and calculation method on variogram estimation of throughfall data. For our investigation, we first generated non-Gaussian random fields based on throughfall data with large outliers. Subsequently, we sampled the fields with three extents (plots with edge lengths of 25 m, 50 m, and 100 m), four common sampling designs (two grid-based layouts, transect and random sampling) and five sample sizes (50, 100, 150, 200, 400). We then estimated the variogram parameters by method-of-moments (non-robust and robust estimators) and residual maximum likelihood. Our key findings are threefold. First, the choice of the extent has a substantial influence on the estimation of the variogram. A comparatively small ratio of the extent to the correlation length is beneficial for variogram estimation. Second, a combination of a minimum sample size of 150, a design that ensures the sampling of small distances and variogram estimation by residual maximum likelihood offers a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency. Third, studies relying on method-of-moments based variogram estimation may have to employ at least 200 sampling points for reliable variogram estimates. These suggested sample sizes exceed the number recommended by studies dealing with Gaussian data by up to 100 %. Given that most previous

  12. An enzymeimmunoassay method for thyroxine determination in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Korde, A; Meera, V

    1991-05-01

    Here we describe an enzymeimmunoassay (EIA) for thyroxine (T4) in serum, whose performance is comparable to that of a sensitive T4 radioimmunoassay (RIA). In this assay, specific T4 antibody adsorbed on polystyrene beads is used along with T4-horseradishperoxidase as the tracer and omicron-phenylenediamine as chromogen. Several samples were analysed both by this T4 EIA and by using a commercial RIA kit for T4. The results correlate well with a correlation coefficient r = 0.9 and slope = 0.93 (n = 50). PMID:1916941

  13. Rapid method to determine 89Sr/90Sr in large concrete samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; Sudowe, Ralf; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2016-03-24

    Here, a new rapid method has been developed that provides high quality low-level measurements of 89,90Sr in concrete samples with an MDA (Minimum Detectable Activity) of <1 mBq g-1. The new method is fast, meets new decommissioning regulatory limits and is robust even if refractory particles are present. The method utilizes a rapid fusion to ensure total dissolution of samples and rapid preconcentration and separation of 89,90Sr from 5-10 g concrete samples. When, the 89Sr/90Sr ratio is high, Sr can be isolated from up to 5g concrete samples, total 89/90Sr measured, and then 90Sr determined via 90Y separated after amore » period of ingrowth. Another approach allows the immediate determination of 90Sr in 10 g concrete aliquots without waiting for 90Y ingrowth, in instances where the shorter lived 89Sr is unlikely to be encountered.« less

  14. Radiological sampling and analytical methods for National Primary Drinking Water Regulations.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R L; Hahne, R M; Kahn, B; McCurdy, D; Mellor, R A; Moore, W S; Sedlet, J; Whittaker, E

    1985-05-01

    Radiological sampling and analysis performed under the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations were evaluated for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Drinking Water to consider whether any changes should be recommended. The authors reviewed the analytical screening scheme; sample collection, storage and analysis procedures; selection of analytical methods; reliability of results; and possible future needs. The main problem in the program has been dependence on a screening scheme of gross alpha-particle activity measurement and 226Ra analysis for predicting elevated 228Ra levels to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for Ra. In some aquifers, 228Ra levels have been found to be unrelated to 226Ra levels. Several alternatives are discussed to eliminate this problem. A secondary problem is that the measurement for assuring compliance with the MCL for gross alpha-particle activity minus Ra, Rn and U uses chemical U analysis and assumes equilibrium of 238U and 234U. Because some ground waters are known to be at disequilibrium, radiometric U analysis is needed for those gross alpha-particle activities and chemical U values that could result in an erroneous conclusion relative to the MCL. In addition, studies were recommended for determining analytical uncertainties and assuring reliable sampling and sample maintenance; improvements in the system for accepting methods were suggested; and methods were identified for several radionuclides not currently in the analytical program that may be needed to assure absence of elevated radiation doses and could be useful for identifying trace contaminants. PMID:3988523

  15. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2002-01-01

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  16. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2006-04-11

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  17. Ant colony optimization as a method for strategic genotype sampling.

    PubMed

    Spangler, M L; Robbins, K R; Bertrand, J K; Macneil, M; Rekaya, R

    2009-06-01

    A simulation study was carried out to develop an alternative method of selecting animals to be genotyped. Simulated pedigrees included 5000 animals, each assigned genotypes for a bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based on assumed allelic frequencies of 0.7/0.3 and 0.5/0.5. In addition to simulated pedigrees, two beef cattle pedigrees, one from field data and the other from a research population, were used to test selected methods using simulated genotypes. The proposed method of ant colony optimization (ACO) was evaluated based on the number of alleles correctly assigned to ungenotyped animals (AK(P)), the probability of assigning true alleles (AK(G)) and the probability of correctly assigning genotypes (APTG). The proposed animal selection method of ant colony optimization was compared to selection using the diagonal elements of the inverse of the relationship matrix (A(-1)). Comparisons of these two methods showed that ACO yielded an increase in AK(P) ranging from 4.98% to 5.16% and an increase in APTG from 1.6% to 1.8% using simulated pedigrees. Gains in field data and research pedigrees were slightly lower. These results suggest that ACO can provide a better genotyping strategy, when compared to A(-1), with different pedigree sizes and structures. PMID:19220227

  18. Microwave acid digestion and preconcentration neutron activation analysis of biological and diet samples for iodine.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Chatt, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) method has been developed for the determination of low levels of iodine in biological and nutritional materials. The method involves dissolution of the samples by microwave digestion in the presence of acids in closed Teflon bombs and preconcentration of total iodine, after reduction to iodide with hydrazine sulfate, by coprecipitation with bismuth sulfide. The effects of different factors such as acidity, time for complete precipitation, and concentrations of bismuth, sulfide, and diverse ions on the quantitative recovery of iodide have been studied. The absolute detection limit of the PNAA method is 5 ng of iodine. Precision of measurement, expressed in terms of relative standard deviation, is about 5% at 100 ppb and 10% at 20 ppb levels of iodine. The PNAA method has been applied to several biological reference materials and total diet samples. PMID:1897721

  19. Guidance for establishment and implementation of field sample management programs in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-18

    The role of the National Sample Management Program (NSMP) proposed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to be a resource for EM programs and for local Field Sample Management Programs (FSMPs). It will be a source of information on sample analysis and data collection within the DOE complex. The purpose of this document is to establish the suggested scope of the FSMP activities to be performed under each Operations Office, list the drivers under which the program will operate, define terms and list references. This guidance will apply only to EM sampling and analysis activities associated with project planning, contracting, laboratory selection, sample collection, sample transportation, laboratory analysis and data management.

  20. Ant colony optimization as a method for strategic genotype sampling.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simulation study was carried out to develop an alternative method of selecting animals to be genotyped. Simulated pedigrees included 5000 animals, each assigned genotypes for a bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based on assumed allelic frequencies of 0.7/ 0.3 and 0.5/0.5. In addition...

  1. COMPARISON OF LARGE RIVER SAMPLING METHOD USING DIATOM METRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared the results of four methods used to assess the algal communities at 60 sites distributed among four rivers. Based on Principle Component Analysis of physical habitat data collected concomitantly with the algal data, sites were separated into those with a mean thalweg...

  2. COMPARISON OF LARGE RIVER SAMPLING METHODS ON ALGAL METRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared the results of four methods used to assess the algal communities at 60 sites distributed among four rivers. Based on Principle Component Analysis of physical habitat data collected concomitantly with the algal data, sites were separated into those with a mean thalweg...

  3. TESTING METHODS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SPP. IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large waterborne outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.A. in 1993 prompted a search for ways to prevent large-scale waterborne outbreaks of protozoan parasitoses. Methods for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum play an integral role in strategies that lead to...

  4. High-throughput liquid-absorption preconcentrator sampling methods

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, S.

    1994-07-12

    A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container comprising a wettable material. The wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid which flows from one part of the container to a lower end. Sampled air flows through the container in contact with the wetted material with a swirling motion which results in efficient transfer of analyte vapors or aerosol particles to the sorbing liquid and preconcentration of traces of analyte in the liquid. The preconcentrated traces of analyte may be either detected within the container or removed therefrom for injection into a separate detection means or for subsequent analysis. 12 figs.

  5. High-throughput liquid-absorption preconcentrator sampling methods

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    1994-01-01

    A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container comprising a wettable material. The wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid which flows from one part of the container to a lower end. Sampled air flows through the container in contact with the wetted material with a swirling motion which results in efficient transfer of analyte vapors or aerosol particles to the sorbing liquid and preconcentration of traces of analyte in the liquid. The preconcentrated traces of analyte may be either detected within the container or removed therefrom for injection into a separate detection means or for subsequent analysis.

  6. Estimating the Expected Value of Sample Information Using the Probabilistic Sensitivity Analysis Sample: A Fast, Nonparametric Regression-Based Method.

    PubMed

    Strong, Mark; Oakley, Jeremy E; Brennan, Alan; Breeze, Penny

    2015-07-01

    Health economic decision-analytic models are used to estimate the expected net benefits of competing decision options. The true values of the input parameters of such models are rarely known with certainty, and it is often useful to quantify the value to the decision maker of reducing uncertainty through collecting new data. In the context of a particular decision problem, the value of a proposed research design can be quantified by its expected value of sample information (EVSI). EVSI is commonly estimated via a 2-level Monte Carlo procedure in which plausible data sets are generated in an outer loop, and then, conditional on these, the parameters of the decision model are updated via Bayes rule and sampled in an inner loop. At each iteration of the inner loop, the decision model is evaluated. This is computationally demanding and may be difficult if the posterior distribution of the model parameters conditional on sampled data is hard to sample from. We describe a fast nonparametric regression-based method for estimating per-patient EVSI that requires only the probabilistic sensitivity analysis sample (i.e., the set of samples drawn from the joint distribution of the parameters and the corresponding net benefits). The method avoids the need to sample from the posterior distributions of the parameters and avoids the need to rerun the model. The only requirement is that sample data sets can be generated. The method is applicable with a model of any complexity and with any specification of model parameter distribution. We demonstrate in a case study the superior efficiency of the regression method over the 2-level Monte Carlo method. PMID:25810269

  7. Paraoxonase-1 Enzyme Activity Assay for Clinical Samples: Validation and Correlation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Garelnabi, Mahdi; Younis, Abdelmoneim

    2015-01-01

    Background Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) enzyme is reported in various types of tissues and linked to numerous pathophysiological disorders. It is a potential biomarker in many pathological conditions such as cardiovascular diseases. Material/Methods We conducted several small-scale studies to evaluate PON1 performance as affected by sample types, storage, and interferences. We also carried out short-term studies to compare the performance of the widely used PON1 assay to the similar commercially available PON1 kit assay method; sample size for the method comparison was N=40, and the number varied for other validation experiments. Results Our studies using various types of anticoagulants show that samples collected in tubes with NaF, citrate, EDTA, clot activator, and sodium heparin have increased PON1 levels that are 49%, 24.5%, 19.8%, 11.4%, and 8%, respectively, higher compared to serum samples collected in plain tubes. However, samples collected in lithium heparin tubes demonstrated 10.4% lower PON1 levels compared to serum collected in plain tubes. Biological interference such as hemolysis has little effect on PON1 levels; however, samples spiked with lipids have shown 13% lower PON 1 levels. Our studies comparing the PON1 method commonly available for PON1 assay and a similar non-ELISA commercially available PON1 kit method showed a weak Spearman correlation coefficient of R2=0.40 for the range of 104.9–245.6 U/L. Conclusions The current study provides new validation data on enzyme PON1 performance. While no appreciable change was seen with storage, samples type affects the enzyme performance. Our results should encourage additional clinical studies to investigate other aspects of factors known to affect PON1 enzyme function and performance. PMID:25814092

  8. Testing the quasi-absolute method in photon activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Starovoitova, V.; Segebade, C.

    2013-04-19

    In photon activation analysis (PAA), relative methods are widely used because of their accuracy and precision. Absolute methods, which are conducted without any assistance from calibration materials, are seldom applied for the difficulty in obtaining photon flux in measurements. This research is an attempt to perform a new absolute approach in PAA - quasi-absolute method - by retrieving photon flux in the sample through Monte Carlo simulation. With simulated photon flux and database of experimental cross sections, it is possible to calculate the concentration of target elements in the sample directly. The QA/QC procedures to solidify the research are discussed in detail. Our results show that the accuracy of the method for certain elements is close to a useful level in practice. Furthermore, the future results from the quasi-absolute method can also serve as a validation technique for experimental data on cross sections. The quasi-absolute method looks promising.

  9. Tissue sampling methods and standards for vertebrate genomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The recent rise in speed and efficiency of new sequencing technologies have facilitated high-throughput sequencing, assembly and analyses of genomes, advancing ongoing efforts to analyze genetic sequences across major vertebrate groups. Standardized procedures in acquiring high quality DNA and RNA and establishing cell lines from target species will facilitate these initiatives. We provide a legal and methodological guide according to four standards of acquiring and storing tissue for the Genome 10K Project and similar initiatives as follows: four-star (banked tissue/cell cultures, RNA from multiple types of tissue for transcriptomes, and sufficient flash-frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA, all from a single individual); three-star (RNA as above and frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA); two-star (frozen tissue for at least 700 μg of DNA); and one-star (ethanol-preserved tissue for 700 μg of DNA or less of mixed quality). At a minimum, all tissues collected for the Genome 10K and other genomic projects should consider each species’ natural history and follow institutional and legal requirements. Associated documentation should detail as much information as possible about provenance to ensure representative sampling and subsequent sequencing. Hopefully, the procedures outlined here will not only encourage success in the Genome 10K Project but also inspire the adaptation of standards by other genomic projects, including those involving other biota. PMID:23587255

  10. Sampling and analytical methods of stable isotopes and dissolved inorganic carbon from CO2 injection sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geldern, Robert; Myrttinen, Anssi; Becker, Veith; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2010-05-01

    The isotopic composition (δ13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in combination with DIC concentration measurements, can be used to quantify geochemical trapping of CO2 in water. This is of great importance in monitoring the fate of CO2 in the subsurface in CO2 injection projects. When CO2 mixes with water, a shift in the δ13C values, as well as an increase in DIC concentrations is observed in the CO2-H2O system. However, when using standard on-site titration methods, it is often challenging to determining accurate in-situ DIC concentrations. This may be due to CO2 degassing and CO2-exchange between the sample and the atmosphere during titration, causing a change in the pH value or due to other unfavourable conditions such as turbid water samples or limited availability of fluid samples. A way to resolve this problem is by simultaneously determining the DIC concentration and carbon isotopic composition using a standard continuous flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) setup with a Gasbench II coupled to Delta plusXP mass spectrometer. During sampling, in order to avoid atmospheric contact, water samples taken from the borehole-fluid-sampler should be directly transferred into a suitable container, such as a gasbag. Also, to avoid isotope fractionation due to biological activity in the sample, it is recommended to stabilize the gasbags prior to sampling with HgCl2 for the subsequent stable isotope analysis. The DIC concentration of the samples can be determined from the area of the sample peaks in a chromatogram from a CF-IRMS analysis, since it is directly proportional to the CO2 generated by the reaction of the water with H3PO4. A set of standards with known DIC concentrations should be prepared by mixing NaHCO3 with DIC free water. Since the DIC concentrations of samples taken from CO2 injection sites are expected to be exceptionally high due to the additional high amounts of added CO2, the DIC concentration range of the standards should be set high

  11. Random Sampling of Quantum States: a Survey of Methods. And Some Issues Regarding the Overparametrized Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziero, Jonas

    2015-12-01

    The numerical generation of random quantum states (RQS) is an important procedure for investigations in quantum information science. Here, we review some methods that may be used for performing that task. We start by presenting a simple procedure for generating random state vectors, for which the main tool is the random sampling of unbiased discrete probability distributions (DPD). Afterwards, the creation of random density matrices is addressed. In this context, we first present the standard method, which consists in using the spectral decomposition of a quantum state for getting RQS from random DPDs and random unitary matrices. In the sequence, the Bloch vector parametrization method is described. This approach, despite being useful in several instances, is not in general convenient for RQS generation. In the last part of the article, we regard the overparametrized method (OPM) and the related Ginibre and Bures techniques. The OPM can be used to create random positive semidefinite matrices with unit trace from randomly produced general complex matrices in a simple way that is friendly for numerical implementations. We consider a physically relevant issue related to the possible domains that may be used for the real and imaginary parts of the elements of such general complex matrices. Subsequently, a too fast concentration of measure in the quantum state space that appears in this parametrization is noticed.

  12. A sampling method for conducting relocation studies with freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, D.L.; Rach, J.J.; Cope, W.G.; Luoma, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Low recovery of transplanted mussels often prevents accurate estimates of survival. We developed a method that provided a high recovery of transplanted mussels and allowed for a reliable assessment of mortality. A 3 x 3 m polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe grid was secured to the sediment with iron reinforcing bars. The grid was divided into nine 1-m super(2) segments and each treatment segment, was stocked with 100 marked mussels. The recovery of mussels after six months exceeded 80% in all but one treatment group.

  13. Method and apparatus for processing a test sample to concentrate an analyte in the sample from a solvent in the sample

    DOEpatents

    Turner, T.D.; Beller, L.S.; Clark, M.L.; Klingler, K.M.

    1997-10-14

    A method of processing a test sample to concentrate an analyte in the sample from a solvent in the sample includes: (a) boiling the test sample containing the analyte and solvent in a boiling chamber to a temperature greater than or equal to the solvent boiling temperature and less than the analyte boiling temperature to form a rising sample vapor mixture; (b) passing the sample vapor mixture from the boiling chamber to an elongated primary separation tube, the separation tube having internal sidewalls and a longitudinal axis, the longitudinal axis being angled between vertical and horizontal and thus having an upper region and a lower region; (c) collecting the physically transported liquid analyte on the internal sidewalls of the separation tube; and (d) flowing the collected analyte along the angled internal sidewalls of the separation tube to and pass the separation tube lower region. The invention also includes passing a turbulence inducing wave through a vapor mixture to separate physically transported liquid second material from vaporized first material. Apparatus is also disclosed for effecting separations. Further disclosed is a fluidically powered liquid test sample withdrawal apparatus for withdrawing a liquid test sample from a test sample container and for cleaning the test sample container. 8 figs.

  14. Method and apparatus for processing a test sample to concentrate an analyte in the sample from a solvent in the sample

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.; Beller, Laurence S.; Clark, Michael L.; Klingler, Kerry M.

