Science.gov

Sample records for active science framework

  1. Exploring the Science Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Philip; Bricker, Leah; Tzou, Carrie; Lee, Tiffany; Van Horne, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The National Research Council's recent publication "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC 2011), which is the foundation for the Next Generation Science Standards now being developed, places unprecedented focus on the practices involved in doing scientific and engineering work. In an effort…

  2. Exploring the Science Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Robert; Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The vision for science education set forth in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" (NRC 2012) makes it clear that for today's students to become the scientifically literate citizens of tomorrow, their educational experiences must help them become mathematically proficient. "The focus here is on important practices, such as modeling, developing…

  3. Exploring the Science Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Robert; Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The vision for science education set forth in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" (NRC 2012) makes it clear that for today's students to become the scientifically literate citizens of tomorrow their educational experiences must help them become mathematically proficient. "The focus here is on important practices, such as modeling, developing…

  4. Introductory Biology Courses: A Framework To Support Active Learning in Large Enrollment Introductory Science Courses

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Active learning and research-oriented activities have been increasingly used in smaller, specialized science courses. Application of this type of scientific teaching to large enrollment introductory courses has been, however, a major challenge. The general microbiology lecture/laboratory course described has been designed to incorporate published active-learning methods. Three major case studies are used as platforms for active learning. Themes from case studies are integrated into lectures and laboratory experiments, and in class and online discussions and assignments. Students are stimulated to apply facts to problem-solving and to learn research skills such as data analysis, writing, and working in teams. This course is feasible only because of its organizational framework that makes use of teaching teams (made up of faculty, graduate assistants, and undergraduate assistants) and Web-based technology. Technology is a mode of communication, but also a system of course management. The relevance of this model to other biology courses led to assessment and evaluation, including an analysis of student responses to the new course, class performance, a university course evaluation, and retention of course learning. The results are indicative of an increase in student engagement in research-oriented activities and an appreciation of real-world context by students. PMID:15917873

  5. The Atmospheric Science Literacy Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.; Snow, J. T.; Foster, S. Q.; Maccaffery, M.; Buhr, S.; Niepold, F.

    2008-12-01

    The Framework for Atmospheric Science Literacy was developed through a community-based process from November 2007 - July 2008. The kick-off workshop brought together a diverse group of ~60 scientists, educators, and policy makers to identify key concepts essential for atmospheric science literacy for the public and students, as well as linkages among weather, climate, and ocean literacy. The group worked together to refine a draft framework, building on an array of foundational documents. The results of that workshop were formulated into a draft framework, and the community participated through three iterations to finalize the framework, providing over 300 comments to refine the document. A team of educators has subsequently met to map the framework to the National Science Education Standards, and a version of the framework that includes this mapping will be made available for educators in 2009.

  6. Active Implementation Frameworks for Program Success: How to Use Implementation Science to Improve Outcomes for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Allison; Bartley, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade the science related to developing and identifying evidence-based programs and practices for children and families has improved significantly. However, the science related to implementing these programs in early childhood settings has lagged far behind. In this article, the authors outline how the science of implementation and…

  7. Engaging Pre-Service Science Teachers to Act as Active Designers of Technology Integration: A MAGDAIRE Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Yu-Ta; Chang, Chun-Yen; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Kuo-En

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes our efforts in developing the MAGDAIRE framework (abbreviated from Modeled Analysis, Guided Development, Articulated Implementation, and Reflected Evaluation) to transform pre-service science teachers' roles in a teacher education course: moving pre-service teachers from the roles of passive users of technology, as they…

  8. Developing a Framework for Science Performance Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eunjin; Park, Hyun-Ju; Kang, Ho-Kam; Noh, Suk-Goo

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Framework for Performance Assessment in Science Education (F-PASE). Science educators in the past have paid more attention to science curriculum and teaching strategies than assessment. In recent years attention has turned toward performance assessment which addresses the concerns of science curriculum…

  9. Massachusetts Science and Technology Engineering Curriculum Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This 2006 "Massachusetts Science and Technology/Engineering Curriculum Framework" provides a guide for teachers and curriculum coordinators regarding specific content to be taught from PreK through high school. Following this "Organization" chapter, the "Framework" contains the following sections: (1) Philosophy and Vision; (2) Science and…

  10. The Science and Literacy Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zales, Charlotte Rappe; Unger, Connie S.

    2008-01-01

    Carefully selected trade books can introduce science concepts, develop background knowledge, reinforce hands-on lessons, support science-process skills, and at the same time enhance related literacy-process skills. They can also provide inspiration and structure for integrated science and literacy lessons. Based on these ideas, the authors…

  11. Unicam Activity Framework (UAF)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliardi, R.; Mauri, M.; Polzonetti, A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation illustrates the framework of processing performance of the faculty of the University of Camerino. The evaluation criteria are explained and the technological structure that allows automatic performance assessment available online anywhere and anytime. The designed framework is usually applied to the performance evaluation of…

  12. A science framework (SF) for agricultural sustainability.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ferdous; Al-Amin, Abul Q; Masud, Muhammad M; Kari, Fatimah; Mohamad, Zeeda

    2015-09-01

    The significance of Science Framework (SF) to date is receiving more acceptances all over the world to address agricultural sustainability. The professional views, however, advocate that the SF known as Mega Science Framework (MSF) in the transitional economies is not converging effectively in many ways for the agricultural sustainability. Specially, MSF in transitional economies is mostly incapable to identify barriers in agricultural research, inadequate to frame policy gaps with the goal of strategizing the desired sustainability in agricultural technology and innovation, inconsistent in finding to identify the inequities, and incompleteness to rebuild decisions. Therefore, this study critically evaluates the components of MSF in transitional economies and appraises the significance, dispute and illegitimate issue to achieve successful sustainable development. A sound and an effective MSF can be developed when there is an inter-linkage within principal components such as of (a) national priorities, (b) specific research on agricultural sustainability, (c) adequate agricultural research and innovation, and (d) alternative policy alteration. This maiden piece of research which is first its kind has been conducted in order to outline the policy direction to have an effective science framework for agricultural sustainability. PMID:26221988

  13. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  14. Dynamic pluralism: A pluralist framework for science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferret, Juan

    The problem of measurement in quantum physics is one of the most recalcitrant problems of science. Part of the problem lies in the fact that several conflicting interpretations that account for how measurement takes place have endured. Most theorists of science assume that one of the available interpretations, or a future variation of one, will prove to be the true interpretation. What I argue in this dissertation is that the proper response to this problem may be to have a framework in which different relevant interpretations can coexist and offer critical examinations of the conceptual issues related to the problem of measurement. This pluralism of interpretations is not the result of some flaw or inadequacy in quantum physics. From this alternative framework, pluralism in the problem of measurement can be understood as an acceptable, even necessary, response to the process of theorizing and experimentation in quantum mechanics. An important claim in this dissertation is that contemporary versions of pluralism in philosophy of science do not provide an account that recognizes the viability of all the interpretations of the problem of measurement. After showing how these versions of pluralism in philosophy of science fall short, as they apply to the problem of measurement, I argue for several conditions that a pluralism needs to satisfy in order to serve as a pluralistic framework for the evaluation of all interpretations of the problem of measurement. I develop an alternative version of pluralism that does account for the existing and future plurality of interpretations of the problem of measurement. My proposal is that a version of pluralism based on the work of William James and Paul Feyerabend will meet these conditions. Specifically, after introducing the complex pluralism of James as a version of pluralism that comes close to accounting for the multiplicity of interpretations of the problem of measurement, I argue that his version of pluralism does not

  15. The Semantic eScience Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinness, Deborah; Fox, Peter; Hendler, James

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this effort is to design and implement a configurable and extensible semantic eScience framework (SESF). Configuration requires research into accommodating different levels of semantic expressivity and user requirements from use cases. Extensibility is being achieved in a modular approach to the semantic encodings (i.e. ontologies) performed in community settings, i.e. an ontology framework into which specific applications all the way up to communities can extend the semantics for their needs.We report on how we are accommodating the rapid advances in semantic technologies and tools and the sustainable software path for the future (certain) technical advances. In addition to a generalization of the current data science interface, we will present plans for an upper-level interface suitable for use by clearinghouses, and/or educational portals, digital libraries, and other disciplines.SESF builds upon previous work in the Virtual Solar-Terrestrial Observatory. The VSTO utilizes leading edge knowledge representation, query and reasoning techniques to support knowledge-enhanced search, data access, integration, and manipulation. It encodes term meanings and their inter-relationships in ontologies anduses these ontologies and associated inference engines to semantically enable the data services. The Semantically-Enabled Science Data Integration (SESDI) project implemented data integration capabilities among three sub-disciplines; solar radiation, volcanic outgassing and atmospheric structure using extensions to existingmodular ontolgies and used the VSTO data framework, while adding smart faceted search and semantic data registrationtools. The Semantic Provenance Capture in Data Ingest Systems (SPCDIS) has added explanation provenance capabilities to an observational data ingest pipeline for images of the Sun providing a set of tools to answer diverseend user questions such as ``Why does this image look bad?. http://tw.rpi.edu/portal/SESF

  16. The Semantic eScience Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P. A.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of this effort is to design and implement a configurable and extensible semantic eScience framework (SESF). Configuration requires research into accommodating different levels of semantic expressivity and user requirements from use cases. Extensibility is being achieved in a modular approach to the semantic encodings (i.e. ontologies) performed in community settings, i.e. an ontology framework into which specific applications all the way up to communities can extend the semantics for their needs.We report on how we are accommodating the rapid advances in semantic technologies and tools and the sustainable software path for the future (certain) technical advances. In addition to a generalization of the current data science interface, we will present plans for an upper-level interface suitable for use by clearinghouses, and/or educational portals, digital libraries, and other disciplines.SESF builds upon previous work in the Virtual Solar-Terrestrial Observatory. The VSTO utilizes leading edge knowledge representation, query and reasoning techniques to support knowledge-enhanced search, data access, integration, and manipulation. It encodes term meanings and their inter-relationships in ontologies anduses these ontologies and associated inference engines to semantically enable the data services. The Semantically-Enabled Science Data Integration (SESDI) project implemented data integration capabilities among three sub-disciplines; solar radiation, volcanic outgassing and atmospheric structure using extensions to existingmodular ontolgies and used the VSTO data framework, while adding smart faceted search and semantic data registrationtools. The Semantic Provenance Capture in Data Ingest Systems (SPCDIS) has added explanation provenance capabilities to an observational data ingest pipeline for images of the Sun providing a set of tools to answer diverseend user questions such as ``Why does this image look bad?.

  17. Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, Todd C.; McCauliff, Sean; Cote, Miles T.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Wohler, Bill; Allen, Christopher; Middour, Christopher; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission is designed to continuously monitor up to 170,000 stars at a 30 minute cadence for 3.5 years searching for Earth-size planets. The data are processed at the Science Operations Center (SOC) at NASA Ames Research Center. Because of the large volume of data and the memory and CPU-intensive nature of the analysis, significant computing hardware is required. We have developed generic pipeline framework software that is used to distribute and synchronize the processing across a cluster of CPUs and to manage the resulting products. The framework is written in Java and is therefore platform-independent, and scales from a single, standalone workstation (for development and research on small data sets) to a full cluster of homogeneous or heterogeneous hardware with minimal configuration changes. A plug-in architecture provides customized control of the unit of work without the need to modify the framework itself. Distributed transaction services provide for atomic storage of pipeline products for a unit of work across a relational database and the custom Kepler DB. Generic parameter management and data accountability services are provided to record the parameter values, software versions, and other meta-data used for each pipeline execution. A graphical console allows for the configuration, execution, and monitoring of pipelines. An alert and metrics subsystem is used to monitor the health and performance of the pipeline. The framework was developed for the Kepler project based on Kepler requirements, but the framework itself is generic and could be used for a variety of applications where these features are needed.

  18. Science World Activities Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, Madison.

    This document consists of three sections. Section I contains 19 activities developed by master teachers for the Science World '84 summer science program. These activities focus on studies involving airplane controls, trash bag kites, computers, meteorology, compass orienteering, soils, aquatic ecosystems, bogs, and others. Objectives, materials…

  19. Evaluation of Online Teacher and Student Materials for the Framework for K-12 Science Education Science and Engineering Crosscutting Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The National Research Council developed and published the "Framework for K-12 Science Education," a new set of concepts that many states were planning on adopting. Part of this new endeavor included a set of science and engineering crosscutting concepts to be incorporated into science materials and activities, a first in science…

  20. WFIRST Project Science Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The WFIRST Project is a joint effort between GSFC and JPL. The project scientists and engineers are working with the community Science Definition Team to define the requirements and initial design of the mission. The objective is to design an observatory that meets the WFIRST science goals of the Astr02010 Decadal Survey for minimum cost. This talk will be a report of recent project activities including requirements flowdown, detector array development, science simulations, mission costing and science outreach. Details of the interim mission design relevant to scientific capabilities will be presented.

  1. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-08-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of each lesson were analysed to identify individual student's emotions. Results from two representative students are presented as case studies. Using a theoretical perspective drawn from theories of emotions founded in sociology, two assertions emerged. First, during the demonstration activity, students experienced the emotions of wonder and surprise; second, during a laboratory activity, students experienced the intense positive emotions of happiness/joy. Characteristics of these activities that contributed to students' positive experiences are highlighted. The study found that choosing activities that evoked strong positive emotional experiences, focused students' attention on the phenomenon they were learning, and the activities were recalled positively. Furthermore, such positive experiences may contribute to students' interest and engagement in science and longer term memorability. Finally, implications for science teachers and pre-service teacher education are suggested.

  2. Science and Literature: Towards a Conceptual Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, John

    2007-01-01

    Teachers of science and the history of science may wish to enliven and contextualise their subject matter by citing literary references to scientific ideas; similarly, teachers of literature may wish to examine the impact of science on their own field. Both groups of scholars may wish to examine how science and literature inform each other in…

  3. Argumentation in Science Education: A Model-Based Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottcher, Florian; Meisert, Anke

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this article is threefold: First, the theoretical background for a model-based framework of argumentation to describe and evaluate argumentative processes in science education is presented. Based on the general model-based perspective in cognitive science and the philosophy of science, it is proposed to understand arguments as reasons…

  4. Illinois Science Assessment Framework: Grades 4 and 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Illinois Science Assessment Framework is designed to assist educators, test developers, policy makers and the public by clearly defining those elements of the Illinois Learning Standards that are suitable for state testing. It is not designed to replace a local science curriculum and should not be considered a state science curriculum. The…

  5. Complexity Science Framework for Big Data: Data-enabled Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surjalal Sharma, A.

    2016-07-01

    such new analytics can yield improved risk estimates. The challenges of scientific inference from complex and massive data are addressed by data-enabled science, also referred as the Fourth paradigm, after experiment, theory and simulation. An example of this approach is the modelling of dynamical and statistical features of natural systems, without assumptions of specific processes. An effective use of the techniques of complexity science to yield the inherent features of a system from extensive data from observations and large scale numerical simulations is evident in the case of Earth's magnetosphere. The multiscale nature of the magnetosphere makes the numerical simulations a challenge, requiring very large computing resources. The reconstruction of dynamics from observational data can however yield the inherent characteristics using typical desktop computers. Such studies for other systems are in progress. Data-enabled approach using the framework of complexity science provides new techniques for modelling and prediction using Big Data. The studies of Earth's magnetosphere, provide an example of the potential for a new approach to the development of quantitative analytic tools.

