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Sample records for active san jacinto

  1. Mt. San Jacinto College Student Equity Plan Update, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylard, Dana Reece, Ed.

    The Student Equity Plan developed by California's Mount San Jacinto College (MSJC) is intended to ensure equal access of historically underrepresented and ethnic minority students. This update provides current information on the goals and activities involved in the plan. An executive summary reviews state legislation mandating the development of…

  2. 75 FR 57496 - Notice of Public Meeting, Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Advisory Committee; California AGENCIES: Bureau of Land... the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Act of 2000 and the Federal Advisory.... Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (Forest Service) Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains...

  3. 76 FR 53695 - Notice of Public Meeting, Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Advisory Committee; CA AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Act of 2000 and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of... Agriculture, Forest Service (Forest Service) Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument...

  4. Straightening of the northern San Jacinto Fault, California as seen in the fault structure evolution of the San Jacinto step-over

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marliyani, G. I.; Rockwell, T. K.; Onderdonk, N.; McGill, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate a releasing step-over between the Casa Loma and Claremont strands of the northern San Jacinto fault zone to evaluate the Late Quaternary structural evolution of the fault zone, and to assess the likelihood of a rupture jumping across the step-over. Our new CPT and trench observations along the Claremont fault at Mystic Lake indicate that the main strand of the Claremont fault has jumped nearly a half kilometer westward into the San Jacinto releasing step-over during the late Quaternary. Multiple faults are inferred from the CPT data within a small sag at the NE side of the step-over that cuts through younger stratigraphy to the west of the basin bounding fault near Mystic Lake. Previous seismic reflection data also suggest the presence of a young fault that cuts basin strata beneath the middle of Mystic Lake farther west from our study area, and seismicity observations are consistent with the hypothesis that new fault strands have formed within the step-over zone. Numerous tectono-geomorphic features observed in satellite and LiDAR DEM imagery are interpreted to delineate the location of the currently active faults, as well as a zone of faults that cut across the basin from the northern end of the Casa Loma fault to the southern end of the active trace of the Claremont fault. Finally, new paleoseismic data from Mystic Lake site suggest that some late Holocene earthquakes may have jumped the step-over. All of these observations suggest that the San Jacinto step-over, which has been used as the primary basis for segmenting the northern San Jacinto fault zone, is being by-passed and that the fault zone may now be capable of larger earthquakes than previously expected.

  5. Mud transport in the Microtidal San Jacinto Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The overall objective of this research is to better understand the sediment transport processes in the microtidal San Jacinto Estuary (near Houston, TX) under variable hydrologic conditions. A numerical modeling approach is selected to answer the main question of; how will changes in freshwater input change the sedimentation pattern of the region? In this computational work, no new numerical method or code is developed, but rather an existing technology (MIKE 3D developed by DHI) is used to build a virtual San Jacinto Estuary laboratory where boundary conditions could be applied and altered to the domain to observe the general functional response of the system. Two synthetic freshwater inflows, simulating dry and wet conditions, were used in the numerical modeling experiments. Simulations showed that change in freshwater inflow has major impact on the salinity magnitude within the estuary. In dry conditions, the 5 ppt isohaline traveled all the way upstream of Morgans Point, almost to the confluence of San Jacinto River with Buffalo Bayou. During the extreme wet weather conditions, the 5 ppt isohaline of the surface water was pushed almost as far as Galveston Island. Overall erosion and deposition pattern showed little change between extreme dry and wet years. In general, part of the shallow areas experienced erosion whereas deeper parts of the estuary were under deposition. High freshwater inflow caused around 30% higher deposition in some parts of the channel compared with the low freshwater. Furthermore, examining the mass balance within the whole San Jacinto Estuary showed that around 28% of the input sediment was flushed out during the wet season. But in dry season, not only no sediment left the domain but also it received around 17% of the total available sediment within the estuary from the shelf.

  6. Mud transport in the Microtidal San Jacinto Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, M.; Strom, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of this research is to better understand the sediment transport processes in the microtidal San Jacinto Estuary (near Houston, TX) under variable hydrologic conditions. A numerical modeling approach is selected to answer the main question of; how will changes in freshwater input change the sedimentation pattern of the region? In this computational work, no new numerical method or code is developed, but rather an existing technology (MIKE 3D developed by DHI) is used to build a virtual San Jacinto Estuary laboratory where boundary conditions could be applied and altered to the domain to observe the general functional response of the system. Two synthetic freshwater inflows, simulating dry and wet conditions, were used in the numerical modeling experiments. Simulations showed that change in freshwater inflow has major impact on the salinity magnitude within the estuary. In dry conditions, the 5 ppt isohaline traveled all the way upstream of Morgans Point, almost to the confluence of San Jacinto River with Buffalo Bayou. During the extreme wet weather conditions, the 5 ppt isohaline of the surface water was pushed almost as far as Galveston Island. Overall erosion and deposition pattern showed little change between extreme dry and wet years. In general, part of the shallow areas experienced erosion whereas deeper parts of the estuary were under deposition. High freshwater inflow caused around 30% higher deposition in some parts of the channel compared with the low freshwater. Furthermore, examining the mass balance within the whole San Jacinto Estuary showed that around 28% of the input sediment was flushed out during the wet season. But in dry season, not only no sediment left the domain but also it received around 17% of the total available sediment within the estuary from the shelf.

  7. Recording Plate Boundary Deformation Processes Around The San Jacinto Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, K.; Mencin, D.; Borsa, A.; Fox, O.; Walls, C.; Van Boskirk, E.

    2012-04-01

    The San Jacinto Fault is one of the major faults which form the San Andreas Fault System in southern California. The fault, which lies to the west of the San Andreas, is one of the most active in the region. While strain rates are higher along the San Andreas, 23-37 mm/yr compared to 12-22 mm/yr along the San Jacinto, there have been 11 earthquakes of M6 and greater along the San Jacinto in the past 150 years while there have been none of this magnitude on the San Andreas in this region. UNAVCO has installed an array of geodetic and seismic instruments along the San Jacinto as part of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The network includes 25 GPS stations within 20 km of the surface trace with a concentration of borehole instrumentation in the Anza region where there are nine boreholes sites. Most of the borehole sites contain a GTSM21 4-component strainmeter, a Sonde-2 seismometer, a MEMS accelerometer and a pore pressure sensor. Thus, the array has the capability to capture plate boundary deformation processes with periods of milliseconds (seismic) to decades (GPS). On July 7th 2010 a M5.4 earthquake occurred on the Coyote Creek segment of the fault. The event was preceded by a M4.9 earthquake in the same area four weeks earlier and four earthquakes of M5 and greater within a 20 km radius of the epicenter in the past 50 years. In this study we will present the signals recorded by the different instrument types for the July 7th 2010 event and will compare the coseismic displacements recorded by the GPS and strainmeters with the displacement field predicted by Okada [1992]. All data recorded as part of the PBO observatory are publically available from the UNAVCO, the IRIS Data Management Center and the Northern California Earthquake Data Center.

  8. New paleoseismic data from the northern San Jacinto Fault Zone, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onderdonk, N.; McGill, S. F.; Marliyani, G. I.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from a new paleoseismic site along the Claremont strand of the San Jacinto Fault Zone in southern California. The site is located along the northeast edge of the ephemeral Mystic Lake at the north end of the San Jacinto Valley step-over. A small-scale (300 m wide) releasing step-over along the Claremont fault has created a sag depression that can be seen in early aerial photography. In 2009 an initial locator trench was excavated 400 m across the full width of this sag, exposing multiple faults and a structural depression filled with excellent shallow lake stratigraphy. Three additional trenches were excavated in 2010 across the main active fault zone that bounds the southwest edge of the sag. This fault is expressed as a zone of progressively folded and displaced strata. Upward terminations, fissures, folding, and growth stratigraphy provide evidence for at least six events in the upper 2 meters of section that was exposed. The stratigraphic relationships suggest a model in which each surface rupture results in subsidence of the sag, followed by clay deposition as the sag is filled in, culminating in a weak surface soil. 14C dating of 19 samples (out of over 400 that have been collected) was used to develop a preliminary event chronology. The most recent rupture occurred after 1750 AD and the penultimate event occurred between 1502 AD and 1612 AD. There is evidence for a cluster of 3 earthquakes between 1026 AD and 1220 AD, and a sixth event between 620 AD and 864 AD. The timing of the three events around 800 to 1000 years ago coincides temporally with a cluster of three events that were recorded at the Wrightwood paleoseismic site on the Mojave segment of the San Andreas Fault (SAF). These three events have not been recognized at paleoseismic sites along the San Bernardino segment of the SAF south of the juncture with the San Jacinto Fault, which suggests that some events on the SAF may rupture southward down the San Jacinto Fault (or vice

  9. 75 FR 34481 - Notice of Reestablishment of the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Reestablishment of the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National...) have reestablished the charter of the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Advisory...). Certification Statement I hereby certify that the reestablishment of the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto...

  10. A case for historic joint rupture of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults.

    PubMed

    Lozos, Julian C

    2016-03-01

    The San Andreas fault is considered to be the primary plate boundary fault in southern California and the most likely fault to produce a major earthquake. I use dynamic rupture modeling to show that the San Jacinto fault is capable of rupturing along with the San Andreas in a single earthquake, and interpret these results along with existing paleoseismic data and historic damage reports to suggest that this has likely occurred in the historic past. In particular, I find that paleoseismic data and historic observations for the ~M7.5 earthquake of 8 December 1812 are best explained by a rupture that begins on the San Jacinto fault and propagates onto the San Andreas fault. This precedent carries the implications that similar joint ruptures are possible in the future and that the San Jacinto fault plays a more significant role in seismic hazard in southern California than previously considered. My work also shows how physics-based modeling can be used for interpreting paleoseismic data sets and understanding prehistoric fault behavior. PMID:27034977

  11. A case for historic joint rupture of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults

    PubMed Central

    Lozos, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is considered to be the primary plate boundary fault in southern California and the most likely fault to produce a major earthquake. I use dynamic rupture modeling to show that the San Jacinto fault is capable of rupturing along with the San Andreas in a single earthquake, and interpret these results along with existing paleoseismic data and historic damage reports to suggest that this has likely occurred in the historic past. In particular, I find that paleoseismic data and historic observations for the ~M7.5 earthquake of 8 December 1812 are best explained by a rupture that begins on the San Jacinto fault and propagates onto the San Andreas fault. This precedent carries the implications that similar joint ruptures are possible in the future and that the San Jacinto fault plays a more significant role in seismic hazard in southern California than previously considered. My work also shows how physics-based modeling can be used for interpreting paleoseismic data sets and understanding prehistoric fault behavior. PMID:27034977

  12. A Case for Historic Joint Rupture of the San Andreas and San Jacinto Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozos, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ~M7.5 southern California earthquake of 8 December 1812 ruptured the San Andreas Fault from Cajon Pass to at least as far north as Pallet Creek (Biasi et al., 2002). The 1812 rupture has also been identified in trenches at Burro Flats to the south (Yule and Howland, 2001). However, the lack of a record of 1812 at Plunge Creek, between Cajon Pass and Burro Flats (McGill et al., 2002), complicates the interpretation of this event as a straightforward San Andreas rupture. Paleoseismic records of a large early 19th century rupture on the northern San Jacinto Fault (Onderdonk et al., 2013; Kendrick and Fumal, 2005) allow for alternate interpretations of the 1812 earthquake. I use dynamic rupture modeling on the San Andreas-San Jacinto junction to determine which rupture behaviors produce slip patterns consistent with observations of the 1812 event. My models implement realistic fault geometry, a realistic velocity structure, and stress orientations based on seismicity literature. Under these simple assumptions, joint rupture of the two faults is the most common behavior. My modeling rules out a San Andreas-only rupture that is consistent with the data from the 1812 earthquake, and also shows that single fault events are unable to match the average slip per event for either fault. The choice of nucleation point affects the details of rupture directivity and slip distribution, but not the first order result that multi-fault rupture is the preferred behavior. While it cannot be definitively said that joint San Andreas-San Jacinto rupture occurred in 1812, these results are consistent with paleoseismic and historic data. This has implications for the possibility of future multi-fault rupture within the San Andreas system, as well as for interpretation of other paleoseismic events in regions of complex fault interactions.

  13. Tomographic investigation of the wear along the San Jacinto fault, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tae-Kyung; Menke, William

    2006-05-01

    The seismic properties of the wear along the San Jacinto fault are investigated using local seismic records for clustered fault-zone earthquakes. Spatial reciprocity allows us to use the seismicity along fault plane to mimic the situation where receiver arrays are placed at depth on the fault plane. A seismic record at the event location is constructed by stacking the original station records. Waveform cross-correlations is then used to calculate the traveltimes of shear waves traveling between the pair of events. We analyze 157 small earthquakes occurring between 1998 and 2004 on the San Jacinto and Elsinore fault zones. Low shear velocities in the San Jacinto fault zone related to wear and gouge are persistently observed up to the depth of brittle-ductile transition zone (˜16 km). On the other hand, low velocities in the Elsinore fault zone are only visible in the northwestern portion at shallow depth. The wear structures in the San Jacinto fault zone display lower shear velocities by 6-8% than those of the wall-rock.

  14. Synchronous Late Quaternary slip rate variability on two strands of the San Jacinto fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, K. N.; Oskin, M.

    2007-12-01

    We present new results that show slip rates varied synchronously by a factor of two over the past 35 kyr along two parallel strands of the San Jacinto fault. Our results combine high-resolution LiDAR digital topography, field mapping and 10Be exposure-age dating from two of the most active strands of the southern San Jacinto fault: the Clark fault (CLF) and Coyote Creek fault (CCF). These faults form numerous NW-striking scarps that offset three generations of Quaternary alluvial fan surfaces, Q2b, Q3a, and Q3b. We dated alluvial fans along both the CCF and CLF using 10Be sampling methods adapted for available material and degradation of the surface. For younger surfaces with well-preserved bar and swale morphology, we used a new sampling method where 12 to 20 chips from quartz-bearing boulders lodged within a bar were amalgamated into a single sample. For older surfaces we either sampled individual meter-sized boulders or collected samples from a 2 m-deep depth profile. Surface ages are consistent between CCF and CLF sites: 40 ± 12 ka and 31 ± 6 ka for Q2b, 7.1 ± 1.6 ka and 4.6 ± 1.6 ka for Q3a, respectively. Samples from Q3b near the CLF yielded ages of 1.0 ± 0.2 ka and 2.1 ± 0.3 ka. CCF samples have not yet been corrected 10Be inheritance, thus we use the CLF ages to calculate preliminary slip rates. Late Pleistocene to present rates are CLF: 2.2 ± 0.5 mm/yr, CCF: 3.4 ± 0.9 mm/yr, and 5.6 ± 1.4 mm/yr combined. Mid-Holocene to present rates are CLF: 4.1 ± 1.5 mm/yr, CCF: 6.7 ± 2.8 mm/yr, and 10.9 ± 4.3 mm/yr combined. Latest Holocene CLF slip rate exceeds 3 mm/yr. The combined Late Pleistocene to present slip rate for the southern San Jacinto fault is less than one third the rate deduced from the onset of faulting ca. 1 Ma. Mid-Holocene to present slip rates for both the CLF and CCF are about double their ca. 35 kyr rates, but are less than the 16 - 20 mm/yr geodetic loading rates and the >16 mm/yr slip rate since 1 ka at Hog Lake. We conclude that (1

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Alkane-Degrading Acinetobacter venetianus JKSF02, Isolated from Contaminated Sediment of the San Jacinto River in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rupa; Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter venetianusJKSF02 was isolated from contaminated sediment in eastern Houston, Texas along the San Jacinto River. This microorganism specializes in n-alkane degradation and is well suited for bioremediation of the petroleum hydrocarbon deposited throughout the region by shipping and industrial activity from the Houston Ship Channel. PMID:27081144

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Alkane-Degrading Acinetobacter venetianus JKSF02, Isolated from Contaminated Sediment of the San Jacinto River in Houston, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter venetianus JKSF02 was isolated from contaminated sediment in eastern Houston, Texas along the San Jacinto River. This microorganism specializes in n-alkane degradation and is well suited for bioremediation of the petroleum hydrocarbon deposited throughout the region by shipping and industrial activity from the Houston Ship Channel. PMID:27081144

  17. Temporal and spatial late Quaternary slip rate variability on the southern San Jacinto fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, K.; Oskin, M.; Rockwell, T.; Owen, L.

    2008-12-01

    The history of the San Jacinto fault in accommodating Pacific-North America plate motion illustrates how deformation is partitioned in time and space across transform fault systems. We present new slip rate results from alluvial fans displaced by two parallel strands of the southern San Jacinto fault zone: the Clark and Coyote Creek faults. Alluvial fans were mapped in the field with 'B4' LiDAR imagery and dated using cosmogenic 10Be. We find that slip rates 1) varied synchronously by a factor of two over the past ~35 kyr and 2) change significantly along strike as slip is transferred southwestward from the Clark fault to the Coyote Creek fault. 35 ka to present average dextral slip rates for the Clark fault are 5.4 ± 2.2 mm/yr at the Rockhouse Canyon and 1.5 ± 0.4 mm/yr farther southeast, near the southern Santa Rosa Mountains. Over the same time period, the slip rate for the Coyote Creek fault is 2.9 ± 1.0 mm/yr. This yields a combined average slip-rate of 8.3 ± 2.2 mm/yr for the San Jacinto fault zone over the past ~35 kyr. Mid-Holocene to present rates are significantly faster along both fault strands. Displaced ~3-4 ka alluvial fans show that the Clark fault slips at a rate of 7.3 ± 1.8 mm/yr at Rockhouse Canyon and 3.9 ± 1.4 mm/yr at the southern Santa Rosa Mountians. Along the Coyote Creek fault the slip rate is 8.6 ± 2.9 mm/yr over the past ~3 ka. The combined Holocene rate of 15.9 ± 4.7 mm/yr is consistent with geodetic slip-rate estimates of 15 to 21 mm/yr for the San Jacinto fault zone. The apparently synchronous variation of slip-rate along both strands of the San Jacinto fault suggests that the rate of loading across the fault zone has varied significantly over the past ~35 kyr.

  18. Subsurface Characterization of Mystic Lake Paleoseismic site on the Claremont Fault Using CPT Data: Evidence for Straightening of the northern San Jacinto Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marliyani, G. I.; Rockwell, T. K.; Onderdonk, N.; McGill, S. F.

    2010-12-01

    We collected Cone Penetrometer Test (CPT) data along two transects across a small releasing step over at the Mystic Lake paleoseismic site along the Claremont segment of San Jacinto Fault, California. The primary reasons for this study are to characterize the Holocene pattern of sedimentation and to locate the most promising areas for additional trenching. At the depth of the trench, CPT data agree well with trench observations to better than 10cm resolution. The main fault identified in our 2009 trench is clearly the principal dip slip fault at depth, and shows increasing vertical separation with increasing depth. Based on limited shallow age data from the trench, the sedimentation rate varies by a factor of two across the main fault, making this an ideal paleoseismic site. The late Holocene sedimentation rate is 3-4 mm/yr within the small sag depression, with units at 2 m depth west of the fault appearing at 4-6 m depth east of the fault in the sag. As we only trenched to about 2 m depth, the current paleoseismic record of pre-historical events is probably a minimum. The young active fault is about 0.5 km from the basin bounding mapped trace of the Claremont fault, which displays minimal Holocene activity in our preliminary trenches. Along with the presence of young faults within the Mystic Lake step over between the Casa Loma and Claremont strands (also referred to as the Hemet step-over), as determined from seismic reflection and seismicity data, these observations suggest that the northern San Jacinto fault is reorganizing and straightening, and will eventually bypass this large releasing step in San Jacinto Valley, thereby lengthening the straight continuous section of San Jacinto Fault. Rupture of the entire Clark-Casa Loma-Claremont fault zone could result in earthquakes as large as Mw7.6, rivaling the San Andreas fault for hazard to the densely populated Los Angeles and San Bernardino/Riverside areas.

  19. A seismic refraction and reflection study across the central San Jacinto Basin, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, T.-C.; Biehler, S.; Park, S.K.; Stephenson, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    The San Jacinto Basin is a northwest-trending, pullapart basin in the San Jacinto fault zone of the San Andreas fault system in southern California. About 24 km long and 2 to 4 km wide, the basin sits on a graben bounded by two strands of the San Jacinto fault zone: the Claremont Fault on the northeast and the Casa Loma Fault on the southwest. We present a case study of shallow structure (less than 1 km) in the central basin. A 2.75-km refraction line running from the northeast to southwest across the regional structural trend reveals a groundwater barrier (Offset I). Another line, bent southward and continued for 1.65-km, shows a crystalline basement offset (Offset III) near an inferred trace of the Casa Loma Fault. Although a basement refractor was not observed along the 2.75-km line, a mismatch between the estimate of its minimum depth and the basement depth determined for the 1.65-km line suggests that an offset in the basement (greater than 260 m) exists around the junction of the two refraction lines (Offset II). By revealing more faults and subtle sedimentary structures, the reflection stack sections confirm the two refraction offsets as faults. Offsets I and III each separate sediments of contrasting structures and, in addition. Offset III disrupts an unconformity. However, the sense and amount of the offset across Offset III contradict what may be expected across the Casa Loma Fault, which has its basinward basement down-thrown to about 2.5 km in the better defined southeastern part of the graben. The Casa Loma Fault trace has been mislinked in the existing geological maps and the trace should be remapped to Offset II where the reflector disruptions spread over a 400-m wide zone. Our Offset III is an unnamed, concealed fault.

  20. The B4 Project: Scanning the San Andreas and San Jacinto Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevis, M.; Hudnut, K.; Sanchez, R.; Toth, C.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.; Kendrick, E.; Caccamise, D.; Raleigh, D.; Zhou, H.; Shan, S.; Shindle, W.; Yong, A.; Harvey, J.; Borsa, A.; Ayoub, F.; Shrestha, R.; Carter, B.; Sartori, M.; Phillips, D.; Coloma, F.

    2005-12-01

    We performed a high-resolution topographic survey of the San Andreas and San Jacinto fault zones in southern California, in order to obtain pre-earthquake imagery necessary to determine near-field ground deformation after a future large event (hence the name B4), and to support tectonic and paleoseismic research. We imaged the faults in unprecedented detail using Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) and all-digital navigational photogrammetry. The scientific purpose of such spatially detailed imaging is to establish actual slip and afterslip heterogeneity so as to help resolve classic `great debates' in earthquake source physics. We also expect to be able to characterize near-field deformation associated with the along-strike transition from continuously creeping to fully locked sections of the San Andreas fault with these data. In order to ensure that the data are extraordinarily well georeferenced, an abnormally intensive array of GPS ground control was employed throughout the project. For calibration and validation purposes, numerous areas along the fault zones were blanketed with kinematic GPS profiles. For redundant determination of the airborne platform trajectory, the OSU independent inertial measurement unit and GPS system were included in the flight payload along with the NCALM equipment. Studies using the ground control are being conducted to estimate true accuracy of the airborne data, and the redundant flight trajectory data are being used to study and correct for errors in the airborne data as well. All of this work is directed at overall improvement in airborne imaging capabilities, with the intent of refining procedures that may then be used in the large-scale GeoEarthScope project over the next few years, led by UNAVCO. More generally, we also intend to improve airborne imaging to the point of geodetic quality. The present NSF-funded project, led by Ohio State University and the U. S. Geological Survey, was supported in all aspects of the airborne

  1. Paleoecology of benthic foraminifera from the Miocene of the San Jacinto Basin, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, John Sebastian; Fiorini, Flavia; Andres Trejos, Raul; Vallejo, Diego Felipe; Pardo, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative benthic foraminifera analysis was conducted on 34 samples collected from a borehole core (393.72m deep) drilled by Colombian Hydrocarbon Agency (ANH) on 2009 in the San Jacinto basin (Northern Colombia). The aims of the research were to define a taxonomical data-bank of Miocene benthic foraminifera for this region, to use the benthic foraminifera assemblages to interpret the paleoenvironment and to identify paleoenvironmental changes. The bottom of the section was dated between lowest Burdigalian to middle Langhian (20.393-17.721 Ma) based on calcareous nannofossils bioevents: LO Helicosphaera ampliaperta, HCO Sphenolithus belemnos and LCO Sphenolithus heteromorphus. The benthic foraminifera fauna identified in the studied samples is composed for the majority of calcareous hyaline tests and is dominated by infaunal taxas. Species belonging to the genera Uvigerina and Lenticulina are commonly occurring in the studied section together with other species typical of outer-shelf upper-bathyal environment. Cibicidoides spp., abundant in the lower part of the section, abruptly decreases in abundance in the upper part. Species belonging to the opportunistic genera Bulimina and Bolivina are more abundant in the upper part of the section. Variability in the abundance of opportunistic species can be associated with tectonic disturbance on the Sinu-San Jacinto fold belt (NW of Colombia) as a result of collision of the Caribbean plate against NW of South America. The tectonics could lead a perturbation on deep ocean sedimentation and circulation.

  2. Pleistocene Brawley and Ocotillo Formations: Evidence for initial strike-slip deformation along the San Felipe and San Jacinto fault zonez, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.M.; Janecke, S.U.; Dorsey, R.J.; Housen, B.A.; Langenheim, V.E.; McDougall, K.A.; Steeley, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    We examine the Pleistocene tectonic reorganization of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in the Salton Trough of southern California with an integrated approach that includes basin analysis, magnetostratigraphy, and geologic mapping of upper Pliocene to Pleistocene sedimentary rocks in the San Felipe Hills. These deposits preserve the earliest sedimentary record of movement on the San Felipe and San Jacinto fault zones that replaced and deactivated the late Cenozoic West Salton detachment fault. Sandstone and mudstone of the Brawley Formation accumulated between ???1.1 and ???0.6-0.5 Ma in a delta on the margin of an arid Pleistocene lake, which received sediment from alluvial fans of the Ocotillo Formation to the west-southwest. Our analysis indicates that the Ocotillo and Brawley formations prograded abruptly to the east-northeast across a former mud-dominated perennial lake (Borrego Formation) at ???1.1 Ma in response to initiation of the dextral-oblique San Felipe fault zone. The ???25-km-long San Felipe anticline initiated at about the same time and produced an intrabasinal basement-cored high within the San Felipe-Borrego basin that is recorded by progressive unconformities on its north and south limbs. A disconformity at the base of the Brawley Formation in the eastern San Felipe Hills probably records initiation and early blind slip at the southeast tip of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault zone. Our data are consistent with abrupt and nearly synchronous inception of the San Jacinto and San Felipe fault zones southwest of the southern San Andreas fault in the early Pleistocene during a pronounced southwestward broadening of the San Andreas fault zone. The current contractional geometry of the San Jacinto fault zone developed after ???0.5-0.6 Ma during a second, less significant change in structural style. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  3. Ground Motion Prediction Equations for data recorded in the immediate vicinity of the San Jacinto fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzon, I.; Vernon, F. L.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new set of empirical Ground Motion results for horizontal Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) and Peak Ground Velocity (PGV) that include data from the immediate vicinity of the San Jacinto fault zone. The results to date are based on earthquakes in the magnitude range of 1 < M < 5.5 recorded by up to 60 stations at distances ranging from the fault zone itself up to 120km. The data are examined and compared against several models of Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPE). The New Generation Attenuation (NGA) project was focused on a magnitude range of M > 5 (e.g., Campbell & Bozorgnia 2006, Boore & Atkinson 2006); therefore, our main comparison is with the ShakeMap system results (Quitoriano 2003 for M < 5.3) and with Cua & Heaton (2008) GMPE accounting for a magnitude range of 2 < M < 8. The data employed so far involves several aftershock sequences on small and known fault segments. These constrains allow for better consideration of the path and site effects, including the path in the near vicinity of the source. Therefore, as opposed to most models (using either the epicentral distance for low magnitude events or the closest surface projection of the fault for stronger events) we consider the hypocentral source-receiver distance as controlling both the geometrical spreading and the inelastic path effects. This approach is not only more physical for M < 5 events, but also reveals the upper crustal heterogeneity (< 20km) in the San Jacinto Fault Zone area. The continuing work will focus on incorporating more data as it becomes available, and using the results to develop updated Ground Motion Prediction Equations. The results will be useful for earthquake engineering and for exploring the crustal heterogeneity around active faults.

  4. Using Precariously Balanced Rocks, Historic Records And Paleoseismology To Constrain Rupture Patterns And Rupture Potential Of The San Andreas And San Jacinto Faults In The Los Angeles Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant Ludwig, L.; Brune, J. N.

    2010-12-01

    The San Andreas fault (SAF) has been identified as the likely source of a future damaging earthquake that could threaten millions of California residents, and the southern half of the fault has been identified as a likely candidate for rupture because it appears to be loaded with accumulated strain. Forecasts of future large earthquakes on the southern SAF and estimates of co-seismic slip depend critically on the slip rate and date of last rupture. The earliest historically documented rupture of the southern SAF occurred on December 8th and/or 21st, 1812 A.D., as recorded by early California missionaries, and confirmed by tree ring studies at Wrightwood, California. Prior to the tree ring study, the sequence of earthquakes in December 1812 was attributed to the Newport-Inglewood fault and/or another fault offshore of southern California, to explain the collapse of a church at Mission San Juan Capistrano and a tsunami near Mission Santa Barbara. Competing rupture models have been proposed to fit the sparse historic accounts of shaking recorded at the Missions, and sparse paleoseismic data from trenches excavated across the San Andreas and other southern California faults. Confirmation of proposed rupture patterns has been elusive because dates of surface ruptures observed in trenches at several locations along the SAF either cannot be resolved to 1812 due to uncertainty in radiocarbon dating, or preclude rupture. One possibility is that the 1812 earthquake ruptured both the SAF in Wrightwood and the northern San Jacinto fault in the Cajon Pass and San Bernardino Valley. Active traces of the faults are less than 2 km apart in Cajon Pass and it is well documented that ruptures can propagate between fault strands up to several kilometers apart. Here we propose that the distribution of fragile semi-precarious and precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) in the western San Bernardino Mountains is inconsistent with accepted rupture models for the 1812 earthquake. To better fit

  5. Interaction of the san jacinto and san andreas fault zones, southern california: triggered earthquake migration and coupled recurrence intervals.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C O

    1993-05-14

    Two lines of evidence suggest that large earthquakes that occur on either the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ) or the San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) may be triggered by large earthquakes that occur on the other. First, the great 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake in the SAFZ seems to have triggered a progressive sequence of earthquakes in the SJFZ. These earthquakes occurred at times and locations that are consistent with triggering by a strain pulse that propagated southeastward at a rate of 1.7 kilometers per year along the SJFZ after the 1857 earthquake. Second, the similarity in average recurrence intervals in the SJFZ (about 150 years) and in the Mojave segment of the SAFZ (132 years) suggests that large earthquakes in the northern SJFZ may stimulate the relatively frequent major earthquakes on the Mojave segment. Analysis of historic earthquake occurrence in the SJFZ suggests little likelihood of extended quiescence between earthquake sequences. PMID:17818388

  6. A reservoir engineering assessment of the San Jacinto-Tizate Geothermal Field, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Ostapenko, S.; Spektor, S.; Davila, H.; Porras, E.; Perez, M.

    1996-01-24

    More than twenty yews have passed since geothermal research and drilling took place at the geothermal fields in Nicaragua- Tbe well horn Momotombo Geothermal Field (70 We) has been generating electricity since 1983, and now a new geothermal field is under exploration. the San Jacinto-Tizate. Two reservoirs hydraulic connected were found. The shallow reservoir (270°C) at the depth of 550 - 1200 meters, and the deep one at > 1600 meters. Both of theme are water dominated reservoirs, although a two phase condition exist in the upper part of the shallow one. Different transient tests and a multi-well interference test have been carried out, very high transmissivity value were estimated around the well SJ-4 and average values for the others. A preliminar conceptual model of the geothermal system is given in this paper, as the result of the geology, geophysics, hydrology studies, drilling and reservoir evaluation.

  7. A reservoir engineering assessment of the San Jacinto-Tizate geothermal field, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Ostapenko, S.; Spektor, S.; Davila, H.; Porras, E.; Perez, M.

    1996-12-31

    More than twenty years have passed since geothermal research and drilling took place at the geothermal fields in Nicaragua. The well known Momotombo Geothermal Field (70 MWe) has been generating electricity since 1983, and now a new geothermal field is under exploration, the San Jacinto-Tizate. Two reservoirs hydraulic connected were found. The shallow reservoir (270{degrees}C) at the depth of 550 - 1200 meters, and the deep one at > 1600 meters. Both of them are water dominated reservoirs although a two phase condition exist in the upper part of the shallow one. Different transient tests and a multi-well interference test have been carried out, very high transmissivity value were estimated around the well SJ-4 and average values for the others. A preliminary conceptual model of the geothermal system is given in this paper, as the result of the geology, geophysics, hydrology studies, drilling and reservoir evaluation.

  8. Modeling spatio-temporal variations of seismicity in the San Jacinto Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöller, G.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate spatio-temporal properties of earthquake patterns in the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ), California, between Cajon Pass and the Superstition Hill Fault, using long records of simulated seismicity constrained by available data. The model provides an effective realization (e.g. Ben-Zion 1996; Zöller et al. 2007) of a large segmented strike-slip fault zone in 3D elastic half space, with heterogeneous distributions of static/kinetic friction and creep properties, and boundary conditions consisting of constant velocity motion around the fault. The computational section of the fault contains small brittle slip patches which fail during earthquakes and may undergo some creep deformation between events. The creep rates increase to the end points of the computational section and with depth. Two significant offsets of the SJFZ at San Jacinto Valley and Coyote Ridge are modeled by strength heterogeneities. The simulated catalogs are compared to the seismicity recorded at the SJFZ since 1932 and to recently reported results on paleoearthquakes at sites along the SJFZ at Hog Lake (HL) and Mystic Lake (ML) in the last 1500 years (e.g. Onderdonk et al., 2012; Rockwell et al., 2012). We address several questions including the following intriguing issue raised by the available paleoseismological data: are large earthquakes with signatures in ML and HL typically correlated? In particular: is a typical paleoevent in HL an incomplete rupture that is continued later in ML, and vice versa? The simulation results provide insights on the statistical significance of these and other patterns, and the ability of the SJFZ to produce large earthquakes which have not been observed in recent decades.

  9. Shallow seismic trapping structure in the San Jacinto fault zone near Anza, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Vernon, F. L.

    2005-09-01

    We analyse fault zone trapped waves, generated by ~500 small earthquakes, for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface structure of the Coyote Creek, Clark Valley and Buck Ridge branches of the San Jacinto fault zone near Anza, California. Based on a small number of selected trapped waves within this data set, a previous study concluded on the existence of a low-velocity waveguide that is continuous to a depth of 15-20 km. In contrast, our systematic analysis of the larger data set indicates a shallow trapping structure that extends only to a depth of 3-5 km. This is based on the following lines of evidence. (1) Earthquakes clearly outside these fault branches generate fault zone trapped waves that are recorded by stations within the fault zones. (2) A traveltime analysis of the difference between the direct S arrivals and trapped wave groups shows no systematic increase (moveout) with increasing hypocentral distance or event depth. Estimates based on the observed average moveout values indicate that the propagation distances within the low-velocity fault zone layers are 3-5 km. (3) Quantitative waveform inversions of trapped wave data indicate similar short propagation distances within the low-velocity fault zone layers. The results are compatible with recent inferences on shallow trapping structures along several other faults and rupture zones. The waveform inversions also indicate that the shallow trapping structures are offset to the northeast from the surface trace of each fault branch. This may result from a preferred propagation direction of large earthquake ruptures on the San Jacinto fault.

  10. Does the slip rate of the San Jacinto fault vary along strike? Constraints from campaign GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, J. P.; Funning, G.

    2013-12-01

    Does the slip rate of the San Jacinto fault vary along strike? Constraints from campaign GPS data Conrad, JP Jconr003@ucr.edu Dept. of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA Funning, G J gareth@ucr.edu Dept. of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA The historically active San Jacinto fault (SJF) is major component of the plate boundary fault system in southern California. In close proximity to large population centers in California's Inland Empire, the loss of life and property damage that from a large earthquake along the SJF is potentially great. As the SJF is a relatively young fault, morphologically, it is made up of numerous discontinuous strands and segments, leading to disparate geologic slip rates and complicating their estimation. In the most recent Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, the modeled slip rates for the northern SJF are variable, from 6.0 mm/yr on the San Bernardino section to 14.8 mm/yr in Anza [Field et al., 2009]. Since fault slip rates control the accumulation of moment deficit on a fault, such a reduction should correspond with a proportional reduction in seismic hazard. The San Bernardino segment slip rate was lowered from the previous UCERF forecast and is a factor of 1/3 less than the segment immediately south of it, yet no new data was introduced to substantiate this change. With velocity fields modeled from GPS data collected over 25 years we will validate whether GPS velocities are consistent with the UCERF 2 slip rates. To accomplish this, we process data from over 100 continuous and survey GPS sites with epochs from 1995 to 2013 within the Western United States. Data sources include locally collected data from previous and current UC Riverside campaigns, as well as campaign data archived at the Southern California Earthquake Center, UNAVCO, and SOPAC and continuous data from the IGS and Plate Boundary Observatory. Site positions are estimated using GAMIT 10.5 in the ITRF 2008

  11. Damage asymmetry from hydro-geomorphic signals along the trifurcation area of the San- Jacinto Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechsler, N.; Rockwell, T. K.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2007-12-01

    An important earthquake research topic is the question of whether there are geological controls on rupture propagation direction. A persistent preferred propagation direction should produce asymmetric damage structure that is recorded in the volume of rock surrounding a fault, and there may be geomorphic manifestations on active faults that can be recognized and analyzed in a quantitative fashion. The San-Jacinto Fault (SJF) is one of the most active faults in southern California, with well expressed geomorphology, a fast geologic slip rate, and a strong GPS strain signal. We use standard morphometric analysis to detect the damage asymmetry across a part of the SJF in the trifurcation area where the Clark, Coyote-Creek and Buck-Ridge segments meet. The analysis is done at two scales: 1. Small scale DEM with 30m per pixel resolution derived from SRTM data. 2. Large scale DEM with 1m per pixel resolution derived from LIDAR data, covering the fault at ~1 km width. The geomorphic analysis is done using the GIS software ArcMap and the TauDEM tool box. We compare several morphometric parameters (drainage density, stream frequency, texture ratio, bifurcation ratio, ruggedness number, hypsometric integral) for drainages on both sides of the fault. North of the trifurcation point, the north-east side of the fault is more damaged, in agreement with Dor el at (2006) and Lewis et al (2005), but south of the trifurcation the situation is reversed. A number of factors can affect the results of the morphometric analysis, including the proximity of several fault strands, a restraining bend on the main strand, and different lithologies on the two sides of the fault. The current results are not conclusive since the morphometric analysis depends on various additional factors, such as different slopes, rates of erosion, vegetation, etc., that were only partially accounted for. Nevertheless, these preliminary results on reversed damage asymmetry suggest that large earthquakes on the

  12. Waveform cross-correlation and relocations for seismic events in the San Jacinto Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galipchak, E.; Kurzon, I.; Vernon, F.; Pavlis, G. L.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a new approach for the relocation of local seismic events using waveform cross-correlation and automatic detection algorithm. This approach is developed and implemented for the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ), where recent cross-correlation and double-difference relocation methods (e.g., Hauksson et al. 2011) account up to ~75% of the seismic events, due to the complex nature of the SJFZ. The fault zone complexity features include a mismatch between the fault traces and seismicity clusters and strong heterogeneity of focal mechanisms. Our goal is to develop an efficient relocation method in which ~90% of the seismic events would be considered. The 'dbxcor' tool of the Antelope software package (e.g., Pavlis & Vernon 2010) is a graphic cross-correlation method involving an active reviewing of the cross-correlation process by a seismic analyst. The method is adjusted here for the analysis of local events from the original algorithm developed mainly for the processing of teleseismic events. The advantage of this approach is that the analyst may keep many of the waveforms that would have been dropped out due to the cross-correlation threshold, thereby increasing the percentage of events considered in the process. Moreover, the method allows an interactive demonstration and identification of different nearby source mechanisms, thus helping to examine the heterogeneity of the fault zone. A pre-request of the cross-correlation algorithm is the existence of arrivals for each waveform in the process. This required tuning a set of efficient automated detectors for grasping the specific nature of seismicity in the SJFZ. Applying such detectors we manage to increase the catalogue by up to 40% of additional events not reviewed previously by analysts. This improvement allows incorporating not only more events into the relocation process, but also additional stations, which were missed by previous automatic or manual picking of P and S arrivals. The relocated events

  13. Geophysical and isotopic mapping of preexisting crustal structures that influenced the location and development of the San Jacinto fault zone, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.; Morton, D.M.; Kistler, R.W.; Matti, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine the role of preexisting crustal structure within the Peninsular Ranges batholith on determining the location of the San Jacinto fault zone by analysis of geophysical anomalies and initial strontium ratio data. A 1000-km-long boundary within the Peninsular Ranges batholith, separating relatively mafic, dense, and magnetic rocks of the western Peninsular Ranges batholith from the more felsic, less dense, and weakly magnetic rocks of the eastern Peninsular Ranges batholith, strikes north-northwest toward the San Jacinto fault zone. Modeling of the gravity and magnetic field anomalies caused by this boundary indicates that it extends to depths of at least 20 km. The anomalies do not cross the San Jacinto fault zone, but instead trend northwesterly and coincide with the fault zone. A 75-km-long gradient in initial strontium ratios (Sri) in the eastern Peninsular Ranges batholith coincides with the San Jacinto fault zone. Here rocks east of the fault are characterized by Sri greater than 0.706, indicating a source of largely continental crust, sedimentary materials, or different lithosphere. We argue that the physical property contrast produced by the Peninsular Ranges batholith boundary provided a mechanically favorable path for the San Jacinto fault zone, bypassing the San Gorgonio structural knot as slip was transferred from the San Andreas fault 1.0-1.5 Ma. Two historical M6.7 earthquakes may have nucleated along the Peninsular Ranges batholith discontinuity in San Jacinto Valley, suggesting that Peninsular Ranges batholith crustal structure may continue to affect how strain is accommodated along the San Jacinto fault zone. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  14. Strike-slip fault propagation and linkage via work optimization with application to the San Jacinto fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, E. H.; McBeck, J.; Cooke, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Over multiple earthquake cycles, strike-slip faults link to form through-going structures, as demonstrated by the continuous nature of the mature San Andreas fault system in California relative to the younger and more segmented San Jacinto fault system nearby. Despite its immaturity, the San Jacinto system accommodates between one third and one half of the slip along the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. It therefore poses a significant seismic threat to southern California. Better understanding of how the San Jacinto system has evolved over geologic time and of current interactions between faults within the system is critical to assessing this seismic hazard accurately. Numerical models are well suited to simulating kilometer-scale processes, but models of fault system development are challenged by the multiple physical mechanisms involved. For example, laboratory experiments on brittle materials show that faults propagate and eventually join (hard-linkage) by both opening-mode and shear failure. In addition, faults interact prior to linkage through stress transfer (soft-linkage). The new algorithm GROW (GRowth by Optimization of Work) accounts for this complex array of behaviors by taking a global approach to fault propagation while adhering to the principals of linear elastic fracture mechanics. This makes GROW a powerful tool for studying fault interactions and fault system development over geologic time. In GROW, faults evolve to minimize the work (or energy) expended during deformation, thereby maximizing the mechanical efficiency of the entire system. Furthermore, the incorporation of both static and dynamic friction allows GROW models to capture fault slip and fault propagation in single earthquakes as well as over consecutive earthquake cycles. GROW models with idealized faults reveal that the initial fault spacing and the applied stress orientation control fault linkage propensity and linkage patterns. These models allow the gains in

  15. UCERF3 and Rupture Behavior of the San Jacinto Fault in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, T. K.; Biasi, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    The UCERF3 model predicts that most San Jacinto fault (SJF) earthquakes are larger than M7.5. In contrast, both the historical record of moderate earthquakes, along with the rich paleoseismic record, argues that most of the moment release on the SJF is accommodated by earthquakes in the Mw6.5-7.3 range. Over the past 4000 years at Hog Lake, large ruptures are exemplified by the M7.3 event in November 1800, with 1918-type earthquakes filling in the section of low slip to the NW. Limits on the range of rupture sizes can also be inferred by comparing the Hog Lake record to the Mystic Lake site to the NW. Less than half of Hog Lake events have plausible matches at Mystic Lake, implying that the mode in earthquake magnitude is unlikely to be in the M>7.5 range as reported in the UCERF3 model. In addition, moderate earthquakes occurred along the northern SJF in 1899 (2 events), 1918, and 1923, and ~M6.5 events with surface rupture occurred on the southern San Jacinto fault in 1968 and 1987. Several M6-sized earthquakes (1937, 1954, 1890?, 1892?) have also occurred along the southern SJF. Paleoseismic observations to the south, although less extensive, also argue that M7.3 events that rupture the entire Superstition Mountain-Coyote Creek fault are less frequent than ruptures with smaller magnitudes. The CoV at Hog Lake is resolved to be about 0.63 for the entire record, decreasing for the subset of largest interpreted events. The complete record thus suggests quasi-periodic behavior of large earthquakes with superposed more randomly occurring moderate events. The shorter southern SJF record can be interpreted in the same way, with occasional larger earthquakes superposed with moderate, 1968-type events. Both records lend geological support to the recent model-based UCERF3 conclusion that the CoV for ground rupturing earthquakes must depend on magnitude in order to match site-specific observations of CoV in the range of 0.6. A picture emerges of more regular large events

  16. Shallow low-velocity zone of the San Jacinto fault from local earthquake waveform modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongfeng; Zhu, Lupei

    2010-10-01

    We developed a method to determine the depth extent of low-velocity zone (LVZ) associated with a fault zone (FZ) using S-wave precursors from local earthquakes. The precursors are diffracted S waves around the edges of LVZ and their relative amplitudes to the direct S waves are sensitive to the LVZ depth. We applied the method to data recorded by three temporary arrays across three branches of the San Jacinto FZ. The FZ dip was constrained by differential traveltimes of P waves between stations at two side of the FZ. Other FZ parameters (width and velocity contrast) were determined by modelling waveforms of direct and FZ-reflected P and S waves. We found that the LVZ of the Buck Ridge fault branch has a width of ~150 m with a 30-40 per cent reduction in Vp and a 50-60 per cent reduction in Vs. The fault dips 70 +/- 5° to southwest and its LVZ extends only to 2 +/- 1 km in depth. The LVZ of the Clark Valley fault branch has a width of ~200 m with 40 per cent reduction in Vp and 50 per cent reduction in Vs. The Coyote Creek branch is nearly vertical and has a LVZ of ~150 m in width and of 25 per cent reduction in Vp and 50 per cent reduction in Vs. The LVZs of these three branches are not centred at the surface fault trace but are located to their northeast, indicating asymmetric damage during earthquakes.

  17. Spatial variations of shear wave anisotropy near the San Jacinto Fault Zone in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Vernon, Frank L.

    2015-12-01

    We examine crustal anisotropy at several scales along and across the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) by systematically measuring shear wave splitting (SWS) parameters. The analyzed data are recorded by 86 stations during 2012-2014, including five linear dense arrays crossing the SJFZ at different locations and other autonomous stations within 15 km from the main fault trace. Shear phase arrivals and SWS parameters (fast directions and delay times) are obtained with automated methods. The measurement quality is then assessed using multiple criteria, resulting in 23,000 high-quality measurements. We find clear contrast of fast directions between the SW and NE sides of the SJFZ. Stations on the SW side have fast directions consistent overall with the maximum horizontal compression direction (SHmax), while stations on the NE side show mixed patterns likely reflecting lithological/topographic variations combined with fault zone damage. The fast directions in the Anza gap section with relatively simple fault geometry agree with the inferred SHmax, and the delay times at an array within that section are smaller than those observed at other across-fault arrays. These indications of less pronounced damage zone in the Anza section compared to other segments of the SJFZ are correlated generally with geometrical properties of the surface traces. Significant variations of fast directions on several across-fault arrays, with station spacing on the orders of a few tens of meters, suggest that shallow fault structures and near-surface layers play an important role in controlling the SWS parameters.

  18. Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry of the Centennial Re-survey of the San Jacinto Mountains, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, M. L.; Swarth, E.; Swarth, C.; Smith-Herman, N.; Tremor, S.; Unitt, P.

    2009-12-01

    In 1908, the San Jacinto Mountains were first surveyed for their animal and plant diversity by Joseph Grinnell and Harry Swarth, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley. In 2008, continuing until 2011, the ecology and stable isotope biogeochemistry of the plants, insects, birds, and mammals is being re-surveyed. Results of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotopes in organic matter show the variation in regional climate and trophic structure. For example, δ15N of plants at more arid stations are more positive by 3-5‰. Plants on westward facing slopes have more negative δ15N (to -6‰) possibly indicating N sources from atmospheric N deposition originating from urban Los Angeles. Isotopic analyses of recent collections will be compared with historic, museum archived specimens of plants and resident birds species. Our initial results show that the carbon isotopic compositions of plants collected in 1908 and during the early part of the 20th century are 1.6‰ enriched in δ13C, as predicted with the rise in industrially influenced atmospheric CO2. Isotopic data will be augmented by species diversity to test the hypothesis that 100 years of human influence has affected the ecosystem in this area and in what manner.

  19. Seasonal variations of seismic velocities in the San Jacinto fault area observed with ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillers, G.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Campillo, M.; Zigone, D.

    2015-08-01

    We observe seasonal seismic wave speed changes (dv/v) in the San Jacinto fault area and investigate several likely source mechanisms. Velocity variations are obtained from analysis of 6 yr data of vertical component seismic noise recorded by 10 surface and six borehole stations. We study the interrelation between dv/v records, frequency-dependent seismic noise properties, and nearby environmental data of wind speed, rain, ground water level, barometric pressure and atmospheric temperature. The results indicate peak-to-peak seasonal velocity variations of ˜0.2 per cent in the 0.5-2 Hz frequency range, likely associated with genuine changes of rock properties rather than changes in the noise field. Phase measurements between dv/v and the various environmental data imply that the dominant source mechanism in the arid study area is thermoelastic strain induced by atmospheric temperature variations. The other considered environmental effects produce secondary variations that are superimposed on the thermal-based changes. More detailed work with longer data on the response of rocks to various known external loadings can help tracking the evolving stress and effective rheology at depth.

  20. Is there a "blind" strike-slip fault at the southern end of the San Jacinto Fault system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymofyeyeva, E.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the interseismic deformation at the southern end of the San Jacinto fault system using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) data. To complement the continuous GPS measurements from the PBO network, we have conducted campaign-style GPS surveys of 19 benchmarks along Highway 78 in the years 2012, 2013, and 2014. We processed the campaign GPS data using GAMIT to obtain horizontal velocities. The data show high velocity gradients East of the surface trace of the Coyote Creek Fault. We also processed InSAR data from the ascending and descending tracks of the ENVISAT mission between the years 2003 and 2010. The InSAR data were corrected for atmospheric artifacts using an iterative common point stacking method. We combined average velocities from different look angles to isolate the fault-parallel velocity field, and used fault-parallel velocities to compute strain rate. We filtered the data over a range of wavelengths prior to numerical differentiation, to reduce the effects of noise and to investigate both shallow and deep sources of deformation. At spatial wavelengths less than 2km the strain rate data show prominent anomalies along the San Andreas and Superstition Hills faults, where shallow creep has been documented by previous studies. Similar anomalies are also observed along parts of the Coyote Creek Fault, San Felipe Fault, and an unmapped southern continuation of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto Fault. At wavelengths on the order of 20km, we observe elevated strain rates concentrated east of the Coyote Creek Fault. The long-wavelength strain anomaly east of the Coyote Creek Fault, and the localized shallow creep observed in the short-wavelength strain rate data over the same area suggest that there may be a "blind" segment of the Clark Fault that accommodates a significant portion of the deformation on the southern end of the San Jacinto Fault.

  1. Spatial variability of time-constant slip rates on the San Jacinto fault zone, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Oskin, M. E.; Sharp, W. D.; Meriaux, A. B.; Rockwell, T. K.; Fletcher, K.; Owen, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    In southern California, the San Andreas (SAF) and San Jacinto fault (SJF) zones account for 70-80% of the relative dextral motion between the Pacific and North American plates, with some studies suggesting that the SJF zone may be the dominant structure. However, few slip rate measurements are available for the SJF zone, making it difficult to evaluate the partitioning of deformation across the plate boundary. To more reliably constrain the late Quaternary slip history of the SJF zone, we measured the displacement of well-preserved alluvial fans along the Clark and Coyote Creek fault strands of the SJF zone using field mapping and high-resolution LiDAR topographic data, and dated the fans using U-series on pedogenic carbonate clast-coatings and in situ cosmogenic 10Be. Our results from four sites along the Clark fault strand and two sites along the Coyote Creek fault strand indicate that late Quaternary slip rates have fluctuated along their length but have remained constant since the late Pleistocene. Slip rates along the Clark fault strand over the past 50-30 kyr decrease southward over a distance of ~60 km from ~13 mm/yr at Anza, to 8.9 ± 2.0 mm/yr at Rockhouse Canyon, and 1.5 ± 0.4 mm/yr near the SE end of the Santa Rosa Mountains, probably due to transfer of slip from the Clark fault strand to the Coyote Creek fault strand and nearby zones of distributed deformation. Slip rates of up to ~14 to 18 mm/yr summed across the southern SJF zone suggest that since the latest Pleistocene, the SJF zone may rival the southern SAF zone in accommodating deformation across the Pacific-North America Plate boundary.

  2. LiDAR and Field Observations of Earthquake Slip Distribution for the central San Jacinto fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, J. B.; Rockwell, T. K.; Middleton, T.; Hudnut, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    We mapped the tectonic geomorphology of 80 km of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault to determine slip per event for the past several surface ruptures. From the southeastern end of Clark Valley (east of Borrego Springs) northwest to the mouth of Blackburn Canyon (near Hemet), we identify 203 offset geomorphic features from which we make over 560 measurements on channel margins, channel thalwegs, ridge noses, and bar crests using filtered B4 LiDAR imagery, aerial photography, and field observations. Displacement estimates show that the most recent large event (MRE) produced an average of 2.5-2.9 m of right-lateral slip, with maximum slip of 3.5 to 4 m at Anza. Double-event offsets for the same 80 km section average ~5.5 m of right-lateral slip. Maximum values near Anza are estimated to be close to 3 m for the penultimate event, suggesting that the penultimate event was similar in size to the MRE. The third event is also similar in size, with cumulative displacement of 9-10 m through Anza for the past three events. Magnitude estimates for the MRE range from Mw 7.2 to Mw 7.5, depending on how far north the rupture continued. Historically, no earthquakes reported along the Clark fault are large enough to have produced the offset geomorphology we observe. However, recent paleoseismic work at Hog Lake dates the most recent surface rupture event at ca. 1790, potentially placing this event in the historic period. A poorly located, large earthquake occurred on November 22, 1800, and is reported to have caused extensive damage (MMI VII) at the San Diego and San Juan Capistrano missions. We infer slightly lower intensity values for the two missions (MMI VI-VII instead of VII) and relocate this event on the Clark fault based on dating of the MRE at Hog Lake. We also recognize the occurrence of a younger offset along ~15-20 km of the fault in Blackburn Canyon, apparently due to lower slip in that area in the November 22, 1800 event. With average displacement of ~1.25 m

  3. Southern San Andreas-San Jacinto fault system slip rates estimated from earthquake cycle models constrained by GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Paul; Hetland, Eric A.; Liu, Zhen; Fielding, Eric J.