    1997-01-01

    A method of processing a test sample to concentrate an analyte in the sample from a solvent in the sample includes: a) boiling the test sample containing the analyte and solvent in a boiling chamber to a temperature greater than or equal to the solvent boiling temperature and less than the analyte boiling temperature to form a rising sample vapor mixture; b) passing the sample vapor mixture from the boiling chamber to an elongated primary separation tube, the separation tube having internal sidewalls and a longitudinal axis, the longitudinal axis being angled between vertical and horizontal and thus having an upper region and a lower region; c) collecting the physically transported liquid analyte on the internal sidewalls of the separation tube; and d) flowing the collected analyte along the angled internal sidewalls of the separation tube to and pass the separation tube lower region. The invention also includes passing a turbulence inducing wave through a vapor mixture to separate physically transported liquid second material from vaporized first material. Apparatus are also disclosed for effecting separations. Further disclosed is a fluidically powered liquid test sample withdrawal apparatus for withdrawing a liquid test sample from a test sample container and for cleaning the test sample container.

  15. Sparsity-weighted outlier FLOODing (OFLOOD) method: Efficient rare event sampling method using sparsity of distribution.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuhei; Nakamura, Tomotake; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2016-03-30

    As an extension of the Outlier FLOODing (OFLOOD) method [Harada et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2015, 36, 763], the sparsity of the outliers defined by a hierarchical clustering algorithm, FlexDice, was considered to achieve an efficient conformational search as sparsity-weighted "OFLOOD." In OFLOOD, FlexDice detects areas of sparse distribution as outliers. The outliers are regarded as candidates that have high potential to promote conformational transitions and are employed as initial structures for conformational resampling by restarting molecular dynamics simulations. When detecting outliers, FlexDice defines a rank in the hierarchy for each outlier, which relates to sparsity in the distribution. In this study, we define a lower rank (first ranked), a medium rank (second ranked), and the highest rank (third ranked) outliers, respectively. For instance, the first-ranked outliers are located in a given conformational space away from the clusters (highly sparse distribution), whereas those with the third-ranked outliers are nearby the clusters (a moderately sparse distribution). To achieve the conformational search efficiently, resampling from the outliers with a given rank is performed. As demonstrations, this method was applied to several model systems: Alanine dipeptide, Met-enkephalin, Trp-cage, T4 lysozyme, and glutamine binding protein. In each demonstration, the present method successfully reproduced transitions among metastable states. In particular, the first-ranked OFLOOD highly accelerated the exploration of conformational space by expanding the edges. In contrast, the third-ranked OFLOOD reproduced local transitions among neighboring metastable states intensively. For quantitatively evaluations of sampled snapshots, free energy calculations were performed with a combination of umbrella samplings, providing rigorous landscapes of the biomolecules. PMID:26611770

  16. Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples: method validation.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory authorities are expected to measure concentration of contaminants in foodstuffs, but the simple determination of total amount cannot be sufficient for fully judging its impact on the human health. In particular, the methylation of metals generally increases their toxicity; therefore validated analytical methods producing reliable results for the assessment of methylated species are highly needed. Nowadays, there is no legal limit for methylmercury (MeHg) in food matrices. Hence, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg exists within the international jurisdiction. Contemplating the possibility of a future legislative limit, a method for low level determination of MeHg in marine biota matrixes, based on aqueous-phase ethylation followed by purge and trap and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Py-AFS) detection, has been developed and validated. Five different extraction procedures, namely acid and alkaline leaching assisted by microwave and conventional oven heating, as well as enzymatic digestion, were evaluated in terms of their efficiency to extract MeHg from Scallop soft tissue IAEA-452 Certified Reference Material. Alkaline extraction with 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) with 5M HCl and enzymatic digestion with protease XIV yielded the highest extraction recoveries. Standard addition or the introduction of a dilution step were successfully applied to overcome the matrix effects observed when microwave-assisted extraction using 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol or 25% (w/v) aqueous TMAH were used. ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines were followed to perform the validation of the methodology. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration curve, linearity (0.9995), working range (1-800pg), recovery (97%), precision, traceability, limit of detection (0.45pg), limit of quantification (0.85pg) and expanded uncertainty (15.86%, k=2) were assessed with Fish protein Dorm-3 Certified

  17. Determination of optimal sampling times for a two blood sample clearance method using (51)Cr-EDTA in cats.

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, Eva; De Sadeleer, Carlos; Piepsz, Amy; Ham, Hamphrey R; Dobbeleir, André A; Vermeire, Simon T; Van Hoek, Ingrid M; Daminet, Sylvie; Slegers, Guido; Peremans, Kathelijne Y

    2010-08-01

    Estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a useful tool in the evaluation of kidney function in feline medicine. GFR can be determined by measuring the rate of tracer disappearance from the blood, and although these measurements are generally performed by multi-sampling techniques, simplified methods are more convenient in clinical practice. The optimal times for a simplified sampling strategy with two blood samples (2BS) for GFR measurement in cats using plasma (51)chromium ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid ((51)Cr-EDTA) clearance were investigated. After intravenous administration of (51)Cr-EDTA, seven blood samples were obtained in 46 cats (19 euthyroid and 27 hyperthyroid cats, none with previously diagnosed chronic kidney disease (CKD)). The plasma clearance was then calculated from the seven point blood kinetics (7BS) and used for comparison to define the optimal sampling strategy by correlating different pairs of time points to the reference method. Mean GFR estimation for the reference method was 3.7+/-2.5 ml/min/kg (mean+/-standard deviation (SD)). Several pairs of sampling times were highly correlated with this reference method (r(2) > or = 0.980), with the best results when the first sample was taken 30 min after tracer injection and the second sample between 198 and 222 min after injection; or with the first sample at 36 min and the second at 234 or 240 min (r(2) for both combinations=0.984). Because of the similarity of GFR values obtained with the 2BS method in comparison to the values obtained with the 7BS reference method, the simplified method may offer an alternative for GFR estimation. Although a wide range of GFR values was found in the included group of cats, the applicability should be confirmed in cats suspected of renal disease and with confirmed CKD. Furthermore, although no indications of age-related effect were found in this study, a possible influence of age should be included in future studies. PMID:20452793

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF RNA INTEGRITY ON THE DETECTION OF HONEY BEE VIRUSES: MOLECULAR ASSESSMENT OF DIFFERENT SAMPLE STORAGE METHODS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA quality has been considered one of the most critical components for the overall success of RNA-based assays. To ensure accuracy of virus diagnosis by RT-PCR method, it is important to identify an optimal sample storage method that stabilizes RNA and prevents RNA from activities of RNase in int...

  19. Method to determine 226Ra in small sediment samples by ultralow background liquid scintillation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Kwong, Laval Liong Wee; Betti, Maria

    2010-08-15

    (210)Pb dating of sediment cores is a widely used tool to reconstruct ecosystem evolution and historical pollution during the last century. Although (226)Ra can be determined by gamma spectrometry, this method shows severe limitations which are, among others, sample size requirements and counting times. In this work, we propose a new strategy based on the analysis of (210)Pb through (210)Po in equilibrium by alpha spectrometry, followed by the determination of (226)Ra (base or supported (210)Pb) without any further chemical purification by liquid scintillation and with a higher sample throughput. Although gamma spectrometry might still be required to determine (137)Cs as an independent tracer, the effort can then be focused only on those sections dated around 1963, when maximum activities are expected. In this work, we optimized the counting conditions, calibrated the system for changing quenching, and described the new method to determine (226)Ra in small sediment samples, after (210)Po determination, allowing a more precise determination of excess (210)Pb ((210)Pb(ex)). The method was validated with reference materials IAEA-384, IAEA-385, and IAEA-313. PMID:20704374

  20. A method for measuring total thiaminase activity in fish tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajicek, J.L.; Tillitt, D.E.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Brown, S.B.; Fitzsimons, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    An accurate, quantitative, and rapid method for the measurement of thiaminase activity in fish samples is required to provide sufficient information to characterize the role of dietary thiaminase in the onset of thiamine deficiency in Great Lakes salmonines. A radiometric method that uses 14C-thiamine was optimized for substrate and co-substrate (nicotinic acid) concentrations, incubation time, and sample dilution. Total thiaminase activity was successfully determined in extracts of selected Great Lakes fishes and invertebrates. Samples included whole-body and selected tissues of forage fishes. Positive control material prepared from frozen alewives Alosa pseudoharengus collected in Lake Michigan enhanced the development and application of the method. The method allowed improved discrimination of thiaminolytic activity among forage fish species and their tissues. The temperature dependence of the thiaminase activity observed in crude extracts of Lake Michigan alewives followed a Q10 = 2 relationship for the 1-37??C temperature range, which is consistent with the bacterial-derived thiaminase I protein. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  1. The OCD collaborative genetics study: methods and sample description.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Jack F; Riddle, Mark A; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Fyer, Abby J; McCracken, James T; Rauch, Scott L; Murphy, Dennis L; Grados, Marco A; Pinto, Anthony; Knowles, James A; Piacentini, John; Cannistraro, Paul A; Cullen, Bernadette; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Rasmussen, Steven A; Pauls, David L; Willour, Virginia L; Shugart, Yin Y; Liang, Kung-yee; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf; Nestadt, Gerald

    2006-04-01

    Results from twin and family studies suggest that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may be transmitted in families but, to date, genes for the disorder have not been identified. The OCD Collaborative Genetics Study (OCGS) is a six-site collaborative genetic linkage study of OCD. Specimens and blinded clinical data will be made available through the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) cell repository. In this initial report, we describe the methods of the study and present clinical characteristics of affected individuals for researchers interested in this valuable resource for genetic studies of OCD. The project clinically evaluated and collected blood specimens from 238 families containing 299 OCD-affected sibling pairs and their parents, and additional affected relative pairs, for a genome-wide linkage study. Of the 999 individuals interviewed to date, 624 were diagnosed with "definite" OCD. The mean age of subjects was 36 years (range 7-95). The majority of affected individuals (66%) were female. The mean age at onset of obsessive-compulsive symptoms was 9.5 years. Specific mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and skin picking were more prevalent in female cases, whereas tics, Tourette disorder, and alcohol dependence were more prevalent in male cases. Compared to "definite" cases of OCD, "probable" cases (n = 82) had, on average, later age at onset of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, lower severity score, and fewer numbers of different categories of obsessions and compulsions, and they were less likely to have received treatment for their symptoms. PMID:16511842

  2. Measurement of bedload transport in sand-bed rivers: a look at two indirect sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Robert R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Sand-bed rivers present unique challenges to accurate measurement of the bedload transport rate using the traditional direct sampling methods of direct traps (for example the Helley-Smith bedload sampler). The two major issues are: 1) over sampling of sand transport caused by “mining” of sand due to the flow disturbance induced by the presence of the sampler and 2) clogging of the mesh bag with sand particles reducing the hydraulic efficiency of the sampler. Indirect measurement methods hold promise in that unlike direct methods, no transport-altering flow disturbance near the bed occurs. The bedform velocimetry method utilizes a measure of the bedform geometry and the speed of bedform translation to estimate the bedload transport through mass balance. The bedform velocimetry method is readily applied for the estimation of bedload transport in large sand-bed rivers so long as prominent bedforms are present and the streamflow discharge is steady for long enough to provide sufficient bedform translation between the successive bathymetric data sets. Bedform velocimetry in small sandbed rivers is often problematic due to rapid variation within the hydrograph. The bottom-track bias feature of the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) has been utilized to accurately estimate the virtual velocities of sand-bed rivers. Coupling measurement of the virtual velocity with an accurate determination of the active depth of the streambed sediment movement is another method to measure bedload transport, which will be termed the “virtual velocity” method. Much research remains to develop methods and determine accuracy of the virtual velocity method in small sand-bed rivers.

  3. Initial evaluation of Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation method for statistical sampling and function integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Vicente Jose; Peterson, Janet S.; Burkhardt, John V.; Gunzburger, Max Donald

    2003-09-01

    A recently developed Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT) unstructured sampling method is investigated here to assess its suitability for use in statistical sampling and function integration. CVT efficiently generates a highly uniform distribution of sample points over arbitrarily shaped M-Dimensional parameter spaces. It has recently been shown on several 2-D test problems to provide superior point distributions for generating locally conforming response surfaces. In this paper, its performance as a statistical sampling and function integration method is compared to that of Latin-Hypercube Sampling (LHS) and Simple Random Sampling (SRS) Monte Carlo methods, and Halton and Hammersley quasi-Monte-Carlo sequence methods. Specifically, sampling efficiencies are compared for function integration and for resolving various statistics of response in a 2-D test problem. It is found that on balance CVT performs best of all these sampling methods on our test problems.

  4. Method for sequential injection of liquid samples for radioisotope separations

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B.; Grate, Jay W.; Bray, Lane A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method of separating a short-lived daughter isotope from a longer lived parent isotope, with recovery of the parent isotope for further use. Using a system with a bi-directional pump and one or more valves, a solution of the parent isotope is processed to generate two separate solutions, one of which contains the daughter isotope, from which the parent has been removed with a high decontamination factor, and the other solution contains the recovered parent isotope. The process can be repeated on this solution of the parent isotope. The system with the fluid drive and one or more valves is controlled by a program on a microprocessor executing a series of steps to accomplish the operation. In one approach, the cow solution is passed through a separation medium that selectively retains the desired daughter isotope, while the parent isotope and the matrix pass through the medium. After washing this medium, the daughter is released from the separation medium using another solution. With the automated generator of the present invention, all solution handling steps necessary to perform a daughter/parent radionuclide separation, e.g. Bi-213 from Ac-225 "cow" solution, are performed in a consistent, enclosed, and remotely operated format. Operator exposure and spread of contamination are greatly minimized compared to the manual generator procedure described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/789,973, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,749,042, herein incorporated by reference. Using 16 mCi of Ac-225 there was no detectable external contamination of the instrument components.

  5. Recent developments on field gas extraction and sample preparation methods for radiokrypton dating of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokochi, Reika

    2016-09-01

    Current and foreseen population growths will lead to an increased demand in freshwater, large quantities of which is stored as groundwater. The ventilation age is crucial to the assessment of groundwater resources, complementing the hydrological model approach based on hydrogeological parameters. Ultra-trace radioactive isotopes of Kr (81 Kr and 85 Kr) possess the ideal physical and chemical properties for groundwater dating. The recent advent of atom trap trace analyses (ATTA) has enabled determination of ultra-trace noble gas radioisotope abundances using 5-10 μ L of pure Kr. Anticipated developments will enable ATTA to analyze radiokrypton isotope abundances at high sample throughput, which necessitates simple and efficient sample preparation techniques that are adaptable to various sample chemistries. Recent developments of field gas extraction devices and simple and rapid Kr separation method at the University of Chicago are presented herein. Two field gas extraction devices optimized for different sampling conditions were recently designed and constructed, aiming at operational simplicity and portability. A newly developed Kr purification system enriches Kr by flowing a sample gas through a moderately cooled (138 K) activated charcoal column, followed by a gentle fractionating desorption. This simple process uses a single adsorbent and separates 99% of the bulk atmospheric gases from Kr without significant loss. The subsequent two stages of gas chromatographic separation and a hot Ti sponge getter further purify the Kr-enriched gas. Abundant CH4 necessitates multiple passages through one of the gas chromatographic separation columns. The presented Kr separation system has a demonstrated capability of extracting Kr with > 90% yield and 99% purity within 75 min from 1.2 to 26.8 L STP of atmospheric air with various concentrations of CH4. The apparatuses have successfully been deployed for sampling in the field and purification of groundwater samples.

  6. Toxin activity assays, devices, methods and systems therefor

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory Jon

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, system and method for conducting toxin activity assay using sedimentation. The toxin activity assay may include generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample. The complexes may include a target toxin and a labeling agent, or may be generated due to presence of active target toxin and/or labeling agent designed to be incorporated into complexes responsive to the presence of target active toxin. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a lower density than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transporting occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.