  6. Earth Systems Science: An Analytic Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Fred N.; Nam, Younkeyong; Oughton, John

    2011-01-01

    Earth Systems Science (ESS) is emerging rapidly as a discipline and is being used to replace the older earth science education that has been taught as unrelated disciplines--geology, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography. ESS is complex and is based on the idea that the earth can be understood as a set of interacting natural and social systems.…

  7. Virtual Reality Hypermedia Design Frameworks for Science Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, R. William; Oh, Byron; Check, Rosa

    This paper reports on a study that conceptualizes a research framework to aid software design and development for virtual reality (VR) computer applications for instruction in the sciences. The framework provides methodologies for the processing, collection, examination, classification, and presentation of multimedia information within hyperlinked…

  8. Missouri's Framework for Curriculum Development in Science K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    Missouri's Framework for Curriculum Development in Science acknowledges that teachers will bring the vision, ideals, and principles of the Show-Me Standards of the state of Missouri into their classrooms in exciting and innovative ways. The role of the frameworks is to provide districts with a "frame" for building curricula using the standards as…

  9. Papermaking as a Science Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetters, Marcia K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple procedure for making paper and provides some suggestions for extending and modifying the activity. The activity is correlated to the National Science Standards and Benchmarks for Science Literacy. (SAH)

  10. FOSE: a framework for open science evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Alexander; van den Bosch, Jasper J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-publication peer review of scientific literature in its present state suffers from a lack of evaluation validity and transparency to the community. Inspired by social networks, we propose a framework for the open exchange of post-publication evaluation to complement the current system. We first formulate a number of necessary conditions that should be met by any design dedicated to perform open scientific evaluation. To introduce our framework, we provide a basic data standard and communication protocol. We argue for the superiority of a provider-independent framework, over a few isolated implementations, which allows the collection and analysis of open evaluation content across a wide range of diverse providers like scientific journals, research institutions, social networks, publishers websites, and more. Furthermore, we describe how its technical implementation can be achieved by using existing web standards and technology. Finally, we illustrate this with a set of examples and discuss further potential. PMID:22754522

  11. The Development of a Conceptual Framework for New K-12 Science Education Standards (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, T.

    2010-12-01

    The National Academy of Sciences has created a committee of 18 National Academy of Science and Engineering members, academic scientists, cognitive and learning scientists, and educators, educational policymakers and researchers to develop a framework to guide new K-12 science education standards. The committee began its work in January, 2010, released a draft of the framework in July, 2010, and intends to have the final framework in the first quarter of 2011. The committee was helped in early phases of the work by consultant design teams. The framework is designed to help realize a vision for science and engineering education in which all students actively engage in science and engineering practices in order to deepen their understanding of core ideas in science over multiple years of school. These three dimensions - core disciplinary ideas, science and engineering practices, and cross-cutting elements - must blend together to build an exciting, relevant, and forward looking science education. The framework will be used as a base for development of next generation K-12 science education standards.

  12. Building a Semantic Framework for eScience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movva, S.; Ramachandran, R.; Maskey, M.; Li, X.

    2009-12-01

    The e-Science vision focuses on the use of advanced computing technologies to support scientists. Recent research efforts in this area have focused primarily on “enabling” use of infrastructure resources for both data and computational access especially in Geosciences. One of the existing gaps in the existing e-Science efforts has been the failure to incorporate stable semantic technologies within the design process itself. In this presentation, we describe our effort in designing a framework for e-Science built using Service Oriented Architecture. Our framework provides users capabilities to create science workflows and mine distributed data. Our e-Science framework is being designed around a mass market tool to promote reusability across many projects. Semantics is an integral part of this framework and our design goal is to leverage the latest stable semantic technologies. The use of these stable semantic technologies will provide the users of our framework the useful features such as: allow search engines to find their content with RDFa tags; create RDF triple data store for their content; create RDF end points to share with others; and semantically mash their content with other online content available as RDF end point.

  13. A Science Framework for Connecticut River Watershed Sustainability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rideout, Stephen; Nicolson, Craig; Russell-Robinson, Susan L.; Mecray, Ellen L.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: This document outlines a research framework for water resource managers and land-use planners in the four-state Connecticut River Watershed (CRW). It specifically focuses on developing the decision-support tools and data needed by managers in the watershed. The purpose of the Science Framework is to identify critical research issues and information required to better equip managers to make decisions on desirable changes in the CRW. This Science Framework is the result of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass-Amherst), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The cooperative project was guided by a Science Steering Committee (SC) and included several focus groups, a 70-person workshop in September 2004, and an open collaborative process by which the workshop outcomes were synthesized, written up, and then progressively refined through peer review. This document is the product of that collaborative process.

  14. Practical use of a framework for network science experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Andrew; Bergamaschi, Flavio

    2014-06-01

    In 2006, the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) established a collaborative research alliance with academia and industry, called the International Technology Alliance (ITA)1 In Network and Information Sciences, to address fundamental issues concerning Network and Information Sciences that will enhance decision making for coalition operations and enable rapid, secure formation of ad hoc teams in coalition environments and enhance US and UK capabilities to conduct coalition warfare. Research conducted under the ITA was extended through collaboration between ARL and IBM UK to characterize and dene a software stack and tooling that has become the reference framework for network science experimentation in support for validation of theoretical research. This paper discusses the composition of the reference framework for experimentation resulting from the ARL/IBM UK collaboration and its use, by the Network Science Collaborative Technology Alliance (NS CTA)2 , in a recent network science experiment conducted at ARL. It also discusses how the experiment was modeled using the reference framework, the integration of two new components, the Apollo Fact-Finder3 tool and the Medusa Crowd Sensing4 application, the limitations identified and how they shall be addressed in future work.

  15. Libre: A Framework for Sharing and Discovering Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, J.; Duerr, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    To enable peer review and re-use, data must be publicly shareable and discoverable. The Libre project within the NSIDC, in conjunction with other members of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners and the Polar Information Commons, provides a framework for collaborative publishing of open science data. This talk describes the Libre framework as a model for “freeing” science data. Libre uses technologies such as Atom feeds to enable syndication of data sets and services. Open Search services allow the feeds to be discovered. An aggregator, like a news reader, provides notice for new or changed data sets and services. With these technologies, the Libre project provides both open-source tooling and a road map for similar efforts in other fields.

  16. Everyday science & science every day: Science-related talk & activities across settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Heather

    To understand the development of science-related thinking, acting, and learning in middle childhood, I studied youth in schools, homes, and other neighborhood settings over a three-year period. The research goal was to analyze how multiple everyday experiences influence children's participation in science-related practices and their thinking about science and scientists. Ethnographic and interaction analysis methodologies were to study the cognition and social interactions of the children as they participated in activities with peers, family, and teachers (n=128). Interviews and participant self-documentation protocols elucidated the participants' understandings of science. An Everyday Expertise (Bell et al., 2006) theoretical framework was employed to study the development of science understandings on three analytical planes: individual learner, social groups, and societal/community resources. Findings came from a cross-case analysis of urban science learners and from two within-case analyses of girls' science-related practices as they transitioned from elementary to middle school. Results included: (1) children participated actively in science across settings---including in their homes as well as in schools, (2) children's interests in science were not always aligned to the school science content, pedagogy, or school structures for participation, yet children found ways to engage with science despite these differences through crafting multiple pathways into science, (3) urban parents were active supporters of STEM-related learning environments through brokering access to social and material resources, (4) the youth often found science in their daily activities that formal education did not make use of, and (5) children's involvement with science-related practices can be developed into design principles to reach youth in culturally relevant ways.

  17. The MMI Semantic Framework: Rosetta Stones for Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, C.; Bermudez, L. E.; Graybeal, J.; Alexander, P.

    2009-12-01

    Semantic interoperability—the exchange of meaning among computer systems—is needed to successfully share data in Ocean Science and across all Earth sciences. The best approach toward semantic interoperability requires a designed framework, and operationally tested tools and infrastructure within that framework. Currently available technologies make a scientific semantic framework feasible, but its development requires sustainable architectural vision and development processes. This presentation outlines the MMI Semantic Framework, including recent progress on it and its client applications. The MMI Semantic Framework consists of tools, infrastructure, and operational and community procedures and best practices, to meet short-term and long-term semantic interoperability goals. The design and prioritization of the semantic framework capabilities are based on real-world scenarios in Earth observation systems. We describe some key uses cases, as well as the associated requirements for building the overall infrastructure, which is realized through the MMI Ontology Registry and Repository. This system includes support for community creation and sharing of semantic content, ontology registration, version management, and seamless integration of user-friendly tools and application programming interfaces. The presentation describes the architectural components for semantic mediation, registry and repository for vocabularies, ontology, and term mappings. We show how the technologies and approaches in the framework can address community needs for managing and exchanging semantic information. We will demonstrate how different types of users and client applications exploit the tools and services for data aggregation, visualization, archiving, and integration. Specific examples from OOSTethys (http://www.oostethys.org) and the Ocean Observatories Initiative Cyberinfrastructure (http://www.oceanobservatories.org) will be cited. Finally, we show how semantic augmentation of web

  18. Student Empowerment in an Environmental Science Classroom: Toward a Framework for Social Justice Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimick, Alexandra Schindel

    2012-01-01

    Social justice education is undertheorized in science education. Given the wide range of goals and purposes proposed within both social justice education and social justice science education scholarship, these fields require reconciliation. In this paper, I suggest a student empowerment framework for conceptualizing teaching and learning social…

  19. Computational Thinking in High School Science Classrooms: Exploring the Science "Framework" and "NGSS"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneider, Cary; Stephenson, Chris; Schafer, Bruce; Flick, Larry

    2014-01-01

    A "Framework for K-12 Science Education" identified eight practices as "essential elements of the K-12 science and engineering curriculum" (NRC 2012, p. 49). Most of the practices, such as Developing and Using Models, Planning and Carrying Out Investigations, and Analyzing and Interpreting Data, are well known among science…

  20. Mobilizing Science, Evidence and Technology for the Sendai Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2015, UN member states adopted the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction: 2015-2030. The Sendai Framework recognises the cross-cutting nature of DRR policy and calls on a range of stakeholders to help governments. The Sendai Framework sets the aim of achieving "the substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health and in the economic, physical, social, cultural and environmental assets of persons, businesses, communities and countries" (para 16). The international science community is acknowledged as a key stakeholder in supporting countries to implement the Sendai Framework. With this call to action and the gravity of disaster risk escalating around the globe, it is now vital that scientific knowledge and research resources are shared and become accessible in a form that can directly support coordinated application. Recent work is presented on the DRR gaps voiced by governments and scientists across a range of science and technology related needs, including through the drafting process for the Sendai Framework. Across regions and development levels, countries are seeking to address specific gaps they face in scientific capacities and information. Considering the many existing programmes, research initiatives and resources already seeking to generate evidence on DRR at all scales, how can science and technology improve delivery? Models and case studies prompt a useful discussion on what does and does not work. We provide an example of recent work in the UK disasters research community to assess scientific and technical capacity and collaborative effort to fulfil the commitment of the Sendai Framework. While there is no one-size-fits-all, any implementation approach needs to take into account the extraordinary, dynamic and localised nature of disasters and needs to be able to deliver relevant information to decision-makers at national and local levels, in a timely manner.

  1. The Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline Framework Extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, Todd C.; Cote, Miles T.; McCauliff, Sean; Girouard, Forrest R.; Wohler, Bill; Allen, Christopher; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Bryson, Stephen T.; Middour, Christopher; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) is responsible for several aspects of the Kepler Mission, including managing targets, generating on-board data compression tables, monitoring photometer health and status, processing the science data, and exporting the pipeline products to the mission archive. We describe how the generic pipeline framework software developed for Kepler is extended to achieve these goals, including pipeline configurations for processing science data and other support roles, and custom unit of work generators that control how the Kepler data are partitioned and distributed across the computing cluster. We describe the interface between the Java software that manages the retrieval and storage of the data for a given unit of work and the MATLAB algorithms that process these data. The data for each unit of work are packaged into a single file that contains everything needed by the science algorithms, allowing these files to be used to debug and evolve the algorithms offline.

  2. Photon Temporal Modes: A Complete Framework for Quantum Information Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, B.; Reddy, Dileep V.; Silberhorn, C.; Raymer, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    Field-orthogonal temporal modes of photonic quantum states provide a new framework for quantum information science (QIS). They intrinsically span a high-dimensional Hilbert space and lend themselves to integration into existing single-mode fiber communication networks. We show that the three main requirements to construct a valid framework for QIS—the controlled generation of resource states, the targeted and highly efficient manipulation of temporal modes, and their efficient detection—can be fulfilled with current technology. We suggest implementations of diverse QIS applications based on this complete set of building blocks.

  3. Supporting Teachers on Science-Focused School Trips: Towards an Integrated Framework of Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Jennifer; Osborne, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Although science centres and museums are important educational resources, school trips to these places are not often conducted in a manner that could maximise learning. In addressing this issue, a Framework for Museum Practice (FMP) is proposed, derived from the perspectives of Cultural Historical Activity Theory, theories of intrinsic motivation,…

  4. Science Activities in Energy: Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 14 activities relating to energy conservation. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a simple card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  5. Citizen Science, Crowdsourcing and Big Data: A Scientific and Social Framework for Natural Resources and Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, P. D.; Jones, J. W.; Liu, S. B.; Shapiro, C. D.; Jenter, H. L.; Hogan, D. M.; Govoni, D. L.; Poore, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a conceptual framework for Citizen Science that can be applied to improve the understanding and management of natural resources and environments. For us, Citizen Science represents an engagement from members of the public, usually volunteers, in collaboration with paid professionals and technical experts to observe and understand natural resources and environments for the benefit of science and society. Our conceptual framework for Citizen Science includes crowdsourcing of observations (or sampling). It considers a wide range of activities, including volunteer and professional monitoring (e.g. weather and climate variables, water availability and quality, phenology, biota, image capture and remote sensing), as well as joint fact finding and analyses, and participatory mapping and modeling. Spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of the biophysical processes that control natural resources and environments are taken into account within this conceptual framework, as are the availability, scaling and diversity of tools and efforts that are needed to properly describe these biophysical processes. Opportunities are sought within the framework to properly describe, QA/QC, archive, and make readily accessible, the large amounts of information and traceable knowledge required to better understand and manage natural resources and environments. The framework also considers human motivational needs, primarily through a modern version of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. We examine several USGS-based Citizen Science efforts within the context of our framework, including the project called "iCoast - Did the Coast Change?", to understand the utility of the framework, its costs and benefits, and to offer concrete examples of how to expand and sustain specific projects. We make some recommendations that could aid its implementation on a national or larger scale. For example, implementation might be facilitated (1) through greater engagement of paid professionals, and (2

  6. Design Activity Framework for Visualization Design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Sean; Mazur, Dominika; Agutter, James; Meyer, Miriah

    2014-12-01

    An important aspect in visualization design is the connection between what a designer does and the decisions the designer makes. Existing design process models, however, do not explicitly link back to models for visualization design decisions. We bridge this gap by introducing the design activity framework, a process model that explicitly connects to the nested model, a well-known visualization design decision model. The framework includes four overlapping activities that characterize the design process, with each activity explicating outcomes related to the nested model. Additionally, we describe and characterize a list of exemplar methods and how they overlap among these activities. The design activity framework is the result of reflective discussions from a collaboration on a visualization redesign project, the details of which we describe to ground the framework in a real-world design process. Lastly, from this redesign project we provide several research outcomes in the domain of cybersecurity, including an extended data abstraction and rich opportunities for future visualization research. PMID:26356933

  7. A New Framework for Science and Technology Policy

    SciTech Connect

    VanDevender, J.P.

    1999-03-04

    The usual divisions of science and technology into pure research applied research, development, demonstration, and production creates impediments for moving knowledge into socially useful products and services. This failing has been previously discussed without concrete suggestions of how to improve the situation. In the proposed framework the divisive and artificial distinctions of basic and applied are softened, and the complementary and somewhat overlapping roles of universities, corporations, and federal labs are clarified to enable robust partnerships. As a collegial group of scientists and technologists from industry, university, and government agencies and their national laboratories, we have worked together to clarify this framework. We offer the results in hopes of improving the results from investments in science and technology and thereby helping strengthen the social contract between the public and private investors and the scientists-technologists.