    2009-02-01

    We use ground geodetic and interferometric synthetic aperture radar satellite observations across the southern San Andreas (SAF)-San Jacinto (SJF) fault systems to constrain their slip rates and the viscosity structure of the lower crust and upper mantle on the basis of periodic earthquake cycle, Maxwell viscoelastic, finite element models. Key questions for this system are the SAF and SJF slip rates, the slip partitioning between the two main branches of the SJF, and the dip of the SAF. The best-fitting models generally have a high-viscosity lower crust (η = 1021 Pa s) overlying a lower-viscosity upper mantle (η = 1019 Pa s). We find considerable trade-offs between the relative time into the current earthquake cycle of the San Jacinto fault and the upper mantle viscosity. With reasonable assumptions for the relative time in the earthquake cycle, the partition of slip is fairly robust at around 24-26 mm/a for the San Jacinto fault system and 16-18 mm/a for the San Andreas fault. Models for two subprofiles across the SAF-SJF systems suggest that slip may transfer from the western (Coyote Creek) branch to the eastern (Clark-Superstition hills) branch of the SJF from NW to SE. Across the entire system our best-fitting model gives slip rates of 2 ± 3, 12 ± 9, 12 ± 9, and 17 ± 3 mm/a for the Elsinore, Coyote Creek, Clark, and San Andreas faults, respectively, where the large uncertainties in the slip rates for the SJF branches reflect the large uncertainty in the slip rate partitioning within the SJF system.

  4. Climate contributes to zonal forest mortality in Southern California's San Jacinto Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellows, A.; Goulden, M.

    2010-12-01

    An estimated 4.6 million trees died over ~375,000 acres of Southern California forest in 2002-2004. This mortality punctuated a decline in forest health that has been attributed to air pollution, stem densification, or drought. Bark beetles were the proximate cause of most tree death but the underlying cause of this extensive mortality is arguably poor forest health. We investigated the contributions that climate, particularly drought, played in tree mortality and how physiological drought stress may have structured the observed patterns of mortality. Field surveys showed that conifer mortality was zonal in the San Jacinto Mountains of Southern California. The proportion of conifer mortality increased with decreasing elevation (p=0.01). Mid-elevation conifers (White Fir, Incense Cedar, Coulter Pine, Sugar Pine, Ponderosa and Jeffrey Pine) died in the lower portions of their respective ranges, which resulted in an upslope lean in species’ distribution and an upslope shift in species’ mean elevation. Long-term precipitation (P) is consistent with elevation over the conifer elevation range (p=0.43). Potential evapotranspiration (ET) estimated by Penman Monteith declines with elevation by nearly half over the same range. These trends suggest that ET, more than P, is critical in structuring the elevational trend in drought stress and may have contributed to the patterns of mortality that occurred in 2002-04. Physiological measurements in a mild drought year (2009) showed late summer declines in plant water availability with decreasing elevation (p < 0.01) and concomitant reductions in carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance with decreasing elevation. We tie these observations together with a simple water balance model.

  5. A new method to identify earthquake swarms applied to seismicity near the San Jacinto Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Shearer, Peter M.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding earthquake clustering in space and time is important but also challenging because of complexities in earthquake patterns and the large and diverse nature of earthquake catalogs. Swarms are of particular interest because they likely result from physical changes in the crust, such as slow slip or fluid flow. Both swarms and clusters resulting from aftershock sequences can span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Here we test and implement a new method to identify seismicity clusters of varying sizes and discriminate them from randomly occurring background seismicity. Our method searches for the closest neighboring earthquakes in space and time and compares the number of neighbors to the background events in larger space/time windows. Applying our method to California's San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ), we find a total of 89 swarm-like groups. These groups range in size from 0.14 to 7.23 km and last from 15 minutes to 22 days. The most striking spatial pattern is the larger fraction of swarms at the northern and southern ends of the SJFZ than its central segment, which may be related to more normal-faulting events at the two ends. In order to explore possible driving mechanisms, we study the spatial migration of events in swarms containing at least 20 events by fitting with both linear and diffusion migration models. Our results suggest that SJFZ swarms are better explained by fluid flow because their estimated linear migration velocities are far smaller than those of typical creep events while large values of best-fitting hydraulic diffusivity are found.

  6. A new method to identify earthquake swarms applied to seismicity near the San Jacinto Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Shearer, Peter M.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding earthquake clustering in space and time is important but also challenging because of complexities in earthquake patterns and the large and diverse nature of earthquake catalogues. Swarms are of particular interest because they likely result from physical changes in the crust, such as slow slip or fluid flow. Both swarms and clusters resulting from aftershock sequences can span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Here we test and implement a new method to identify seismicity clusters of varying sizes and discriminate them from randomly occurring background seismicity. Our method searches for the closest neighbouring earthquakes in space and time and compares the number of neighbours to the background events in larger space/time windows. Applying our method to California's San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ), we find a total of 89 swarm-like groups. These groups range in size from 0.14 to 7.23 km and last from 15 min to 22 d. The most striking spatial pattern is the larger fraction of swarms at the northern and southern ends of the SJFZ than its central segment, which may be related to more normal-faulting events at the two ends. In order to explore possible driving mechanisms, we study the spatial migration of events in swarms containing at least 20 events by fitting with both linear and diffusion migration models. Our results suggest that SJFZ swarms are better explained by fluid flow because their estimated linear migration velocities are far smaller than those of typical creep events while large values of best-fitting hydraulic diffusivity are found.

  7. Paleoseismic Investigations of the Walnut Site on the San Jacinto Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, T.E.; Kendrick, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Walnut paleoseismic site is located along the northern San Jacinto fault about 3 km southeast of the San Bernardino, California city center (Figures 1, 2). More than 340 meters of trenches were excavated across the fault zone at this site as part of an Alquist-Priolo fault study (Figure 3). We photographed and logged the SE wall and most of the NE wall of trench 1, both walls of trenches 2 and 7, the NW walls of trenches 3 and 4 and the SE wall of trench 6. After carefully cleaning the trench walls we put up a 1m by 0.5m string and nail grid. For trenches 1, 2, 6, and 7, we photographed each 1m by 0.5m panel individually and photologged on these unrectified photos. These large-scale photos were later rectified to remove the distortion due to irregularities in the trench walls and slight distortion introduced by the camera lens. Field linework was then transferred to the rectified photomosaics. We also took a set of overview photographs for each trench taken from the top of the trench towards the opposite wall. We spliced together these overview photos to make photomosaics of all of the trenches. Because the photos were taken at a downward angle, there is significant distortion. Some of this distortion has been corrected: an attempt was made to keep horizontal grid lines horizontal and there has been some horizontal scaling to align vertical lines between benches. Although the string and nail grid spacing is 1 meter by 0.5 meter, because of the distortion in the photos and subsequent adjustments, the scale is variable along the benches, from bench to bench and from trench to trench for these overview mosaics. This report serves principally as a repository for the overview photomosaics. Sheet 1 shows the overview mosaics for both walls of trenches 1 and 2 along with some linework including most of the fault traces, a prominent unconformity within the fluvial deposits and the larger bodies of liquefied sand. Sheet 2 shows the overview mosaics for the SE wall of

  8. Infrequent triggering of tremor along the San Jacinto Fault near Anza, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Tien-Huei; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Agnew, Duncan Carr; Oglesby, David D.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the conditions necessary to trigger tremor along the San Jacinto fault (SJF) near Anza, California, where previous studies suggest triggered tremor occurs, but observations are sparse. We investigate the stress required to trigger tremor using continuous broadband seismograms from 11 stations located near Anza, California. We examine 44 Mw≥7.4 teleseismic events between 2001 and 2011; these events occur at a wide range of back azimuths and hypocentral distances. In addition, we included one smaller‐magnitude, regional event, the 2009 Mw 6.5 Gulf of California earthquake, because it induced extremely high strains at Anza. We find the only episode of triggered tremor occurred during the 3 November 2002 Mw 7.8 Denali earthquake. The tremor episode lasted 300 s, was composed of 12 tremor bursts, and was located along SJF at the northwestern edge of the Anza gap at approximately 13 km depth. The tremor episode started at the Love‐wave arrival, when surface‐wave particle motions are primarily in the transverse direction. We find that the Denali earthquake induced the second highest stress (~35  kPa) among the 44 teleseismic events and 1 regional event. The dominant period of the Denali surface wave was 22.8 s, at the lower end of the range observed for all events (20–40 s), similar to periods shown to trigger tremor in other locations. The surface waves from the 2009 Mw 6.5 Gulf of California earthquake had the highest observed strain, yet a much shorter dominant period of 10 s and did not trigger tremor. This result suggests that not only the amplitude of the induced strain, but also the period of the incoming surface wave, may control triggering of tremors near Anza. In addition, we find that the transient‐shear stress (17–35 kPa) required to trigger tremor along the SJF at Anza is distinctly higher than what has been reported for the well‐studied San Andreas fault.

  9. Multi-Scale Structure and Earthquake Properties in the San Jacinto Fault Zone Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.

    2014-12-01

    I review multi-scale multi-signal seismological results on structure and earthquake properties within and around the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) in southern California. The results are based on data of the southern California and ANZA networks covering scales from a few km to over 100 km, additional near-fault seismometers and linear arrays with instrument spacing 25-50 m that cross the SJFZ at several locations, and a dense rectangular array with >1100 vertical-component nodes separated by 10-30 m centered on the fault. The structural studies utilize earthquake data to image the seismogenic sections and ambient noise to image the shallower structures. The earthquake studies use waveform inversions and additional time domain and spectral methods. We observe pronounced damage regions with low seismic velocities and anomalous Vp/Vs ratios around the fault, and clear velocity contrasts across various sections. The damage zones and velocity contrasts produce fault zone trapped and head waves at various locations, along with time delays, anisotropy and other signals. The damage zones follow a flower-shape with depth; in places with velocity contrast they are offset to the stiffer side at depth as expected for bimaterial ruptures with persistent propagation direction. Analysis of PGV and PGA indicates clear persistent directivity at given fault sections and overall motion amplification within several km around the fault. Clear temporal changes of velocities, probably involving primarily the shallow material, are observed in response to seasonal, earthquake and other loadings. Full source tensor properties of M>4 earthquakes in the complex trifurcation area include statistically-robust small isotropic component, likely reflecting dynamic generation of rock damage in the source volumes. The dense fault zone instruments record seismic "noise" at frequencies >200 Hz that can be used for imaging and monitoring the shallow material with high space and time details, and

  10. Review of the chronostratigraphic charts in the Sinú-San Jacinto basin based on new seismic stratigraphic interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Esteban; Holz, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Disperse and punctual studies; absence of integration of data ranging from local to regional focus; interpretations based only on lithostratigraphic features; and interpretation of data premised on an allochthonous origin of the Caribbean plate, are some of factors that increase the confusion and uncertainty in understanding the Sinú-San Jacinto Basin. The sedimentary record of Upper Cretaceous to Eocene has been traditionally interpreted as the record of deep-water settings. However, recently these sediments have been related to shallow marine and deltaic settings. Second problematic point is about the deposition environment of the Oligocene to Late Miocene succession. Some studies suggest canyons, turbidites and sediments deposited in deep-water settings. However, recent studies propose deltaic and shallow marine settings. The last stratigraphic problem is related to the controversial fluvial vs. shallow marine interpretations of the Pliocene sediments. Based upon seismic stratigraphic analysis in recent and reprocessed 2D seismic data, integrated with well data, we propose chronostratigraphic charts for the northern, central and southern zones of the Sinú-San Jacinto Basin. Twenty seismic facies based on amplitude, continuity, frequency and geometry of seismic reflectors and twelve seismic sequences were recognized. The seismic stratigraphic analysis in this study suggests that the sediments of Upper Cretaceous to Paleocene/Eocene were associated to continental to shallow marine settings. Lagoons, coastal plain and carbonate platform dominated during this period. The Oligocene to Middle Miocene record was characterized by deep-water deposition, whereas the Late Miocene to recent sedimentation was characterized by falling base level, characterized by deltaic and fluvial deposits. Five syn-rift sequences with wedge-shaped geometry were identified in this study. Three Triassic to Jurassic syn-rift sequences were characterized by seismic facies typical of fluvial

  11. Shallow Seismic Trapping Structure in the San Jacinto Fault Zone, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Vernon, F.

    2003-12-01

    We analyze a waveform data set generated by 385 events and recorded by linear seismic arrays across the Clark Valley and Coyote Creek faults in the trifurcation area of the San Jacinto fault zone (FZ). The goal is to obtain structural information from a comprehensive analysis of FZ trapped waves in the data. A previous work based on selected waveforms suggested a low-velocity waveguide continuous to a depth of at least 18 km (Li and Vernon, JGR, 2001). If so, events located clearly outside the FZ proper should not generate any FZ trapped waves. On the other hand, a shallow FZ waveguide can produce (Fohrmann et al., PAGEOPH, 2003) trapped waves for events clearly off the fault. Our analysis of trapped waves in the larger considered data set is compatible with the existence of shallow non continuous waveguide layers along both the Clark Valley and Coyote Creek faults. Ben-Zion et al. (GJI, 2003) found in the context of the North Anatolian fault that many events off the fault produce FZ trapped waves and suggested that a better term for such data may be FZ related site effects. Within a distance of roughly 90 km, a subset of 159 events including many off the fault are suitably recorded by the arrays for analysis. A spectral ratio method is used to calculate the concentration of seismic energy within the FZ stations, producing a systematic measure of the quality of trapped waves or FZ related site effects. We find that FZ site effects are observed at FZ stations for the majority of the earthquakes, with the generating events located at various distances from the fault trace and various angles and distances from the receivers. The distribution of the events implies that the trapping structures are not continuous along the strike of either fault branch and do not extend bellow the depth of the shallowest events (e.g., 5 km). A travel time analysis of the difference between the direct S and trapped wave group arrivals shows no systematic increase with hypocentral distance

  12. Geophysical Field Work for Educators: Teachers Use Ground-Penetrating Radar to Study San Jacinto Battlefield Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, A. T.; Sawyer, D. S.; Milliken, K.

    2008-12-01

    In July 2008, a group of Houston area K-12 teachers investigated San Jacinto Battlefield Park in La Porte, Texas, utilizing ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to image the subsurface and global positioning system (GPS) units to map surface features. Participants were in-service K-12 teachers from urban Houston school districts where the majority of students are members of historically underrepresented minority groups. Over a period of two weeks, participants acquired and interpreted GPR profiles in the park, mapped surface features using hand-held GPS units, and analyzed the data using ArcGIS software. This summer experience was followed by a content-intensive academic year course in Earth Science. The Battle of San Jacinto took place on April 21, 1836, and was the decisive battle in the Texas Revolution. The site is thought to contain numerous in-situ artifacts dropped by the Texan and Mexican armies, as well as unmarked burials from the early 1800's. Two stratigraphic units were identified from the GPR profiles and matched to strata exposed through archaeological excavations. The stratigraphic units are interpreted as recent flood/storm deposits with soil formation on Pleistocene deltaic deposits of a previous sea-level highstand. In addition to the stratigraphy, a number of isolated subsurface anomalies (possibly artifacts) were identified. Participants also interpreted past shoreline positions using vintage aerial photographs and acquired several transects of GPS positions along the shoreline. Participants confirmed that the area is in fact subsiding, rather than being eroded. Participants not only experienced the scientific process but also utilized geophysics for community service (i.e. contributing educational material to the park). Through background research, they derived a rich historical context for their investigation and learned to appreciate the multi-disciplinary aspect of solving real- world scientific problems.

  13. Late Quaternary slip rate gradient defined using high-resolution topography and 10Be dating of offset landforms on the southern San Jacinto Fault zone, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, Kimberly; Rockwell, Thomas; Owen, Lewis A.; Oskin, Michael; Lippincott, Caitlin; Caffee, Marc W.; Dortch, Jason

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies suggest the San Jacinto fault zone may be the dominant structure accommodating PA-NA relative plate motion. However, because the late Quaternary slip history of the southern San Andreas fault system is insufficiently understood, it is difficult to evaluate the partitioning of deformation across the plate boundary and its evolution. Landforms displaced by the Clark fault of the southern San Jacinto fault zone were mapped using high-resolution airborne laser-swath topography and selected offset landforms were dated using cosmogenic 10Be. Beheaded channels at Rockhouse Canyon, displaced by 500 ± 70 m and 220 ± 70 m, have been dated to 47 ± 8 ka and 28 ± 9 ka, respectively. Farther south, near the southern Santa Rosa Mountains, an alluvial deposit displaced by 51 ± 9 m has been dated to 35 ± 7 ka. From these sites, the slip rate of the Clark fault is determined to diminish southward from 8.9 ± 2.0 to 1.5 ± 0.4 mm/yr. This implies a slip-rate decrease along the Clark fault from Anza southeastward to its surface termination near the Salton Trough, where slip is transferred to the Coyote Creek fault, and additional deformation is compensated by folding and thrusting in the basin. These data suggest that since ˜30 to 50 ka, the slip rate along the southern San Jacinto fault zone has been lower than, or equivalent to, the rate along the southernmost San Andreas fault. Accordingly, either the slip rate of the San Jacinto fault has substantially decreased since fault initiation, or fault slip began earlier than previously suggested.

  14. Application of high resolution DEM data to detect rock damage from geomorphic signals along the central San Jacinto Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechsler, Neta; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2009-12-01

    We analyze geomorphic properties extracted from LiDAR and SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) data to test whether the damage zone along the central San Jacinto Fault (SJF) zone can be resolved with remotely-sensed data in a quantitative fashion. The SJF is one of the most active faults in southern California, with well expressed geomorphology and a fast slip rate, as seen in the geology and by GPS. We use ArcMap and the TauDEM toolbox to compare several morphometric parameters, including drainage density (Dd), on both sides of the fault, using a 1 km and a 5 km buffer for the LiDAR and SRTM data, respectively. We also analyze the spatial patterns of Dd near the fault, using two different definitions of spatial Dd. The high resolution of the LiDAR data allows us to focus on a single fault, eliminating the effects of parallel nearby faults. From the LiDAR data we find that the highest Dd values occur in areas between two fault strands, followed generally by rocks on the northeast side of the fault, with the lowest Dd values occurring on the southwest side of the fault. The SRTM data shows a band of high Dd values centered on the main fault trace with ~ 1 km width. Our results indicate that there is a strong correlation between drainage density and proximity to the fault, with zones of structural complexity along the fault displaying the highest Dd. We interpret this to largely be an effect of degree of rock damage, as these are areas that are expected to be more damaged, and field observations support this contention. If we are correct, then it appears that the northeast side of the SJF is generally more damaged. South of the trifurcation area there is evidence that the signal is reversed on the larger scale, with more damage on the southwest side of the fault inferred from the SRTM data, possibly caused by extension between the Coyote Creek and Clark faults. The implications of the observed asymmetry could be geological evidence for rupture propagation

  15. Basic data features and results from a spatially dense seismic array on the San Jacinto fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Vernon, Frank L.; Ozakin, Yaman; Zigone, Dimitri; Ross, Zachary E.; Meng, Haoran; White, Malcolm; Reyes, Juan; Hollis, Dan; Barklage, Mitchell

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several outstanding aspects of seismograms recorded during >4 weeks by a spatially dense Nodal array, straddling the damage zone of the San Jacinto fault in southern California, and some example results. The waveforms contain numerous spikes and bursts of high-frequency waves (up to the recorded 200 Hz) produced in part by minute failure events in the shallow crust. The high spatial density of the array facilitates the detection of 120 small local earthquakes in a single day, most of which not detected by the surrounding ANZA and regional southern California networks. Beamforming results identify likely ongoing cultural noise sources dominant in the frequency range 1-10 Hz and likely ongoing earthquake sources dominant in the frequency range 20-40 Hz. Matched-field processing and back-projection of seismograms provide alternate event location. The median noise levels during the experiment at different stations, waves generated by Betsy gunshots, and wavefields from nearby earthquakes point consistently to several structural units across the fault. Seismic trapping structure and local sedimentary basin produce localized motion amplification and stronger attenuation than adjacent regions. Cross correlations of high-frequency noise recorded at closely spaced stations provide a structural image of the subsurface material across the fault zone. The high spatial density and broad frequency range of the data can be used for additional high resolution studies of structure and source properties in the shallow crust.

  16. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction based on palynofacies analyses of the Cansona Formation (Late Cretaceous), Sinú-San Jacinto Basin, northwest Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliao-Lemus, Tatiana; Carvalho, Marcelo de Araujo; Torres, Diego; Plata, Angelo; Parra, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    To reconstruct the paleoenvironments of the Cansona Formation, a Cretaceous succession in Colombia that has controversial paleoenvironmental interpretation, occasionally deep marine and occasionally shallow marine, palynofacies analyses were conducted on 93 samples from four sections of the Sinú San Jacinto Basin in the north, midwest, and southwest sectors. For the palynofacies analyses, the kerogen categories were counted and subjected to cluster analyses. Four palynofacies associations were revealed for the four sections: Palynofacies Association I (PA I), which consisted of microforaminiferal linings, scolecodonts, dinoflagellate cysts, pollen grains, and fungi hyphae; PA II, which consisted of phytoclast translucent non-biostructured and biostructured, opaque phytoclasts (equidimensional and lath shaped); PA III, which consisted of pseudoamorphous particles, cuticles, resin, and fungal spores; and PA IV, which consisted of fluorescent and non-fluorescent amorphous organic matter and the fresh-water algae Botryococcus. In contrast to early studies that suggested a generalization of the depositional environment for the Cansona Formation (deep or shallow conditions), this study suggests that the formation reflects conspicuous stratigraphic and lateral changes and hence different depositional environments. The Cerro Cansona (CC4 section) and Chalán (AP section) areas are a more marine proximal settings (Early Campanian-Maastrichtian), and there is an intermediate setting for the Lorica area (SC section) and deeper conditions for the Montería area (CP2 section).

  17. Seismicity rate changes in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field and the San Jacinto Fault Zone after the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2014-06-01

    Whether static or dynamic stress changes play the most important role in triggering earthquakes in the near field is still in debate. Here, we examine the seismicity rate changes in southern California following the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. We focus on the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) and the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) because of high-sensitivity continuous borehole recordings and ample background seismicity. A significant increase in seismic activity is found in both study regions immediately following the main shock. However, near the SSGF where the static Coulomb stress decreased, the seismicity rate dropped below the pre-main-shock rate after ˜1 month. In comparison, along the SJFZ with an increase in the static Coulomb stress, the seismicity rate remained higher than the background rate with several moderate-size earthquakes occurring in the subsequent months. While we cannot completely rule out other mechanisms, these observations are best consistent with a widespread increase in seismicity from dynamic stress changes immediately after the main shock, and longer term seismicity rate changes from static stress changes. Our observation, together with other recent studies, suggests that both static and dynamic stress changes are important in triggering near-field earthquakes, but their affected regions and timescales are different.

  18. Rainfall-runoff characteristics and effects of increased urban density on streamflow and infiltration in the eastern part of the San Jacinto River basin, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guay, Joel R.

    2002-01-01

    To better understand the rainfall-runoff characteristics of the eastern part of the San Jacinto River Basin and to estimate the effects of increased urbanization on streamflow, channel infiltration, and land-surface infiltration, a long-term (1950?98) time series of monthly flows in and out of the channels and land surfaces were simulated using the Hydrologic Simulation Program- FORTRAN (HSPF) rainfall-runoff model. Channel and land-surface infiltration includes rainfall or runoff that infiltrates past the zone of evapotranspiration and may become ground-water recharge. The study area encompasses about 256 square miles of the San Jacinto River drainage basin in Riverside County, California. Daily streamflow (for periods with available data between 1950 and 1998), and daily rainfall and evaporation (1950?98) data; monthly reservoir storage data (1961?98); and estimated mean annual reservoir inflow data (for 1974 conditions) were used to calibrate the rainfall-runoff model. Measured and simulated mean annual streamflows for the San Jacinto River near San Jacinto streamflow-gaging station (North-South Fork subbasin) for 1950?91 and 1997?98 were 14,000 and 14,200 acre-feet, respectively, a difference of 1.4 percent. The standard error of the mean for measured and simulated annual streamflow in the North-South Fork subbasin was 3,520 and 3,160 acre-feet, respectively. Measured and simulated mean annual streamflows for the Bautista Creek streamflow-gaging station (Bautista Creek subbasin) for 1950?98 were 980 acre-feet and 991 acre-feet, respectively, a difference of 1.1 percent. The standard error of the mean for measured and simulated annual streamflow in the Bautista Creek subbasin was 299 and 217 acre-feet, respectively. Measured and simulated annual streamflows for the San Jacinto River above State Street near San Jacinto streamflow-gaging station (Poppet subbasin) for 1998 were 23,400 and 23,500 acre-feet, respectively, a difference of 0.4 percent. The simulated

  19. Seismic and Aseismic Slip on the San-Jacinto Fault Near Anza, CA, from Joint Analysis of Strain and Aftershock Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbal, A.; Avouac, J. P.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The San-Jacinto Fault (SJF) is the most active fault in southern California, which together with the southern San-Andreas Fault accommodates a large fraction of the motion across the plate boundary. Seismicity along the SJF is distributed over several fault segments with distinct spatio-temporal characteristics. One of these segments, known as the Anza seismic gap, is a 25 km long strand almost devoid of seismicity. In recent years, four M4-5 events occurred SE of the gap. Despite their moderate magnitudes, these earthquakes triggered rich aftershock sequences and pronounced afterslip that lasted for several weeks, and was well captured by nearby PBO borehole strain meters. A similar transient was remotely triggered by the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. Geodetic and seismic observations following a local M5.4 mainshock indicate that afterslip propagated unilaterally towards the NW at speed of about 5 km/day. We infer the distribution of slip via a joint inversion of the aftershock and strain data. Our approach is based on Dieterich's (1994) model relating the evolution of seismicity rate to applied stresses, within the framework of rate-and-state friction. This approach provides resolution power at depths inaccessible to the surface geodetic network. Moreover, it allows us to gain important insights onto the fault mechanical properties. We apply this inversion scheme to episodes that occurred during 2010. Remarkably, we find that the cumulative moment released post-seismically during the locally triggered transient is 5-10 times larger than the moment of the mainshock. We show that the data favour a model in which deep slip transients, which may develop due to local or remote earthquakes, occur on a weak, close-to-velocity-neutral fault. The transients increase the stress along the Anza gap, and trigger earthquakes outside it through static stress transfer.

  20. Long paleoseismic records on the San Jacinto fault: what they tell us about earthquake cycles and cumulative strain release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, T. K.; Onderdonk, N.; McGill, S. F.; Buga, M.; Salisbury, B.

    2012-12-01

    Paleoseismic studies along the length of the San Jacinto fault zone demonstrate that earthquake production in the past 2-4 ka, averaged over at least eight or more earthquake cycles, is consistent with the long-term slip rate of 12-15 mm/yr. However, ages of past large earthquakes at Mystic Lake and Hog Lake suggest that some events may rupture both the Clark and Claremont segments together, and some Hog Lake events are recognized at Clark Lake in the southern third of this segment. These possible correlations are consistent with geomorphic observations along the Clark strand that indicate rupture of the entire segment in Mw7.3 earthquakes, as likely occurred on Nov. 22, 1800. Smaller Mw6.9 earthquakes, as in 1918, rupture only part of the northern Clark segment. The surface rupture for 1918 has now been identified by geomorphology and trenching, with an average of 1.25 m of displacement over at least 20 km. The northern Coyote Creek fault last failed with up to 1.5m of displacement in the past few hundred years, with the 1968 earthquake apparently filling in a section of fault that experienced lower slip south of Borrego Mountain. Observations at most sites show some degree of clustering of past events, although some of the events in a cluster may represent rupture overlap. All of these observations support the idea that perceived segment boundaries are soft, even for a segmented fault such as the SJF. Our data also suggest that slip during ruptures along the SJF may behave in a bimodal fashion, with large earthquakes (M7+) that involve entire segments, or multiple segments, and smaller events (M6.2-6.9) that fill in areas of lower displacement.

  1. Magnetostratigraphy of Neogene sediments in the San Jacinto fault zone, southern California, and paleomagnetic evidence for block rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuing, D.F.; Seeber, L. )

    1991-03-01

    A suite of oriented paleomagnetic samples from a continuous sedimentary section in the right-lateral San Jacinto fault zone allows the interpretation of magnetic stratigraphy, documentation of the clockwise rotation of crustal blocks, and identification of several potentially adverse effects on the precision of paleomagnetic directions. Accounting for these effects has led to a clearer understanding of the structural evolution and depositional patterns within the fault zone. The 500-m sampled interval includes all of the upper Pleistocene Ocotillo Formation (alluvial sands and interbedded shales) and the upper 25 m of the underlying Borrego Formation (lacustrine deposits). Most samples contain two magnetic components: a low-temperature component that fails the fold test (suggesting its recent acquisition), and a high-temperature component that passes the fold test. The magnetostratigraphy of the sampled interval, calibrated by vertebrate biostratigraphy, implies the base of the Ocotillo Formation is 1.25 million years old. Compared to published ages for the base of this formation towards the southeast, these new data suggest the onset of alluvial deposition was diachronous within the fault zone. Scatter in paleomagnetic directions results from two depositional and two structural effects. Depositional effects include paleocurrent-induced grain orientation and inclination shallowing due to compaction. Structural overprints include shear associated with both faulting and folding that induces rotation of magnetic grains. Removal of samples affected by these factors suggests an average clockwise block rotation of 21{degree}{plus minus}7{degree} over the past 1.3 m.y. and further that rotation has been progressive over this interval.

  2. Low-velocity zones along the San Jacinto Fault, Southern California, from body waves recorded in dense linear arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongfeng; Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Vernon, Frank

    2014-12-01

    We derive high-resolution information on low-velocity fault zone (FZ) structures along the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ), Southern California, using waveforms of local earthquakes that are recorded at multiple linear cross-fault arrays. We observe clear across-fault delays of direct P and S waves, indicating damage zones at different segments of the SJFZ. We then compute synthetic traveltimes and waveforms using generalized ray theory and perform forward modeling to constrain the FZ parameters. At the southern section near the trifurcation area, the low-velocity zone (LVZ) of the Clark branch has a width of ~200 m, 30-45% reduction in Vp, and ~50% reduction in Vs. From array data across the Anza seismic gap, we find a LVZ with ~200 m width and ~50% reduction in both Vp and Vs, nearly as prominent as that on the southern section. We only find prominent LVZs beneath three out of the five arrays, indicating along-strike variations of the fault damage. FZ-reflected phases are considerably less clear than those observed above the rupture zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake shortly after the event. This may reflect partially healed LVZs with less sharp boundaries at the SJFZ, given the relatively long lapse time from the last large surface-rupturing event. Alternatively, the lack of observed FZ-reflected phases could be partially due to the relatively small aperture of the arrays. Nevertheless, the clear signatures of damage zones at Anza and other locations indicate very slow healing process, at least in the top few kilometers of the crust.

  3. Fault Segmentation and Earthquake Behavior: A High Resolution Paleoseismic Study in The Southern San Jacinto Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragona, D.; Rockwell, T. K.; Orgil, A.

    2001-12-01

    The southern San Jacinto fault zone consists of three main fault strands or segments: the Coyote Creek (CCF), Superstition Mountain (SMF) and Superstition Hills (SHF) faults. The CCF is divided into northern, central and southern segments, defined after its rupture in the 1968 Borrego Mountain earthquake. The boundaries of these segments are delineated by step-overs and/or fault bends. In contrast, the segment boundary between the southern segment of the CCF and the northern end of the SMF is defined only by a 10o bend or change in strike. However, the main reason that these two faults are considered separate is that the 1968 rupture terminated along the southern segment of the CCF. The only way to demonstrate how individual segments have behaved in the past and how segment boundaries work is to resolve their past rupture histories through high-resolution paleoseismic studies. We studied the earthquake history of the southern CCF and northern SMF to obtain a complete record of how and which boundaries have controlled past ruptures. We exposed faulted sediments of the regionally-correlative Lake Cahuilla at Carrizo Wash along the northernmost SMF, and correlated the stratigraphy and earthquake history to sites along the CCF using radiocarbon dates and sequence stratigraphy. We exposed a 5 m-thick section of very well stratified fluvial, deltaic and lacustrine sediments, part of which have been displaced by the fault. Four and probably five surface rupturing events are recorded in this section. The last two lake Cahuilla high-stand deposits are not faulted, indicating that the northern Superstition Mountain fault has not ruptured for at least 330 years and probably 500 years. Using high resolution 3D trenching techniques we obtained information of fault geometry and slip for the last two events. The last earthquake rupture consisted of en echelon faults with a minimum horizontal displacement of 6 to 9 cm of slip in each. Minimum total slip across the whole fault zone

  4. Seismic velocity structure in the Hot Springs and Trifurcation areas of the San Jacinto fault zone, California, from double-difference tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A. A.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Kurzon, I.; Vernon, F.

    2014-08-01

    We present tomographic images of crustal velocity structures in the complex Hot Springs and Trifurcation areas of the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) based on double-difference inversions of earthquake arrival times. We invert for VP, VS and hypocentre location within 50 × 50 × 20 km3 volumes, using 266 969 P and 148 249 S arrival times. We obtain high-fidelity images of seismic velocities with resolution on the order of a few kilometres from 2 to 12 km depth and validate the results using checkerboard tests. Due to the relatively large proportion of S-wave arrival times, we also obtain stable maps of VP/VS ratios in both regions. The velocity of the Trifurcation Area as a whole is lower than adjacent unfaulted material. We interpret a 4-km-wide low velocity zone with high VP/VS ratio in the trifurcation itself as related to fault zone damage. We also observe clear velocity contrasts across the Buck Ridge, Clark and Coyote Creek segments of the SJFZ. The Anza segment of the SJFZ, to the NW of the trifurcation area, displays a strong (up to 27 per cent) contrast of VS from 2 to 9 km depth. In the Hot Springs area, a low velocity zone between the Claremont and Casa Loma Strands narrows with depth, with clear velocity contrasts observed across both segments. A roughly 10-km-wide zone of low velocity and low VP/VS ratio at the NW tip of the Hot Springs fault is indicative of either unconsolidated sediments associated with the San Jacinto basin, or fluid-filled cracks within a broad deformation zone. High VP/VS ratios along the Anza segment could indicate a preferred nucleation location for future large earthquakes, while the across-fault velocity contrast suggests a preferred northwest rupture propagation direction for such events.

  5. A methodological approach toward high-resolution surface wave imaging of the San Jacinto Fault Zone using ambient-noise recordings at a spatially dense array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Philippe; Moreau, Ludovic; Lecointre, Albanne; Hillers, Gregor; Campillo, Michel; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri; Vernon, Frank

    2016-05-01

    We present a new technique for deriving detailed information on seismic velocities of the sub-surface material from continuous ambient noise recorded by spatially dense seismic arrays. This method uses iterative double beamforming between various subarrays to extract surface-wave contributions from the ambient-noise data in complex environments with unfavorable noise-source distributions. The iterative double beamforming extraction makes it possible to retrieve large amounts of Rayleigh wave travel-time information in a wide frequency band. The method is applied to data recorded by a highly dense Nodal array with 1,108 vertical geophones, centered on the damage zone of the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone south of Anza, California. The array covers a region of ˜650 m x 700 m, with instrument spacing of 10 m to 30 m, and continuous recording at 500 samples/s over 30 days in 2014. Using this iterative double beamforming on subarrays of 25 sensors and cross-correlations between all of the station pairs, we separate surface waves from body waves that are abundant in the raw cross-correlation data. Focusing solely on surface waves, maps of travel times are obtained at different frequencies with unprecedented accuracy at each point of a 15-m-spacing grid. Group velocity inversions at 2 Hz to 4 Hz reveal depth and lateral variations in the structural properties within and around the San Jacinto Fault Zone in the study area. This method can be used over wider frequency ranges and can be combined with other imaging techniques, such as eikonal tomography, to provide unprecedented detailed structural images of the sub-surface material.

  6. A methodological approach towards high-resolution surface wave imaging of the San Jacinto Fault Zone using ambient-noise recordings at a spatially dense array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Philippe; Moreau, Ludovic; Lecointre, Albanne; Hillers, Gregor; Campillo, Michel; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri; Vernon, Frank

    2016-08-01

    We present a new technique for deriving detailed information on seismic velocities of the subsurface material from continuous ambient noise recorded by spatially dense seismic arrays. This method uses iterative double beamforming between various subarrays to extract surface wave contributions from the ambient-noise data in complex environments with unfavourable noise-source distributions. The iterative double beamforming extraction makes it possible to retrieve large amounts of Rayleigh wave traveltime information in a wide frequency band. The method is applied to data recorded by a highly dense Nodal array with 1108 vertical geophones, centred on the damage zone of the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone south of Anza, California. The array covers a region of ˜650 × 700 m2, with instrument spacing of 10-30 m, and continuous recording at 500 samples s-1 over 30 d in 2014. Using this iterative double beamforming on subarrays of 25 sensors and cross-correlations between all of the station pairs, we separate surface waves from body waves that are abundant in the raw cross-correlation data. Focusing solely on surface waves, maps of traveltimes are obtained at different frequencies with unprecedented accuracy at each point of a 15-m-spacing grid. Group velocity inversions at 2-4 Hz reveal depth and lateral variations in the structural properties within and around the San Jacinto Fault Zone in the study area. This method can be used over wider frequency ranges and can be combined with other imaging techniques, such as eikonal tomography, to provide unprecedented detailed structural images of the subsurface material.

  7. Seismic velocity structure in the Hemet Stepover and Trifurcation Areas of the San Jacinto Fault Zone from double-difference earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A. A.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Vernon, F.; Kurzon, I.

    2013-12-01

    We present tomographic images of crustal velocity structures in the Hemet Stepover and Trifurcation areas of the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) based on double-difference inversions of earthquake arrival times. We discretize both regions with a horizontal 250m grid spacing and a vertical 500m spacing within 50km by 50km by 20km volumes. We invert for VP, VS, and hypocenter location using data from 16064 earthquakes recorded at 136 stations. In total, we use 266,969 P and 148,249 S arrivals to constrain the seismic velocity structures in the two regions. With large numbers of both arrivals, we are able to obtain images of VP and VS at similar resolutions, enabling us to make spatial maps of and interpret the VP/VS ratios. Though ray coverage is limited at shallow depths, we obtain high-fidelity images of seismic velocities from 2 to 12 km, and validate the results using checkerboard tests. The tomographic images indicate that the velocity of the trifurcation area as a whole is lower than adjacent unfaulted material. We interpret a 4km-wide low velocity zone in the trifurcation itself as fault zone damage related due to high VP/VS ratio. We also observe clear velocity contrasts across the Buck Ridge, Clark, and Coyote Creek segments of the SJFZ. The Anza segment of the SJFZ, to the NW of the trifurcation area, displays a strong (up to 27%) contrast of VS from 2km to 9km. In the Hemet Stepover, a low velocity zone between the Claremont and Casa Loma Strands narrows with depth, with clear velocity contrasts observed across both segments. A roughly 10km-wide zone of low velocity and low VP/VS ratio at the NW tip of the Hot Springs fault is indicative of either unconsolidated sediments associated with the San Jacinto basin, or fluid-filled cracks within a broad deformation zone. Relocated seismicity tends to align with the surface traces of the various fault strands, though it is offset to the northeast of the Casa Loma-Clark strand and to the southwest of the Hot Springs

  8. Streamflow and water-quality properties in the West Fork San Jacinto River Basin and regression models to estimate real-time suspended-sediment and total suspended-solids concentrations and loads in the West Fork San Jacinto River in the vicinity of Conroe, Texas, July 2008-August 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, Lee J.; Oden, Jeannette H.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the hydrology (streamflow and water quality) of the West Fork San Jacinto River Basin downstream from Lake Conroe near Conroe, Texas, including spatial and temporal variation in suspended-sediment (SS) and total suspended-solids (TSS) concentrations and loads, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, measured streamflow and collected continuous and discrete water-quality data during July 2008-August 2009 in the West Fork San Jacinto River Basin downstream from Lake Conroe. During July 2008-August 2009, discrete samples were collected and streamflow measurements were made over the range of flow conditions at two streamflow-gaging stations on the West Fork San Jacinto River: West Fork San Jacinto River below Lake Conroe near Conroe, Texas (station 08067650) and West Fork San Jacinto River near Conroe, Texas (station 08068000). In addition to samples collected at these two main monitoring sites, discrete sediment samples were also collected at five additional monitoring sites to help characterize water quality in the West Fork San Jacinto River Basin. Discrete samples were collected semimonthly, regardless of flow conditions, and during periods of high flow resulting from storms or releases from Lake Conroe. Because the period of data collection was relatively short (14 months) and low flow was prevalent during much of the study, relatively few samples collected were representative of the middle and upper ranges of historical daily mean streamflows. The largest streamflows tended to occur in response to large rainfall events and generally were associated with the largest SS and TSS concentrations. The maximum SS and TSS concentrations at station 08067650 (180 and 133 milligrams per liter [mg/L], respectively) were on April 19, 2009, when the instantaneous streamflow was the third largest associated with a discrete sample at the station. SS concentrations

  9. Estimating Attenuation Coefficients and P-Wave Velocities of the Shallow San Jacinto Fault Zone from Betsy Gunshots Data Recorded by a Spatially Dense Array with 1108 Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozakin, Yaman; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    We estimate values of P wave velocity and P attenuation coefficients (QP) for the subsurface material at the Sage Brush Flat site along the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone. The data are generated by 33 Betsy gunshots and recorded by a spatially dense array of 1108 vertical component geophones deployed in a rectangular grid that is approximately 600 m x 600 m. We automatically pick the arrival times of the seismic body waves from each explosion arriving at stations within 200 m. These measurements are used to derive an average velocity map with velocity values ranging from 500 m/s to 1250 m/s. We estimate the energy of the early P waves by squaring the amplitudes in a short window relative to the automatic picks. These energies are fitted to a decay function representing the geometrical spreading and intrinsic attenuation. By separating the stations into spatial bins and calculating attenuation values for each by linear regression, we construct a QP values map. Most of the QP values are in 5-20 range, which is consistent with other studies of shallow fault zone regions.

  10. Large Earthquake Hazard of the San Jacinto Fault Zone, CA, from Long Record of Simulated Seismicity Assimilating the Available Instrumental and Paleoseismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöller, G.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate spatio-temporal properties of earthquake patterns in the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ), California, between Cajon Pass and the Superstition Hill Fault, using a long record of simulated seismicity constrained by available seismological and geological data. The model provides an effective realization of a large segmented strike-slip fault zone in a 3D elastic half-space, with heterogeneous distribution of static friction chosen to represent several clear step-overs at the surface. The simulated synthetic catalog reproduces well the basic statistical features of the instrumental seismicity recorded at the SJFZ area since 1981. The model also produces events larger than those included in the short instrumental record, consistent with paleo-earthquakes documented at sites along the SJFZ for the last 1,400 years. The general agreement between the synthetic and observed data allows us to address with the long-simulated seismicity questions related to large earthquakes and expected seismic hazard. The interaction between m ≥ 7 events on different sections of the SJFZ is found to be close to random. The hazard associated with m ≥ 7 events on the SJFZ increases significantly if the long record of simulated seismicity is taken into account. The model simulations indicate that the recent increased number of observed intermediate SJFZ earthquakes is a robust statistical feature heralding the occurrence of m ≥ 7 earthquakes. The hypocenters of the m ≥ 5 events in the simulation results move progressively towards the hypocenter of the upcoming m ≥ 7 earthquake.

  11. Increasing lengths of aftershock zones with depths of moderate-size earthquakes on the San Jacinto Fault suggests triggering of deep creep in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Recent geodetic studies along the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) in southern California revealed a shallower locking depth than the seismogenic depth outlined by microseismicity. This disagreement leads to speculations that creeping episodes drive seismicity in the lower part of the seismogenic zone. Whether deep creep occurs along the SJF holds key information on how fault slips during earthquake cycle and potential seismic hazard imposed to southern California. Here we apply a matched filter technique to 10 M > 4 earthquake sequences along the SJF since 2000 and obtain more complete earthquake catalogues. We then systematic investigate spatio-temporal evolutions of these aftershock sequences. We find anomalously large aftershock zones for earthquakes occurred below the geodetically inferred locking depth (i.e. 11-12 km), while aftershock zones of shallower main shocks are close to expectations from standard scaling relationships. Although we do not observe clear migration of aftershocks, most aftershock zones do expand systematically with logarithmic time since the main shock. All the evidences suggest that aftershocks near or below the locking depth are likely driven by deep creep following the main shock. The presence of a creeping zone below 11-12 km may have significant implications on the maximum sizes of events in this region.

  12. Detailed Shallow Structure and Seismic Catalog Based on Data of a Spatially-Dense Array on the San Jacinto Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-12-01

    I review results on imaging the shallow structure of San Jacinto fault zone and detection/location of seismic energy sources using data of a spatially-dense Nodal array centered on the Clark branch of the fault. The array operated at the Sage Brush site south of Anza for about 4 weeks in 2014 with 1108 vertical (10 Hz) geophones in about 650 m x 700 m box configuration. Continuous waveforms with signals generated by the ambient seismic noise, earthquakes, and Betsy gunshots were recorded with useable frequencies up to 200 Hz. Imaging the shallow structure is done with surface and body waves extracted from the ambient noise, arrivals from local and teleseismic earthquakes, and waves generated by the gunshots. The results reveal shallow material with very low seismic velocities and attenuation coefficients, strong lateral and vertical variations, seismic trapping structure, local sedimentary basin, and overall lithology contrast across the fault. The detection/location techniques include stacking, beamforming, matched field processing, and templates generated by these methods. The analysis uncovers many hundred of daily earthquakes not detected by the regional networks and several different types of surface noise sources.

  13. Fault-Bounded Late Neogene Sedimentary Deposits in the Santa Rosa Mountains, Southern CA: Constraints on the Evolution of the San Jacinto Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matti, J. C.; Morton, D. M.; Cox, B. F.; Landis, G. P.; Langenheim, V. E.; Premo, W. R.; Kistler, R.; Budahn, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    In the Santa Rosa Mountains (SRM) on the W side of the Salton Trough, a late Neogene sedimentary sequence (Zosel sequence, ZS) in the hanging wall of the E-dipping Zosel normal fault (ZFHW) has implications for the geologic history of the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) system. The upper conglomeratic part of the ZS records the culmination of slip on the ZF, which preceded strike-slip faulting on the right-lateral San Jacinto Fault (SJF) a few km to the W. The conglomerate is an alluvial-fan complex of fluvial, debris-flow, and rock-avalanche deposits that prograded NE over underlying paralic and marine deposits. Clasts are ?10m, and fluvial imbrications indicate mean streamflow trending ~N30E; paleocurrent indicators and clast compositions suggest sediment was derived mainly from granitoid terrains SW of the SRM. Deposition appears to have ceased by early Quaternary time: cosmogenic analysis of boulders from the eroded upper surface of the ZS indicates min and max exposure ages of 500Ka and 1.3Ma (Ne in qtz), 514Ka to 1.17Ma (Ne in hbl), and 647Ka to 1.158Ma (He). Granitoid clasts include distinctive texturally massive hbl- bio tonalite unlike any basement rock exposed in the SRM or in other footwall crystalline terranes directly to the W. The tonalite clasts are similar to bedrock in the White Wash (WW) area 24 km to the NW on the W side of the Clark strand of the SJF (SJFC). Initial Sr ratios for WW samples range from 0.70622 to 0.70631; ZS clasts range from 0.70615 to 0.70638. One sample from ZS and WW have identical light REE patterns that appear to be unique in the Peninsular Ranges batholith. U/Pb zircon ages for WW samples range from 96.6 to 98.2Ma while ZS clasts range from 95.8 to 98.7Ma. Based on these data, tonalite clasts in the ZS match tonalite now exposed in the WW area. We propose the following reconstruction: (1) From 6Ma to 1.2Ma, Zosel sediment is deposited near sea level as an alluvial-fan and fan-delta complex interfingering NE-ward with

  14. Characterization of the San Jacinto Fault Zone Northwest of the Trifurcation Area from Earthquake Data Recorded by a Dense Linear Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, P. E.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Ross, Z.; Qiu, H.; Vernon, F.

    2015-12-01

    Data generated by earthquakes and recorded by a linear seismic array at Blackburn saddle NW of the trifurcation area, crossing the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone, are used to study the internal fault zone structure in the area. The linear array (BB) is 180 m long and comprises 7 broadband three-component 1-Hz seismometers. Automatic algorithms are used to detect P and S body waves and fault zone head and trapped waves. Statistical analyses of P body wave travel times of 765 events, occurring during 2012-2014 within a 110 by 20 km window centered along the length of the Clark fault, show a 0.6-0.8 % gradual increase in slowness from the SW most (BB01) to the NE most (BB07) station. The results suggest the NE most stations overlie a zone of greater damage. Sharp velocity contrasts across the fault are imaged using fault zone head waves. In total, 72 events (within the same 110 by 20 km window) are found to produce phases with clear head wave characteristics. Further analysis of the candidate events leads to the characterization of two separate groups. The first, consisting of 51 events within approximately 11 km epicentral distance from the array, shows a clear increase of head to P body wave differential times with increasing along fault distance. Based on this moveout, an average velocity contrast across of the fault of 4 % (SW block is slower) is calculated for the portion of the Clark Fault beneath the array. Differential times for the second group show no moveout with along fault distance, suggesting a local secondary bimaterial interface with limited along-strike and/or depth extent. Events located in a broad region that also includes the San Andreas and Elsinore Faults produce candidate trapped waves that are most clear at stations BB05, BB06 and BB07 (the three NE most stations). Waveform modeling results will be presented in the meeting.

  15. Further Resolution of Past Earthquake Surface Ruptures at the Carrizo Wash Site, Superstition Mountain Strand of the San Jacinto Fault, Imperial Valley, Southern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdugo, D.; Ragona, D. E.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from new trench exposures in Carrizo Wash along the northernmost part of the Superstition Mountain strand (SMF) of the San Jacinto Fault, southern California. Prior paleoseismic work by Ragona (2003) recovered evidence for 7 earthquake events, 3 of which occurred in the past 1000 years. The most recent event produced only 15 cm of slip and is only recognized along the Coyote Creek Fault (CCF). The other two recognized events cumulatively produced nearly 6 m of slip. However, an erosional unconformity in the initial excavations removed evidence for at least one event, based on problematic correlations to nearby sites resulting from mismatches in both the number of recognized lake units as well as the relative stratigraphic position of events with respect to the lakes. The new trenches, south of the effects of the erosional channel, contain evidence for an additional event and an additional delta-lake sequence not present in the original exposures. The new event likely correlates to the penultimate event at the Northern Shoreline site (Gurrola and Rockwell, 1996). Thus, the observed 6 m of slip was mostly accommodated by three events, suggesting about 2 m of slip per event for large SMF ruptures. Our new observations also agree well with data from four other nearby trench sites along the CCF and SMF, and suggest that 1) the SMF has ruptured in only three large events in the past 1100 years, 2) at least two of these events are likely recognized along the CCF, indicating that the step-over between SMF and CCF is soft in large events, 3) most CCF ruptures do not propagate onto the SMF, indicating that the step-over is hard for small displacements, such as 1968-type events (30-50 cm of slip). These observations support the concept of segmentation but indicate that a perceived segment boundary may be transparent if slip exceeds a threshold value.

  16. LiDAR and field observations of slip distribution for the most recent surface ruptures along the central San Jacinto fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    J.B. Salisbury; T.K. Rockwell; T.J. Middleton; Hudnut, Kenneth W.

    2012-01-01

    We measured offsets on tectonically displaced geomorphic features along 80 km of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault (SJF) to estimate slip‐per‐event for the past several surface ruptures. We identify 168 offset features from which we make over 490 measurements using B4 light detection and ranging (LiDAR) imagery and field observations. Our results suggest that LiDAR technology is an exemplary supplement to traditional field methods in slip‐per‐event studies. Displacement estimates indicate that the most recent surface‐rupturing event (MRE) produced an average of 2.5–2.9 m of right‐lateral slip with maximum slip of nearly 4 m at Anza, a Mw 7.2–7.5 earthquake. Average multiple‐event offsets for the same 80 kms are ∼5.5  m, with maximum values of 3 m at Anza for the penultimate event. Cumulative displacements of 9–10 m through Anza suggest the third event was also similar in size. Paleoseismic work at Hog Lake dates the most recent surface rupture event at ca. 1790. A poorly located, large earthquake occurred in southern California on 22 November 1800; we relocate this event to the Clark fault based on the MRE at Hog Lake. We also recognize the occurrence of a younger rupture along ∼15–20  km of the fault in Blackburn Canyon with ∼1.25  m of average displacement. We attribute these offsets to the 21 April 1918 Mw 6.9 event. These data argue that much or all of the Clark fault, and possibly also the Casa Loma fault, fail together in large earthquakes, but that shorter sections may fail in smaller events.

  17. 10Be and U-series dating of late Quaternary landforms along the southern San Jacinto fault: Implications for temporal slip rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Oskin, M. E.; Fletcher, K.; Sharp, W. D.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    Robust age control on faulted landforms with well-constrained offsets is essential to documenting the heterogeneous behavior of a fault zone over time. However, showing late Quaternary temporal slip rate variation is often challenging due to the difficultly of obtaining reliable ages for Quaternary deposits. Exposure ages from cosmogenic isotopes can be significantly affected by surface processes, and U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate provides only minimum ages because carbonate accumulation occurs after deposition. Fortunately, the controlling factors for the resulting age uncertainties of each method are relatively independent from each other, so a combination of cosmogenic isotope and U-series dating may significantly improve the reliability of landform dating and yield more robust slip rate estimates. We present preliminary results of this dual-dating approach at 4 sites along the southern San Jacinto fault zone in California: 2 sites along the Coyote Creek fault, and 2 sites along the Clark fault. These results show age agreement between the two dating methods. Along the southern Clark fault, a 10Be depth profile model age of 34.5 ±6.6 ka and a U-series age of 33.2 ±1.1 ka were obtained for an offset Q2b fan surface, and a Q3b surface yielded a weighted mean 10Be surface exposure age of 5.9 ±1.5 ka, similar to an U-series age of 6.3 ±0.4 ka. Along the northern Coyote Creek fault, preliminary data indicate a 10Be surface exposure age of 11.3 ±3.4 ka and a U-series age of 11.7 ±1.8 ka for an offset Q3a surface, and a 10Be surface exposure age of 6.9 ±1.0 ka and a U-series age of 7.8 ± 0.9 ka for an offset Q3b surface. The remarkable consistency among ages from the two dating methods suggest that: (1) U-series ages of pedogenic carbonate clast rinds closely approach depositional ages of the host alluvium; (2) erosion may be negligible at the sampled sites; and (3) inherited 10Be has been accurately quantified (via depth profile) for the late

  18. A Statistical Framework for Calculating and Assessing Compositional Linear Trends Within Fault Zones: A Case Study of the NE Block of the Clark Segment, San Jacinto Fault, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Brian G.; Girty, Gary H.; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2014-11-01

    Utilizing chemical data derived from the various fault zone architectural components of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault, southern California, USA, we apply for the first time non-central principal component analysis to calculate a compositional linear trend within molar A-CN-K space. In this procedure A-CN-K are calculated as the molar proportions of Al2O3 (A), CaO* + Na2O (CN), and K2O (K) in the sum of molar Al2O3, Na2O, CaO*, and K2O. CaO* is the molar CaO after correction for apatite. We then derive translational invariant chemical alteration intensity factors, t, for each architectural component through orthogonal projection of analyzed samples onto the compositional linear trend. The chemical alteration intensity factor t determines the relative change in composition compared to the original state (i.e., the composition of the altered wall rocks). It is dependent on the degree of intensity to which the process or processes responsible for the change in composition of each architectural component has been active. These processes include shearing, fragmentation, fluid flow, and generation of frictional heat. Non-central principal component analysis indicates that principal component 1 explains 99.7 % of the spread of A-CN-K data about the calculated compositional linear trend (i.e., the variance). The significance level for the overall one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) is 0.0001. Such a result indicates that at least one significant difference across the group of means of t values is different at the 95 % confidence level. Following completion of the overall one-way ANOVA, the difference in means t test indicated that the mean of the t values for the fault core are different than the means obtained from the transition and damage zones. In contrast, at the 95 % confidence level, the means of the t values for the transition and damage zones are not statistically distinguishable. The results of XRD work completed during this study revealed that the <2

  19. A 21-Event, 4,000-Year History of Surface Ruptures in the Anza Seismic Gap, San Jacinto Fault, and Implications for Long-term Earthquake Production on a Major Plate Boundary Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Thomas K.; Dawson, Timothy E.; Young Ben-Horin, Jeri; Seitz, Gordon

    2015-05-01

    Paleoseismic work completed at Hog Lake on the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) near Anza, California, indicates that at least 21 surface ruptures have occurred in the Anza Seismic gap over the past 4,000 years. The ages of the ruptures are constrained by 111 radiocarbon dates, 97 of which fall in stratigraphic order. The average recurrence interval for all ruptures for this period is about 185 ± 105 years, although some ruptures, such as occurred in the April 1918 earthquake, caused only minor displacement. We rate the expression of each interpreted event in each of the twelve developed field exposures presented in this work by assigning numeric values for the presence of different criteria that indicate rupture to a paleo-ground surface. Weakly expressed ruptures, for example the deformation we interpret to be the result of the historical 1918 earthquake, received low scores and are interpreted as smaller earthquakes. From this analysis, we infer that at least fifteen of the identified ruptures are indicative of large earthquakes similar to the penultimate earthquake, inferred to be the M w 7.3 22 November 1800 earthquake. The adjusted recurrence interval for large earthquakes lengthens to approximately 254 years. Comparison with the rupture history at the Mystic Lake paleoseismic site on the Claremont strand indicates that it is plausible that several of the large ruptures identified at Hog Lake could have jumped the Hemet step-over at Mystic Lake and continued on the Claremont strand (or vice versa), but most of the event ages do not match between the two sites, indicating that most ruptures do not jump the step. Finally, comparison with San Andreas Fault ruptures both to the north and south of its juncture with the SJF suggest that some northern SJF ruptures identified at Mystic Lake may correlate with events identified at Wrightwood, but that these northern ruptures have no match at Hog Lake and can not indicate rupture of the entire SJF onto the SAF.