  7. A Typology of Mixed Methods Sampling Designs in Social Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for developing sampling designs in mixed methods research. First, we present sampling schemes that have been associated with quantitative and qualitative research. Second, we discuss sample size considerations and provide sample size recommendations for each of the major research designs for quantitative and…

  8. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases. PMID:27501318

  9. A Sequential Optimization Sampling Method for Metamodels with Radial Basis Functions

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Guang; Ye, Pengcheng; Yang, Zhidong

    2014-01-01

    Metamodels have been widely used in engineering design to facilitate analysis and optimization of complex systems that involve computationally expensive simulation programs. The accuracy of metamodels is strongly affected by the sampling methods. In this paper, a new sequential optimization sampling method is proposed. Based on the new sampling method, metamodels can be constructed repeatedly through the addition of sampling points, namely, extrema points of metamodels and minimum points of density function. Afterwards, the more accurate metamodels would be constructed by the procedure above. The validity and effectiveness of proposed sampling method are examined by studying typical numerical examples. PMID:25133206

  10. Comparing the Push-Pull Versus Discard Blood Sample Method From Adult Central Vascular Access Devices.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Dia

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of replacing the discard blood sampling method for central vascular access devices with the push-pull method. A comparative, within-subject design was used to evaluate 61 unique, paired blood samples from 1 adult outpatient oncology clinic. A 21-measure laboratory panel was conducted on each of the paired samples. Interpretation showed a small mean bias and excellent agreement between the methods. Blood samples obtained using the push-pull method were within clinically acceptable ranges. No hemolysis was noted by laboratory evaluation of 59 samples. PMID:27074989

  11. Predictive Sampling of Rare Conformational Events in Aqueous Solution: Designing a Generalized Orthogonal Space Tempering Method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Li, Xubin; Wu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Lianqing; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-12

    In aqueous solution, solute conformational transitions are governed by intimate interplays of the fluctuations of solute-solute, solute-water, and water-water interactions. To promote molecular fluctuations to enhance sampling of essential conformational changes, a common strategy is to construct an expanded Hamiltonian through a series of Hamiltonian perturbations and thereby broaden the distribution of certain interactions of focus. Due to a lack of active sampling of configuration response to Hamiltonian transitions, it is challenging for common expanded Hamiltonian methods to robustly explore solvent mediated rare conformational events. The orthogonal space sampling (OSS) scheme, as exemplified by the orthogonal space random walk and orthogonal space tempering methods, provides a general framework for synchronous acceleration of slow configuration responses. To more effectively sample conformational transitions in aqueous solution, in this work, we devised a generalized orthogonal space tempering (gOST) algorithm. Specifically, in the Hamiltonian perturbation part, a solvent-accessible-surface-area-dependent term is introduced to implicitly perturb near-solute water-water fluctuations; more importantly in the orthogonal space response part, the generalized force order parameter is generalized as a two-dimension order parameter set, in which essential solute-solvent and solute-solute components are separately treated. The gOST algorithm is evaluated through a molecular dynamics simulation study on the explicitly solvated deca-alanine (Ala10) peptide. On the basis of a fully automated sampling protocol, the gOST simulation enabled repetitive folding and unfolding of the solvated peptide within a single continuous trajectory and allowed for detailed constructions of Ala10 folding/unfolding free energy surfaces. The gOST result reveals that solvent cooperative fluctuations play a pivotal role in Ala10 folding/unfolding transitions. In addition, our assessment

  12. Predictive Sampling of Rare Conformational Events in Aqueous Solution: Designing a Generalized Orthogonal Space Tempering Method

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Chao; Li, Xubin; Wu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Lianqing; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In aqueous solution, solute conformational transitions are governed by intimate interplays of the fluctuations of solute-solute, solute-water, and water-water interactions. To promote essential fluctuations to enhance sampling, a common strategy is to construct an expanded Hamiltonian through a series of Hamiltonian perturbations, for instance on certain interactions of focus. Due to lack of active sampling of configuration response to perturbation transitions, it is challenging for common expanded Hamiltonian methods to robustly explore solvent mediated rare conformational events. The orthogonal space sampling (OSS) scheme, as exemplified by the orthogonal space random walk and orthogonal space tempering methods, provides a general framework for synchronous acceleration of slow configuration responses. To more effectively sample conformational transitions in aqueous solution, in this work, we devised a generalized orthogonal space tempering (gOST) algorithm. Specifically, in the Hamiltonian perturbation part, a solvent-accessible-surface-area-dependent term is introduced to implicitly perturb near-solute water-water fluctuations; and in the orthogonal space response part, the generalized force order parameter is generalized as a two-dimension order parameter set, in which the solute-solvent and solute-solute components are separately treated. The gOST algorithm is evaluated through a molecular dynamics simulation study on the explicitly-solvated deca-alanine (Ala10) peptide. Based on a fully automated sampling protocol, the gOST simulation enabled repetitive folding and unfolding of the solvated peptide within a single continuous trajectory and allowed for detailed constructions of Ala10 folding/unfolding free energy surfaces. The gOST result reveals that solvent cooperative fluctuations play a pivotal role in Ala10 folding/unfolding transitions. In addition, our assessment analysis suggests that because essential rare events are mainly driven by the compensating

  13. Microscopic and mesoscopic structural features of an activated carbon sample, prepared from sorghum via activation by phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Temleitner, László; Pusztai, László; Rubio-Arroyo, Manuel F.; Aguilar-López, Sergio; Pizio, Orest

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Preparation of a new activated carbon sample from sorghum. ► Characterization by adsorption/desorption methods. ► Determination of the structure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. ► The sample is amorphous and contains distorted graphene fragments. ► A characteristic nanoscale distance is established from the radial distribution function. -- Abstract: An acidic chemical activation procedure has been used for preparing activated carbon with a surface area exceeding 1000 m{sup 2}/g from sorghum. In order to reveal structural features, synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed. The structure of the material has been characterized by the total scattering structure factor and the radial distribution function describing short-range arrangement of atoms at distances of the order of a few atomic diameters as well as correlations at a longer scale, of the order of nanometers. The atomic arrangement has been found to be consistent with that of amorphous graphite-like carbon. As far as the mesoscopic structure is concerned, the presence of a characteristic distance is suggested on the basis of the clear nanometer scale oscillations of the radial distribution function, which distance may be assigned as the mesopore size in the material. It is suggested that the approach devized here may later be applied routinely for other activated carbon samples, too, for characterizing atomic and nanoscale order simultaneously.

  14. Quantitative Method of Measuring Metastatic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated uroldnase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  15. An improved regulatory sampling method for mapping and representing plant disease from a limited number of samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A key challenge for plant pathologists is to develop efficient methods to describe spatial patterns of disease spread accurately from a limited number of samples. Knowledge of disease spread is essential for informing and justifying plant disease management measures. A mechanistic modelling approa...

  16. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  17. Differences in Movement Pattern and Detectability between Males and Females Influence How Common Sampling Methods Estimate Sex Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, João Fabrício Mota; Coelho, Marco Túlio Pacheco

    2016-01-01

    Sampling the biodiversity is an essential step for conservation, and understanding the efficiency of sampling methods allows us to estimate the quality of our biodiversity data. Sex ratio is an important population characteristic, but until now, no study has evaluated how efficient are the sampling methods commonly used in biodiversity surveys in estimating the sex ratio of populations. We used a virtual ecologist approach to investigate whether active and passive capture methods are able to accurately sample a population’s sex ratio and whether differences in movement pattern and detectability between males and females produce biased estimates of sex-ratios when using these methods. Our simulation allowed the recognition of individuals, similar to mark-recapture studies. We found that differences in both movement patterns and detectability between males and females produce biased estimates of sex ratios. However, increasing the sampling effort or the number of sampling days improves the ability of passive or active capture methods to properly sample sex ratio. Thus, prior knowledge regarding movement patterns and detectability for species is important information to guide field studies aiming to understand sex ratio related patterns. PMID:27441554

  18. Sample Energy Conservation Education Activities for Elementary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; LaHart, David E., Ed.

    The booklet contains learning activities for introducing energy and conservation concepts into the existing elementary school curriculum. The activities were developed by Palm Beach County teachers during a one-week workshop. A framework of ideas is divided into three functional categories: universe of energy, living systems and energy, and social…

  19. [An electrochemical method for measuring metabolic activity and counting cells].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, B a; Khlupova, M e; Shleev, S V; Kaprel'iants, A S; Iaropolov, A I

    2006-01-01

    An express electrochemical method for determining the metabolic activity of live cells based on the possibility of an electron exchange between an electrode and elements of the biological electron transfer chain in the presence of a mediator is proposed. This method is useful for studying any live cells (animal, plant, and microbial), including anaerobic, dormant, and spore cells. The sample preparation and measurement itself does not take more than 30 min. The detection limit in a volume of 15 ml amounts to 10-5 cells/ml. The applicability of the assessment method of the metabolic activity level during the transition of the bacteria Mycobacterium smegmatis into an uncultivable dormant state was demonstrated. This method is of special value for medicine and environmental control, detecting latent forms of pathogens. An optimal combination of the methods for the express analysis of latent pathogens is proposed. PMID:17066962

  20. {sup 222}Rn in water: A comparison of two sample collection methods and two sample transport methods, and the determination of temporal variation in North Carolina ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, J.H. III

    1994-12-31

    Objectives of this field experiment were: (1) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the radon concentrations of samples collected by EPA`s standard method, using a syringe, and an alternative, slow-flow method; (2) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the measured radon concentrations of samples mailed vs samples not mailed; and (3) determine whether there was a temporal variation of water radon concentration over a 7-month period. The field experiment was conducted at 9 sites, 5 private wells, and 4 public wells, at various locations in North Carolina. Results showed that a syringe is not necessary for sample collection, there was generally no significant radon loss due to mailing samples, and there was statistically significant evidence of temporal variations in water radon concentrations.

  1. METHODS USED IN DETERMINATION OF CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview and historical perspective of the many available methods for cholinesterase (ChE) activity determination. ue to the almost universal use of the spectrophotometric assay in wildlife toxicology, the remainder of the chapter focuses on this techniqu...

  2. Earth formation sampling and testing method and apparatus with improved filter means

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.F.

    1990-08-28

    This patent describes a method for obtaining samples of connate fluids from formations traversed by a borehole. Also described is an apparatus for collecting samples of connate fluids from earth formations traversed by a borehole.

  3. Impact of the sampling method and chilling on the Salmonella recovery from pig carcasses.

    PubMed

    Vanantwerpen, Gerty; De Zutter, Lieven; Berkvens, Dirk; Houf, Kurt

    2016-09-01

    Differences in recovery of Salmonella on pig carcasses using non-destructive and destructive sampling methods is not well understood in respect to the chilling processes applied in slaughterhouses. Therefore, in two slaughterhouses, four strains at two different concentrations were inoculated onto pork skin. Inoculated skin samples were sampled before and after chilling with two sampling methods: swabbing and destruction. Both slaughterhouses were visited three times and all tests were performed in triplicate. All samples were analysed using the ISO-method and recovered isolates were confirmed by PFGE. The chilling system (fast or conventional cooling) nor the sampling step (before and after chilling) did not significantly influence the recovery of Salmonella. However, swabbing after chilling leads to an underestimation of the real number of contaminated carcasses. Therefore, destructive sampling is the more designated sampling method after chilling. PMID:27236225

  4. 137Cs re-sampling as a method for soil erosion assessment in Alpine grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arata, Laura; Meusburger, Katrin; Bissig, Nicole; Mabit, Lionel; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Over the past decades, radioactive fallout 137Cs has been used as a tracer to provide information on soil erosion and sedimentation rates. However, the method may produce relatively large uncertainties in Alpine grasslands. The latter difficulties are caused by a combination of (i) the heterogeneous distribution of atmospheric 137Cs Chernobyl fallout, (ii) the partly snow covered ground in Alpine areas during the fallout event in April 1986, which results in inhomogeneous 137Cs distribution during snow melt and (iii) uncertainties in finding undisturbed references sites in the geomorphological and anthropogenic highly active slopes of the Alps. To overcome these difficulties, our aim is to replace the classical 137Cs approach, where an undisturbed reference site is compared to erosional sites, with a re-sampling approach, where we re-sample sites which have already been measured for 137Cs inventories in the past. Thus, we use temporal instead of spatial reference. The study area is located in the Central Swiss Alps in the Urseren Valley. Potential erosional sites have been sampled in 2007 and re-sampled in 2012. Two different grassland types were investigated: hayfield (2 sites) and pasture without dwarf shrubs (3 sites). For each site, 4 to 9 sampling points have been defined, and at each point two soil samples have been collected. To reduce the random error, the two soil samples were bulked prior to gamma-analysis. 137Cs inventories of the two sampling years were calculated and used to assess recent soil erosion in the experimental sites. Our results show that within the 5 years measurable soil erosion and deposition processes have occurred within the sites, as indicated by the relevant difference between the 137Cs inventories of 2007 and 2012. 64% of the sites exhibit a decrease in 137Cs inventories, 20% of the sites an increase, and the remaining 16% no significant difference. In particular, hayfield sites have been affected by erosion processes, mostly due to

  5. Automated sample preparation for ICP analysis of active pharmaceutical ingredients and intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sims, Jonathan; Smith, Andrew; Patel, Dharmista; Batchelor, Richard; Carreira, Judith

    2011-10-01

    Routine testing of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) for metal residues is an expectation of regulatory bodies such as the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). Sample preparation techniques are the rate-limiting step in the testing process and can be variable depending on the specific characteristics of the API under test. Simplification and standardization of the routine preparation of inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy sample solutions of organic compounds has been developed using a commercially available robotic workstation. Contamination from the metal components of the instrument and from sample tubes used in the methodology has been studied using a Design of Experiments approach. The optimized method described can be used for the measurement of trace metals in Pharmaceuticals at levels compliant with European and U.S. regulatory requirements. PMID:21906564

  6. Jazz Listening Activities: Children's Literature and Authentic Music Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nan L.; Fisher, Douglas; Helzer, Rick

    2002-01-01

    Describes a unit that is appropriate for upper elementary and middle school students that focuses on jazz music using biographies about jazz musicians. Discusses the five sections of the unit. Includes a list of "Suggested Jazz Listening Samples," jazz videos, and a bibliography of resources related to jazz music. (CMK)

  7. Comparing Respondent-Driven Sampling and Targeted Sampling Methods of Recruiting Injection Drug Users in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Malekinejad, Mohsen; Vaudrey, Jason; Martinez, Alexis N.; Lorvick, Jennifer; McFarland, Willi; Raymond, H. Fisher

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to compare demographic characteristics, risk behaviors, and service utilization among injection drug users (IDUs) recruited from two separate studies in San Francisco in 2005, one which used targeted sampling (TS) and the other which used respondent-driven sampling (RDS). IDUs were recruited using TS (n = 651) and RDS (n = 534) and participated in quantitative interviews that included demographic characteristics, risk behaviors, and service utilization. Prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess whether there were differences in these variables by sampling method. There was overlap in 95% CIs for all demographic variables except African American race (TS: 45%, 53%; RDS: 29%, 44%). Maps showed that the proportion of IDUs distributed across zip codes were similar for the TS and RDS sample, with the exception of a single zip code that was more represented in the TS sample. This zip code includes an isolated, predominantly African American neighborhood where only the TS study had a field site. Risk behavior estimates were similar for both TS and RDS samples, although self-reported hepatitis C infection was lower in the RDS sample. In terms of service utilization, more IDUs in the RDS sample reported no recent use of drug treatment and syringe exchange program services. Our study suggests that perhaps a hybrid sampling plan is best suited for recruiting IDUs in San Francisco, whereby the more intensive ethnographic and secondary analysis components of TS would aid in the planning of seed placement and field locations for RDS. PMID:20582573

  8. A neutron activation analysis procedure for the determination of uranium, thorium and potassium in geologic samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aruscavage, P. J.; Millard, H.T., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A neutron activation analysis procedure was developed for the determination of uranium, thorium and potassium in basic and ultrabasic rocks. The three elements are determined in the same 0.5-g sample following a 30-min irradiation in a thermal neutron flux of 2??1012 n??cm-2??sec-1. Following radiochemical separation, the nuclides239U (T=23.5 m),233Th (T=22.2 m) and42K (T=12.36 h) are measured by ??-counting. A computer program is used to resolve the decay curves which are complex owing to contamination and the growth of daughter activities. The method was used to determine uranium, throium and potassium in the U. S. Geological Survey standard rocks DTS-1, PCC-1 and BCR-1. For 0.5-g samples the limits of detection for uranium, throium and potassium are 0.7, 1.0 and 10 ppb, respectively. ?? 1972 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  9. Associations between physical activity and other health behaviors in a representative sample of US adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Pate, R R; Heath, G W; Dowda, M; Trost, S G

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the associations between physical activity and other health behaviors in a representative sample of US adolescents. METHODS: In the 1990 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 11631 high school students provided information on physical activity; diet; substance use; and other negative health behaviors. Logistic regression analyses examined associations between physical activity and other health behaviors in a subset of 2652 high-active and 1641 low-active students. RESULTS: Low activity was associated with cigarette smoking, marijuana use, lower fruit and vegetable consumption, greater television watching, failure to wear a seat belt, and low perception of academic performance. For consumption of fruit, television watching, and alcohol consumption, significant interactions were found with race/ethnicity or sex, suggesting that sociocultural factors may affect the relationships between physical activity and some health behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Low physical activity was associated with several other negative health behaviors in teenagers. Future studies should examine whether interventions for increasing physical activity in youth can be effective in reducing negative health behaviors. PMID:8916523

  10. Measurement of radon potential from soil using a special method of sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosma, Constantin; Papp, Botond; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Victor; Cindea, Ciprian; Suciu, Liviu; Apostu, Adelina

    2010-10-01

    Soil radon gas and/or its exhalation rate are used as indicators for some applications, such as uranium exploration, indoor radon concentration, seismic activity, location of subsurface faults, etc., and also in the studies where the main interest is the field verification of radon transport models. This work proposes a versatile method for the soil radon sampling using a special manner of pumping. The soil gas is passed through a column of charcoal by using passive pumping. A plastic bottle filled with water is coupled to an activated charcoal column and the flow of water through an adjustable hole made at the bottom of bottle assures a controlled gas flow from the soil. The results obtained for the activity of activated charcoal are in the range of 20-40 kBq/m3, for a depth of approximately 0.8 m. The results obtained by this method were confirmed by simultaneous measurements using LUK 3C device for soil radon measurements. Possible applications for the estimation of radon soil potential are discussed.

  11. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOEpatents

    Beverly, Claude R.; Ernstberger, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases.

  12. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOEpatents

    Beverly, C.R.; Ernstberger, E.G.

    1985-07-03

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases. 1 fig.

  13. Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) From Photochemical Activity in Snow Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, G.; Ariya, P. A.

    2004-05-01

    The occurrence of VOCs in snow has been observed and can be related to anthropogenic emissions and biological activity. Photochemistry and microorganisms play a major role in the transformation of compounds in different compartments of the global ecosystem. Studies so far focused on the determination of single analytes or a class of compounds - mainly of anthropogenic origin (e.g. halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons) - that were considered important with regard to health and environmental concerns. Broader studies that describe a range of different compounds with different functionalities are relatively rare, especially for those of biological origin. The presented study investigated the formation of VOCs in snow samples and their connection with microbiological activity. The main aim was to pre-concentrate, identify and quantify volatile organic compounds. Snow samples were collected in an urban environment (Montreal, Canada) with sterilized containers. Samples were transferred into a heated reaction flask, where the sample was melted. A two-trap system was employed for pre-concentration: The first trap was used for water removal. The second trap was used for the collection of expected analytes by removing volatiles from the circulating air. Circulation was maintained with a pump at atmospheric pressure. Adsorption to glass walls of the reaction flask was prevented with halocarbon wax coating. Different sterilization methods were employed to suppress microbiological activity in order to collect background data and identify compounds of biological origin. VOC concentration and compound identification was performed with gas chromatography and mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) by taking a sample with a gas-tight syringe through a septum-port. The sample was directly injected into the GC system. Compounds were identified by their respective mass spectra and included aldehydes and alcohols.