  8. Partners in Science: A Suggested Framework for Inclusive Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Public participation in scientific research, also known as citizen science, is effective on many levels: it produces sound, publishable science and data, helps participants gain scientific knowledge and learn about the methods and practices of modern science, and can help communities advance their own priorities. Unfortunately, the demographics of citizen science programs do not reflect the demographics of the US; in general people of color and less affluent members of society are under-represented. To understand the reasons for this disparity, it is useful to look to the broader research about participation in science in a variety of informal and formal settings. From this research, the causes for unequal participation in science can be grouped into three broad categories: accessibility challenges, cultural differences, and a gap between scientific goals and community priorities. Many of these challenges are addressed in working with communities to develop an integrated program of scientific research, education, and community action that addresses community priorities and invites community participation at every stage of the process from defining the question to applying the results. In the spectrum of ways to engage the public in scientific research, this approach of "co-creation" is the most intensive. This talk will explore several examples of co-creation of science, including collaborations with tribal communities around climate change adaptation, work in the Louisiana Delta concerning land loss, and the link between weather and disease in Africa. We will articulate some of the challenges of working this intensively with communities, and suggest a general framework for guiding this kind of work with communities. This model of intensive collaboration at every stage is a promising one for adding to the diversity of citizen science efforts. It also provides a powerful strategy for science more generally, and may help us diversify our field, ensure the use and

  9. e-Science Partnerships: Towards a Sustainable Framework for School-Scientist Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falloon, Garry

    2013-08-01

    In late 2006, the New Zealand Government embarked on a series of initiatives to explore how the resources and expertise of eight, small, state-owned science research institutes could be combined efficiently to support science teaching in schools. Programmes were developed to enable students and teachers to access and become involved in local science research and innovation, with the aim being to broaden their awareness of New Zealand science research contexts, adding authenticity and relevance to their school studies. One of these initiatives, known as Science-for-Life, partnered scientists with teachers and students in primary and secondary schools (K-12). A key output from the trial phase of Science-for-Life was the generation of a framework for guiding and coordinating the activities of the eight institutes within the education sector, to improve efficiency, effectiveness and promote sustainability. The framework, based on data gathered from a series of interviews with each institute's Chief Executive Officer (CEO), an online questionnaire, and informed by findings from trial partnership case studies published as institute technical reports and published articles, is presented in this paper. While the framework is developed from New Zealand data, it is suggested that it may be useful for coordinating interactions between multiple small science organisations and the school sector in other small-nation or state contexts.

  10. Outreach Activities for Plasma Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, M.; Bannan, K.; Delooper, J.; Eastman, T.; Sweet, P.; Smith, T.

    1997-11-01

    The need for communication beyond experts from subfields of scientific inquiry has been long identified. In response to this need, new outreach activities for plasma science have begun to take shape and grow. One example of this increase in activity is the formation of the Coalition for Plasma Science. The focus of the Coalition's efforts is to enhance the understanding and support for plasma science in the scientific community, the education community, business and the general public. One of the Coalition's first activities was to coordinate the assembly of an eight panel exhibit entitled "Plasmas: Science and Technology for the 21st Century". The formation of the Coalition and the display will be described and some possible future activities will be outlined.

  11. A Bayesian framework for active artificial perception.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João Filipe; Lobo, Jorge; Bessière, Pierre; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Dias, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a Bayesian framework for the active multimodal perception of 3-D structure and motion. The design of this framework finds its inspiration in the role of the dorsal perceptual pathway of the human brain. Its composing models build upon a common egocentric spatial configuration that is naturally fitting for the integration of readings from multiple sensors using a Bayesian approach. In the process, we will contribute with efficient and robust probabilistic solutions for cyclopean geometry-based stereovision and auditory perception based only on binaural cues, modeled using a consistent formalization that allows their hierarchical use as building blocks for the multimodal sensor fusion framework. We will explicitly or implicitly address the most important challenges of sensor fusion using this framework, for vision, audition, and vestibular sensing. Moreover, interaction and navigation require maximal awareness of spatial surroundings, which, in turn, is obtained through active attentional and behavioral exploration of the environment. The computational models described in this paper will support the construction of a simultaneously flexible and powerful robotic implementation of multimodal active perception to be used in real-world applications, such as human-machine interaction or mobile robot navigation. PMID:23014760

  12. A Framework for the Next Generation of Risk Science

    PubMed Central

    Krewski, Daniel; Andersen, Melvin E.; Paoli, Gregory M.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Al-Zoughool, Mustafa; Croteau, Maxine C.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Cote, Ila

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated the NexGen project to develop a new paradigm for the next generation of risk science. Methods: The NexGen framework was built on three cornerstones: the availability of new data on toxicity pathways made possible by fundamental advances in basic biology and toxicological science, the incorporation of a population health perspective that recognizes that most adverse health outcomes involve multiple determinants, and a renewed focus on new risk assessment methodologies designed to better inform risk management decision making. Results: The NexGen framework has three phases. Phase I (objectives) focuses on problem formulation and scoping, taking into account the risk context and the range of available risk management decision-making options. Phase II (risk assessment) seeks to identify critical toxicity pathway perturbations using new toxicity testing tools and technologies, and to better characterize risks and uncertainties using advanced risk assessment methodologies. Phase III (risk management) involves the development of evidence-based population health risk management strategies of a regulatory, economic, advisory, community-based, or technological nature, using sound principles of risk management decision making. Conclusions: Analysis of a series of case study prototypes indicated that many aspects of the NexGen framework are already beginning to be adopted in practice. Citation: Krewski D, Westphal M, Andersen ME, Paoli GM, Chiu WA, Al-Zoughool M, Croteau MC, Burgoon LD, Cote I. 2014. A framework for the next generation of risk science. Environ Health Perspect 122:796–805; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307260 PMID:24727499

  13. Modeling Activities in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Kathy

    2014-05-01

    Students usually find science to be quite abstract. This is especially true of disciplines like Earth Science where it is difficult for the students to conduct and design hands-on experiments in areas such as Plate Tectonics that would allow them to develop predictive models. In the United States the new Next Generation Science Standards explicitly requires students to experience the science disciplines via modeling based activities. This poster presentation will discuss an activity that demonstrates how modeling, plate tectonics and student discourse converge in the earth science classroom. The activities featured on the poster will include using cardboard and shaving cream to demonstrate convergent plate boundaries, a Milky Way candy bar to demonstrate divergent boundaries and silly putty to demonstrate a strike slip boundary. I will discuss how students report back to the group about the findings from the lab and the techniques that can be used to heighten the student discourse. The activities outlined in this poster were originally designed for a middle school Earth Science class by Suzi Shoemaker for a graduate thesis at Arizona State University.

  14. Utah Science Activities, Update 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Utah Water Science Center

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a bureau of the U.S. Department of the Interior, serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. The USGS has become a world leader in the natural sciences thanks to our scientific excellence and responsiveness to society's needs. This newsletter describes some of the current and recently completed USGS earth-science activities in Utah. As an unbiased, multi-disciplinary science organization that focuses on biology, geography, geology, and water, we are dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the landscape, our natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten us. Learn more about our goals and priorities for the coming decade in the USGS Science Strategy at http://www.usgs.gov/science_strategy/ .

  15. A Framework for Relating Cognitive to Neural Systems. Cognitive Science Program, Technical Report No. 84-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.

    This paper reviews the aspects of cognitive science that relate best to using electrical and magnetic recording to understand the function of brain systems. It outlines a framework for relating cognitive activities of daily life (typing, reading) to underlying neural systems. The framework uses five levels of analysis: task, elementary operations,…

  16. A framework for training health professionals in implementation and dissemination science.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Ralph; Handley, Margaret A; Ackerman, Sara; Oʼsullivan, Patricia S

    2012-03-01

    The authors describe a conceptual framework for implementation and dissemination science (IDS) and propose competencies for IDS training. Their framework is designed to facilitate the application of theories and methods from the distinct domains of clinical disciplines (e.g., medicine, public health), population sciences (e.g., biostatistics, epidemiology), and translational disciplines (e.g., social and behavioral sciences, business administration education). They explore three principles that guided the development of their conceptual framework: Behavior change among organizations and/or individuals (providers, patients) is inherent in the translation process; engagement of stakeholder organizations, health care delivery systems, and individuals is imperative to achieve effective translation and sustained improvements; and IDS research is iterative, benefiting from cycles and collaborative, bidirectional relationships. The authors propose seven domains for IDS training-team science, context identification, literature identification and assessment, community engagement, intervention design and research implementation, evaluation of effect of translational activity, behavioral change communication strategies-and define 12 IDS training competencies within these domains. As a model, they describe specific courses introduced at the University of California, San Francisco, which they designed to develop these competencies. The authors encourage other training programs and institutions to use or adapt the design principles, conceptual framework, and proposed competencies to evaluate their current IDS training needs and to support new program development. PMID:22373617

  17. California Framework for the Next Generation Science Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Alessio, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2013, the California State Board of Education approved a revision to the state's science education standards, adopting the Next Generation Science Standards for the nation's most populous state. That action began a multi-year transition process that is ongoing. While the standards have been formally adopted, instructional materials and assessments that align with these standards have not yet been approved by the state. The approval process includes adopting a framework document that lays out the criteria for insructional materials and provides guidance to districts and teachers about how NGSS can be implemented effectively (not to be confused with the 2012 NRC Framework document). This document is currently available in draft form and has been approved by an appointed subcommittee, will undergo two periods of public comment, and is expected to be finalized by September 2016. We provide a summary of the process California is taking to implement NGSS, present highlights of the current document, and give a summary of the first public comment period.

  18. Panaceas, uncertainty, and the robust control framework in sustainability science

    PubMed Central

    Anderies, John M.; Rodriguez, Armando A.; Janssen, Marco A.; Cifdaloz, Oguzhan

    2007-01-01

    A critical challenge faced by sustainability science is to develop strategies to cope with highly uncertain social and ecological dynamics. This article explores the use of the robust control framework toward this end. After briefly outlining the robust control framework, we apply it to the traditional Gordon–Schaefer fishery model to explore fundamental performance–robustness and robustness–vulnerability trade-offs in natural resource management. We find that the classic optimal control policy can be very sensitive to parametric uncertainty. By exploring a large class of alternative strategies, we show that there are no panaceas: even mild robustness properties are difficult to achieve, and increasing robustness to some parameters (e.g., biological parameters) results in decreased robustness with respect to others (e.g., economic parameters). On the basis of this example, we extract some broader themes for better management of resources under uncertainty and for sustainability science in general. Specifically, we focus attention on the importance of a continual learning process and the use of robust control to inform this process. PMID:17881574

  19. An Extensible, User- Modifiable Framework for Planning Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshing, Joseph C.; Abramyan, Lucy; Mickelson, Megan C.; Wallick, Michael N.; Kurien, James A.; Crockett, Thomasa M.; Powell, Mark W.; Pyrzak, Guy; Aghevli, Arash

    2013-01-01

    This software provides a development framework that allows planning activities for the Mars Science Laboratory rover to be altered at any time, based on changes of the Activity Dictionary. The Activity Dictionary contains the definition of all activities that can be carried out by a particular asset (robotic or human). These definitions (and combinations of these definitions) are used by mission planners to give a daily plan of what a mission should do. During the development and course of the mission, the Activity Dictionary and actions that are going to be carried out will often be changed. Previously, such changes would require a change to the software and redeployment. Now, the Activity Dictionary authors are able to customize activity definitions, parameters, and resource usage without requiring redeployment. This software provides developers and end users the ability to modify the behavior of automatically generated activities using a script. This allows changes to the software behavior without incurring the burden of redeployment. This software is currently being used for the Mars Science Laboratory, and is in the process of being integrated into the LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) mission, as well as the International Space Station.

  20. Fundamental awareness: A framework for integrating science, philosophy and metaphysics.

    PubMed

    Theise, Neil D; Kafatos, Menas C

    2016-01-01

    The ontologic framework of Fundamental Awareness proposed here assumes that non-dual Awareness is foundational to the universe, not arising from the interactions or structures of higher level phenomena. The framework allows comparison and integration of views from the three investigative domains concerned with understanding the nature of consciousness: science, philosophy, and metaphysics. In this framework, Awareness is the underlying reality, not reducible to anything else. Awareness and existence are the same. As such, the universe is non-material, self-organizing throughout, a holarchy of complementary, process driven, recursive interactions. The universe is both its own first observer and subject. Considering the world to be non-material and comprised, a priori, of Awareness is to privilege information over materiality, action over agency and to understand that qualia are not a "hard problem," but the foundational elements of all existence. These views fully reflect main stream Western philosophical traditions, insights from culturally diverse contemplative and mystical traditions, and are in keeping with current scientific thinking, expressible mathematically. PMID:27489576

  1. Fundamental awareness: A framework for integrating science, philosophy and metaphysics

    PubMed Central

    Theise, Neil D.; Kafatos, Menas C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ontologic framework of Fundamental Awareness proposed here assumes that non-dual Awareness is foundational to the universe, not arising from the interactions or structures of higher level phenomena. The framework allows comparison and integration of views from the three investigative domains concerned with understanding the nature of consciousness: science, philosophy, and metaphysics. In this framework, Awareness is the underlying reality, not reducible to anything else. Awareness and existence are the same. As such, the universe is non-material, self-organizing throughout, a holarchy of complementary, process driven, recursive interactions. The universe is both its own first observer and subject. Considering the world to be non-material and comprised, a priori, of Awareness is to privilege information over materiality, action over agency and to understand that qualia are not a “hard problem,” but the foundational elements of all existence. These views fully reflect main stream Western philosophical traditions, insights from culturally diverse contemplative and mystical traditions, and are in keeping with current scientific thinking, expressible mathematically. PMID:27489576

  2. A Working Framework for Enabling International Science Data System Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. Steven; Hardman, Sean; Crichton, Daniel J.; Martinez, Santa; Law, Emily; Gordon, Mitchell K.

    2016-07-01

    For diverse scientific disciplines to interoperate they must be able to exchange information based on a shared understanding. To capture this shared understanding, we have developed a knowledge representation framework that leverages ISO level reference models for metadata registries and digital archives. This framework provides multi-level governance, evolves independent of the implementation technologies, and promotes agile development, namely adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, and rapid and flexible response to change. The knowledge representation is captured in an ontology through a process of knowledge acquisition. Discipline experts in the role of stewards at the common, discipline, and project levels work to design and populate the ontology model. The result is a formal and consistent knowledge base that provides requirements for data representation, integrity, provenance, context, identification, and relationship. The contents of the knowledge base are translated and written to files in suitable formats to configure system software and services, provide user documentation, validate input, and support data analytics. This presentation will provide an overview of the framework, present a use case that has been adopted by an entire science discipline at the international level, and share some important lessons learned.

  3. Evolution of Climate Science Modelling Language within international standards frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Dominic; Woolf, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The Climate Science Modelling Language (CSML) was originally developed as part of the NERC Data Grid (NDG) project in the UK. It was one of the first Geography Markup Language (GML) application schemas describing complex feature types for the metocean domain. CSML feature types can be used to describe typical climate products such as model runs or atmospheric profiles. CSML has been successfully used within NDG to provide harmonised access to a number of different data sources. For example, meteorological observations held in heterogeneous databases by the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC) and Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH) were served uniformly as CSML features via Web Feature Service. CSML has now been substantially revised to harmonise it with the latest developments in OGC and ISO conceptual modelling for geographic information. In particular, CSML is now aligned with the near-final ISO 19156 Observations & Measurements (O&M) standard. CSML combines the O&M concept of 'sampling features' together with an observation result based on the coverage model (ISO 19123). This general pattern is specialised for particular data types of interest, classified on the basis of sampling geometry and topology. In parallel work, the OGC Met Ocean Domain Working Group has established a conceptual modelling activity. This is a cross-organisational effort aimed at reaching consensus on a common core data model that could be re-used in a number of met-related application areas: operational meteorology, aviation meteorology, climate studies, and the research community. It is significant to note that this group has also identified sampling geometry and topology as a key classification axis for data types. Using the Model Driven Architecture (MDA) approach as adopted by INSPIRE we demonstrate how the CSML application schema is derived from a formal UML conceptual model based on the ISO TC211 framework. By employing MDA tools which map consistently between UML and GML we

  4. Marine Science Activities, Grade Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, James A.

    This unit, one of a series designed to develop and foster an understanding of the marine environment, presents marine science activities for grade 6 students. The unit is divided into the following sections: (1) Pagoo (story of a hermit crab); (2) introduction to marine environments; (3) salt water environment; (4) sea water investigations; (5)…

  5. Marine Science Activities, Grade Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, James A.

    This unit, one of a series designed to develop and foster an understanding of the marine environment, presents marine science activities for second grade students. The unit, focusing on awareness of living/non-living factors shaping life of the sea, is divided into sections dealing with: physical characteristics of oceans; fish; sea anemone;…

  6. A Framework for Guiding Future Citizens to Think Critically about Nature of Science and Socioscientific Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacoubian, Hagop A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I introduce a framework for guiding future citizens to think critically about nature of science (NOS) and "with" NOS as they engage in socioscientific decision making. The framework, referred to as the critical thinking--nature of science (CT-NOS) framework, explicates and targets both NOS as a learning objective and NOS…

  7. Distributed Application Framework for Earth Science Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, P.; Nemani, R.; Michaelis, A.; Neuschwander, A.; Coughlan, J.; Bowker, C.