  20. Response of deformation patterns to reorganizations of the southern San Andreas fault system since ca. 1.5 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. L.; Fattaruso, L.; Dorsey, R. J.; Housen, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Between ~1.5 and 1.1 Ma, the southern San Andreas fault system underwent a major reorganization that included initiation of the San Jacinto fault and termination of slip on the extensional West Salton detachment fault. The southern San Andreas fault itself has also evolved since this time, with several shifts in activity among fault strands within San Gorgonio Pass. We use three-dimensional mechanical Boundary Element Method models to investigate the impact of these changes to the fault network on deformation patterns. A series of snapshot models of the succession of active fault geometries explore the role of fault interaction and tectonic loading in abandonment of the West Salton detachment fault, initiation of the San Jacinto fault, and shifts in activity of the San Andreas fault. Interpreted changes to uplift patterns are well matched by model results. These results support the idea that growth of the San Jacinto fault led to increased uplift rates in the San Gabriel Mountains and decreased uplift rates in the San Bernardino Mountains. Comparison of model results for vertical axis rotation to data from paleomagnetic studies reveals a good match to local rotation patterns in the Mecca Hills and Borrego Badlands. We explore the mechanical efficiency at each step in the evolution, and find an overall trend toward increased efficiency through time. Strain energy density patterns are used to identify regions of off-fault deformation and potential incipient faulting. These patterns support the notion of north-to-south propagation of the San Jacinto fault during its initiation. The results of the present-day model are compared with microseismicity focal mechanisms to provide additional insight into the patterns of off-fault deformation within the southern San Andreas fault system.

  1. Has the San Gabriel fault been offset

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J.R.

    1988-03-01

    The San Gabriel fault (SGF) in southern California is a right-lateral, strike-slip fault extending for 85 mi in an arcuate, southwestward-bowing curve from near the San Andreas fault at Frazier Mountain to its intersection with the left-lateral San Antonio Canyon fault (SACF) in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains. Termination of the SGF at the presently active SACF is abrupt and prompts the question Has the San Gabriel Fault been offset. Tectonic and geometric relationships in the area suggest that the SGF has been offset approximately 6 mi in a left-lateral sense and that the offset continuation of the SGF, across the SACF, is the right-lateral, strike-slip San Jacinto fault (SJF), which also terminates at the SACF. Reversing the left-lateral movement on the SACF to rejoin the offset ends of the SGF and SJF reveals a fault trace that is remarkably similar in geometry and movement (and perhaps in tectonic history), to the trace of the San Andreas fault through the southern part of the San Bernardino Mountains. The relationship of the Sierra Madre-Cucamonga fault system to the restored SGF-SJF fault is strikingly similar to the relationship of the Banning fault to the Mission Creek-Mill Creek portion of the San Andreas fault. Structural relations suggest that the San Gabriel-San Jacinto system predates the San Andreas fault in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains and that continuing movement on the SACF is currently affecting the trace of the San Andreas fault in the Cajon Pass area.

  2. Earthquakes, active faults, and geothermal areas in the Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, D.P.; Mowinckel, P.; Peake, L.G.

    1975-01-01

    A dense seismograph network in the Imperial Valley recorded a series of earthquake swarms along the Imperial and Brawley faults and a diffuse pattern of earthquakes along the San Jacinto fault. Two known geothermal areas are closely associated with these earthquake swarms. This seismicity pattern demonstrates that seismic slip is occurring along both the Imperial-Brawley and San Jacinto fault systems.

  3. Earthquakes, active faults, and geothermal areas in the imperial valley, california.

    PubMed

    Hill, D P; Mowinckel, P; Peake, L G

    1975-06-27

    A dense seismograph network in the Imperial Valley recorded a series of earthquake swarms along the Imperial and Brawley faults and a diffuse pattern of earthquakes along the San Jacinto fault. Two known geothermal areas are closely associated with these earthquake swarms. This seismicity pattern demonstrates that seismic slip is occurring along both the Imperial-Brawley and San Jacinto fault systems. PMID:17772600

  4. San Diego Gas and Electric Company Imperial Valley geothermal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichs, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    San Diego Gas and Electric and its wholly owned subsidiary New Albion Resources Co. have been affiliated with Magma Power Company, Magma Energy Inc. and Chevron Oil Company for the last 2-1/2 years in carrying out geothermal research and development in the private lands of the Imperial Valley. The steps undertaken in the program are reviewed and the sequence that must be considered by companies considering geothermal research and development is emphasized. Activities at the south end of the Salton Sea and in the Heber area of Imperial Valley are leading toward development of demonstration facilities within the near future. The current status of the project is reported.

  5. Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in San Francisco and Monterey Bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. P.

    2002-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient utilized by all living organisms, and has been recognized as a limiting nutrient in some oceanic systems (Cotner et al., 1997; Karl et al., 1995; Michaels et al., 1996; Wu et al., 2000). However, relatively little is known about the extent of P limitation in natural environments, how P limitation varies spatially and temporally, and what determines how and when P becomes limiting (Benitez-Nelson, 2000). A more direct estimate of the degree of P limitation in a variety of oceanic systems is needed to better understand P cycling and dynamics within the ocean and how these have and will change in response to global climate and environmental perturbation. Accordingly, the objective this study is to assess the P-status of marine planktonic communities in Monterey and San Francisco Bays using the activity of alkaline phosphatase in the water column. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is the most widely used enzyme that marine organisms use to hydrolize organic P compounds to biologically available orthophosphate. Accordingly it is expected that in areas where P is a limiting nutrient organisms will produce and release more AP to seawater so they can utilize the dissolved and particulate organic P compounds. Indeed it has been suggested that the AP activity is a reliable indicator of P-availability to planktonic communities (Ammerman and Azam, 1985; Cotner and Wetzel, 1991; Hong et al., 1998). High enzyme activities indicate low dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) availability while low levels suggest that DIP supply satisfies the community P-demand. This study examines AP activity in San Francisco and Monterey Bays over a 12 month period, from November, 2001 through November, 2002 using two enzyme assays. The study encompasses data from a three-station transect in Monterey Bay, at depths ranging from 0-60 meters. The stations range from coastal waters to open ocean depths of several thousand meters. In San Francisco Bay, surface water from

  6. Activism in Concrete: Student Union, San Francisco State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The San Francisco State University Student Union is a futurist design of two steel space-frame pyramids. Each contains a stairway leading to four partial floors that diminish in size as the pyramid tapers. (Author/MLF)

  7. Late Cenozoic geology of Cajon Pass: implications for tectonics and sedimentation along the San Andreas fault

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, R.J. II

    1986-01-01

    The geology in Cajon Pass, southern California, provides a detailed history of strike-slip activity on the San Andreas fault, compressional deformation associated with the uplift of the central Transverse Ranges and an excellent Cenozoic record of syntectonic sedimentation. Age control was established in all of the sediments deposited since the Early Miocene, using biostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, fission-track dating of volcanic ashes, radiocarbon dating, soil development, and the relative stratigraphic and geomorphic position of the units. Detailed mapping revealed that tectonic deformation and sedimentation styles varied through time, reflecting the evolution of the San Andreas fault zone within the Pacific-North American plate boundary and climatic changes. Three distinct phases of the uplift of the San Bernardino Mountains have been recognized, suggesting a long-term interaction between the strike-slip activity on the San Andreas system and the compressional tectonics of the Transverse Ranges. Uplift began in the late Miocene, paused during the Pliocene, recommenced in the earliest Pleistocene and culminated in the late Pleistocene. The average slip rate across the combined San Andreas and San Jacinto faults was 37.5 +/- 2 mm/yr during the Quaternary Period. The Holocene slip rate on the San Andreas fault in Cajon Pass was determined to be 24.5 +/- 3.5 mm/yr. This investigation indicates that the last earthquake associated wit rupture on the San Andreas fault in Cajon Pass occurred around 1700 AD and that the average recurrence interval between earthquakes is between 150 and 200 years. A kinematic model was constructed from the structural and slip rate data developed here that produces internally consistent motions for all of the fault-bounded blocks in southern California.

  8. Active and inactive faults in southern California viewed from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M.; Lamar, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    A number of prominent linears in basement terrane of the Peninsular Ranges appeared on Skylab images. In most cases, they were represented by straight or gently curved valleys; however, detailed field investigations have shown that several of these linears mark previously unmapped faults which form two distinct fault sets; one set trends northeast, the other west-northwest. No indications of recent movement were present on these faults which were truncated by seismically active, northwest trending fault zones such as the Elsinore and San Jacinto. Right-lateral separation is demonstrable on the northeast trending set.

  9. Change in failure stress on the southern san andreas fault system caused by the 1992 magnitude = 7.4 landers earthquake.

    PubMed

    Stein, R S; King, G C; Lin, J

    1992-11-20

    The 28 June Landers earthquake brought the San Andreas fault significantly closer to failure near San Bernardino, a site that has not sustained a large shock since 1812. Stress also increased on the San Jacinto fault near San Bernardino and on the San Andreas fault southeast of Palm Springs. Unless creep or moderate earthquakes relieve these stress changes, the next great earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault is likely to be advanced by one to two decades. In contrast, stress on the San Andreas north of Los Angeles dropped, potentially delaying the next great earthquake there by 2 to 10 years. PMID:17778356

  10. Change in failure stress on the southern San Andreas fault system caused by the 1992 magnitude = 7.4 Landers earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stein, R.S.; King, G.C.P.; Lin, J.

    1992-01-01

    The 28 June Landers earthquake brought the San Andreas fault significantly closer to failure near San Bernardino, a site that has not sustained a large shock since 1812. Stress also increased on the San Jacinto fault near San Bernardino and on the San Andreas fault southeast of Palm Springs. Unless creep or moderate earthquakes relieve these stress changes, the next great earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault is likely to be advanced by one to two decades. In contrast, stress on the San Andreas north of Los Angeles dropped, potentially delaying the next great earthquake there by 2 to 10 years.

  11. SNAC: San Mateo Nutrition Activity Curriculum. "Swing Into Nutrition" (Kindergarten - Fifth Grade).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo City Elementary School District, CA.

    The primary goal of the San Mateo Nutrition Activity Curriculum (SNAC) is to assist the development and improvement of healthful food habits among kindergarten through fifth grade students. The curriculum is based on five concepts: food choices and health; factors influencing food choices; food related careers; consumer competencies; and food…

  12. Modelling large scale human activity in San Francisco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Marta

    2010-03-01

    Diverse group of people with a wide variety of schedules, activities and travel needs compose our cities nowadays. This represents a big challenge for modeling travel behaviors in urban environments; those models are of crucial interest for a wide variety of applications such as traffic forecasting, spreading of viruses, or measuring human exposure to air pollutants. The traditional means to obtain knowledge about travel behavior is limited to surveys on travel journeys. The obtained information is based in questionnaires that are usually costly to implement and with intrinsic limitations to cover large number of individuals and some problems of reliability. Using mobile phone data, we explore the basic characteristics of a model of human travel: The distribution of agents is proportional to the population density of a given region, and each agent has a characteristic trajectory size contain information on frequency of visits to different locations. Additionally we use a complementary data set given by smart subway fare cards offering us information about the exact time of each passenger getting in or getting out of the subway station and the coordinates of it. This allows us to uncover the temporal aspects of the mobility. Since we have the actual time and place of individual's origin and destination we can understand the temporal patterns in each visited location with further details. Integrating two described data set we provide a dynamical model of human travels that incorporates different aspects observed empirically.

  13. The impact of human activities on sediments of San Francisco Bay, California: an overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Geen, Alexander; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1999-01-01

    This note introduces a set of eight papers devoted to a detailed study of two sediment cores from San Francisco Bay with an overview of the region and a chronology of human activities. Data used in this study to constrain the range of sediment ages at different depths include , and  concentrations in the sediment and the  age of shell fragments. In order of first detectable appearance in the record, the indicators of contamination that were analyzed include PAHs>Hg>Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn>DDT, PCB>foraminiferal Cd/Ca. This study also documents a large memory effect for estuarine contamination caused by sediment mixing and resuspension. Once an estuary such as San Francisco Bay has been contaminated, decades must pass before contaminant levels in surface sediment will return to background levels, even if external contaminant inputs have been entirely eliminated.

  14. Imaging the internal structure of the San Jacinto Fault Zone with high Frequency noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigone, D.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Campillo, M.; Hillers, G.; Roux, P.; Vernon, F.

    2014-12-01

    Regional tomography studies in the SJFZ area gives detailed images up to the top 500 meters or so of the crust (Zigone et al., 2014; Allam et al., 2014). To obtain additional high resolution information on local structures at the shallower crust, we use cross correlation of ambient seismic noise between 10 Hz and 70 Hz recorded by several linear arrays that cross the SJFZ with typical inter-station distances around 40 m. Pre-processing techniques involving earthquakes removal and whitening on 15 minutes time windows are used to obtained the 9-component correlation tensors associated with all station pairs. The obtained cross correlations exhibit coherent waves up to 30-40 Hz that travel between the station pairs. Polarization and dispersion analysis show that both body and surface waves are reconstructed with Rayleigh group velocity around 400-500 m/s. The results likely include also body waves and trapped fault zone signals. After rejecting paths without sufficient signal to noise ratios, we invert the Rayleigh group velocity measurements using the Barmin et al. (2001) approach on a 20m grid size. The obtained group velocity maps reveal complex structures with very low velocity damage zones around the surface traces of the SJFZ. The group velocities are inverted to 3D images of shear wave speeds using the linear inversion method of Hermann & Ammon (2002). The results show local flower-type damage structures in the top 200m, with Vs values at 30m depths around 250-300 m/s in agreement with the available Vs30 values in the literature. This high-resolution study will be complemented with a more detailed analysis using a dense rectangular array with 1108 vertical-component seismometers separated by 10-30 m centered on the fault. This geometry allows the use of very high frequency seismic noise up to 200 Hz that can be used to image the small-scale features (~10-20 m) in the top few hundred m of the crust. Updated results will be presented in the meeting.

  15. Water-quality of Lake Conroe on the west fork San Jacinto River, Southeastern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flugrath, M.W.; Andrews, F.L.; McPherson, Emma

    1985-01-01

    Thermal stratification in Lake Conroe, Texas usually begins to develop in March and persists until October. Thermal stratification has resulted in significant seasonal and areal variations in the concentrations of dissolved oxygen, dissolved iron, dissolved manganese, total inorganic nitrogen, and total phosphorus. Volume-weighted-average concentration of dissolved solids generally was < 120 mg/L, that of dissolved chloride generally was < 22 mg/L, and that of dissolved sulfate was < 10 mg/L in Lake Conroe during the 1973-82 water years. The concentrations of each of these constituents usually were largest during the summer. The water was moderately hard (hardness > 60 but < 120 mg/L as calcium carbonate). The average concentrations of dissolved oxygen at most sites in the downstream one-half of the lake averaged 3.2 mg/L during summer stratification and > 9 mg/L during winter circulation. The concentrations at most sites in the headwaters of the lake averaged < 4.3 mg/L during the summer and < 7.9 mg/L during the winter. Water below depths of 25 to 35 ft usually contained < 1 mg/L dissolved oxygen during the summer. The concentrations of dissolved iron and dissolved manganese in water throughout the reservoir during winter circulation and in water near the reservoir surface during summer stratification were < 100 micrograms/L. The greatest concentration occurred during summer stagnation near the reservoir bottom at a deep site near Lake Conroe Dam. The concentrations of total inorganic nitrogen and total phosphorus were greatest during summer stratification in water near the reservoir bottom at deep sites. No accumulation of these constituents within the reservoir was detected during the study. The densities and composition of algal populations varied seasonally. Algal densities were greatest during the summer with blue-green algae being the predominant phylum. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Sequence stratigraphy of a Pliocene delta complex deposited in an active margin setting, Etchegoin and San Joaquin gas sands, San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    Prolific gas sands of the Pliocene Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations of the southern San Joaquin basin, California, are part of a 1300-m thick succession of deltaic sediments that record the final regression of the Pacific Ocean from a tectonically active, restricted basin associated with the California transform margin. Individual field studies, lacking a regional framework and based primarily on electric log data, correlate these gas sands to the extent that individual sands maintain the same stratigraphic level within the succession. However, a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework, constructed from recent 3D-seismic data and detailed well log correlations on the Bakersfield Arch area of the basin, indicates that the Pliocene succession is part of a south/southwest prograding delta complex. Therefore, sands climb up-section in the landward direction and grade laterally from deep-water to shallow-water facies. Because lithofacies boundaries cross chronostratigraphic surfaces, previous interpretations of the reservoir architecture are inaccurate. This model increases predictability of reservoir facies by constraining lithofacies mapping and enables interpretation of the effects on deposition of the integrated and inter-related controls of tectonics, eustatic sea-level change, and sediment supply. With this understanding, a well-defined model of the stratal architecture of the Pliocene succession of the southern San Joaquin basin is now possible.

  17. Sequence stratigraphy of a Pliocene delta complex deposited in an active margin setting, Etchegoin and San Joaquin gas sands, San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.C. )

    1996-01-01

    Prolific gas sands of the Pliocene Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations of the southern San Joaquin basin, California, are part of a 1300-m thick succession of deltaic sediments that record the final regression of the Pacific Ocean from a tectonically active, restricted basin associated with the California transform margin. Individual field studies, lacking a regional framework and based primarily on electric log data, correlate these gas sands to the extent that individual sands maintain the same stratigraphic level within the succession. However, a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework, constructed from recent 3D-seismic data and detailed well log correlations on the Bakersfield Arch area of the basin, indicates that the Pliocene succession is part of a south/southwest prograding delta complex. Therefore, sands climb up-section in the landward direction and grade laterally from deep-water to shallow-water facies. Because lithofacies boundaries cross chronostratigraphic surfaces, previous interpretations of the reservoir architecture are inaccurate. This model increases predictability of reservoir facies by constraining lithofacies mapping and enables interpretation of the effects on deposition of the integrated and inter-related controls of tectonics, eustatic sea-level change, and sediment supply. With this understanding, a well-defined model of the stratal architecture of the Pliocene succession of the southern San Joaquin basin is now possible.

  18. Virucidal activity of essential oils from aromatic plants of San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    García, C C; Talarico, L; Almeida, N; Colombres, S; Duschatzky, C; Damonte, E B

    2003-11-01

    Essential oils obtained from eight aromatic plants of San Luis Province, Argentina, were screened for virucidal activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Junin virus (JUNV) and dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2). The most potent inhibition was observed with the essential oil of Lippia junelliana and Lippia turbinata against JUNV with virucidal concentration 50% (VC(50)) values in the range 14-20 ppm, whereas Aloysia gratissima, Heterotheca latifolia and Tessaria absinthioides inhibited JUNV in the range 52-90 ppm. The virucidal activity was time- and temperature-dependent. The essential oils of A. gratissima, Artemisia douglasiana, Eupatorium patens and T. absinthioides inactivated HSV-1 at 65-125 ppm. However, only A. douglasiana and E. patens had any discernible effect on DEN-2 infectivity with VC(50) values of 60 and 150 ppm, respectively. PMID:14595590

  19. San Marino.

    PubMed

    1985-02-01

    San Marino, an independent republic located in north central Italy, in 1983 had a population of 22,206 growing at an annual rate of .9%. The literacy rate is 97% and the infant mortality rate is 9.6/1000. The terrain is mountainous and the climate is moderate. According to local tradition, San Marino was founded by a Christian stonecutter in the 4th century A.D. as a refuge against religious persecution. Its recorded history began in the 9th century, and it has survived assaults on its independence by the papacy, the Malatesta lords of Rimini, Cesare Borgia, Napoleon, and Mussolini. An 1862 treaty with the newly formed Kingdom of Italy has been periodically renewed and amended. The present government is an alliance between the socialists and communists. San Marino has had its own statutes and governmental institutions since the 11th century. Legislative authority at present is vested in a 60-member unicameral parliament. Executive authority is exercised by the 11-member Congress of State, the members of which head the various administrative departments of the goverment. The posts are divided among the parties which form the coalition government. Judicial authority is partly exercised by Italian magistrates in civil and criminal cases. San Marino's policies are tied to Italy's and political organizations and labor unions active in Italy are also active in San Marino. Since World War II, there has been intense rivalry between 2 political coalitions, the Popular Alliance composed of the Christian Democratic Party and the Independent Social Democratic Party, and the Liberty Committee, coalition of the Communist Party and the Socialist Party. San Marino's gross domestic product was $137 million and its per capita income was $6290 in 1980. The principal economic activities are farming and livestock raising, along with some light manufacturing. Foreign transactions are dominated by tourism. The government derives most of its revenue from the sale of postage stamps to

  20. Low resistivity and permeability in actively deforming shear zones on the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C.; Lockner, D. A.; Hickman, S.

    2015-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific drill hole near Parkfield, California, crosses the San Andreas Fault at a depth of 2.7 km. Downhole measurements and analysis of core retrieved from Phase 3 drilling reveal two narrow, actively deforming zones of smectite-clay gouge within a roughly 200 m wide fault damage zone of sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. Here we report electrical resistivity and permeability measurements on core samples from all of these structural units at effective confining pressures up to 120 MPa. Electrical resistivity (~10 Ω-m) and permeability (10-21 to 10-22 m2) in the actively deforming zones were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding damage zone material, consistent with broader-scale observations from the downhole resistivity and seismic velocity logs. The higher porosity of the clay gouge, 2 to 8 times greater than that in the damage zone rocks, along with surface conduction were the principal factors contributing to the observed low resistivities. The high percentage of fine-grained clay in the deforming zones also greatly reduced permeability to values low enough to create a barrier to fluid flow across the fault. Together, resistivity and permeability data can be used to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics of the fault, key to understanding fault structure and strength. The low resistivities and strength measurements of the SAFOD core are consistent with observations of low resistivity clays that are often found in the principal slip zones of other active faults making resistivity logs a valuable tool for identifying these zones.

  1. Geomorphotectonic studies of the Wilshire blind thrust fault and the San Andreas fault, Los Angeles area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, R.L.

    1996-08-01

    WSUs Nodes program finds geomorphologic features formed by active faults and folds using a DEM. Two active faults in the Los Angeles basin, California were studied. The Wilshire fault was recently designated a fault based on the presence of the Wilshire Arch cored by a blind thrust. A new Nodes detector was designed to look for the observed parabolic ridge over it. The detector was 2.5 km in diameter with ridges 1 to 6 m high. The axis of the Wilshire arch, freeways, other oil fields probably controlled by arches, and interfluve dissection drainage ridges in older alluvium were all detected. Complex strike slip and thrust faults exist near Cajon Pass. The major strike slip faults (San Andreas, San Jacinto) have a {open_quotes}rift{close_quotes} valley 1 km wide that was found with a 41 pixel (1200 m) diameter Nodes detector, as were east-west oriented thrusts. The SAF and SJF were also found with a slope break detector.

  2. Geomorphic evidence of active tectonics in the San Gorgonio Pass region of the San Andreas Fault system: an example of discovery-based research in undergraduate teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinen, L. A.; Yule, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Student-conducted research in courses during the first two undergraduate years can increase learning and improve student self-confidence in scientific study, and is recommended for engaging and retaining students in STEM fields (PCAST, 2012). At Pomona College, incorporating student research throughout the geology curriculum tripled the number of students conducting research prior to their senior year that culminated in a professional conference presentation (Reinen et al., 2006). Here we present an example of discovery-based research in Neotectonics, a second-tier course predominantly enrolling first-and second-year students; describe the steps involved in the four week project; and discuss early outcomes of student confidence, engagement and retention. In the San Gorgonio Pass region (SGPR) in southern California, the San Andreas fault undergoes a transition from predominantly strike-slip to a complex system of faults with significant dip-slip, resulting in diffuse deformation and raising the question of whether a large earthquake on the San Andreas could propagate through the region (Yule, 2009). In spring 2014, seven students in the Neotectonics course conducted original research investigating quantifiable geomorphic evidence of tectonic activity in the SGPR. Students addressed questions of [1] unequal uplift in the San Bernardino Mountains, [2] fault activity indicated by stream knick points, [3] the role of fault style on mountain front sinuosity, and [4] characteristic earthquake slip determined via fault scarp degradation models. Students developed and revised individual projects, collaborated with each other on methods, and presented results in a public forum. A final class day was spent reviewing the projects and planning future research directions. Pre- and post-course surveys show increases in students' self-confidence in the design, implementation, and presentation of original scientific inquiries. 5 of 6 eligible students participated in research the

  3. 78 FR 30270 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 61-San Juan, Puerto Rico, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 61--San Juan, Puerto Rico, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Janssen Ortho LLC (Pharmaceutical Products Production), Gurabo, Puerto Rico The Puerto Rico Trade and Export Company, grantee...

  4. Comparative Analysis of Gravity Wave Activity at Wallops Island and San Juan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, Catalin; Zabotin, Nikolay; Bullett, Terrence

    2014-05-01

    There are numerous gravity wave detection schemes currently in use, based on various data acquisition schemes and instrumentation types. We developed one such method based on dynasonde data, which include both electron density and electron density gradients. The results described in this work extend a range of 150-250 km in altitude, while being essentially continuous in time. In addition to this, we can fully diagnose the gravity wave field, simultaneously determining spatial and temporal characteristics. This paper describes a comparative analysis of wave activity at two locations: Wallops Island, Virginia, U.S.A. and San Juan, Puerto Rico. At both locations, we show cases of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID's) clearly caused by gravity wave activity. The dominant frequency is sometimes obvious, but generally we have a superposition of several waves, each with an associated bandwidth. We extract the frequency, amplitude, wavelength and direction of propagation for each mode detected, independent of all other modes present. The wave spectra can drastically change with altitude, time, season, geographical location, etc. The same is true for the other wave characteristics listed above, and this becomes even more complex when we consider waves propagating along the two horizontal axes separately. All these aspects are discussed in our work, separating effects due to these various factors. Finally, we describe how our work will be extended be adding several other stations to provide a global characterization of wave activity in the thermosphere-ionosphere system.

  5. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    active oil fields generally show different characteristics of frequency-magnitude distributions, higher fractal dimensions and higher b-values compared to natural seismicity. The estimated b-values vary between 0.7 close to the San Andreas fault up to 1.3 within the North-western corner of the Kern County. High b-values within this particular region are likely related to active petroleum production. The spatial differences in seismicity statistics delineate earthquakes related to active faults from distributed seismicity toward the center of the basin. Our results highlight, that the analysis of spatial and temporal variations in seismicity statistics may be a promising tool to identify induced seismicity in active tectonic regions.

  6. Frictional properties of the active San Andreas Fault at SAFOD: Implications for fault strength and slip behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.

    2015-07-01

    We present results from a comprehensive laboratory study of the frictional strength and constitutive properties for all three active strands of the San Andreas Fault penetrated in the San Andreas Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). The SAFOD borehole penetrated the Southwest Deforming Zone (SDZ), the Central Deforming Zone (CDZ), both of which are actively creeping, and the Northeast Boundary Fault (NBF). Our results include measurements of the frictional properties of cuttings and core samples recovered at depths of ~2.7 km. We find that materials from the two actively creeping faults exhibit low frictional strengths (μ = ~0.1), velocity-strengthening friction behavior, and near-zero or negative rates of frictional healing. Our experimental data set shows that the center of the CDZ is the weakest section of the San Andreas Fault, with μ = ~0.10. Fault weakness is highly localized and likely caused by abundant magnesium-rich clays. In contrast, serpentine from within the SDZ, and wall rock of both the SDZ and CDZ, exhibits velocity-weakening friction behavior and positive healing rates, consistent with nearby repeating microearthquakes. Finally, we document higher friction coefficients (μ > 0.4) and complex rate-dependent behavior for samples recovered across the NBF. In total, our data provide an integrated view of fault behavior for the three active fault strands encountered at SAFOD and offer a consistent explanation for observations of creep and microearthquakes along weak fault zones within a strong crust.

  7. Peep show establishments, police activity, public place, and time: a study of secondary effects in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Linz, Daniel; Paul, Bryant; Yao, Mike

    2006-05-01

    An empirical study was undertaken in San Diego, California, to test assumptions made by the government and by conservative religious policy advocates that there is a greater incidence of crime in the vicinity of peep show establishments. We asked two questions: (a) Is criminal activity in San Diego particularly acute at peep show establishments compared to surrounding control locations? and (b) Is criminal activity in San Diego disproportionately greater at or near peep show establishments between the hours of 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. compared to other times of the day? The levels of crime activity and the expenditure of police resources were examined by measuring the number of calls-for-service (CFSs) to the police within a 1,000-ft. area on either side of the peep show establishments and comparably-sized control areas beyond the immediate 1,000-foot area. A more focused late-night (2 a.m. to 6 a.m.) analysis was also undertaken. The results showed no reliable evidence of differences in crime levels between the control and test areas, nor was there any evidence of disproportionately greater amounts of crime within the 2 a.m. to 6 a.m. time period in the areas surrounding the peep show establishments. We concluded that San Diego does not have a problem with crime at the peep show establishments generally, nor is there a heightened problem with crime during the 2 a.m. to 6 a.m. period. We discuss the implications of assuming that peep show establishments are associated with negative effects in the community and the possibility of viewpoint discrimination against sex communication. PMID:16817065

  8. Quaternary landscape development, alluvial fan chronology and erosion of the Mecca Hills at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Harrison J.; Owen, Lewis; Dietsch, Craig; Beck, Richard A.; Caffee, Marc A.; Finkelman, Robert B.; Mahan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative geomorphic analysis combined with cosmogenic nuclide 10Be-based geochronology and denudation rates have been used to further the understanding of the Quaternary landscape development of the Mecca Hills, a zone of transpressional uplift along the southern end of the San Andreas Fault, in southern California. The similar timing of convergent uplifts along the San Andreas Fault with the initiation of the sub-parallel San Jacinto Fault suggest a possible link between the two tectonic events. The ages of alluvial fans and the rates of catchment-wide denudation have been integrated to assess the relative influence of climate and tectonic uplift on the development of catchments within the Mecca Hills. Ages for major geomorphic surfaces based on 10Be surface exposure dating of boulders and 10Be depth profiles define the timing of surface stabilization to 2.6 +5.6/–1.3 ka (Qyf1 surface), 67.2 ± 5.3 ka (Qvof2 surface), and 280 ± 24 ka (Qvof1 surface). Comparison of 10Be measurements from active channel deposits (Qac) and fluvial terraces (Qt) illustrate a complex history of erosion, sediment storage, and sediment transport in this environment. Beryllium-10 catchment-wide denudation rates range from 19.9 ± 3.2 to 149 ± 22.5 m/Ma and demonstrate strong correlations with mean catchment slope and with total active fault length normalized by catchment area. The lack of strong correlation with other geomorphic variables suggests that tectonic uplift and rock weakening have the greatest control. The currently measured topography and denudation rates across the Mecca Hills may be most consistent with a model of radial topographic growth in contrast to a model based on the rapid uplift and advection of crust.

  9. Quaternary landscape development, alluvial fan chronology and erosion of the Mecca Hills at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Harrison J.; Owen, Lewis A.; Dietsch, Craig; Beck, Richard A.; Caffee, Marc A.; Finkel, Robert C.; Mahan, Shannon A.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative geomorphic analysis combined with cosmogenic nuclide 10Be-based geochronology and denudation rates have been used to further the understanding of the Quaternary landscape development of the Mecca Hills, a zone of transpressional uplift along the southern end of the San Andreas Fault, in southern California. The similar timing of convergent uplifts along the San Andreas Fault with the initiation of the sub-parallel San Jacinto Fault suggest a possible link between the two tectonic events. The ages of alluvial fans and the rates of catchment-wide denudation have been integrated to assess the relative influence of climate and tectonic uplift on the development of catchments within the Mecca Hills. Ages for major geomorphic surfaces based on 10Be surface exposure dating of boulders and 10Be depth profiles define the timing of surface stabilization to 2.6 +5.6/-1.3 ka (Qyf1 surface), 67.2 ± 5.3 ka (Qvof2 surface), and 280 ± 24 ka (Qvof1 surface). Comparison of 10Be measurements from active channel deposits (Qac) and fluvial terraces (Qt) illustrate a complex history of erosion, sediment storage, and sediment transport in this environment. Beryllium-10 catchment-wide denudation rates range from 19.9 ± 3.2 to 149 ± 22.5 m/Ma and demonstrate strong correlations with mean catchment slope and with total active fault length normalized by catchment area. The lack of strong correlation with other geomorphic variables suggests that tectonic uplift and rock weakening have the greatest control. The currently measured topography and denudation rates across the Mecca Hills may be most consistent with a model of radial topographic growth in contrast to a model based on the rapid uplift and advection of crust.

  10. Pore pressure sensitivities to dynamic strains: Observations in active tectonic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Andrew J.

    2015-08-01

    Triggered seismicity arising from dynamic stresses is often explained by the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, where elevated pore pressures reduce the effective strength of faults in fluid-saturated rock. The seismic response of a fluid-rock system naturally depends on its hydromechanical properties, but accurately assessing how pore fluid pressure responds to applied stress over large scales in situ remains a challenging task; hence, spatial variations in response are not well understood, especially around active faults. Here I analyze previously unutilized records of dynamic strain and pore pressure from regional and teleseismic earthquakes at Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) stations from 2006 to 2012 to investigate variations in response along the Pacific/North American tectonic plate boundary. I find robust scaling response coefficients between excess pore pressure and dynamic strain at each station that are spatially correlated: around the San Andreas and San Jacinto fault systems, the response is lowest in regions of the crust undergoing the highest rates of secular shear strain. PBO stations in the Parkfield instrument cluster are at comparable distances to the San Andreas Fault (SAF), and spatial variations there follow patterns in dextral creep rates along the fault, with the highest response in the actively creeping section, which is consistent with a narrowing zone of strain accumulation seen in geodetic velocity profiles. At stations in the San Juan Bautista (SJB) and Anza instrument clusters, the response depends nonlinearly on the inverse fault-perpendicular distance, with the response decreasing toward the fault; the SJB cluster is at the northern transition from creeping-to-locked behavior along the SAF, where creep rates are at moderate to low levels, and the Anza cluster is around the San Jacinto Fault, where to date there have been no statistically significant creep rates observed at the surface. These results suggest that the strength of the

  11. Application of frequency ratio and logistic regression to active rock glacier occurrence in the Andes of San Juan, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angillieri, María Yanina Esper

    2010-01-01

    This study employs statistical modeling techniques and geomorphological mapping to analyze the distribution of active rock glaciers in relation to altitude, aspect, slope, lithology and solar radiation using optical remote sensing techniques with GIS. The study area includes a portion of the Dry Andes of the Cordillera Frontal of San Juan around 30°S latitude, where few geomorphological studies have been conducted. Over 155 rock glaciers have been identified, and 85 are considered active. The relationship between the variables and the rock glaciers distribution was analyzed using the frequency ratio method and logistic regression models. The analytical results show that elevations > 3824 m a.s.l., a south-facing or east-facing aspect, areas with relatively low solar radiation, and slope between 2° and 20° favor the existence of the rock glaciers, and demonstrate that lithology and slope exert major influences.

  12. Map showing recently active breaks along the San Andreas Fault between Pt. Delgada and Bolinas Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Robert D., Jr.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    1970-01-01

    This strip map is one of a series of maps showing recently active fault breaks along the San Andreas and other active faults in California. It is designed to inform persons who are concerned with land use near the fault of the location of those fault breaks that have moved recently. The lines on the map are lines of rupture and creep that can be identified by field evidence and that clearly affect the present surface of the land. Map users should keep in mind that these lines are intended primarily as guides to help locate the fault; the mapped lines are not necessarily shown with the precision demanded by some engineering or land utilization needs.

  13. Ground-water outflow, San Timoteo-Smiley Heights area, upper Santa Ana Valley, Southern California, 1927 through 1968

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutcher, L.C.; Fenzel, F.W.

    1972-01-01

    The San Timoteo-Smiley Heights area is in the upper Santa Ana Valley, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, Calif., where the Yucaipa and San Timoteo-Beaumont ground-water basins border Bunker .Hill basin on the south between the San Jacinto and San Andreas faults. The area is broken by numerous faults, the topography is rough, and in a large part of the area few wells had been drilled prior to 196S. The alluvial deposits, which constitute the aquifers in the area, range in thickness from 0 where they lap onto exposed bedrock hills to about 1,000 feet. Beneath the southern part of the area near the San Jacinto fault the total thickness of alluvial and lacustrine deposits may be as much as 6,000 feet. The purpose of this study was to estimate ground-water outflow by an indirect method not involving balancing of the hydrologic budget. For this purpose it was necessary to estimate the permeability of the aquifer materials, the average annual hydraulic gradient, and the cross-sectional area through which the flow occurs; these values were estimated for five segments along a line of section between the San Jacinto fault and Crafton Hills. To provide data for the outflow estimates, several miles of reflection and refraction seismic traverses were made along and across the outflow section. Nineteen deep and shallow test holes were drilled; one of the deep test holes and several existing wells were pumped to obtain data on aquifer permeability. The estimated average permeabilities of the aquifer materials range from 5 gallons per day per square foot for the lower part of the San Timoteo beds of Frick (1921) and 40 gallons per day per square foot for the older alluvium to 220 gallons per day per square foot for the upper part of the San Timoteo beds. The estimated outflow in 1927 was 8,150 acre-feet. By 1967 the estimated total outflow was 5,350 acre-feet, a reduction of approximately 34 percent. During the 12-year period 1956 through 1967, however, the annual outflow

  14. Investigation of Quaternary slip rates along the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault near San Gorgonio Pass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, P. O.; Behr, W. M.; Rood, D.; Kendrick, K. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2013-12-01

    Present-day Pacific-North American relative plate motion in southern California is shared primarily between the San Jacinto and San Andreas faults. At the north end of the Coachella Valley, the San Andreas fault splits into the Banning and Mission Creek strands, which are sub-parallel to each other within the Indio Hills. Northwest of the Indio Hills, the Mission Creek fault diverges from the Banning and continues northwest toward the southeastern San Bernardino Mountains, but loses surface expression beneath Quaternary alluvial deposits in Morongo Wash. The Banning fault, upon exiting the Indio Hills, is deflected toward the west and transitions into a structurally complex fault zone at San Gorgonio Pass, where it is delineated by thrust scarps in Holocene alluvium. The slip rates of the Banning and Mission Creek fault strands northwest of the Indio Hills and southeast of San Gorgonio Pass are presently unconstrained, but understanding how slip is partitioned between these two strands is critical to southern California earthquake forecasting efforts. Here we present preliminary slip rate data for the Banning fault ~2 km southeast of San Gorgonio Pass at Devers Hill. Using the B4 LiDAR as a base, we have mapped the extents of three truncated and offset alluvial fan deposits, which we have differentiated based on both field and remote (LiDAR- and air photo-based) observations of texture: in particular, the distribution of different clast sizes, pavement and soil development, and color and appearance. To confirm across-fault correlation of the displaced deposits, we have measured 26 cosmogenic Be-10 ages from boulders and cobble samples taken from each of the three fan surfaces on both sides of the fault. One debris flow deposit (Q2a) has been dated to ~80 ka, and appears to be offset 1.6-2.2 km, though confirming this reconstruction will depend on future excavations and uranium-series dating of soil carbonate. A second debris flow deposit (Q2b), for which ages are

  15. The Eastern California Shear Zone as the northward extension of the southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W.; Savage, J. C.; Simpson, R. W.

    2016-04-01

    Cluster analysis offers an agnostic way to organize and explore features of the current GPS velocity field without reference to geologic information or physical models using information only contained in the velocity field itself. We have used cluster analysis of the Southern California Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field to determine the partitioning of Pacific-North America relative motion onto major regional faults. Our results indicate the large-scale kinematics of the region is best described with two boundaries of high velocity gradient, one centered on the Coachella section of the San Andreas Fault and the Eastern California Shear Zone and the other defined by the San Jacinto Fault south of Cajon Pass and the San Andreas Fault farther north. The ~120 km long strand of the San Andreas between Cajon Pass and Coachella Valley (often termed the San Bernardino and San Gorgonio sections) is thus currently of secondary importance and carries lesser amounts of slip over most or all of its length. We show these first order results are present in maps of the smoothed GPS velocity field itself. They are also generally consistent with currently available, loosely bounded geologic and geodetic fault slip rate estimates that alone do not provide useful constraints on the large-scale partitioning we show here. Our analysis does not preclude the existence of smaller blocks and more block boundaries in Southern California. However, attempts to identify smaller blocks along and adjacent to the San Gorgonio section were not successful.

  16. Uranium concentrations and /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratios in fault-associated groundwater as possible earthquake precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Finkel, R.C.

    1981-05-01

    In order to assess the utility of uranium isotopes as fluid phase earthquake precursors, uranium concentrations and /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratios have been monitored on a monthly or bimonthly basis in water from 24 wells and springs associated with Southern California fault zones. Uranium concentrations vary from 0.002 ppb at Indian Canyon Springs on the San Jacinto fault to 8.3 ppb at Lake Hughes well on the San Andreas fault in the Palmdale area. /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratios vary from 0.88 at Agua Caliente Springs on the Elsinore fault to 5.4 at Niland Slab well on the San Andreas fault in the Imperial Valley. There was one large earthquake in the study area during 1979, the 15 October 1979 M = 6.6 Imperial Valley earthquake. Correlated with this event, uranium concentrations varied by a factor of more than 60 and activity ratios by a factor of 3 at the Niland Slab site, about 70 km from the epicenter. At the other sites monitored, uranium concentrations varied in time, but with no apparent pattern, while uranium activity ratios remained essentially constant throughout the monitoring period.

  17. Biological assessment of the effects of activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard training site, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California, on the endangered san joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 imposes several requirements on federal agencies concerning listed threatened and endangered species and their designated critical habitat. Camp Roberts is operated by the California Army National Guard (CA ARNG) with funding from the National Guard Bureau (NGB). Its primary mission to provide a site where military training requirements of the western United States can be met. The presence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) was confirmed in 1960 and the distribution and abundance of the species increased over the next two decades. The Secretary of Interior has not designated any critical habitat for San Joaquin kit fox. The major objective of this Biological Assessment is to provide FWS with sufficient information concerning the possible impacts that routine military training, maintenance and repair activities, and proposed construction projects may have on the San Joaquin kit fox and its essential habitat at Camp Roberts so that formal consultation with NGB and CA ARNG can begin. FWS will use this information as part of the basis for issuing a Biological Opinion which will include an incidental take provision. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Jacinto Duverger Goyanes, MS, Systems Analyst. Provincial Hygiene, Epidemiology & Microbiology Center, Guantánamo.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Gloria

    2008-01-01

    Jacinto Duverger received his Bachelor's Degree in Economic Cybernetics from the University of Donetsk, Ukraine in 1988 and his Master's Degree in Information and Communications in 2007 from a joint program between the University of Las Villas and Guant�namo University. Since 1994 he has worked almost exclusively on the development of the Health Trends Analysis Units (Unidad de An�lisis de Tendencias en la Salud, UATS) throughout Cuba, participating in their conceptual design, installing their first computer network, and more. Born in the country's easternmost province, Guant�namo, his fascination with programming and Prospective Methodology led him to create health software that helps provincial UATS track and forecast health events and to engage in proactive strategic health planning. Most recently, Duverger developed a software package to study the financial sustainability of Mexico's new catastrophic illness coverage program. Duverger sat down with MEDICC Review to talk about software development, strategic health planning methodologies, and training the new generation of Cuban public health leaders. PMID:21483350

  19. Shape Preferred Orientation of Porphyroclasts in the Active Gouge Zones of the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, D. W.; Chester, J. S.; Chester, F. M.

    2009-12-01

    Recovered core samples from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) offer a unique opportunity to study the products of faulting and to learn about the mechanisms of slip at 3 km depth. Active creep is occurring at two locations in the borehole that correspond to meters-thick intervals of gouge recovered by coring. Both gouge layers consist of a clay-bearing, ultrafine grain matrix containing porphyroclasts of sandstone and serpentinite; these layers correspond to the southwest creeping zone at 3194 m measured depth (MD) and the main creeping zone at 3301 m MD. We have used X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) imaging to investigate the mesoscale structure of the core samples, specifically to characterize the shape, preferred orientation, and size distribution of the porphyroclasts. Using various image processing techniques, porphyroclast shape and size are characterized in 3D by best-fit ellipsoids. The resolution of the XCT imaging to date permits characterization of porphyroclasts with equivalent spherical diameters greater than 8 mm; current work involves higher resolution imaging of representative samples to investigate the 3D shape of porphyroclasts to the sub-millimeter size. The porphyroclast population in each gouge layer can be approximated with a scalene-oblate ellipsoid; size and aspect ratio (major to minor axis ratios) distributions also are similar throughout. Aspect ratios generally range between 1.5 and 4, with the majority occurring between 2-2.5. A strong shape preferred orientation (SPO) exists in both creeping zones, where the minor axes form a SPO normal to the plane of the San Andreas Fault, and the major axes define a lineation in the plane of the fault. The SPO in the main creeping zone is particularly well defined, and the orientation distribution, assuming the major-axis lineation is horizontal (strike-slip kinematics), indicates a slight synthetic asymmetry relative to the macroscopic orientation of the San Andreas Fault. The

  20. Using topography to decipher the uplift history of the western San Gabriel Mountains, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibiase, R. A.; Whipple, K. X.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Transient landscapes serve an important role in tectonic geomorphology, both by echoing the temporal changes of driving climatic or tectonic forces, and by providing field settings to discriminate among different surface process models that behave similarly under steady-state conditions. Here we investigate the surface expression of a two-staged transient signal in the 300 km2 Big Tujunga river basin in the western San Gabriel Mountains using a combination of DEM analysis, detailed field surveys of stream channels, and a rich erosion rate dataset. The upper (earlier) transient in the Big Tujunga catchment has nearly propagated through the entire fluvial network, with only isolated patches of an elevated low-relief weathering surface remaining. The lower transient, however, is characterized by a dramatic inner gorge with over-steepened valley walls and fluvial hanging valleys. In both cases, an increase in the rate of local base-level fall resulted in the propagation of a wave of incision upstream through the landscape, with discrete knickpoints separating adjusting from relict portions of the landscape. We use a 10 m digital elevation model to extract channel long profiles and hillslope angles in order to determine knickpoint elevations. Concordance in knickpoint elevations allows the estimation of the timing of the onset of the transient using a relationship between channel steepness and erosion rate (derived from detrital cosmogenic 10Be concentrations) developed for the region. We find the age of the upper transient to be ca. 6 Ma, which corresponds to the initiation of uplift in the San Gabriel Mountains associated with the transfer of slip from the San Gabriel Fault to the current trace of the San Andreas Fault. The younger transient dates to ca. 2 Ma, which overlaps with estimates of activation of the San Jacinto Fault Zone, whose inception has been linked to increases in rock uplift rate in both the eastern San Gabriel Mountains and in the nearby San

  1. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 1999, Volume 3. San Jacinto River Basin, Brazos River Basin, San Bernard River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.; Jones, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 78 gaging stations; stage only at 7 gaging stations; stage and contents at 28 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 27 gaging stations; and data for 48 partial-record stations comprised of 19 flood-hydrograph, 8 low-flow, and 17 crest-stage, and 4 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  2. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 2000, Volume 3. San Jacinto River Basin, Brazos River Basin, San Bernard River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 84 gaging stations; stage only at 9 gaging stations; stage and contents at 32 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 25 gaging stations; and data for 43 partial-record stations comprised of 18 flood-hydrograph, 8 low-flow, 14 crest-stage, and 3 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  3. Water Resources Data, Texas Water Year 1998, Volume 2. San Jacinto River Basin, Brazos River Basin, San Bernard River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Barbie, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas are presented in four volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 2 contains records for water discharge at 74 gaging stations; stage only at 9 gaging stations; stage and contents at 21 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 32 gaging stations; and data for 73 partial-record stations comprised of 43 flood-hydrograph, 9 low-flow, and 16 crest-stage, and 5 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  4. Water resources data Texas, water year 2004, volume 3. San Jacinto River basin, Brazos River basin, San Bernard River basin, and intervening coastal basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Susan C. Aragon; Reece, Brian D.; Eames, Deanna R.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 92 gaging stations; stage only at 6 gaging stations; elevation at 27 lakes and reservoirs; content at 6 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality at 33 gaging stations. Also included are data for 33 partial-record stations comprised of 15 flood-hydrograph, 8 low-flow, and 10 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  5. Interseismic strain accumulation and the earthquake potential on the southern San Andreas fault system.

    PubMed

    Fialko, Yuri

    2006-06-22

    The San Andreas fault in California is a mature continental transform fault that accommodates a significant fraction of motion between the North American and Pacific plates. The two most recent great earthquakes on this fault ruptured its northern and central sections in 1906 and 1857, respectively. The southern section of the fault, however, has not produced a great earthquake in historic times (for at least 250 years). Assuming the average slip rate of a few centimetres per year, typical of the rest of the San Andreas fault, the minimum amount of slip deficit accrued on the southern section is of the order of 7-10 metres, comparable to the maximum co-seismic offset ever documented on the fault. Here I present high-resolution measurements of interseismic deformation across the southern San Andreas fault system using a well-populated catalogue of space-borne synthetic aperture radar data. The data reveal a nearly equal partitioning of deformation between the southern San Andreas and San Jacinto faults, with a pronounced asymmetry in strain accumulation with respect to the geologically mapped fault traces. The observed strain rates confirm that the southern section of the San Andreas fault may be approaching the end of the interseismic phase of the earthquake cycle. PMID:16791192

  6. Monooxygenase activity of black-crowned night-heron (BCNH) nestlings in Virginia, the Great Lakes and San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Custer, T.W.; Hothem, R.L.; King, K.A.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Spann, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate cytochrome P-450 related parameters as biomarkers of pollutant exposure, rates of arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), benzyloxyROD (BROD), pentoxyROD (PROD) and ethoxycoumarinOD (ECOD) were studied in 10-day-old BCNHs (Nycticorax nycticorax). Nestlings were collected from Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, VA ('controls') and from polluted sites including. Cat Island, Green Bay, WI, and Bair and West Marin Islands, San Francisco Bay, CA. Livers were frozen (-70.C) for monooxygenase assays and SDS-PAGE. Microsomal AHH and BROD activities were greater (P2 standard deviations from the control mean (induced up to 3-fold). EROD, PROD and ECOD did not differ among sites. Absence of an EROD response with AHH and BROD induction in BCNHs is different than responses in other species. The association of pollutant burdens with P-450 parameters is being studied. These biomarkers may serve as a rapid screen of exposure in a national contaminant biomonitoring program and other assessment activities.

  7. Monooxygenase activity and contaminant burdens of pipping heron embryos in Virginia, the Great Lakes and San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Custer, T.W.; Hothem, R.L.; King, K.A.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Spann, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Black-crowned night-heron (Nvcticorax nvcticorax) pipping embryos were studied from undisturbed (Chincoteague National Wildl ife Refuge, VA) and industrialized (Cat Island, Green Bay WI, and Bair and W. Marin Islands, San Francisco Bay, CA) locations. Hepatic aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) , ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, (EROD), benzyloxyROD (BROD), pentoxyROD (PROD) and ethoxycoumarinOD (ECOD) activities and burdens of organochlorines (embryo + yolk sac - liver) were quantified. AHH, BROD, ECOD and EROD were induced up to 100-fold (P<.O5) in embryos from Cat Island compared to the other sites. Greatest burdens of total PCBs and p,p?DDE were detected in Cat Island embryos. Monooxygenase activities (AHH, BROD, ECOD and EROD) and PCB concentrations were significantly correlated (r=O.50 to 0.72). These and other data indicate that monooxygenases may be rapid and inexpensive biomarkers of exposure to some PCB congeners. Current efforts include determination of PCB congeners and other contaminants in these embryos, additional characterization of the induced P-450 isozymes, and expanding the study to include heron embryos and nestlings at other estuaries.

  8. Screening Active Components from Yu-Ping-Feng-San for Regulating Initiative Key Factors in Allergic Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhijie; Yu, Xi; Liu, Hailiang; Wang, Huizhu; Fan, Hongwei; Wang, Dawei; Jiang, Guorong; Hong, Min

    2014-01-01

    Yu-ping-feng-san (YPFS) is a Chinese medical formula that is used clinically for allergic diseases and characterized by reducing allergy relapse. Our previous studies demonstrated that YPFS efficiently inhibited T helper 2 cytokines in allergic inflammation. The underlying mechanisms of action of YPFS and its effective components remain unclear. In this study, it was shown that YPFS significantly inhibited production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), an epithelial cell-derived initiative factor in allergic inflammation, in vitro and in vivo. A method of human bronchial epithelial cell (16HBE) binding combined with HPLC-MS (named 16HBE-HPLC-MS) was established to explore potential active components of YPFS. The following five components bound to 16HBE cells: calycosin-7-glucoside, ononin, claycosin, sec-o-glucosylhamaudol and formononetin. Serum from YPFS-treated mice was analyzed and three major components were detected claycosin, formononetin and cimifugin. Among these, claycosin and formononetin were detected by 16HBE-HPLC-MS and in the serum of YPFS-treated mice. Claycosin and formononetin decreased the level of TSLP markedly at the initial stage of allergic inflammation in vivo. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB, a key transcription factor in TSLP production, was also inhibited by claycosin and formononetin, either in terms of transcriptional activation or its nuclear translocation in vitro. Allergic inflammation was reduced by claycosin and formononetin when they are administered only at the initial stage in a murine model of atopic contact dermatitis. Thus, epithelial cell binding combined with HPLC-MS is a valid method for screening active components from complex mixtures of Chinese medicine. It was demonstrated that the compounds screened from YPFS significantly attenuated allergic inflammation probably by reducing TSLP production via regulating NF-κB activation. PMID:25198676

  9. SAN-RL: combining spreading activation networks and reinforcement learning to learn configurable behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J.; Gaines, D. M.; Wilkes, M.; Kusumalnukool, K.; Thongchai, S.; Kawamura, K.