  14. Accurate measurement of bromine contents in plastic samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, I J; Lee, K S; Hwang, E; Min, H S; Yim, Y H

    2013-03-26

    Accurate measurements of bromine contents in plastic samples were made by the direct comparator instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Individual factors affecting the measurements were comprehensively evaluated and compensated, including the volatility loss of bromine from standard comparators, the background bromine level in the filter papers used for preparation of the standard comparators, nuclear interference, γ-ray spectral interference and the variance among replicates of the samples. Uncertainty contributions from those factors were thoroughly evaluated and included in the uncertainty budgeting of the INAA measurement. (81)Br was chosen as the target isotope, and the INAA measurements for bromine were experimentally confirmed to exhibit good linearity within a bromine content range of 10-170 μg. The established method has been applied to the analysis of eight plastic samples: four commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) of polyethylene and polystyrene and four acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) samples prepared as the candidate reference materials (KRISS CRM 113-01-012, -013, -014 and -015). The bromine contents of the samples were calculated at three different γ-ray energies and compared, showing good agreement. The results of the four CRMs also showed good consistency with their certified values within the stated uncertainties. Finally, the bromine contents of the ABS samples were determined with expanded uncertainties (at a 95% level of confidence) between 2.5% and 5% in a bromine content range of 25-900 mg kg(-1). PMID:23498117

  15. Quantification of active infliximab in human serum with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a tumor necrosis factor alpha -based pre-analytical sample purification and a stable isotopic labeled infliximab bio-similar as internal standard: A target-based, sensitive and cost-effective method.

    PubMed

    El Amrani, Mohsin; van den Broek, Marcel P H; Göbel, Camiel; van Maarseveen, Erik M

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic monoclonal antibody Infliximab (IFX) is a widely used drug for the treatment of several inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, approximately 10% of patients develop anti-infliximab antibodies (ATIs) rendering the treatment ineffective. Early detection of underexposure to unbound IFX would result in a timely switch of therapy which could aid in the treatment of this disease. Streptavidin coated 96 well plates were used to capture biotinylated-tumor necrosis factor -alpha (b-TNF-α), which in turn was used to selectively extract the active form of IFX in human serum. After elution, IFX was digested using trypsin and one signature peptide was selected for subsequent analysis on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The internal standard used was a stable isotopic labeled IFX bio-similar. The assay was successfully validated according to European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines and was found to be linear in a range of 0.5-20μg/mL (r(2)=0.994). Lower limit of quantification for the assay (<20% CV) was 0.5μg/mL, requiring only 2μL of sample. Cross-validation against enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) resulted in a high correlation between methods (r(2)=0.95 with a ρc=0.83) and the accuracy was in line with previously published results. In conclusion, a sensitive, robust and cost-effective method was developed for the bio-analysis of IFX with LC-MS/MS by means of a target-based pre-analytical sample purification. Moreover, low volume and costs of consumables per sample promote its feasibility in (pre)clinical studies and in therapeutic drug monitoring. This method should be considered as first choice due to its accuracy and multiple degree of selectivity. PMID:27264745

  16. Evaluation of methods to assess physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenders, Nicole Y. J. M.

    Epidemiological evidence has accumulated that demonstrates that the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure during a week reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and all-cause mortality. To further understand the amount of daily physical activity and related energy expenditure that are necessary to maintain or improve the functional health status and quality of life, instruments that estimate total (TDEE) and physical activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE) under free-living conditions should be determined to be valid and reliable. Without evaluation of the various methods that estimate TDEE and PAEE with the doubly labeled water (DLW) method in females there will be eventual significant limitations on assessing the efficacy of physical activity interventions on health status in this population. A triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D, (TT)), an uniaxial (Computer Science and Applications Inc., (CSA)) activity monitor, a Yamax-Digiwalker-500sp°ler , (YX-stepcounter), by measuring heart rate responses (HR method) and a 7-d Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (7-d PAR) were compared with the "criterion method" of DLW during a 7-d period in female adults. The DLW-TDEE was underestimated on average 9, 11 and 15% using 7-d PAR, HR method and TT. The underestimation of DLW-PAEE by 7-d PAR was 21% compared to 47% and 67% for TT and YX-stepcounter. Approximately 56% of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the registration of body movement with accelerometry. A larger proportion of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} was explained by jointly incorporating information from the vertical and horizontal movement measured with the CSA and Tritrac-R3D (rsp2 = 0.87). Although only a small amount of variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the number of steps taken per day, because of its low cost and ease of use, the Yamax-stepcounter is useful in studies promoting daily walking. Thus, studies involving the

  17. A cost effective, sensitive, and environmentally friendly sample preparation method for determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in solid samples

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Chika; Lee, Wen-Yee

    2010-01-01

    A simple, cost effective, and yet sensitive sample preparation technique was investigated for determining polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in solid samples. The method comprises ultrasonic extraction, Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE), and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD – GC/MS) to increase analytical capacity in laboratories. This method required no clean-up and satisfied PAHs recovery and significantly advances cost performance over conventional extraction methods, such as Soxhlet and Microwave Assisted Extraction (MAE). This study evaluated three operational parameters for ultrasonic extraction: solvent composition, extraction time, and sample load. A standard material, SRM 1649 a (urban dust), was used as the solid sample matrix, and 12 priority PAHs on the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) list were analyzed. Combination of non-polar and polar solvents ameliorated extraction efficiency. Acetone/hexane mixtures of 2:3 and 1:1 (v/v) gave the most satisfactory results: recoveries ranged from 63.3 % to 122 %. Single composition solvents (methanol, hexane, and dichloromethane) showed fewer recoveries. Comparing 20 minutes with 60 minutes sonication, longer sonication diminished extraction efficiencies in general. Furthermore, sample load became a critical factor in certain solvent systems, such as MeOH. MAE was also compared to the ultrasonic extraction, and results determined that the 20-minutes ultrasonic extraction using acetone / hexane (2:3 v/v) was as potent as MAE. The SBSE method using 20 mL of 30 % alcohol-fortified solution rendered a limit of detection ranging from 1.7 to 32 ng L−1 and a limit of quantitation ranging from 5.8 to 110 ng L−1 for the 16 US EPA PAHs. PMID:20851399

  18. A method to optimize sampling locations for measuring indoor air distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Shen, Xiong; Li, Jianmin; Li, Bingye; Duan, Ran; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Liu, Junjie; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Indoor air distributions, such as the distributions of air temperature, air velocity, and contaminant concentrations, are very important to occupants' health and comfort in enclosed spaces. When point data is collected for interpolation to form field distributions, the sampling locations (the locations of the point sensors) have a significant effect on time invested, labor costs and measuring accuracy on field interpolation. This investigation compared two different sampling methods: the grid method and the gradient-based method, for determining sampling locations. The two methods were applied to obtain point air parameter data in an office room and in a section of an economy-class aircraft cabin. The point data obtained was then interpolated to form field distributions by the ordinary Kriging method. Our error analysis shows that the gradient-based sampling method has 32.6% smaller error of interpolation than the grid sampling method. We acquired the function between the interpolation errors and the sampling size (the number of sampling points). According to the function, the sampling size has an optimal value and the maximum sampling size can be determined by the sensor and system errors. This study recommends the gradient-based sampling method for measuring indoor air distributions.

  19. The method of radioactive tracer for measuring the amount of inorganic nanoparticles in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzulukov, Yu; Antsiferova, A.; Demin, V. A.; Demin, V. F.; Kashkarov, P.

    2015-11-01

    The method to measure the mass of inorganic nanoparticles in biological (or any other samples) using nanoparticles labeled with radioactive tracers is developed and applied to practice. The tracers are produced in original nanoparticles by radioactive activation of some of their atomic nuclei. The method of radioactive tracers demonstrates a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy equal or better than popular methods of optical and mass spectrometry, or electron microscopy and has some specific advantages. The method can be used for study of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in living organism, as well as in ecological and fundamental research. It was used in practice to study absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Se, ZnO, TiO2 as well as to study transportation of silver nanoparticles through the barriers of blood-brain, placenta and milk gland of rats. Brief descriptions of data obtained in experiments with application of this method included in the article. The method was certified in Russian Federation standard system GOST-R and recommended by the Russian Federation regulation authority ROSPOTREBNADZOR for measuring of toxicokinetic and organotropy parameters of nanoparticles.

  20. A new method of geobiological sample storage by snap freezing under alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morono, Y.; Terada, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Hirose, T.; Xiao, N.; Sugeno, M.; Ohwada, N.; Inagaki, F.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific ocean drilling provides unprecedented opportunities to study the deep subseafloor biosphere. Especially, subseafloor living life and its genomes are significant components, since the activity may play some roles in global biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, metals, and other elements over geologic times. Given the significance of deep biological components as well as the potential application of future analytical technologies to the core, the material (or portions thereof) should be preserved in the best appropriate manner for long-term storage. Here we report a novel technology to freeze the cored sample with the least damage on scientifically important multiple characteristics including microbial cells. In the conventional freezer, expanding volume of pore space by the formation of ice crystals may change the (micro-) structure in the core sample (e.g., cell, micro-fossils). The cell alive system (CAS) is the new super-quick freezing system that applies alternating magnetic field for vibrating water molecules in the samples: i.e., the vibration leads to the stable super-cooled condition of the liquid-phase water at around -7 to -10 degree-C, keeping the liquid at the low temperature uniformly. Following further decrease of temperature enables the snap and hence uniform freezing of the samples with minimal size of the ice crystal formation, resulting in the minimum damage on structurally fragile components such as microbial cells and its DNA. We tested the CAS freezing technique for sediment core samples obtained by the Chikyu training cruise 905 and others. The core samples from various depths were sub-sampled, and immediately frozen in the CAS system along with the standard freezing method under the temperature of -20, -80, and -196 (liquid nitrogen) degree-C. Microbial cell abundance showed that the normal freezing decreased the number of microbial cells, whereas the CAS freezing resulted in almost no loss of the cells. We also tested

  1. Active music therapy and Parkinson's disease: methods.

    PubMed

    Pacchetti, C; Aglieri, R; Mancini, F; Martignoni, E; Nappi, G

    1998-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is an unconventional, multisensorial therapy poorly assessed in medical care but widely used to different ends in a variety of settings. MT has two branches: active and passive. In active MT the utilisation of instruments is structured to correspond to all sensory organs so as to obtain suitable motor and emotional responses. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effects of MT in the neurorehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), a common degenerative disorder involving movement and emotional impairment. Sixteen PD patients took part in 13 weekly sessions of MT each lasting 2 hours. At the beginning and at the end of the session, every 2 weeks, the patients were evaluated by a neurologist, who assessed PD severity with UPDRS, emotional functions with Happiness Measures (HM) and quality of life using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL). After every session a significant improvement in motor function, particularly in relation to hypokinesia, was observed both in the overall and in the pre-post session evaluations. HM, UPDRS-ADL and PDQL changes confirmed an improving effect of MT on emotional functions, activities of daily living and quality of life. In conclusion, active MT, operating at a multisensorial level, stimulates motor, affective and behavioural functions. Finally, we propose active MT as new method to include in PD rehabilitation programmes. This article describes the methods adopted during MT sessions with PD patients. PMID:9584875

  2. Evaluation of seven aquatic sampling methods for amphibians and other aquatic fauna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunzburger, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    To design effective and efficient research and monitoring programs researchers must have a thorough understanding of the capabilities and limitations of their sampling methods. Few direct comparative studies exist for aquatic sampling methods for amphibians. The objective of this study was to simultaneously employ seven aquatic sampling methods in 10 wetlands to compare amphibian species richness and number of individuals detected with each method. Four sampling methods allowed counts of individuals (metal dipnet, D-frame dipnet, box trap, crayfish trap), whereas the other three methods allowed detection of species (visual encounter, aural, and froglogger). Amphibian species richness was greatest with froglogger, box trap, and aural samples. For anuran species, the sampling methods by which each life stage was detected was related to relative length of larval and breeding periods and tadpole size. Detection probability of amphibians varied across sampling methods. Box trap sampling resulted in the most precise amphibian count, but the precision of all four count-based methods was low (coefficient of variation > 145 for all methods). The efficacy of the four count sampling methods at sampling fish and aquatic invertebrates was also analyzed because these predatory taxa are known to be important predictors of amphibian habitat distribution. Species richness and counts were similar for fish with the four methods, whereas invertebrate species richness and counts were greatest in box traps. An effective wetland amphibian monitoring program in the southeastern United States should include multiple sampling methods to obtain the most accurate assessment of species community composition at each site. The combined use of frogloggers, crayfish traps, and dipnets may be the most efficient and effective amphibian monitoring protocol. ?? 2007 Brill Academic Publishers.

  3. Evaluation of micro-colorimetric lipid determination method with samples prepared using sonication and accelerated solvent extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Billa, Nanditha; Hubin-Barrows, Dylan; Lahren, Tylor; Burkhard, Lawrence P

    2014-02-01

    Two common laboratory extraction techniques were evaluated for routine use with the micro-colorimetric lipid determination method developed by Van Handel (1985) [2] and recently validated for small samples by Inouye and Lotufo (2006) [1]. With the accelerated solvent extraction method using chloroform:methanol solvent and the colorimetric lipid determination method, 28 of 30 samples had significant proportional bias (α=1%, determined using standard additions) and 1 of 30 samples had significant constant bias (α=1%, determined using Youden Blank measurements). With sonic extraction, 0 of 6 samples had significant proportional bias (α=1%) and 1 of 6 samples had significant constant bias (α=1%). These demonstrate that the accelerated solvent extraction method with chloroform:methanol solvent system creates an interference with the colorimetric assay method, and without accounting for the bias in the analysis, inaccurate measurements would be obtained. PMID:24401464

  4. Improved method for mutagenicity testing of gaseous compounds by using a gas sampling bag.

    PubMed

    Araki, A; Noguchi, T; Kato, F; Matsushima, T

    1994-05-01

    A simple and safety gas exposure method was developed using a gas sampling bag as an exposure vessel and a preparation vessel of diluted gas. The gas exposure conditions such as amount of S9 in the plate, volume of gas for the plate, amount of top agar, exposure period and exposure temperature were examined by mutagenicity testing of 1,3-butadiene using the gas sampling bag. Mutagenicity tests of 14 compounds and 1,3-butadiene on S. typhimurium TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537, and E. coli WP2 uvrA were also examined by the developed gas exposure method. 1,3-Butadiene, propyne (methyl acetylene), monochlorodifluoromethane, ethylchloride, diborane and silane were mutagenic. 1-Butene, 2-butene, 2-methylpropene, methyl vinyl ether, trichlorofluoromethane, dichlorodifluoromethane, 1,2-dichloro-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane, 1,1-difluoroethane and phosphine were not mutagenic on S. typhimurium TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537, and E. coli WP2 uvrA with or without metabolic activation. These results were compatible with a previous report, and this developed method has the advantage that it can be tested easily and safely for combustible and self-combustible substances such as 1,3-butadiene and silane. PMID:7513814

  5. Development of a sampling and analytical method for 2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane in workplace air.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Chul; Yi, Gwang Yong; Kim, Yangho; Paik, Nam Won

    2002-01-01

    The use of 2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane (compound number: HCFC-123) is growing in industry as a substitute for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Recently, liver-related illnesses have been reported from industries handling HCFC-123. However, information on worker exposure to the material is limited, and an acceptable sampling/analytical method is not available. The aim of this study was to develop a widely applicable sampling and analytical method to determine worker exposures to airborne HCFC-123 and to evaluate the performance of the method. A solid sorbent tube, containing two sections (400 mg in the front and 200 mg in the back) of activated coconut-shell charcoal was chosen for sampling airborne HCFC-123 vapor. The breakthrough volumes were 13.6 L at 3597 +/- 210.1 ppm (with a sampling airflow rate of 0.046 L/min) and 17.0 L at 1841 +/- 4.5 ppm (with sampling airflow rate of 0.046-0.050 L/min). Samples of HCFC-123 in the charcoal tube were stable for 7 days either at room temperature or in a refrigerator and a migration occurred within 14 days at room temperature. It is recommended that the HCFC-123 sample in activated charcoal tubes be stored either at room temperature or in a refrigerator and be analyzed within 7 days. The HCFC-123 in the charcoal tubes was desorbed into dichloromethane and analyzed using gas chromatography/ flame ionization detection. The limit of detection was 0.23 mg/sample, and the average desorption efficiency was 99.0%. The total coefficient of variation was 0.060, and the method accuracy was 16.6%. In conclusion, the performance of the sampling and analytical method developed for the determination of airborne HCFC-123 concentrations was acceptable to the NIOSH sampling and analytical criteria. PMID:12570079

  6. Measurement for Work. Teaching Guide and Sample Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Margo; Bolton, Chris

    This document is intended to help Australian technical and further education instructors in New South Wales (TAFE NSW) identify teaching principles and learning activities that they can use to help adult learners master the mathematics processes, knowledge, and skills needed to perform basic measurement tasks in today's workplace. The materials…

  7. METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF METALS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES - SUPPLEMENT I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual includes seven analytical methods four of which are considered multi-analyte methods, two are single analyte methods, and the total recoverable sample preparation procedure is given as a separate method write up. These methods utilize inductively coupled plasma (ICP)/...

  8. A comparative study between the dynamic method and passive can technique of radon exhalation measurements from samples.

    PubMed

    Raj Menon, Sreeja; Sahoo, B K; Balasundar, S; Gaware, J J; Jose, M T; Venkatraman, B; Mayya, Y S

    2015-05-01

    A comparative study has been carried out between the SSNTD based 'can' technique and active monitors based dynamic method using nine different samples, eight of granite and one of phosphogypsum. Besides radon ((222)Rn) exhalation, thoron((220)Rn) exhalation and (226)Ra and (232)Th content were also measured. The results are: (i) presence of significant thoron exhalation from samples and (ii) observation of thoron interference and leak (~0.05h(-1)) from the 'can' in the SSNTD based 'can' technqiue. The study unequivocally demonstrates the presence of intrinsic uncertainty in SSNTD based 'can' technique. Instead, dynamic method offers a more reliable and faster method. PMID:25770859

  9. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  10. Sample Heat, Activity, Reactivity, and Dose Analysis for Safety Analysis of Irradiations in a Research Reactor.

    1987-12-01

    SHARDA is a program for assessing sample heating rates, activities produced and reactivity load caused while irradiating a small sample in a well thermalized research reactor like CIRUS. It estimates the sample cooling or lead shielding requirements to limit the gamma-ray dose rates due to the irradiated sample within permissible levels.

  11. Review of Analytes of Concern and Sample Methods for Closure of DOE High Level Waste Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, T.R.

    2002-05-06

    Sampling residual waste after tank cleaning and analysis for analytes of concern to support closure and cleaning targets of large underground tanks used for storage of legacy high level radioactive waste (HLW) at Department of Energy (DOE) sites has been underway since about 1995. The DOE Tanks Focus Area (TFA) has been working with DOE tank sites to develop new sampling plans, and sampling methods for assessment of residual waste inventories. This paper discusses regulatory analytes of concern, sampling plans, and sampling methods that support closure and cleaning target activities for large storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP).