    2002-12-01

    One of the characteristics of earth science data is their diversity, which results in a large number of similar algorithms tailored to a specific data set. This approach is not very cost-effective, yet it is often used not only at a small-scale university level, but also on large government projects. Additionally, it is often hard to integrate dependent algorithms in which output of one of the algorithms is input of the next, especially if these were not developed by the same team. Our system addresses these issues by providing a framework for easy integration of dependent earth science data processing algorithms and for their generalization. One of the important features of the system is the decoupling of the data from the algorithms. Since the input data come in all different formats we are developing a common set of FGDC-compliant metadata to provide a better description of the data content, including projection, data types, fill values, etc. We use XML to store this metadata information together with the data itself in HDF5 files. Rather than rewriting the data processing algorithms to fit the appropriate data set, we implement filters that preprocess the data to the format required by the algorithms. This is much simpler then rewriting the algorithms and encourages code re-use on the algorithm part. Because the data processing is often time-consuming, we are able to parallelize the processing by providing a Java RMI framework for distributed execution. With our framework we can easily build flexible and scalable processing "pipelines" that include preprocessing, processing and automated result analysis as independent modules. This system gives us the flexibility to add and remove modules on the fly, as well as re- use existing code, and thus enables us to concentrate more on the science itself rather than of system development. Finally, the system can run without user interventions for long periods of time, providing the scientists with an automated way to

  8. Scientific and Engineering Practices in K-12 Classrooms: Understanding "A Framework for K-12 Science Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    The author presents the science and engineering practices from the recently released "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas." He recognizes the changes implied by the new framework, and eventually a new generation of science education standards will present new perspectives for the science…

  9. Chemistry in Past and New Science Frameworks and Standards: Gains, Losses, and Missed Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente; Sevian, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Science education frameworks and standards play a central role in the development of curricula and assessments, as well as in guiding teaching practices in grades K-12. Recently, the National Research Council published a new Framework for K-12 Science Education that has guided the development of the Next Generation Science Standards. In this…

  10. Scientific and Engineering Practices in K-12 Classrooms: Understanding "A Framework for K-12 Science Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the science and engineering practices from the recently released "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC 2011). The author recognizes the changes implied by the new framework, and eventually a new generation of science education standards will present new…

  11. A Decision Support Framework For Science-Based, Multi-Stakeholder Deliberation: A Coral Reef Example

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a decision support framework for science-based assessment and multi-stakeholder deliberation. The framework consists of two parts: a DPSIR (Drivers-Pressures-States-Impacts-Responses) analysis to identify the important causal relationships among anthropogenic environ...

  12. A pedagogical framework for developing innovative science teachers with ICT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Laurence; Twidle, John

    2013-11-01

    Background: The authors have conducted a number of research projects into the use of ICT in science teaching and most recently have collaborated with five European partners in teacher education to develop resources to assist teacher trainers in delivering courses for the professional development of science teachers. Purpose: 1. To describe the main aspects of pedagogy which are relevant to the use of ICT tools which serve practical science teaching. 2. To discuss approaches to teacher education which aim to emphasise the pedagogical aspects of using those ICT tools. Sources of evidence: 1. A review of the research literature on the effectiveness of using ICT in education with a particular focus on pedagogical knowledge and its interaction with associated technical knowledge. 2. Authors' experience as teacher trainers and as researchers in methods of employing ICT in science education. 3. Studies conducted by partners in the ICT for Innovative Science Teachers Project and training materials developed by the project. Main argument: Starting from the premise that it is the pedagogical actions of the teacher which determine successful learning outcomes of using ICT in science lessons, the paper describes the main components of pedagogical knowledge and understanding required by teachers. It examines the role of an understanding of affordances in helping teachers to deploy software tools appropriately and defines some of the skills for exploiting them to benefit learning. Innovation is successful when ICT activities are incorporated in ways that complement non-ICT activities and serve science learning objectives. When teachers are alert to adapt their pedagogical skills, they evolve new ways of working and interacting with students. Training courses need to provide means of helping teachers to examine the professional beliefs which underpin their pedagogical approaches. This is most effectively achieved when a course blends personal hands-on experience with discourse

  13. Aggression, science, and law: The origins framework. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Victoroff, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Human societies have formalized instincts for compliance with reciprocal altruism in laws that sanction some aggression and not other aggression. Neuroscience makes steady advances toward measurements of various aspects of brain function pertinent to the aggressive behaviors that laws are designed to regulate. Consciousness, free will, rationality, intent, reality testing, empathy, moral reasoning, and capacity for self-control are somewhat subject to empirical assessment. The question becomes: how should law accommodate the wealth of information regarding these elements of mind that the science of aggression increasingly makes available? This essay discusses the evolutionary purpose of aggression, the evolutionary purpose of law, the problematic assumptions of the mens rea doctrine, and the prospects for applying the neuroscience of aggression toward the goal of equal justice for unequal minds. Nine other essays are introduced, demonstrating how each of them fits into the framework of the permanent debate about neuroscience and justice. It is concluded that advances in the science of human aggression will have vital, but biologically limited, impact on the provision of justice. PMID:19540592

  14. Analyzing Science Activities in Force and Motion Concepts: A Design of an Immersion Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayar, Mehmet C.; Aydeniz, Mehmet; Yalvac, Bugrahan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the science activities offered at 7th grade in the Turkish science and technology curriculum along with addressing the curriculum's original intent. We refer to several science education researchers' ideas, including Chinn & Malhotra's (Science Education, 86:175--218, 2002) theoretical framework and…

  15. The National Academy of Sciences offers a new framework for addressing global warming issues.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R C; Morgan, D L

    2000-02-01

    The recent landmark report by the National Academy of Sciences reviewed the science on which the Kyoto Protocol was based. NAS concluded that the policy choices and the mandatory reductions in greenhouse gases by the developed nations were based on incomplete science with significant uncertainties. In view of these uncertainties the NAS report developed a comprehensive strategic 10-year research program to address the basic issue of whether human activity that results in environmental changes is responsible for climate changes. The report provides a new framework for consideration of global warming issues. The UN International Panel on Climate Change (the UN science advisor) in its 1997 report to the Kyoto parties pointed out the confusing difference between scientific usage of the term "climate change" that distinguishes human from natural causes of change and the official usage that combines natural and human causes of changes in climate. The conclusion of the UN panel on human causes is equivocal. The 1999 report of the U.S. Global Science Research Committee also reached an equivocal conclusion on human causes and announced a 10-year research program to be developed in consultation with NAS. The precautionary measures provided in the 1992 UN Framework Convention differ from the ill-defined "precautionary principle" based on fear of uncertainty, and are consistent with the objectives of the NAS proposed research program. These developments together with the third report of the UN Intergovernmental Science Panel on developments in climate science due in 2001 merit consideration by the convention of the parties under the Kyoto Protocol. PMID:10715229

  16. Science Teaching and Learning Activities and Students' Engagement in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Bennett, Judith

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the variation in students' reports of engagement in science across science teaching and learning activities. In addition, this study examines student and school characteristics that may be associated with students' levels of engagement in science. Data are drawn from the Programme for International Student Assessment 2006 study. The analysis employs a quantitative approach that includes descriptive and inferential statistics to examine three measures of student engagement for a nationally representative sample of approximately 12,000 15-year-old students in the UK. The main results indicate that there is an association between students' motivation towards science, enjoyment of science and future orientation towards science, and the frequency in which various teaching and learning activities take place in the classroom. Understanding student engagement in science and the factors that influence it is essential in addressing the issue of uptake of science after compulsory schooling.

  17. Education and Outreach activities in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, E.; Rodrigo, C.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we will describe the main education and outreach activities that are being conducted in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory. In particular, we will outline the scientific and technical activities that are being done in collaboration with astronomical amateurs as well as the citizen science project to improve the orbits of near Earth asteroids using archive images.

  18. Schizotypy as An Organizing Framework for Social and Affective Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Alex S.; Mohr, Christine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Chan, Raymond C. K.; Park, Sohee

    2015-01-01

    Schizotypy, defined in terms of commonly occurring personality traits related to the schizophrenia spectrum, has been an important construct for understanding the neurodevelopment and stress-diathesis of schizophrenia. However, as schizotypy nears its sixth decade of application, it is important to acknowledge its impressively rich literature accumulating outside of schizophrenia research. In this article, we make the case that schizotypy has considerable potential as a conceptual framework for understanding individual differences in affective and social functions beyond those directly involved in schizophrenia spectrum pathology. This case is predicated on (a) a burgeoning literature noting anomalies in a wide range of social functioning, affiliative, positive and negative emotional, expressive, and social cognitive systems, (b) practical and methodological features associated with schizotypy research that help facilitate empirical investigation, and (c) close ties to theoretical constructs of central importance to affective and social science (eg, stress diathesis, neural compensation). We highlight recent schizotypy research, ie providing insight into the nature of affective and social systems more generally. This includes current efforts to clarify the neurodevelopmental, neurobiological, and psychological underpinnings of affiliative drives, hedonic capacity, social cognition, and stress responsivity systems. Additionally, we discuss neural compensatory and resilience factors that may mitigate the expression of stress-diathesis and functional outcome, and highlight schizotypy’s potential role for understanding cultural determinants of social and affective functions. PMID:25810057

  19. Schizotypy as an organizing framework for social and affective sciences.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alex S; Mohr, Christine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Chan, Raymond C K; Park, Sohee

    2015-03-01

    Schizotypy, defined in terms of commonly occurring personality traits related to the schizophrenia spectrum, has been an important construct for understanding the neurodevelopment and stress-diathesis of schizophrenia. However, as schizotypy nears its sixth decade of application, it is important to acknowledge its impressively rich literature accumulating outside of schizophrenia research. In this article, we make the case that schizotypy has considerable potential as a conceptual framework for understanding individual differences in affective and social functions beyond those directly involved in schizophrenia spectrum pathology. This case is predicated on (a) a burgeoning literature noting anomalies in a wide range of social functioning, affiliative, positive and negative emotional, expressive, and social cognitive systems, (b) practical and methodological features associated with schizotypy research that help facilitate empirical investigation, and (c) close ties to theoretical constructs of central importance to affective and social science (eg, stress diathesis, neural compensation). We highlight recent schizotypy research, ie providing insight into the nature of affective and social systems more generally. This includes current efforts to clarify the neurodevelopmental, neurobiological, and psychological underpinnings of affiliative drives, hedonic capacity, social cognition, and stress responsivity systems. Additionally, we discuss neural compensatory and resilience factors that may mitigate the expression of stress-diathesis and functional outcome, and highlight schizotypy's potential role for understanding cultural determinants of social and affective functions. PMID:25810057

  20. A Framework for Re-thinking Learning in Science from Recent Cognitive Science Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytler, Russell; Prain, Vaughan

    2010-10-01

    Recent accounts by cognitive scientists of factors affecting cognition imply the need to reconsider current dominant conceptual theories about science learning. These new accounts emphasize the role of context, embodied practices, and narrative-based representation rather than learners' cognitive constructs. In this paper we analyse data from a longitudinal study of primary school children's learning to outline a framework based on these contemporary accounts and to delineate key points of difference from conceptual change perspectives. The findings suggest this framework provides strong theoretical and practical insights into how children learn and the key role of representational negotiation in this learning. We argue that the nature and process of conceptual change can be re-interpreted in terms of the development of students' representational resources.

  1. Nuclear Science Teaching Aids and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodburn, John H.

    This publication is a sourcebook for science teachers. It provides guides for basic laboratory work in nuclear energy, suggesting various teacher and student demonstrations. Ideas for science clubs, science fairs, and project research seminars are presented. Problem-solving activities for both science and mathematics classes are included, as well…

  2. Review of the National Research Council's Framework for K-12 Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    The new "Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" is a big, comprehensive volume, carefully organized and heavily documented. It is the long-awaited product of the Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New K-12 Science Education Standards. As noted, it is a weighty document (more than 300 crowded…

  3. A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Increasing Opportunities for Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Thomas E.; Pearson, Greg

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce engineering and technology teachers to the process that led to the National Research Council's framework for K-12 science education and some of its content and delve into the dimensions of the framework that should be of most interest to engineering and technology teachers. The framework articulates a vision…

  4. Science Curriculum Design: Views from a Psychological Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Marcia C.

    It is now almost universally acknowledged that science education must be rejuvenated to serve the needs of American society. An emerging science of science education based on recent advances in psychological research could make this rejuvenation dramatic. Four aspects of psychological research relevant to science curriculum design are discussed:…

  5. The Whole Cosmos. Catalog of Science Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abruscato, Joe; Hassard, Jack

    Based on the notion that science begins and ends with the natural curiosity that young people have about themselves and the world, this book provides teachers and parents with many options for science exploration. Concepts are developed through science activities, creative arts activities, puzzles and games, and short biographies of individuals…

  6. Reference Data Layers for Earth and Environmental Science: History, Frameworks, Science Needs, Approaches, and New Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Global Mapping Project, Web-enabled Landsat Data (WELD), International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP), hydrology, solid earth dynamics, sedimentary geology, climate modeling, integrated assessments and so on all have needs for or have worked to develop consistently integrated data layers for Earth and environmental science. This paper will present an overview of an abstract notion of data layers of this types, what we are referring to as reference data layers for Earth and environmental science, highlight some historical examples, and delve into new approaches. The concept of reference data layers in this context combines data availability, cyberinfrastructure and data science, as well as domain science drivers. We argue that current advances in cyberinfrastructure such as iPython notebooks and integrated science processing environments such as iPlant's Discovery Environment coupled with vast arrays of new data sources warrant another look at the how to create, maintain, and provide reference data layers. The goal is to provide a context for understanding science needs for reference data layers to conduct their research. In addition, to the topics described above this presentation will also outline some of the challenges to and present some ideas for new approaches to addressing these needs. Promoting the idea of reference data layers is relevant to a number of existing related activities such as EarthCube, RDA, ESIP, the nascent NSF Regional Big Data Innovation Hubs and others.

  7. Technology Integration in Science Classrooms: Framework, Principles, and Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minchi C.; Freemyer, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A great number of technologies and tools have been developed to support science learning and teaching. However, science teachers and researchers point out numerous challenges to implementing such tools in science classrooms. For instance, guidelines, lesson plans, Web links, and tools teachers can easily find through Web-based search engines often…

  8. Primary Teachers' Attitudes toward Science: A New Theoretical Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Aalderen-Smeets, Sandra I.; Walma van der Molen, Juliette H.; Asma, Lieke J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Attention to the attitudes of preservice and inservice primary teachers toward science is of fundamental importance to research on primary science education. However, progress in this field of research has been slow due to the poor definition and conceptualization of the construct of primary teachers' attitude toward science. This poor theoretical…

  9. Activities for Science: Cooperative Learning Lessons (Challenging).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasmine, Grace; Jasmine, Julia

    This book is designed to help advanced elementary students learn science skills while actively engaged in cooperative activities based on the earth sciences and natural disasters. The first section explains how to make cooperative learning a part of the curriculum and includes an overview, instructions and activities to bring cooperative learning…

  10. ActiveTutor: Towards More Adaptive Features in an E-Learning Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Jean-Pierre; Sansonnet, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to sketch the emerging notion of auto-adaptive software when applied to e-learning software. Design/methodology/approach: The study and the implementation of the auto-adaptive architecture are based on the operational framework "ActiveTutor" that is used for teaching the topic of computer science programming in first-grade…

  11. On DESTINY Science Instrument Electrical and Electronics Subsystem Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Benford, Dominic J.; Lauer, Tod R.