    2001-01-01

    This approach provides the agent with a causal structure, the spreading activation network, relating goals to the actions that can achieve those goals. This enables the agent to select actions relative to the goal priorities.

  10. Southern San Andreas Fault evaluation field activity: approaches to measuring small geomorphic offsets--challenges and recommendations for active fault studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Salisbury, J. Barrett; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    In southern California, where fast slip rates and sparse vegetation contribute to crisp expression of faults and microtopography, field and high‐resolution topographic data (<1  m/pixel) increasingly are used to investigate the mark left by large earthquakes on the landscape (e.g., Zielke et al., 2010; Zielke et al., 2012; Salisbury, Rockwell, et al., 2012, Madden et al., 2013). These studies measure offset streams or other geomorphic features along a stretch of a fault, analyze the offset values for concentrations or trends along strike, and infer that the common magnitudes reflect successive surface‐rupturing earthquakes along that fault section. Wallace (1968) introduced the use of such offsets, and the challenges in interpreting their “unique complex history” with offsets on the Carrizo section of the San Andreas fault; these were more fully mapped by Sieh (1978) and followed by similar field studies along other faults (e.g., Lindvall et al., 1989; McGill and Sieh, 1991). Results from such compilations spurred the development of classic fault behavior models, notably the characteristic earthquake and slip‐patch models, and thus constitute an important component of the long‐standing contrast between magnitude–frequency models (Schwartz and Coppersmith, 1984; Sieh, 1996; Hecker et al., 2013). The proliferation of offset datasets has led earthquake geologists to examine the methods and approaches for measuring these offsets, uncertainties associated with measurement of such features, and quality ranking schemes (Arrowsmith and Rockwell, 2012; Salisbury, Arrowsmith, et al., 2012; Gold et al., 2013; Madden et al., 2013). In light of this, the Southern San Andreas Fault Evaluation (SoSAFE) project at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) organized a combined field activity and workshop (the “Fieldshop”) to measure offsets, compare techniques, and explore differences in interpretation. A thorough analysis of the measurements from the

  11. Somali Perspectives on Physical Activity: Photovoice to Address Barriers and Resources in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kate; Mohamed, Amina Sheik; Dawson, Darius B.; Syme, Maggie; Abdi, Sahra; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background Though many immigrants enter the U.S. with a healthy body weight, this health advantage disappears the longer they reside in the U.S. To better understand the complexities of obesity change within a cultural framework, a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, Photovoice, was utilized focusing on physical activity among Muslim Somali women. Objectives The CBPR partnership was formed to identify barriers and resources to engaging in physical activity with goals of advocacy and program development. Methods Muslim Somali women (n = 8) were recruited to participate, trained and provided cameras, and engaged in group discussions about the scenes they photographed. Results Participants identified several barriers, including safety concerns, minimal culturally appropriate resources, and financial constraints. Strengths included public resources and a community support system. The CBPR process identified opportunities and challenges to collaboration and dissemination processes. Conclusions The findings laid the framework for subsequent program development and community engagement. PMID:25981428

  12. Effect of Mining Activities in Biotic Communities of Villa de la Paz, San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Reyes, Guillermo; González-Mille, Donaji J.; Ilizaliturri-Hernández, César A.; Mejía-Saavedra, Jesús; Cilia-López, V. Gabriela; Costilla-Salazar, Rogelio; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Mining is one of the most important industrial activities worldwide. During its different stages numerous impacts are generated to the environment. The activities in the region have generated a great amount of mining residues, which have caused severe pollution and health effects in both human population and biotic components. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact of mining activities on biotic communities within the district of Villa de la Paz. The results showed that the concentrations of As and Pb in soil were higher than the national regulations for urban or agricultural areas. The bioavailability of these metals was certified by the presence of them in the roots of species of plants and in kidneys and livers of wild rodents. In regard to the community analysis, the sites that were located close to the mining district of Villa de la Paz registered a lower biological diversity, in both plants and wild rodents, aside from showing a change in the species composition of plant communities. The results of this study are evidence of the impact of mining on biotic communities, and the need to take into account the wildlife in the assessment of contaminated sites. PMID:24592381

  13. Cell-Based Screening Identifies the Active Ingredients from Traditional Chinese Medicine Formula Shixiao San as the Inhibitors of Atherosclerotic Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofan; Zhang, Ruowen; Gu, Liqiang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xu; Bi, Kaishun; Chen, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed a phenotypic screening in human endothelial cells exposed to oxidized low density lipoprotein (an in vitro model of atherosclerotic endothelial dysfunction) to identify the effective compounds in Shixiao San. After investigating the suitability and reliability of the cell-based screening method using atorvastatin as the positive control drug, this method was applied in screening Shixiao San and its extracts. The treatment of n-butanol fraction on endothelial cells exhibited stronger healing effects against oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced insult when compared with other fractions. Cell viability, the level of nitric oxide, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and endothelin-1 were measured, respectively. The assays revealed n-butanol fraction significantly elevated the survival ratio of impaired cells in culture. In parallel, n-butanol fraction exhibited the highest inhibition of inflammation. The generation of prostaglandin-2 and adhesion molecule (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1) was obviously declined. Furthermore, n-butanol fraction suppressed the production of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and restored the activity of superoxide dismutase. Compounds identification of the n-butanol fraction was carried out by ultra high liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The active ingredients including quercetin-3-O-(2G-α-l-rhamnosyl)-rutinoside, quercetin-3-O-neohesperidoside, isorhamnetin-3-O-neohesperidoside and isorhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside revealed the ability of anti-atherosclerosis after exposing on endothelial cells. The current work illustrated the pharmacology effect of Shixiao San and clearly indicated the major active components in Shixiao San. More importantly, the proposed cell-based screening method might be particularly suitable for fast evaluating the anti-atherosclerosis efficacy of Traditional Chinese Medicines and screening out the interesting

  14. Tracking on non-active collaborative objects from San Fernando Laser station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Manuel; Quijano, Manuel; Cortina, Luis M.; Pazos, Antonio A.; Martín-Davila, José

    2016-04-01

    The Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy (ROA) works on satellite geodesy from the early days of the space age, when the first artificial satellite tracking telescope was installed in 1958: the Baker-Nunn camera. In 1975 a French satellite Laser ranging (SLR) station was installed and operated at ROA . Since 1980, ROA has been operating this instrument which was upgraded to a third generation and it is still keep into a continuous update to reach the highest level of operability. Since then ROA has participated in different space geodesy campaigns through the International Laser Service Stations (ILRS) or its European regional organization (EUROLAS), tracking a number of artificial satellites types : ERS, ENVISAT, LAGEOS, TOPEX- POSEIDON to name but a few. Recently we opened a new field of research: space debris tracking, which is receiving increasing importance and attention from international space agencies. The main problem is the relatively low accuracy of common used methods. It is clear that improving the predicted orbit accuracy is necessary to fulfill our aims (avoiding unnecessary anti-collision maneuvers,..). Following results obtained by other colleagues (Austria, China, USA,...) we proposed to share our time-schedule using our satellite ranging station to obtain data which will make orbital elements predictions far more accurate (sub-meter accuracy), while we still keep our tracking routines over active satellites. In this communication we report the actions fulfill until nowadays.

  15. Growth patterns of a Miocene turbidite complex in an active-margin basin, Yowlumne Field, San Joaquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.S.; Melvin, J.D.; Kamerling, M.

    1996-12-31

    The upper Miocene Yowlumne sandstone was deposited as a lobate, northward-prograding turbidite complex, in eight or more stages, along the tectonically active southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, California. This prolific sandstone, which has produced most of the 100 MMBL of oil attributed to Yowlumne field, is one of several different, discontinuous reservoirs that make up the Stevens sandstone, a deep-marine clastic facies of the Miocene Monterey Formation. The Yowlumne reservoir is a lens-shaped, complex- layered sandstone body with evidence of channeling and erosion within the body. However, because seismic markers bounding this body are not truncated by it, and merge on the margins of the body, the reservoir does not incise underlying strata. Pressure data, 3D-seismic, and detailed well log correlations indicate lens-shaped, lobate sandstone layers within the Yowlumne reservoir that downlap to the north and are separated by thin shales. These layers represent separate permeability pathways that are in pressure communication over geologic time (thousands of years) but become weakly compartmentalized during rapid reservoir draw down (tens of years). Two layers form a left-stepping (westward), shingled complex that resulted from lateral shifting of turbidite depositional lobes. A second, younger, left-stepping complex of five layers is located basinward (northward) from the first and represents a basinward shift of deposition. A third, even younger complex may be located basinward from the second. Most likely, left-stepping geometries represent lobe switching influenced by Coriolis forces, and basinward-stepping geometries represent progradation controlled by accommodation.

  16. 1974 meeting in san antonio.

    PubMed

    Bowden, V

    1974-01-01

    San Antonio will be the site of the 1974 MLA Annual Meeting, and the program will emphasize expanding the role of health science libraries. Tours, as well as activities available in San Antonio, are described. The Convention Center itself, and the convention hotel, the Hilton Palacio del Rio, are mentioned, and other accommodations are listed. Social events are discussed, and the city's many interesting restaurants are noted. PMID:16017664

  17. Heterogeneous GPS Velocity Field and Active Faults in the Northern Puget Lowland and San Juan Island Region of Northwestern Washington: First Results From the Northwest Washington Geodetic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldow, J. S.; Apel, E. V.

    2002-12-01

    Velocities from a dense GPS network in the northern Puget lowland and San Juan Island region of northwestern Washington support geological and geophysical investigations and suggest active deformation on several throughgoing fault systems. The Northwest Washington Geodetic Network (NWGN) consists of 27 sites along an east-northeast transect stretching from the Pacific coast on the Olympic Peninsula to east of the northern Cascade Range. GPS sites within the network are concentrated along a broad north-south swath covering the San Juan Islands, northern Puget lowland, western Cascade foothills, and the eastern Olympic Peninsula. Baselines in the central part of the network range between 10 and 50 km and provide the site density needed to assess whether or not specific fault zones within the region are active. Twenty four sites of the NWGN were successfully reoccupied in 2001, five years after the initial network deployment in 1996. Of the original sites, two were destroyed and one site solution was contaminated by multipathing. Site occupations in 1995 ranged from 24 to 48 hours and in 2001 all sites were occupied for 48 hours. Although based on only two occupations, the NWGN velocities are consistent with those determined for the wide aperture Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array and give us a degree of confidence in the validity of the solutions. In a fixed North American reference frame, NWGN sites show a west to east decrease in velocity from near the Pacific coast where displacements of ~18 mm/yr directed to the northeast progressively decrease to essentially zero in the foothills east of the northern Cascade Range. In the northern Puget lowland and San Juan Island region, the regional velocity field is characterized by substantial spatial variability. When effects of the locked Cascadia megathrust are removed, differential motions of up to 5 mm/yr are recognized within the central NWGN. The velocity field is heterogeneous with significant variations in azimuth and

  18. The Rhizosphere Zone: A Hot Spot of Microbial Activity and Methylmercury Production in Saltmarsh Sediments of San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Marvin-Dipasquale, M.; Voytek, M.; Kirshtein, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Agee, J. L.; Cox, M.; Kakouros, E.; Collins, J. N.; Yee, D.

    2008-12-01

    Tidal marshes of varying hydrology and salinity have been shown to have high rates of microbial methylmercury (MeHg) production, especially the periodically flooded, higher elevations which are densely vegetated with shallowly rooted plants. The specific influence of emergent wetland plants and their active rhizosphere (root zone) on mercury (Hg) biogeochemistry, however, is poorly understood. Seasonal and spatial patterns of Hg biogeochemistry were examined in 2005 and 2006 at three marshes along a salinity gradient of the Petaluma River, in Northern San Francisco Bay, California. In addition, to directly examine the influence of rhizosphere activity on MeHg production, a suite of devegetation experiments was conducted in 2006 within each marsh using paired vegetated and devegetated plots in two marsh subhabitats: poorly- drained interior sites and well-drained "edge" sites near slough channels. Surface sediment (0-2cm) was sampled in both April and August from these plots, as well as from 1st and 3rd order slough channels that were naturally free of vegetation. Vegetated marsh sites produced 3- to19-fold more MeHg than did slough sites, and MeHg production rates were greater in marsh interior sites compared to more oxic marsh "edge" sites. Microbial biomass (ng DNA gdrysed) was greater in vegetated marsh settings, compared to slough channels, and increased significantly between April and August at all marsh sites. Despite this seasonal increase in microbial biomass, MeHg concentrations and production rates decreased from April to August in vegetated surface sediments. Microbial indicators of methylation also decreased from April to August, including rates of microbial sulfate reduction and the abundance of iron- and sulfate- reducing bacterial DNA. Results from the devegetated plots suggest that root exudation of fermentative labile carbon to surface soils is responsible for the higher microbial biomass, and the higher relative abundance of iron- and sulfate

  19. From Activism to Academics: The Evolution of American Indian Studies at San Francisco State, 1968-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Torre, Joely

    2001-01-01

    The founding of the American Indian Studies program at San Francisco State University took place against a backdrop of the Indian occupation of Alcatraz Island and the demands of Indian students for more relevant coursework. Today the program connects students to the urban Indian community through service learning projects and is committed to…

  20. Development and recent activity of the San Andrés landslide on El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeš, Jan; Yepes, Jorge; Becerril, Laura; Kusák, Michal; Galindo, Inés; Blahut, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Extremely voluminous landslides with a long run-out (also known as megalandslides) on oceanic volcanic islands are infrequent denudational processes on such islands. At the same time, they represent a major geological hazard that must be looked into to avoid negative consequences for the inhabitants of these islands. Their occurrence can be related to periods of intense seismo-volcanic activity, similar to that which occurred on El Hierro Island over 2011-2012. Landslides on volcanic islands are studied using onshore and offshore geological, geophysical and geomorphological records, considering their unique triggering conditions (e.g. lava intrusions, eruptive vents, magma chamber collapses). Previous work has pointed out similarities between specific cases of landslides on volcanic islands and deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (DSGSDs) which are typical in high mountain settings. Nevertheless, the methodological approaches and concepts used to investigate DSGSDs are not commonly applied on volcanic islands studies, even though their use may provide new information about the development stage, recent movements and future hazards. Therefore, this approach for studying the San Andrés landslide (SAL) on El Hierro (Canary Islands) has been developed applying a detailed morphological field mapping, an interpretation of digital elevation models, structural measurements, kinematic testing, and a precise movement monitoring system. The acquired information revealed a strong structural influence on the landslide morphology and the presence of sets of weakened planes acting as the sliding surfaces of the SAL or secondary landslides within its body. The presence of secondary landslides, deep erosive gullies, coastal cliffs and high on-shore relative relief also suggests a high susceptibility to future landslide movement. Direct monitoring on the landslide scarps and the slip plane, performed between February 2013 and July 2014, using an automated optical

  1. Development and use of a mathematical model of the San Bernardino Valley ground-water basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardt, William F.; Hutchinson, C.B.

    1980-01-01

    Part of the San Bernardino urbanized area in California overlies formerly swampy lands with a history of flowing wells. This area , upgradient from and adjacent to the San Jacinto fault, contains a zone in an alluvial ground-water basin that is under artesian pressure. Since 1945, withdrawals have exceeded recharge and caused head declines of more than 100 feet. Artificial recharge of imported water in the upgradient areas may cause ground-water levels to rise, which could cause abandoned but unplugged wells to resume flowing. If so, structures could be damaged. A two-layer Galerkin finite-element digital model was used for predicting the rate and extent of the rise in water levels from 1975 to 2000. Six hydrologic conditions were modeled for the basin. Artificial recharge of one-half entitlement and full entitlement from the California Aqueduct were each coupled with low, average, and high natural recharge to the basin. According to model predictions, the greatest water level rises will be along the San Bernardino front. This area encompasses the artificial recharge sites and also has a thick section of unsaturated sediments for storing ground water. The formerly swampy lands between Warm Creek and the Santa Ana River adjacent to the San Jacinto fault have little additional storage capacity, and water levels could rise to the land surface as early as 1983 under maximum recharge conditions and 1970-74 average pumping conditions. If pumping rates are reduced in the Warm Creek area, water levels may rise to land surface prior to the dates predicted by the model, regardless of the artificial-recharge program. (USGS)

  2. Continuity of the San Andreas Fault at San Gorgonio Pass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, S.; Suppe, J.

    2002-12-01

    The San Andreas fault at San Gorgonio Pass does not have a clear surface trace and is considered aseismic. Our findings suggest in fact that the existence of a through-going vertical or near-vertical San Andreas fault between Yucaipa and North Palm Springs is highly unlikely. We mapped over 70 faults in the San Gorgonio Pass-San Bernardino Mountains region using the catalog of 43,500 relocated 1975-1998 earthquakes of Richards-Dinger and Shearer (2000). A clustering algorithm was applied to the relocated earthquakes in order to obtain tighter earthquake clouds and thus better-defined fault surfaces. The earthquakes were then imported into Gocad, a 3D modeling software that allowed us to separate earthquakes into coplanar clusters associated with different faults and fault strands and to fit optimized surfaces to them. We also used the catalog of 13,000 focal mechanisms of Hauksson (2000) to confirm the nature of the mapped faults. We were able to constrain the 3D geometry of the San Andreas fault near San Gorgonio Pass from the 3D geometry of the fault network surrounding it. None of these faults show any displacement due to an hypothetical sub-vertical San Andreas. The San Andreas fault must therefore rotate to much shallower dips, or lose its continuity at depths between 3 and 15 km The most likely configuration is the one where the San Andreas fault merges into the shallow-dipping San Gorgonio Pass thrust W of North Palm Springs. Strike-slip motion is taken up by both the thrust (the slip vector on the N. Palm Springs segment is reverse/right-lateral strike-slip) and by a series of NW striking faults in the footwall of the thrust. The W termination of the most active part of the San Gorgonio Pass thrust coincides with one of these footwall faults at depth, and with the south bend in the San Andreas fault strand N of Banning. This boundary also marks a change in the stress field, with a dominant strike-slip regime to the E (and localized thrusting between San

  3. Informant consensus factor and antibacterial activity of the medicinal plants used by the people of San Rafael Coxcatlán, Puebla, México.

    PubMed

    Canales, M; Hernández, T; Caballero, J; Romo de Vivar, A; Avila, G; Duran, A; Lira, R

    2005-03-21

    Using ethnobotanical techniques, the medicinal flora used by the inhabitants of San Rafael Coxcatlán, Puebla was determined. During the field work, two types of interviews were applied (free listing and semi-structured) to 60 informants, who supplied consistent information concerning the use of 46 species of medicinal plants. Further analysis showed 13 categories of different medicinal use. An informant consensus factor was calculated and 16 species were selected due to their utilization in the treatment of diseases of possible bacterial origin. Of these 16 plants, sequential extractions were made with hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol. The obtained extracts were used to assess their antibacterial activity against 14 bacterial strains; 75% of the plants presented antibacterial activity. The medicinal species Jatropha neopauciflora Pax (Euphorbiaceae) and Juliania adstringens (Schldl.) Schldl. (Julianiaceae) were those that showed the biggest activity. Moreover, these species also had the highest informant consensus factor values. PMID:15740877

  4. Response of mating activity of the plainfin midshipman to inflow into San Francisco Bay from a summer storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    The plainfin midshipman (Porichthys notatus) is a small fish which nests in estuarine waters during summer months. The male makes a loud continuous droning call to attract females to a nest, where eggs and newborn young are guarded by the male. Midshipman calls have been recorded continuously with a fixed hydrophone near a pier in San Francisco Bay, over two successive mating seasons. A dramatic increase in calling followed a very unusual intense rainstorm in mid-October 2009. This suggests a response to biochemical stimuli from the runoff water. Further study may make it possible to isolate the contaminants producing this alteration of sexual behavior.

  5. Emplacement, offset history, and recent uplift of basement within the San Andreas Fault System, northeast San Gabriel Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Miles Douglas

    1999-11-01

    Mapping, petrography, cross-sections, structure contours, earthquake locations, and focal mechanism analogues of summed moment tensors have provided insights into the reconstruction and deformation associated with the San Andreas Fault System in the San Gabriel and Western San Bernardino Mountains (WSBM) of the Central Transverse Ranges. The San Gabriel Mountains (SGM) represent a Quaternary 'arch' that extends across the northwest trending San Andreas Fault (SAF). Mechanisms to explain the relatively large magnitudes of uplift on both sides of this relatively straight strike slip fault have been problematical. The uplift results from the interactions between the right lateral San Jacinto Fault (SJF) and SAF, and the thrust Cucamonga-Sierra Madre Faults (CF-SMF). Uplift south of the SAF occurs as the SGM Block propagates through the restraining bend at the intersection of the SJF and SAF at the surface, which has produced an antiform in the topography of the range and in the Vincent Thrust. Uplift is also due to motion on the CF-SMF. Uplift north of the SAF is attributed to an upper-crustal north-dipping subsurface restraining bend in the SAF due to the projected intersection of the CF-SMF and SJF, with the SAF. Northwest migration of the restraining bend in the Quaternary has produced a ˜1.5 km high, northeast dipping monocline in crystalline basement which is adjacent and parallel to the SAF. Reverse faults and deformation of alluvial terraces document a northwest migrating locus of compression and uplift. Toward the southeast, the subsurface restraining bend becomes a subsurface lateral ramp where the SJF intersects the SAF at depth. Crystalline basement of the Holcomb Ridge-Table Mountain 'slice' consists of a syntectonically emplaced, intercalated, north-dipping, igneous and metamorphic suite. Cretaceous igneous rocks were emplaced as tabular bodies, which now strike eastwest, and are concordant with a relatively older metasedimentary screen and para

  6. Fragmented Landscapes in the San Gorgonio Pass Region: Insights into Quaternary Strain History of the Southern San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, K. J.; Matti, J. C.; Landis, G. P.; Alvarez, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    The San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) region is a zone of structural complexity within the southern San Andreas Fault system that is characterized by (1) multiple strands of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), (2) intense and diverse microseismicity, (3) contraction within the SGP fault zone (SGPfz), and (4) complex and diverse landforms - all a consequence of structural complications in the vicinity of the southeastern San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). Multiple strands of the SAF zone in the SGP region partition the landscape into discrete geomorphic/geologic domains, including: San Gorgonio Mountain (SGM), Yucaipa Ridge (YR), Kitching Peak (KP), Pisgah Peak (PP), and Coachella Valley (CV) domains. The morphology of each domain reflects the tectonic history unique to that region. Development of the SGP knot in the Mission Creek strand of the SAF (SAFmi) led to westward deflection of the SAFmi, juxtaposition of the KP, PP, and SGM domains, initiation of uplift of YR domain along thrust faults in headwaters of San Gorgonio River, and development of the San Jacinto Fault. Slip on the SAF diminished as a result, thereby allowing integrated drainage systems to develop in the greater SGP region. San Gorgonio River, Whitewater River, and Mission Creek are discrete drainages that transport sediment across the SGM, YR, PP, KP, and CV domains into alluvial systems peripheral to the SGP region. There, depositional units (San Timoteo Formation, upper member, deformed gravels of Whitewater River) all contain clasts of SBM-type and San Gabriel Mountain-type basement, thus constraining slip on the SAF in the SGP region. Middle and late Pleistocene slip on the Mill Creek strand of the SAF (SAFm) in the SGP region has attempted to bypass the SGP knot, and has disrupted landscapes established during SAFmi quiescence. Restoration of right-slip on the SAFm is key to deciphering landscape history. Matti and others (1985, 1992) proposed that a bi-lobed alluvial deposit in the Raywood Flats area has been

  7. Treatment of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) effluent by an activated sludge system: the role of sulphide and thiosulphate in the process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramírez, J E; Seco, A; Ferrer, J; Bouzas, A; García-Usach, F

    2015-01-01

    This work studies the use of a well-known and spread activated sludge system (UCT configuration) to treat the effluent of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) treating domestic wastewater. Ammonia, phosphate, dissolved methane and sulphide concentrations in the SAnMBR effluent were around 55 mg NH4-N L(-1), 7 mg PO4-P L(-1), 30 mg non-methane biodegradable COD L(-1), and 105 mg S(2-) L(-1) respectively. The results showed a nitrification inhibition caused by the presence of sulphur compounds at any of the solids retention time (SRT) studied (15, 20 and 25 days). This inhibition could be overcome increasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 13 to 26 h. Among the sulphur compounds, sulphide was identified as the substance which caused the nitrification inhibition. When the nitrification was well established, removal rates of nitrogen and phosphorus of 56% and 45% were reached respectively. The sulphide present in the influent was completely oxidised to sulphate, contributing this oxidation to the denitrification process. Moreover, the presence of methanotrophic bacteria, detected by FISH technique, could also contribute to the denitrification. PMID:25239686

  8. Wastewater and Saltwater: Studying the Biogeochemistry and Microbial Activity Associated with Wastewater Inputs to San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challenor, T.; Menendez, A. D.; Damashek, J.; Francis, C. A.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrification is the process of converting ammonium (NH­­4+) into nitrate (NO3-), and is a crucial step in removing nitrogen (N) from aquatic ecosystems. This process is governed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) that utilize the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA). Studying the rates of nitrification and the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in south San Francisco Bay's Artesian Slough, which receives treated effluent from the massive San Jose-Santa Clara Regional Wastewater Facility, are important for understanding the cycling of nutrients in this small but complex estuary. Wastewater inputs can have negative environmental impacts, such as the release of nitrous oxide, a byproduct of nitrification and a powerful greenhouse gas. Nutrient inputs can also increase productivity and sometimes lead to oxygen depletion. Assessing the relative abundance and diversity of AOA and AOB, along with measuring nitrification rates gives vital information about the biology and biogeochemistry of this important N-cycling process. To calculate nitrification rates, water samples were spiked with 15N-labeled ammonium and incubated in triplicate for 24 hours. Four time-points were extracted across the incubation and the "denitrifier" method was used to measure the isotopic ratio of nitrate in the samples over time. In order to determine relative ratios of AOB to AOA, DNA was extracted from water samples and used in clade-specific amoA PCR assays. Nitrification rates were detectable in all locations sampled and were higher than in other regions of the bay, as were concentrations of nitrate and ammonium. Rates were highest in the regions of Artesian Slough most directly affected by wastewater effluent. AOB vastly outnumbered AOA, which is consistent with other studies showing that AOB prefer high nutrient environments. AOB diversity includes clades of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas prevalent in estuarine settings. Many of the sequenced genes are related

  9. 78 FR 53243 - Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego... Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The limits of the safety...

  10. Radon emanation on San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.

    1978-01-01

    Subsurface radon emanation monitored in shallow dry holes along an active segment of the San Andreas fault in central California shows spatially coherent large temporal variations that seem to be correlated with local seismicity. ??1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Caribbean affinities of mafic crust from northern Colombia: preliminary geochemical results from basaltic rocks of the Sinu-San Jacinto belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, C.; Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Weber, M.; Guzman, G.; Montes, C.; Ibañez, M.; Lara, M.; Toro, M.

    2009-12-01

    The petrotectonic characterization of accreted mafic remnants within the northern Andes and the Caribbean yield major insights on the growth and evolution of oceanic plates, as well as in the identification of the role of terrane accretion within the northern Andes orogeny. Within the northern termination of the Andes, in northern Colombia, several exposures of mafic and ultramafic rocks have been identified. However, extensive sedimentary cover and difficulties in field access have left the petogenetic analysis and tectonic implications of this rocks scarcely studied. Preliminary geochemical constrains from volcanic rocks obtained in outcrops and as clasts from a Paleocene-Eocene conglomerate indicate that the mafic rocks are mainly andesitic in composition, with well defined enrichment in Th and Ce and depletion in Nb and flat to weakly enriched LREE. These features suggest a relatively immature intra-oceanic volcanic arc setting for the formation of these rocks. Hornblende-dioritic dikes in peridotites also attest to the role of water in the magmatic evolution, and the affinity to a subduction related setting. The tectonic implications of this arc remnants and the relation between these rocks and other oceanic domains in the northern Andes suggest that the compositional and tectonic setting on the different accreted margins of the Caribbean plate are heterogeneous.

  12. A specialized boundary element algorithm developed to calculate the state of stress in the Anza Gap, San Jacinto Fault Zone, Southern, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Aster, R.; Flores, R.; Fehler, M.

    1995-06-01

    The widely-used algorithm of Crouch and Starfield is unstable when used to solve our mixed boundary equation problem of interest. Altering the boundary conditions and correspondingly rearranging the system of equations to utilize double-sided boundary elements overcomes this drawback. The new algorithm described here is more physically realistic as in that it allows for rotation of the fault segments in the strain field resulting from satisfying the fault static shear strength condition. Preliminary test results indicate that a fault trifurcation gap model may describe the non-strike slip components to some of the seismicity.

  13. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

    1981-08-01

    Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

  14. Gene expression and enzyme activity of lipoprotein lipase correlate with intramuscular fat content in Guangxi san-huang and Arbor Acres chickens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y N; Wang, J; Chen, B J; Jiang, Q Y; Guo, Y F; Lan, G Q; Jiang, H S

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key enzyme in lipid metabolism. This study investigated LPL gene expression, LPL enzyme activity, and the correlation of each with intramuscular fat (IMF) in Chinese Guangxi san-huang (GXSH) and Arbor Acres (AA) chickens. The results showed that age and breed had significant effects on LPL expression and enzyme activity. Correlation analyses showed significant positive correlations between LPL expression levels and IMF contents in the breast and thigh tissues of both GXSH (r = 0.712, P = 0.001; r = 0.792, P < 0.001, respectively) and AA (r = 0.644, P < 0.001; r = 0.545, P < 0.001, respectively) chickens. The results also indicated a significant positive correlation between LPL enzyme activity and IMF contents in the breast and thigh tissues of both GXSH (r = 0.615, P = 0.001; r = 0.685, P < 0.001, respectively) and AA (r = 0.600, P = 0.001; r = 0.528, P = 0.003, respectively) chickens. The results indicated that the LPL gene was significantly correlated with IMF in these two breeds. The results presented here could contribute to knowledge of LPL mRNA developmental expression patterns and enzyme activity, and it could facilitate further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying IMF deposition in chickens. PMID:27323106

  15. Cocktail of Four Active Components Derived from Sheng Mai San Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced PC12 Cell Apoptosis Linked with the Caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC Pathway.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Huana; Song, Yunfei; Cao, Zhengyu; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2015-12-01

    SMXZF, a combination of four active components including ginsenoside Rb1, ginsenoside Rg1, schizandrin, and DT-13 (6:9:5:4) that is derived from Sheng Mai San, has previously been shown to exhibit a neuroprotective effect against focal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Due to the key role of oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis in the pathogenesis of stroke, we examined the effect of SMXZF in oxidative stress responses and related signaling pathways in differentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Our results showed that incubation with 100 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for 12 hr could reduce cell viability and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity with an increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In contrast, SMXZF alleviated oxidative stress by reducing the over-production of ROS and MDA in parallel to concentration dependently increasing SOD activity. In addition, SMXZF significantly attenuated H2O2-induced caspase-3 cleavage, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase-1 (ROCK1) activation, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation. Inhibiting either caspase-3 or ROCK1 mimicked the effect. Consequently, our results suggest that SMXZF inhibits H2O2-induced neuronal apoptosis linked with the caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC pathway, which has also been confirmed to be a positive feedback loop in oxidative stress-injured PC12 cells. These findings support the pharmacological potential of SMXZF for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. PMID:26058543

  16. Exploring the shallow structure of the San Ramón thrust fault in Santiago, Chile (~33.5° S), using active seismic and electric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, D.; Maksymowicz, A.; Vargas, G.; Vera, E.; Contreras-Reyes, E.; Rebolledo, S.

    2014-08-01

    The crustal-scale west-vergent San Ramón thrust fault system, which lies at the foot of the main Andean Cordillera in central Chile, is a geologically active structure with manifestations of late Quaternary complex surface rupture on fault segments along the eastern border of the city of Santiago. From the comparison of geophysical and geological observations, we assessed the subsurface structural pattern that affects the sedimentary cover and rock-substratum topography across fault scarps, which is critical for evaluating structural models and associated seismic hazard along the related faults. We performed seismic profiles with an average length of 250 m, using an array of 24 geophones (Geode), with 25 shots per profile, to produce high-resolution seismic tomography to aid in interpreting impedance changes associated with the deformed sedimentary cover. The recorded travel-time refractions and reflections were jointly inverted by using a 2-D tomographic approach, which resulted in variations across the scarp axis in both the velocities and the reflections that are interpreted as the sedimentary cover-rock substratum topography. Seismic anisotropy observed from tomographic profiles is consistent with sediment deformation triggered by west-vergent thrust tectonics along the fault. Electrical soundings crossing two fault scarps were used to construct subsurface resistivity tomographic profiles, which reveal systematic differences between lower resistivity values in the hanging wall with respect to the footwall of the geological structure, and clearly show well-defined east-dipping resistivity boundaries. These boundaries can be interpreted in terms of structurally driven fluid content change between the hanging wall and the footwall of the San Ramón fault. The overall results are consistent with a west-vergent thrust structure dipping ~55° E in the subsurface beneath the piedmont sediments, with local complexities likely associated with variations in fault

  17. Exploring the shallow structure of the San Ramón thrust fault in Santiago, Chile (∼33.5° S), using active seismic and electric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, D.; Maksymowicz, A.; Vargas, G.; Vera, E.; Contreras-Reyes, E.; Rebolledo, S.

    2014-01-01

    The crustal-scale west-vergent San Ramón thrust fault system at the foot of the main Andean Cordillera in central Chile is a geologically active structure with Quaternary manifestations of complex surface rupture along fault segments in the eastern border of Santiago city. From the comparison of geophysical and geological observations, we assessed the subsurface structure pattern affecting sedimentary cover and rock-substratum topography across fault scarps, which is critic for evaluating structural modeling and associated seismic hazard along this kind of faults. We performed seismic profiles with an average length of 250 m, using an array of twenty-four geophones (GEODE), and 25 shots per profile, supporting high-resolution seismic tomography for interpreting impedance changes associated to deformed sedimentary cover. The recorded traveltime refractions and reflections were jointly inverted by using a 2-D tomographic approach, which resulted in variations across the scarp axis in both velocities and reflections interpreted as the sedimentary cover-rock substratum topography. Seismic anisotropy observed from tomographic profiles is consistent with sediment deformation triggered by west-vergent thrust tectonics along the fault. Electrical soundings crossing two fault scarps supported subsurface resistivity tomographic profiles, which revealed systematic differences between lower resistivity values in the hanging wall with respect to the footwall of the geological structure, clearly limited by well-defined east-dipping resistivity boundaries. The latter can be interpreted in terms of structurally driven fluid content-change between the hanging wall and the footwall of a permeability boundary associated with the San Ramón fault. The overall results are consistent with a west-vergent thrust structure dipping ∼55° E at subsurface levels in piedmont sediments, with local complexities being probably associated to fault surface rupture propagation, fault-splay and

  18. Focal mechanisms and the state of stress on the San Andreas Fault in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lucile M.

    1988-08-01

    strikes of the San Jacinto and San Andreas faults. The strong correlation between present state of stress and segmentation in previous earthquakes suggests that the stress state is important in controlling rupture propagation.

  19. Gender differences in sexual and injection risk behavior among active young injection drug users in San Francisco (the UFO Study).

    PubMed

    Evans, Jennifer L; Hahn, Judith A; Page-Shafer, Kimberly; Lum, Paula J; Stein, Ellen S; Davidson, Peter J; Moss, Andrew R

    2003-03-01

    Female injection drug users (IDUs) represent a large proportion of persons infected with HIV in the United States, and women who inject drugs have a high incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Therefore, it is important to understand the role of gender in injection risk behavior and the transmission of blood-borne virus. In 2000-2002, 844 young (<30 years old) IDUs were surveyed in San Francisco. We compared self-reported risk behavior between 584 males and 260 female participants from cross-sectional baseline data. We used logistic regression to determine whether demographic, structural, and relationship variables explained increased needle borrowing, drug preparation equipment sharing, and being injected by another IDU among females compared to males. Females were significantly younger than males and were more likely to engage in needle borrowing, ancillary equipment sharing, and being injected by someone else. Females were more likely than males to report recent sexual intercourse and to have IDU sex partners. Females and males were not different with respect to education, race/ethnicity, or housing status. In logistic regression models for borrowing a used needle and sharing drug preparation equipment, increased risk in females was explained by having an injection partner who was also a sexual partner. Injecting risk was greater in the young female compared to male IDUs despite equivalent frequency of injecting. Overlapping sexual and injection partnerships were a key factor in explaining increased injection risk in females. Females were more likely to be injected by another IDU even after adjusting for years injecting, being in a relationship with another IDU, and other potential confounders. Interventions to reduce sexual and injection practices that put women at risk of contracting hepatitis and HIV are needed. PMID:12612103

  20. 29. Photocopy of photograph (from San Francisco Chronicle Library, San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of photograph (from San Francisco Chronicle Library, San Francisco, California, c. 1930 (?) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW OF CONVENTO, FRONT VIEW, AFTER RESTORATION - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  1. 40. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Chronicle Collection San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Chronicle Collection San Francisco, California March 24, 1924 VIEW OF HIGH ALTAR - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  2. Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Activity of Pseudopterosins and seco-Pseudopterosins Isolated from the Octocoral Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae of San Andrés and Providencia Islands (Southwest Caribbean Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Hebelin; Aristizabal, Fabio; Duque, Carmenza; Kerr, Russell

    2011-01-01

    To expand the potential of pseudopterosins and seco-pseudopterosins isolated from the octocoral Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae of San Andrés and Providencia islands (southwest Caribbean Sea), we report the anti-microbial profile against four pathogenic microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans) and report a more complete cytotoxic profile against five human cells lines (HeLa, PC-3, HCT116, MCF-7 and BJ) for the compounds PsG, PsP, PsQ, PsS, PsT, PsU, 3-O-acetyl-PsU, seco-PsJ, seco-PsK and IMNGD. For the cytotoxic profiles, all compounds evaluated showed moderate and non-selective activity against both tumor and normal cell lines, where PsQ and PsG were the most active compounds (GI50 values between 5.8 μM to 12.0 μM). With respect to their anti-microbial activity the compounds showed good and selective activity against the Gram-positive bacteria, while they did not show activity against the Gram-negative bacterium or yeast. PsU, PsQ, PsS, seco-PsK and PsG were the most active compounds (IC50 2.9–4.5 μM) against S. aureus and PsG, PsU and seco-PsK showed good activity (IC50 3.1–3.8 μM) against E. faecalis, comparable to the reference drug vancomycin (4.2 μM). PMID:21556163

  3. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

  4. Chemistry and isotopic composition of ground water along a section near the Newmark area, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Danskin, Wesley R.; Mendez, Gregory O.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic analyses and flow-meter measurements in pumped wells were used to determine the source, movement, and age of ground water along a section of the valley-fill aquifer from the San Jacinto Fault to the base of the San Bernardino Mountains near the Newmark area in the Bunker Hill Basin of southern California. Water samples were collected from four multiple-depth well sites, from different depths within three production wells, and from two nearby streams; these samples were analyzed for major ions, selected trace elements, stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen (delta oxygen-18 and delta deuterium), tritium, and carbon-14. Within the production wells, variations in vertical flowrate with depth were recorded during pumped conditions using a standard spinner tool. Where saturated, the upper 200 feet of unconsolidated deposits contributed as much as 60 percent of the well discharge; deposits at depths greater than 700 feet contributed less than 10 percent. Chemical analyses indicate that three general zones of ground-water quality are present along a north-south section--an oxygenated zone near the base of the San Bernardino Mountains, an oxygen-depleted zone near the San Jacinto Fault, and a deeper zone characterized by concentrations of fluoride greater than 1 mg/L and by a general water-quality composition similar to that of base flow in East Twin Creek. The presence of tritium in water from wells along the section indicates that post-1952 recharge has moved rapidly through the valley-fill aquifer to depths as great as 800 feet. Carbon-14 data indicate that the maximum age of ground water, sampled at depths ranging from 600 to 1,000 feet, is less than 5,000 years before present. Ground water along the study section is much younger than ground water from similar depths in other nearby basins. Delta oxygen-18 and delta deuterium data indicate that as much as 25 percent of the discharge from some wells near the base of the San Bernardino Mountains is

  5. 77 FR 63290 - Foreign-Trade Zone 61-San Juan, Puerto Rico; Authorization of Production Activity, Pfizer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... comment (77 FR 36997, 6/20/2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the activity is... Activity, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Subzone 61A), (Ibuprofen Pharmaceutical Products), Guayama, Puerto... notification of proposed production activity on behalf of Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Subzone 61A) for...

  6. Activated carbon amendment as a treatment for residual DDT in sediment from a superfund site in San Francisco Bay, Richmond, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Jeanne E; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2007-10-01

    Pesticide formulators formerly operating at Lauritzen Channel, a portion of San Francisco Bay near Richmond (CA, USA), caused contamination of sediment with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The present study evaluated the distribution of residual DDT in channel sediment six years following extensive remedial dredging. High DDT concentrations (up to 252 mg/ kg) were found in Young Bay Mud sampled across the channel. Particle analyses showed most of the contamination is contained in the clay/silt sediment fraction, and desorption tests showed that availability is greater for DDT metabolites than parent DDT. The present study examined the feasibility of using activated carbon amendment to sequester DDT from sediment, including an evaluation of reactivated carbon as a less costly alternative to virgin activated carbons. Treatment success of activated carbon amendment to sediment collected from Lauritzen Channel was measured by reductions in aqueous equilibrium concentrations and uptake in semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). Four different activated carbons were tested and, after one month of treatment with 3.2 weight % carbon, DDT aqueous equilibrium concentrations were reduced up to 83% and SPMD uptake was reduced up to 91%. Reactivated carbon was comparable with virgin carbons in all tests. Reduction in SPMD uptake of DDT by treatment with 3.2% reactivated carbon increased to 99% after 26 months of treatment. The effectiveness of activated carbon was dependent on the type, size, dose, and contact time. The results show the potential usefulness of activated carbon amendment as a follow-up remedial technology for management of residuals after dredging contaminated sediment. PMID:17867891

  7. Anti‑inflammatory and antioxidant activity of the traditional herbal formula Gwakhyangjeonggi‑san via enhancement of heme oxygenase‑1 expression in RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Kim, Ohn-Soon; Yoo, Sae-Rom; Seo, Chang-Seob; Kim, Yeji; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2016-05-01

    Gwakhyangjeonggi‑san (GHJGS) is a mixture of herbal plants, including Agastache rugosa, Perilla frutescens, Angelica dahurica, Areca catechu, Poria cocos, Magnolia officinalis, Atractylodes macrocephala, Citrus reticulata, Pinellia ternata, Platycodon grandiflorum, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Ziziphus jujuba and Zingiber officinale. GHJGS has been used for treating diarrhea‑predominant irritable bowel syndrome in traditional Korean medicine. In the present study, the anti‑inflammatory and antioxidant effects of GHJGS were investigated using the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. GHJGS significantly reduced production of the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor‑α, interleukin‑6 and prostaglandin E2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑stimulated macrophages. GHJGS markedly suppressed LPS‑induced phosphorylation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases, whereas it had no effect on nuclear factor‑κB activation. Furthermore, GHJGS enhanced expression of heme oxygenase‑1 and prevented the generation of reactive oxygen species in RAW 264.7 cells. These results indicate that GHJGS is a viable therapeutic agent against inflammation and oxidative stress‑associated disorders. PMID:27052497

  8. California: San Joaquin Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley   ... is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected ... as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, ...

  9. 77 FR 36997 - Foreign-Trade Zone 61-San Juan, PR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Pfizer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... 617, 12/11/ 1992, 57 FR 61046, 12/23/1992). On June 8, 2012, a minor boundary modification under 15... Activity; Pfizer Pharmaceuticals LLC (Subzone 61A); (Ibuprofen Pharmaceutical Products); Guayama, PR The... activity on behalf of Pfizer Pharmaceuticals LLC (Pfizer) (Subzone 61A) for its manufacturing...

  10. Fault depth and seismic moment rate estimates of the San Andreas Fault System: Observations from seismology and geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Konter, B. R.; Sandwell, D. T.; Shearer, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    The depth of the seismogenic zone is a critical parameter for earthquake hazard models of the San Andreas Fault System. Independent observations from both seismology and geodesy can provide insight into the depths of faulting, however these depths do not always agree. Here we inspect variations in fault depths of 12 segments of the southern San Andreas Fault System derived from over 1000 GPS velocities and 66,000 relocated earthquake hypocenters. Geodetically-determined locking depths range from 6-22 km, while seismogenic thicknesses are largely limited to depths of 11-20 km. Seismogenic depths best match the geodetic locking depths when estimated at the 95% cutoff depth in seismicity and most fault segment depths agree to within 2 km. However, we identify 3 outliers (Imperial, Coyote Creek, and Borrego segments) with significant discrepancies. In these cases the geodetically-inferred locking depths are much shallower than the seismogenic depths. We also inspect seismic moment accumulation rates per unit fault length, with the highest rates estimated for the Mojave and Carrizo segments (~1.8 x 1013 Nm/yr/km) and the lowest rates (~0.2 x 1013 Nm/yr/km) found along several San Jacinto segments. The largest variation in seismic moment is calculated for the Imperial segment, where the moment rate from seismic depths is nearly a factor of 2.5 larger than that from geodetic depths. Such variability has important implications for the accuracy to which the magnitude of future major earthquakes can be estimated.

  11. A Community Stormwater Investigation, San Francisco, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chio, J.; Garcia, E.; Hernandez, M.; Devine, M.; Isip, N.; Jiang, J.; Li, A.; Li, D.; Lopez, J.; Mark, J.; McGuire, S.; Navarro, K.; Negrete, R.; Orellana, S.; Yun, C.; Bissell, M.; Neiss, J.

    2008-12-01

    The San Francisco Bay watershed covers 40% of the State of California. Nonpoint source pollutants from cars, lawns, houses, parks and people residing within the watershed contribute contamination into San Francisco Bay. To measure the contribution from our neighborhoods we collected runoff from storm-drains at 10 different sites around San Francisco and tested them for heavy metals, Total Organic Carbons (TOC), and Methylene Blue Active Substances (MBAS) during a six-month period. Each sample site location is situated within one block of each participant's home. The goal of this study was to determine the contaminants contributed as nonpoint source pollution into San Francisco Bay. Our results show that a variety of contaminants are entering the Bay's ecosystem via sources in our residential settings. While this contribution may be thought of as unsubstantial, our results show that our neighborhoods are significant sources of watershed pollution.

  12. San Andres Rift, Nicaraguan Shelf: A 346-Km-Long, North-South Rift Zone Actively Extending the Interior of the "Stable" Caribbean Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, L. C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The San Andres rift (SAR) is an active, 015°-trending, bathymetric and structural rift basin that extends for 346 km across the Nicaraguan platform and varies in bathymetric width from 11-27 km and in water depth from 1,250 to 2,500 m. We used four 2D regional seismic lines tied to two offshore, industry wells located west of the SAR on the Nicaraguan platform to map normal faults, transfer faults, and possibly volcanic features with the rift. The Colombian islands of San Andres (26 km2) and Providencia (17 km2) are footwall uplifts along west-dipping, normal fault bounding the eastern margin of the rift. Mapping indicates the pre-rift section is Late Cretaceous to Oligocene in age and that the onset of rifting began in the early to middle Miocene as shown by wedging of the Miocene and younger sedimentary fill controlled by north-south-striking normal faults. Structural restorations at two locations across the rift shows that the basin opened mainly by dip-slip fault motions producing a total, east-west extension of 18 km in the north and 15 km in the south. Structural restoration shows the rift formed on a 37-km-wide, elongate basement high - possibly of late Cretaceous, volcanic origin and related to the Caribbean large igneous province. Previous workers have noted that the SAR is associated with province of Pliocene to Quaternary seamounts and volcanoes which range from non-alkaline to mildly alkaline, including volcanic rocks on Providencia described as andesites and rhyolites. The SAR forms one of the few recognizable belts of recorded seismicity within the Caribbean plate. The origin of the SAR is related to Miocene and younger left-lateral displacement along the Pedro Banks fault to the north and the southwestern Hess fault to the south. We propose that the amount of left-lateral displacement that created the rift is equivalent to the amount of extension that formed it: 18-20 km.

  13. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2016-05-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to ~450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  14. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: Observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Mühle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-02-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (Cre; ∼30 fmol kg-1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1-9 times Cre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10-980 times Cre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20-100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3- 1) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼ 7.5 ×104km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019- 3.2) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial-interglacial transitions.

  15. Effects of Bofu-Tsusho-San on Diabetes and Hyperlipidemia Associated with AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Glucose Transporter 4 in High-Fat-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect and mechanism of Bofu-tsusho-san formula (BO) on hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia and in mice fed with a high-fat (HF) diet. The C57BL/6J mice were received control/HF diet for 12 weeks, and oral administration of BO (at three doses) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or vehicle for the last 4 weeks. Blood, skeletal muscle and tissues were examined by means of measuring glycaemia and dyslipidaemia-associated events. BO treatment effectively prevented HF diet-induced increases in the levels of triglyceride (TG), free fatty acid (FFA) and leptin (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively). BO treatment exhibited reduced both visceral fat mass and hepatic triacylglycerol content; moreover, BO treatment displayed significantly decreased both the average area of the cut of adipocytes and ballooning of hepatocytes. BO treatment exerted increased the protein contents of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscle, and caused lowered blood glucose levels. BO treatment displayed increased levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both skeletal muscle and liver tissue. Furthermore, BO reduced the hepatic expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose production. Therefore, it is possible that the activation of AMPK by BO leads to diminished gluconeogenesis in liver tissue. BO increased hepatic expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), whereas down-regulating decreasing expressions of fatty acid synthesis, including sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), resulting in a decrease in circulating triglycerides. This study originally provides the evidence that amelioration of dyslipidemic and diabetic state by BO in HF-fed mice occurred by regulation of GLUT4, SREBP1c, FAS, PPARα, adiponectin and AMPK phosphorylation. PMID:25375187

  16. SNAC: San Mateo Nutrition Activity Curriculum. "Swing Into Nutrition" (Staff In-Service Guide and Staff Workbook).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo City Elementary School District, CA.

    This inservice training guide on nutrition activities for preschool and elementary school teachers consists of 14 lesson plans for two workshops and more than 20 related instructional handouts that can be copied for teachers. The first workshop for teachers provides a rationale for nutrition education ine elementary curriculum as well as…

  17. Long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault, from 10Be-26Al surface exposure dating of an offset alluvial fan

    SciTech Connect

    der Woerd, J v; Klinger, Y; Sieh, K; Tapponnier, P; Ryerson, F; M?riaux, A

    2006-01-13

    We determine the long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault in the southeastern Indio Hills using {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al isotopes to date an offset alluvial fan surface. Field mapping complemented with topographic data, air photos and satellite images allow to precisely determine piercing points across the fault zone that are used to measure an offset of 565 {+-} 80 m. A total of twenty-six quartz-rich cobbles from three different fan surfaces were collected and dated. The tight cluster of nuclide concentrations from 19 samples out of 20 from the offset fan surface implies a simple exposure history, negligible prior exposure and erosion, and yield an age of 35.5 {+-} 2.5 ka. The long-term slip rate of the San Andreas Fault south of Biskra Palms is thus 15.9 {+-} 3.4 mm/yr. This rate is about 10 mm/yr slower than geological (0-14 ka) and short-term geodetic estimates for this part of the San Andreas Fault implying changes in slip rate or in faulting behavior. This result puts new constraints on the slip rate of the San Jacinto and on the Eastern California Shear Zone for the last 35 ka. Our study shows that more sites along the major faults of southern California need to be targeted to better constrain the slip-rates over different time scales.

  18. Essential oil of Azorella cryptantha collected in two different locations from San Juan Province, Argentina: chemical variability and anti-insect and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    López, Sandra; Lima, Beatriz; Aragón, Liliana; Espinar, Luis Ariza; Tapia, Alejandro; Zacchino, Susana; Zygadlo, Julio; Feresin, Gabriela Egly; López, María Liza

    2012-08-01

    The essential oils (EOs) of two populations of Azorella cryptantha (Clos) Reiche, a native species from San Juan Province, were obtained by hydrodistillation in a Clevenger-type apparatus and characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. The compounds identified amounted to 92.3 and 88.7% of the total oil composition for A. cryptantha from Bauchaceta (Ac-BAU) and Agua Negra (Ac-AN), respectively. The EO composition for the two populations was similar, although with differences in the identity and content of the main compounds and also in the identity of minor components. The main compounds of the Ac-BAU EO were α-pinene, α-thujene, sabinene, δ-cadinene, δ-cadinol, trans-β-guaiene, and τ-muurolol, while α-pinene, α-thujene, β-pinene, γ-cadinene, τ-cadinol, δ-cadinene, τ-muurolol, and a not identified compound were the main constituents of the Ac-AN EO, which also contained 3.0% of oxygenated monoterpenes. The repellent activity on Triatoma infestans nymphs was 100 and 92% for the Ac-AN and Ac-BAU EOs, respectively. Regarding the toxic effects on Ceratitis capitata, the EOs were very active with LD(50) values lower than 11 μg/fly. The dermatophytes Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton rubrum, and T. mentagrophytes and the bacterial strains Escherichia coli LM(1), E. coli LM(2), and Yersinia enterocolitica PI were more sensitive toward the Ac-AN EO (MIC 125 μg/ml) than toward the Ac-BAU EO. This is the first report on the composition of A. cryptantha EO and its anti-insect and antimicrobial properties. PMID:22899606

  19. Sans study of spinach CF 1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmettes, P.; Girault, G.; Berger, G.; Galmiche, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    SANS experiments were performed on solutions of spinach chloroplast CF 1-ATPase in heavy water. Removal of the ɛ subunit partially activates the enzyme and further addition of dithiothreitol fully activates it. Molar masses and gyration radii values are given for these different conditions.

  20. Ferricrete, manganocrete, and bog iron occurrences with selected sedge bogs and active iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Church, Stanley E.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Wirt, Laurie

    2003-01-01

    During 1996 to 2000, the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a coordinated strategy to (1) study the environmental effects of historical mining on Federal lands, and (2) remediate contaminated sites that have the greatest impact on water quality and ecosystem health. This dataset provides information that contributes to these overall objectives and is part of the USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative. Data presented here represent ferricrete occurrences and selected iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed in San Juan County near Silverton, Colorado. Ferricretes (stratified iron and manganese oxyhydroxide-cemented sedimentary deposits) are one indicator of the geochemical baseline conditions as well as the effect that weathering of mineralized rocks had on water quality in the Animas River watershed prior to mining. Logs and wood fragments preserved in several ferricretes in the upper Animas River watershed, collected primarily along streams, yield radiocarbon ages of modern to 9,580 years B.P. (P.L. Verplanck, D.B. Yager, and S.E. Church, work in progress). The presence of ferricrete deposits along the current stream courses indicates that climate and physiography of the Animas River watershed have been relatively constant throughout the Holocene and that weathering processes have been ongoing for thousands of years prior to historical mining activities. Thus, by knowing where ferricrete is preserved in the watershed today, land-management agencies have an indication of (1) where metal precipitation from weathering of altered rocks has occurred in the past, and (2) where this process is ongoing and may confound remediation efforts. These data are included as two coverages-a ferricrete coverage and a bogs and springs coverage. The coverages are included in ArcInfo shapefile and Arc

  1. Roughness of Grain-scale Frictional Sliding Surfaces in the Actively Creeping Clay Gouge of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadizadeh, J.; Candela, T.; Renard, F.; Williams, R.