  12. Review of Analytes of Concern and Sample Methods for Closure of DOE High Level Waste Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Thomas Russell

    2002-08-01

    Sampling residual waste after tank cleaning and analysis for analytes of concern to support closure and cleaning targets of large underground tanks used for storage of legacy high level radioactive waste (HLW) at Department of Energy (DOE) sites has been underway since about 1995. The DOE Tanks Focus Area (TFA) has been working with DOE tank sites to develop new sampling plans, and sampling methods for assessment of residual waste inventories. This paper discusses regulatory analytes of concern, sampling plans, and sampling methods that support closure and cleaning target activities for large storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP).

  13. Antimicrobial activity of different solvent extracted samples from the flowers of medicinally important Plumeria obstusa.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nasir; Ahmad, Dawood; Bakht, Jehan

    2015-01-01

    The present research work was carried out to investigate the antimicrobial (eight bacteria and one fungus) activities of different solvent (ethanol, petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and isobutanol) extracted samples from flowers of P. obstusa by disc diffusion method. Analysis of the data revealed that all the five extracts from flowers of P. obstusa showed different ranges of antimicrobial activities. Petroleum ether fractions showed inhibitory activities against all the nine microbial species except Klebsiella pneumonia. Ethyl acetate and isobutanol fractions showed inhibitory effects against all the tested microbial species except Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Chloroform and ethanol extracts had varying levels of inhibitions against all of the tested microorganisms. The most susceptible gram positive bacterium was Bacillus subtilis which was inhibited by all the five extracts while the most resistant gram positive bacterium was Staphylococcus aureus. Erwinia carotovora was the most susceptible gram negative bacterium while Pseudomonas aeruginosa was highly resistant among the gram negative bacteria. PMID:25553696

  14. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR THE DETERMINATION OF FORMALDEHYDE IN SAMPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ORIGIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method was developed for the determination of formaldehyde in samples of environmental origin. After a review of the current literature, five candidate methods involving chemical derivatization were chosen for evaluation. The five derivatization reagents studied wer...

  15. Substrate-zymography: a still worthwhile method for gelatinases analysis in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Serena; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Oriente, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Di Carlo, Angelina

    2016-08-01

    Matrix metallo-proteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases, capable of degrading all the molecular components of extracellular matrix. A class of MMPs is gelatinases which includes gelatinase A or MMP-2 (72 kDa) and gelatinase B or MMP-9 (92 kDa), which have been shown to play critical roles in pathophysiology of many human disease and, in particular, cancer progression. For these reasons they obtained a great interest as potential non-invasive biomarker in providing useful clinical information in cancer diagnosis and therapy. A sensitive and unexpensive method for analysis of gelatinases is the gelatine zymography, which allows to measure the relative amounts of active and inactive enzymes in body fluids and tissue extracts. The procedure involves the electrophoretic separation of proteins under denaturing but non reducing conditions through a polyacrylamide gel containing a synthetic substrate (gelatin). The aim of this mini-review has been to describe the general principles of gelatine zymography technique, underling the main advantages and disadvantages. Even though an improvement of this method is necessary for a better applicability in laboratory medicine, gelatine zymography represents the most convenient method to detect the activity of the different gelatinases from a wide range of biological samples. PMID:26641968

  16. IMPROVEMENTS IN PREPARATION OF SAMPLES GENERATED BY SW-846 METHOD 0010

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a field evaluation of a stationary source method (SW-846, 0010), a problem of low sample recovery was encountered. he source had a high moisture content and the sampling media was difficult to remove from the sample container. he problem was identified to be the use of met...

  17. A METHOD FOR THE SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for the sampling and analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in air. An easily constructed, high-volume sampling system is employed with porous polyurethane foam as the collection medium. The sample is collected at the rate of 0.6 to 1.0 cu m per minut...

  18. Persistence Pays Off: Follow-Up Methods for Difficult-to-Track Longitudinal Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Kleschinsky, John H.; Bosworth, Leslie B.; Nelson, Sarah E.; Walsh, Erinn K.; Shaffer, Howard J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Evolving privacy and confidentiality regulations make achieving high completion rates in longitudinal studies challenging. Periodically reviewing the methods researchers use to retain participants throughout the follow-up period is important. We review the effectiveness of methods to maximize completion rates in a 1-year longitudinal study of repeat driving-under-the-influence (DUI) offenders. Method: During the course of 21 months, we attempted to follow-up with 704 participants of a licensed residential treatment facility for repeat DUI offenders. High rates of lifetime Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, substance-use disorders (97.6%) and nonsubstance- or nongambling-related psychiatric disorders (44.5%) among the sample made tracking participants difficult. To locate participants and complete follow-up interviews, we obtained baseline information, contacted collaterals, sent mailed reminders, searched Internet databases, and gave a monetary incentive for completing study interviews. Results: We located 608 participants with active telephone numbers (87.4%) and completed interviews with 488 (70.1% of the entire eligible sample and 80.3% of those with active telephone numbers), after an average (SD) of 8.6 (9.1) calls (median = 5.0). Increasing the number of calls continued to yield additional completions at 10, 20, and 30 calls; at approximately 40 telephone calls, the potential return for additional calls did not justify the added effort. Conclusions: These results suggest that researchers need to (1) employ more than 10 telephone calls to adequately track difficult-to-follow substance-using populations, and (2) prepare for a subsample of participants who might require more extensive contact. These results highlight the importance of using empirical guidelines to plan estimates for the number of contacts needed to achieve an adequate follow-up completion rate. PMID:19737500

  19. Rapid method for the determination of 226Ra in hydraulic fracturing wastewater samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Warren, Richard A.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2016-03-24

    A new method that rapidly preconcentrates and measures 226Ra from hydraulic fracturing wastewater samples was developed in the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory. The method improves the quality of 226Ra measurements using gamma spectrometry by providing up to 100x preconcentration of 226Ra from this difficult sample matrix, which contains very high levels of calcium, barium, strontium, magnesium and sodium. The high chemical yield, typically 80-90%, facilitates a low detection limit, important for lower level samples, and indicates method ruggedness. Ba-133 tracer is used to determine chemical yield and correct for geometry-related counting issues. The 226Ra sample preparation takes < 2 hours.

  20. Improved Butanol-Methanol (BUME) Method by Replacing Acetic Acid for Lipid Extraction of Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Mutya; Wang, Miao; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Han, Xianlin

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of lipids from biological samples is a critical step in lipidomics, especially for shotgun lipidomics where lipid extracts are directly infused into a mass spectrometer. The butanol-methanol (BUME) extraction method was originally developed to extract lipids from plasma samples with 1 % acetic acid. Considering some lipids are sensitive to acidic environments, we modified this protocol by replacing acetic acid with lithium chloride solution and extended the modified extraction to tissue samples. Although no significant reduction of plasmalogen levels in the acidic BUME extracts of rat heart samples was found, the modified method was established to extract various tissue samples, including rat liver, heart, and plasma. Essentially identical profiles of the majority of lipid classes were obtained from the extracts of the modified BUME and traditional Bligh-Dyer methods. However, it was found that neither the original, nor the modified BUME method was suitable for 4-hydroxyalkenal species measurement in biological samples. PMID:27245345

  1. COMPARISON OF SAMPLING METHODS FOR SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANIC CARBON (SVOC) ASSOCIATED WITH PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates the influence of denuder sampling methods and filter collection media on the measurement of semi-volatile organic carbon (SVOC) associated with PM2.5. Two types of collection media, charcoal (activated carbon) and XAD, were used both in diffusion denuders ...

  2. Neutron activation determination of iridium, gold, platinum, and silver in geologic samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Low-level methods for the determination of iridium and other noble metals have become increasingly important in recent years due to interest in locating abundance anomalies associated with the Cretaceous and Tertiary (K-T) boundary. Typical iridium anomalies are in the range of 1 to 100 ??g/kg (ppb). Thus methods with detection limits near 0.1 ??g/kg should be adequate to detect K-T boundary anomalies. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis methods continue to be required although instrumental neutron activation analysis techniques employing elaborate gamma-counters are under development. In the procedure developed in this study samples irradiated in the epithermal neutron facility of the U. S. Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor (Denver, Colorado) are treated with a mini-fire assay technique. The iridium, gold, and silver are collected in a 1-gram metallic lead button. Primary contaminants at this stage are arsenic and antimony. These can be removed by heating the button with a mixture of sodium perioxide and sodium hydroxide. The resulting 0.2-gram lead bead is counted in a Compton suppression spectrometer. Carrier yields are determined by reirradiation of the lead beads. This procedure has been applied to the U.S.G.S. Standard Rock PCC-1 and samples from K-T boundary sites in the Western Interior of North America. ?? 1987 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  3. Optical method and system for the characterization of laterally-patterned samples in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    2011-02-22

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample having a structure disposed on or within the sample, comprising the steps of applying a first pulse of light to a surface of the sample for creating a propagating strain pulse in the sample, applying a second pulse of light to the surface so that the second pulse of light interacts with the propagating strain pulse in the sample, sensing from a reflection of the second pulse a change in optical response of the sample, and relating a time of occurrence of the change in optical response to at least one dimension of the structure.

  4. Optical method for the characterization of laterally-patterned samples in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    2010-08-24

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample having a structure disposed on or within the sample, comprising the steps of applying a first pulse of light to a surface of the sample for creating a propagating strain pulse in the sample, applying a second pulse of light to the surface so that the second pulse of light interacts with the propagating strain pulse in the sample, sensing from a reflection of the second pulse a change in optical response of the sample, and relating a time of occurrence of the change in optical response to at least one dimension of the structure.

  5. Optical method and system for the characterization of laterally-patterned samples in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    2008-03-04

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample having a structure disposed on or within the sample, comprising the steps of applying a first pulse of light to a surface of the sample for creating a propagating strain pulse in the sample, applying a second pulse of light to the surface so that the second pulse of light interacts with the propagating strain pulse in the sample, sensing from a reflection of the second pulse a change in optical response of the sample, and relating a time of occurrence of the change in optical response to at least one dimension of the structure.

  6. Optical method for the characterization of laterally-patterned samples in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample having a structure disposed on or within the sample, comprising the steps of applying a first pulse of light to a surface of the sample for creating a propagating strain pulse in the sample, applying a second pulse of light to the surface so that the second pulse of light interacts with the propagating strain pulse in the sample, sensing from a reflection of the second pulse a change in optical response of the sample, and relating a time of occurrence of the change in optical response to at least one dimension of the structure.

  7. A LITERATURE REVIEW OF WIPE SAMPLING METHODS FOR CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS AND TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wipe sampling is an important technique for the estimation of contaminant deposition in buildings, homes, or outdoor surfaces as a source of possible human exposure. Numerous

    methods of wipe sampling exist, and each method has its own specification for the type of wipe, we...

  8. 40 CFR 80.8 - Sampling methods for gasoline and diesel fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sampling methods for gasoline and... gasoline and diesel fuel. The sampling methods specified in this section shall be used to collect...

  9. 40 CFR 80.8 - Sampling methods for gasoline and diesel fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sampling methods for gasoline and... gasoline and diesel fuel. The sampling methods specified in this section shall be used to collect...

  10. 40 CFR 80.8 - Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the Federal Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. To enforce any edition other than... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel... Provisions § 80.8 Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels....

  11. 43 CFR 11.64 - Injury determination phase-testing and sampling methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Injury determination phase-testing and sampling methods. 11.64 Section 11.64 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type B Procedures § 11.64 Injury determination phase—testing and sampling methods. (a) General. (1) The...

  12. Evaluation of beef trim sampling methods for detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a major concern in ground beef. Several methods for sampling beef trim prior to grinding are currently used in the beef industry. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of the sampling methods for detecting STEC in beef ...

  13. Application of a Permethrin Immunosorbent Assay Method to Residential Soil and Dust Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    A low-cost, high throughput bioanalytical screening method was developed for monitoring cis/trans-permethrin in dust and soil samples. The method consisted of a simple sample preparation procedure [sonication with dichloromethane followed by a solvent exchange into methanol:wate...

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF PHYSICAL FACTORS ON COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE OF SAMPLING METHODS IN LARGE RIVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1999, we compared five existing benthic macroinvertebrate sampling methods used in boatable rivers. Each sampling protocol was performed at each of 60 sites distributed among four rivers in the Ohio River drainage basin. Initial comparison of methods using key macroinvertebr...

  15. Sampling Methods and the Accredited Population in Athletic Training Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Volberding, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Context: We describe methods of sampling the widely-studied, yet poorly defined, population of accredited athletic training education programs (ATEPs). Objective: There are two purposes to this study; first to describe the incidence and types of sampling methods used in athletic training education research, and second to clearly define the…

  16. Comparison of Three Insect Sampling Methods in Sweetpotato Foliage in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three sampling methods-sweep-net, hand-vacuum modified from a leaf vacuum/blower, and a wheeled, blower-vacuum designed to blow insects from the foliage into the vacuum port of a leaf vacuum-were compared as methods for sampling insects in sweetpotatoes, lpomead batatas L. Results of the 4-yr study...

  17. 7 CFR 51.308 - Methods of sampling and calculation of percentages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Grades of Apples Methods of Sampling and Calculation of Percentages § 51.308 Methods of sampling and... weigh ten pounds or less, or in any container where the minimum diameter of the smallest apple does not vary more than 1/2 inch from the minimum diameter of the largest apple, percentages shall be...

  18. 7 CFR 51.308 - Methods of sampling and calculation of percentages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Grades of Apples Methods of Sampling and Calculation of Percentages § 51.308 Methods of sampling and... weigh ten pounds or less, or in any container where the minimum diameter of the smallest apple does not vary more than 1/2 inch from the minimum diameter of the largest apple, percentages shall be...

  19. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2006-10-31

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  20. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2010-08-24

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  1. Map showing locations of samples dated by radiocarbon methods in the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Robert H.

    1971-01-01

    The potential value of a radiocarbon date is diminished, however, if adequate site data are not taken with the sample and do not accompany the date in publication.  At a minimum, published dates should include an accurate location for the dated sample, type of material dated and method of dating, nature of the site, depth below surface (or other accurately defined datum) of date sample, stratigraphy of material overlying date sample, and the significance of the data in the study.

  2. Estimation of the sugar cane cultivated area from LANDSAT images using the two phase sampling method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Cappelletti, C. A.; Mendonca, F. J.; Lee, D. C. L.; Shimabukuro, Y. E.

    1982-01-01

    A two phase sampling method and the optimal sampling segment dimensions for the estimation of sugar cane cultivated area were developed. This technique employs visual interpretations of LANDSAT images and panchromatic aerial photographs considered as the ground truth. The estimates, as a mean value of 100 simulated samples, represent 99.3% of the true value with a CV of approximately 1%; the relative efficiency of the two phase design was 157% when compared with a one phase aerial photographs sample.

  3. [Study on the optimization methods of common-batch identification of amphetamine samples].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianxin; Zhang, Daming

    2008-07-01

    The essay introduced the technology of amphetamine identification and its optimization method. Impurity profiling of amphetamine was analyzed by GC-MS. Identification of common-batch amphetamine samples could be successfully finished by the data transition and pre-treating of the peak areas. The analytical method was improved by optimizing the techniques of sample extraction, gas chromatograph, sample separation and detection. PMID:18839544

  4. Universal nucleic acids sample preparation method for cells, spores and their mixture

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei

    2011-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method for extracting nucleic acids from biological samples. More specifically the invention relates to a universal method for extracting nucleic acids from unidentified biological samples. An advantage of the presently invented method is its ability to effectively and efficiently extract nucleic acids from a variety of different cell types including but not limited to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and/or recalcitrant organisms (i.e. spores). Unlike prior art methods which are focused on extracting nucleic acids from vegetative cell or spores, the present invention effectively extracts nucleic acids from spores, multiple cell types or mixtures thereof using a single method. Important that the invented method has demonstrated an ability to extract nucleic acids from spores and vegetative bacterial cells with similar levels effectiveness. The invented method employs a multi-step protocol which erodes the cell structure of the biological sample, isolates, labels, fragments nucleic acids and purifies labeled samples from the excess of dye.

  5. Phosphatase activity in Antarctica soil samples as a biosignature of extant life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Itoh, Yuki; Takano, Yoshinori; Fukui, Manabu; Kaneko, Takeo; Kobayashi, Kensei

    Microbial activities have been detected in such extreme terrestrial environments as deep lithosphere, a submarine hydrothermal systems, stratosphere, and Antarctica. Microorganisms have adapted to such harsh environments by evolving their biomolecules. Some of these biomolecules such as enzymes might have different characteristics from those of organisms in ordinary environments. Many biosignatures (or biomarkers) have been proposed to detect microbial activities in such extreme environments. A number of techniques are proposed to evaluate biological activities in extreme environments including cultivation methods, assay of metabolism, and analysis of bioorganic compounds like amino acids and DNA. Enzyme activities are useful signature of extant life in extreme environments. Among many enzymes, phosphatase could be a good indicator of biological activities, since phosphate esters are essential for all the living terrestrial organisms. In addition, alkaline phosphatase is known as a typical zinc-containing metalloenzyme and quite stable in environments. We analyzed phosphatase activities in Antarctica soil samples to see whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life. In addition, we characterized phosphatases extracted from the Antarctica soil samples, and compared with those obtained from other types of environments. Antarctica surface environments are quite severe environments for life since it is extremely cold and dry and exposed to strong UV and cosmic rays. We tried to evaluate biological activities in Antarctica by measuring phosphatase activities. Surface soil samples are obtained at the Sites 1-8 near Showa Base in Antarctica during the 47th Japan Antarctic exploration mission in 2005-6. Activities of acid phosphatase (ACP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) are measured spectrophotometrically after mixing the powdered sample and p-nitrophenyl phosphate solution (pH 6.5 for ACP, pH 8.0 for ALP). ALP was characterized after extraction from soils with

  6. Viability of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in frozen pig lung samples and comparison of different methods of direct diagnosis in fresh samples.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, C B; Rodriguez Barbosa, J I; Gonzalez, O R; Tascon, R I; Rodriguez Ferri, E F

    1992-04-01

    A comparative study on different methods of diagnosis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae from both fresh and frozen pig lungs is described. A total of 196 lung tissues with pneumonic lesions were examined for culture isolation on chocolate blood agar, as well as for antigen detection by means of the coagglutination test, the immunodiffusion test and the indirect ELISA. These samples were subsequently frozen for 1 yr and then they were recultured. A. pleuropneumoniae was recovered from fresh lung specimens in 30 cases (15.3%) and from frozen samples in only two cases (0.9%). Such a different degree of isolation demonstrates that long freezing had an adverse effect on the viability of this organism in lung samples. A pleuropneumoniae detection was positive in 134 samples (68.4%) by at least one of the immunological techniques examined. The indirect ELISA was the most sensitive and specific test, with antigen detected in 125 lungs (63.8%). In comparison with the coagglutination and immunodiffusion tests, the sensitivities of the indirect ELISA were 95.8 and 93.7%, and the specificities were 67.0 and 63.4%, respectively. PMID:1563263

  7. [Preparation of sub-standard samples and XRF analytical method of powder non-metallic minerals].