    2009-01-01

    Future space missions are going to require large focal planes with many sensing arrays and hundreds of millions of pixels all read out at high data rates'' . This will place unique demands on the electrical and electronics (EE) subsystem design and it will be critically important to have high technology readiness level (TRL) EE concepts ready to support such missions. One such omission is the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) charged with making precise measurements of the expansion rate of the universe to reveal vital clues about the nature of dark energy - a hypothetical form of energy that permeates all of space and tends to increase the rate of the expansion. One of three JDEM concept studies - the Dark Energy Space Telescope (DESTINY) was conducted in 2008 at the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland. This paper presents the EE subsystem framework, which evolved from the DESTINY science instrument study. It describes the main challenges and implementation concepts related to the design of an EE subsystem featuring multiple focal planes populated with dozens of large arrays and millions of pixels. The focal planes are passively cooled to cryogenic temperatures (below 140 K). The sensor mosaic is controlled by a large number of Readout Integrated Circuits and Application Specific Integrated Circuits - the ROICs/ASICs in near proximity to their sensor focal planes. The ASICs, in turn, are serviced by a set of "warm" EE subsystem boxes performing Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based digital signal processing (DSP) computations of complex algorithms, such as sampling-up-the-ramp algorithm (SUTR), over large volumes of fast data streams. The SUTR boxes are supported by the Instrument Control/Command and Data Handling box (ICDH Primary and Backup boxes) for lossless data compression, command and low volume telemetry handling, power conversion and for communications with the spacecraft. The paper outlines how the JDEM DESTINY concept

  12. NASA's NPOESS Preparatory Project Science Data Segment: A Framework for Measurement-based Earth Science Data Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, Mathew R.; Schweiss, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    The NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) Science Data Segment (SDS) provides a framework for the future of NASA s distributed Earth science data systems. The NPP SDS performs research and data product assessment while using a fully distributed architecture. The components of this architecture are organized around key environmental data disciplines: land, ocean, ozone, atmospheric sounding, and atmospheric composition. The SDS thus establishes a set of concepts and a working prototypes. This paper describes the framework used by the NPP Project as it enabled Measurement-Based Earth Science Data Systems for the assessment of NPP products.

  13. Utilizing the National Research Council's (NRC) Conceptual Framework for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): A Self-Study in My Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvo, Arthur Francis

    Given the reality that active and competitive participation in the 21 st century requires American students to deepen their scientific and mathematical knowledge base, the National Research Council (NRC) proposed a new conceptual framework for K--12 science education. The framework consists of an integration of what the NRC report refers to as the three dimensions: scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas in four disciplinary areas (physical, life and earth/spaces sciences, and engineering/technology). The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS ), which are derived from this new framework, were released in April 2013 and have implications on teacher learning and development in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). Given the NGSS's recent introduction, there is little research on how teachers can prepare for its release. To meet this research need, I implemented a self-study aimed at examining my teaching practices and classroom outcomes through the lens of the NRC's conceptual framework and the NGSS. The self-study employed design-based research (DBR) methods to investigate what happened in my secondary classroom when I designed, enacted, and reflected on units of study for my science, engineering, and mathematics classes. I utilized various best practices including Learning for Use (LfU) and Understanding by Design (UbD) models for instructional design, talk moves as a tool for promoting discourse, and modeling instruction for these designed units of study. The DBR strategy was chosen to promote reflective cycles, which are consistent with and in support of the self-study framework. A multiple case, mixed-methods approach was used for data collection and analysis. The findings in the study are reported by study phase in terms of unit planning, unit enactment, and unit reflection. The findings have implications for science teaching, teacher professional development, and teacher education.

  14. Framework for Empirical Research on Science Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Hans Ernst; Klemm, Klaus; Leutner, Detlev; Sumfleth, Elke; Tiemann, Rudiger; Wirth, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    In view of the research on education--and subject-related education in particular--that has been conducted in recent years, it would seem useful to describe the current state and future trends of research on science teaching and learning. In the present article, research findings are described, the deficits of science education are analyzed, and…

  15. Three-Year High School Science Core Curriculum: A Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardeen, Marjorie; Freeman, Wade; Lederman, Leon; Marshall, Stephanie; Thompson, Bruce; Young, M. Jean

    It is time to start a complete re-structuring of the high school science sequence: new content, new instructional materials, new laboratories, new assessment tools, and new teacher preparation. This white paper initiates re-structuring by proposing organization, pedagogy, and content for a new sequence of science courses. The proposal respects the…

  16. A Pedagogical Framework for Developing Innovative Science Teachers with ICT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Laurence; Twidle, John

    2013-01-01

    Background: The authors have conducted a number of research projects into the use of ICT in science teaching and most recently have collaborated with five European partners in teacher education to develop resources to assist teacher trainers in delivering courses for the professional development of science teachers. Purpose: 1. To describe the…

  17. A Curriculum Innovation Framework for Science, Technology and Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tytler, Russell; Symington, David; Smith, Craig

    2011-01-01

    There is growing concern about falling levels of student engagement with school science, as evidenced by studies of student attitudes, and decreasing participation at the post compulsory level. One major response to this, the Australian School Innovation in Science, Technology and Mathematics (ASISTM) initiative, involves partnerships between…

  18. Energy Activities for Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, David; And Others

    This document is a collection of six energy education activities for junior high school science. Its purpose is to help promote knowledge about energy, provide laboratory experiences, provoke inquiry, and relate energy to society through the science curriculum. The six activities are designed to take one to three class periods. Two of the…

  19. Great Activities for Great Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Esther B.

    1993-01-01

    Presents hands-on spring science activities to help elementary students think and act like scientists. Students use the scientific process to make connections between life, physical, and earth science. Activities look at insects, flowers, trees, the sun, and the earth's rotation around the sun. (SM)

  20. Activity Theory as a Framework For Designing Constructivist Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.; Rohrer-Murphy, Lucia

    1999-01-01

    Defines activity theory as a socio-cultural and socio-historical lens through which the interaction of human activity and consciousness within its relevant environmental context can be analyzed. Describes how activity theory can be used as a framework for analyzing activities and settings for the purpose of designing constructivist learning…

  1. DIS[subscript 2]ECT: A Framework for Effective Inclusive Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Lucinda S.; Flannagan, Jenny Sue

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide special education and general education teachers a framework (DIS[subscript 2]ECT) for teaching science in inclusive settings. DIS2ECT stands for Design (Backwards); Individualization; Scaffolding and Strategies; Experiential learning; Cooperative Learning; and Teamwork. This framework was derived from our…

  2. Integrating Science and Technology: Using Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge as a Framework to Study the Practices of Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, Rose M.; Dawson, Kara; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined how teachers involved in a yearlong technology integration initiative planned to enact technological, pedagogical, and content practices in science lessons. These science teachers, engaged in an initiative to integrate educational technology in inquiry-based science lessons, provided a total of 525 lesson plans for this study. While our findings indicated an increase in technology-related practices, including the use of sophisticated hardware, very little improvements occurred with fostering inquiry-based science and effective science-specific pedagogy. In addition, our conceptual framework, technological pedagogical content knowledge, as a lens to examine teachers' intentions as documented in their lesson plans, provided an additional platform from which to investigate technology integration practices within the ambit of reform science teaching practices. This study, therefore, contributes knowledge about the structure and agenda of professional development initiatives that involve educational technology and integration into content knowledge disciplines such as science.

  3. Using the Geoscience Literacy Frameworks and Educational Technologies to Promote Science Literacy in Non-science Major Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, S.; Tuddenham, P.; Bishop, K. O.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years several geoscience communities have been developing ocean, climate, atmosphere and earth science literacy frameworks as enhancements to the National Science Education Standards content standards. Like the older content standards these new geoscience literacy frameworks have focused on K-12 education although they are also intended for informal education and general public audiences. These geoscience literacy frameworks potentially provide a more integrated and less abstract approach to science literacy that may be more suitable for non-science major students that are not pursuing careers in science research or education. They provide a natural link to contemporary environmental issues - e.g., climate change, resource depletion, species and habitat loss, natural hazards, pollution, development of renewable energy, material recycling. The College of Exploration is an education research non-profit that has provided process and technical support for the development of most of these geoscience literacy frameworks. It has a unique perspective on their development. In the last ten years it has also gained considerable national and international expertise in facilitating web-based workshops that support in-depth conversations among educators and working scientists/researchers on important science topics. These workshops have been of enormous value to educators working in K-12, 4-year institutions and community colleges. How can these geoscience literacy frameworks promote more collaborative inquiry-based learning that enhances the appreciation of scientific thinking by non-majors? How can web- and mobile-based education technologies transform the undergraduate non-major survey course into a place where learners begin their passion for science literacy rather than end it? How do we assess science literacy in students and citizens?

  4. Prototyping a Knowledge IntegrationFramework to Solve Science Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, S.; Conover, H.; Ramachandran, R.; Movva, S.; Fox, P.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    Key information technology advances in recent years include the emergence of distributed computing architectures based on web services; knowledge engineering efforts as evidenced by the development of science domain ontologies in the Semantic Web; and growing interest in scientific data mining as a means for automated knowledge extraction from the ever-increasing volumes of science observations and model data available. We present the results of our prototype study that bring together these key information technology components, as applied to the problem of feature extraction and morphology identification for multi-wavelength images of the Sun. We present, the science application, the linked ontologies describing both the data mining, manipulation and analysis services as well as the science domain; and a web-based user interface based on an existing smart search tool (NOESIS) which allows a user to discover and explore available data and perform the desired analysis.

  5. An Indigenous Framework for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monette, G.

    2003-12-01

    The American Indian Higher Education Consortium, composed of 35 American Indian tribally-controlled Colleges and Universities in the U.S. and Canada, is leading a comprehensive effort to improve American Indian student achievement in STEM. A key component of this effort is the synthesis of indigenous ways of knowing and western education systems. This presentation will provide an overview of culturally responsive, place-based teaching, learning, and research and will discuss potential opportunities and strategies for helping to ensure that education systems and research programs reflect our diversity and respect our cultures. One example to be discussed is the NSF-funded "Tribal College Rural Systemic Initiative." Founded on the belief that all students can learn and should be given the opportunity to reach their full potential, Tribal Colleges are leading this effort to achieve successful and sustainable improvement of science, math, and technology education at the K-14 level in rural, economically disadvantaged, geographically challenged areas. Working with parents, tribal governments, schools and the private sector, the colleges are helping to implement math and science standards-based curriculum for students and standards-based assessment for schools; provide math and science standards-based professional development for teachers, administrators, and community leaders; and integrate local Native culture into math and science standards-based curriculum. The close working relationship between the Tribal Colleges and K-12 is paying off. According to the National Science Foundation, successful systemic reform has resulted in enhanced student achievement and participation in science and math; reductions in the achievement disparities among students that can be attributed to socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, or learning styles; implementation of a comprehensive, standards-based curriculum aligned with instructions and assessment; development of a coherent

  6. Activity Sourcebook for Earth Science. Science Education Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Victor J., Ed.

    Designed to provide teachers of earth science with activities and information that will assist them in keeping their curricula up to date, this publication contains activities grouped into six chapters. Chapter titles are: (1) Weather and Climate, (2) Oceans, (3) The Earth and Its Surface, (4) Plate Tectonics, (5) Uses of Space Photography, and…

  7. Learning through Constructing Representations in Science: A Framework of Representational Construction Affordances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prain, Vaughan; Tytler, Russell

    2012-01-01

    Compared with research on the role of student engagement with expert representations in learning science, investigation of the use and theoretical justification of student-generated representations to learn science is less common. In this paper, we present a framework that aims to integrate three perspectives to explain how and why…

  8. A Semiotic Framework for Information Science Leading to the Development of a Quantitative Measure of Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yovits, M. C.; Abilock, Judith G.

    If information science is to be considered a "science" in the true sense of the word, a set of general concepts and analytical expressions must be developed. Fundamental to this development is a rigorous and quantifiable measure of information. In previous papers a general framework, called a generalized information system, is suggested which…

  9. The Use of Ethical Frameworks for Implementing Science as a Human Endeavour in Year 10 Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Siew Fong; Dawson, Vaille

    2014-01-01

    This research focuses on the use of ethical frameworks as a pedagogical model for socio-scientific education in implementing the "Science as a Human Endeavour" (SHE) strand of the Australian Curriculum: Science in a Year 10 biology class in a Christian college in metropolitan Perth, Western Australia. Using a case study approach, a mixed…

  10. Analyzing Language Demands Facing English Learners on Science Performance Assessments: The SALD Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jerome M.; Bunch, George C.; Geaney, Edward R.

    2010-01-01

    This article report on the development and use of an analytical framework intended to map the language demands encountered by English learners as they engage in science performance assessments. Grounded in functional and interactional views of language and language use, the authors--two science education researchers and a language…

  11. Conceptualizing the Science Curriculum: 40 Years of Developing Assessment Frameworks in Three Large-Scale Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kind, Per Morten

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyzes conceptualizations in the science frameworks in three large-scale assessments, Trends in Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), and National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The assessments have a shared history, but have developed different conceptualizations. The…

  12. The Art and Science of Teaching: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Though classroom instructional strategies should clearly be based on sound science and research, knowing when to use them and with whom is more of an art. In "The Art and Science of Teaching: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Instruction," author Robert J. Marzano presents a model for ensuring quality teaching that balances the necessity of…

  13. A Framework for Facilitating Equitable Discourse in Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Ellen; Joseph, Jann

    2010-01-01

    In traditional classroom discourse, the teacher controls the discussion, asking most of the questions and calling on students to respond. This model does not work well for the inquiry-based classroom, which depends on engagement, peer interaction, and student ownership of learning. In this article, the authors present an alternative framework for…

  14. Science Activities in Energy: Chemical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 15 activities relating to chemical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  15. Science Activities in Energy: Electrical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 16 activities relating to electrical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined in a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  16. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 12 activities relating to solar energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's supplement…

  17. Exploring the development of a cultural care framework for European caring science

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Elizabeth; Bach, Shirley; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Lundberg, Pranee; Law, Kate

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the development of a cultural care framework that seeks to inform and embrace the philosophical ideals of caring science. Following a review of the literature that identified a lack of evidence of an explicit relationship between caring science and cultural care, a number of well-established transcultural care frameworks were reviewed. Our purpose was to select one that would resonate with underpinning philosophical values of caring science and that drew on criteria generated by the European Academy of Caring Science members. A modified framework based on the work of Giger and Davidhizar was developed as it embraced many of the values such as humanism that are core to caring science practice. The proposed caring science framework integrates determinants of cultural lifeworld-led care and seeks to provide clear directions for humanizing the care of individuals. The framework is offered to open up debate and act as a platform for further academic enquiry. PMID:22171224

  18. Framework for Empirical Research on Science Teaching and Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Hans Ernst; Klemm, Klaus; Leutner, Detlev; Sumfleth, Elke; Tiemann, Rüdiger; Wirth, Joachim

    2005-12-01

    In view of the research on education—and subject-related education in particular—that has been conducted in recent years, it would seem useful to describe the current state and future trends of research on science teaching and learning. In the present article, research findings are described, the deficits of science education are analyzed, and medium- and long-term research goals are specified from the perspective of an interdisciplinary cooperative effort between specialists in the fields of empirical educational research; the psychology of learning and instruction; and biology, chemistry, and physics education.