    2011-12-01

    The gouge from 3197.2m measured depth within the active creep interval in the SAFOD borehole is unconsolidated and mainly composed of illite-smectite and Mg-rich-smectite clays interspersed with rounded lithic fragments and serpentinite porphyroclasts. We find evidence of deformation by frictional grain boundary sliding (FGBS) including a hierarchy of finely striated and slickenside surfaces. At the scale of the core sample, first order slip surfaces appear as mode II and III fractures cutting across a second set of slip surfaces that bound sliding grains in an anastomosing or lozenge-shape fabric. To characterize the different sliding orders and establish possible roughness scaling between the FGBS and outcrop-scale slip surfaces, we profiled the first and second order slip surfaces using white light interferometry (WLI) technique. Sample surfaces (10 samples; 20-140 mm2/sample) were differentiated on the basis of morphology and directly extracted from the core sample. Data was collected along 240 profiles using a Zygo NV7300 WLI scanning microscope at 1-2 points/micrometer distance. The 2-D roughness as represented by Hurst exponent (H) was determined via Fourier Power Spectrum, Root Mean Square and Wavelet methods for multiple profiles/surface, parallel (L) and perpendicular (A) to slip striations. The scanned surfaces were mostly strongly self-affine, definable by two Hurst exponents HL and HA. The difference in mean H values (HL-HA) for all measurements were 0.244 and 0.018 for the first and second order surfaces respectively suggesting that the first order surfaces were about 13 times more anisotropic than the second order surfaces. Based on this and previously published results we assume that the higher anisotropy of the first order surfaces is due to greater cumulative slip. The possible explanations are argued as follows. 1. The second order surfaces with larger total surface areas could be preferentially subject to resurfacing by processes such as

  2. Modelling the activation of a confined debris slide in Northern Calabria: the 28 January 2009 slope movement at San Benedetto Ullano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capparelli, G.; Iaquinta, P.; Iovine, G.; Terranova, O.; Versace, P.

    2009-09-01

    Southern Italy was severely stricken by abundant rains during Autumn-Winter 2008/2009, with widespread geomorphic effects such as slope movements and erosive processes, floods, inundations of cultivated fields and urbanised sectors, and coastal instabilities. A large number of superficial landslides were triggered in Calabria up to the middle of January, damaging life lines, roads, urbanised areas and lands, mainly in the NW sector of the region. Further persistent rainfalls were recorded until the end of March, and several deeper phenomena also activated along the slopes threatening villages and main lifelines. More specifically, a large rainfall-induced debris slide started mobilizing on 28 January along the Eastern slope of the Coastal Chain, in the vicinity of San Benedetto Ullano (Cosenza province). The slope movement threatened the southern suburbs of the village, damaging the road to the cemetery and the provincial road to Marri. Thanks to a prompt detailed geomorphologic field survey (protracted for the entire period of activity), to recurrent hand-made measures of superficial displacements performed at a set of datum points by a team of volunteers, and a real-time control system of meteoric conditions and superficial displacements at a set of precision-extensometers, the evolution of the phenomenon was mapped up to the last days of April, when the movement practically stopped at the end of the rainy period. Based on the results of the above-mentioned control activities, a basic empirical reference framework of procedures could be defined, which allowed the Authorities concerned to better manage the phases of geo-hydrological crisis, by adopting suitable emergency measures. The preliminary geological model of the landslide and of the affected slope, which had to be defined in the first stages of mobilization based on the few available data, was progressively refined thanks to the results of a couple of explorative drillings, driven down to 40 meters below

  3. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Muhle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (CreCre; ∼30 fmol kg−1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1–9 times CreCre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10–980 times CreCre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20–100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3–1)×10−1 kg(0.3–1)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼7.5×104 km2∼7.5×104 km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg(0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial–interglacial transitions.

  4. History of the Italian San Marco equatorial mobile range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, H. N.

    1971-01-01

    Events leading to the development of the San Marco Equatorial Range are presented. Included are background information leading to the cooperative space program between the United States and Italy, conceptual planning, training activities, equipment design and fabrication, and range utilization. The technical support provided the San Marco Program by Scout Project Office, and other NASA installations is described.

  5. 1989 CPC National Meeting...Nowhere Else but San Antonio!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Career Planning and Employment, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Describes the 1989 College Placement Council national meeting to be held in San Antonio, Texas from May 30 through June 2, 1989. Briefly describes the city of San Antonio, discusses receptions and activities planned for the meeting, and lists five seminars covering topics of empowerment, endurance, enterprise, etiquette, and expertise, which will…

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Chronicle Library San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Chronicle Library San Francisco, California Year Built: 1834 Photo Taken: About 1925 VIEW FROM EAST - General Sherman Quarters, 464 Calle Principal, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  7. Linking Nitrogen-Cycling Microbial Communities to Environmental Fluctuations and Biogeochemical Activity in a Large, Urban Estuary: the San Francisco Bay-Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability is an important factor controlling productivity and thus carbon cycling in estuaries. The fate of N in estuaries depends on the activities of the microbes that carry out the N-cycle, which in turn depend on factors such as organic matter availability, dissolved inorganic N, salinity, oxygen, and temperature. Key microbial N transformations include nitrification (the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate) and denitrification (the anaerobic reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen gas). While denitrification leads to N loss, nitrification is the only link between reduced N (produced by decomposition) and oxidized N (substrates for N loss processes), and both processes are known to produce nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Understanding controls of N-cycling in the San Francisco Bay-Delta (SFBD)—the largest estuary on the west coast of North America—is particularly important, as this urban estuary is massively polluted with N, even compared to classic "eutrophic" systems. Interestingly, the SFBD has been spared the detrimental consequences of nutrient enrichment, largely due to high suspended sediment concentrations (and thus low light penetration) throughout the water column, combined with high grazing pressure. However, the recent "clearing" of SFBD waters due to a sharp decrease in suspended sediments may significantly alter the ecology of the estuary, by increasing phytoplankton growth. Thus, the SFBD may be losing its historical resilience to eutrophication, and may soon be "high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll" no more. Elucidating the environmental factors affecting the community structure, activity, and functioning of N-cycling microbes in SFBD is crucial for determining how changes in turbidity and productivity will be propagated throughout the ecosystem. While substantial ecological research in the SFBD has focused on phytoplankton and food webs, bacterial and archaeal communities have received far less attention

  8. History of San Marco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caporale, A. J.

    1968-01-01

    A brief history is reported of the first San Marco project, a joint program of the United States and Italy. The Project was a three phase effort to investigate upper air density and associated ionosphere phenomena. The initial phase included the design and development of the spacecraft, the experiments, the launch complex, and a series of suborbital flights, from Wallops Island. The second phase, consisting of designing, fabricating, and testing a spacecraft for the first orbital mission, culminated in an orbital launch also from Wallops Island. The third phase consisted of further refining the experiments and spacecraft instrumentation and of establishing a full-bore scout complex in Kenya. The launch of San Marco B, in April 1967, from this complex into an equatorial orbit, concluded the initial San Marco effort.

  9. Locking depths estimated from geodesy and seismology along the San Andreas Fault System: Implications for seismic moment release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Konter, Bridget R.; Sandwell, David T.; Shearer, Peter

    2011-06-01

    The depth of the seismogenic zone is a critical parameter for earthquake hazard models. Independent observations from seismology and geodesy can provide insight into the depths of faulting, but these depths do not always agree. Here we inspect variations in fault depths of 12 segments of the southern San Andreas Fault System derived from over 1000 GPS velocities and 66,000 relocated earthquake hypocenters. Geodetically determined locking depths range from 6 to 22 km, while seismogenic thicknesses are largely limited to depths of 11-20 km. These seismogenic depths best match the geodetic locking depths when estimated at the 95% cutoff depth in seismicity, and most fault segment depths agree to within 2 km. However, the Imperial, Coyote Creek, and Borrego segments have significant discrepancies. In these cases the geodetically inferred locking depths are much shallower than the seismogenic depths. We also examine variations in seismic moment accumulation rate per unit fault length as suggested by seismicity and geodesy and find that both approaches yield high rates (1.5-1.8 × 1013 Nm/yr/km) along the Mojave and Carrizo segments and low rates (˜0.2 × 1013 Nm/yr/km) along several San Jacinto segments. The largest difference in seismic moment between models is calculated for the Imperial segment, where the moment rate from seismic depths is a factor of ˜2.5 larger than that from geodetic depths. Such variability has important implications for the accuracy to which future major earthquake magnitudes can be estimated.

  10. The San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Priest, S.S.; Duffield, W.A.; Malis-Clark, Karen; Hendley, J. W., II; Stauffer, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    Northern Arizona's San Francisco Volcanic Field, much of which lies within Coconino and Kaibab National Forests, is an area of young volcanoes along the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. During its 6-million-year history, this field has produced more than 600 volcanoes. Their activity has created a topographically varied landscape with forests that extend from the Pi?on-Juniper up to the Bristlecone Pine life zones. The most prominent landmark is San Francisco Mountain, a stratovolcano that rises to 12,633 feet and serves as a scenic backdrop to the city of Flagstaff.

  11. SAN PEDRO WATERSHED DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The San Pedro River Geo-Data Browser was jointly developed by the Landscape Ecology Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (Tucson, AZ). Since 1995, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EP A) and U...

  12. SAN PEDRO GEODATA BROWSER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The San Pedro Data Browser was developed by the Landscape Ecology Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Las Vegas, NV). The goal of the Landscape Sciences Program is to improve decision-making relative to natural and human resource management through the development...

  13. San Rafael Schools Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Rafael City Schools, CA.

    The San Rafael City Schools' exhibit which was displayed at the 1983 Marin County Fair (California) is described. The exhibit, entitled "Education - A Real Winner," consisted of 12 display panels illustrating the following aspects of the school system: (1) early history from 1861; (2) present board and administration; (3) present schools and…

  14. Innovation in san francisco.

    PubMed

    Travis, J

    1992-08-01

    In San Francisco 2 weeks ago, AAAS and Science sponsored a new meeting, Science Innovation '92. The unusual gathering focused not on research results but on new techniques and instruments, particularly for biomedical science. As seen in the stories below, some of the most eye-catching innovations emerged at the intersection of physics and biology. PMID:17736460

  15. San Jose, Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    San Jose, capital city of Costa Rica, fills the valley between two steep mountain ranges. In this image made from data collected by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite, visible, shortwave, and near-infrared wavelengths of light that the sensor observed have been combined to produce a false-color version of the scene in which vegetation is red, urban areas are silvery gray, water is dark blue, and clouds are white. The image was captured on February 8, 2007. San Jose is in the center of the image. The Rio Torres winds through downtown San Jose. Cartago, the much smaller colonial capital, sits in the lower right corner, while the city of Alajuela appears across the river, northwest of San Jose. The cities' manmade surfaces contrast sharply with the lushly vegetated landscape surrounding the city. Greenhouses are common in the region, and their glass roofs may be the brilliant white spots around the outer edges the cities. The long, straight runway of the Tobias Bolanos International Airport is visible as a dark line southeast of Alajuela. The landscape around the two cities shown here is rugged. Steep mountain peaks cast dark shadows across their leeward slopes. Patches of dark red vegetation on the mountains north of San Jose may be rainforest. Coffee plantations also cover the slopes of the mountains around the city. February is the dry season in Costa Rica. During the rainy season, from about April to November, clouds usually block the satellite's view of this tropical location. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of Asaf Ullah and Tim Gubbels, SERVIR project.

  16. 77 FR 54811 - Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego... Competitor Group is sponsoring the TriRock Triathlon, consisting of 2000 swimmers swimming a...

  17. Structure of the San Bernardino Basin Along Two Seismic Transects: Rialto-Colton Fault to the San Andreas Fault and Along the I-215 Freeway (I-10 to SR30)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Gandhok, G.; Steedman, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    show internal consistency and consistency with other existing geophysical data. Collectively, the data suggest that the I-215 freeway trends along the faulted edge of a pull-apart basin, within a zone where the principal slip of the San Jacinto Fault is transferred to the San Andreas Fault. Because the I-215 freeway trends at low angles to these flower-structure faults, both primary and numerous secondary faults are apparent between the I-10 exchange and State Road-30, suggesting that much of the 8-km-long segment of the I-215 freeway could experience movement along primary or secondary faults.

  18. Early Miocene transpression across the Pacific-North American plate margin, initiation of the San Andreas fault, and tectonic wedge activation

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, R.J. ); Underwood, M.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Magnetic stripes on the Pacific plate (PAC) indicate that subduction along the North American plate (NAM) margin ceased about 26--28 Ma south of the Mendocino fracture zone (MFZ), when the Pacific-Farallon (PAC-FAR) ridge encountered the NAM. In this area the PAC-FAR ridge apparently was segmented and abandoned as it encountered the margin, and was thrust beneath the western lip of the NAM, possibly due to residual FAR slab-pull. Between [approximately] 26 and 23.5 Ma, compressional tectonism in the distal NAM overlying the hot, buoyant ridge, produced ocean floor volcanism and a series of borderland structural basins that filled with continent-derived clastics. Initiation of the San Andreas transform, and capture of a large segment of the NAM by the PAC appears to have occurred between [approximately] 24 and [approximately] 14 Ma. Beginning at least as early as 18 Ma, northeast of the San Andreas fault, blind thrusts, folding and tilting developed in the roof of a northeastwardly-propagating wedge complex beneath the length of the Coast Ranges. The wedge complex probably was multistage and may have been initiated as early as 70--60 Ma. In the Cape Mendocino and Loma Prieta regions, Miocene or younger northeast-vergent members of the roof thrust system root into the San Andreas fault and characteristically displace deep water marine rocks northeastward over the shallower margin. Total shortening across the transform margin based on deep crustal models must exceed 200 km since 70 Ma and is [ge]50 km since 28 Ma.

  19. Kinematic modeling of fault slip rates using new geodetic velocities from a transect across the Pacific-North America plate boundary through the San Bernardino Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, Sally F.; Spinler, Joshua C.; McGill, John D.; Bennett, Richard A.; Floyd, Michael A.; Fryxell, Joan E.; Funning, Gareth J.

    2015-04-01

    Campaign GPS data collected from 2002 to 2014 result in 41 new site velocities from the San Bernardino Mountains and vicinity. We combined these velocities with 93 continuous GPS velocities and 216 published velocities to obtain a velocity profile across the Pacific-North America plate boundary through the San Bernardino Mountains. We modeled the plate boundary-parallel, horizontal deformation with 5-14 parallel and one obliquely oriented screw dislocations within an elastic half-space. Our rate for the San Bernardino strand of the San Andreas Fault (6.5 ± 3.6 mm/yr) is consistent with recently published latest Quaternary rates at the 95% confidence level and is slower than our rate for the San Jacinto Fault (14.1 ± 2.9 mm/yr). Our modeled rate for all faults of the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) combined (15.7 ± 2.9 mm/yr) is faster than the summed latest Quaternary rates for these faults, even when an estimate of permanent, off-fault deformation is included. The rate discrepancy is concentrated on faults near the 1992 Landers and 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes; the geodetic and geologic rates agree within uncertainties for other faults within the ECSZ. Coupled with the observation that postearthquake deformation is faster than the pre-1992 deformation, this suggests that the ECSZ geodetic-geologic rate discrepancy is directly related to the timing and location of these earthquakes and is likely the result of viscoelastic deformation in the mantle that varies over the timescale of an earthquake cycle, rather than a redistribution of plate boundary slip at a timescale of multiple earthquake cycles or longer.

  20. San Antonio, Texas, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This sharp, cloud free view of San Antonio, Texas (29.5N, 98.5W) illustrates the classic pattern of western cities. The city has a late nineteenth century Anglo grid pattern overlaid onto an earlier, less regular Hispanic settlement. A well marked central business district having streets laid out north/south and east/west is surrounded by blocks of suburban homes and small businesses set between the older colonial radial transportation routes.

  1. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Examiner Library EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Examiner Library EAST ELEVATION - Presidio of San Francisco, Old Station Hospital, Funston Avenue & Lincoln Boulevard, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. 77 FR 34988 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Diego State University, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: San Diego State University, San Diego, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: San Diego State University Archeology Collections... associated funerary objects may contact San Diego State University Archeology Collections Management...

  3. Andean coastal uplift and active tectonics in southern Peru: 10Be surface exposure dating of differentially uplifted marine terrace sequences (San Juan de Marcona, ~ 15.4°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saillard, M.; Hall, S. R.; Audin, L.; Farber, D. L.; Regard, V.; Hérail, G.

    2011-05-01

    Along the San Juan de Marcona Bay of southern Peru, two spectacular sequences of preserved marine terraces record net Quaternary uplift. Previous geomorphic analysis of these paleo-shorelines has revealed evidence of upper plate deformation and regional uplift. However, in the absence of a robust absolute dating method, these studies contain substantial uncertainties concerning the numerical dating of these marine markers and thus the corresponding calculated surface uplift rates. However, field mapping, surveying the neotectonic features and 10Be dating of abraded surfaces contained within two sequences of marine terraces along this margin should allow for the robust calculation of Pleistocene uplift rates. The San Juan de Marcona Bay lies on the southern flank of the subducting and south-migrating aseismic Nazca Ridge where the maximum rates of coastal uplift are expected. In this locality, we measure high uplift rates ranging from 0.4 m/ka to 0.9 m/ka during the Pleistocene. Margin-parallel normal faults displace several marine terraces and influence the development of bays, thereby contributing to the configuration of paleo- and present-day coastlines. The faults have relatively low slip rates, < 0.1 m/ka over 400 ka, and have been inactive for the last 80 ka. The presence and activity of these normal faults can be directly linked to subduction zone processes, with the release and accommodation of short-term coseismic compression during megathrust subduction-zone events. In contrast, the regional permanent uplift is probably controlled by post-seismic and/or interseismic strain accumulation over longer time-scales due to inelastic behavior of the upper plate. Since at least the latest Pliocene, the San Juan de Marcona area has experienced long-term regional tectonic uplift that has increased since about 800 ka due to the southward migration of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Based on migration velocity and geometry of the ridge, the influence of the Nazca Ridge on

  4. Arsenic in benthic bivalves of San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johns, C.; Luoma, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    Arsenic concentrations were determined in fine-grained, oxidized, surface sediments and in two benthic bivalves, Corbicula sp. and Macoma balthica, within San Francisco Bay, the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta, and selected rivers not influenced by urban or industrial activity. Arsenic concentrations in all samples were characteristic of values reported for uncontaminated estuaries. Small temporal fluctuations and low arsenic concentrations in bivalves and sediments suggest that most inputs of arsenic are likely to be minor and arsenic contamination is not widespread in the Bay.

  5. Potential of public lands in California's central valley as habitat for the endangered San Joaquin kit fox. [Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; McCue, P.; Sauls, M.L.; Kato, T.

    1982-01-01

    As part of an assessment of the impacts of their activities on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox and its essential habitat, the Department of Energy and Bureau of Land Management investigated the potential of public lands in the San Joaquin Valley as suitable habitat for the San Joaquin kit fox. (ACR)

  6. SAN DIEGO ZOO EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego County Dept. of Education, CA.

    A BROCHURE GEARED TO HELP TEACHERS AND STUDENTS IN THE SAN DIEGO AREA TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES OF THE SAN DIEGO ZOO IS PRESENTED. THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OF THE ZOO EMPLOYS TWO FULL-TIME TEACHERS AND A DRIVER-GUIDE. THE PROGRAM OFFERED IS BRIEFLY DESCRIBED--(1) IN "PRESCHOOL AND FIRST GRADE," INTRODUCTIONS ARE MADE TO…

  7. ASTER Images San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of the San Francisco Bay region was acquired on March 3, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: This image covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 75 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The combination of bands portrays vegetation in red, and urban areas in gray. Sediment in the Suisun Bay, San Pablo Bay, San Francisco Bay, and the Pacific Ocean shows up as lighter shades of blue. Along the west coast of the San Francisco Peninsula, strong surf can be seen as a white fringe along the shoreline. A powerful rip tide is visible extending westward from Daly City into the Pacific Ocean. In the lower right corner, the wetlands of the South San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge appear as large dark blue and brown polygons. The high spatial resolution of ASTER allows fine detail to be observed in the scene. The main bridges of the area (San Mateo, San Francisco-Oakland Bay, Golden Gate, Richmond-San Rafael, Benicia-Martinez, and Carquinez) are easily picked out, connecting the different communities in the Bay area. Shadows of the towers along the Bay Bridge can be seen over the adjacent bay water. With enlargement the entire road network can be easily mapped; individual buildings are visible, including the shadows of the high-rises in downtown San Francisco.

    Inset: This enlargement of the San Francisco Airport highlights the high spatial resolution of ASTER. With further enlargement and careful examination, airplanes can be seen at the terminals.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth

  8. Active Crustal Deformation in the Area of San Carlos, Baja California Sur, Mexico as Shown by Data of Local Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munguía, Luis; González-Escobar, Mario; Navarro, Miguel; Valdez, Tito; Mayer, Sergio; Aguirre, Alfredo; Wong, Victor; Luna, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed earthquakes of sequences that occurred at different times near San Carlos, a town of approximately 5000 inhabitants. The seismic sequences happened during March-April 1989, October 2000-June 2001, and 5-15 February 2004 at about 200 km west of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. The strong shaking from initial earthquakes of the first two sequences prompted the installation of temporary seismic stations in the area. With data recorded by these stations, we found an earthquake distribution that is consistent with the northwest segment of the Santa Margarita fault. Both the focal depth, that seemed to increase in E-NE direction, and a composite fault-plane solution, obtained from polarity data of the small earthquakes, were also consistent with the main characteristics of that fault. We also found that our normal-faulting mechanism (east side down) was quite similar to centroid moment tensor solutions for earthquakes with M w 5.4 and 5.3 that occurred in the area in February 2004. It is likely, then, that these larger earthquakes also occurred along the Santa Margarita Fault. To get some insight into the regional stress pattern, we compared the above mechanisms with mechanisms reported for other earthquakes of the Pacific margin of Baja California Sur and the Gulf of California regions. We observed that focal mechanisms of the two regions have T axes of stress that plunge sub horizontally in E-NE average direction. The corresponding P axes have N-NW average trend, but for the Pacific earthquakes these axes plunge at angles that are ~35° larger than those for the Gulf earthquakes. These more vertically inclined P axes of compressive stress mean substantial oblique fault motions. The mixture of oblique and strike-slip components of fault motions, as the focal mechanisms show, confirms a transtensional stress regime for the region. Before this research, we knew little about the seismicity and styles of faulting in the area. Now we know that

  9. 78 FR 58878 - Safety Zone; San Diego Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay... Diego Shark Fest Swim. This safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of the participants,...

  10. A network pharmacology approach to discover active compounds and action mechanisms of San-Cao Granule for treatment of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shizhang; Niu, Ming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jiabo; Su, Haibin; Luo, Shengqiang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Guo, Yanlei; Liu, Liping; Liu, Fengqun; Zhao, Qingguo; Chen, Hongge; Xiao, Xiaohe; Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance San-Cao Granule (SCG) has been used in patients with liver fibrosis for many years and has shown good effect. However, its mechanism of therapeutic action is not clear because of its complex chemical system. The purpose of our study is to establish a comprehensive and systemic method that can predict the mechanism of action of SCG in antihepatic fibrosis. Materials and methods In this study, a “compound–target–disease” network was constructed by combining the SCG-specific and liver fibrosis–specific target proteins with protein–protein interactions, and network pharmacology was used to screen out the underlying targets and mechanisms of SCG for treatment of liver fibrosis. Then, some key molecules of the enriched pathway were chosen to verify the effects of SCG on liver fibrosis induced by thioacetamide (TAA). Results This systematic approach had successfully revealed that 16 targets related to 11 SCG compounds were closely associated with liver fibrosis therapy. The pathway-enrichment analysis of them showed that the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway is relatively important. Animal experiments also proved that SCG could significantly ameliorate liver fibrosis by inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad pathway. Conclusion SCG could alleviate liver fibrosis through the molecular mechanisms predicted by network pharmacology. Furthermore, network pharmacology could provide deep insight into the pharmacological mechanisms of Chinese herbal formulas. PMID:26929602

  11. 78 FR 34895 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks Display, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks Display, San.... SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce the safety zones for the San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks... INFORMATION: The Coast Guard will enforce the San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks Display safety...

  12. 75 FR 55975 - Safety Zone; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego... of a bay swim in San Diego Harbor. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety... of the San Diego Bay swim in sufficient time to issue an NPRM without delaying this rulemaking....

  13. The San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region, California: Structure and kinematics of a Young plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, R.C.; Zoback, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data delineate offset and/or truncated magnetic rock bodies of the Franciscan Complex that define the location and structure of, and total offset across, the San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region. Two distinctive magnetic anomalies caused by ultramafic rocks and metabasalts east of, and truncated at, the San Andreas fault have clear counterparts west of the fault that indicate a total right-lateral offset of only 22 km on the Peninsula segment, the active strand that ruptured in 1906. The location of the Peninsula segment is well defined magnetically on the northern peninsula where it goes offshore, and can be traced along strike an additional ~6 km to the northwest. Just offshore from Lake Merced, the inferred fault trace steps right (northeast) 3 km onto a nearly parallel strand that can be traced magnetically northwest more than 20 km as the linear northeast edge of a magnetic block bounded by the San Andreas fault, the Pilarcitos fault, and the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault zone. This right-stepping strand, the Golden Gate segment, joins the eastern mapped trace of the San Andreas fault at Bolinas Lagoon and projects back onshore to the southeast near Lake Merced. Inversion of detailed gravity data on the San Francisco Peninsula reveals a 3 km wide basin situated between the two strands of the San Andreas fault, floored by Franciscan basement and filled with Plio-Quaternary sedimentary deposits of the Merced and Colma formations. The basin, ~1 km deep at the coast, narrows and becomes thinner to the southeast along the fault over a distance of ~12 km. The length, width, and location of the basin between the two strands are consistent with a pull-apart basin formed behind the right step in the right-lateral strike-slip San Andreas fault system and currently moving southeast with the North American plate. Slight nonparallelism of the two strands bounding the basin (implying a small component of convergence

  14. Time and space evolution of an active creeping zone: competition between brittle and ductile deformations, new insights from microstructure studies of SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.; Gratier, J.; Doan, M.; Renard, F.; Boullier, A.

    2012-12-01

    Creep processes can relax an important part of the tectonic stresses in active faults, either by permanent steady-state creep or by episodic post-seismic creep. Here, our goal is to better constrain the micro-physical parameters that control this transition between seismic and aseismic behavior, both in time and in space. We present new results from microstructural studies on natural samples collected from the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) drilling project, located on the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault (SAF). Seven samples were collected from the main active creeping zone: the Central Deforming Zone at 3301-3303m depth. We performed chemical and mineralogical analyses and microscope observations on twenty thin sections cut from those samples. In a previous study (Gratier et al., Geology, 2011), we have already shown that pressure solution creep is an active deformation process in the SAF. We propose a model of microstructural evolution to characterize in which conditions pressure solution creep is efficient enough to relax stress and to prevent the nucleation of moderate to large earthquakes. We show that two crucial parameters may accelerate pressure solution: the presence of phyllosilicates and the degree of rock fracturing. The initial structure and composition of the rocks may explain why pressure solution creep is efficient or not. Moreover, both the content of phyllosilicates and the degree of fracture may evolve with time at various scales during the seismic cycle: - During interseismic periods (years to millennia): fracturing activates postseismic creep. However, the progressive healing of the fracture annihilates this effect. Meanwhile, growth of phyllosilicate minerals, associated with postseismic fluid flow may also activate the creep rate. - During much longer geological periods (hundred thousands to millions of years), the composition of gouge material deformed by pressure solution evolves by the passive concentration of

  15. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is California's famous San Andreas Fault. The image, created with data from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, Calif., about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. Another fault, the Garlock Fault lies at the base of the Tehachapis; the San Andreas and the Garlock Faults meet in the center distance near the town of Gorman. In the distance, over the Tehachapi Mountains is California's Central Valley. Along the foothills in the right hand part of the image is the Antelope Valley, including the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. The data used to create this image were acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space

  16. Diel activity patterns of juvenile late fall-run Chinook salmon with implications for operation of a gated water diversion in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumb, John M.; Adams, Noah S.; Perry, Russell W.; Holbrook, Christopher; Romine, Jason G.; Blake, Aaron R.; Burau, Jon R.

    2016-01-01

    In the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, tidal forces that reverse river flows increase the proportion of water and juvenile late fall-run Chinook salmon diverted into a network of channels that were constructed to support agriculture and human consumption. This area is known as the interior delta, and it has been associated with poor fish survival. Under the rationale that the fish will be diverted in proportion to the amount of water that is diverted, the Delta Cross Channel (DCC) has been prescriptively closed during the winter out-migration to reduce fish entrainment and mortality into the interior delta. The fish are thought to migrate mostly at night, and so daytime operation of the DCC may allow for water diversion that minimizes fish entrainment and mortality. To assess this, the DCC gate was experimentally opened and closed while we released 2983 of the fish with acoustic transmitters upstream of the DCC to monitor their arrival and entrainment into the DCC. We used logistic regression to model night-time arrival and entrainment probabilities with covariates that included the proportion of each diel period with upstream flow, flow, rate of change in flow and water temperature. The proportion of time with upstream flow was the most important driver of night-time arrival probability, yet river flow had the largest effect on fish entrainment into the DCC. Modelling results suggest opening the DCC during daytime while keeping the DCC closed during night-time may allow for water diversion that minimizes fish entrainment into the interior delta.

  17. The stress shadow effect: a mechanical analysis of the evenly-spaced parallel strike-slip faults in the San Andreas fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuza, A. V.; Yin, A.; Lin, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Parallel evenly-spaced strike-slip faults are prominent in the southern San Andreas fault system, as well as other settings along plate boundaries (e.g., the Alpine fault) and within continental interiors (e.g., the North Anatolian, central Asian, and northern Tibetan faults). In southern California, the parallel San Jacinto, Elsinore, Rose Canyon, and San Clemente faults to the west of the San Andreas are regularly spaced at ~40 km. In the Eastern California Shear Zone, east of the San Andreas, faults are spaced at ~15 km. These characteristic spacings provide unique mechanical constraints on how the faults interact. Despite the common occurrence of parallel strike-slip faults, the fundamental questions of how and why these fault systems form remain unanswered. We address this issue by using the stress shadow concept of Lachenbruch (1961)—developed to explain extensional joints by using the stress-free condition on the crack surface—to present a mechanical analysis of the formation of parallel strike-slip faults that relates fault spacing and brittle-crust thickness to fault strength, crustal strength, and the crustal stress state. We discuss three independent models: (1) a fracture mechanics model, (2) an empirical stress-rise function model embedded in a plastic medium, and (3) an elastic-plate model. The assumptions and predictions of these models are quantitatively tested using scaled analogue sandbox experiments that show that strike-slip fault spacing is linearly related to the brittle-crust thickness. We derive constraints on the mechanical properties of the southern San Andreas strike-slip faults and fault-bounded crust (e.g., local fault strength and crustal/regional stress) given the observed fault spacing and brittle-crust thickness, which is obtained by defining the base of the seismogenic zone with high-resolution earthquake data. Our models allow direct comparison of the parallel faults in the southern San Andreas system with other similar strike

  18. San Francisco Bay Sediment Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This March 3, 2000 image of the San Francisco Bay region shows a 60 by 75 kilometer Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image in band 1 (near infrared, 0.52-0.60 microns). The color coded suspended sediment image was created from band 1 by blacking out the land, and assigning colors to the relative brightnesses in the water. High values were colored white, then red, yellow, green, and blue. Brighter values in band 1 indicate higher sediment load in the water. The highest values are in Suisun and San Pablo Bays, into which the Sacramento River empties, and along the coast of the San Francisco Peninsula. The Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay water are relatively clear. Image courtesy ASTER Science Team

  19. Jean Parker School, San Francisco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Soren

    1999-01-01

    Describes the post-earthquake renovation of a San Francisco urban elementary school that preserved its historical detail within a modern replacement. Design features are detailed; photos and a floorplan are included. (GR)

  20. Northern California near San Francisco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A part of northern California centered near San Francisco Bay (38.0N, 122.0W) photographed at 3 p.m. January 1, 1974, from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. This near vertical view encompasses the coastline from Monteray Bay (right) to about 50 miles north of Point Reyes (left) and includes, from bottom to top, San Francisco Bay (center), Sacramento Valley (left center), San Joaquin Valley (right center), and the snow-covered Sierra Nevada. Afternoon shadows sharply delineate a valley which parallels San Francisco Bay, crosses Point Reyes, and lies between the Bay and the Pacific coastline. This valley marks the location of the San Andreas Fault. Forces acting on the crust are causing the land west (bottom) of the fault line to move north relative to land on the east side. Agricultural areas in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys are indicated by the tan areas which are easily discerned in contrast to the green-gray background.

  1. 41. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco CallBulletin Library San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Call-Bulletin Library San Francisco, California INTERIOR VIEW OF CHURCH BEFORE RESTORATION - 1934 - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  2. New evidence on the state of stress of the san andreas fault system.

    PubMed

    Zoback, M D; Zoback, M L; Mount, V S; Suppe, J; Eaton, J P; Healy, J H; Oppenheimer, D; Reasenberg, P; Jones, L; Raleigh, C B; Wong, I G; Scotti, O; Wentworth, C

    1987-11-20

    Contemporary in situ tectonic stress indicators along the San Andreas fault system in central California show northeast-directed horizontal compression that is nearly perpendicular to the strike of the fault. Such compression explains recent uplift of the Coast Ranges and the numerous active reverse faults and folds that trend nearly parallel to the San Andreas and that are otherwise unexplainable in terms of strike-slip deformation. Fault-normal crustal compression in central California is proposed to result from the extremely low shear strength of the San Andreas and the slightly convergent relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Preliminary in situ stress data from the Cajon Pass scientific drill hole (located 3.6 kilometers northeast of the San Andreas in southern California near San Bernardino, California) are also consistent with a weak fault, as they show no right-lateral shear stress at approximately 2-kilometer depth on planes parallel to the San Andreas fault. PMID:17839366

  3. Subsurface Structure of San Leandro From the San Francisco Bay to the Hayward Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M. R.; Catching, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Gandhok, G.; Steedman, C. E.

    2003-12-01

    The city of San Leandro, California is located in the eastern San Francisco Bay area between the Bay and the East Bay hills (Diablo Mountains). The major known tectonic structures in the immediate San Leandro area are the Hayward fault to the east and the San Leandro basin, a deep sedimentary basin, beneath the western side of the city. To better understand the San Leandro basin, its subsurface fault structures, and the effect of these structures on ground water and earthquake hazards, the U.S. Geological Survey acquired an approximately 10-km-long, high-resolution, combined reflection and refraction seismic imaging profile across the city in June 2002. The seismic profile originated within the waters of the San Francisco Bay and ended at the Hayward fault. Seismic sources were generated by a combination of 400-grain, Betsy-Seisgun blanks in 0.3-m-deep holes and 0.25-to-0.5-kg, buried explosions in 1.5-m-deep holes. The combined spacing of seismic sources was 5 m. The seismic data were recorded on an array of four 60-channel Geometrics Strataview seismographs, with 40-Hz single-element, vertical sensors spaced at 5 m. P-wave velocities range from about 800 m/s at the surface to greater than 2000 m/s at about 100 m depth. Prominent lateral low-velocity areas are evident at several locations along the profile. Reflection images show that the low-velocity areas are largely related to zones of faulting. Near-surface faults are observed on the reflection images, including southwest-dipping faults at the edge of the bay and near-vertical faults within the Hayward fault zone, but the most prominent fault occurs approximately 1 km east of the bay, where it bounds the ~1-km-deep San Leandro basin. Because the near-surface faults are observed within a few meters of the surface and because epicenters of small-magnitude earthquakes correlate with these faults, it is likely that they are active and represent potential hazards. The reflection and velocity images show that some

  4. Yu Ping Feng San, an ancient Chinese herbal decoction, regulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 and the activity of intestinal alkaline phosphatase in cultures.

    PubMed

    Du, Crystal Y Q; Choi, Roy C Y; Dong, Tina T X; Lau, David T W; Tsim, Karl W K

    2014-01-01

    Yu Ping Feng San (YPFS), a Chinese herbal decoction comprising Astragali Radix (AR; Huangqi), Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma (AMR; Baizhu), and Saposhnikoviae Radix (SR; Fangfeng), has been used clinically to treat inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Previously, we demonstrated a dual role of YPFS in regulating cytokine release in cultured macrophages. In this study, we elucidated the anti-inflammatory effect of YPFS that is mediated through modulating the expression of three key enzymes involved in IBD: inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IALP). In a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced chronic-inflammation model of cultured murine macrophages, YPFS treatment suppressed the activation of iNOS and COX-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, application of YPFS in cultured small intestinal enterocytes markedly induced the expression of IALP in a time-dependent manner, which might strengthen the intestinal detoxification system. A duality of YPFS in modulating the expression of iNOS and COX-2 was determined here. The expression of iNOS and COX-2 in macrophages was induced by YPFS, and this activation was partially blocked by the NF-κB-specific inhibitor BAY 11-7082, indicating a role of NF-κB signaling. These YPFS-induced changes in gene regulation strongly suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of YPFS are mediated through the regulation of inflammatory enzymes. PMID:24967898

  5. Discovery Along the San Andreas Fault: Relocating Photographs From the 1906 Earthquake in San Francisco and San Mateo Counties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, K.; Prentice, C.; Polly, J.; Yuen, C.; Wu, K.; Zhong, S.; Lopez, J.

    2005-12-01

    April of 2006 will mark the 100-year anniversary of the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake. This earthquake was important not only because of its human tragedy (thousands of dead or homeless people), but also because of its scientific significance. The 8.3 magnitude earthquake ruptured 430 km of the northern San Andreas fault (SAF) and lasted nearly one minute. Investigations after the earthquake led to discoveries that were the beginning of modern earthquake theories and measuring instruments. This was also one of the first large-scale natural disasters to be photographed. Our research group, which is part of the National Science Foundation funded SF-ROCKS program, acquired photographs that were taken shortly after the earthquake in downtown San Francisco and along the SAF in San Mateo County. The SAF photos are part of a Geographical Information System (GIS) database being published on a U.S. Geological Survey web site. The goal of our project was to improve estimates of photograph locations and to compare the landscape features that were visible after the earthquake with the landscape that we see today. We used the GIS database to find initial photo locations, and we then used a high-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) to measure the geographic coordinates of the locations once we matched our view to what we saw in a photo. Where possible, we used a digital camera to retake photos from the same position, to show the difference in the landscape 100 years later. The 1906 photos show fault zone features such as ground rupture, sag ponds, shutter ridges, and offset fences. Changes to the landscape since 1906 have included erosion and grading of the land, building of houses and other structures, and more tree cover compared to previous grassland vegetation. Our project is part of 1906 Earthquake Centennial activities; it is contributing to the photo archive that helps scientists and engineers who study earthquakes and their effects. It will also help the

  6. Environmental setting of the San Joaquin-Tulare basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gronberg, JoAnn A.; Dubrovsky, Neil M.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Brown, Larry R.; Burow, Karen R.

    1998-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program for the San Joaquin- Tulare Basins began in 1991 to study the effects of natural and anthropogenic influences on the quality of ground water, surface water, biology, and ecology. The San Joaquin-Tulare Basins study unit, which covers approximately 31,200 square miles in central California, is made up of the San Joaquin Valley, the eastern slope of the Coast Ranges to the west, and the western slope of the Sierra Nevada to the east. The sediments of the San Joaquin Valley can be divided into alluvial fans and basin deposits. The San Joaquin River receives water from tributaries draining the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges, and except for streams discharging directly to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, is the only surface- water outlet from the study unit. The surface-water hydrology of the San Joaquin-Tulare Basins study unit has been significantly modified by development of water resources. Almost every major river entering the valley from the Sierra Nevada has one or more reservoirs. Almost every tributary and drainage into the San Joaquin River has been altered by a network of canals, drains, and wasteways. The Sierra Nevada is predominantly forested, and the Coast Ranges and the foothills of the Sierra Nevada are predominately rangeland. The San Joaquin Valley is dominated by agriculture, which utilized approximately 14.7 million acre-feet of water and 597 million pounds active ingredient of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers in 1990, and 88 million pounds active ingredient of pesticides in 1991. In addition, the livestock industry contributed 318 million pounds active ingredient of nitrogen and phosphorus from manure in 1987. This report provides the background information to assess the influence of these and other factors on water quality and to provide the foundation for the design and interpretation of all spatial data. These characterizations provide a basis for comparing the influences of human activities

  7. San Diego City Schools Speech Arts League Participation Guide: Rules and Regulations for Operation of Co-Curricular Speech Arts Activities. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego City Schools, CA.

    The fourth edition of a guide originally prepared in 1964, this publication is designed to meet the need for active competition among students of varying levels of experience in the areas of speech and drama. The co-curricular program outlined is designed for use as a supplement to senior high school instruction and activities. Included in the…

  8. Space Radar Image of San Francisco, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of San Francisco, California, taken on October 3,1994. The image is about 40 kilometers by 55 kilometers (25 miles by 34 miles) with north toward the upper right. Downtown San Francisco is visible in the center of the image with the city of Oakland east (to the right) across San Francisco Bay. Also visible in the image is the Golden Gate Bridge (left center) and the Bay Bridge connecting San Francisco and Oakland. North of the Bay Bridge is Treasure Island. Alcatraz Island appears as a small dot northwest of Treasure Island. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on orbit 56. The image is centered at 37 degrees north latitude, 122degrees west longitude. This single-frequency SIR-C image was obtained by the L-band (24 cm) radar channel, horizontally transmitted and received. Portions of the Pacific Ocean visible in this image appear very dark as do other smooth surfaces such as airport runways. Suburban areas, with the low-density housing and tree-lined streets that are typical of San Francisco, appear as lighter gray. Areas with high-rise buildings, such as those seen in the downtown areas, appear in very bright white, showing a higher density of housing and streets which run parallel to the radar flight track. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: the L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes

  9. UAVSAR and GPS Observations of Crustal Deformation in Southern California and Implications for Earthquake Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnellan, A.; Parker, J. W.; Lyzenga, G. A.; Rundle, J. B.; Grant Ludwig, L.; Granat, R. A.; Glasscoe, M. T.; Heflin, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 El-Mayor Cucapah earthquake was the first earthquake to be observed with UAVSAR. UAVSAR observations, GPS time series analysis, and simulations suggest that the fault that ruptured in the earthquake is coupled to the Elsinore, San Jacinto, and San Andreas faults to the north. GPS and UAVSAR observations indicate a zone of shear that extends southward from the Big Bend of the San Andreas fault near Gorman through the San Fernando Valley towards the Newport-Inglewood fault. The zone steps over to the region of the Elsinore or San Jacinto faults, though the partitioning of strain between the two faults is not as clear. State changes in GPS time series data fall in line with the shear zone through the San Fernando Valley and extend northward from the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake rupture. Seismicity hotspots also indicate elevated earthquake hazard near the San Fernando Valley and in the Inland Empire near the Elsinore and San Jacinto faults. Inversions of GPS velocity vectors favor a fault underlying the shear zone extending from the Big Bend to the Newport-Inglewood fault over substantial slip on the San Andreas fault under north of Los Angeles. Virtual California simulations of southern California are being analyzed for fault activity associated with the identified shear zone and for subsequent earthquakes that may be related to El Mayor-Cucapah type earthquakes in Baja.

  10. Tectonic history of the north portion of the San Andreas fault system, California, inferred from gravity and magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griscom, A.; Jachens, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Geologic and geophysical data for the San Andreas fault system north of San Francisco suggest that the eastern boundary of the Pacific plate migrated eastward from its presumed original position at the base of the continental slope to its present position along the San Andreas transform fault by means of a series of eastward jumps of the Mendocino triple junction. These eastward jumps total a distance of about 150 km since 29 Ma. Correlation of right-laterally displaced gravity and magnetic anomalies that now have components at San Francisco and on the shelf north of Point Arena indicates that the presently active strand of the San Andreas fault north of the San Francisco peninsula formed recently at about 5 Ma when the triple junction jumped eastward a minimum of 100 km to its present location at the north end of the San Andreas fault. -from Authors

  11. Geohydrology and water chemistry in the Rialto-Colton Basin, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolfenden, Linda R.; Kadhim, Dina

    1997-01-01

    The 40-square-mile Rialto-Colton ground- water basin is in western San Bernardino County, California, about 60 miles east of Los Angeles.This basin was chosen for storage of imported water because of the good quality of native ground water, the known capacity for additional ground-water storage in the basin, and the availability of imported water. Because the movement and mixing of imported water needed to be determined, the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District entered into a cooperative program with the U.S.Geological Survey in 1991 to study the geohydrology and water chemistry in the Rialto- Colton basin. Ground-water flow and chemistry were investigated using existing data, borehole- geophysical and lithologic logs from newly drilled test holes, measurement of water levels, and chemical analyses of water samples. The Rialto-Colton basin is bounded on the northwest and southeast by the San Gabriel Mountains and the Badlands, respectively. The San Jacinto Fault and Barrier E form the northeastern boundary, and the Rialto-Colton Fault forms the southwestern boundary. Except in the southeastern part of the basin, the San Jacinto and Rialto-Colton Faults act as groundwater barriers that impede ground- water flow into and out of the basin.Barrier E generally does not impede ground- water flow into the basin. The ground-water system consists primarily of gravel, sand, silt, and clay. The maximum thickness is greater than 1,000 feet. The ground- water system is divided into four water-bearing units: river-channel deposits, and upper, middle, and lower water-bearing units. Relatively impermeable consolidated deposits underlie the lower water- bearing unit and form the lower boundary of the ground- water system. Ground water moves from east to west in the river-channel deposits and upper water-bearing unit in the southeastern part of the basin, and from northwest to southeast in the middle and lower water-bearing units. Two major internal faults, Barrier J and

  12. 1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT TURNOUT ON SAN TAN FLOODWATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT TURNOUT ON SAN TAN FLOOD-WATER CANAL TO SAN TAN INDIAN CANAL - San Carlos Irrigation Project, San Tan Flood Water Canal, North Side of Gila River, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  13. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is the San Andreas Fault in an image created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, California, about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. This area is at the junction of two large mountain ranges, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains on the right. Quail Lake Reservoir sits in the topographic depression created by past movement along the fault. Interstate 5 is the prominent linear feature starting at the left edge of the image and continuing into the fault zone, passing eventually over Tejon Pass into the Central Valley, visible at the upper left.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994

  14. South San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gibbons, Helen

    2007-01-01

    View eastward. Elevations in mapped area color coded: purple (approx 15 m below sea level) to red-orange (approx 90 m above sea level). South San Francisco Bay is very shallow, with a mean water depth of 2.7 m (8.9 ft). Trapezoidal depression near San Mateo Bridge is where sediment has been extracted for use in cement production and as bay fill. Land from USGS digital orthophotographs (DOQs) overlaid on USGS digital elevation models (DEMs). Distance across bottom of image approx 11 km (7 mi); vertical exaggeration 1.5X.

  15. Update: San Andreas Fault experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Satellite laser ranging techniques are used to monitor the broad motion of the tectonic plates comprising the San Andreas Fault System. The San Andreas Fault Experiment, (SAFE), has progressed through the upgrades made to laser system hardware and an improvement in the modeling capabilities of the spaceborne laser targets. Of special note is the launch of the Laser Geodynamic Satellite, LAGEOS spacecraft, NASA's only completely dedicated laser satellite in 1976. The results of plate motion projected into this 896 km measured line over the past eleven years are summarized and intercompared.

  16. Holocene slip rates along the San Andreas Fault System in the San Gorgonio Pass and implications for large earthquakes in southern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heermance, R. V., III; Yule, D.

    2015-12-01

    onto the Eastern California Shear Zone or San Jacinto Fault, or accommodated by off-fault deformation through the SGP. Nonetheless, the slip at Millard Canyon, combined with evidence for sporadic slip events from nearby fault trenches, suggests that displacement on these faults occurs synchronously with some, but not all, outside-of-the-pass SAF earthquakes.

  17. Involvement & Participation. National Conference on Physical Activity for the Exceptional Individual (11th, San Diego, California, November 19-20, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves, Edward R.; Richmond, Alan

    This publication contains papers, presented at a conference about physical activities for the exceptional individual, concerning: (1) student interest/motivation; (2) swimming; (3) games; (4) wheelchairs; (5) movement education; (6) physical stress and bone growth; (7) parent involvement; (8) meningomyelocele; (9) blind athletes; (10) Project…

  18. 77 FR 28771 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Giants Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; San Francisco Giants Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA... enforce the safety zone for the San Francisco Giants Fireworks Display in the Captain of the Port, San... life and property of the maritime public from the hazards associated with the fireworks display....

  19. 78 FR 20792 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Giants Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; San Francisco Giants Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA... enforce the safety zone for the San Francisco Giants Fireworks Display in the Captain of the Port, San... life and property of the maritime public from the hazards associated with the fireworks display....

  20. 77 FR 15260 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; San Francisco Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA AGENCY... safety zone for the San Francisco Giants Fireworks Display in the Captain of the Port, San Francisco area... and property of the maritime public from the hazards associated with the fireworks display. During...

  1. 76 FR 38305 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Chronicle Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; San Francisco Chronicle Fireworks Display, San Francisco... will enforce the safety zones for the annual San Francisco Chronicle Fireworks Display (Independence Day Celebration for the City of San Francisco Fireworks). This action is necessary to control...

  2. 77 FR 42647 - Safety Zone: San Diego Symphony POPS Fireworks; San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: San Diego Symphony POPS Fireworks; San... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of San Diego Bay in support of the San Diego Symphony...

  3. 75 FR 77756 - Safety Zone; San Diego Parade of Lights Fireworks, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Parade of Lights Fireworks, San... San Diego Parade of Lights Fireworks Displays on December 12 and December 19, 2010. This safety zone... San Diego Parade of Lights Fireworks Displays, which will include two fireworks...

  4. 75 FR 39166 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Giants Baseball Game Promotion, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Francisco Giants Baseball Game... Bay off San Francisco, CA in support of the San Francisco Giants Baseball Game Promotion. This safety... Giants will sponsor the San Francisco Giants Baseball Game Promotion on July 16, 2010, on the...

  5. 77 FR 37603 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks Display, San... Guard will enforce the safety zones for the San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks Display in the... INFORMATION: The Coast Guard will enforce the San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks Display safety...

  6. 406. Delineator Unknown April 19, 1933 ELEVATION STUDY FOR SAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    406. Delineator Unknown April 19, 1933 ELEVATION STUDY FOR SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; BOARD OF CONSULTING ARCHITECTS; TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER, ARTHUR BROWN JR., JOHN J. DONOVAN; SHEET 23 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. A Spanish Borderlands Community: San Antonio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teja, Jesus F. de la

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the founding of San Antonio, originally San Antonio de Bexar, which, in 1718, came into being as a military settlement involved in Spanish imperial defensive measures. Focuses on the development and continued growth of San Antonio, Texas's most populous city in the 19th century. (CMK)

  8. Television Viewing Habits of San Juan Students Related to Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Housden, Theresa

    This paper summarizes research on the effects of television viewing on student achievement. Information concerning students in the San Juan Unified School District in California is highlighted. Studies have revealed that: (1) watching more than 3 hours of television a day prevents students from engaging in other activities; (2) moderate television…

  9. Courtney and I Teach San Diego County History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harry, Kay

    1982-01-01

    Describes how a koala hand puppet was used to teach county history as well as reading and writing skills, multicultural awareness, music, art, and self-esteem to third graders in San Diego, California. Activities that involved the puppet are described. (AM)

  10. San Diego Met High School: Personalization as a Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of San Diego Met High School is to prepare students for college and the workforce through active learning, academic rigor, and community involvement in a small school setting. Because personalization is a key component of the school culture, advisories of 20-25 students work with the same teachers for all four years. Advisers, parents,…

  11. Pulitzer Prize Speakers Enhance Credibility of San Antonio Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aradillas, Elaine

    1994-01-01

    Describes a mass communications program at Texas's San Antonio College that invites Pulitzer Prize recipients to give guest lectures. Includes a list of the speakers who have lectured since the program's inception in 1978, a description of the speakers' accomplishments, and a description of program activities. (MAB)

  12. Foraminifera and paleoenvironments in the Etchegoin and lower San Joaquin Formations, west-central San Joaquin valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lagoe, M.B.; Tenison, J.A.; Buehring, R. )

    1991-02-01

    The Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations preserve a rich stratigraphic record of paleoenvironments, deposition, and tectonics during the late Miocene-Pliocene development of the San Joaquin basin. The distribution of foraminifera within these formations can help constrain this record, which includes final filling of the basin, facies responses to sea level changes, and active movement on the San Andreas fault system. The distribution of foraminifera in core samples is analyzed from seven wells along the west-central San joaquin basin - four from Buena Vista oil field, one from western Elk Hills oil field, and two from an area just south of South Belridge oil field. A model of modern, shallow- to marginal-marine foraminiferal biofacies is used to interpret the Etchegoin-San Joaquin faunal distributions. This modern model distinguishes marsh, tidal channel, intertidal, lagoonal, littoral, and shallow sublittoral environments. Ongoing work calibrating this foraminiferal record to the lithologic and macrofossil records in addition to interpreted depositional systems within these formations will further define relationships between paleoenvironments, relative sea level, and tectonics.

  13. Seeking Justice in San Francisco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the life of Carlos A. Garcia, superintendent at the San Francisco Unified School District. Garcia was born in Chicago, but his parents shortly thereafter moved back to their homeland of Mexico for a few years. When Garcia was almost 5, his family moved to Los Angeles, where his parents worked in factories and Garcia was…

  14. Landslide oil field, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, B.P.; March, K.A.; Caballero, J.S.; Stolle, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    The Landslide field, located at the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 by a partnership headed by Channel Exploration Company, on a farm out from Tenneco Oil Company. Initial production from the Tenneco San Emidio 63X-30 was 2064 BOPD, making landslide one of the largest onshore discoveries in California during the past decade. Current production is 7100 BOPD from a sandstone reservoir at 12,500 ft. Fifteen wells have been drilled in the field, six of which are water injectors. Production from the Landslide field occurs from a series of upper Miocene Stevens turbidite sandstones that lie obliquely across an east-plunging structural nose. These turbidite sandstones were deposited as channel-fill sequences within a narrowly bounded levied channel complex. Both the Landslide field and the larger Yowlumne field, located 3 mi to the northwest, comprise a single channel-fan depositional system that developed in the restricted deep-water portion of the San Joaquin basin. Information from the open-hole logs, three-dimensional surveys, vertical seismic profiles, repeat formation tester data, cores, and pressure buildup tests allowed continuous drilling from the initial discovery to the final waterflood injector, without a single dry hole. In addition, the successful application of three-dimensional seismic data in the Landslide development program has helped correctly image channel-fan anomalies in the southern Maricopa basin, where data quality and severe velocity problems have hampered previous efforts. New exploration targets are currently being evaluated on the acreage surrounding the Landslide discovery and should lead to an interesting new round of drilling activity in the Maricopa basin.