    PubMed

    Kong, Qin; Chen, Lei; Wang, Ling

    2012-05-01

    In order to solve the problem that standard samples of non-metallic minerals are not satisfactory in practical work by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) analysis with pressed powder pellet, a method was studied how to make sub-standard samples according to standard samples of non-metallic minerals and to determine how they can adapt to analysis of mineral powder samples, taking the K-feldspar ore in Ebian-Wudu, Sichuan as an example. Based on the characteristic analysis of K-feldspar ore and the standard samples by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical methods, combined with the principle of the same or similar between the sub-standard samples and unknown samples, the experiment developed the method of preparation of sub-standard samples: both of the two samples above mentioned should have the same kind of minerals and the similar chemical components, adapt mineral processing, and benefit making working curve. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a method for determination of SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2, CaO, MgO, K2O and Na2O of K-feldspar ore by XRF was established. Thedetermination results are in good agreement with classical chemical methods, which indicates that this method was accurate. PMID:22827101

  8. Analyses of ammonium in geologic samples: comparison of indophenol-blue and fluorometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. W.; Goldblatt, C.; El-Sabaawi, R.; Hanson, N.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen in geologic materials is a tracer and record of biologic activity. Analysis can be difficult, however, as concentrations are often low (~1s to 10s ppm). The most stable form for N to be preserved in rocks and minerals is as NH4+, which is derived from organic matter and substitutes into mineral lattices for K+. Thus, measuring NH4+ content serves as a good proxy for total N content. Fluorometry (FL) is the standard technique for aqueous samples, and has a number of advantages over older indophenol-blue based, colorimetric (IBC) techniques (Hall, 1993). These include lower sample processing time, safer reagents, more stable reactions, and greater precision. In this study, I adapt a fluorometry technique (Holmes et al., 1999) for use in analyzing NH4+ concentration in geologic materials.Samples and standards were dissolved in hydrofluoric acid, neutralized with potassium hydroxide, then analyzed either with FL or IBC. As part of IBC, a distillation step was carried out to concentrate NH4+, and both techniques were used after this step to as well. Initial results show promise, as reproducible, ppm-level concentrations are demonstrated in several different rock types of various ages: Neoproterozoic siliciclastic sediments, a Jurassic granodiorite, a Cretaceous serpentinite, and Neoproterozoic carbonates. Concentrations are comparable between the two methods, though curiously fluorometry indicates NH4+ concentrations about 22% lower. Distillation appears effective in strengthening the signal for FL, though it may not be necessary for accurate results.There are several factors affecting the quality of FL. Sample pH appears to be the most important. At pH>9, NH3 is stable, and can easily escape a solution. Ensuring samples remain below pH 9 should prove key. Additional tests are being carried out to improve sample recovery, lessen time of HF dissolution, and improve accuracy.This new application of a standard technique should prove useful not only in determining

  9. Quantitative conformationally sampled pharmacophore for delta opioid ligands: reevaluation of hydrophobic moieties essential for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Denzil; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2007-04-19

    Recent studies have indicated several therapeutic applications for delta opioid agonists and antagonists. To exploit the therapeutic potential of delta opioids developing a structural basis for the activity of ligands at the delta opioid receptor is essential. The conformationally sampled pharmacophore (CSP) method (Bernard et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 3103-3107) is extended here to obtain quantitative models of delta opioid ligand efficacy and affinity. Quantification is performed via overlap integrals of the conformational space sampled by ligands with respect to a reference compound. Iterative refinement of the CSP model identified hydrophobic groups other than the traditional phenylalanine residues as important for efficacy and affinity in DSLET and ICI 174 864. The obtained models for a structurally diverse set of peptidic and nonpeptidic delta opioid ligands offer good predictions with R2 values>0.9, and the predicted efficacy for a set of test compounds was consistent with the experimental values. PMID:17367120

  10. Comparability among four invertebrate sampling methods, Fountain Creek Basin, Colorado, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Bruce, James F.; Stogner, Robert W.; Brown, Krystal D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Springs City Engineering and Colorado Springs Utilities, designed a study to determine if sampling method and sample timing resulted in comparable samples and assessments of biological condition. To accomplish this task, annual invertebrate samples were collected concurrently using four sampling methods at 15 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gages in the Fountain Creek basin from 2010 to 2012. Collectively, the four methods are used by local (U.S. Geological Survey cooperative monitoring program) and State monitoring programs (Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment) in the Fountain Creek basin to produce two distinct sample types for each program that target single-and multiple-habitats. This study found distinguishable differences between single-and multi-habitat sample types using both community similarities and multi-metric index values, while methods from each program within sample type were comparable. This indicates that the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment methods were compatible with the cooperative monitoring program methods within multi-and single-habitat sample types. Comparisons between September and October samples found distinguishable differences based on community similarities for both sample types, whereas only differences were found for single-habitat samples when multi-metric index values were considered. At one site, differences between September and October index values from single-habitat samples resulted in opposing assessments of biological condition. Direct application of the results to inform the revision of the existing Fountain Creek basin U.S. Geological Survey cooperative monitoring program are discussed.

  11. Application of enhanced sampling methods to mineral nucleation and growth processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral nucleation and growth are amongst the most critical processes occurring in natural environments. However, even with high-resolution in situ techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), mechanistic details must typically be inferred from kinetic measurements. Computational methods are potentially powerful tools which may assist in understanding aspects of mineral reactivity, however, in practice standard approaches effectively probe only those processes whose associated activation barriers are comparable to the ambient thermal energy (kBT). Therefore, due to inherent limitations on the simulation accessible timescale, many reactions of geochemical interest continue to challenge existing computational strategies. Enhanced sampling methods increase the rate at which rare events occur in atomistic simulations by accelerating the exploration of the free energy landscape. Here, two such methods are applied to aspects of calcium carbonate nucleation and growth. Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) is used to explore the initial formation of hydrated mineral clusters from solution (Wallace et al., in press, Science). Characterization of the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the clusters suggests that a dense liquid phase of calcium carbonate forms under certain conditions. Additionally, it is demonstrated that coalescence of the dense liquid products of the liquid-liquid separation results in the formation of a solid phase whose structure is consistent with amorphous calcium carbonate. Results from forward flux sampling (FFS) simulations are also presented. The rate of solvent exchange about calcium ions in solution is rapid enough to be determined directly from a standard molecular dynamics simulation and is used in this instance to calibrate the FFS method. The calibrated procedure is then applied to obtain preliminary rates of ion attachment and detachment from calcite surfaces.

  12. Update on field evaluation of EPA Method CTM-039 (PM2.5 Stack Sampling Method)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural operations are encountering difficulties complying with current air pollution regulations for particulate matter (PM). These regulations are based on the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, which set maximum concentration limits for ambient air PM. Source sampling for compliance pur...

  13. Preliminary field evaluation of EPA Method CTM-039 (PM2.5 Stack Sampling Method)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural operations are encountering difficulties complying with current air pollution regulations for particulate matter (PM). These regulations are based on the National Ambient Air Quality Standards which set maximum concentration limits for ambient air PM. Source sampling for compliance purp...

  14. Determination of ATP-activity as a useful tool for monitoring microbial load in aqueous humidifier samples.

    PubMed

    Liebers, Verena; Bachmann, Dieter; Franke, Gabriele; Freundt, Susanne; Stubel, Heike; Düser, Maria; Kendzia, Benjamin; Böckler, Margret; Brüning, Thomas; Raulf, Monika

    2015-03-01

    Air humidifier water tanks are potential sources of microbial contaminants. Aerosolization of these contaminants is associated with the development of airway and lung diseases; therefore, implementation of preventive strategies including monitoring of the microbial contamination is recommended. So far, culture-based methods that include measuring colony forming units (CFU) are widely used to monitor microbial load. However, these methods are time consuming and have considerable drawbacks. As a result, alternative methods are needed which provide not only clear and accurate results concerning microbial load in water samples, but are also rapid and easy to use in the field. This paper reports on a rapid test for ATP quantification as an alternative method for microbial monitoring, including its implementation, validation and application in the field. For this purpose, 186 water samples were characterized with different methods, which included ATP analysis, culture-based methods, endotoxin activity (common and rapid test), pyrogenic activity and number of particles. Half of the samples was measured directly in the field and the other half one day later in the laboratory. The results of both tests are highly correlated. Furthermore, to check how representative the result from one sample of a water source is, a second sample of the same water tank were collected and measured. Bioluminescence results of the undiluted samples covered a range between 20 and 25,000 relative light units (RLU) and correlated with the results obtained using the other methods. The highest correlation was found between bioluminescence and endotoxin activity (rs=0.79) as well as pyrogenic activity (rs=0.75). Overall, the results of this study indicate that ATP measurement using bioluminescence is a suitable tool to obtain rapid, reproducible and sensitive information on the microbial load of water samples, and is suitable to use in the field. However, to use ATP measurement as an indicator of

  15. Environmental and mental conditions predicting the experience of involuntary musical imagery: An experience sampling method study.

    PubMed

    Floridou, Georgia A; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    An experience sampling method (ESM) study on 40 volunteers was conducted to explore the environmental factors and psychological conditions related to involuntary musical imagery (INMI) in everyday life. Participants reported 6 times per day for one week on their INMI experiences, relevant contextual information and associated environmental conditions. The resulting data was modeled with Bayesian networks and led to insights into the interplay of factors related to INMI experiences. The activity that a person is engaged was found to play an important role in the experience of mind wandering, which in turn enables the experience of INMI. INMI occurrence is independent of the time of the day while the INMI trigger affects the subjective evaluation of the INMI experience. The results are compared to findings from earlier studies based on retrospective surveys and questionnaires and highlight the advantage of ESM techniques in research on spontaneous experiences like INMI. PMID:25800098

  16. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

  17. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  18. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

  19. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  20. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Furthermore, precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  1. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  2. Modified shifted angular spectrum method for numerical propagation at reduced spatial sampling rates.

    PubMed

    Ritter, André

    2014-10-20

    The shifted angular spectrum method allows a reduction of the number of samples required for numerical off-axis propagation of scalar wave fields. In this work, a modification of the shifted angular spectrum method is presented. It allows a further reduction of the spatial sampling rate for certain wave fields. We calculate the benefit of this method for spherical waves. Additionally, a working implementation is presented showing the example of a spherical wave propagating through a circular aperture. PMID:25401659

  3. Multiplex biotoxin surface plasmon resonance method for marine biotoxins in algal and seawater samples.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Sara E; Elliott, Christopher T; Delahaut, Philippe; Campbell, Katrina

    2013-10-01

    A multiplex surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid was developed. This method was compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Seawater samples (n=256) from around Europe were collected by the consortia of an EU project MIcroarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) and evaluated using each method. A simple sample preparation procedure was developed which involved lysing and releasing the toxins from the algal cells with glass beads followed by centrifugation and filtering the extract before testing for marine biotoxins by both multi-SPR and ELISA. Method detection limits based on IC20 values for PSP, okadaic acid and domoic acid toxins were 0.82, 0.36 and 1.66 ng/ml, respectively, for the prototype multiplex SPR biosensor. Evaluation by SPR for seawater samples has shown that 47, 59 and 61 % of total seawater samples tested positive (result greater than the IC20) for PSP, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid toxins, respectively. Toxic samples were received mainly from Spain and Ireland. This work has demonstrated the potential of multiplex analysis for marine biotoxins in algal and seawater samples with results available for 24 samples within a 7 h period for three groups of key marine biotoxins. Multiplex immunological methods could therefore be used as early warning monitoring tools for a variety of marine biotoxins in seawater samples. PMID:23250726

  4. Guidance for characterizing explosives contaminated soils: Sampling and selecting on-site analytical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, A.B.; Craig, H.D.; Jenkins, T.F.; Sisk, W.E.

    1996-09-01

    A large number of defense-related sites are contaminated with elevated levels of secondary explosives. Levels of contamination range from barely detectable to levels above 10% that need special handling due to the detonation potential. Characterization of explosives-contaminated sites is particularly difficult due to the very heterogeneous distribution of contamination in the environment and within samples. To improve site characterization, several options exist including collecting more samples, providing on-site analytical data to help direct the investigation, compositing samples, improving homogenization of samples, and extracting larger samples. On-site analytical methods are essential to more economical and improved characterization. On-site methods might suffer in terms of precision and accuracy, but this is more than offset by the increased number of samples that can be run. While verification using a standard analytical procedure should be part of any quality assurance program, reducing the number of samples analyzed by the more expensive methods can result in significantly reduced costs. Often 70 to 90% of the soil samples analyzed during an explosives site investigation do not contain detectable levels of contamination. Two basic types of on-site analytical methods are in wide use for explosives in soil, calorimetric and immunoassay. Calorimetric methods generally detect broad classes of compounds such as nitroaromatics or nitramines, while immunoassay methods are more compound specific. Since TNT or RDX is usually present in explosive-contaminated soils, the use of procedures designed to detect only these or similar compounds can be very effective.

  5. Evaluation of Methods for Sampling, Recovery, and Enumeration of Bacteria Applied to the Phylloplane

    PubMed Central

    Donegan, Katherine; Matyac, Carl; Seidler, Ramon; Porteous, Arlene

    1991-01-01

    Determining the fate and survival of genetically engineered microorganisms released into the environment requires the development and application of accurate and practical methods of detection and enumeration. Several experiments were performed to examine quantitative recovery methods that are commonly used or that have potential applications. In these experiments, Erwinia herbicola and Enterobacter cloacae were applied in greenhouses to Blue Lake bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Cayuse oats (Avena sativa). Sampling indicated that the variance in bacterial counts among leaves increased over time and that this increase caused an overestimation of the mean population size by bulk leaf samples relative to single leaf samples. An increase in the number of leaves in a bulk sample, above a minimum number, did not significantly reduce the variance between samples. Experiments evaluating recovery methods demonstrated that recovery of bacteria from leaves was significantly better with stomacher blending, than with blending, sonication, or washing and that the recovery efficiency was constant over a range of sample inoculum densities. Delayed processing of leaf samples, by storage in a freezer, did not significantly lower survival and recovery of microorganisms when storage was short term and leaves were not stored in buffer. The drop plate technique for enumeration of bacteria did not significantly differ from the spread plate method. Results of these sampling, recovery, and enumeration experiments indicate a need for increased development and standardization of methods used by researchers as there are significant differences among, and also important limitations to, some of the methods used. PMID:16348404

  6. Comparison of individual and pooled sampling methods for detecting bacterial pathogens of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Evered, J.; Brunson, Ray; Levine, J.; Winton, J.

    2005-01-01

    Examination of finfish populations for viral and bacterial pathogens is an important component of fish disease control programs worldwide. Two methods are commonly used for collecting tissue samples for bacteriological culture, the currently accepted standards for detection of bacterial fish pathogens. The method specified in the Office International des Epizooties Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals permits combining renal and splenic tissues from as many as 5 fish into pooled samples. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) Blue Book/US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Inspection Manual specifies the use of a bacteriological loop for collecting samples from the kidney of individual fish. An alternative would be to more fully utilize the pooled samples taken for virology. If implemented, this approach would provide substantial savings in labor and materials. To compare the relative performance of the AFS/USFWS method and this alternative approach, cultures of Yersinia ruckeri were used to establish low-level infections in groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were sampled by both methods. Yersinia ruckeri was cultured from 22 of 37 groups by at least 1 method. The loop method yielded 18 positive groups, with 1 group positive in the loop samples but negative in the pooled samples. The pooled samples produced 21 positive groups, with 4 groups positive in the pooled samples but negative in the loop samples. There was statistically significant agreement (Spearman coefficient 0.80, P < 0.001) in the relative ability of the 2 sampling methods to permit detection of low-level bacterial infections of rainbow trout.