  19. Toward an Analytic Framework of Interdisciplinary Reasoning and Communication (IRC) Processes in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ji; Sung, Shannon; Zhang, Dongmei

    2015-11-01

    Students need to think and work across disciplinary boundaries in the twenty-first century. However, it is unclear what interdisciplinary thinking means and how to analyze interdisciplinary interactions in teamwork. In this paper, drawing on multiple theoretical perspectives and empirical analysis of discourse contents, we formulate a theoretical framework that helps analyze interdisciplinary reasoning and communication (IRC) processes in interdisciplinary collaboration. Specifically, we propose four interrelated IRC processes-integration, translation, transfer, and transformation, and develop a corresponding analytic framework. We apply the framework to analyze two meetings of a project that aims to develop interdisciplinary science assessment items. The results illustrate that the framework can help interpret the interdisciplinary meeting dynamics and patterns. Our coding process and results also suggest that these IRC processes can be further examined in terms of interconnected sub-processes. We also discuss the implications of using the framework in conceptualizing, practicing, and researching interdisciplinary learning and teaching in science education.

  20. Information and Knowledge: An Evolutionary Framework for Information Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Marcia J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Many definitions of information, knowledge, and data have been suggested throughout the history of information science. In this article, the objective is to provide definitions that are usable for the physical, biological, and social meanings of the terms, covering the various senses important to our field. Argument: Information 1 is…

  1. Astrobiology Courses--A Useful Framework for Teaching Interdisciplinary Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauterer, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Explains astrobiology and indicates the possibility of life on other planets and the interest of humankind in this possibility. Defines topics open to public misconception and their primary reinforcements by television shows. Expresses the need for students to learn the connections between different science majors. (YDS)

  2. Meaning Frameworks, Explanatory Modes, and the Teaching of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finegold, Menahem

    1977-01-01

    With observed physical phenomena, scientific inquiry, magic, or religious explanatory modes can be used. The educated world has chosen scientific inquiry. Within this mode, the author points out, are fruitful and also non-promising prescriptive conclusions regarding the teaching of science. (CP)

  3. [Secondary Career Education Activities: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford City Schools, VA.

    The guide is one of a series developed in a pilot project to integrate career education concepts with subject matter in secondary grades. The units are designed to reveal career orientation aspects of traditional topics within five major subject areas: English, social studies, mathematics, science, and health and physical education. The lesson…

  4. What do the 2011 NRC Framework and the Next Generation Science Standards the Mean for K-12 Science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    I will discuss the research-based recommendations for reform of K-12 science education that have motivated the construction of the NRC Science Education Framework (2011) and the implementation of this framework in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The Framework and NGSS present three major evolutions in standards that challenge current widely used curriculum materials and the way science is often taught in classrooms. First, learning is organized around a small number of core explanatory ideas, an attempt to achieve a greater depth rather than superficial treatment of too many topics. Second, the standards are organized in learning progressions, that emphasize how ideas can build over time, and make explicit the connections between ideas in physical, life, and earth and space sciences. The new standards are designed to bring greater coherence to science learning. Third, standards are articulated not as separate content and process goals, but as integrated performance expectations, that emphasize engaging students in scientific and engineering practices to develop and apply these explanatory ideas. I examine the implications of these three goals for curriculum materials, classroom teaching, and assessments, particularly in the areas of climate literacy.

  5. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of the junior high science curriculum. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  6. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of earth science experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; method; questions; recommendations for further study; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  7. Schoolyard Science: 101 Easy and Inexpensive Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Thomas R.; Travis, Holly J.

    2011-01-01

    With 101 easy and inexpensive activities to do on school grounds, "Schoolyard Science" can help students develop their observation and inquiry skills as well as an appreciation of their outdoor environment. Covering topics such as lower plants, gardens, insects and other invertebrates, energy, and Earth science, Thomas Lord and Holly Travis…

  8. [Fernbank Science Center Environmental Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Lewis

    This document is a compilation of environmental activities related directly to the environment in Georgia. A description of the physiographic characteristics of Georgia is presented upon which the activities that follow are based. These activities include soil, stream and forest investigations; meteorology activities; and plant and animal studies.…

  9. Doing Better: Illuminating a Framework of Equitable Science Pedagogy through a Cross- Case Analysis of Urban High School Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Manali J.

    Students of color are routinely asked to participate in science education that is less intellectually rich and self-affirming. Additionally, teachers have trouble embarking on professional growth related to issues of equity and diversity in science. The purpose of this dissertation research is to develop a multi-dimensional framework for equitable science pedagogy (ESP) through analyzing the efforts and struggles of high school science teachers. This study is grounded in a conceptual framework derived from scholarship in science education, multicultural education, critical science studies, and teacher learning. The following questions guide this research: 1) What visions and enactments emerge in teachers' practices towards equitable science pedagogy? 2) How are teachers' practice decisions towards ESP influenced by their personal theories of race/culture, science, and learning and sociocultural contexts? 3) Why are there consistencies and variances across teachers' practices? This study employs a qualitative multiple case study design with ethnographic data collection to explore the practices of three urban high school science teachers who were identified as being committed to nurturing the science learning of students of color. Data include over 120 hours of classroom observation, 60 hours of teacher interviews, and 500 teacher- and student-generated artifacts. Data analysis included coding teachers' practices using theory- and participant generated codes, construction of themes based on emergent patterns, and cross-case analysis. The affordances and limitations of the participants' pedagogical approaches inform the following framework for equitable science pedagogy: 1) Seeing race and culture and sharing responsibility for learning form foundational dimensions. Practices from the other three dimensions--- nurturing students' identities, re-centering students' epistemologies, and critiquing structural inequities---emerge from the foundation. As emergent practices

  10. ENERGY-NET (Energy, Environment and Society Learning Network): Enhancing opportunities for learning using an Earth systems science framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, E. M.; Bain, D. J.; Divers, M. T.; Crowley, K. J.; Povis, K.; Scardina, A.; Steiner, M.

    2012-12-01

    We describe a newly funded collaborative NSF initiative, ENERGY-NET (Energy, Environment and Society Learning Network), that brings together the Carnegie Museum of Natural History (CMNH) with the Learning Science and Geoscience research strengths at the University of Pittsburgh. ENERGY-NET aims to create rich opportunities for participatory learning and public education in the arena of energy, the environment, and society using an Earth systems science framework. We build upon a long-established teen docent program at CMNH and to form Geoscience Squads comprised of underserved teens. Together, the ENERGY-NET team, including museum staff, experts in informal learning sciences, and geoscientists spanning career stage (undergraduates, graduate students, faculty) provides inquiry-based learning experiences guided by Earth systems science principles. Together, the team works with Geoscience Squads to design "Exploration Stations" for use with CMNH visitors that employ an Earth systems science framework to explore the intersecting lenses of energy, the environment, and society. The goals of ENERGY-NET are to: 1) Develop a rich set of experiential learning activities to enhance public knowledge about the complex dynamics between Energy, Environment, and Society for demonstration at CMNH; 2) Expand diversity in the geosciences workforce by mentoring underrepresented teens, providing authentic learning experiences in earth systems science and life skills, and providing networking opportunities with geoscientists; and 3) Institutionalize ENERGY-NET collaborations among geosciences expert, learning researchers, and museum staff to yield long-term improvements in public geoscience education and geoscience workforce recruiting.

  11. Less Than Proficient A Review of the Draft Science Framework for the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    The mission of this review is to appraise the new draft NAEP science framework and to determine whether it is up to snuff. This is an evaluation of the September 30, 2005, draft document, Science Framework for the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (Framework), developed for the National Assessment Governing Board. The criteria is…

  12. Science Activities for School Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quint, Walter C.

    1980-01-01

    Describes ways in which physics-learning activity packets can be used by high school students participating in trips organized by other departments. Provides an example of physics activities incorporated into an airplane trip to Disney World. (CS)

  13. Science Activities in Energy: Wind Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 12 activities related to wind energy for elementary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question. Topics include: (1) At what time of day is there enough wind to make electricity where you live?; (2) Where is the windiest spot on your schoolground?; and…

  14. Selected Science Activities in Consumer Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagness, Richard L.; Sagness, Rebecca L.

    This publication has been designed for use by teachers wishing to incorporate consumer education activities into their science program. Each activity is classified by grade level most appropriate for use, area of consumer education involved, specific topic, and consumer education concept involved. Activities are designated as suitable for grades…

  15. Thinking Science: Classroom Activities in Secondary Science. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adey, Philip; And Others

    This teacher's guide is part of a program of activities that help secondary-level students develop the complex thinking skills needed to succeed in science. This program can be used with current curriculum materials. It is designed to help students integrate ideas and develop concepts that demonstrate higher level thinking. A rich environment of…

  16. Individualized Instruction in Science, Introductory Physical Science, Learning Activity Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    Learning Activity Packages (LAP) mostly relating to the Introductory Physical Science Text are presented in this manual for use in sampling a new type of instruction. The total of 14 topics are incorporated into five units: (1) introduction to individualized learning; (2) observation versus interpretation; (3) quantity of matter; (4) introduction…

  17. The ICAP Framework: Linking Cognitive Engagement to Active Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chi, Michelene T. H.; Wylie, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the ICAP framework that defines cognitive engagement activities on the basis of students' overt behaviors and proposes that engagement behaviors can be categorized and differentiated into one of four modes: "Interactive," "Constructive," "Active," and "Passive." The ICAP…

  18. A Lightweight Hierarchical Activity Recognition Framework Using Smartphone Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Manhyung; Bang, Jae Hun; Nugent, Chris; McClean, Sally; Lee, Sungyoung

    2014-01-01

    Activity recognition for the purposes of recognizing a user's intentions using multimodal sensors is becoming a widely researched topic largely based on the prevalence of the smartphone. Previous studies have reported the difficulty in recognizing life-logs by only using a smartphone due to the challenges with activity modeling and real-time recognition. In addition, recognizing life-logs is difficult due to the absence of an established framework which enables the use of different sources of sensor data. In this paper, we propose a smartphone-based Hierarchical Activity Recognition Framework which extends the Naïve Bayes approach for the processing of activity modeling and real-time activity recognition. The proposed algorithm demonstrates higher accuracy than the Naïve Bayes approach and also enables the recognition of a user's activities within a mobile environment. The proposed algorithm has the ability to classify fifteen activities with an average classification accuracy of 92.96%. PMID:25184486

  19. Can Programming Frameworks Bring Smartphones into the Mainstream of Psychological Science?

    PubMed Central

    Piwek, Lukasz; Ellis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones continue to provide huge potential for psychological science and the advent of novel research frameworks brings new opportunities for researchers who have previously struggled to develop smartphone applications. However, despite this renewed promise, smartphones have failed to become a standard item within psychological research. Here we consider the key issues that continue to limit smartphone adoption within psychological science and how these barriers might be diminishing in light of ResearchKit and other recent methodological developments. We conclude that while these programming frameworks are certainly a step in the right direction it remains challenging to create usable research-orientated applications with current frameworks. Smartphones may only become an asset for psychology and social science as a whole when development software that is both easy to use and secure becomes freely available. PMID:27602010

  20. Systems Science and Obesity Policy: A Novel Framework for Analyzing and Rethinking Population-Level Planning

    PubMed Central

    Matteson, Carrie L.; Finegood, Diane T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We demonstrate the use of a systems-based framework to assess solutions to complex health problems such as obesity. Methods. We coded 12 documents published between 2004 and 2013 aimed at influencing obesity planning for complex systems design (9 reports from US and Canadian governmental or health authorities, 1 Cochrane review, and 2 Institute of Medicine reports). We sorted data using the intervention-level framework (ILF), a novel solutions-oriented approach to complex problems. An in-depth comparison of 3 documents provides further insight into complexity and systems design in obesity policy. Results. The majority of strategies focused mainly on changing the determinants of energy imbalance (food intake and physical activity). ILF analysis brings to the surface actions aimed at higher levels of system function and points to a need for more innovative policy design. Conclusions. Although many policymakers acknowledge obesity as a complex problem, many strategies stem from the paradigm of individual choice and are limited in scope. The ILF provides a template to encourage natural systems thinking and more strategic policy design grounded in complexity science. PMID:24832406

  1. Collaborative activities for improving the quality of science teaching and learning and learning to teach science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2012-03-01

    I have been involved in research on collaborative activities for improving the quality of teaching and learning high school science. Initially the collaborative activities we researched involved the uses of coteaching and cogenerative dialogue in urban middle and high schools in Philadelphia and New York (currently I have active research sites in New York and Brisbane, Australia). The research not only transformed practices but also produced theories that informed the development of additional collaborative activities and served as interventions for research and creation of heuristics for professional development programs and teacher certification courses. The presentation describes a collage of collaborative approaches to teaching and learning science, including coteaching, cogenerative dialogue, radical listening, critical reflection, and mindful action. For each activity in the collage I provide theoretical frameworks and empirical support, ongoing research, and priorities for the road ahead. I also address methodologies used in the research, illustrating how teachers and students collaborated as researchers in multilevel investigations of teaching and learning and learning to teach that included ethnography, video analysis, and sophisticated analyses of the voice, facial expression of emotion, eye gaze, and movement of the body during classroom interactions. I trace the evolution of studies of face-to-face interactions in science classes to the current focus on emotions and physiological aspects of teaching and learning (e.g., pulse rate, pulse strength, breathing patterns) that relate to science participation and achievement.

  2. Elements of Design-Based Science Activities That Affect Students' Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Brett D.; Chittum, Jessica R.; Akalin, Sehmuz; Schram, Asta B.; Fink, Jonathan; Schnittka, Christine; Evans, Michael A.; Brandt, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the ways in which a 12-week after-school science and engineering program affected middle school students' motivation to engage in science and engineering activities. We used current motivation research and theory as a conceptual framework to assess 14 students' motivation through questionnaires,…

  3. A theoretical framework for the incorporation of history in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, James Stephen

    This thesis formulates a theoretical framework for the incorporation of history of science in science teaching, which, it is argued, is essential to laying a stable foundation for instructional design and future empirical studies. It is assumed that the historical approach to teaching science no longer needs defending and that contextual methods are a pedagogically sound approach to learning. Various cognitive and learning theories suggest that there are five distinct contexts that are important in engaging learners: the theoretical, practical, social, historical, and affective. On the basis of these five contexts, a model for teaching and learning is constructed, in which the story assumes a major role in engaging the learner affectively. This model is named the Story-Driven Contextual Approach (SDCA). The SDCA is introduced to students by means of a narrative, encouraging students to become actively engaged with the five contexts. In the SDCA, students are seen as novice researchers and the teacher as a research director. The place and nature of the historical science story in science education is a relatively undeveloped area in the literature. This thesis argues that the development of the events in a story proceed in the same fashion as the steps in learning a concept. A structural model of a story consisting of a three-stage temporal sequence, which includes a causative element, is presented and developed. It is argued that the conceptual change process, from a temporal perspective, can also be viewed as a three-stage sequence similar to the story. The story can, in this light, be thought of as the re-enactment of a particular type of learning process. This knowledge about the nature of stories can serve as a guiding principle in the designing and writing of effective stories based on the history of science, which are to be incorporated with the SDCA. The SDCA was tested in a university physics class using a constructed story which portrays the heroic

  4. Using a guided inquiry and modeling instructional framework (EIMA) to support preservice K-8 science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Christina V.; Gwekwerere, Yovita N.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results from a study aimed at helping preservice elementary and middle school teachers incorporate model-centered scientific inquiry into their science teaching practices. Specifically, the authors studied the effect of using a guided inquiry and modeling instructional framework (EIMA) and accompanying science methods instruction on preservice elementary teachers' science lesson design skills, scientific model use, and teaching orientations. Analysis of preservice teachers' pre-posttests, classroom artifacts, peer interviews, and lesson plans throughout the semester indicates that the framework successfully built on preservice teachers' prior instructional ideas, and that the majority of preservice teachers learned and used the framework in their lesson plans and teaching. Additionally, analysis of pre-posttest differences indicates an increase in posttest lesson plans that focused on engaging students in scientific inquiry using several kinds of models. Most importantly, the framework and accompanying instruction enabled two thirds of the class to move their teaching orientations away from discovery or didactic approaches toward reform-based approaches such as conceptual change, inquiry, and guided inquiry. Results from this study show that using instructional frameworks such as EIMA can enable preservice teachers to socially construct, synthesize, and apply their knowledge for enacting reform-oriented science teaching approaches such as model-centered scientific inquiry.

  5. [The role of science in policy making--EuSANH-ISA project, framework for science advice for health].