  15. 33 CFR 165.1185 - Regulated Navigation Area; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and..., Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and connecting waters in California. (a) Location. All waters of San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River,...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1185 - Regulated Navigation Area; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and..., Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and connecting waters in California. (a) Location. All waters of San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River,...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1185 - Regulated Navigation Area; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and..., Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and connecting waters in California. (a) Location. All waters of San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River,...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1185 - Regulated Navigation Area; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and..., Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and connecting waters in California. (a) Location. All waters of San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River,...

  19. ASTER Flyby of San Francisco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer, ASTER, is an international project: the instrument was supplied by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint US/Japan science team developed algorithms for science data products, and is validating instrument performance. With its 14 spectral bands, extremely high spatial resolution, and 15 meter along-track stereo capability, ASTER is the zoom lens of the Terra satellite. The primary mission goals are to characterize the Earth's surface; and to monitor dynamic events and processes that influence habitability at human scales. ASTER's monitoring and mapping capabilities are illustrated by this series of images of the San Francisco area. The visible and near infrared image reveals suspended sediment in the bays, vegetation health, and details of the urban environment. Flying over San Francisco (3.2MB) (high-res (18.3MB)), we see the downtown, and shadows of the large buildings. Past the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz Island, we cross San Pablo Bay and enter Suisun Bay. Turning south, we fly over the Berkeley and Oakland Hills. Large salt evaporation ponds come into view at the south end of San Francisco Bay. We turn northward, and approach San Francisco Airport. Rather than landing and ending our flight, we see this is as only the beginning of a 6 year mission to better understand the habitability of the world on which we live. For more information: ASTER images through Visible Earth ASTER Web Site Image courtesy of MITI, ERSDAC, JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  20. Neogene contraction between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley, San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Schmidt, K.M.; Jachens, R.C.; Stanley, R.G.; Jayko, A.S.; McDougall, K.A.; Tinsley, J.C.; Valin, Z.C.

    1999-01-01

    In the southern San Francisco Bay region of California, oblique dextral reverse faults that verge northeastward from the San Andreas fault experienced triggered slip during the 1989 M7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake. The role of these range-front thrusts in the evolution of the San Andreas fault system and the future seismic hazard that they may pose to the urban Santa Clara Valley are poorly understood. Based on recent geologic mapping and geophysical investigations, we propose that the range-front thrust system evolved in conjunction with development of the San Andreas fault system. In the early Miocene, the region was dominated by a system of northwestwardly propagating, basin-bounding, transtensional faults. Beginning as early as middle Miocene time, however, the transtensional faulting was superseded by transpressional NE-stepping thrust and reverse faults of the range-front thrust system. Age constraints on the thrust faults indicate that the locus of contraction has focused on the Monte Vista, Shannon, and Berrocal faults since about 4.8 Ma. Fault slip and fold reconstructions suggest that crustal shortening between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley within this time frame is ~21%, amounting to as much as 3.2 km at a rate of 0.6 mm/yr. Rates probably have not remained constant; average rates appear to have been much lower in the past few 100 ka. The distribution of coseismic surface contraction during the Loma Prieta earthquake, active seismicity, late Pleistocene to Holocene fluvial terrace warping, and geodetic data further suggest that the active range-front thrust system includes blind thrusts. Critical unresolved issues include information on the near-surface locations of buried thrusts, the timing of recent thrust earthquake events, and their recurrence in relation to earthquakes on the San Andreas fault.

  1. A study of tectonic activity in the Basin-Range Province and on the San Andreas Fault. No. 1: Kinematics of Basin-Range intraplate extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddington, P. K.; Smith, R. B.; Renggli, C.

    1986-01-01

    Strain rates assessed from brittle fracture and total brittle-ductile deformation measured from geodetic data were compared to estimates of paleo-strain from Quaternary geology for the intraplate Great Basin part of the Basin-Range, western United States. These data provide an assessment of the kinematics and mode of lithospheric extension that the western U.S. Cordillera has experienced from the past few million years to the present. Strain and deformation rates were determined by the seismic moment tensor method using historic seismicity and fault plane solutions for sub-regions of homogeneous strain. Contemporary deformation in the Great Basin occurs principally along the active seismic zones. The integrated opening rate across the entire Great Basin is accommodated by E-E extension at 8 to 10 mm/a in the north that diminishes to NW-SE extension of 3.5 mm/a in the south. Zones of maximum lithospheric extension correspond to belts of thin crust, high heat flow, and Quaternary basaltic volcanism, suggesting that these parameters are related through mechanism of extension such as a stress relaxation, allowing bouyant uplift and ascension of magmas.

  2. A new look at vertical motion around the San Andreas Fault in the Southern California from Integrated GPS and InSAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Johnson, K. M.; Weldon, R. J.; Blewitt, G.; Burgette, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Here we report on a new analysis of GPS and space-based InSAR-estimated vertical motions in the vicinity of the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) near the eastern Transverse Ranges. We consider GPS data from all of the available high precision geodetic networks in southern California such as the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory and SCIGN networks. We analyze raw GPS observations using the GIPSY-OASIS software, and align the solutions to the newly updated NA12 reference frame, derived from ITRF2008. Vertical data are considered if the station has at least 4 years of data, have time series that are fit well by a linear plus seasonal terms plus steps from known equipment changes and earthquakes. We supplement the data with rates from time series analyses of ERS and ENVISAT radar data between 1992 and 2009, obtained from the WinSAR archive. We use 532 scenes from 7 track/frames to form 7476 interferograms, providing line-of-sight (LOS) velocities for overlapping descending (6) and ascending (1) frames. To separate the vertical from the horizontal signals, we align the InSAR LOS rates to the GPS LOS rates using a bilinear transformation and subtract the LOS signal of horizontal deformation estimated from a strain rate map constructed from horizontal GPS velocities. The result is an InSAR LOS rate map aligned to NA12, which we unproject into the vertical direction. InSAR and GPS motions track one another well, with RMS difference in vertical rate of 1.0 mm/yr, where the signal of vertical rate varies between -5.0 and 2.6 mm/yr. Aligning the InSAR to GPS reduces errors in InSAR attributable to long wavelength effects from the atmosphere and orbit uncertainties. The vertical rates show both basin-scale pockets of subsidence and regional wavelength variations in uplift rate. We detect previously reported signals in the San Bernadino, San Jacinto, Pomona, and LA basins with both the GPS and InSAR. Near the coast uplift patterns are similar to those from repeated leveling

  3. Potential and limits of InSAR to characterize interseismic deformation independently of GPS data: Application to the southern San Andreas Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Johnson, C. W.; Fattahi, H.; Bürgmann, R.

    2016-03-01

    The evaluation of long-wavelength deformation associated with interseismic strain accumulation traditionally relies on spatially sparse GPS measurements, or on high spatial-resolution InSAR velocity fields aligned to a GPS-based model. In this approach the InSAR contributes only short-wavelength deformation and the two data sets are dependent, thereby challenging the evaluation of the InSAR uncertainties and the justification of atmospheric corrections. Here we present an analysis using 7 years of Envisat InSAR data to characterize interseismic deformation along the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) and the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) in southern California, where the SAF bifurcates onto the Mission Creek (MCF) and the Banning (BF) fault strands. We outline the processing steps for using InSAR alone to characterize both the short- and long-wavelength deformation, and evaluate the velocity field uncertainties with independent continuous GPS data. InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) and continuous GPS velocities agree within ˜1-2 mm/yr in the study area, suggesting that multiyear InSAR time series can be used to characterize interseismic deformation with a higher spatial resolution than GPS. We investigate with dislocation models the ability of this mean LOS velocity field to constrain fault slip rates and show that a single viewing geometry can help distinguish between different slip-rate scenarios on the SAF and SJF (˜35 km apart) but multiple viewing geometries are needed to differentiate slip on the MCF and BF (<12 km apart). Our results demonstrate that interseismic models of strain accumulation used for seismic hazards assessment would benefit from the consideration of InSAR mean velocity maps.

  4. Postseismic relaxation along the San Andreas fault at Parkfield from continuous seismological observations.

    PubMed

    Brenguier, F; Campillo, M; Hadziioannou, C; Shapiro, N M; Nadeau, R M; Larose, E

    2008-09-12

    Seismic velocity changes and nonvolcanic tremor activity in the Parkfield area in California reveal that large earthquakes induce long-term perturbations of crustal properties in the San Andreas fault zone. The 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes both reduced seismic velocities that were measured from correlations of the ambient seismic noise and induced an increased nonvolcanic tremor activity along the San Andreas fault. After the Parkfield earthquake, velocity reduction and nonvolcanic tremor activity remained elevated for more than 3 years and decayed over time, similarly to afterslip derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) measurements. These observations suggest that the seismic velocity changes are related to co-seismic damage in the shallow layers and to deep co-seismic stress change and postseismic stress relaxation within the San Andreas fault zone. PMID:18787165

  5. Origin and characteristics of discharge at San Marcos Springs, south-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Crow, Cassi L.

    2013-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is one of the most productive aquifers in the Nation and is the primary source of water for the rapidly growing San Antonio area. Springs issuing from the Edwards aquifer provide habitat for several threatened and endangered species, serve as locations for recreational activities, and supply downstream users. Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are major discharge points for the Edwards aquifer, and their discharges are used as thresholds in groundwater management strategies. Regional flow paths originating in the western part of the aquifer are generally understood to supply discharge at Comal Springs. In contrast, the hydrologic connection of San Marcos Springs with the regional Edwards aquifer flow system is less understood. During November 2008–December 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, collected and analyzed hydrologic and geochemical data from springs, groundwater wells, and streams to gain a better understanding of the origin and characteristics of discharge at San Marcos Springs. During the study, climatic and hydrologic conditions transitioned from exceptional drought to wetter than normal. The wide range of hydrologic conditions that occurred during this study—and corresponding changes in surface-water, groundwater and spring discharge, and in physicochemical properties and geochemistry—provides insight into the origin of the water discharging from San Marcos Springs. Three orifices at San Marcos Springs (Deep, Diversion, and Weissmuller Springs) were selected to be representative of larger springs at the spring complex. Key findings include that discharge at San Marcos Springs was dominated by regional recharge sources and groundwater flow paths and that different orifices of San Marcos Springs respond differently to changes in hydrologic conditions; Deep Spring was less responsive to changes in hydrologic conditions than were Diversion Spring and

  6. South elevation and main floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South elevation and main floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Includes chemistry and botany departments. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 2, job no. 311. Scale 1/8 inch to the foot. February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 10. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. Location of Water Lines, Presidio of San Francisco. Sheet 30. November 1943. SHOWING EASTERN PORTION OF CRISSY FIELD AND AREA A. - Presidio of San Francisco, Storehouse & Administration, Crissy Field North cantonment, Allen Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. 9. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. Location of Water Lines, Presidio of San Francisco. Sheet 29. June 1944. SHOWING EASTERN PORTION OF CRISSY FIELD. - Presidio of San Francisco, Storehouse & Administration, Crissy Field North cantonment, Allen Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. 111. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF SAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF SAN FRANCISCO VIADUCT WITH BUS RAMP TO TRANSBAY TERMINAL BUS LOOP IN FOREGROUND, NEAR SECOND STREET, FACING SOUTH. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. Shelving plans, elevations, and sections. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Shelving plans, elevations, and sections. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 9, job no. 311. Scale 1.2 inch to the foot. February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. South entrance, plan, section, & detail. San Bernardino Valley Union ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South entrance, plan, section, & detail. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Detailed drawings of tile work, wrought iron, and art stone, Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 6, job no. 311. Scale 1.2 inch to the foot. February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. 36. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco. Plot Plan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco. Plot Plan, Letterman Army Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 1958. SHOWING LOCATION OF BUILDINGS 1006 AND 1049 IN LETTERMAN HOSPITAL COMPLEX IN 1958. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. Elevations, plan and section PP of main entrance. San Bernardino ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations, plan and section PP of main entrance. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Library Building. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 9, job no. 315. Scale 1/2 inch to the foot. No date given on sheet (probably March or April, 1927). - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. Capteur Tridimensionnel Sans Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnant, D.

    1986-07-01

    Three-dimensionnal measurements on human body using a scanning laser beam. The active optical apparatus principle and the image data processing giving three dimensional informations of complex forms is presented. The output is given in terms of one or several files of real coordinates. The basic components of this system are : A light-sheet which is generated by a laser source and, the optical sensors (cameras) with corresponding hard-soft extractor; This 3D sensorial system is especially adapted to partial or total acquisitions of body coordinates. The main advantages are : - Vision and measurement capability of complete accessible contours without shadow areas. - The real time data acquisition and scanning of the object in a few seconds. - The access to distance measurements between significant points. - The presently obtained accuracy is better than 1/1000 in relatives units and lower than one MM absolute. - Physically stuck markers on body are not necessary. - The monochromaticity of the laser light source allows the use of a color filter over the detector (camera) for ambient light rejection. - The fully programmable capability for any use, allows the adaptation to a large variety of particular cases. - The hardware open system offers many options. - The hard-soft tool is designed for auto-calibration operation. - The system offers easy connection to a host computer or a production robot.

  15. San Francisco and Bay Area, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Although clouds obscure part of the city of San Francisco and the mouth of the Bay (37.5N, 122.0W), many cultural and natural features in the immediate vicinity are obvious. The Bay Bridge which was damaged in the 1989 earthquake, Candlestick Park, San Mateo and Dumbarton Bridges as well as the various colored settling ponds rimming the south end of the Bay, the San Andreas and Calaveras faults and many of the major highways can be seen.

  16. Metals in sediments of San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, F.G.; Aguilera, L.G. ); Sharma, V.K. )

    1994-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution in water is generally associated with industrial and municipal discharges into rivers, estuaries and lagoons. Once metals are in the water column, they may be taken up by organisms, deposited in the sediments or remain for some period in the water itself. The deposition rate in sediments depends on, among other factors, metal concentration in surface sediments. The concentrations of heavy metals in sediments of coastal, estuarine and lagoon environments have been determined by many workers. For the past several years, we have been interested in determining trace and heavy metal concentrations in the lagoons in Mexico to establish the levels of metal pollution. The work reported here is the completion of our ongoing study in San Andres lagoon. San Andres lagoon is located north of two industrial ports, Tampico and Altamira. In this industrial zone, the basins of the Panuco and Tamesi Rivers are localized and have industrial effluent throughout the year. All these activities and the input of the Tigre River, which runs through an agricultural and cattle-raising region, may affect the biogeochemistry of the San Andres lagoon. In the present work, we report concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn and Pb in sediments of San Andres lagoon. The measurements were made in different seasons; Rain-84 (August-September 1984); North (October-December 1984); Dry (April 1985); and Rain-85 (April-June 1985). 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Resistance Management for San Jose Scale (Hemiptera: Diaspididae).

    PubMed

    Buzzetti, K; Chorbadjian, R A; Nauen, R

    2015-12-01

    The San Jose scale Diaspidiotus perniciosus Comstock is one of the most important pests of deciduous fruit trees. The major cause of recent outbreaks in apple orchards is thought to be the development of insecticide resistance, specifically organophosphates. The first report was given in North America, and now, in Chile. In the present study, San Jose scale populations collected from two central regions of Chile were checked for their susceptibility to different mode of action insecticides in order to establish alternatives to manage this pest. No evidence of cross resistance between organophosphates insecticides and acetamiprid, buprofezin, pyriproxyfen, spirotetramat, sulfoxaflor, or thiacloprid was found. Baselines of LC50-LC95 for different life stages of San Jose scale are given, as reference to future studies of resistance monitoring. The systemic activity of acetamiprid, spirotetramat, and thiacloprid was higher than the contact residue effect of these compounds. For sulfoxaflor, both values were similar. Program treatments including one or more of these compounds are compared in efficacy and impact on resistance ratio values. In order to preserve new insecticides as an important tool to control San Jose scale, resistance management programs should be implemented, considering insecticide mode of action classes alternated or mixed. PMID:26470382

  18. Geodetic constraints on vertical tectonic deformation in the Coachella and San Bernardino Valleys from InSAR and well level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisely, B. A.; Schmidt, D.

    2006-12-01

    San Bernardino Valley extends the analysis of Lu and Danskin (2001) who used single pair interferometry from 1992-1995. Lu and Danskin identified two areas of substantial uplift in the vicinities of the Lytle Creek subbasin and Santa Ana River, which they attribute to high runoff and recharge in 1993. We observe that the uplift is transitory and that residual subsidence in these same two areas has occurred since 1995 at an average rate of 5 mm/yr. Several groundwater barriers in the basin are clearly imaged in the stacked interferograms. Although no clear signal aligns with the trace of the San Jacinto fault, we hypothesize that this fault marks a partition in the aquifer based on the InSAR timeseries.

  19. 75 FR 35651 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Chronicle Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; San Francisco Chronicle Fireworks Display, San Francisco... will enforce the Independence Day Celebration for the City of San Francisco Fireworks safety zone from 11 a.m. through 10 p.m. on July 4, 2010. The fireworks will be fired simultaneously from two...

  20. 78 FR 18238 - Safety Zone; SFPD Training Safety Zone; San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register SFPD San Francisco Police Department NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; SFPD Training Safety Zone; San Francisco... Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone in the navigable waters of the San Francisco Bay...

  1. 77 FR 57494 - Safety Zone; Fleet Week Fireworks, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Fleet Week Fireworks, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco... will enforce the safety zone for the Fleet Week Fireworks in the Captain of the Port, San Francisco...'' W (NAD83) for the Fleet Week Fireworks in 33 CFR 165.1191, Table 1, item number 25. This safety...

  2. Metamorphism of San Antonio Terrane metapelites, San Gabriel Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, L.; Ishimatsu, J.; Schneiderman, J.S. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Pelitic schists and gneisses from the San Antonio terrane in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains consist of garnet, biotite, plagioclase, quartz, sillimanite, cordierite, hercynite [+-] alkali feldspar. Large garnet porphyroblasts contain quartz, plagioclase and sillimanite inclusions. Cordierite occurs as haloes around garnet porphyroblasts and as small subgrains always associated with hercynite and together replacing sillimanite blades. Hercynite additionally appears to have nucleated on the edges of sillimanite blades. Contrary to previous investigations, hercynite appears to be a late mineral phase. Reaction textures described above have been used to calculate a set of net-transfer reactions that can be used (1) to characterize all possible exchanges of matter between minerals in the system and (2) to construct a reaction space for the system. Fourteen thin sections with large garnet porphyroblasts and abundant biotite were used for microprobe analysis. Detailed probe analyses show well-developed zoning in the plagioclase and alkali feldspar whose character varies depending on location in the thin section relative to neighboring minerals. Generally, large plagioclase porphyroblasts display normal zoning and are not as calcium-rich as plagioclase inclusions in the garnet. Garnet porphyroblasts have flat zoning profiles due to high temperatures of metamorphism. Pressures and temperatures of metamorphism have been calculated from these assemblages using garnet-biotite geothermometry and quartz-garnet-aluminosilicate-plagioclase geobarometry.

  3. SAN RAFAEL PRIMITIVE AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gower, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    No mineral-resource potential was identified during studies of the San Rafael Primitive Area, located at the southern end of the Coast Ranges of California. No petroleum has been produced from the area and there is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources. Limestone occurs in the area but also is found in abundance outside the area. Inasmuch as sampling and analytical techniques have improved significantly since this study was completed a restudy of the area using new methodology is possibly warranted.

  4. San Francisco floating STOLport study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The operational, economic, environmental, social and engineering feasibility of utilizing deactivated maritime vessels as a waterfront quiet short takeoff and landing facility to be located near the central business district of San Francisco was investigated. Criteria were developed to evaluate each site, and minimum standards were established for each criterion. Predicted conditions at the two sites were compared to the requirements for each of the 11 criteria as a means of evaluating site performance. Criteria include land use, community structure, economic impact, access, visual character, noise, air pollution, natural environment, weather, air traffic, and terminal design.

  5. 8. GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST (Title Insurance Co. collection, San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST (Title Insurance Co. collection, San Diego Historical Society). Historical view, no date, photocopied for HABS, 1975 - Long-Waterman House, 2408 First Avenue, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Photo by Muybridge, Gleason Collection San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Photo by Muybridge, Gleason Collection San Francisco College for Women Ca. 1870 CONSTRUCTION VIEW FROM SOUTH - U. S. Branch Mint, Mission & Fifth Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLEX (drawing from History of San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF COMPLEX (drawing from History of San Diego County, California, published 1883. Photocopy 1975 by Bert Shankland, San Diego). - Johnson-Taylor Ranch House, Black Mountain Road vicinity, Rancho Penasquitos, San Diego County, CA

  8. Space Radar Image of San Francisco, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This image of San Francisco, California shows how the radar distinguishes between densely populated urban areas and nearby areas that are relatively unsettled. Downtown San Francisco is at the center and the city of Oakland is at the right across the San Francisco Bay. Some city areas, such as the South of Market, called the SOMA district in San Francisco, appear bright red due to the alignment of streets and buildings to the incoming radar beam. Various bridges in the area are also visible including the Golden Gate Bridge (left center) at the opening of San Francisco Bay, the Bay Bridge (right center) connecting San Francisco and Oakland, and the San Mateo Bridge (bottom center). All the dark areas on the image are relatively smooth water: the Pacific Ocean to the left, San Francisco Bay in the center, and various reservoirs. Two major faults bounding the San Francisco-Oakland urban areas are visible on this image. The San Andreas fault, on the San Francisco peninsula, is seen in the lower left of the image. The fault trace is the straight feature filled with linear reservoirs which appear dark. The Hayward fault is the straight feature on the right side of the image between the urban areas and the hillier terrain to the east. The image is about 42 kilometers by 58 kilometers (26 miles by 36 miles) with north toward the upper right. This area is centered at 37.83 degrees north latitude, 122.38 degrees east longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 3, 1994. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  9. Sediment accumulation in San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century - A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, K.M.; Fuller, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Major changes made in the configuration of San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century have caused rapid sedimentation within parts of the Bay. Comparison of bathymetric surveys indicates that sedimentation in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel averaged 0.7 cm/annum between 1856 and 1984. Lead-210 data collected at four shallow water sites east of the San Leandro Bay channel indicated that sedimentation rates have averaged between 0.06 and 0.28 cm/annum. Because bioturbation of bottom sediments cannot be discounted, better definition of this range in sedimentation rates would require measuring the activity of lead-210 on incoming sediments. In addition to sediment deposited in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel and open, shallow areas to the east, 850,740 cu m of sediment was deposited between 1948 and 1983 in an area dredged at the mouth of San Leandro Creek. All available data indicate that between 1,213,000 and 1,364,000 cu m of sediment was deposited in San Leandro Bay between 1948 and 1983. Sediment yield data from an adjacent drainage basin, when combined with inventories of lead-210 and cesium-137, indicate that most of the sediment deposited in San Leandro Bay is coming from resuspension of bottom sediments or from erosion of marshes or shorelines of San Leandro or San Francisco Bay. 31 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Explosive and Phreatomagmatic Activity from San Salvador Volcanic Complex (El Salvador) and Their Effects on El Cambio Archaeological Site: a Review of the Last 3000 yrs. Based on Volcanic Stratigraphy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrés, D.; Delgado, H.; Pullinger, C.; Castillo, R.; Chávez, H. I.

    2007-05-01

    El Cambio archeological site (ECAS; Zapotitán Valley), 4 km NW from the San Salvador Volcanic Complex comprises 3000 yrs. of pyroclastic record. Sheets (1983) identified different levels rich in cultural remains intercalated within the volcanic deposits, indicating that different prehistoric settings were affected by San Salvador volcano eruptions, and giving information on the reoccupation frequency in the area. Accordingly, ECAS was occupied since the Late Pre-Classic period until before the last plinian eruption of Ilopango Caldera (425AD) reference, that originated the Tierra Blanca Joven (TBJ), pyroclastic deposits generally used as key-layer in stratigraphic reconstructions. Within the next two centuries, there is no evidence of human occupation at ECAS until the end of Late Classic which was a period of maximum splendor in the valley. During this time the area was affected by at least 3 eruptions from the San Salvador volcanic complex that produced the: Laguna Caldera volcanic fall deposits (which affected Joya de Cerén archeological site in 625AD), "Talpetate" surge deposits or Toba de San Andrés (600-900AD), and fall deposits of El Playón volcano (1658). We report new data on volcanic stratigraphy and archeological history including the following: a) the phreatomagmatic nature of eruptions that affected the area, the new excavations allowed the detailed study of surge deposits indicating magma-water interaction at Laguna Caldera and El Playón, previously considered strombolian eruptions; b)document the occupation of ECAS during Middle Pre-Classic period, new surge deposits below TBJ have been identified (with Middle Pre-Classic artifacts and pottery), that had not been documented before, extending the historic record up to 3000 yrs. BP. and c) detailed study of the "Talpetate" deposits, this sequence consists of fall, pyroclastic flow and surge deposits, present in the rim and slopes of San Salvador Volcano, which can be correlated with surge deposits

  11. MAPP in action in San Antonio, Texas.

    PubMed

    Shields, Kathleen M; Pruski, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    San Antonio was selected as an official Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) demonstration site by National Association of County and City Officials in 2000. The San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, under the leadership of Dr Fernando A. Guerra, agreed to facilitate the process. The MAPP process provided the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, the local public health authority, a defined process for community health improvement, as well as a mechanism to help bridge the gap between public health and the community. The San Antonio Metropolitan Health District organized a Core Planning Team to lead the MAPP process in April 2001. By October 2002, the Core Planning Team was expanded to a full community working group named the Alliance for Community Health in San Antonio and Bexar County (Alliance). The Alliance identified six strategic issues, which eventually became the basis of the San Antonio Community Health Improvement Plan. The strategic issues are Public Policy, Data Tracking, Healthy Lifestyles, Promoting a Sense of Community, Access to Care, and Safe Environment. San Antonio's MAPP experience has been successful in bringing together the public health system partners, and establishing public health priorities collectively. The MAPP process has resulted in the development of many new initiatives, and, most important, has opened the door to many partnership opportunities in the future. The work of the Alliance, through the MAPP process, has helped to leverage resources for public health improvement in San Antonio, and has the potential to effect positive change in public health in the future. PMID:16103814

  12. San Diego's High School Dropout Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James C.

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights San Diego's dropout problem and how much it's costing the city and the state. Most San Diegans do not realize the enormous impact high school dropouts on their city. The California Dropout Research Project, located at the University of California at Santa Barbara, has estimated the lifetime cost of one class or cohort of…

  13. Trouble Brewing in San Francisco. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The city of San Francisco will face enormous budgetary pressures from the growing deficits in public pensions, both at a state and local level. In this policy brief, the author estimates that San Francisco faces an aggregate $22.4 billion liability for pensions and retiree health benefits that are underfunded--including $14.1 billion for the city…

  14. San Diego City College Accreditation Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahata, Gail M.; Armstrong, William B.

    In fall, 1996, the San Diego Community College District undertook a self-study period to prepare for the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) visit in 1998. Faculty, staff, and students at San Diego City College were asked if the College met the ten standards of the ACCJC as evidence of "good educational practices."…

  15. Jack London and the San Francisco earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sachs, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    After it was over, it seemed to many, and especially to eyewitnesses like Jack London, that the earthquake and fire had devastated San Francisco. However people were confident that, like the phoeniz, San Francisco would rise from the ashes and regain her palce as the "Imperial City of the West." 

  16. Geomorphological expression of a complex structural region: San Andreas Fault through the San Gorgonio Pass, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, K. J.; Matti, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) region of southern California is a locus of extensive Quaternary deformation surrounding a complex section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) zone. The geomorphology of the SGP region reflects the complicated history of geologic events in the formation of this structural 'knot'. Critical questions remain in assessing earthquake hazard for this region: What is the likelihood that rupture will propagate through the SGP? If rupture is able to propagate, what pathway will connect the various fault strands? To address these questions, we focus on the geology and geomorphology of the SGP region. We have identified fault-bounded blocks, and focus on three that are developed within crystalline bedrock: the Yucaipa Ridge block (YRB) block, the Kitching Peak block (KPB), and the Pisgah Peak block (PPB). The latter two blocks are positioned south of the YRB, and partially separated from each other by the San Bernardino strand; this strand cannot be mapped at the surface as an active connection between fault strands. Both KPB and PPB are bounded to the south by the San Gorgonio Pass Fault Zone. Morphometric analyses consistently demonstrate distinctions between KPB and PPB, though the bedrock lithologies are the same. Geologic mapping of the region highlights the differences in Quaternary units within the blocks. These geomorphic and geologic distinctions lead to our interpretation that KPB and PPB have experienced markedly different uplift histories that constrain the history of dextral slip on the SAF through SGP. Specifically, although the latest Quaternary geologic setting of SGP raises questions about modern slip transfer through the Pass, the contrasting uplift histories of KPB and PPB strongly suggest that earlier in Quaternary time SGP was not a barrier to slip transfer between the Coachella Valley to the SE and the San Bernardino Basin to the NW.

  17. Solar-energy-system performance evaluation. San Anselmo School, San Jose, California, April 1981-March 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkala, P. A.

    The San Anselmo School is a one story brick elementary school building in San Jose, California. The active solar energy system is designed to supply 70% of the space heating and 72% of the cooling load. It is equipped with 3740 square feet of evacuated tube collectors, a 2175 gallon tank for heat storage, a solar supplied absorption chiller, and four auxiliary gas fired absorption chillers/heaters. The measured solar fraction of 19% is far below the expected values and is attributed to severe system control and HVAC problems. Other performance data given for the year include the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Also tabulated are monthly performance data for the overall solar energy system, collector subsystem, space heating and cooling subsystems. Typical hourly operation data for a day are tabulated, including hourly isolation, collector array temperatures (inlet and outlet), and storage fluid temperatures. The solar energy use and percentage of losses are also graphed.

  18. The paleoseismology of the San Andreas fault at Pitman Canyon, San Bernadino, California

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, G.; Weldon, R.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The San Andreas fault at Pitman Canyon creates a well-defined downhill-facing scarp in young alluvium deposited mainly as debris flows. Groundwater rising on the uphill side of the scarp produces marshes that accumulate peat deposits. Trench exposures and C-14 dates confirm that this depositional environment, resulting in a datable section of inter-layered debris flows and peats, has existed for at least 1,400 years. The scarp extends across the entire canyon floor with the exception of a central shutterridge, offset along the fault, and the active channel. At the shutterridge this datable section overlies the fault and is involved in the faulting. A debris flow levee is offset approximately 4 meters and is inferred to be caused by the 1812 earthquake. To the northwest similar 4 meter offsets exist in Purdue and Lone Pine Canyons (Weldon and Sieh, 1985). An older debris flow lobe which postdates 1659 AD, the earliest possible age of a directly underlying C-14 dated peat is offset 7--8 meter indicating a similar size event post 1659 AD. Up to three additional events prior to 1280 AD were recognized in trench exposures based upon the upward termination of fault breaks, facies mismatches, and folding. Further study of offset buried debris flows and channels should allow determination of displacement per event. This preliminary record suggests extending the 1812 rupture into the San Bernadino region and is compatible with extending an approximately 1700 AD event from Indio to Wrightwood.

  19. Nonvolcanic tremors deep beneath the San Andreas Fault.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Robert M; Dolenc, David

    2005-01-21

    We have discovered nonvolcanic tremor activity (i.e., long-duration seismic signals with no clear P or S waves) within a transform plate boundary zone along the San Andreas Fault near Cholame, California, the inferred epicentral region of the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake (moment magnitude approximately 7.8). The tremors occur between 20 to 40 kilometers' depth, below the seismogenic zone (the upper approximately 15 kilometers of Earth's crust where earthquakes occur), and their activity rates may correlate with variations in local earthquake activity. PMID:15591163

  20. Earthquake Swarm Along the San Andreas Fault near Palmdale, Southern California, 1976 to 1977.

    PubMed

    McNally, K C; Kanamori, H; Pechmann, J C; Fuis, G

    1978-09-01

    Between November 1976 and November 1977 a swarm of small earthquakes (local magnitude San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California. This swarm was the first observed along this section of the San Andreas since cataloging of instrumental data began in 1932. The activity followed partial subsidence of the 35-centimeter vertical crustal uplift known as the Palmdale bulge along this "locked" section of the San Andreas, which last broke in the great (surface-wave magnitude = 8(1/4)+) 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake. The swarm events exhibit characteristics previously observed for some foreshock sequences, such as tight clustering of hypocenters and time-dependent rotations of stress axes inferred from focal mechanisms. However, because of our present lack of understanding of the processes that precede earthquake faulting, the implications of the swarm for future large earthquakes on the San Andreas fault are unknown. PMID:17738534

  1. Earthquake swarm along the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, Southern California, 1976 to 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mcnally, K.C.; Kanamori, H.; Pechmann, J.C.; Fuis, G.

    1978-01-01

    Between November 1976 and November 1977 a swarm of small earthquakes (local magnitude ??? 3) occurred on or near the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California. This swarm was the first observed along this section of the San Andreas since cataloging of instrumental data began in 1932. The activity followed partial subsidence of the 35-centimeter vertical crustal uplift known as the Palmdale bulge along this "locked" section of the San Andreas, which last broke in the great (surface-wave magnitude = 81/4+) 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake. The swarm events exhibit characteristics previously observed for some foreshock sequences, such as tight clustering of hypocenters and time-dependent rotations of stress axes inferred from focal mechanisms. However, because of our present lack of understanding of the processes that precede earthquake faulting, the implications of the swarm for future large earthquakes on the San Andreas fault are unknown. Copyright ?? 1978 AAAS.

  2. Mineralogy from Cores in Prospect Gulch, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, Dana J.; Johnson, Raymond H.; Yager, Douglas B.

    2007-01-01

    In the late nineteenth century, San Juan County, Colorado, was the center of a metal mining boom in the San Juan Mountains. Although most mining activity ceased by the 1990s, the effects of historical mining continue to contribute metals to ground water and surface water. Previous research by the U.S. Geological Survey identified ground-water discharge as a significant pathway for the loading of metals to surface water from both acid-mine drainage and acid-rock drainage. In an effort to understand the ground-water flow system in the upper Animas River watershed, Prospect Gulch was selected for further study because of the amount of previous data provided in and around that particular watershed. In support of this ground-water research effort, data was collected from drill core, which included: (1) detailed descriptions of the subsurface geology and hydrothermal alteration patterns, (2) depth of sulfide oxidation, and (3) quantitative mineralogy.

  3. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Theroux, Susanna; Hartman, Wyatt; He, Shaomei; Tringe, Susannah

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  4. Diazinon and chlorpyrifos loads in the San Joaquin River basin, California, January and February 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Zamora, Celia; Knifong, Donna L.

    2002-01-01

    The application of diazinon and chlorpyrifos on dormant orchards in 2000 in the San Joaquin River Basin was less than 21 percent of application in 1993 and 1994. A total of 13 sites were sampled weekly during nonstorm periods and more frequently during two storm periods. The sites included five major river and eight minor tributary sites. The highest concentrations of diazinon and chlorpyrifos occurred during the storm periods. Four samples from major river sites (Tuolumne River and two San Joaquin River sites) had diazinon concentrations greater than 0.08 microgram per liter, the concentration being considered by the state of California as its criterion maximum concentration for the protection of aquatic habitat. One sample from a major river site (San Joaquin River) exceeded the equivalent State guideline of 0.02 microgram per liter for chlorpyrifos. At the eight minor tributary sites, 24 samples exceeded the diazinon guideline and four samples exceeded the chlorpyrifos guideline. The total diazinon load in the San Joaquin River near Vernalis during January and February 2000 was 19.6 pounds active ingredient; of this, 8.17 pounds active ingredient was transported during two storms. In 1994, 27.4 pounds active ingredient was transported during two storms. The total chlorpyrifos load in the San Joaquin River near Vernalis during January and February 2000 was 5.68 pounds active ingredient; of this, 2.17 pounds active ingredient was transported during the two storms. During the frequently sampled February 2000 storm, the main sources of diazinon in the San Joaquin River Basin were the San Joaquin River near Stevinson Basin (25 percent), Tuolumne River Basin (14 percent), and the Stanislaus River Basin (10 percent). The main sources of chlorpyrifos in the San Joaquin River Basin were the San Joaquin River near Stevinson Basin (17 percent), Tuolumne River Basin (13 percent), and the Merced River Basin (11 percent). The total January and February diazinon load in the

  5. San Francisco and Bay Area, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Although clouds obscure part of the city of San Francisco and the mouth of the Bay (37.5N, 122.0W), many cultural and natural features in the immediate vicinity are obvious. The Bay Bridge which was damaged in the 1989 earthquake, Candlestick Park, San Mateo and Dumbarton Bridges as well as the various colored settling ponds rimming the south end of the Bay, the San Andreas and Calaveras faults and many of the major highways can be seen. Color infrared photography is very useful for haze penetration and greater definition of the imagery as well as vegetation detection, depicted as shades of red.

  6. San Francisco and Bay Area, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This cloud free color infrared view of San Francisco and Bay Area, CA (38.0N, 122.5W) is unusual because the city is normally concealed from view by clouds and fog. Gray tones represent urban areas and the red toned areas are vegetated. Within the city, parks easily stand out from the well-developed parts of the city as enclaves of color. The trace of the San Andreas fault shows as a straight valley running across the San Francisco peninsula.

  7. CIRSS vertical data integration, San Bernardino study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, W.; Christenson, J.; Michel, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The creation and use of a vertically integrated data base, including LANDSAT data, for local planning purposes in a portion of San Bernardino County, California are described. The project illustrates that a vertically integrated approach can benefit local users, can be used to identify and rectify discrepancies in various data sources, and that the LANDSAT component can be effectively used to identify change, perform initial capability/suitability modeling, update existing data, and refine existing data in a geographic information system. Local analyses were developed which produced data of value to planners in the San Bernardino County Planning Department and the San Bernardino National Forest staff.

  8. SANS studies of micellar and magnetic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B,

    1985-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has proved to be an excellent technique for the study of complex fluids. This article introduces SANS from the viewpoint of such studies. The use of SANS to determine the structures of concentrated micellar fluids is then discussed within the framework of current one-component macrofluid (OCM) models, and experimental examples are taken from several contemporary studies. Finally, the discussion is extended to magnetic fluids (ferrofluids) in which the neutron magnetic interaction plays an important experimental role. 25 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Inventory of San Joaquin kit fox on BLM lands in southern and southwestern San Joaquin Valley. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.; McCue, P.; Sauls, M.L.

    1980-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide the Bureau of Land Management, Bakersfield District, with information on the distribution of the San Joaquin kit fox, an endangered species, on public lands in the southern and southwestern San Joaquin Valley of California, and to develop information essential for designating kit fox critical habitats on lands under their jurisdiction as outlined by the Endangered Species Act and its amendments. A total of 31,860 acres of BLM lands were surveyed using line transects at a density of 8 per linear mile. Observations were recorded on: (1) kit fox dens, tracks, scats, and remains of their prey; (2) vegetation associations; (3) topography; (4) evidence of human activities; (5) species composition and abundance of wildlife seen, especially lagomorphs; (6) presence of Eriogonum gossypinum, a plant of special interest; and (7) presence of the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, another endangered species.

  10. 42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital, X-Ray Department and Second Floor Plan, X-Ray Department Plan, Building 1006. no date. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. 19. REGIONAL MAP, SALINAS RIVER PROJECT, CAMP SAN LUIS OBISPO, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. REGIONAL MAP, SALINAS RIVER PROJECT, CAMP SAN LUIS OBISPO, IN CENTRAL PORTION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA. Leeds Hill Barnard & Jewett - Consulting Engineers, February 1942. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  12. 21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital. EKG Cardiology Clinic, Building 1049. December 1955. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. 22. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Building # ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Building # 1049 Letterman General Hospital. Alterations to EKG Cardiology Clinic. November 1963. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. 1. ABANDONED TURNOUT (CALLED CAPTAIN WHEEL) TO SAN TAN INDIAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ABANDONED TURN-OUT (CALLED CAPTAIN WHEEL) TO SAN TAN INDIAN CANAL OFF OF SAN TAN FLOOD-WATER CANAL, T4S, R6E, S11/12. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - San Carlos Irrigation Project, San Tan Indian Canal, North of Gila River, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  15. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Hemet 7.5' Quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Matti, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    The Hemet 7.5' quadrangle is located near the eastern edge of the Perris block of the Peninsular Ranges batholith. The northeastern corner of the quadrangle extends across the San Jacinto Fault Zone onto the edge of the San Jacinto Mountains block. The Perris block is a relatively stable area located between the Elsinore Fault Zone on the west and the San Jacinto Fault Zone on the east. Both of the fault zones are active; the San Jacinto being the seismically most active in southern California. The fault zone is obscured by very young alluvial deposits. The concealed location of the San Jacinto Fault Zone shown on this quadrangle is after Sharp, 1967. The geology of the quadrangle is dominated by Cretaceous tonalite formerly included in the Coahuila Valley pluton of Sharp (1967). The northern part of Sharp's Coahuila Valley pluton is separated out as the Hemet pluton. Tonalite of the Hemet pluton is more heterogeneous than the tonalite of the Coahuila Valley pluton and has a different sturctural pattern. The Coahuila Valley pluton consists of relatively homogeneous hornblende-biotite tonalite, commonly with readily visible large euhedral honey-colored sphene crystals. Only the tip of the adjacent Tucalota Valley pluton, another large tonalite pluton, extends into the quadrangle. Tonalite of the Tucalota Valley pluton is very similar to the tonalite of the Coahuila Valley pluton except it generally lacks readily visible sphene. In the western part of the quadrangle a variety of amphibolite grade metasedimentary rocks are informally referred to as the rocks of Menifee Valley; named for exposures around Menifee Valley west of the Hemet quadrangle. In the southwestern corner of the quadrangle a mixture of schist and gneiss marks a suture that separated low metamorphic grade metasedimentary rocks to the west from high metamorphic grade rocks to the east. The age of these rocks is interpreted to be Triassic and the age of the suturing is about 100 Ma, essentially the

  16. Variability of fault slip behavior along the San Andreas Fault in the San Juan Bautista Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Bürgmann, Roland; Nadeau, Robert M.; Dreger, Douglas S.

    2014-12-01

    An improved understanding of the time history of fault slip at depth is an essential step toward understanding the underlying mechanics of the faulting process. Using a waveform cross-correlation approach, we document spatially and temporally varying fault slip along the northernmost creeping section of the San Andreas Fault near San Juan Bautista (SJB), California, by systematically examining spatiotemporal behaviors of characteristically repeating earthquakes (CREs). The spatial distribution of pre-1998 SJB earthquake (1984-1998) fault slip rate inferred from the CREs reveals a ~15 km long low creep or partially locked section located near the 1998 Mw 5.1 SJB earthquake rupture. A finite-fault slip inversion reveals that the rupture of the 1998 SJB earthquake is characterized by the failure of a compact ~4 km2 asperity with a maximum slip of about 90 cm and corresponding peak stress drop of up to 50 MPa, whereas the mean stress drop is about 15 MPa. Following the 1998 earthquake, the CRE activity was significantly increased in a 5-10 km deep zone extending 2-7 km northwest of the main shock, which indicates triggering of substantial aseismic slip. The postseismic slip inferred from the CRE activity primarily propagated to the northwest and released a maximum slip of 9 cm. In this 5-10 km depth range, the estimated postseismic moment release is 8.6 × 1016 N m, which is equivalent to Mw 5.22. The aseismic slip distribution following the 1998 earthquake is not consistent with coseismic stress-driven afterslip but represents a triggered, long-lasting slow earthquake.

  17. Sediment conditions in the San Antonio River Basin downstream from San Antonio, Texas, 2000-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Banta, J. Ryan; Crow, Cassi L.; Opsahl, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment plays an important role in the ecological health of rivers and estuaries and consequently is an important issue for water-resource managers. To better understand sediment characteristics in the San Antonio River Basin, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio River Authority, completed a two-part study in the San Antonio River Basin downstream from San Antonio, Texas, to (1) collect and analyze sediment data to characterize sediment conditions and (2) develop and calibrate a watershed model to simulate hydrologic conditions and suspended-sediment loads during 2000–12.

  18. Underwater gravity meter survey of San Francisco and San Pablo bays, California, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childs, Jonathan R.; Beyer, L.A.; McCulloch, D.S.; McHendrie, G.A.; Steele, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Seafloor gravity measurements were made at 281 bottom stations in San Francisco and San Pablo Bays, California, on a series of lines oriented approximately NNE.. Line spacing was approximately 2.8 km and stations along the lines mere spaced 0.5 to 1.5 km apart, between 0.5 and 1.5 km perpendicular to the axis. Sample Bouguer anomalies in the San Francisco Bay range from -15 to +15 mGals (?0.1 mgal), while anomalies in the San Pablo Bay are consistently negative, ranging from +4.0 to -40.0 mGal (?0.2 mGal).

  19. 76 FR 10945 - San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, CA; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, CA; Notice of Appointment of... Corporation as sole Receiver for San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, California, (OTS No. 15051)...

  20. Suicide Among Chinese in San Francisco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourne, Peter G.

    1973-01-01

    Reports on a study which investigated suicide among Chinese in San Francisco, its relationship to age and sex distribution, place of birth, marital status, occupation, and methods and causes of suicide. (SF)

  1. Computerized Bus Routing in San Francisco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell, Peter J.; Jungherr, J. Anton

    1979-01-01

    A computerized routing and scheduling system for the San Francisco Public Schools includes the batch processing of bus route assignments and schedules for all schools and the online terminal processing of daily changes. (Author/MLF)

  2. Foundation plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Library Building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Foundation plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Library Building. Also includes sections A through MM. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 1, job no. 315. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (plan) and 1/2 inch to the foot (sections). No date given on sheet (probably March or April, 1927). - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. East and west elevations. San Berardino Valley Union Junior College, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East and west elevations. San Berardino Valley Union Junior College, Library Building. Also includes miscellaneous full size details. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 4, Job no. 315. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (elevations). No date given on sheet (probably March or April, 1927). - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. 2. SAN FRANCISCO STREET PROFILES: Photocopy of engraving, c. 1880, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SAN FRANCISCO STREET PROFILES: Photocopy of engraving, c. 1880, showing street profiles of two San Francisco cable railroads. Figure 10 illustrates the mainline of the Sutter Street Railroad on Sutter Street, while Figure 11 shows the route of the Presidio & Ferries Railroad along Union Street. Note the lack of significant grades along the Sutter Street route. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 1. SAN FRANCISCO STREET PROFILES: Photocopy of engraving, c. 1880, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SAN FRANCISCO STREET PROFILES: Photocopy of engraving, c. 1880, showing street profiles of three San Francisco cable lines. Figure 7, at bottom of engraving, is the profile of Hallidie's Clay Street Hill Railroad. Figures 8 and 9 show the grades for the California Street Cable Railroad and the Geary Street Park & Ocean Railroad respectively. Note the lack of significant grades along Geary Street. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. East and west elevations. San Berardino Valley Union Junior College, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East and west elevations. San Berardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Also includes elevations and sections of chemistry department shelving. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 4, Job no. 311. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (elevations) and 1/2 inch t other foot (shelving). February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. West elevation. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West elevation. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Also includes plan of entrance, section EE showing tiling and typical transom design, and a full size detail of a door jamb for inside concrete walls. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 7, job no. 311. Scale 1.2 inch to the foot. February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. Section AA through main entrance gates & west stairs. San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section AA through main entrance gates & west stairs. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Also includes plans and sections of boys' and girls' toilets. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 5, job no. 311. Scales 1/4 inch to the foot (section AA) and 1/2 inch to the foot (toilet rooms). February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. North elevation and second floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North elevation and second floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Includes physics, geology, and zoology departments shelving. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 4, job no. 311. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (elevations) and 1/2 inch to the foot (shelving). February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. Elevation and plan of east side entrance. San Bernardino Valley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation and plan of east side entrance. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Library Building. Also includes sections II and SS of entrance hall; and a stress diagram of steel truss. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 7, job no. 315. Scale 1/2 inch to the foot. No date given on sheet (probably March or April, 1927). - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. 11. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. Location of Water Lines, Presidio of San Francisco. Sheet 31. November 1943. SHOWING EASTERN PORTION OF AREA A; BUILDINGS 274, 275, AND 277; AND POST ENGINEER'S SHOP AND YARDS INCLUDING BUILDINGS 280, 282-285, AND 288. - Presidio of San Francisco, Storehouse & Administration, Crissy Field North cantonment, Allen Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. Plot plan & miscellaneous details. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plot plan & miscellaneous details. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Classics Building. Includes map drawers, surveying equipment lockers, counters, platforms, etc. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 8, job no. 312. Scales 1/2 inch to the foot (details) and 1/64 inch to the foot (plot plan). February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Classics Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. Foundation plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Classics Building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Foundation plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Classics Building. Also includes sections AA-KK (except DD). Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 1, job no. 312. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (plan) and 1/2 inch to the foot (sections). February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Classics Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. Ecological Impact of LAN: San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Eric Richard; Craine, Brian L.

    2015-08-01

    The San Pedro River in Southeastern Arizona is home to nearly 45% of the 900 total species of birds in the United States; millions of songbirds migrate though this unique flyway every year. As the last undammed river in the Southwest, it has been called one of the “last great places” in the US. Human activity has had striking and highly visible impacts on the San Pedro River. As a result, and to help preserve and conserve the area, much of the region has been designated the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area (SPRNCA). Attention has been directed to impacts of population, water depletion, and border fence barriers on the riparian environment. To date, there has been little recognition that light at night (LAN), evolving with the increased local population, could have moderating influences on the area. STEM Laboratory has pioneered techniques of coordinated airborne and ground based measurements of light at night, and has undertaken a program of characterizing LAN in this region. We conducted the first aerial baseline surveys of sky brightness in 2012. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) shapefiles allow comparison and correlation of various biological databases with the LAN data. The goal is to better understand how increased dissemination of night time lighting impacts the distributions, behavior, and life cycles of biota on this ecosystem. We discuss the baseline measurements, current data collection programs, and some of the implications for specific biological systems.

  15. Earthquakes and fault creep on the northern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nason, R.

    1979-01-01

    At present there is an absence of both fault creep and small earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault, which had a magnitude 8 earthquake with 5 m of slip in 1906. The fault has apparently been dormant after the 1906 earthquake. One possibility is that the fault is 'locked' in some way and only produces great earthquakes. An alternative possibility, presented here, is that the lack of current activity on the northern San Andreas fault is because of a lack of sufficient elastic strain after the 1906 earthquake. This is indicated by geodetic measurements at Fort Ross in 1874, 1906 (post-earthquake), and 1969, which show that the strain accumulation in 1969 (69 ?? 10-6 engineering strain) was only about one-third of the strain release (rebound) in the 1906 earthquake (200 ?? 10-6 engineering strain). The large difference in seismicity before and after 1906, with many strong local earthquakes from 1836 to 1906, but only a few strong earthquakes from 1906 to 1976, also indicates a difference of elastic strain. The geologic characteristics (serpentine, fault straightness) of most of the northern San Andreas fault are very similar to the characteristics of the fault south of Hollister, where fault creep is occurring. Thus, the current absence of fault creep on the northern fault segment is probably due to a lack of sufficient elastic strain at the present time. ?? 1979.

  16. Danggui-Shaoyao-San: New Hope for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin; Wang, QiuHong; Wang, ZhiBin; Kuang, HaiXue; Jiang, Pinghui

    2016-08-01

    Danggui-Shaoyao-San (DSS), also called Toki-shakuyaku-san (TJ-23) or Dangguijakyak-san (DJS), is a well-known herbal formula (Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels., Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort., Paeonia lactiflora pall., Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf, Alisma orientalis (Sam.) Juzep., Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz.), which has been widely used in oriental countries for the treatment of various gynecological diseases. Recent studies show that DSS has an effect on free radical-mediated neurological diseases and exhibits anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and reduces cell apoptosis in the hippocampus. In addition, DSS mediates the modulation of central monoamine neurotransmitter systems and ameliorates dysfunction of the central cholinergic nervous system and scopolamine-induced decrease in ACh levels. DSS improves the function of the dopaminergic, adrenergic, and serotonergic nervous systems. Interestingly, DSS can alleviate cognitive dysfunction of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, suggesting that it is a useful therapeutic agent for AD. This paper reviews the mechanism of DSS for the treatment of AD. PMID:27493835

  17. Danggui-Shaoyao-San: New Hope for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xin; Wang, QiuHong; Wang, ZhiBin; Kuang, HaiXue; Jiang, Pinghui

    2016-01-01

    Danggui-Shaoyao-San (DSS), also called Toki-shakuyaku-san (TJ-23) or Dangguijakyak-san (DJS), is a well-known herbal formula (Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels., Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort., Paeonia lactiflora pall., Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf, Alisma orientalis (Sam.) Juzep., Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz.), which has been widely used in oriental countries for the treatment of various gynecological diseases. Recent studies show that DSS has an effect on free radical-mediated neurological diseases and exhibits anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and reduces cell apoptosis in the hippocampus. In addition, DSS mediates the modulation of central monoamine neurotransmitter systems and ameliorates dysfunction of the central cholinergic nervous system and scopolamine-induced decrease in ACh levels. DSS improves the function of the dopaminergic, adrenergic, and serotonergic nervous systems. Interestingly, DSS can alleviate cognitive dysfunction of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, suggesting that it is a useful therapeutic agent for AD. This paper reviews the mechanism of DSS for the treatment of AD. PMID:27493835

  18. Trouble Brewing in San Diego. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The city of San Diego will face enormous budgetary pressures from the growing deficits in public pensions, both at a state and local level. In this policy brief, the author estimates that San Diego faces total of $45.4 billion, including $7.95 billion for the county pension system, $5.4 billion for the city pension system, and an estimated $30.7…

  19. Children and the San Fernando earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    Before dawn, on February 9, 1971, a magnitude 6.4 earthquake occurred in the San Fernando Valley of California. On the following day, theSan Fernando Valley Child Guidance Clinic, through radio and newspapers, offered mental health crises services to children frightened by the earthquake. Response to this invitation was immediate and almost overwhelming. During the first 2 weeks, the Clinic's staff counseled hundreds of children who were experiencing various degrees of anxiety. 

  20. Tracer study of San Vicente reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    The City of San Diego remains on the cutting edge of water conservation. With an unwavering commitment to maintain an adequate water supply for the future, water repurification is now being considered. The City of San Diego and San Diego Water Authority (CWA) have proposed to recycle repurified water through San Vicente Reservoir. A key component of assessing the feasibility of such a project is to calculate the retention time of repurified water in the reservoir. Working with engineering consultant team (Montgomery-Watson Engineers and Flow Science, Incorporated) two tracer studies were conducted to model the circulation and mixing of repurified water introduced into the reservoir. The goal was to determine whether repurified water recycled through San Vicente will meet the retention time criteria established by the Department of Health Services. This presentation however, will not attempt to interpret the results of the study, that aspect will be evaluated by the Flow Scientist. The objective here is to explain how the project was carried out and to focus mostly on the analytical work performed on the samples by the chemist in the City of San Diego Water Quality Laboratory.

  1. Toxic phytoplankton in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodgers, Kristine M.; Garrison, David L.; Cloern, James E.