  7. Comparison of individual and pooled sampling methods for detecting bacterial pathogens of fish.

    PubMed

    Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Evered, Joy; Brunson, Ray; Levine, Jay; Winton, Jim

    2005-07-01

    Examination of finfish populations for viral and bacterial pathogens is an important component of fish disease control programs worldwide. Two methods are commonly used for collecting tissue samples for bacteriological culture, the currently accepted standards for detection of bacterial fish pathogens. The method specified in the Office International des Epizooties Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals permits combining renal and splenic tissues from as many as 5 fish into pooled samples. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) Blue Book/US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Inspection Manual specifies the use of a bacteriological loop for collecting samples from the kidney of individual fish. An alternative would be to more fully utilize the pooled samples taken for virology. If implemented, this approach would provide substantial savings in labor and materials. To compare the relative performance of the AFS/USFWS method and this alternative approach, cultures of Yersinia ruckeri were used to establish low-level infections in groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were sampled by both methods. Yersinia ruckeri was cultured from 22 of 37 groups by at least 1 method. The loop method yielded 18 positive groups, with 1 group positive in the loop samples but negative in the pooled samples. The pooled samples produced 21 positive groups, with 4 groups positive in the pooled samples but negative in the loop samples. There was statistically significant agreement (Spearman coefficient 0.80, P < 0.001) in the relative ability of the 2 sampling methods to permit detection of low-level bacterial infections of rainbow trout. PMID:16130986

  8. Melting Temperature Mapping Method: A Novel Method for Rapid Identification of Unknown Pathogenic Microorganisms within Three Hours of Sample Collection

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Hideki; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Abe, Akihito; Tsurue, Takahiro; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Goto, Michihiko; Akiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kitajima, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring the earliest possible identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy in infected patients. We herein report the novel “melting temperature (Tm) mapping method” for rapidly identifying the dominant bacteria in a clinical sample from sterile sites. Employing only seven primer sets, more than 100 bacterial species can be identified. In particular, using the Difference Value, it is possible to identify samples suitable for Tm mapping identification. Moreover, this method can be used to rapidly diagnose the absence of bacteria in clinical samples. We tested the Tm mapping method using 200 whole blood samples obtained from patients with suspected sepsis, 85% (171/200) of which matched the culture results based on the detection level. A total of 130 samples were negative according to the Tm mapping method, 98% (128/130) of which were also negative based on the culture method. Meanwhile, 70 samples were positive according to the Tm mapping method, and of the 59 suitable for identification, 100% (59/59) exhibited a “match” or “broad match” with the culture or sequencing results. These findings were obtained within three hours of whole blood collection. The Tm mapping method is therefore useful for identifying infectious diseases requiring prompt treatment. PMID:26218169

  9. Activity ratios of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Bossew, P; Lettner, H; Hubmer, A; Erlinger, C; Gastberger, M

    2007-01-01

    Both global and Chernobyl fallout have resulted in environmental contamination with radionuclides such as 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu. In environmental samples, 137Cs and 239+240Pu can be divided into the contributions of either source, if also the isotopes 134Cs and 238Pu are measurable, based on the known isotopic ratios in global and Chernobyl fallout. No analogous method is available for 90Sr. The activity ratios of Sr to Cs and Pu, respectively, are known for the actual fallout mainly from air filter measurements; but due to the high mobility of Sr in the environment, compared to Cs and Pu, these ratios generally do not hold for the inventory many years after deposition. In this paper we suggest a method to identify the mean contributions of global and Chernobyl fallout to total Sr in soil, sediment and cryoconite samples from Alpine and pre-Alpine regions of Austria, based on a statistical evaluation of Sr/Cs/Pu radionuclide activity ratios. Results are given for Sr:Cs, Sr:Pu and Cs:Pu ratios. Comparison with fallout data shows a strong depletion of Sr against Cs and Pu. PMID:17407799

  10. RAPID FUSION METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES IN LARGE RICE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-03-01

    A new rapid fusion method for the determination of plutonium in large rice samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used to determine very low levels of plutonium isotopes in rice. The recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid, reliable radiochemical analyses for radionuclides in environmental and food samples. Public concern regarding foods, particularly foods such as rice in Japan, highlights the need for analytical techniques that will allow very large sample aliquots of rice to be used for analysis so that very low levels of plutonium isotopes may be detected. The new method to determine plutonium isotopes in large rice samples utilizes a furnace ashing step, a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a column separation process with TEVA Resin cartridges. The method can be applied to rice sample aliquots as large as 5 kg. Plutonium isotopes can be determined using alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory plutonium particles are effectively digested. The MDA for a 5 kg rice sample using alpha spectrometry is 7E-5 mBq g{sup -1}. The method can easily be adapted for use by ICP-MS to allow detection of plutonium isotopic ratios.

  11. Quality assurance guidance for field sampling and measurement assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This document is one of several guidance documents developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). These documents support the EM Analytical Services Program (ASP) and are based on applicable regulatory requirements and DOE Orders. They address requirements in DOE Orders by providing guidance that pertains specifically to environmental restoration and waste management sampling and analysis activities. DOE 5700.6C Quality Assurance (QA) defines policy and requirements to establish QA programs ensuring that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized. This is accomplished through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks imposed by the facility and the project. Every organization supporting EM`s environmental sampling and analysis activities must develop and document a QA program. Management of each organization is responsible for appropriate QA program implementation, assessment, and improvement. The collection of credible and cost-effective environmental data is critical to the long-term success of remedial and waste management actions performed at DOE facilities. Only well established and management supported assessment programs within each EM-support organization will enable DOE to demonstrate data quality. The purpose of this series of documents is to offer specific guidance for establishing an effective assessment program for EM`s environmental sampling and analysis (ESA) activities.

  12. Rapid method to determine actinides and 89/90Sr in limestone and marble samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; Sudowe, Ralf; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2016-04-12

    A new method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in limestone and marble samples has been developed that utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the sample. Following rapid pre-concentration steps to remove sample matrix interferences, the actinides and 89/90Sr are separated using extraction chromatographic resins and measured radiometrically. The advantages of sodium hydroxide fusion versus other fusion techniques will be discussed. Lastly, this approach has a sample preparation time for limestone and marble samples of <4 hours.

  13. Novel sampling methods for use with thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1994-12-31

    Novel sampling approaches have been investigated to improve the analytical utility of thermal desorption Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS). Because DSITMS involves the direct introduction of samples into an ion trap mass spectrometer, problems with detection capabilities (sensitivity and selectivity) can often occur when performing trace analysis in complex matrices. Various sampling approaches have been evaluated to improve thermal desorption detection capabilities and to extend the utilities of DSITMS methodologies without significantly increasing analysis times or the cost-effectiveness of DSITMS methods. Three sampling approaches have been investigated including solid phase microextraction (SPME), solid phase extraction columns (SPEC), and purge and trap.

  14. Trace-element analysis of 1000 environmental samples per year using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    The technology and methods developed at the Plum Brook Reactor to analyze 1000 samples per year and report data on as many as 56 elements are described. The manpower for the complete analysis of 20 to 24 samples per week required only 3 to 3.5 hours per sample. The solutions to problems encountered in sample preparation, irradiation, and counting are discussed. The automation of data reduction is described. Typical data on various sample matrices are presented.

  15. Metrological activity determination of 133Ba by sum-peak absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, R. L.; de Almeida, M. C. M.; Delgado, J. U.; Poledna, R.; Santos, A.; de Veras, E. V.; Rangel, J.; Trindade, O. L.

    2016-07-01

    The National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation provides gamma sources of radionuclide and standardized in activity with reduced uncertainties. Relative methods require standards to determine the sample activity while the absolute methods, as sum-peak, not. The activity is obtained directly with good accuracy and low uncertainties. 133Ba is used in research laboratories and on calibration of detectors for analysis in different work areas. Classical absolute methods don't calibrate 133Ba due to its complex decay scheme. The sum-peak method using gamma spectrometry with germanium detector standardizes 133Ba samples. Uncertainties lower than 1% to activity results were obtained.

  16. Optimisation steps of an innovative air sampling method for semi volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarov, Borislav; Swinnen, Rudi; Spruyt, Maarten; Goelen, Eddy; Stranger, Marianne; Desmet, Gilbert; Wauters, Eric

    2013-11-01

    This work describes optimisation steps of an innovative method for the measurement several groups of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in air, collecting both gaseous and particulate air fractions. It is based on active air sampling on sorption tubes (consisting of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and Tenax TA), followed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis (TD-GC-MS). The optimised method was validated in the laboratory for the measurement of selected target compounds from the following chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and phthalate esters (PEs). It was applied in different Belgian urban outdoor as well as indoor environments. The new method is characterised by limits of detection in the range of 0.003-0.3 ng m-3 for PAHs, 0.004-0.2 ng m-3 for PCBs, 0.113-0.201 ng m-3 for PBDEs and 0.002-0.2 ng m-3 for PEs, a linearity of 0.996 and a repeatability of less than 10% for all studied compounds.

  17. A sensitive method for confocal fluorescence microscopic visualization of starch granules in iodine stained samples

    PubMed Central

    Ovecka, Miroslav; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Muñoz, Francisco José; Almagro, Goizeder; Ezquer, Ignacio; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Li, Jun; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Synthesized by glycogen synthase and starch synthases (SS) using ADP-glucose as the sugar donor molecule, glycogen and starch accumulate as predominant storage carbohydrates in most bacteria and plants, respectively. We have recently shown that the so-called “starch-less” Arabidopsis thaliana adg1–1 and aps1 mutants impaired in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase do indeed accumulate low starch content in normal growth conditions, and relatively high starch content when plants were cultured in the presence of microbial volatiles. Our results were strongly supported by data obtained using a highly sensitive method for confocal fluorescence microscopic visualization of iodine stained starch granules. Using Arabidopsis leaves from WT plants, aps1 plants, ss3/ss4 plants lacking both class III and class IV SS, gbss plants lacking the granule-bound SS, and sus1/sus2/sus3/sus4 plants lacking four genes that code for proteins with sucrose synthase activity, in this work we precisely describe the method for preparation of plant samples for starch microscopic examination. Furthermore, we show that this method can be used to visualize glycogen in bacteria, and pure starch granules, amylose and amylopectin. PMID:22899048

  18. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs. PMID:26819909

  19. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs. PMID:26819909

  20. A green method for the determination of cocaine in illicit samples.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Alfonso, Clara; Galipienso, Nieves; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2014-04-01

    Direct determination of cocaine in untreated seized samples has been made based on diffuse reflectance measurements of the near infrared (NIR) radiation through samples contained inside standard glass vials. The method used a series of previously analyzed samples, by the reference gas chromatography method, to build a partial least squares calibration model which was validated using an independent set of samples. The use of a general model for samples containing from 11.38% till 86.44% (w/w) cocaine was based on the use of spectral ranges from 12500.7 to 10128.6, 9339.8 to 6967.7 and 5388.3 to 4597.6cm(-1) with previous first derivative and vector normalization data pre-processing and provided a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 4.0% (w/w) with a residual prediction deviation (RPD) of 3.9% (w/w), based on the use of 8 latent variables, 34 samples for calibration and an independent set of 44 samples for validation. The aforementioned results could be improved on considering two separate models, one for high concentrated bulk samples and another for samples diluted with cutting agents. Additionally a new set of batch samples with cocaine concentrations from 60% till 84% was evaluated by using the developed method. PMID:24607706

  1. [Research of Outlier Samples Elimination Methods for Near-Infrared Spectral Analysis of Blood Glucose].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yongzhong; Li, Lina; Lin, Tianliang

    2015-12-01

    For the near-infrared (NIR) spectral analysis of the concentration of blood glucose, the calibration accuracy can be affected because of the existing of outlier samples. In this research, a Monte-Carlo cross validation (MCCV) method is constructed for eliminating outlier samples. The human blood plasma experiment in vitro and the human body experiment in vivo were introduced to evaluate the MCCV method for its application effect in NIR spectral analysis of blood glucose. And the uninformative sample elimination method based on modified uninformative variable elimination (MUVE-USE) was employed in this study for the comparison with MCCV. The results indicated that, like the MUVE-USE method, the outlier samples elimination method based on MCCV could be used to eliminate the outlier samples which came from gross errors (such as bad sample) or system errors (such as baseline drift). In addition, the outlier samples from the random errors of uncertain causes which affect model accuracy can be eliminated simultaneously by MCCV. The elimination of multiple outlier samples is beneficial to the improvement of prediction accuracy of calibration model. PMID:27079108

  2. Development of a reliable analytical method to determine lipid peroxidation biomarkers in newborn plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Cháfer-Pericás, C; Torres-Cuevas, I; Sanchez-Illana, A; Escobar, J; Kuligowski, J; Solberg, R; Garberg, H T; Huun, M U; Saugstad, O D; Vento, M

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a reliable analytical method based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to determine F2-isoprostanes and other total byproducts (isoprostanes, isofurans, neuroprostanes and neurofurans) as lipid peroxidation biomarkers in newborn plasma samples. The proposed procedure is characterized by a simple sample treatment employing a reduced sample volume (100µL). Also, it shows a high throughput and high selectivity to determine simultaneously different isoprostane isomers in a large number of samples. The reliability of the described method was demonstrated by analysis of spiked plasma samples, obtaining recoveries between 70% and 130% for most of the analytes. Taking into account the implementation of further clinical studies, it was demonstrated the proper sensitivity of the method by means of the analysis of few human newborn plasma samples. In addition to this, newborn piglet plasma samples (n=80) were analyzed observing that the developed method was suitable to determine the analyte levels present in this kind of samples. Therefore, this analytical method could be applied in further clinical research about establishment of reliable lipid peroxidation biomarkers employing this experimental model. PMID:27130102

  3. Using improved serial blood sampling method of mice to study pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ayahisa; Watari, Ryosuke; Ogawa, Keiko; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Yukari; Takai, Nozomi; Nezasa, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka

    2015-03-01

    In pharmacokinetic evaluation of mice, using serial sampling methods rather than a terminal blood sampling method could reduce the number of animals needed and lead to more reliable data by excluding individual differences. In addition, using serial sampling methods can be valuable for evaluation of the drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential of drug candidates. In this study, we established an improved method for serially sampling the blood from one mouse by only one incision of the lateral tail vein, and investigated whether our method could be adapted to pharmacokinetic and DDI studies. After intravenous and oral administration of ibuprofen and fexofenadine (BCS class II and III), the plasma concentration and pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated by our method and a terminal blood sampling method, with the result that both methods gave comparable results (ibuprofen: 63.8 ± 4.0% and 64.4%, fexofenadine: 6.5 ± 0.7% and 7.9%, respectively, in bioavailability). In addition, our method could be adapted to DDI study for cytochrome P450 and organic anion transporting polypeptide inhibition. These results demonstrate that our method can be useful for pharmacokinetic evaluation from the perspective of reliable data acquisition as well as easy handling and low stress to mice and improve the quality of pharmacokinetic and DDI studies. PMID:25452230

  4. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  5. Study of activation of metal samples from LDEF-1 and Spacelab-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The activation of metal samples and other material orbited onboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and Spacelab-2 were studied. Measurements of the radioactivities of spacecraft materials were made, and corrections for self-absorption and efficiency were calculated. Activation cross sections for specific metal samples were updated while cross sections for other materials were tabulated from the scientific literature. Activation cross sections for 200 MeV neutrons were experimentally determined. Linear absorption coefficients, half lives, branching ratios and other pertinent technical data needed for LDEF sample analyses were tabulated. The status of the sample counting at low background facilities at national laboratories is reported.

  6. A low-luminosity type-1 QSO sample. III. Optical spectroscopic properties and activity classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremou, E.; Garcia-Marin, M.; Zuther, J.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-Schneider, M.; Vitale, M.; Shan, C.

    2015-08-01

    Context. We report on the optical spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 99 low-luminosity quasi-stellar objects (LLQSOs) at z ≤ 0.06 base the Hamburg/ESO QSO Survey (HES). To better relate the low-redshift active galactic nucleus (AGN) to the QSO population it is important to study samples of the latter type at a level of detail similar to that of the low-redshift AGN. Powerful QSOs, however, are absent at low redshifts due to evolutionary effects and their small space density. Our understanding of the (distant) QSO population is, therefore, significantly limited by angular resolution and sensitivity. The LLQSOs presented here offer the possibility of studying the faint end of this population at smaller cosmological distances and, therefore, in greater detail. Aims: In comparing two spectroscopic methods, we aim to establish a reliable activity classification scheme of the LLQSOs sample. Our goal is to enrich our systematic multiwavelength analysis of the AGN/starburst relation in these systems and give a complementary information on this particular sample of LLQSOs from the Hamburg ESO survey. Methods: Here, we present results of the analysis of visible wavelength spectroscopy provided by the HES and the 6 Degree Field Galaxy Survey (6dFGS). These surveys use different spectroscopic techniques, long-slit and circular fiber, respectively. These allow us to assess the influence of different apertures on the activity of the LLQSOs using classical optical diagnostic diagrams. We perform a Gaussian fitting of strong optical emission lines and decompose narrow and broad Balmer components. Results: A small number of our LLQSO present no broad component, which is likely to be present but buried in the noise. Two sources show double broad components, whereas six comply with the classic NLS1 requiremnts. As expected in NLR of broad line AGNs, the [Sii]-based electron density values range between 100 and 1000 Ne/cm3. Using the optical characteristics of Populations A and B

  7. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: State of the science for organic contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Lydy, Michael J; Landrum, Peter F; Oen, Amy MP; Allinson, Mayumi; Smedes, Foppe; Harwood, Amanda D; Li, Huizhen; Maruya, Keith A; Liu, Jingfu

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript surveys the literature on passive sampler methods (PSMs) used in contaminated sediments to assess the chemical activity of organic contaminants. The chemical activity in turn dictates the reactivity and bioavailability of contaminants in sediment. Approaches to measure specific binding of compounds to sediment components, for example, amorphous carbon or specific types of reduced carbon, and the associated partition coefficients are difficult to determine, particularly for native sediment. Thus, the development of PSMs that represent the chemical activity of complex compound–sediment interactions, expressed as the freely dissolved contaminant concentration in porewater (Cfree), offer a better proxy for endpoints of concern, such as reactivity, bioaccumulation, and toxicity. Passive sampling methods have estimated Cfree using both kinetic and equilibrium operating modes and used various polymers as the sorbing phase, for example, polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene in various configurations, such as sheets, coated fibers, or vials containing thin films. These PSMs have been applied in laboratory exposures and field deployments covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales. A wide range of calibration conditions exist in the literature to estimate Cfree, but consensus values have not been established. The most critical criteria are the partition coefficient between water and the polymer phase and the equilibrium status of the sampler. In addition, the PSM must not appreciably deplete Cfree in the porewater. Some of the future challenges include establishing a standard approach for PSM measurements, correcting for nonequilibrium conditions, establishing guidance for selection and implementation of PSMs, and translating and applying data collected by PSMs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:167–178. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  8. Quantification of creatinine in biological samples based on the pseudoenzyme activity of copper-creatinine complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Avinash, Krishnegowda; Shivakumar, Anantharaman; Krishna, Honnur

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the marker of chronic kidney disease can be analyzed by the concentration of cystatin C or creatinine and its clearance in human urine and serum samples. The determination of cystatin C alone as an indicator of GFR does not provide high accuracy, and is more expensive, thus measurement of creatinine has an important role in estimating GFR. We have made an attempt to quantify creatinine based on its pseudoenzyme activity of creatinine in the presence of copper. Creatinine in the presence of copper oxidizes paraphenylenediamine dihydrochloride (PPDD) which couples with dimethylamino benzoicacid (DMAB) giving green colored chromogenic product with maximum absorbance at 710 nm. Kinetic parameters relating this reaction were evaluated. Analytical curves of creatinine by fixed time and rate methods were linear at 8.8-530 μmol L-1 and 0.221-2.65 mmol L-1, respectively. Recovery of creatinine varied from 97.8 to 107.8%. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 2.55 and 8.52 μmol L-1 respectively whereas Sandell's sensitivity and molar absorption coefficient values were 0.0407 μg cm-2 and 0.1427 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 respectively. Precision studies showed that within day imprecision was 0.745-1.26% and day-to-day imprecision was 1.55-3.65%. The proposed method was applied to human urine and serum samples and results were validated in accordance with modified Jaffe's procedure. Wide linearity ranges with good recovery, less tolerance from excipients and application of the method to serum and urine samples are the claims which ascertain much advantage to this method.