    PubMed

    Cianciara, Dorota; Piotrowicz, Maria; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Wysocki, Mirosław J

    2012-01-01

    Governments and other authorities (including MPs) should be well informed on issues of science and technology. This is particularly important in the era of evidence-based practice. This implies the need to get expert advice. The process by which scientific knowledge is transmitted, along with proposals how to solve the problem, is called science advice. The main aim of the article is to discuss the issue of science advice--definitions, interaction between science and policymaking, and its position in contemporary policies. The second aim is to present European Science Advisory Network for Health (EuSANH), EuSANH-ISA project, and framework for science advice for health which was developed by participants. Furthermore, the role of civil society in decision-making process and science advice is also discussed. Interaction between scientists and policy-makers are described in terms of science-push approach (technocratic model), policy-pull (decisionistic) and simultaneous push-pull approach (pragmatic). The position of science advice is described in historical perspective from the 50s, especially in the last two decades. Description relies to USA, Canada and UK. Principles of scientific advice to government (Government Office for Science, UK) are quoted. Some important documents related to science advice in EU and UN are mentioned. EuSANH network is described as well as EuSANH-ISA project, with its objectives and outcomes. According to findings of this project, the process of science advice for health should follow some steps: framing the issue to be covered; planning entire process leading to the conclusion; drafting the report; reviewing the report and revision; publishing report and assessing the impact on policy. PMID:23230726

  6. Integration of physical activity and technology motion devices within a combined 5th and 6th grade science curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Kevin Eugene

    Background: National recommendations to increase school-based physical activity and promote academic success advise incorporating movement into traditional classroom lessons. Classroom-based physical activities have favorable associations with indicators of cognitive functioning, academic behaviors, and academic achievement. Purpose: This study analyzed the Active Science framework, which incorporated school-based physical activity within interactive science classroom lessons. Specifically, the study measured the effects of the Active Science framework on student physical activity levels in the classroom, student learning of science inquiry skills and content knowledge, and student perceptions of physical activity and science. A secondary purpose was to evaluate the teachers' perceptions on the implementation of the framework. Subjects: Participants were 37 Hispanic girls (age=11.1 +/-0.8 yr) in mixed 5th/6th grade science classes in a private, urban middle school. Methods: Physical activity levels of the students during the Active Science framework were measured using pedometers and heart rate monitors. Pre- and post-tests were used to assess the levels of learning achieved by the students in science inquiry skills and content during the Active Science framework. Student perceptions and attitudes toward science and physical activity were measured during student focus groups and pre-post perception surveys. Lesson plan evaluations completed by the teachers and structured interviews provided data on implementation of the framework. Results: Physical activity results showed heart rate (146 +/-9 bpm); maximal heart rate (196 +/-10.6 bpm); time (35 +/-2.5 mins); steps (3050 +/-402.7); calories (99 +/-8.4 kcal); and distance (1.1 +/-0.2 miles) while performing the activity portion of the science lessons were consistent with national recommendations for accumulating school-based physical activity. Significant increases in science content and skills test scores with a 22

  7. The ACRL framework for information literacy in higher education: implications for health sciences librarianship.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Maureen; Brower, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    The Association of College and Research Libraries is developing a new framework of information literacy concepts that will revise and replace the previously adopted standards. This framework consists of six threshold concepts that are more flexible than the original standards, and that work to identify both the function and the feelings behind information literacy education practices. This column outlines the new tentative framework with an eye toward its implications for health sciences libraries, and suggests ways the medical library community might work with this new document. PMID:25316079

  8. Marine Science Activities for Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Dennis; And Others

    These marine education materials are based on the approach that students learn best when given a multisensory experience. The activities are intended to develop such experiences for the visually impaired child. Activities are intended to supplement an upper-elementary science curriculum or be the basis of a unit on marine biology. The guide is…

  9. U.S. Geological Survey core science systems strategy: characterizing, synthesizing, and understanding the critical zone through a modular science framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bristol, R. Sky; Euliss, Ned H.; Booth, Nathaniel L.; Burkardt, Nina; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Gesch, Dean B.; McCallum, Brian E.; Miller, David M.; Morman, Suzette A.; Poore, Barbara S.; Signell, Richard P.; Viger, Roland J.

    2013-01-01

    Core Science Systems is a new mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that resulted from the 2007 Science Strategy, "Facing Tomorrow's Challenges: U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017." This report describes the Core Science Systems vision and outlines a strategy to facilitate integrated characterization and understanding of the complex Earth system. The vision and suggested actions are bold and far-reaching, describing a conceptual model and framework to enhance the ability of the USGS to bring its core strengths to bear on pressing societal problems through data integration and scientific synthesis across the breadth of science. The context of this report is inspired by a direction set forth in the 2007 Science Strategy. Specifically, ecosystem-based approaches provide the underpinnings for essentially all science themes that define the USGS. Every point on Earth falls within a specific ecosystem where data, other information assets, and the expertise of USGS and its many partners can be employed to quantitatively understand how that ecosystem functions and how it responds to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Every benefit society obtains from the planet-food, water, raw materials to build infrastructure, homes and automobiles, fuel to heat homes and cities, and many others, are derived from or affect ecosystems. The vision for Core Science Systems builds on core strengths of the USGS in characterizing and understanding complex Earth and biological systems through research, modeling, mapping, and the production of high quality data on the Nation's natural resource infrastructure. Together, these research activities provide a foundation for ecosystem-based approaches through geologic mapping, topographic mapping, and biodiversity mapping. The vision describes a framework founded on these core mapping strengths that makes it easier for USGS scientists to discover critical information, share and publish results, and identify potential

  10. Inquiry Science and Active Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandifer, Cody

    2011-01-01

    Pairing an inquiry lesson with a traditional reading activity creates a jarring philosophical mismatch between the interaction, deep thinking, and scientific reasoning that drives meaningful inquiry instruction and the "scan the text, copy the answers" response often obtained from elementary nonfiction readers. Realizing that there must be a…

  11. Equity in Informal Science Education: Developing an Access and Equity Framework for Science Museums and Science Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Informal science education (ISE) is a popular pursuit, with millions of people visiting science museums, science centres, zoos, botanic gardens, aquaria, science festivals and more around the world. Questions remain, however, about how accessible and inclusive ISE practices are. This article reviews research on participation in ISE through the…

  12. A Metadata Management Framework for Collaborative Review of Science Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, A. F.; Cinquini, L.; Mattmann, C. A.; Thompson, D. R.; Wagstaff, K.; Zimdars, P. A.; Jones, D. L.; Lazio, J.; Preston, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Data volumes generated by modern scientific instruments often preclude archiving the complete observational record. To compensate, science teams have developed a variety of "triage" techniques for identifying data of potential scientific interest and marking it for prioritized processing or permanent storage. This may involve multiple stages of filtering with both automated and manual components operating at different timescales. A promising approach exploits a fast, fully automated first stage followed by a more reliable offline manual review of candidate events. This hybrid approach permits a 24-hour rapid real-time response while also preserving the high accuracy of manual review. To support this type of second-level validation effort, we have developed a metadata-driven framework for the collaborative review of candidate data products. The framework consists of a metadata processing pipeline and a browser-based user interface that together provide a configurable mechanism for reviewing data products via the web, and capturing the full stack of associated metadata in a robust, searchable archive. Our system heavily leverages software from the Apache Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) project, an open source data integration framework that facilitates the construction of scalable data systems and places a heavy emphasis on the utilization of metadata to coordinate processing activities. OODT provides a suite of core data management components for file management and metadata cataloging that form the foundation for this effort. The system has been deployed at JPL in support of the V-FASTR experiment [1], a software-based radio transient detection experiment that operates commensally at the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), and has a science team that is geographically distributed across several countries. Daily review of automatically flagged data is a shared responsibility for the team, and is essential to keep the project within its resource constraints. We

  13. An Evolving Framework for Describing Student Engagement in Classroom Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Flavio S.; diSessa, Andrea A.; Sherin, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Student engagement in classroom activities is usually described as a function of factors such as human needs, affect, intention, motivation, interests, identity, and others. We take a different approach and develop a framework that models classroom engagement as a function of students' "conceptual competence" in the "specific content" (e.g., the…

  14. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 14 activities related to solar energy for secondary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question such as: (1) how much solar heat comes from the sun? or (2) how many times do you have to run water through a flat-plate collector to get a 10 degree rise in…

  15. Science Curriculum and Student Diversity: A Framework for Equitable Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Okhee; Buxton, Cory

    2008-01-01

    We address issues of science curriculum for nonmainstream students--students of color, students learning English as a new language, and students from low-income families--who are often concentrated in urban schools. First, we describe a theoretical framework for equitable learning opportunities with nonmainstream students. Building on this…

  16. A Comparative Analysis of PISA Scientific Literacy Framework in Finnish and Thai Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sothayapetch, Pavinee; Lavonen, Jari; Juuti, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    A curriculum is a master plan that regulates teaching and learning. This paper compares Finnish and Thai primary school level science curricula to the PISA 2006 Scientific Literacy Framework. Curriculum comparison was made following the procedure of deductive content analysis. In the analysis, there were four main categories adopted from PISA…

  17. Analysing Theoretical Frameworks of Moral Education through Lakatos's Philosophy of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Hyemin

    2014-01-01

    The structure of studies of moral education is basically interdisciplinary; it includes moral philosophy, psychology, and educational research. This article systematically analyses the structure of studies of moral educational from the vantage points of philosophy of science. Among the various theoretical frameworks in the field of philosophy of…

  18. Reconstructing the Relationship between Science and Education for Sustainability: A Proposed Framework of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdsall, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Science and education for sustainability have recently become estranged. Both of these learning areas are also experiencing issues that are affecting students' understandings in these areas. This paper presents a framework of learning containing 12 components that reconstructs the relationship between these two areas and could have the…

  19. Map Resource Packet: Course Models for the History-Social Science Framework, Grade Seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This packet of maps is an auxiliary resource to the "World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times. Course Models for the History-Social Science Framework, Grade Seven." The set includes: outline, precipitation, and elevation maps; maps for locating key places; landform maps; and historical maps. The list of maps are grouped under…

  20. Grade Expectations for Vermont's Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities, (Summer 2004) Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Educators from around the state, with the help of The Vermont Institutes, developed Science Grade Expectations as a means to identify the content knowledge and skills expected of all students for local assessment required under Act 68. This work was accomplished using the "Vermont's Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities," Vermont…

  1. Metacognitive Research and Development Framework (MRDF) for Internet Instructional Science Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, R. William

    2000-01-01

    This project established a metacognitive research and development framework (MRDF) and production process for the development of Web-based instructional science programming for early elementary and at-risk students. Mapped cognitive variables to metacognitive learning strategies for those variables, to metadata for the instructional design of the…

  2. Enhancing science education through extracurricular activities: A retrospective study of "Suzy Science and the Whiz Kids(c)"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralina, Linda M.

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) are informal settings offering free-choice experiences that are generally voluntary, open-ended, non-sequential, self-directed, hands-on, and evaluation-free. This mixed methods study investigates participation in a high school science ECA by collecting the memories of former student members for their perceptions of engagement as well as social positioning. First, this study examines the levels in which the science club engaged these members, particularly females, in science and teaching. Second, the study also ascertains how participation in the club allowed members to explore new identities and fostered the development of new skills, actions and behaviors, expanding possible future trajectories of identification, specifically in science- and education-related career fields. Based on a review of the related literature regarding engagement and identity formation and the reconstructed reality from the memories of these students and sponsor, a theoretical framework has been constructed, based on seven essential elements of informal learning for an engaging as well as a socially constructive high school science ECA. The most significant findings are (1) the high correlation between engagement, specifically, cognitive engagement with social positioning, (2) the important role of emotional engagement in science ECA, (3) the major perception roadblocks to science learning that can be overcome, particularly for females in physical science, and (4) the importance of the teacher-student interactions in science ECA. Articulating a theoretical framework to legitimate the power of informal learning structures may help other educators to understand the potential benefits of science ECA and thus, increase opportunities for such experiential activities in order to enhance engagement and expand positioning of their students in science. More engaging, socially constructive science ECA have the potential to enhance science education.

  3. 101 Environmental Education Activities. Booklet 4--Science Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Helen, Comp.

    Fourth in the series "101 Environmental Education Activities" by the Upper Mississippi River ECO-Center, the booklet contains 39 environment-based science activities directed to students in primary, intermediate, and junior high classes. Organization of the activities usually includes grade level, objectives, procedures, and materials, evaluation…

  4. Neutron activation analysis in the life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontasyeva, M. V.

    2011-03-01

    Development of methods for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and their applications in the life sciences are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on epithermal activation with reactor neutrons (ENAA), and the advantages of this technique in analysis of environmental objects are shown. The results of applied INAA studies in the field of the life sciences carried out at the world's leading nuclear centers are reported. Experience in employing a radioanalytical complex at the IBR-2 reactor (Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna) for such studies is summarized.

  5. Space station freedom life sciences activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    Life sciences activities being planned for Space Station Freedom (SSF) as of Fall 1992 are discussed. Planning for these activities is ongoing. Therefore, this description should be viewed as indicative of the prevailing ideas at one particular time in the SSF development cycle. The proposed contributions of the Canadian Space Agency (CSN) the European Space Agency (ESA), Japan, and the United States are all discussed in detail. In each case, the life sciences goals, and the way in which each partner proposes to achieve their goals, are reviewed.

  6. Development of a flexible higher education curriculum framework for geographic information science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenendaal, B.

    2014-04-01

    A wide range of geographic information science (GIScience) educational programs currently exist, the oldest now over 25 years. Offerings vary from those specifically focussed on geographic information science, to those that utilise geographic information systems in various applications and disciplines. Over the past two decades, there have been a number of initiatives to design curricula for GIScience, including the NCGIA Core Curriculum, GIS&T Body of Knowledge and the Geospatial Technology Competency Model developments. The rapid developments in geospatial technology, applications and organisations means that curricula need to constantly be updated and developed to maintain currency and relevance. This paper reviews the curriculum initiatives and outlines a new and flexible GIScience higher education curriculum framework which complements and utilises existing curricula. This new framework was applied to the GIScience programs at Curtin University in Perth, Australia which has surpassed 25 years of GIScience education. Some of the results of applying this framework are outlined and discussed.

  7. ESA Science Archives and associated VO activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, Christophe; Baines, Deborah; Barbarisi, Isa; Castellanos, Javier; Cheek, Neil; Costa, Hugo; Fajersztejn, Nicolas; Gonzalez, Juan; Fernandez, Monica; Laruelo, Andrea; Leon, Ignacio; Ortiz, Inaki; Osuna, Pedro; Salgado, Jesus; Tapiador, Daniel

    ESA's European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC), near Madrid, Spain, hosts most of ESA space based missions' scientific archives, in planetary (Mars Express, Venus Express, Rosetta, Huygens, Giotto, Smart-1, all in ESA Planetary Science Archive), in astronomy (XMM-Newton, Herschel, ISO, Integral, Exosat, Planck) and in solar physics (Soho). All these science archives are operated by a dedicated Science Archives and Virtual Observatory Team (SAT) at ESAC, enabling common and efficient design, development, operations and maintenance of the archives software systems. This also ensures long term preservation and availability of such science archives, as a sustainable service to the science community. ESA space science data can be accessed through powerful and user friendly user interface, as well as from machine scriptable interface and through VO interfaces. Virtual Observatory activities are also fully part of ESA archiving strategy and ESA is a very ac-tive partner in VO initiatives in Europe through Euro-VO AIDA and EuroPlanet and worldwide through the IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) and the IPDA (International Planetary Data Alliance).

  8. Using Metaphors to Investigate the Personal Frameworks of Pre-Service Science Teachers as They Experience a Science in Society Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd

    2011-01-01

    This research presents a multiple case study investigating the personal frameworks of pre-service science teachers as they experience a science in society course. Through examining the metaphors employed by the participants' student experiences were illuminated. These experiences revealed shifts in frameworks over time that were more consistent…

  9. Analyzing learning during Peer Instruction dialogues: A resource activation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Hardy, Judy; Sinclair, Christine M.