    1996-01-01

    The Regional Monitoring Program (RMP) was conceived and designed to document the changing distribution and effects of trace substances in San Francisco Bay, with focus on toxic contaminants that have become enriched by human inputs. However, coastal ecosystems like San Francisco Bay also have potential sources of naturally-produced toxic substances that can disrupt food webs and, under extreme circumstances, become threats to public health. The most prevalent source of natural toxins is from blooms of algal species that can synthesize metabolites that are toxic to invertebrates or vertebrates. Although San Francisco Bay is nutrient-rich, it has so far apparently been immune from the epidemic of harmful algal blooms in the world’s nutrient-enriched coastal waters. This absence of acute harmful blooms does not imply that San Francisco Bay has unique features that preclude toxic blooms. No sampling program has been implemented to document the occurrence of toxin-producing algae in San Francisco Bay, so it is difficult to judge the likelihood of such events in the future. This issue is directly relevant to the goals of RMP because harmful species of phytoplankton have the potential to disrupt ecosystem processes that support animal populations, cause severe illness or death in humans, and confound the outcomes of toxicity bioassays such as those included in the RMP. Our purpose here is to utilize existing data on the phytoplankton community of San Francisco Bay to provide a provisional statement about the occurrence, distribution, and potential threats of harmful algae in this Estuary.

  2. ASTER Images San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These images of the San Francisco Bay region were acquired on March 3, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. Each covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 75 kilometers (47 miles) long. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Upper Left: The color infrared composite uses bands in the visible and reflected infrared. Vegetation is red, urban areas are gray; sediment in the bays shows up as lighter shades of blue. Thanks to the 15 meter (50-foot) spatial resolution, shadows of the towers along the Bay Bridge can be seen.

    Upper right: A composite of bands in the short wave infrared displays differences in soils and rocks in the mountainous areas. Even though these regions appear entirely vegetated in the visible, enough surface shows through openings in the vegetation to allow the ground to be imaged.

    Lower left: This composite of multispectral thermal bands shows differences in urban materials in varying colors. Separation of materials is due to differences in thermal emission properties, analogous to colors in the visible.

    Lower right: This is a color coded temperature image of water temperature, derived from the thermal bands. Warm waters are in white and yellow, colder waters are blue. Suisun Bay in the upper right is fed directly from the cold Sacramento River. As the water flows through San Pablo and San Francisco Bays on the way to the Pacific, the waters warm up.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is

  3. Teaching Geology at San Quentin State Prison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, M. A.; Pehl, J.; Ferrier, K. L.; Pehl, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    The students enrolled in our Geology 215 class are about as on-traditional as it gets. They range in age from about 20 - 50 years old, they are all male, all from under-represented ethnic groups, and they are all serving time in one of the country's most notorious prisons. We teach in a degree-granting community college program inside California's San Quentin State Prison. The program is run entirely by volunteers, and students who participate in educational programs like ours are about 5 times less likely to return to prison than the general inmate population in California. The prison population of California is ethnically diverse, though minorities are present in higher proportion than in the general population. Last semester, our geology class happened to be composed entirely of minorities even though the college program serves the full spectrum of the prison population. While some trends in geoscience education encourage the use of technology in the classroom, security restrictions prevent us from using even some of the simplest visual aids. Faced with these challenges, we have developed an inquiry-based syllabus for an introductory Geology class at the community college level. We find that kinaesthetic learning activities such as urban geologic mapping and acting out plate tectonic motions from ridge to trench (complete with magnetic pole polarity shifts) are not only possible in restricted learning environments, but they promote student learning in unexpected ways.

  4. Abrupt along-strike change in tectonic style: San Andreas fault zone, San Francisco Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.L.; Jachens, R.C.; Olson, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Seismicity and high-resolution aeromagnetic data are used to define an abrupt change from compressional to extensional tectonism within a 10- to 15-km-wide zone along the San Andreas fault on the San Francisco Peninsula and offshore from the Golden Gate. This 100-km-long section of the San Andreas fault includes the hypocenter of the Mw = 7.8 1906 San Francisco earthquake as well as the highest level of persistent microseismicity along that ???470-km-long rupture. We define two distinct zones of deformation along this stretch of the fault using well-constrained relocations of all post-1969 earthquakes based a joint one-dimensional velocity/hypocenter inversion and a redetermination of focal mechanisms. The southern zone is characterized by thrust- and reverse-faulting focal mechanisms with NE trending P axes that indicate "fault-normal" compression in 7- to 10-km-wide zones of deformation on both sides of the San Andreas fault. A 1- to 2-km-wide vertical zone beneath the surface trace of the San Andreas is characterized by its almost complete lack of seismicity. The compressional deformation is consistent with the young, high topography of the Santa Cruz Mountains/Coast Ranges as the San Andreas fault makes a broad restraining left bend (???10??) through the southernmost peninsula. A zone of seismic quiescence ???15 km long separates this compressional zone to the south from a zone of combined normal-faulting and strike-slip-faulting focal mechanisms (including a ML = 5.3 earthquake in 1957) on the northernmost peninsula and offshore on the Golden Gate platform. Both linear pseudo-gravity gradients, calculated from the aeromagnetic data, and seismic reflection data indicate that the San Andreas fault makes an abrupt ???3-km right step less than 5 km offshore in this northern zone. A similar right-stepping (dilatational) geometry is also observed for the subparallel San Gregorio fault offshore. Persistent seismicity and extensional tectonism occur within the San

  5. Chronology of eclipse "San Miao"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ci-Yuan

    2001-06-01

    The ancient book "Mozi" (5th century BC) records: "In ancient times, the San Miao tribes were in disarray. The sun rose in the evening...King Yu vanquished them. "King Yu is a prehistoric person living in 23-19th century BC. The strange phenomena "sun rose in evening" was explained as a large solar eclipse at sunset by Pang. Therefore investigations on it may lead to an important progress of Chinese chronology. After an analysis on all similar records in Chinese history, we pay main attention to the relationship of eclipse computations with parameter "c", the long term of earth's rotation rate. We have computed all the solar eclipses in that period by the way similar to that used for investigating the "double dawn" eclipse. By change parameter "c" in reasonable range (28-36 sec/cy2), we have found 11 possible results listed in a table. One figure shows the eclipse maps and relative "double dawn/dusk" areas while another one illustrates how the parameter "c" affects the result. For an exact conclusion of King Yu's chronology, we need further progress from both side: history which may limit the King Yu's period and astronomy which may limit the possible range of parameter "c".

  6. Accelerating and spatially-varying crustal uplift and its geomorphic expression, San Andreas Fault zone north of San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Karen; Sklar, Leonard S.; Scherer, Anne Marie; Lee, Gina; Davis, Jerry

    2010-12-01

    Marine terraces that bevel the western flank of the Point Reyes Peninsula were used to measure crustal uplift rates west of the San Andreas Fault segment north of San Francisco. Field measurements of platform inner edges, and luminescence ages from overlying marine sediments, suggest the youngest platform was cut by waves during the ~ 80-ka sea-level high stand (MIS 5a). Since 80 ka, the platform has been uplifted slowly throughout most of the peninsula, but more rapidly in the southern part, where uplift reaches a rate of ~ 1 m/ka. Analyses of the spatial distributions of hillslope gradient and elevation are consistent with the terrace data. Correlations of older terrace levels to high-stand ages suggest that crustal uplift has accelerated in the southern part of the peninsula during the past ~ 300 ky, probably as a result of a contractional zone that has been migrating northward. This study is the first to quantify the rate and style of crustal uplift west of this San Andreas Fault segment. Although the transform motions in this region are well documented, the complex nature of interacting fault strands are only beginning to be understood. These results imply that other faults, with reverse-motions, are also active and potentially contributing to earthquake hazards.

  7. MONITORING REPORT FOR 1995 AND 1996 - SAN FRANCISCO DEEP OCEAN DISPOSAL SITE (SF-DODS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the findings of Tier 1 monitoring activities at the San Francisco Deep Ocean Disposal Site (SF-DODS) for calendar years 1995 and 1996. The regional monitoring activities included: collection of regional physical oceanographic data; net sampling of plankton ...

  8. Deep permeability of the San Andreas Fault from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) core samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Lockner, David A.; Moore, Diane E.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific borehole near Parkfield, California crosses two actively creeping shear zones at a depth of 2.7 km. Core samples retrieved from these active strands consist of a foliated, Mg-clay-rich gouge containing porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock. The adjacent damage zone and country rocks are comprised of variably deformed, fine-grained sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. We conducted laboratory tests to measure the permeability of representative samples from each structural unit at effective confining pressures, Pe up to the maximum estimated in situ Pe of 120 MPa. Permeability values of intact samples adjacent to the creeping strands ranged from 10−18 to 10−21 m2 at Pe = 10 MPa and decreased with applied confining pressure to 10−20–10−22 m2 at 120 MPa. Values for intact foliated gouge samples (10−21–6 × 10−23 m2 over the same pressure range) were distinctly lower than those for the surrounding rocks due to their fine-grained, clay-rich character. Permeability of both intact and crushed-and-sieved foliated gouge measured during shearing at Pe ≥ 70 MPa ranged from 2 to 4 × 10−22 m2 in the direction perpendicular to shearing and was largely insensitive to shear displacement out to a maximum displacement of 10 mm. The weak, actively-deforming foliated gouge zones have ultra-low permeability, making the active strands of the San Andreas Fault effective barriers to cross-fault fluid flow. The low matrix permeability of the San Andreas Fault creeping zones and adjacent rock combined with observations of abundant fractures in the core over a range of scales suggests that fluid flow outside of the actively-deforming gouge zones is probably fracture dominated.

  9. Deep permeability of the San Andreas Fault from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) core samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Lockner, D. A.; Moore, D. E.; Hickman, S.

    2014-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific borehole near Parkfield, California crosses two actively creeping shear zones at a depth of 2.7 km. Core samples retrieved from these active strands consist of a foliated, Mg-clay-rich gouge containing porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock. The adjacent damage zone and country rocks are comprised of variably deformed, fine-grained sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. We conducted laboratory tests to measure the permeability of representative samples from each structural unit at effective confining pressures, Pe up to the maximum estimated in situ Pe of 120 MPa. Permeability values of intact samples adjacent to the creeping strands ranged from 10-18 to 10-21 m2 at Pe = 10 MPa and decreased with applied confining pressure to 10-20-10-22 m2 at 120 MPa. Values for intact foliated gouge samples (10-21-6 × 10-23 m2 over the same pressure range) were distinctly lower than those for the surrounding rocks due to their fine-grained, clay-rich character. Permeability of both intact and crushed-and-sieved foliated gouge measured during shearing at Pe ≥ 70 MPa ranged from 2 to 4 × 10-22 m2 in the direction perpendicular to shearing and was largely insensitive to shear displacement out to a maximum displacement of 10 mm. The weak, actively-deforming foliated gouge zones have ultra-low permeability, making the active strands of the San Andreas Fault effective barriers to cross-fault fluid flow. The low matrix permeability of the San Andreas Fault creeping zones and adjacent rock combined with observations of abundant fractures in the core over a range of scales suggests that fluid flow outside of the actively-deforming gouge zones is probably fracture dominated.

  10. San Ardo--A case history of a successful steam flood

    SciTech Connect

    Traverse, E.F.; Deibert, A.D.; Sustek, A.J.

    1983-03-01

    Texaco's largest steam flood project is in the San Ardo Field in California, and is a model of a successful steam flooding operation. This reservoir still has about 600 million barrels of 11 to 14/sup 0/ API oil in place, and now produces about 20,000 BOPD. The San Ardo Field is located approximately halfway between San Francisco and Los Angeles in Monterey County, California. Several characteristics of the San Ardo operation make it a rather unique steam flood. But the most unique and significant characteristic relates to demonstrated recoveries of from 40% to over 80% of the OOIP in the active portion of the steam flood. An extension of the performance to date indicates that over 65% to 70% of the OOIP will eventually be recovered. Effective reservoir management, including the development of innovative pattern strategy, and proven operational practices have formed the basis for the current performance. This paper reviews the evolution of the field operation and stress new activities that Texaco is implementing at San Ardo to produce more oil and to do it more efficiently. These activities include a field test of a downhole steam generator.

  11. Evidence for Late Oligocene-Early Miocene episode of transtension along San Andreas Fault system in central California

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, R.G.

    1986-04-01

    The San Andreas is one of the most intensely studied fault systems in the world, but many aspects of its kinematic history remain controversial. For example, the period from the late Eocene to early Miocene is widely believed to have been a time of negligible strike-slip movement along the San Andreas fault proper, based on the rough similarity of offset of the Eocene Butano-Point of rocks Submarine Fan, the early Miocene Pinnacles-Neenach volcanic center, and an early Miocene shoreline in the northern Gabilan Range and San Emigdio Mountains. Nonetheless, evidence indicates that a late Oligocene-early Miocene episode of transtension, or strike-slip motion with a component of extension, occurred within the San Andreas fault system. The evidence includes: (1) about 22-24 Ma, widespread, synchronous volcanic activity occurred at about 12 volcanic centers along a 400-km long segment of the central California coast; (2) most of these volcanic centers are located along faults of the San Andreas system, including the San Andreas fault proper, the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault, and the Zayante-Vergeles fault, suggesting that these and other faults were active and served as conduits for magmas rising from below; (3) during the late Oligocene and early Miocene, a pull-apart basin developed adjacent to the San Andreas fault proper in the La Honda basin near Santa Cruz; and (4) during the late Oligocene and early Miocene, active faulting, rapid subsidence, and marine transgression occurred in the La Honda and other sedimentary basins in central California. The amount of right-lateral displacement along the San Andreas fault proper during this transtentional episode is unknown but was probably about 7.5-35 km, based on model studies of pull-apart basin formation. This small amount of movement is well within the range of error in published estimates of the offset of the Eocene to early Miocene geologic features noted.

  12. Investigating Fault Slip and Rheology Along the San Andreas Fault in the San Juan Bautista Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, T.; Burgmann, R.; Nadeau, R. M.; Dreger, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    An improved understanding of the connection between seismic behavior and fault-zone rheology at depth is an essential step toward understanding the underlying mechanics of the faulting process. We investigate the seismicity along the northernmost creeping section of the San Andreas fault near San Juan Bautista (SJB), California, by systematically examining spatiotemporal behaviors of the aftershock sequences following the 12 August 1998 Mw 5.1 SJB earthquake. This 1998 SJB earthquake was the largest historic earthquake in the SJB area and was associated with a large slow slip event. Using a waveform cross-correlation approach (Peng and Zhao, 2009, NatureGeo), we have detected previously uncataloged earthquakes (about 500 events), resolving details of the aftershock activity in a zone at a depth of 9 km about 7 km northwest of the 1998 SJB mainshock. This aftershock zone is marked by one of the highest changes in the seismicity rate, exhibiting a delayed peak (about 20 hours after the mainshock) in the rate of aftershocks preceded by a period of very low rate of aftershocks since the mainshock. Subsequently, the rate of aftershocks shows power-law decay with time for about 1 month, and then the aftershock activity approached the pre-earthquake background level. This temporal behavior of the aftershock activity is different from the predicted aftershock decay based on the model of Dieterich (1994, JGR). Instead, our observation is more consistent with the decay rate of aftershocks occurring in the transition zone between locked and stable slip, as simulated numerically by Kaneko and Lapusta (2008, JGR). Our waveform analysis also identifies over 20 repeating microearthquake sequences (or groups of earthquakes with similar waveforms) associated with the 1998 SJB mainshock. The majority of the sequences have events occurring in the first month of the postseismic period. In other words, they reflect short-lived, accelerated repeater recurrences activated by the 1998 SJB

  13. 78 FR 29289 - Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA... Big Bay Boom Fireworks display from 8:45 p.m. to 10 p.m. on July 4, 2013. These proposed safety zones... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A....

  14. 78 FR 39610 - Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay; San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay; San Diego, CA... Fourth of July Big Bay Boom Fireworks display on the evening of July 4, 2013. These temporary safety... as being available in the docket, go to http://www.regulations.gov , type the docket number in...

  15. 33 CFR 165.754 - Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... remain in the safety zone unless authorized by the Captain of the Port, San Juan, Puerto Rico, or a... through the safety zone with a Coast Guard designated escort. (3) The Captain of the Port and the Duty Officer at Sector San Juan, Puerto Rico, can be contacted at telephone number 787-289-2041. The...

  16. 75 FR 51098 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Register on August 14, 2007 (72 FR 45444), announcing our intent to complete a CCP/EA and inviting public... Fish and Wildlife Service Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan, Skagit, and Whatcom Counties, WA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior....

  17. 78 FR 10062 - Safety Zone; Sea World San Diego Fireworks, Mission Bay; San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sea World San Diego Fireworks, Mission Bay... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Mission Bay in support of the Sea World San...

  18. The Economic Impact of San Juan College on San Juan County, New Mexico, 1991-92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary Jo

    A study was conducted of the economic impact of San Juan College (SJC) in Farmington, New Mexico, on businesses and employment in San Juan County during fiscal year (FY) 1991-92. The five components used to measure the college's tangible economic impact on the local community were SJC's total expenditures in FY 1991-92 used to buy goods and…

  19. 77 FR 46115 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...The San Diego Museum of Man has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and a present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the San Diego Museum of Man.......

  20. 76 FR 14051 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection...

  1. 78 FR 29025 - Sea World San Diego Fireworks 2013 Season; Mission Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Sea World San Diego Fireworks 2013 Season; Mission Bay... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Mission Bay in support of the Sea World San...

  2. 77 FR 42638 - Safety Zone: Sea World San Diego Fireworks, Mission Bay; San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: Sea World San Diego Fireworks, Mission Bay... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Mission Bay in support of the Sea World San...

  3. 77 FR 60899 - Safety Zone; Sea World San Diego Fireworks, Mission Bay; San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sea World San Diego Fireworks, Mission Bay... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Mission Bay in support of the Sea World San...

  4. Una Visita al Viejo San Juan (A Visit to Old San Juan).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabello, Victor; And Others

    Written in Spanish, this black and white illustrated booklet provides a tour of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico's oldest and most historic city. Brief historical information is provided on the Perro de San Jeronimo, a statue of a barking dog found in front of the Castillo; Plaza de Colon, a small plaza dedicated to Christopher Columbus; the Catedral de…

  5. The San Andreas Fault 'Supersite' (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.

    2013-12-01

    An expanded and permanent Supersite has been proposed to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) for the San Andreas Fault system, based upon the successful initial Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Geohazard Supersite for the Los Angeles region from 2009-2013. As justification for the comprehensive San Andreas Supersite, consider the earthquake history of California, in particular the devastating M 7.8 San Francisco earthquake of 1906, which occurred along the San Andreas Fault, as did an earthquake of similar magnitude in 1857 in southern California. Los Angeles was only a small town then, but now the risk exposure has increased for both of California's megacities. Between the San Francisco and Los Angeles urban areas lies a section of the San Andreas Fault known to creep continually, so it has relatively less earthquake hazard. It used to be thought of as capable of stopping earthquakes entering it from either direction. Transitional behavior at either end of the creeping section is known to display a full range of seismic to aseismic slip events and accompanying seismicity and strain transient events. Because the occurrence of creep events is well documented by instrumental networks such as CISN and PBO, the San Andreas Supersite can be expected to be especially effective. A good baseline level of geodetic data regarding past events and strain accumulation and release exists. Many prior publications regarding the occurrence of geophysical phenomena along the San Andreas Fault system mean that in order to make novel contributions, state-of-the-art science will be required within this Supersite region. In more recent years, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake struck adjacent to the San Andreas Fault and caused the most damage along the western side of the San Francisco Bay Area. More recently, the concern has focused on the potential for future events along the Hayward Fault along the eastern side of San Francisco Bay. In Southern California, earthquakes

  6. Anthropogenic influence on sedimentation and intertidal mudflat change in San Pablo Bay, California: 1856-1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, B.E.; Smith, R.E.; Foxgrover, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of a series of historical bathymetric surveys has revealed large changes in morphology and sedimentation from 1856 to 1983 in San Pablo Bay, California. In 1856, the morphology of the bay was complex, with a broad main channel, a major side channel connecting to the Petaluma River, and an ebb-tidal delta crossing shallow parts of the bay. In 1983, its morphology was simpler because all channels except the main channel had filled with sediment and erosion had planed the shallows creating a uniform gently sloping surface. The timing and patterns of geomorphic change and deposition and erosion of sediment were influenced by human activities that altered sediment delivery from rivers. From 1856 to 1887, high sediment delivery (14.1 ?? 106 m3/yr) to San Francisco Bay during the hydraulic gold-mining period in the Sierra Nevada resulted in net deposition of 259 ?? 14 ?? 106 m3 in San Pablo Bay. This rapid deposition filled channels and increased intertidal mudflat area by 60% (37.4 ?? 3.4 to 60.6 ?? 6.2 km2). From 1951 to 1983, 23 ?? 3 ?? 106 m3 of sediment was eroded from San Pablo Bay as sediment delivery from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers decreased to 2.8 ?? 106 m3/yr because of damming of rivers, riverbank protection, and altered land use. Intertidal mudflat area in 1983 was 31.8 ?? 3.9 km2, similar to that in 1856. Intertidal mudflat distribution in 1983, however, was fairly uniform whereas most of the intertidal mudflats were in the western part of San Pablo Bay in 1856. Sediment delivery, through its affect on shallow parts of the bay, was determined to be a primary control on intertidal mudflat area. San Pablo Bay has been greatly affected by human activities and will likely continue to erode in the near term in response to a diminished sediment delivery from rivers. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. California coastal processes study: Skylab. [San Pablo and San Francisco Bays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirie, D. M.; Steller, D. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In San Pablo Bay, the patterns of dredged sediment discharges were plotted over a three month period. It was found that lithogenous particles, kept in suspension by the fresh water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin, were transported downstream to the estuarine area at varying rates depending on the river discharge level. Skylab collected California coastal imagery at limited times and not at constant intervals. Resolution, however, helped compensate for lack of coverage. Increased spatial and spectral resolution provided details not possible utilizing Landsat imagery. The S-192 data was reformatted; band by band image density stretching was utilized to enhance sediment discharge patterns entrainment, boundaries, and eddys. The 26 January 1974 Skylab 4 imagery of San Francisco Bay was taken during an exceptionally high fresh water and suspended sediment discharge period. A three pronged surface sediment pattern was visible where the Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers entered San Pablo Bay through Carquinez Strait.

  8. Research Report: Alternative Calendar Student Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Kimberley

    Eleven classes from the San Jacinto campus and ten classes from the Menifee Valley campus of Mount San Jacinto College (MSJC) (California) participated in a survey designed to obtain students' preferences for an alternative 16-6-16-6 academic calendar. Stratified random sampling techniques were used to obtain representative courses from across the…

  9. Dual-system Tectonics of the San Luis Range and Vicinity, Coastal Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    The M 6.5 "San Simeon" earthquake of December 22, 2003, occurred beneath the Santa Lucia Range in coastal central California, and resulted in around $250,000,000 property damage and two deaths from collapse of an historic building in the town of Paso Robles, located 40 km from the epicenter. The earthquake and more than 10,000 aftershocks were well recorded by nearby seismographs, which permitted detailed analysis of the event (eg: McLaren et al., 2008). This analysis facilitated evaluation of the hazard of the occurrence of a similar event in the nearby San Luis Range, located along the coast west of the city of San Luis Obispo some 55 km south of the San Simeon epicenter. The future occurrence of earthquakes analogous to the 2003 event in this area had been proposed in the late 1960’s (eg: Benioff and Smith, 1967; Richter, 1969) but the apparent hazard of such occurrences came to be overshadowed by the discovery of the “Hosgri” strike slip fault passing close to the area in the offshore. However data accumulated since the early 1970’s clearly demonstrate the hazard as being partitioned between nearby earthquakes of strike slip origin, and underlying earthquakes of thrust origin analogous to that of the 2003 San Simeon earthquake. And for the onshore San Luis Range area, an underlying actively seismogenic thrust wedge appears to provide the maximum potential seismic ground motion; exceeding that potentially resulting from large events on nearby strike slip faults of the San Simeon-Hosgri system, for onshore sites. Understanding and documentation of the geology, geomorphology, tectonics and seismogenesis of the San Luis Range and vicinity has recently experienced a quantum improvement as both new and accumulated data have been analysed. An integrated interpretation of all available data now clearly shows that a dual “side by side” system of active tectonics exists in the region. Essentially the most obvious evidence for this is seen simply in the

  10. Insights from low-temperature thermochronometry into transpressional deformation and crustal exhumation along the San Andreas fault in the western Transverse Ranges, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Nathan A.; Buscher, Jamie T.; Spotila, James A.; House, Martha A.; Kelley, Shari A.

    2013-12-01

    San Emigdio Mountains are an example of an archetypical, transpressional structural system, bounded to the south by the San Andreas strike-slip fault, and to the north by the active Wheeler Ridge thrust. Apatite (U-Th)/He and apatite and zircon fission track ages were obtained along transects across the range and from wells in and to the north of the range. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages are 4-6 Ma adjacent to the San Andreas fault, and both (U-Th)/He and fission track ages grow older with distance to the north from the San Andreas. The young ages north of the San Andreas fault contrast with early Miocene (U-Th)/He ages from Mount Pinos on the south side of the fault. Restoration of sample paleodepths in the San Emigdio Mountains using a regional unconformity at the base of the Eocene Tejon Formation indicates that the San Emigdio Mountains represent a crustal fragment that has been exhumed more than 5 km along the San Andreas fault since late Miocene time. Marked differences in the timing and rate of exhumation between the northern and southern sides of the San Andreas fault are difficult to reconcile with existing structural models of the western Transverse Ranges as a thin-skinned thrust system. Instead, these results suggest that rheologic heterogeneities may play a role in localizing deformation along the Big Bend of the San Andreas fault as the San Emigdio Mountains are compressed between the crystalline basement of Mount Pinos and oceanic crust that underlies the southern San Joaquin Valley.

  11. Chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in sediment cores from San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venkatesan, M.I.; De Leon, R. P.; VanGeen, A.; Luoma, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment cores of known chronology from Richardson and San Pablo Bays in San Francisco Bay, CA, were analyzed for a suite of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls to reconstruct a historic record of inputs. Total DDTs (DDT = 2,4'- and 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and the metabolites, 2,4'- and 4,4'-DDE, -DDD) range in concentration from 4-21 ng/g and constitute a major fraction (> 84%) of the total pesticides in the top 70 cm of Richardson Bay sediment. A subsurface maximum corresponds to a peak deposition date of 1969-1974. The first measurable DDT levels are found in sediment deposited in the late 1930's. The higher DDT inventory in the San Pablo relative to the Richardson Bay core probably reflects the greater proximity of San Pablo Bay to agricultural activities in the watershed of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) occur at comparable levels in the two Bays (< 1-34 ng/g). PCBs are first detected in sediment deposited during the 1930's in Richardson Bay, about a decade earlier than the onset of detectable levels of DDTs. PCB inventories in San Pablo Bay are about a factor of four higher in the last four decades than in Richardson Bay, suggesting a distribution of inputs not as strongly weighed towards the upper reaches of the estuary as DDTs. The shallower subsurface maximum in PCBs compared to DDT in the San Pablo Bay core is consistent with the imposition of drastic source control measures four these constituents in 1970 and 1977 respectively. The observed decline in DDT and PCB levels towards the surface of both cores is consistent with a dramatic drop in the input of these pollutants once the effect of sediment resuspension and mixing is taken into account.

  12. Cacao use and the San Lorenzo Olmec

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Terry G.; Cyphers, Ann; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Grivetti, Louis; Cheong, Kong

    2011-01-01

    Mesoamerican peoples had a long history of cacao use—spanning more than 34 centuries—as confirmed by previous identification of cacao residues on archaeological pottery from Paso de la Amada on the Pacific Coast and the Olmec site of El Manatí on the Gulf Coast. Until now, comparable evidence from San Lorenzo, the premier Olmec capital, was lacking. The present study of theobromine residues confirms the continuous presence and use of cacao products at San Lorenzo between 1800 and 1000 BCE, and documents assorted vessels forms used in its preparation and consumption. One elite context reveals cacao use as part of a mortuary ritual for sacrificial victims, an event that occurred during the height of San Lorenzo's power. PMID:21555564

  13. Cacao use and the San Lorenzo Olmec.

    PubMed

    Powis, Terry G; Cyphers, Ann; Gaikwad, Nilesh W; Grivetti, Louis; Cheong, Kong

    2011-05-24

    Mesoamerican peoples had a long history of cacao use--spanning more than 34 centuries--as confirmed by previous identification of cacao residues on archaeological pottery from Paso de la Amada on the Pacific Coast and the Olmec site of El Manatí on the Gulf Coast. Until now, comparable evidence from San Lorenzo, the premier Olmec capital, was lacking. The present study of theobromine residues confirms the continuous presence and use of cacao products at San Lorenzo between 1800 and 1000 BCE, and documents assorted vessels forms used in its preparation and consumption. One elite context reveals cacao use as part of a mortuary ritual for sacrificial victims, an event that occurred during the height of San Lorenzo's power. PMID:21555564

  14. Observing the San Andreas Fault at Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, W.; Hickman, S.; Zoback, M.; Davis, E.; Gee, L.; Huggins, R.; Krug, R.; Lippus, C.; Malin, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Paulsson, B.; Shalev, E.; Vajapeyam, B.; Weiland, C.; Zumberge, M.

    2005-12-01

    Extending 4 km into the Earth along a diagonal path that crosses the divide between Salinian basement accreted to the Pacific Plate and Cretaceous sediments of North America, the main hole at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was designed to provide a portal into the inner workings of a major plate boundary fault. The successful drilling and casing of the main hole in the summer of 2005 to a total vertical depth of 3.1 km make it possible to conduct spatially extensive and long-duration observations of active tectonic processes within the actively deforming core of the San Andreas Fault. In brief, the observatory consists of retrievable seismic, deformation and environmental sensors deployed inside the casing in both the main hole (maximum temperature 135 C) and the collocated pilot hole (1.1 km depth), and a fiber optic strainmeter installed behind casing in the main hole. By using retrievable systems deployed on either wire line or rigid tubing, each hole can be used for a wide range of scientific purposes, with instrumentation that takes maximum advantage of advances in sensor technology. To meet the scientific and technical challenges of building the observatory, borehole instrumentation systems developed for use in the petroleum industry and by the academic community in other deep research boreholes have been deployed in the SAFOD pilot hole and main hole over the past year. These systems included 15Hz omni-directional and 4.5 Hz gimbaled seismometers, micro-electro-mechanical accelerometers, tiltmeters, sigma-delta digitizers, and a fiber optic interferometeric strainmeter. A 1200-m-long, 3-component 80-level clamped seismic array was also operated in the main hole for 2 weeks of recording in May of 2005, collecting continuous seismic data at 4000 sps. Some of the observational highlights include capturing one of the M 2 SAFOD target repeating earthquakes in the near-field at a distance of 420 m, with accelerations of up to 200 cm/s and a

  15. Salt Ponds, South San Francisco Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    higher resolution 1000 pixel-wide image The red and green colors of the salt ponds in South San Francisco Bay are brilliant visual markers for astronauts. The STS-111 crew photographed the bay south of the San Mateo bridge in June, 2002. This photograph is timely because a large number of the salt ponds (more than 16,500 acres) that are owned by Cargill, Inc. will be sold in September for wetlands restoration-a restoration project second in size only to the Florida Everglades project. Rough boundaries of the areas to be restored are outlined on the image. Over the past century, more than 80% of San Francisco Bay's wetlands have been filled and developed or diked off for salt mining. San Francisco Bay has supported salt mining since 1854. Cargill has operated most of the bay's commercial salt ponds since 1978, and had already sold thousands of acres to the State of California and the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge. This new transaction will increase San Francisco Bay's existing tidal wetlands by 50%. The new wetlands, to be managed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will join the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge, and provide valuable habitat for birds, fish and other wildlife. The wetlands will contribute to better water quality and flood control in the bay, and open up more coastline for public enjoyment. Additional information: Cargill Salt Ponds (PDF) Turning Salt Into Environmental Gold Salt Ponds on Way to Becoming Wetlands Historic Agreement Reached to Purchase San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds Astronaut photograph STS111-376-3 was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth

  16. Forecasting the Next Great San Francisco Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, P.; Rundle, J. B.; Turcotte, D. L.; Donnellan, A.; Yakovlev, G.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2005-12-01

    The great San Francisco earthquake of 18 April 1906 and its subsequent fires killed more than 3,000 persons, and destroyed much of the city leaving 225,000 out of 400,000 inhabitants homeless. The 1906 earthquake occurred on a km segment of the San Andreas fault that runs from the San Juan Bautista north to Cape Mendocino and is estimated to have had a moment magnitude m ,l 7.9. Observations of surface displacements across the fault were in the range m. As we approach the 100 year anniversary of this event, a critical concern is the hazard posed by another such earthquake. In this talk we examine the assumptions presently used to compute the probability of occurrence of these earthquakes. We also present the results of a numerical simulation of interacting faults on the San Andreas system. Called Virtual California, this simulation can be used to compute the times, locations and magnitudes of simulated earthquakes on the San Andreas fault in the vicinity of San Francisco. Of particular importance are new results for the statistical distribution of interval times between great earthquakes, results that are difficult or impossible to obtain from a purely field-based approach. We find that our results are fit well under most circumstances by the Weibull statistical distribution, and we compute waiting times to future earthquakes based upon our simulation results. A contrasting approach to the same problem has been adopted by the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, who use observational data combined with statistical assumptions to compute probabilities of future earthquakes.

  17. Location and Shallow Structure of the Frijoles Strand of the San Gregorio Fault Zone, Pescadero, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Lent, C.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M. R.; Steedman, C. E.; Prentice, C. S.

    2003-12-01

    The San Gregorio fault is one of the principal faults of the San Andreas fault system in the San Francisco Bay area. Located west of the active trace of the San Andreas fault and near the coast, the San Gregorio fault zone consists of at least two northwest-southeast-trending strands, the Coastways and Frijoles faults. Little is known about the slip history on the San Gregorio, and information for the Frijoles fault is especially scarce, as it lies mostly offshore. To better understand the contribution of the San Gregorio fault zone to slip along the San Andreas fault system, we conducted a high-resolution, seismic imaging investigation of the Frijoles fault to locate near-surface, onshore, branches of the fault that may be suitable for paleoseismic trenching. Our seismic survey consisted of a 590-meter-long, east-west-trending, combined seismic reflection and refraction profile across Butano Creek Valley, in Pescadero, California. The profile included 107 shot points and 120 geophones spaced at 5-m increments. Seismic sources were generated by a Betsy Seisgun in 0.3-m-deep holes. Data were recorded on two Geometrics Strataview RX-60 seismographs at a sampling rate of 0.5 ms. Seismic p-wave velocities, determined by inverting first-arrival refractions using tomographic methods, ranged from 900 m/s in the shallow subsurface to 5000 m/s at 200 m depth, with higher velocities in the western half of the profile. Migrated seismic reflection images show clear, planar layering in the top 100-200 meters on the eastern and western ends of the seismic profile. However, to within the shallow subsurface, a 200-m-long zone near the center of the profile shows disturbed stratigraphic layers with several apparent fault strands approaching within a few meters of the surface. The near-surface locations of the imaged strands suggest that the Frijoles fault has been active in the recent past, although further paleoseismic study is needed to detail the slip history of the San Gregorio

  18. San Marcos Astronomical Project and Doctoral Prospectus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M. L.

    2009-05-01

    The Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, UNMSM, in Lima, Perú, is the only Peruvian institution working for the peruvian astronomical development as a career since 1970. We are conforming a network with international friend astronomers to invite them as Visiting Lectures to assure the academic level for the future doctoral studies in the UNMSM. The Chancellor of UNMSM has decided that the Astronomical Project is a UNMSM Project, to encourage and advance in this scientific and strategical area, to impulse the modernity of Peru, the major effort will be the building of the San Marcos Astronomical Observatory, with a telescope of 1 meter aperture.

  19. Lower San Fernando corrugated metal pipe failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bardet, J.P.; Davis, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    During the January 17, 1994, Northridge earthquake, a 2.4 m diameter corrugated metal pipe was subjected to 90 m of extensive lateral crushing failure at the Lower San Fernando Dam. The dam and outlet works were reconstructed after the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake. In 1994, the dam underwent liquefaction upstream of the reconstructed berm. The pipe collapsed on the west side of the liquefied zone and a large sinkhole formed over the drain line. The failure of this drain line provides a unique opportunity to study the seismic response of buried drains and culverts.

  20. Aerial views of the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.

    1988-01-01

    These aerial photographs of the San Andreas fault were taken in 1965 by Robert E. Wallace of the U.S Geological Survey. The pictures were taken with a Rolliflex camera on 20 format black and white flim; Wallace was aboard a light, fixed-wing aircraft, flying mostly at low altitudes. He photographed the fault from San Francisco near its north end where it enters by the Salton Sea. These images represent only a sampling of the more than 300 images prodcued during this project. All the photographs reside in the U.S Geological Survey Library in Menlo Park, California. 

  1. 98. Street view, East San Antonio Ave., looking west northwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. Street view, East San Antonio Ave., looking west northwest, Guarantee Shoe Co. is 211 East San Antonio Ave. - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  2. 30. Photocopy of photograph (from National Park Service, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph (from National Park Service, San Francisco, California, 1930 (?) EXTERIOR, EAST SIDE OF MISSIONA AFTER RESTORATION, C. 1930 (?) - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  3. 27. Photocopy of photograph (from National Park Service, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of photograph (from National Park Service, San Francisco, California, Date unknown) EXTERIOR, SOUTH FRONT, DETAIL OF ENTRANCE AFTER RESTORATION, C. 1930 (?) - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  4. 13. Photocopy of photograph (from Golden Gate Museum, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (from Golden Gate Museum, San Francisco, California, 1850's) EXTERIOR, VIEW OF CONVENTO BEFORE RESTORATION, 1850'S - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  5. 75 FR 71179 - Environmental Impact Statement: San Diego County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: San Diego County, CA AGENCY: Federal... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will be prepared ] for a proposed highway project in San Diego County... Hovey, Environmental Analysis Branch Chief, California Department of Transportation, District...

  6. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey From Golden Gate Park San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey From Golden Gate Park San Francisco, California Original: Ante 1860 Re-photo: February 1940 VIEW FROM SOUTH - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  7. Sediment accumulation in San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century : a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, K.M.; Fuller, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Major changes made in the configuration of San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century have caused rapid sedimentation within parts of the Bay. Opening of the Oakland tidal channel and removal of 97% of the marshlands formerly surrounding the Bay have decreased tidal velocities and volumes. Marshland removal has decreased the tidal prism by about 25%. Comparison of bathymetric surveys indicates that sedimentation in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel averaged 0.7 cm/annum between 1856 and 1984. Lead-210 data collected at four shallow water sites east of the San Leandro Bay channel indicated that sedimentation rates have averaged between 0.06 and 0.28 cm/annum. Because bioturbation of bottom sediments cannot be discounted, better definition of this range in sedimentation rates would required measuring the activity of lead-210 on incoming sediments. In addition to sediment deposited in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel and open, shallow areas to the east, 850,740 cu m of sediment was deposited between 1948 and 1983 in an area dredged at the mouth of San Leandro Creek. All available data indicate that between 1 ,213,000 and 1,364,000 cu m of sediment was deposited in San Leandro Bay between 1948 and 1983. Sediment yield data from an adjacent drainage basin, when combined with inventories of lead-210 and cesium-137, indicate that most of the sediment deposited in San Leandro Bay is coming from resuspension of bottom sediments or from erosion of marshes or shorelines of San Leandro or San Francisco Bay. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Tower details, sheet 16. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Tower details, sheet 16. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. Clock and finial details; tower roof plan. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 16, job no. 692. Various scales. July 15, 1937. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, July 24, 1937. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. Sections. Ceiling plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections. Ceiling plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 9, job no. 692. Scale 1/8 inch to the foot. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. Detail of proscenium opening. San bernardino Valley Union Junior College, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of proscenium opening. San bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. Details of corbels and soffit; lettering detail for frieze. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet W.P.A. 2, job no. 692. Scale 3/4 inch to the foot. May 18, 1937. (no state stamp. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Basement plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium building. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 2, Job no. 692. Scale 1/8 inch to the foot. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. Rose windows and other details. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rose windows and other details. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. Rose window; front windows; drinking fountain alcove; proscenium arch; stage door. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 12, job no. 692. Various scales. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. Second floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 4, job no. 692. Scale 1/8 inch to the foot. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. Plot plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plot plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium building. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 1, job no. 692. Scale 1 inch to forty feet. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Radar image San Francisco Bay Area, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay Area in California and its surroundings are shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On this image, smooth areas, such as the bay, lakes, roads and airport runways appear dark, while areas with buildings and trees appear bright. Downtown San Francisco is at the center and the city of Oakland is at the right across the San Francisco Bay. Some city areas, such as the South of Market district in San Francisco, appear bright due to the alignment of streets and buildings with respect to the incoming radar beam. Three of the bridges spanning the Bay are seen in this image. The Bay Bridge is in the center and extends from the city of San Francisco to Yerba Buena and Treasure Islands, and from there to Oakland. The Golden Gate Bridge is to the left and extends from San Francisco to Sausalito. The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge is in the upper right and extends from San Rafael to Richmond. Angel Island is the large island east of the Golden Gate Bridge, and lies north of the much smaller Alcatraz Island. The Alameda Naval Air Station is seen just below the Bay Bridge at the center of the image. Two major faults bounding the San Francisco-Oakland urban areas are visible on this image. The San Andreas fault, on the San Francisco peninsula, is seen on the left side of the image. The fault trace is the straight feature filled with linear reservoirs, which appear dark. The Hayward fault is the straight feature on the right side of the image between the urban areas and the hillier terrain to the east.

    This radar image was acquired by just one of SRTM's two antennas and, consequently, does not show topographic data, but only the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground. This signal, known as radar backscatter, provides insight into the nature of the surface, including its roughness, vegetation cover and urbanization. The overall faint striping pattern in the images is a data processing artifact due to the

  16. Creep Transients and Fault Interaction from Repeating Earthquakes Near San Juan Bautista, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. C.; Nadeau, R. M.; Burgmann, R.

    2012-12-01

    Along creeping sections of the San Andreas and other faults, small asperities in the fault zone load and fail in characteristic repeating earthquake sequences which can be used as subsurface creepmeters. Here, we use these virtual creepmeters to examine and compare slip rates on both the northwestern end of the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault near San Juan Bautista and on the nearby sub-parallel Sargent Fault, previously observed to have ~3mm/year of right-lateral creep. While creep on the San Andreas increases dramatically in response to the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and takes about ten years to resume interseismic rates, the Sargent shows little immediate response. The Sargent rather exhibits a very gradual increase of activity after the Loma Prieta earthquake, consistent with its generally lower interseismic slip rate and with static stress change models that show only a minor increase in the stress along the Sargent. When the SAF resumes its interseismic rate, it begins creeping coherently in time with the Sargent, indicating a mutual driving force in the system. Background seismicity in gray points, newly discovered repeaters in black circles (inset). Boxes show study area. Stars show epicenters of 1989 Loma Prieta EQ, 1998 San Juan Bautista EQ, and 2004 Parkfield EQ.

  17. Aspects of the earthquake geology and seismotectonics of the southern San Andreas and related faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Patrick Lee

    Aspects of the mechanics and movement history of the southernmost San Andreas or related faults are addressed. The seismotectonic context of the southernmost San Andreas fault is investigated. Microstratigraphic and geomorphological investigations of the fault's segmentation, slip potential and latest seismogenic slip history are presented. Measurements of geological deposits, man-made structures, alignment arrays and creepmeters offset across the southernmost San Andreas fault are presented. These measure the fault's aseismic slip rate during the past three hundred years. Observations of triggered aseismic slippage along the southernmost 100 km of the San Andreas fault soon after the North Palm Springs earthquake are described. Dextral surficial slip ranging from less than or equal to 9 mm and occurred on three sections of the San Andreas fault that lie between 44 and 86 km from the epicenter near North Palm Springs. Data complied and interpretations gleaned from repeated measurements of surface slip at dozens of site along the Superstition Hills fault during the period of two hours to one year after the Superstition Hills earthquake are presented. The common result of these five investigations is increased understanding of phenomena associated with fault motion along the highly active border between the Pacific and North American plates.

  18. Complexity of the deep San Andreas Fault zone defined by cascading tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelly, David R.

    2015-02-01

    Weak seismic vibrations--tectonic tremor--can be used to delineate some plate boundary faults. Tremor on the deep San Andreas Fault, located at the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, is thought to be a passive indicator of slow fault slip. San Andreas Fault tremor migrates at up to 30 m s-1, but the processes regulating tremor migration are unclear. Here I use a 12-year catalogue of more than 850,000 low-frequency earthquakes to systematically analyse the high-speed migration of tremor along the San Andreas Fault. I find that tremor migrates most effectively through regions of greatest tremor production and does not propagate through regions with gaps in tremor production. I interpret the rapid tremor migration as a self-regulating cascade of seismic ruptures along the fault, which implies that tremor may be an active, rather than passive participant in the slip propagation. I also identify an isolated group of tremor sources that are offset eastwards beneath the San Andreas Fault, possibly indicative of the interface between the Monterey Microplate, a hypothesized remnant of the subducted Farallon Plate, and the North American Plate. These observations illustrate a possible link between the central San Andreas Fault and tremor-producing subduction zones.

  19. San Pedro Mártir Observatory: a competitive astronomical site for the next generation of telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, J.; Michel, R.; Costero, R.

    2006-08-01

    We review some of the most important aspects of the astronomical Observatory at the Sierra de San Pedro Mártir, in Baja California, México. We put particular emphasis on our own results on seeing evaluation and compare the results with what we considered the best twenty sites in the world. We also compile the results on the San Pedro Mártir site in sensitive aspects like number of clear and photometric nights, scintillation, water vapour content and seismic activity among others.

  20. Fault zone connectivity: slip rates on faults in the san francisco bay area, california.

    PubMed

    Bilham, R; Bodin, P

    1992-10-01

    The slip rate of a fault segment is related to the length of the fault zone of which it is part. In turn, the slip rate of a fault zone is related to its connectivity with adjoining or contiguous fault zones. The observed variation in slip rate on fault segments in the San Francisco Bay area in California is consistent with connectivity between the Hayward, Calaveras, and San Andreas fault zones. Slip rates on the southern Hayward fault taper northward from a maximum of more than 10 millimeters per year and are sensitive to the active length of the Maacama fault. PMID:17835127

  1. Local geomagnetic events associated with displacements on the san andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Breiner, S; Kovach, R L

    1967-10-01

    The piezomagnetic properties of rock suggest that a change in subsurface stress will manifest itself as a change in the magnetic susceptibility and remanent magnetization and hence the local geomagnetic field. A differential array of magnetometers has been operating since late 1965 on the San Andreas fault in the search for piezomagnetic signals under conditions involving active fault stress. Local changes in the geomagnetic field have been observed near Hollister, California, some tens of hours preceding the onset of abrupt creep displacement on the San Andreas fault. PMID:17798647

  2. 75 FR 53332 - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Bureau of Reclamation San Carlos Irrigation Project, Arizona AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior... of San Carlos Irrigation Project (SCIP) water delivery facilities near the communities of Casa Grande... and Central Arizona Project (CAP) to agricultural lands in the San Carlos Irrigation and...

  3. 76 FR 12692 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... comments should be sent to Attn: San Juan National Forest RAC, 15 Burnett Court, Durango, CO...

  4. 75 FR 48306 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... comments should be sent to Attn: San Juan National Forest RAC, 15 Burnett Court, Durango, CO...

  5. 76 FR 40876 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... Sonoran Meeting Rooms. Written comments should be sent to Attn: San Juan National Forest RAC, 15...

  6. 27 CFR 9.130 - San Ysidro District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... northerly drainage of San Ysidro Creek southeast for approximately 2,000 feet to the seasonal pond adjacent to Canada Road; (7) From the seasonal pond, the boundary follows the southerly drainage of San Ysidro... end of a seasonal pond on the San Felipe, Calif., U.S.G.S. map; (10) The boundary follows...

  7. 33 CFR 161.50 - Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the San Joaquin River, as far north as the port of Sacramento on the Sacramento River. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vessel Traffic Service San... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.50 Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco. The...

  8. 33 CFR 161.50 - Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the San Joaquin River, as far north as the port of Sacramento on the Sacramento River. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vessel Traffic Service San... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.50 Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco. The...

  9. 33 CFR 161.50 - Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the San Joaquin River, as far north as the port of Sacramento on the Sacramento River. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vessel Traffic Service San... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.50 Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco. The...

  10. 33 CFR 161.50 - Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the San Joaquin River, as far north as the port of Sacramento on the Sacramento River. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vessel Traffic Service San... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.50 Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco. The...

  11. Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region, Kern, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.

    1952-01-01

    Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region Kern, Riverside, and Bernardino counties were made in five areas recommended as favorable for the occurrence of radioactive raw materials: (1) Rock Corral area, San Bernardino County. (2) Searles Station area, Kern county. (3) Soledad area, Kern County. (4) White Tank area, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. (5) Harvard Hills area, San Bernardino County. Anomalous radiation was detected in all but the Harvard Hills area. The radioactivity anomalies detected in the Rock Corral area are of the greatest amplitude yet recorded by the airborne equipment over natural sources. The activity is apparently attributable to the thorium-beating mineral associated with roof pendants of crystalline metamorphic rocks in a granitic intrusive. In the Searles Station, Soledad, and White Tank area, several radioactivity anomalies of medium amplitude were recorded, suggesting possible local concentrations of radioactive minerals.

  12. Neotectonics of the San Andreas Fault system, basin and range province juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Crowell, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The development, active processes, and tectonic interplay of the southern San Andreas fault system and the basin and range province were studied. The study consist of data acquisition and evaluation, technique development, and image interpretation and mapping. Potentially significant geologic findings are discussed.

  13. Creating an Engaging Library Orientation: First Year Experience Courses at UC San Diego

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Crystal; Turnbow, Dominique; Roth, Amanda; Friedman, Lia; Heskett, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the development of an engaging library orientation module for UC San Diego First Year Experience (FYE) courses. The library module included a brief in-class presentation about research concepts and library services, an online interactive library scavenger hunt given as an in-class activity, and a homework assignment where…

  14. SAN FRANCISCO BAY ESTUARY PROJECT 2002 IR POST-CCMP NEP REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The San Francisco Bay Estuary Project Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the Project through examination of it activities in relation to the CCMP. Contents of the IR include: CCMP Implementation which has the status of efforts on Priority ...

  15. 33 CFR 165.754 - Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... referenced use datum: NAD 83. (2) The waters around Liquefied Petroleum Gas ships departing San Juan Harbor... coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (b) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter, transit...

  16. San Francisco's New Zoo's Connections for Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Routman, Emily

    2001-01-01

    Provides information on a redevelopment project at the San Francisco Zoo known as the New Zoo. The explicit goal of the project is to inspire a sense of caring and appreciation for wildlife that is the foundation of a conservation ethic. (DDR)

  17. 77 FR 20379 - San Diego Gas &

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission San Diego Gas & Electric Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Into Markets Operated by the California Independent System Operator Corporation and the...

  18. Persistence and Attrition at San Juan College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Nelle

    A project was undertaken at San Juan College, in New Mexico, to examine findings from several studies of student persistence and retention to shed light on factors influencing persistence at the college. The project took into account several definitions of persistence, including re-enrollment in the subsequent semester (semester to semester),…

  19. San Miguel High School: Focus and Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The corporate internship program is a cornerstone of the education that students receive at San Miguel High School in Tucson, Arizona. Four students share one job, so each student works for a corporate partner outside of the school every fourth day. The money they earn is used to help defray the cost of their education, and the experience is…

  20. San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Francisco, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  1. High Tech Images. San Bernardino City Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Esther

    1974-01-01

    A part of San Bernardino's larger redevelopment plan, the new City Hall has helped revitalize the downtown core. The solar bronze glass-surfaced structure, called a 6-story street, is the shape of the street which was closed to form the site. (Author/MF)

  2. Student Tracking System, San Antonio College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherne, Ferne; And Others

    The Student Tracking System (STS) at San Antonio College is designed to increase retention of high risk students, and primarily students enrolled in developmental education courses. In addition to identifying students experiencing difficulty in the classroom, STS alerts educational support services personnel to these students, provides a system of…

  3. San Diego, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Diego, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  4. Humanities at College of San Mateo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo Coll., CA.

    Descriptions are provided for the courses in the College of San Mateo's new Humanities program. As introductory material notes, these team-taught, interdisciplinary courses were designed to be taken independently in various combinations depending upon the student's major or interests. They carry three units of transferable credit and satisfy…

  5. Simulations of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Petersson, A; Tkalcic, H

    2005-12-16

    Simulations of the Great 1906 San Francisco earthquake are being performed as part of the event's centenary. LLNL is participating in a large effort to study this event and possible consequences if the event were to happen today. This document is meant to describe our efforts to others participating in the project.

  6. SAN PEDRO VEGETATION MAP VECTOR DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a digital vegetation map of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area and Babocomari River. The map was produced by manual interpretation of true-color, stereo aerial photography flown in November 2000. Standard U.S. Geological Survey Digital Orthophoto...

  7. SAN PEDRO VEGETATION MAP GRID DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a digital vegetation map of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area and Babocomari River. The map was produced by manual interpretation of true-color, stereo aerial photography flown in November 2000. Standard U.S. Geological Survey Digital Orthophoto...

  8. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Francisco County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents educational and socioeconomic information for San Francisco County, nearby counties, and the state. It highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This information provides a framework for enhanced communication and collaboration between the…

  9. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Diego County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Diego County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  10. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Mateo County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Mateo County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  11. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Benito County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Benito County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  12. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Bernardino County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Bernardino County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  13. Are Fibre Channel SANs a Commodity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Jeff; Jacob, Matt; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of putting together a Fibre Channel Storage Area Network with heterogeneous hardware running both open-source and commercial operating systems. Adherence to the Fibre Channel Specification is supposed to guarantee interoperability in such an environment. We also want to evaluate how difficult it might be to put together a SAN using open-source components. While all the commercial vendors provide Fibre Channel support, this comes at a cost, e.g., not only O/S and drivers, but usually an expensive support contract. The open-source model could lower the cost of building and maintaining a SAN. Of course, for this to be the case, the open-source platforms would have to provide the functionality to construct a SAN. We are assembling a Fibre Channel SAN from heterogeneous hardware (i386, alpha, sparc) running *BSD, Linux, Tru64, NT and Solaris operating systems. We are running several tests to investigate the level of Fibre Channel support provided by each OS. Our current testbed is specified in the table below. Currently, it only contains open-source platforms. We plan to add a PC running OpenBSD, as well as the following commercial systems: Sun Ultra 1/Solaris, DEC AlphaServer 4000/Tru64 Unix, Pentium Pro PC/Windows NT.

  14. San Jose, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Jose, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  15. San Geronimo de Taos (Taos Pueblo).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Heta

    1989-01-01

    This lesson plan introduces high school students to pueblo architecture. Students will learn about pueblo architecture and its cultural tradition; discuss architectural characteristics and aesthetics in San Geronimo de Taos; examine the pueblo as a living environment; explore adobe pueblo structure in clay; and study Hopi, Zuni, and Pueblo…

  16. Potamocorbula amurensis discovered in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.

    1989-01-01

    The small Asian clam, Potamocorbula amurensis, is now a major component of benthic communities in most areas of northern San Francisco Bay and some areas of South Bay. Because of its wide tolerance of salinity and other environmental variables and its high abundance in many areas, benthic ecologists believe this recent invasion may represent a major and permanent change in the bay system.