  9. Different sample preparation and detection methods for normal and lung cancer urinary proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Sinchaikul, Supachok; Tantipaiboonwong, Payungsak; Sriyam, Supawadee; Tzao, Ching; Phutrakul, Suree; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2010-01-01

    The urinary proteome is known to be a valuable field of study related to human physiological functions because many components in urine provide an alternative to blood plasma as a potential source of disease biomarkers useful in clinical diagnosis and therapeutic application. Due to the variability and complexity of urine, sample preparation is very important for decreasing the dynamic range of components and isolating specific urinary proteins prior to analysis. We discuss many useful sample preparation methods in this chapter, including those of lung cancer urine samples. In addition, protein detection methods are also crucial in visualizing protein profiles and for quantification of protein content in urine samples from both normal donor and lung cancer patients. This chapter also provides alternative choices of urine sample preparation and detection methods for selective use in urinary proteome analysis and for identifying urinary protein markers in lung cancer and other diseases. PMID:20407942

  10. A comparison of microscopic and spectroscopic identification methods for analysis of microplastics in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee; Jang, Mi; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Lee, Jongmyoung; Shim, Won Joon

    2015-04-15

    The analysis of microplastics in various environmental samples requires the identification of microplastics from natural materials. The identification technique lacks a standardized protocol. Herein, stereomicroscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FT-IR) identification methods for microplastics (<1mm) were compared using the same samples from the sea surface microlayer (SML) and beach sand. Fragmented microplastics were significantly (p<0.05) underestimated and fiber was significantly overestimated using the stereomicroscope both in the SML and beach samples. The total abundance by FT-IR was higher than by microscope both in the SML and beach samples, but they were not significantly (p>0.05) different. Depending on the number of samples and the microplastic size range of interest, the appropriate identification method should be determined; selecting a suitable identification method for microplastics is crucial for evaluating microplastic pollution. PMID:25682567

  11. Sampling Methods for Detection and Monitoring of the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae).

    PubMed

    Monzo, C; Arevalo, H A; Jones, M M; Vanaclocha, P; Croxton, S D; Qureshi, J A; Stansly, P A

    2015-06-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama is a key pest of citrus due to its role as vector of citrus greening disease or "huanglongbing." ACP monitoring is considered an indispensable tool for management of vector and disease. In the present study, datasets collected between 2009 and 2013 from 245 citrus blocks were used to evaluate precision, sensitivity for detection, and efficiency of five sampling methods. The number of samples needed to reach a 0.25 standard error-mean ratio was estimated using Taylor's power law and used to compare precision among sampling methods. Comparison of detection sensitivity and time expenditure (cost) between stem-tap and other sampling methodologies conducted consecutively at the same location were also assessed. Stem-tap sampling was the most efficient sampling method when ACP densities were moderate to high and served as the basis for comparison with all other methods. Protocols that grouped trees near randomly selected locations across the block were more efficient than sampling trees at random across the block. Sweep net sampling was similar to stem-taps in number of captures per sampled unit, but less precise at any ACP density. Yellow sticky traps were 14 times more sensitive than stem-taps but much more time consuming and thus less efficient except at very low population densities. Visual sampling was efficient for detecting and monitoring ACP at low densities. Suction sampling was time consuming and taxing but the most sensitive of all methods for detection of sparse populations. This information can be used to optimize ACP monitoring efforts. PMID:26313984

  12. Method for sampling from fission neutron energy spectra. [For DEC KA-10

    SciTech Connect

    Froehner, F.H.; Spencer, R.R.

    1981-02-01

    A simple method for fast and efficient sampling from the Watt fission neutron energy spectrum is described. As a limiting case the Maxwellian energy distribution can also be sampled. A short FORTRAN routine written for this purpose and results obtained with it are presented. The routine is shown to give accurate results, and requires <1 ms/sample on a DEC KA-10 processor. 1 figure, 1 table.

  13. A rapid sample preparation method for the HPLC determination of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in serum.

    PubMed

    Hurst, W J; Zagon, I S; Aboul-Enein, H Y

    1999-08-01

    HPLC with UV and electrochemical detection has routinely been employed for the determination of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in serum. Sample preparation protocols range from liquid/liquid to solid phase extraction. The sample preparation described in this communication uses ultrafiltration as the mode of sample preparation prior to HPLC analysis. The method is accurate, precise and saves considerable time compared to previously published techniques. PMID:10483613

  14. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  15. Screening for antimicrobial resistance in fecal samples by the replica plating method.

    PubMed Central

    Osterblad, M; Leistevuo, T; Huovinen, P

    1995-01-01

    Replica plating can be used for the detection of antibiotic resistance in normal flora. We have evaluated this application of the replica plating method by comparing it with a five-colony method. The replica plating method uses a single plate for each antibiotic, with a concentration just above that for borderline resistance. By the five-colony method, five colonies per sample were picked, chosen to represent all different colony morphologies present, and MICs were determined by a standard agar dilution method. The gram-negative, aerobic floras of 131 fecal samples were screened for resistance to ampicillin, cefuroxime, nalidixic acid, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline by both methods. The rate of resistance detection by the two methods did not differ statistically for any of the antibiotics tested. The breakpoint concentrations used for the replica plates in the study gave results similar to those produced by the agar dilution method and the breakpoint values of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards and can thus be recommended. As the only currently used resistance detection method, replica plating facilitates an exact determination of the percentage of resistant colonies/total number of colonies (between 1 and 100%) in a sample. This revealed an uneven distribution, with only 23% of the samples having resistance frequencies in the range of 10 to 85%; usually, the resistant flora either was a small minority or was very dominant in samples with resistance. This phenomenon was present for all of the antibiotics. PMID:8586690

  16. Assessment of fish assemblages in coastal lagoon habitats: Effect of sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A.; Pérez-Ruzafa, A.; Drouineau, H.; Franzoi, P.; Koutrakis, E. T.; Lepage, M.; Verdiell-Cubedo, D.; Bouchoucha, M.; López-Capel, A.; Riccato, F.; Sapounidis, A.; Marcos, C.; Oliva-Paterna, F. J.; Torralva-Forero, M.; Torricelli, P.

    2012-10-01

    The structure of fish assemblages accounted for by different sampling methods (namely fyke net, seine nets, visual census) applied to vegetated and unvegetated lagoon habitats was investigated in terms of species composition, functional groups (ecological and trophic guilds), and fish size distribution. Significant differences were detected among methods, even among similar ones (seine nets). Visual census and fyke net detected more easily pelagic species, allowing the sampling of larger fish, whereas seine nets targeted more efficiently benthic-demersal species, with a dominance of 2-10 cm size classes in the fish catches. Differences were detected also among habitats, reflecting the different fish assemblages associated to vegetated and unvegetated habitats in coastal lagoons and transitional waters. However a different ability of discriminating between habitat-associated fish assemblages was recorded for the sampling methods. The different selectivity and functioning of the tested sampling methods confirm the importance of considering the targeted scale at which the research is being carried out, as well as the method that will be used to assess the ecological status of lagoon fish assemblages when choosing the most appropriate sampling method. A cross-validation of fish sampling methodologies in transitional waters is necessary to cope with the mandatory of the Water Framework Directive of standardization and comparability of monitoring methods.

  17. SAMPLE COLLECTION AND PREPARATION METHODS AFFECTING MUTAGENICITY AND CYTOTOXICITY OF COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports by several investigators describing the biological activity of coal fly ash have presented a variety of results which in some cases are conflicting. The biological activity of coal fly ash may differ because of one or more of the following factors: (1) the samples studied...

  18. A sensitive LC-MS/MS method for measurement of organophosphorus pesticides and their oxygen analogs in air sampling matrices.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jenna L; Dills, Russell L; Yu, Jianbo; Yost, Michael G; Fenske, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    A rapid liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed for determination of levels of the organophosphorus (OP) pesticides chlorpyrifos (CPF), azinphos methyl (AZM), and their oxygen analogs chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-O) and azinphos methyl-oxon (AZM-O) on common active air sampling matrices. XAD-2 resin and polyurethane foam (PUF) matrices were extracted with acetonitrile containing stable-isotope labeled internal standards (ISTD). Analysis was accomplished in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) mode, and analytes in unknown samples were identified by retention time (±0.1 min) and qualifier ratio (±30% absolute) as compared to the mean of calibrants. For all compounds, calibration linearity correlation coefficients were ≥0.996. Limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.15-1.1 ng/sample for CPF, CPF-O, AZM, and AZM-O on active sampling matrices. Spiked fortification recoveries were 78-113% from XAD-2 active air sampling tubes and 71-108% from PUF active air sampling tubes. Storage stability tests also yielded recoveries ranging from 74-94% after time periods ranging from 2-10 months. The results demonstrate that LC-MS/MS is a sensitive method for determining these compounds from two different matrices at the low concentrations that can result from spray drift and long range transport in non-target areas following agricultural applications. In an inter-laboratory comparison, the limit of quantification (LOQ) for LC-MS/MS was 100 times lower than a typical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. PMID:24328542

  19. Apparatus and method for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    DOEpatents

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-11

    A dilution apparatus for diluting a gas sample. The apparatus includes a sample gas conduit having a sample gas inlet end and a diluted sample gas outlet end, and a sample gas flow restricting orifice disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end connected with the sample gas conduit and providing fluid communication between the exterior and the interior of the sample gas conduit. A diluted sample gas conduit is provided within the sample gas conduit having a mixing end with a mixing space inlet opening disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end, thereby forming an annular space between the sample gas conduit and the diluted sample gas conduit. The mixing end of the diluted sample gas conduit is disposed at a distance from the sample gas flow restricting orifice. A dilution gas source connected with the sample gas inlet end of the sample gas conduit is provided for introducing a dilution gas into the annular space, and a filter is provided for filtering the sample gas. The apparatus is particularly suited for diluting heated sample gases containing one or more condensable components.

  20. Using geostatistical methods to inform field sampling of heterogeneous fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollyea, R.; Fairley, J.

    2008-12-01

    Acquiring data at appropriately fine scales to capture heterogeneous features for use in stochastic simulation can be costly when relying on borehole data, lidar, or other geophysical methods. Additionally, relying on available borehole data typically yields lateral resolution inadequate for assessing horizontal correlation structure. Here we present methodology for developing a field sampling plan in fractured basalt using a published fracture map of a basalt surface exposure. Using a sub-meter sample grid the correlation range of the fractures on the published fracture map was determined. Field sampling was then emulated by removing samples and reassessing the correlation range. Sample spacing for field sampling was identified as the largest that would maintain the original correlation structure. This sample spacing was then implemented for obtaining field samples at surface exposures of two basalt flows near the fracture map exposure. The correlation range of the field samples suggests that using the model semivariogram to test a field sampling plan in preparation for a field sampling event may provide useful information for defining a sampling scheme in heterogeneous fractured media.

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Micro- and Nanoscale Proteomic Sample Preparation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haixing H.; Qian, Weijun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Clauss, Therese R.W.; Anderson, David J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Sforza, Daniel M.; Pallavicini, Maria; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-10-05

    Efficient and effective sample preparation of micro- and nano-scale (micro- and nano-gram) clinical specimens for proteomic applications is often difficult due to losses during the processing steps. Herein we describe a simple “single-tube” preparation protocol appropriate for small proteomic samples using the organic co-solvent, trifluoroethanol (TFE). TFE facilitates both protein extraction and protein denaturation without requiring a separate cleanup step, thus minimizing sample loss. The performance of the TFE method was initially evaluated by comparing to traditional detergent-based methods on relatively large scale sample processing using human breast cancer cells and mouse brain tissue. The results demonstrated that the TFE protocol provided comparable results to the traditional detergent-based protocols for larger samples (milligrams), based on both sample recovery and peptide/protein identification. The effectiveness of this protocol for micro- and nano-scale sample processing was then evaluated for the extraction of proteins/peptides and shown effective for small mouse brain tissue samples (~ 20 μg total protein content) and also for samples of ~ 5 000 human breast cancer MCF-7 cells (~ 500 ng total protein content), where the detergent-based methods were ineffective due to losses during cleanup and transfer steps.

  2. Design Study of Methods for Sampling Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, William D.; Parker, Rebecca Robin

    This report describes efforts to develop sampling methods to be used in national or regional studies of migrant and seasonal farm workers (MSFWs). Several facets of the MSFWs' lifestyle create sampling difficulties. One is mobility. Although the dynamic nature of MSFWs' movement is partly understood, it is sufficiently unpredictable to create…

  3. The "Closed School-Cluster" Method of Selecting a Probability Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaycoft, Marion F.

    In some educational research studies--particularly longitudinal studies requiring a probability sample of schools and spanning a wide range of grades--it is desirable to so select the sample that schools at different levels (e.g., elementary and secondary) "correspond." This has often proved unachievable, using standard methods of selecting school…

  4. Comparison of alternative methods, sample grinds, and fermentation times for determining indigestible neutral detergent fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of sample grind, fermentation method, and time on the determination of indigestible neutral detergent fiber (iNDF). Samples of: 1) alfalfa hay and silage, 2) corn stalks and silage, and 3) ryegrass and mixed grass hays were ground through 2-m...

  5. The Effects of Sample Size, Estimation Methods, and Model Specification on SEM Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao; And Others

    A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to investigate the effects of sample size, estimation method, and model specification on structural equation modeling (SEM) fit indices. Based on a balanced 3x2x5 design, a total of 6,000 samples were generated from a prespecified population covariance matrix, and eight popular SEM fit indices were…

  6. GROUND WATER MONITORING AND SAMPLING: MULTI-LEVEL VERSUS TRADITIONAL METHODS WHATS WHAT?

    EPA Science Inventory

    After years of research and many publications, the question still remains: What is the best method to collect representative ground water samples from monitoring wells? Numerous systems and devices are currently available for obtaining both multi-level samples as well as traditi...

  7. COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR SAMPLING BACTERIA AT SOLID WASTE PROCESSING FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an assessment of the field sampling methodologies used to measure concentrations of airborne bacteria and viruses in and around waste handling and processing facilities. The sampling methods are discussed as well as the problems encountered and subsequent changes ma...

  8. Aerostat-lofted instrument and sampling method for determination of emissions from open area sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    An aerostat-borne instrument and sampling method was developed to characterize air samples from area sources, such as emissions from open burning. The 10 kg battery-powered instrument system, termed "the Flyer," is lofted with a helium-filled aerostat of 4 m nominal diameter and ...

  9. Drying and storage methods affect cyfluthrin concentrations in exposed plant samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard procedures exist for collection and chemical analyses of pyrethroid insecticides in environmental matrices. However, less detail is given for drying and potential storage methods of plant samples prior to analyses. Due to equipment and financial limitations, immediate sample analysis is n...

  10. Environmental Sampling Procedures and Methods to Respond to Biological Contamination (White Powder)

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2008-11-01

    This is a contribution to the annual report for the DHS Standards Office. It summarizes statistics-focused work associated with developing validated sampling procedures and methods. The main focus is on the experimental and sampling design constructed for contamination and decontamination field tests conducted during September 2007 in a remote, unused office building on the Idaho National Laboratory site.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise oreintationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions is zero.

  12. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  13. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery. PMID:26586405

  14. Evaluating Library Services by Sampling Methods: A Project at the North York Public Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Leonard A.; Magoss, George

    1977-01-01

    Five branch libraries measured the quantity of books, sound recordings, and periodicals in their catalogs in comparison with the number available for loan. A sampling method similar to those used for political pools and market research was employed. (JAB)

  15. SAMPLING/ANALYTICAL METHOD EVALUATION FOR ETHYLENE OXIDE EMISSION AND CONTROL UNIT EFFICIENCY DETERMINATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radian Corporation, assisting the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, performed a field evaluation of a method for sampling and analyzing ethylene oxide (EO) in the vent stream from a sterilization ...

  16. Field evaluation of sampling methods for pressurized geothermal liquids, gases, and suspended solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, D.W.; Cole, M.W.; DeMonia, D.D.; Divine, J.R.; Jensen, G.A.; Kindle, C.H.; Koski, O.H.; Smith, R.P.; Woodruff, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Many different sampling methods were tested and compared for collecting samples for measurement of brine chemistry, gases, and suspended solids from pressurized geothermal systems. The tests were conducted on the 6-2 wellhead and a test loop at the Department of Energy's Geothermal Test Facility at East Mesa, California. The recommended methods for single-phase liquid or single-phase steam (with gases) are presented, together with detailed procedures. The results of testing methods for sampling two phase liquid-steam systems showed significant errors can result. It was recommended that two-phase flowing wells be directed to a full flow separator and the single-phase liquid and single-phase steam sampled separately using the recommended methods.

  17. COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF TOTAL AVAILABLE RESIDUAL CHLORINE IN VARIOUS SAMPLE MATRICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten different methods for determining total available residual chlorine, all based on the iodine-iodide reaction, were tested without modification on four sample matrices. Their precision was determined by seven replicate determinations. Accuracy as compared to the iodometric sta...

  18. COMPENDIUM OF SELECTED METHODS FOR SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS AT GEOTHERMAL FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The establishment of generally accepted methods for characterizing geothermal emissions has been hampered by the independent natures of both geothermal industrial development and sampling/analysis procedures despite three workshops on the latter (Las Vegas 1975, 1977, 1980). An i...

  19. Methods of Analysis of Picogram Quantities of Organic Substances in Real Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes sensitive and specific methods used to monitor tetrachlorodibenzodioxins and tetrachlorodibenzofurans. The procedures are suitable for detecting and quantifying these substances at the parts-per-trillion levels in complex environmental and biological samples. (Author/JN)

  20. POP-ART: thermodynamically correct activated event sampling in complex materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubynsky, M. V.; Vocks, Henk; Mousseau, Normand; Barkema, G. T.

    2006-03-01

    Dynamics of complex systems with a rugged energy landscape can be represented as a sequence of rare activated events during which the system jumps between different potential energy minima. The activation-relaxation technique (ART) [1] is an efficient method of sampling such events; however, because of an unknown bias in selecting these events it cannot easily provide thermodynamical information. We present a modification of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART) [2]. POP-ART combines short molecular dynamics runs with ART-like activated moves, with an additional accept/reject step designed to satisfy detailed balance and thus reproduce correct thermodynamics. Both correctness and efficiency of the method have been tested using a variety of systems. We mention briefly some ways of extending the approach to obtain correct dynamics as well.[1] G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4358 (1996)[2] H. Vocks, M.V. Chubynsky, G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, J. Chem. Phys., accepted