  17. Nathaniel Hawthorne Elementary School: San Antonio, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the successful use of Core Knowledge Curriculum in one inner-city elementary school in San Antonio (Texas) that had previously reflected low student achievement, inconsistent attendance, and student behavioral problems. Improvements in these conditions as revealed through teacher observations are highlighted. (GR)

  18. San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Antonio, TX, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  19. The Third International San Francisco Book Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmon, Winn; And Others

    Friends of Books and Comics presents its catalog of the Third International San Francisco Book Fair, a marketplace of alternative books, comics, and magazines. Nearly 200 alternative and small presses are listed alphabetically with address, telephone number, names of principal people involved, and a brief description of type and subject of…

  20. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Joaquin County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Joaquin County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  1. The San Joaquin Valley: 20 years later

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The history of irrigation development and the need for disposal of saline drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley was described to provide background for the drainage water disposal problem that resulted from the closure of the Kesterson Reservoir. A 5 year study developed in Valley alternatives fo...

  2. Desegregation in the South San Joaquin Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Rodolfo G.

    Notably isolated from the large metropolitan centers by geography and predominantly agricultural in its economy, Kern County is California's third largest county in land area. About one-third of the county is situated on the flat valley floor at the extreme southern end of the San Joaquin Valley. The area relies heavily on Chicano and Black manual…

  3. San Joaquin Delta College Student Athlete Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Merrilee R.; Marcopulos, Ernest

    In spring 1988, a study was conducted of students who participated in college athletics at San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC) between 1983-84 and 1987-88. Data collected on each student athlete included ethnicity, sport, place of residence, initial and current reading level, total grade point average (GPA), GPA in athletics and physical education…

  4. Holocene Tectonic and Sedimentary Evolution of Coastal San Diego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Brothers, D. S.; Babcock, J. M.; Kent, G.

    2010-12-01

    The shelf and nearshore region of San Diego, California, between La Jolla cove in the north and the U.S.- Mexico border in the south, is an important ecological and economic resource. It contains two of the largest kelp forests in southern California and lies offshore miles of popular beaches. Understanding the interplay between tectonic and sedimentary processes in this area is critical because it will allow us to assess how other forcing functions such as the rapid sea level rise (2 - 3 mm/yr) and predicted climate change associated with global warming are impacting the kelp and nearshore environments. The fault architecture and sedimentary deposits offshore San Diego have been mapped using high-resolution seismic CHIRP profiling. The mapped area lies within the inner California Continental Borderland (CCB), which is characterized by a system of basins and ridges and extensive strike-slip faulting. The CHIRP data clearly images several splays of the Coronado Bank Fault Zone (CBFZ), a major fault in the area, which show recent activity in the upper 30 m of sediment with the most recent deformation at ~4 m below seafloor. Several sediment packages as deep as 50 m below the seafloor are imaged and place important constraints on tectonic deformation and sediment dispersal in the region as well as the earthquake recurrence interval on the CBFZ. Exposed and buried wavecut terraces identified on numerous CHIRP profiles, which can be correlated to terraces mapped regionally, provide insight into tectonic uplift rates and sea-level fluctuations. Finally, the extensive kelp forests offshore Mount Soledad and Point Loma occur where hardgrounds are exposed at the seafloor as a consequence of tectonic uplift. High resolution mapping offshore San Diego is providing new insight into the complex interplay between tectonics, sedimentation, and biology in this ecologically diverse region.

  5. San Francisco Bay Sand Mining Resource Evaluation and Impact Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenical, S.; Tirindelli, M.; Sicular, D.; Gragg, J.; Huitt, C.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents results of the evaluation of potential future sand resources within certain Central San Francisco Bay (Central Bay) sand mining lease areas, as well as the potential impacts of further mining these areas for a ten-year period. The study consisted of morphological analysis using field measurements and hydrodynamic modeling, and covered a wide spectrum of physical processes including tidal and river circulation, salinity, sediment transport, and morphology. The study was conducted within the framework of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) prepared by the California State Lands Commission (CSLC) as part of the discretionary approval process for issuing new mining leases. The results of the morphological analysis indicate a measurable depletion of sand resources in the Central Bay lease areas during the period 1997-2008, and that for the purposes of the proposed ten-year mining lease renewal, sand mining resources in Central Bay are largely limited to material already in place. The morphological analysis results also indicate that the proposed additional ten years of sand mining in the Central Bay lease areas are not likely to cause a significant impact on sediment transport and budgets in areas outside the vicinity of the lease areas, such as the San Francisco Bar, Ocean Beach, etc. Numerical modeling results, including particle tracking exercises, do indicate a net seaward transport of sand, and that a linkage exists between the mining areas and offshore areas (San Francisco Bar, Ocean Beach, etc). However, the modeling results demonstrate that the linkage is weak, and that any measurable changes in hydrodynamics, salinity and sediment transport/morphology caused by the mining activities are likely to be confined to the vicinity of the mining areas.

  6. Crustal Deformation Along the Northern San Andreas Fault System From Geodetic and Geologic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    The San Andreas fault system north of the San Francisco Bay area is composed of three sub-parallel right-lateral faults: the San Andreas, Rodgers Creek-Ma'acama, and Green Valley-Bartlett Springs. The San Andreas has been essentially aseismic since it last ruptured in 1906, and no major historical earthquakes have occurred on the more seismically active Ma'acama and Bartlett Springs faults, although the slip deficit on the Ma'acama fault may now be large enough to generate a magnitude 7 earthquake. Since 2002, we have been collecting GPS measurements at about 80 monuments that form roughly 10-station profiles across the northern San Andreas fault system from Pt. Reyes to Cape Mendocino. Most of the monuments were last observed in 1993 or 1995, so the new observations significantly improve estimates of their relative motion and models of average interseismic strain accumulation, including possible spatial variations along the fault system. We use angular velocity-backslip block modeling to determine a self-consistent northern California deformation field and rates of strain accumulation along the northern San Andreas fault system. Preliminary results from our modeling, which includes 2 blocks within the San Andreas fault system, as well as a Sierran-Great Valley block, and the Pacific and North America plates, show agreement between observed and predicted velocities at less than 2 mm/yr. Fault-parallel deformation across the entire San Andreas fault system is 38 mm/yr, but deep slip rates on the sub-parallel faults are poorly constrained due to significant correlations between the deep slip rates and locking depths, which we fully characterize using Monte Carlo techniques. We use Bayesian techniques to combine the GPS observations with constraints derived from other seismic, geodetic, and paleoseismic observations, such as locking depths, surface creep rates, and inferred geologic slip rates. These additional constraints significantly improve the estimates of the

  7. Groundwater quality in the San Fernando--San Gabriel groundwater basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California's drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The San Fernando and San Gabriel groundwater basins constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  8. 75 FR 8106 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara... located in Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties of California. We provide this notice in..., we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR in Alameda,...

  9. 77 FR 15799 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Francisco State University, San... University, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has ] determined that the cultural item meets... affiliated with the cultural item may contact the San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program....

  10. 77 FR 36041 - San Antonio Central Railroad, L.L.C.-Lease Exemption-Port Authority of San Antonio

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... Surface Transportation Board San Antonio Central Railroad, L.L.C.--Lease Exemption--Port Authority of San Antonio San Antonio Central Railroad, L.L.C. (SAC), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption... Antonio Central Railroad, L.L.C., Docket No. FD 35604, wherein Watco Holdings, Inc. has filed a...

  11. 75 FR 81854 - Safety Zone; New Year's Celebration for the City of San Francisco, Fireworks Display, San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Celebration for the City of San Francisco Fireworks Display. The temporary safety zone will extend 100 feet... will extend 1,000 feet from the nearest point of the barge during the fireworks display. This safety... feet from the San Francisco Ferry Building in San Francisco, CA. The fireworks display is...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1185 - Regulated Navigation Area; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and connecting waters in California. 165.1185 Section 165.1185 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  13. Preliminary Geologic Map of the San Fernando 7.5' Quadrangle, Southern California: A Digital Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yerkes, R.F., (compiler)

    1997-01-01

    The city of San Fernando sits atop a structurally complex, sedimentologically diverse, and tectonically evolving late Tertiary-Quaternary basin situated within the Transverse Ranges of southern California. The surrounding San Fernando Valley (SFV) contains the headwaters of the Los Angeles River and its tributaries. Prior to the advent of flood control, the valley floor was composed of active alluvial fans and floodplains. Seasonal streams emanating from Pacoima and Big Tujunga Canyons drain the complex western San Gabriel Mountains and deposit coarse, highly permeable alluvium that contains generally high-quality ground water. The more shallow western part derives mainly from Tertiary and pre-Tertiary sedimentary rocks, and is underlain by less permeable, fine-grained deposits containing persistent shallow ground water and poorer water quality. Home of the 1971 San Fernando and the 1994 Northridge earthquakes, the SFV experienced near-record levels of strong ground motion in 1994 that caused widespread damage from strong shaking and ground failure. A new map of late Quaternary deposits of the San Fernando area shows that the SFV is a structural trough that has been filled from the sides, with the major source of sediment being large drainages in the San Gabriel Mountains. Deposition on the major alluvial fan of Tujunga Wash and Pacoima Wash, which issues from the San Gabriel Mountains, and on smaller fans, has been influenced by ongoing compressional tectonics in the valley. Late Pleistocene deposits have been cut by active faults and warped over growing folds. Holocene alluvial fans are locally ponded behind active uplifts. The resulting complex pattern of deposits has a major effect on liquefaction hazards. Young sandy sediments generally are highly susceptible to liquefaction where they are saturated, but the distribution of young deposits, their grain size characteristics, and the level of ground water all are complexly dependent on the tectonics of the valley

  14. Shallow structure and deformation along the San Andreas fault in Cholame Valley, California, based on high-resolution reflection profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, K.M.; Harding, S.T. ); Brocher, T.M. )

    1990-04-10

    The mapped active traces of the San Andreas fault are separated by a 1-km-wide right-stepping offset in Cholame Valley. The authors collected 18 km of high-resolution seismic reflection data specifically designed to image the San Andreas fault zone in the shallow crust surrounding this offset. The reflection profiles and available well data indicate that west of the mapped active traces of the San Andreas fault the shallow subsurface structure of the crust consists of thin ({le} 400 m thick), offset packages of reflections, laterally coherent on the scale of tens of meters, overlying deformed clastic sedimentary rocks. East of the San Andreas fault, the structure of the shallow crust in southern Cholame Valley is characterized by thick packages of reflections, laterally coherent on the scale of kilometers, overlying the Franciscan complex. All of the strata east of the fault (within Cholame Valley) dip toward the San Andreas fault and the offset, into an approximately 1-km-deep sedimentary basin abutting the south strand of San Andreas fault. The offset in Cholame Valley is characterized by a gentle downwarping of sediments into the offset, the presence of many small faults and discontinuous reflections between the traces of the main fault, localized subsidence abutting the main strike-slip fault, the formation of a basin, near the offset, that is about as deep as the jog is wide, and the southward propagation of the deformation associated with the offset. Strain field modeling based on simple geometries of the San Andreas and associated faults successfully predicts the general features of the observed topography and subsurface structure of southern Cholame Valley, including subsidence and basin formation near the offset, a discontinuous San Andreas fault plane, and at least one fault in southeastern Cholame Valley.

  15. Floor plan and front elevation. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor plan and front elevation. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Library Building. Also includes detail of concrete grille; sections QQ and TT; and detail of bulletin board. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 2, job no. 315. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (plan, elevation), 1/2 inch to the foot (sections), and 1/4 inch to the foot (bulletin board). No date given on sheet (probably March or April, 1927). - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Mezzanine plan and north elevation. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Mezzanine plan and north elevation. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, library building. Also includes interior elevation of wall between windows, showing light receptacle and section through beam. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 3, job no. 315. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (plan, elevation) and 1/2 inch to the foot (interior elevation). No date given on sheet (probably March or April, 1927). - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. North & south elevations. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North & south elevations. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Classics Building. Also includes longitudinal sections through the boiler room, plan of chimney, elevations of counter in the bookkeeping room, and detail of trusses over the oral English room. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 4, job no. 312. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot and 1/2 inch to the foot. February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Classics Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  18. SAN virtualization study and implementation based on FC switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Cao, Mingcui; Luo, Zhixiang

    2005-11-01

    Currently the mainstream technology of SAN is SAN storage virtualization and its implementation. The switch-based storage virtualization embeds the virtualizer in the core of the storage networking fabric in an "intelligent switch" rather than an appliance or a host. This paper describes the SV-FC SAN switch's hardware and software architecture. The main aid of design and implementation the switch is to give a new way to realize FC-SAN storage virtualization. Storage virtualization modules are embedded in the switches firmware. The switch can provide simple and friendly interfaces for users to configure and manage the FC SAN.

  19. Low strength of deep San Andreas fault gouge from SAFOD core

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, David A.; Morrow, Carolyn A.; Moore, Diane E.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    The San Andreas fault accommodates 28–34 mm yr−1 of right lateral motion of the Pacific crustal plate northwestward past the North American plate. In California, the fault is composed of two distinct locked segments that have produced great earthquakes in historical times, separated by a 150-km-long creeping zone. The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is a scientific borehole located northwest of Parkfield, California, near the southern end of the creeping zone. Core was recovered from across the actively deforming San Andreas fault at a vertical depth of 2.7 km (ref. 1). Here we report laboratory strength measurements of these fault core materials at in situ conditions, demonstrating that at this locality and this depth the San Andreas fault is profoundly weak (coefficient of friction, 0.15) owing to the presence of the smectite clay mineral saponite, which is one of the weakest phyllosilicates known. This Mg-rich clay is the low-temperature product of metasomatic reactions between the quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite blocks in the fault2, 3. These findings provide strong evidence that deformation of the mechanically unusual creeping portions of the San Andreas fault system is controlled by the presence of weak minerals rather than by high fluid pressure or other proposed mechanisms1. The combination of these measurements of fault core strength with borehole observations1, 4, 5 yields a self-consistent picture of the stress state of the San Andreas fault at the SAFOD site, in which the fault is intrinsically weak in an otherwise strong crust.

  20. Talc-bearing serpentinite and the creeping section of the San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Rymer, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The section of the San Andreas fault located between Cholame Valley and San Juan Bautista in central California creeps at a rate as high as 28 mm yr -1 (ref. 1), and it is also the segment that yields the best evidence for being a weak fault embedded in a strong crust. Serpentinized ultramafic rocks have been associated with creeping faults in central and northern California, and serpentinite is commonly invoked as the cause of the creep and the low strength of this section of the San Andreas fault. However, the frictional strengths of serpentine minerals are too high to satisfy the limitations on fault strength, and these minerals also have the potential for unstable slip under some conditions. Here we report the discovery of talc in cuttings of serpentinite collected from the probable active trace of the San Andreas fault that was intersected during drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) main hole in 2005. We infer that the talc is forming as a result of the reaction of serpentine minerals with silica-saturated hydrothermal fluids that migrate up the fault zone, and the talc commonly occurs in sheared serpentinite. This discovery is significant, as the frictional strength of talc at elevated temperatures is sufficiently low to meet the constraints on the shear strength of the fault, and its inherently stable sliding behaviour is consistent with fault creep. Talc may therefore provide the connection between serpentinite and creep in the San Andreas fault, if shear at depth can become localized along a talc-rich principal-slip surface within serpentinite entrained in the fault zone. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Low strength of deep San Andreas fault gouge from SAFOD core

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Morrow, C.; Moore, D.; Hickman, S.

    2011-01-01

    The San Andreas fault accommodates 28-"34-???mm-???yr ????'1 of right lateral motion of the Pacific crustal plate northwestward past the North American plate. In California, the fault is composed of two distinct locked segments that have produced great earthquakes in historical times, separated by a 150-km-long creeping zone. The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is a scientific borehole located northwest of Parkfield, California, near the southern end of the creeping zone. Core was recovered from across the actively deforming San Andreas fault at a vertical depth of 2.7-???km (ref. 1). Here we report laboratory strength measurements of these fault core materials at in situ conditions, demonstrating that at this locality and this depth the San Andreas fault is profoundly weak (coefficient of friction, 0.15) owing to the presence of the smectite clay mineral saponite, which is one of the weakest phyllosilicates known. This Mg-rich clay is the low-temperature product of metasomatic reactions between the quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite blocks in the fault. These findings provide strong evidence that deformation of the mechanically unusual creeping portions of the San Andreas fault system is controlled by the presence of weak minerals rather than by high fluid pressure or other proposed mechanisms. The combination of these measurements of fault core strength with borehole observations yields a self-consistent picture of the stress state of the San Andreas fault at the SAFOD site, in which the fault is intrinsically weak in an otherwise strong crust. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  2. Talc-bearing serpentinite and the creeping section of the San Andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Moore, Diane E; Rymer, Michael J

    2007-08-16

    The section of the San Andreas fault located between Cholame Valley and San Juan Bautista in central California creeps at a rate as high as 28 mm yr(-1) (ref. 1), and it is also the segment that yields the best evidence for being a weak fault embedded in a strong crust. Serpentinized ultramafic rocks have been associated with creeping faults in central and northern California, and serpentinite is commonly invoked as the cause of the creep and the low strength of this section of the San Andreas fault. However, the frictional strengths of serpentine minerals are too high to satisfy the limitations on fault strength, and these minerals also have the potential for unstable slip under some conditions. Here we report the discovery of talc in cuttings of serpentinite collected from the probable active trace of the San Andreas fault that was intersected during drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) main hole in 2005. We infer that the talc is forming as a result of the reaction of serpentine minerals with silica-saturated hydrothermal fluids that migrate up the fault zone, and the talc commonly occurs in sheared serpentinite. This discovery is significant, as the frictional strength of talc at elevated temperatures is sufficiently low to meet the constraints on the shear strength of the fault, and its inherently stable sliding behaviour is consistent with fault creep. Talc may therefore provide the connection between serpentinite and creep in the San Andreas fault, if shear at depth can become localized along a talc-rich principal-slip surface within serpentinite entrained in the fault zone. PMID:17700697

  3. Low strength of deep San Andreas fault gouge from SAFOD core.

    PubMed

    Lockner, David A; Morrow, Carolyn; Moore, Diane; Hickman, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    The San Andreas fault accommodates 28-34 mm yr(-1) of right lateral motion of the Pacific crustal plate northwestward past the North American plate. In California, the fault is composed of two distinct locked segments that have produced great earthquakes in historical times, separated by a 150-km-long creeping zone. The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is a scientific borehole located northwest of Parkfield, California, near the southern end of the creeping zone. Core was recovered from across the actively deforming San Andreas fault at a vertical depth of 2.7 km (ref. 1). Here we report laboratory strength measurements of these fault core materials at in situ conditions, demonstrating that at this locality and this depth the San Andreas fault is profoundly weak (coefficient of friction, 0.15) owing to the presence of the smectite clay mineral saponite, which is one of the weakest phyllosilicates known. This Mg-rich clay is the low-temperature product of metasomatic reactions between the quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite blocks in the fault. These findings provide strong evidence that deformation of the mechanically unusual creeping portions of the San Andreas fault system is controlled by the presence of weak minerals rather than by high fluid pressure or other proposed mechanisms. The combination of these measurements of fault core strength with borehole observations yields a self-consistent picture of the stress state of the San Andreas fault at the SAFOD site, in which the fault is intrinsically weak in an otherwise strong crust. PMID:21441903

  4. Loading of the San Andreas fault by flood-induced rupture of faults beneath the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel; Kilb, Debi; Luttrell, Karen; Driscoll, Neal W.; Kent, Graham

    2011-01-01

    The southern San Andreas fault has not experienced a large earthquake for approximately 300 years, yet the previous five earthquakes occurred at ~180-year intervals. Large strike-slip faults are often segmented by lateral stepover zones. Movement on smaller faults within a stepover zone could perturb the main fault segments and potentially trigger a large earthquake. The southern San Andreas fault terminates in an extensional stepover zone beneath the Salton Sea—a lake that has experienced periodic flooding and desiccation since the late Holocene. Here we reconstruct the magnitude and timing of fault activity beneath the Salton Sea over several earthquake cycles. We observe coincident timing between flooding events, stepover fault displacement and ruptures on the San Andreas fault. Using Coulomb stress models, we show that the combined effect of lake loading, stepover fault movement and increased pore pressure could increase stress on the southern San Andreas fault to levels sufficient to induce failure. We conclude that rupture of the stepover faults, caused by periodic flooding of the palaeo-Salton Sea and by tectonic forcing, had the potential to trigger earthquake rupture on the southern San Andreas fault. Extensional stepover zones are highly susceptible to rapid stress loading and thus the Salton Sea may be a nucleation point for large ruptures on the southern San Andreas fault.

  5. Crustal-scale tilting of the central Salton block, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorsey, Rebecca; Langenheim, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The southern San Andreas fault system (California, USA) provides an excellent natural laboratory for studying the controls on vertical crustal motions related to strike-slip deformation. Here we present geologic, geomorphic, and gravity data that provide evidence for active northeastward tilting of the Santa Rosa Mountains and southern Coachella Valley about a horizontal axis oriented parallel to the San Jacinto and San Andreas faults. The Santa Rosa fault, a strand of the San Jacinto fault zone, is a large southwest-dipping normal fault on the west flank of the Santa Rosa Mountains that displays well-developed triangular facets, narrow footwall canyons, and steep hanging-wall alluvial fans. Geologic and geomorphic data reveal ongoing footwall uplift in the southern Santa Rosa Mountains, and gravity data suggest total vertical separation of ∼5.0–6.5 km from the range crest to the base of the Clark Valley basin. The northeast side of the Santa Rosa Mountains has a gentler topographic gradient, large alluvial fans, no major active faults, and tilted inactive late Pleistocene fan surfaces that are deeply incised by modern upper fan channels. Sediments beneath the Coachella Valley thicken gradually northeast to a depth of ∼4–5 km at an abrupt boundary at the San Andreas fault. These features all record crustal-scale tilting to the northeast that likely started when the San Jacinto fault zone initiated ca. 1.2 Ma. Tilting appears to be driven by oblique shortening and loading across a northeast-dipping southern San Andreas fault, consistent with the results of a recent boundary-element modeling study.

  6. Predicted variation of stress orientation with depth near an active fault: application to the Cajon Pass Scientific Drillhole, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wesson, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary measurements of the stress orientation at a depth of 2 km interpreted to indicate that the regional orientation of the maximum compression is normal to the fault, and taken as evidence for a very weak fault. The orientation expected from plate tectonic arguments is about 66?? NE from the strike of the fault. Geodetic data indicate that the orientation of maximum compressive strain rate is about 43?? NE from the strike of the fault, and show nearly pure right-lateral shear acting parallel to the fault. These apparent conflicts in the inferred orientation of the axis of maximum compression may be explained in part by a model in which the fault zone is locked over a depth interval in the range of 2-5 to 15 km, but is very weak above and below that interval. This solution does require, however, a few mm/yr of creep at the surface on the San Andreas or nearby sub-parallel faults (such as the San Jacinto), which has not yet been observed, or a shallow zone near the faults of distributed deformation. -from Author

  7. Carte du Ciel, San Fernando zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, C.

    2014-06-01

    An updated summary of a future large astrometric catalogue is presented, based on the two most important astrometric projects carried out by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada de San Fernando (ROA). The goal is to make a catalogue of positions and proper motions based on ROA's Cart du Ciel (CdC) and the Astrographic Catalogue (AC) San Fernando zone plates, and the HAMC2 meridian circle catalogue. The CdC and AC plates are being reduced together to provide first-epoch positions while HAMC2 will provide second-epoch ones. New techniques have been applied, that range from using a commercial flatbed scanner to the proper reduction schemes to avoid systematics from it. Only thirty plates (out of 540) remain to be processed, due to scanning problems that are being solved.

  8. Active Tectonics of Southern California Revealed by Cluster Analysis of GPS Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Savage, J. C.; Simpson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    We use cluster analysis of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Map GPS velocity field for southern California with standard deviations < 1 mm/yr to determine velocity gradients that locate the most important faults, the elastic strain associated with them, and regions of possible block-like behavior. Seven to ten well resolved clusters are statistically significant and spatially distinct with small overlap. In map view (see figure), the 7 clusters solution shows bands of relatively constant velocity sub-parallel to the San Andreas (SAF) and San Jacinto (SJF) faults and the major faults of the eastern Mojave shear zone (EMSZ). These bands are due both to elastic strain accumulation on the SAF and relative motion across lower slip rate faults in the EMSZ and Los Angeles and Ventura basins. At the largest scale, the 7-cluster map shows two main trends. The blue dots define the SJ and SA faults from northwest of the Salton Sea (SS) to Parkfield (P); the grey/magenta boundary suggests that the defined Eastern California Shear Zone could be extended farther south to the Salton Sea. The short ~80-km-long San Gorgonio Pass-San Bernardino Mountains (SGP) segment of the SAF has a much lower slip rate, ~7 mm/yr of right-lateral oblique convergence. As generally shown by previous GPS studies, right-lateral strike-slip movement rates vary considerably along the SAF. In the Imperial Valley (IV) the rate is ~40 mm/yr; east of the Salton Sea it drops to ~20 mm/yr, with 10-15 mm/yr having been shunted westward to the SJF; north of the Salton Sea ~10-15 mm/yr of strike-slip is transferred to the faults of the eastern Mojave; therefore the east-trending faults of San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) take up only ~5 mm/yr of strike slip and ~equal amounts of north-south shortening; on the Mojave (M) segment of the SAF the slip rate increases to ~15-20 mm/yr in the vicinity of Cajon Pass (CP) because of transfer of SJF slip back onto the San Andreas; northwest of Tejon Pass the rate increases again to

  9. San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10

    SciTech Connect

    Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

  10. Bismuth ochers from San Diego Co., California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaller, W.T.

    1911-01-01

    The chief points brought out in this paper may be briefly summarized as follows: (1) The existence of natural Bi2O3 has not been established. (2) Natural bismite or bismuth ocher, when pure, is more probably a bismuth hydroxide. (3) The bismuth ochers from San Diego County, California, are either a bismuth hydroxide or bismuth vanadate, pucherite, or mixtures of these two. (4) Pucherite has been found noncrystallin and determined for the first time in the United States.

  11. The San Joaquin Valley Westside Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Linneman, J. Christopher; Tanji, Kenneth K.

    2006-03-27

    Salt management has been a challenge to westside farmerssince the rapid expansion of irrigated agriculture in the 1900 s. Thesoils in this area are naturally salt-affected having formed from marinesedimentary rocks rich in sea salts rendering the shallow groundwater,and drainage return flows discharging into the lower reaches of the SanJoaquin River, saline. Salinity problems are affected by the importedwater supply from Delta where the Sacramento and San Joaquin Riverscombine. Water quality objectives on salinity and boron have been inplace for decades to protect beneficial uses of the river. However it wasthe selenium-induced avian toxicity that occurred in the evaporationponds of Kesterson Reservoir (the terminal reservoir of a planned but notcompleted San Joaquin Basin Master Drain) that changed public attitudesabout agricultural drainage and initiated a steady stream ofenvironmental legislation directed at reducing non-point source pollutionof the River. Annual and monthly selenium load restrictions and salinityand boron Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) are the most recent of thesepolicy initiatives. Failure by both State and Federal water agencies toconstruct a Master Drain facility serving mostly west-side irrigatedagriculture has constrained these agencies to consider only In-Valleysolutions to ongoing drainage problems. For the Westlands subarea, whichhas no surface irrigation drainage outlet to the San Joaquin River,innovative drainage reuse systems such as the Integrated Farm DrainageManagement (IFDM) offer short- to medium-term solutions while morepermanent remedies to salt disposal are being investigated. Real-timesalinity management, which requires improved coordination of east-sidereservoir releases and west-side drainage, offers some relief toGrasslands Basin farmers and wetland managers - allowing greater salinityloading to the River than under a strict TMDL. However, currentregulation drives a policy that results in a moratorium on all

  12. Cenozoic evolution of San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bartow, J.A.

    1988-03-01

    The Neogene San Joaquin basin in the southern part of the 700-km long Great Valley of California is a successor to a late Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary forearc basin. The transition from forearc basin to the more restricted Neogene marine basin occurred principally during the Paleogene as the plate tectonic setting changed from oblique convergence to normal convergence, and finally to the initiation of tangential (transform) movement near the end of the Oligocene. Regional-scale tectonic events that affected the basin include: (1) clockwise rotation of the southernmost Sierra Nevada, and large-scale en echelon folding in the southern Diablo Range, both perhaps related to Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary right slip on the proto-San-Andreas fault; (2) regional uplift of southern California in the Oligocene that resulted from the subduction of the Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge: (3) extensional tectonism in the Basin and Range province, particularly in the Miocene; (4) wrench tectonism adjacent to the San Andreas fault in the Neogene; (5) northeastward emplacement of a wedge of the Franciscan complex at the west side of the Sierran block, with associated deep-seated thrusting in the late Cenozoic; and (6) the accelerated uplift of the Sierra Nevada beginning in the late Miocene. Neogene basin history was controlled principally by the tectonic effects of the northwestward migration of the Mendocino triple junction along the California continental margin and by the subsequent wrench tectonism associated with the San Andreas fault system. East-west compression in the basin, resulting from extension in the Basin and Range province was an important contributing factor to crustal shortening at the west side of the valley. Analysis of the sedimentary history of the basin, which was controlled to some extent by eustatic sea level change, enables reconstruction of the basin paleogeography through the Cenozoic.

  13. Dipping San Andreas and Hayward faults revealed beneath San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Hart, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay area is crossed by several right-lateral strike-slip faults of the San Andreas fault zone. Fault-plane reflections reveal that two of these faults, the San Andreas and Hayward, dip toward each other below seismogenic depths at 60?? and 70??, respectively, and persist to the base of the crust. Previously, a horizontal detachment linking the two faults in the lower crust beneath San Francisco Bay was proposed. The only near-vertical-incidence reflection data available prior to the most recent experiment in 1997 were recorded parallel to the major fault structures. When the new reflection data recorded orthogonal to the faults are compared with the older data, the highest, amplitude reflections show clear variations in moveout with recording azimuth. In addition, reflection times consistently increase with distance from the faults. If the reflectors were horizontal, reflection moveout would be independent of azimuth, and reflection times would be independent of distance from the faults. The best-fit solution from three-dimensional traveltime modeling is a pair of high-angle dipping surfaces. The close correspondence of these dipping structures with the San Andreas and Hayward faults leads us to conclude that they are the faults beneath seismogenic depths. If the faults retain their observed dips, they would converge into a single zone in the upper mantle -45 km beneath the surface, although we can only observe them in the crust.

  14. Examination of spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) pollutant bioaccumulation in San Diego Bay, San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) is an important recreational sport and subsistence food fish within San Diego Bay, a large industrialized harbor in San Diego, California. Despite this importance, few studies examining the species life history relative to pollutant tissue concentrations and the consumptive fishery exist. This study utilized data from three independent spotted sand bass studies from 1989 to 2002 to investigate PCB, DDT, and mercury tissue concentrations relative to spotted sand bass age and growth in San Diego Bay, with subsequent comparisons to published pollutant advisory levels and fishery regulations for recreational and subsistence consumption of the species. Subsequent analysis focused on examining temporal and spatial differences for different regions of San Diego Bay. Study results for growth confirmed previous work, finding the species to exhibit highly asymptotic growth, making tissue pollutant concentrations at initial take size difficult if not impossible to predict. This was corroborated by independent tissue concentration results for mercury, which found no relationship between fish size and pollutant bioaccumulation observed. However, a positive though highly variable relationship was observed between fish size and PCB tissue concentration. Despite these findings, a significant proportion of fish exhibited pollutant levels above recommended state recreational angler consumption advisory levels for PCBs and mercury, especially for fish above the minimum take size, making the necessity of at-size predictions less critical. Lastly, no difference in tissue concentration was found temporally or spatially within San Diego Bay. PMID:24282672

  15. Examination of spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) pollutant bioaccumulation in San Diego Bay, San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Loflen, Chad L

    2013-01-01

    The spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) is an important recreational sport and subsistence food fish within San Diego Bay, a large industrialized harbor in San Diego, California. Despite this importance, few studies examining the species life history relative to pollutant tissue concentrations and the consumptive fishery exist. This study utilized data from three independent spotted sand bass studies from 1989 to 2002 to investigate PCB, DDT, and mercury tissue concentrations relative to spotted sand bass age and growth in San Diego Bay, with subsequent comparisons to published pollutant advisory levels and fishery regulations for recreational and subsistence consumption of the species. Subsequent analysis focused on examining temporal and spatial differences for different regions of San Diego Bay. Study results for growth confirmed previous work, finding the species to exhibit highly asymptotic growth, making tissue pollutant concentrations at initial take size difficult if not impossible to predict. This was corroborated by independent tissue concentration results for mercury, which found no relationship between fish size and pollutant bioaccumulation observed. However, a positive though highly variable relationship was observed between fish size and PCB tissue concentration. Despite these findings, a significant proportion of fish exhibited pollutant levels above recommended state recreational angler consumption advisory levels for PCBs and mercury, especially for fish above the minimum take size, making the necessity of at-size predictions less critical. Lastly, no difference in tissue concentration was found temporally or spatially within San Diego Bay. PMID:24282672

  16. Diazinon concentrations in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and San Francisco Bay, California, February 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    1993-01-01

    The distribution and possible biological effects of a dormant spray pesticide, diazinon, were examined by measuring pesticide concentrations and estimating toxicity using bioassays at a series of sites in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and San Francisco Bay. Pulses of diazinon were observed in early February 1993 in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers after heavy rains, with elevated concentrations measured for a few days to weeks at a time. The pulse of diazinon in the Sacramento River was followed from Sacramento through Suisun Bay, the eastward embayment of San Francisco Bay. In the central delta, well-defined pulses of diazinon were not observed at the Old and Middle River sites; instead, the concentrations steadily increased throughout February. Ceriodaphnia dubia mortality was 100% in water samples collected for 12 consecutive days (February 8-19) from the San Joaquin River at Vernalis. The bioassay mortality corresponded with the peak diazinon concentrations. Conversely, no toxicity was observed in water collected before or after peaks of diazinon concentration. Other pesticides present also could contribute to the toxicity.

  17. Anthropogenic influences on shoreline and nearshore evolution in the San Francisco Bay coastal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dallas, K.L.; Barnard, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of four historical bathymetric surveys over a 132-year period has revealed significant changes to the morphology of the San Francisco Bar, an ebb-tidal delta at the mouth of San Francisco Bay estuary. From 1873 to 2005 the San Francisco Bar vertically-eroded an average of 80 cm over a 125 km2 area, which equates to a total volume loss of 100 ± 52 million m3 of fine- to coarse-grained sand. Comparison of the surveys indicates the entire ebb-tidal delta contracted radially, with the crest moving landward an average of 1 km. Long-term erosion of the ebb-tidal delta is hypothesized to be due to a reduction in the tidal prism of San Francisco Bay and a decrease in coastal sediment supply, both as a result of anthropogenic activities. Prior research indicates that the tidal prism of the estuary was reduced by 9% from filling, diking, and sedimentation. Compilation of historical records dating back to 1900 reveals that a minimum of 200 million m3 of sediment has been permanently removed from the San Francisco Bay coastal system through dredging, aggregate mining, and borrow pit mining. Of this total, ~54 million m3 of sand-sized or coarser sediment was removed from central San Francisco Bay. With grain sizes comparable to the ebb-tidal delta, and its direct connection to the bay mouth, removal of sediments from central San Francisco Bay may limit the sand supply to the delta and open coast beaches. SWAN wave modeling illustrates that changes to the morphology of the San Francisco Bar have altered the alongshore wave energy distribution at adjacent Ocean Beach, and thus may be a significant factor in a persistent beach erosion ‘hot spot’ occurring in the area. Shoreline change analyses show that the sandy shoreline in the shadow of the ebb-tidal delta experienced long-term (1850s/1890s to 2002) and short-term (1960s/1980s to 2002) accretion while the adjacent sandy shoreline exposed to open-ocean waves experienced long-term and short-term erosion. Therefore

  18. An overview of San Francisco Bay PORTS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; McKinnie, David; English, Chad; Smith, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    The Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) provides observations of tides, tidal currents, and meteorological conditions in real-time. The San Francisco Bay PORTS (SFPORTS) is a decision support system to facilitate safe and efficient maritime commerce. In addition to real-time observations, SFPORTS includes a nowcast numerical model forming a San Francisco Bay marine nowcast system. SFPORTS data and nowcast numerical model results are made available to users through the World Wide Web (WWW). A brief overview of SFPORTS is presented, from the data flow originated at instrument sensors to final results delivered to end users on the WWW. A user-friendly interface for SFPORTS has been designed and implemented. Appropriate field data analysis, nowcast procedures, design and generation of graphics for WWW display of field data and nowcast results are presented and discussed. Furthermore, SFPORTS is designed to support hazardous materials spill prevention and response, and to serve as resources to scientists studying the health of San Francisco Bay ecosystem. The success (or failure) of the SFPORTS to serve the intended user community is determined by the effectiveness of the user interface.

  19. High frequency radar measurements of tidal currents flowing through San Pablo Strait, San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maresca, Joseph W., Jr.; Padden, Robin R.; Cheng, Ralph T.; Seibel, Erwin

    1980-01-01

    High frequency (HF) radar measurements of the surface current averaged over the upper 0.5 m in San Pablo Strait were compared with current meter measurements of the subsurface current made at 9.4 m below mean lower low water (MLLW) over two 12.4-h tidal cycles. After averaging the radar and current meter data over two tidal cycles, a southerly (ebbing direction) surface current of 32 cm·s−1 was deduced from the radar measurements and a northerly (flooding direction) subsurface current of 7 cm·s−1 from the current meter measurements. This nontidal flow is maintained by freshwater discharge from the Sacramento–San Joaquin Rivers into Suisun and San Pablo Bays. The radar measurement technique provides quantitative estimates of the surface currents that previously were determined only from surface drifter studies.

  20. A Study of the San Andreas Slip Rate on the San Francisco Peninsula, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, L. M.; Prentice, C.; Grove, K.; Caskey, J.; Ritz, J. F.; Leslie, S.

    2008-12-01

    The most recent large earthquake on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) along the San Francisco Peninsula was the great San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906, when a Mw= 7.8 event ruptured 435-470 km of the northern SAF. The slip rate for this segment of the SAF is incompletely known but is important for clarifying seismic hazard in this highly urbanized region. A previous study south of our site has found an average slip rate of 17±4 mm/yr for the late Holocene on the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. North of the Golden Gate, the SAF joins the San Gregorio Fault with an estimated slip rate of 6 mm/yr. A trench study north of where the two faults join has produced an average late Holocene slip rate of 24±3 mm/yr. To refine slip-rate estimates for the peninsula segment of the SAF, we excavated a trench across the fault where we located an abandoned channel between the San Andreas and Lower Crystal Springs reservoirs. This abandoned channel marks the time when a new channel cut across the SAF; the new channel has since been offset in a right-lateral sense about 20 m. The measured amount of offset and the age of the youngest fluvial sediments in the abandoned channel will yield a slip rate for the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. We excavated a trench across the abandoned channel and logged the exposed sediments. Our investigation revealed channel-fill alluvium incised and filled by probable debris flow sediments, and a wide fault zone in bedrock, west of the channel deposits. The most prominent fault is probably the strand that moved in 1906. We completed a total-station survey to more precisely measure the offset stream, and to confirm that the fault exposed in the trench aligns with a fence that is known to have been offset 2.8m during the 1906 earthquake. We interpret the debris flow sediments to represent the last phase of deposition prior to abandonment of the old channel. We collected samples for radiocarbon dating, optically stimulated

  1. 2004 Fall Meeting Expands to San Francisco Marriott !

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Rob; Burch, Jim; Plescia, Jeff

    2004-10-01

    After only one year, the AGU Fall Meeting has grown beyond the capacity of Moscone West. Sessions at the upcoming Fall Metting (13-17 December) will be held in both the Moscone West faicility, site of last year's meeting and the San Francisco Marriott Hotel. The Marriott is a 5-minute walk across the street, a distance not farther than the walk from Moscone North to Moscone South, the facilities in which the meeting was held for several years prior to 2003. The Program Committe has tried to schedule sessions to minimize the inconvenience of the 5-minute walk between the two locations. Most Union sessions, including the Union tutorials and the Frontiers of Geophysics lecture, along with many other sessions, will be held at theMarriott. In addition, most Section and Focus groups social events and other activities will be held at the Marriott.

  2. Electromagnetic Imaging of Fluids in the San Andreas Fault

    SciTech Connect

    Martyn Unsworth

    2002-05-01

    OAK 270 - Magnetotelluric data were collected on six profiles across the san Andreas Fault at Cholame,Parkfield, and Hollister in Central California. On each profile, high electrical resistivities were imaged west of the fault, and are due to granitic rocks of the Salinian block. East of the fault, lower electrical resistivities are associated with rocks of the Fanciscan formation. On the seismically active Parkfield and Hollister segments, a region of low resistivity was found in the fault zone that extends to a depth of several kilometers. This is due to a zone of fracturing (the damaged zone) that has been infiltrated by saline ground water. The shallowest micro-earthquakers occur at a depth that is coincident with the base of the low resistivity wedge. This strongly suggests that above this depth, the fault rocks are too weak to accumulate sufficient stress for earthquake rupture to occur and fault motion is accommodated through aseismic creep.

  3. Solar Synoptic Maps from the San Fernando Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, John, II; Chapman, G.; Preminger, D.; Cookson, A.

    2011-05-01

    We are developing a set of synoptic image maps compiled from daily photometric images taken at the San Fernando Observatory. Our initial maps show the progression of solar features across the central meridian for approximately one solar rotation. The red continuum maps show the photometric contrast of solar features in the photosphere while the Ca II K-line maps show the same in the lower chromosphere. Comparing these maps with each other, and with those of other solar groups, will yield information regarding the evolutionary patterns of solar activity at different heights of the solar atmosphere. This is a first step toward a comprehensive set of synoptic maps covering the period from mid-solar cycle 22 in 1988 to the present. This work has been supported in part by NSF grant ATM-0848518.

  4. Birds and environmental contaminants in San Francisco and Chesapeake Bays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Fleming, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The direct and indirect effects of human activities, including environmental contamination, upon bird populations in San Francisco Bay and Chesapeake Bay are imperfectly understood, and few data are available. that allow a comparison of the contamination levels in birds from these two areas. Certain trace elements and organochlorine compounds have been found at sufficiently high concentrations in bird tissues or their foods to expect adverse effects in these birds, based upon results of field and laboratory studies conducted with other avian species. The decline and recovery of populations of many avian species have been recorded, including some associated with organochlorine contamination. The present paper summarizes available information on the occurrence and potential effects of contaminants upon birds in these two regions.

  5. 3. Photographic copy of map. San Carlos Project, Arizona. Irrigation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photographic copy of map. San Carlos Project, Arizona. Irrigation System. Department of the Interior. United States Indian Service. No date. Circa 1939. (Source: Henderson, Paul. U.S. Indian Irrigation Service. Supplemental Storage Reservoir, Gila River. November 10, 1939, RG 115, San Carlos Project, National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO.) - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Lands North & South of Gila River, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  6. The San Marcos River Habitat Conservation Plan: Using HCP's as a Tool for Ecological Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, J. M.; Howard, M. S.; Arsuffi, T. L.

    2005-05-01

    The San Marcos River in San Marcos, Hays County, Texas is a biologically unique system with several listed species found in the headwaters. Flowing from the Edwards Aquifer and the second largest spring system in Texas, the water is clear and thermally constant. The physical and biological character of the habitat within and surrounding the river has been severely degraded by human activity. As a means of dealing with the continued disturbance and finding a balance between human needs and conservation, the San Marcos River Habitat Conservation Plan was written as provided by Section 10(a) of the Endangered Species Act. The plan provides habitat mitigation for the fountain darter (Etheostoma fonticola), Comal Springs riffle beetle, (Heterelmis comalensis), and San Marcos salamander (Eurycea nana), while allowing for incidental take resulting from specific restoration and management projects. We used a science-based ecological/experimental approach to address some of the problems and optimize solutions, including restoration of stream banks damaged from overuse, planning for permanent access points and trails, removal of silt deposits caused by extensive flood control structures, wet-pond construction, managing flow, and the control of submerged and emergent non-native vegetation to improve habitat and enhance recreation.

  7. Anthropogenic influence on sedimentation and intertidal mudflat change in San Pablo Bay, California: 1856 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Bruce E.; Smith, Richard E.; Foxgrover, Amy C.

    2007-06-01

    Analysis of a series of historical bathymetric surveys has revealed large changes in morphology and sedimentation from 1856 to 1983 in San Pablo Bay, California. In 1856, the morphology of the bay was complex, with a broad main channel, a major side channel connecting to the Petaluma River, and an ebb-tidal delta crossing shallow parts of the bay. In 1983, its morphology was simpler because all channels except the main channel had filled with sediment and erosion had planed the shallows creating a uniform gently sloping surface. The timing and patterns of geomorphic change and deposition and erosion of sediment were influenced by human activities that altered sediment delivery from rivers. From 1856 to 1887, high sediment delivery (14.1 × 10 6 m 3/yr) to San Francisco Bay during the hydraulic gold-mining period in the Sierra Nevada resulted in net deposition of 259 ± 14 × 10 6 m 3 in San Pablo Bay. This rapid deposition filled channels and increased intertidal mudflat area by 60% (37.4 ± 3.4 to 60.6 ± 6.2 km 2). From 1951 to 1983, 23 ± 3 × 10 6 m 3 of sediment was eroded from San Pablo Bay as sediment delivery from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers decreased to 2.8 × 10 6 m 3/yr because of damming of rivers, riverbank protection, and altered land use. Intertidal mudflat area in 1983 was 31.8 ± 3.9 km 2, similar to that in 1856. Intertidal mudflat distribution in 1983, however, was fairly uniform whereas most of the intertidal mudflats were in the western part of San Pablo Bay in 1856. Sediment delivery, through its affect on shallow parts of the bay, was determined to be a primary control on intertidal mudflat area. San Pablo Bay has been greatly affected by human activities and will likely continue to erode in the near term in response to a diminished sediment delivery from rivers.

  8. Sills of the San Rafael Volcanic Field, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Richardson, J. A.; Wetmore, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Substantial populations, such as Mexico City, Auckland, and Portland, are built within or near monogenetic fields, so it is important to understand both eruption precursors and magma plumbing systems in such areas. Directly observing the plumbing systems of this rarely witnessed eruption style provides valuable insight into the nature of magmatic transport and storage within the shallow crust, as well as the associated monogenetic eruptive processes. Within the San Rafael Desert of Central Utah is an exposed Pliocene complex of approximately 2000 mapped dikes, 12 sills, and 60 conduits eroded to a depth of 800 m below the paleosurface. A combination of airborne LiDAR (ALS), provided by NCALM, and terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) surveys are used to map the dip of 5 major sills within a 35 sq km area. The ALS provides a 1 m aerial resolution of exposed volcanic features and the TLS gives vertical measurements to cm accuracy. From these data we determine that the 5-25 m thick sills in this area dip approximately 1 to 6 degrees. Field observations show that steps in sills and related fabrics indicate flow direction in sills during emplacement and that sills normally propagate down dip in the Entrada sandstone host rock away from apparent feeder dikes and conduits. Some sills have foundered roofs, especially near conduits, suggesting that nearly neutrally buoyant magmas emplaced into sills along bed partings in the Entrada, differentiated, and in some cases flowed back into conduits. By volume, at 800 m depth in the San Rafael, nearly all igneous rock (approximately 90 percent) is located in sills rather than in dikes or conduits. These observations are consistent with geochemical models that suggest differentiation in shallow sills explains geochemical trends observed in single monogenetic volcanoes in some active fields. Deformation associated with sill inflation and deflation may be a significant precursor to eruptive activity in monogenetic volcanic fields.

  9. Roof and gridiron plans. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Roof and gridiron plans. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. Also includes tower plan drawings, and a drawing of roof plan at stage. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 6, job no. 692. Scales all 1/8 inch to the foot. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. First floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium. Also includes six small detail drawings. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 3, Job no. 692. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (main plan) and various scales for the details. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Tower details, sheet 14. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Tower details, sheet 14. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. Plan and elevation of tower above sixth floor; section through stage ventilators; elevation, stage ventilators. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 14, job no. 692. Scale 3/4 inch to the foot. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. Elevations. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. West, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. West, south, east elevations, elevation of loggia, areaway railing detail. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 7, job no. 692. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (elevations) and 3/4 inch to the foot (detail). March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. Elevations and sections. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations and sections. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. North elevation; longitudinal section through entire building; north, east, and west elevations of foyer. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 8, job no. 692. Scale 1/8 inch to the foot. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. Foyer and entrance details. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Foyer and entrance details. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. Section through foyer showing ticket window; detail front entrance with tiling; rear of ticket window. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 13, job no. 692. Scale 3/4 inch to the foot. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Third floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Third floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. Also includes one small detail drawing of ladder from fly gallery to grid iron. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 5, Job no. 692. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (main plan) and 3/4 inch to the foot for the detail. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Structure and Composition of the San Andreas Fault at Seismogenic Depths: Recent Results from the SAFOD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, S.; Zoback, M.; Ellsworth, W.; Kirschner, D.; Solum, J.

    2004-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was drilled into the San Andreas Fault Zone to study the physics of earthquake nucleation and rupture and determine the composition, physical properties, and mechanical behavior of an active, plate-bounding fault at seismogenic depths. SAFOD is located 10 km NW of Parkfield, CA, and penetrates a section of the fault that is moving through a combination of repeating microearthquakes and fault creep. During Phases 1 and 2 in the summers of 2004 and 2005, SAFOD was drilled vertically to a depth of 1.5 km and then deviated to penetrate the active San Andreas Fault Zone at a vertical depth of about 2.7 km. During Phase 3 in the summer of 2007, cores were acquired from holes branching off the main SAFOD borehole to directly sample fault and country rocks at depth. Geophysical logs and cuttings analyses conducted during Phases 1 and 2 define the San Andreas Fault Zone to be relatively broad (~250 m), containing several discrete, highly localized zones only 2-3 m wide that exhibit very low P- and S-wave velocities and low resistivity. Two of these zones have progressively deformed the cemented casing at measured depths of 3194 m and 3301 m, indicating that they are actively creeping shear zones. These active shear zones were targeted for coring during Phase 3. The 3194 m casing deformation zone lies ~100 m above a cluster of repeating M2 earthquakes that form the southwestern boundary of the creeping and microseismically active San Andreas Fault Zone. Casing deformation is most pronounced across the 3301 m zone; hence this zone is believed to accommodate most of the current creep deformation across the San Andreas Fault at this location. During Phase 3 we have obtained core from just outside the geologically defined San Andreas Fault Zone, at the boundary between the Salinian and Great Valley/Franciscan terranes, and from the active deformation zones at 3194 and 3301 m. The cores obtained from these deformation zones

  17. Structure and Composition of the San Andreas Fault at Seismogenic Depths: Recent Results from the SAFOD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, S.; Zoback, M.; Ellsworth, W.; Kirschner, D.; Solum, J.

    2007-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was drilled into the San Andreas Fault Zone to study the physics of earthquake nucleation and rupture and determine the composition, physical properties, and mechanical behavior of an active, plate-bounding fault at seismogenic depths. SAFOD is located 10 km NW of Parkfield, CA, and penetrates a section of the fault that is moving through a combination of repeating microearthquakes and fault creep. During Phases 1 and 2 in the summers of 2004 and 2005, SAFOD was drilled vertically to a depth of 1.5 km and then deviated to penetrate the active San Andreas Fault Zone at a vertical depth of about 2.7 km. During Phase 3 in the summer of 2007, cores were acquired from holes branching off the main SAFOD borehole to directly sample fault and country rocks at depth. Geophysical logs and cuttings analyses conducted during Phases 1 and 2 define the San Andreas Fault Zone to be relatively broad (~250 m), containing several discrete, highly localized zones only 2-3 m wide that exhibit very low P- and S-wave velocities and low resistivity. Two of these zones have progressively deformed the cemented casing at measured depths of 3194 m and 3301 m, indicating that they are actively creeping shear zones. These active shear zones were targeted for coring during Phase 3. The 3194 m casing deformation zone lies ~100 m above a cluster of repeating M2 earthquakes that form the southwestern boundary of the creeping and microseismically active San Andreas Fault Zone. Casing deformation is most pronounced across the 3301 m zone; hence this zone is believed to accommodate most of the current creep deformation across the San Andreas Fault at this location. During Phase 3 we have obtained core from just outside the geologically defined San Andreas Fault Zone, at the boundary between the Salinian and Great Valley/Franciscan terranes, and from the active deformation zones at 3194 and 3301 m. The cores obtained from these deformation zones

  18. Desaturation of Fatty Acids Associated with Monogalactosyl Diacylglycerol: The Effects of San 6706 and San 9785 1

    PubMed Central

    Lem, Nora W.; Williams, John P.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of two substituted pyridazinone herbicides, San 6706 and San 9785, on photosynthesis, dark respiration, and fatty acid metabolism were studied in mature leaf tissue of Vicia faba. Both San 6706 and San 9785 inhibited photosynthesis within 2 hours after initial exposure of leaf tissue to the chemicals although San 9785 was more effective in inhibiting photosynthesis than San 6706. Neither San 6706 nor San 9785 had any marked effect on dark respiration. Kinetic studies using 14CO2 indicated that synthesis of 18:3 esterified to monogalactosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG) was not completely inhibited by San 9785 up to 48 hours after feeding. Radioactivity was observed to accumulate in MGDG (digalactosyl diacylglycerol [DGDG] and sulpholipid [SL]) 18:2 at the expense of 18:3 but the specific radioactivity of MGDG 18:3 continued to increase throughout the experiment indicating only partial inhibition of MGDG 18:3 synthesis. No significant differences were observed in the metabolism of other fatty acids. The metabolism of fatty acids from leaf tissue was not affected by treatment with San 6706. The data indicate that there are at least two sites for 18:2 desaturation to form 18:3, one associated with MGDG in the chloroplast, which is inhibited by San 9785, and one or more sites not inhibited by San 9785. The fatty acid specific radioactivity data support the hypothesis that there is vectorial transfer of fatty acids from phosphatidyl choline to MGDG to produce the large quantities of MGDG 18:3 found in higher plant tissue. PMID:16662031

  19. Source rock maturation, San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.

    1989-09-01

    Kinetic modeling for thermal histories was simulated for seven wells in the San Juan sag honoring measured geochemical data. Wells in the area of Del Norte field (Sec. 9, T40N, R5E), where minor production has been established from an igneous sill reservoir, show that the Mancos Shale source rocks are in the mature oil generation window as a combined result of high regional heat flow and burial by approximately 2,700 m of Oligocene volcanic rocks. Maturation was relatively recent for this area and insignificant during Laramide subsidence. In the vicinity of Gramps field (Sec. 24, T33N, R2E) on the southwest flank of the San Juan sag, these same source rocks are exposed due to erosion of the volcanic cover but appear to have undergone a similar maturation history. At the north and south margins of the sag, two wells (Champlin 34A-13, Sec. 13, T35N, R4.5E; and Champlin 24A-1, Sec. 1, T44N, R5E) were analyzed and revealed that although the regional heat flow was probably similar to other wells, the depth of burial was insufficient to cause maturation (except where intruded by thick igneous sills that caused localized maturation). The Meridian Oil 23-17 South Fork well (Sec. 17, T39N, R4E) was drilled in a deeper part of the San Juan sag, and source rocks were intruded by numerous igneous sills creating a complex maturation history that includes overmature rocks in the lowermost Mancos Shale, possible CO{sub 2} generation from the calcareous Niobrara Member of the Mancos Shale, and mature source rocks in the upper Mancos Shale.

  20. 78 FR 77597 - Safety Zone; Allied PRA-Solid Works, San Diego Bay; San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of the San Diego Bay in support of a fireworks display on the evening of January 28, 2014. The zone is necessary to provide for the safety of the participants, crew, spectators, participating vessels, and other vessels and users of the waterway. Persons and vessels are prohibited from entering into, transiting......