    2014-12-01

    Peer Instruction (PI) is an evidence based pedagogy commonly used in undergraduate physics instruction. When asked questions designed to test conceptual understanding, it has been observed that the proportion of students choosing the correct answer increases following peer discussion; however, relatively little is known about what takes place during these discussions or how they are beneficial to the processes of learning physics [M. C. James and S. Willoughby, Am. J. Phys. 79, 123 (2011)]. In this paper a framework for analyzing PI discussions developed through the lens of the "resources model" [D. Hammer, Am. J. Phys. 64, 1316 (1996); D. Hammer et al., Information Age Publishing (2005)] is proposed. A central hypothesis for this framework is that the dialogue with peers plays a crucial role in activating appropriate cognitive resources, enabling the students to see the problem differently, and therefore to answer the questions correctly. This framework is used to gain greater insights into the PI discussions of first year undergraduate physics students at the University of Edinburgh, UK, which were recorded using Livescribe Smartpens. Analysis of the dialogues revealed three different types of resource activation corresponding to increasing cognitive grain size. These were activation of knowledge elements, activation of linkages between knowledge elements, and activation of control structures (epistemic games and epistemological frames). Three case studies are examined to illustrate the role that peer dialogue plays in the activation of these cognitive resources in a PI session. The implications for pedagogical practice are discussed.

  10. An economic framework for understanding physical activity and eating behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cawley, John

    2004-10-01

    This paper offers an economic framework of human behavior with respect to physical activity and nutrition. Economics offers useful insights into these behaviors because it is the study of how people allocate their scarce resources of time and money to maximize their lifetime happiness. This paper outlines the criteria for policy interventions from an economic perspective and also considers arguments for policy intervention that are not based on economic considerations. The implications of the economic framework are summarized and its limitations are described. PMID:15450622

  11. A framework for evaluating and designing citizen science programs for natural resources monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chase, Sarah K; Levine, Arielle

    2016-06-01

    We present a framework of resource characteristics critical to the design and assessment of citizen science programs that monitor natural resources. To develop the framework we reviewed 52 citizen science programs that monitored a wide range of resources and provided insights into what resource characteristics are most conducive to developing citizen science programs and how resource characteristics may constrain the use or growth of these programs. We focused on 4 types of resource characteristics: biophysical and geographical, management and monitoring, public awareness and knowledge, and social and cultural characteristics. We applied the framework to 2 programs, the Tucson (U.S.A.) Bird Count and the Maui (U.S.A.) Great Whale Count. We found that resource characteristics such as accessibility, diverse institutional involvement in resource management, and social or cultural importance of the resource affected program endurance and success. However, the relative influence of each characteristic was in turn affected by goals of the citizen science programs. Although the goals of public engagement and education sometimes complimented the goal of collecting reliable data, in many cases trade-offs must be made between these 2 goals. Program goals and priorities ultimately dictate the design of citizen science programs, but for a program to endure and successfully meet its goals, program managers must consider the diverse ways that the nature of the resource being monitored influences public participation in monitoring. PMID:27111860

  12. A mathematical framework for multiscale science and engineering : the variational multiscale method and interscale transfer operators.

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, John Nicolas; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Christon, Mark Allen; Slepoy, Alexander; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Collis, Samuel Scott; Wagner, Gregory John

    2004-05-01

    Existing approaches in multiscale science and engineering have evolved from a range of ideas and solutions that are reflective of their original problem domains. As a result, research in multiscale science has followed widely diverse and disjoint paths, which presents a barrier to cross pollination of ideas and application of methods outside their application domains. The status of the research environment calls for an abstract mathematical framework that can provide a common language to formulate and analyze multiscale problems across a range of scientific and engineering disciplines. In such a framework, critical common issues arising in multiscale problems can be identified, explored and characterized in an abstract setting. This type of overarching approach would allow categorization and clarification of existing models and approximations in a landscape of seemingly disjoint, mutually exclusive and ad hoc methods. More importantly, such an approach can provide context for both the development of new techniques and their critical examination. As with any new mathematical framework, it is necessary to demonstrate its viability on problems of practical importance. At Sandia, lab-centric, prototype application problems in fluid mechanics, reacting flows, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), shock hydrodynamics and materials science span an important subset of DOE Office of Science applications and form an ideal proving ground for new approaches in multiscale science.

  13. Making a map of science: general systems theory as a conceptual framework for tertiary science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, Sergei A.; Stonyer, Heather R.

    2002-07-01

    As a result of the reductionist approach to science curricula in tertiary education, students are learning science in a fragmented way. With the purpose of providing students with tools for a more holistic understanding of science, an integrated approach based on the use of general systems theory (GST) and the concept of 'mapping' scientific knowledge (its relationships, connections and generalities) is developed. GST is used as the core methodology for understanding science and its complexity. By analogy with geographic maps, we introduce scales of educational 'science maps' - scales of integration. Three principal scales of integration can be distinguished in GST, which we consider necessary for GST to be effectively applied in education. They are (a) the scale of branches and fields of science, (b) the scale of hypotheses and theories, and (c) the scale of structures and hierarchies. Examples of each of these three scales are provided from the field of physical science. The role of the scientific community in producing accessible, and essential, maps of scientific knowledge for science education is discussed.

  14. Making a Map of Science: General Systems Theory as a Conceptual Framework for Tertiary Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulyaev, Sergei A.; Stonyer, Heather R.

    2002-01-01

    Develops an integrated approach based on the use of general systems theory (GST) and the concept of 'mapping' scientific knowledge to provide students with tools for a more holistic understanding of science. Uses GST as the core methodology for understanding science and its complexity. Discusses the role of scientific community in producing…

  15. The effect of using a structured reading framework on middle school students' conceptual understanding within the Science Writing Heuristic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jeong Yoon

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the impact of using a Structured Reading Framework within the Science Writing Heuristic approach on a summary writing task, and how this framework is related to the development of students' conceptual understanding in the summary writing task. A quasi-experimental design with sixth and seventh grade students taught by two teachers in the middle school was used. Each teacher had four classes with two classes using the Structured Reading Framework (treatment) and the other two classes used the original reading framework (control). A total of 170 students participated in the study, with 83 in the control group (four classes) and 87 in the treatment group (four classes). All students used the SWH student templates to guide their written work and completed these templates during the SWH investigations of each unit. After completing the SWH investigations, both groups of students were asked to complete the summary writing task at the end of each unit. This process was replicated for each of the two units. All student writing samples collected were scored using an analytical framework and scoring matrices developed for the study. A total of 588 writing samples were included in the statistical analysis. Results indicated that the treatment group who used the Structured Reading Framework performed significantly better on the Summary Writing task than the control group. The results suggest that the using of the Structured Reading Framework in prompting and guiding the reading activities within the SWH approach have an impact on the development of conceptual understanding. In addition, it appears that the Structured Reading Framework impacted the development of conceptual understanding in the Summary Writing task by providing a scaffold to assist students' knowledge construction.

  16. Sample classroom activities based on climate science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miler, T.

    2009-09-01

    We present several activities developed for the middle school education based on a climate science. The first activity was designed to teach about the ocean acidification. A simple experiment can prove that absorption of CO2 in water increases its acidity. A liquid pH indicator is suitable for the demonstration in a classroom. The second activity uses data containing coordinates of a hurricane position. Pupils draw a path of a hurricane eye in a tracking chart (map of the Atlantic ocean). They calculate an average speed of the hurricane, investigate its direction and intensity development. The third activity uses pictures of the Arctic ocean on September when ice extend is usually the lowest. Students measure the ice extend for several years using a square grid printed on a plastic foil. Then they plot a graph and discuss the results. All these activities can be used to improve the natural science education and increase the climate change literacy.

  17. Assessing Students' Understandings of Biological Models and their Use in Science to Evaluate a Theoretical Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünkorn, Juliane; Belzen, Annette Upmeier zu; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    Research in the field of students' understandings of models and their use in science describes different frameworks concerning these understandings. Currently, there is no conjoint framework that combines these structures and so far, no investigation has focused on whether it reflects students' understandings sufficiently (empirical evaluation). Therefore, the purpose of this article is to present the results of an empirical evaluation of a conjoint theoretical framework. The theoretical framework integrates relevant research findings and comprises five aspects which are subdivided into three levels each: nature of models, multiple models, purpose of models, testing, and changing models. The study was conducted with a sample of 1,177 seventh to tenth graders (aged 11-19 years) using open-ended items. The data were analysed by identifying students' understandings of models (nature of models and multiple models) and their use in science (purpose of models, testing, and changing models), and comparing as well as assigning them to the content of the theoretical framework. A comprehensive category system of students' understandings was thus developed. Regarding the empirical evaluation, the students' understandings of the nature and the purpose of models were sufficiently described by the theoretical framework. Concerning the understandings of multiple, testing, and changing models, additional initial understandings (only one model possible, no testing of models, and no change of models) need to be considered. This conjoint and now empirically tested framework for students' understandings can provide a common basis for future science education research. Furthermore, evidence-based indications can be provided for teachers and their instructional practice.

  18. Life and Environment. Elementary Science Activity Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Frank F.

    This book, a volume of the High/Scope Elementary Curriculum science books series, is designed to bring the essential features of plant and animal environments into focus. It contains activities that enable students to gain insights into the life histories of animals and plants, their habitats, and their place in the broader picture of life on…

  19. 474 Science Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Moira D.

    This book uses a child-initiated, whole language approach to help children have fun while exploring the world of science. The activities are divided into 23 units. Each unit begins with an "Attention Getter," the purpose of which is to introduce the unit to children in a way that grabs their attention, stimulates their interest, and creates…

  20. Long-term Science Data Curation Using a Digital Object Model and Open-Source Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Lenhardt, W.; Wilson, B. E.; Palanisamy, G.; Cook, R. B.

    2010-12-01

    Scientific digital content, including Earth Science observations and model output, has become more heterogeneous in format and more distributed across the Internet. In addition, data and metadata are becoming necessarily linked internally and externally on the Web. As a result, such content has become more difficult for providers to manage and preserve and for users to locate, understand, and consume. Specifically, it is increasingly harder to deliver relevant metadata and data processing lineage information along with the actual content consistently. Readme files, data quality information, production provenance, and other descriptive metadata are often separated in the storage level as well as in the data search and retrieval interfaces available to a user. Critical archival metadata, such as auditing trails and integrity checks, are often even more difficult for users to access, if they exist at all. We investigate the use of several open-source software frameworks to address these challenges. We use Fedora Commons Framework and its digital object abstraction as the repository, Drupal CMS as the user-interface, and the Islandora module as the connector from Drupal to Fedora Repository. With the digital object model, metadata of data description and data provenance can be associated with data content in a formal manner, so are external references and other arbitrary auxiliary information. Changes are formally audited on an object, and digital contents are versioned and have checksums automatically computed. Further, relationships among objects are formally expressed with RDF triples. Data replication, recovery, metadata export are supported with standard protocols, such as OAI-PMH. We provide a tentative comparative analysis of the chosen software stack with the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model, along with our initial results with the existing terrestrial ecology data collections at NASA’s ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center for

  1. Taking Science Home: Connecting Schools and Families through Science Activity Packs for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhart, Meredith; Bloomquist, Debra; Strickler-Eppard, Lacey; Czerniak, Charlene M.; Gilbert, Amanda; Kaderavek, Joan; Molitor, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    A Framework for K-12 Science Education indicates that introducing young children to scientific and engineering practices, core disciplinary ideas, and crosscutting concepts during the early years is essential for the development of conceptual understanding in science. Unfortunately, science is infrequently included in preschool and primary…

  2. MSLICE Science Activity Planner for the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Fox, Jason M.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Kurien, James A.; McCurdy, Michael P.; Pyrzak, Guy; Aghevli, Arash; Bachmann, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    MSLICE (Mars Science Laboratory InterfaCE) is the tool used by scientists and engineers on the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission to visualize the data returned by the rover and collaboratively plan its activities. It enables users to efficiently and effectively search all mission data to find applicable products (e.g., images, targets, activity plans, sequences, etc.), view and plan the traverse of the rover in HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) images, visualize data acquired by the rover, and develop, model, and validate the activities the rover will perform. MSLICE enables users to securely contribute to the mission s activity planning process from their home institutions using off-the-shelf laptop computers. This software has made use of several plug-ins (software components) developed for previous missions [e.g., Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix Mars Lander (PHX)] and other technology tasks. It has a simple, intuitive, and powerful search capability. For any given mission, there is a huge amount of data and associated metadata that is generated. To help users sort through this information, MSLICE s search interface is provided in a similar fashion as major Internet search engines. With regard to the HiRISE visualization of the rover s traverse, this view is a map of the mission that allows scientists to easily gauge where the rover has been and where it is likely to go. The map also provides the ability to correct or adjust the known position of the rover through the overlaying of images acquired from the rover on top of the HiRISE image. A user can then correct the rover s position by collocating the visible features in the overlays with the same features in the underlying HiRISE image. MSLICE users can also rapidly search all mission data for images that contain a point specified by the user in another image or panoramic mosaic. MSLICE allows the creation of targets, which provides a way for scientists to collaboratively name

  3. A comparative analysis of Science-Technology-Society standards in elementary, middle and high school state science curriculum frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Karen Marie

    An analysis of curriculum frameworks from the fifty states to ascertain the compliance with the National Science Education Standards for integrating Science-Technology-Society (STS) themes is reported within this dissertation. Science standards for all fifty states were analyzed to determine if the STS criteria were integrated at the elementary, middle, and high school levels of education. The analysis determined the compliance level for each state, then compared each educational level to see if the compliance was similar across the levels. Compliance is important because research shows that using STS themes in the science classroom increases the student's understanding of the concepts, increases the student's problem solving skills, increases the student's self-efficacy with respect to science, and students instructed using STS themes score well on science high stakes tests. The two hypotheses for this study are: (1) There is no significant difference in the degree of compliance to Science-Technology-Society themes (derived from National Science Education Standards) between the elementary, middle, and high school levels. (2) There is no significant difference in the degree of compliance to Science-Technology-Society themes (derived from National Science Education Standards) between the elementary, middle, and high school level when examined individually. The Analysis of Variance F ratio was used to determine the variance between and within the three educational levels. This analysis addressed hypothesis one. The Analysis of Variance results refused to reject the null hypothesis, meaning there is significant difference in the compliance to STS themes between the elementary, middle and high school educational levels. The Chi-Square test was the statistical analysis used to compare the educational levels for each individual criterion. This analysis addressed hypothesis two. The Chi-Squared results showed that none of the states were equally compliant with each

  4. Conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Swann, Edith M.; Singh, Sagri; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Meissner, Helen I.; Stansbury, James P.

    2011-01-01

    HIV vaccine clinical research occurs within a context where biomedical science and social issues are interlinked. Previous HIV vaccine research has considered behavioral and social issues, but often treated them as independent of clinical research processes. Systematic attention to the intersection of behavioral and social issues within a defined clinical research framework is needed to address gaps, such as those related to participation in trials, completion of trials, and the overall research experience. Rigorous attention to these issues at project inception can inform trial design and conduct by matching research approaches to the context in which trials are to be conducted. Conducting behavioral and social sciences research concurrent with vaccine clinical research is important because it can help identify potential barriers to trial implementation, as well as ultimate acceptance and dissemination of trial results. We therefore propose a conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research and use examples from the behavioral and social science literature to demonstrate how the model can facilitate identification of significant areas meriting additional exploration. Standardized use of the conceptual framework could improve HIV vaccine clinical research efficiency and relevance. PMID:21821083

  5. Learning Through Constructing Representations in Science: A framework of representational construction affordances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prain, Vaughan; Tytler, Russell

    2012-11-01

    Compared with research on the role of student engagement with expert representations in learning science, investigation of the use and theoretical justification of student-generated representations to learn science is less common. In this paper, we present a framework that aims to integrate three perspectives to explain how and why representational construction supports learning in science. The first or semiotic perspective focuses on student use of particular features of symbolic and material tools to make meanings in science. The second or epistemic perspective focuses on how this representational construction relates to the broader picture of knowledge-building practices of inquiry in this disciplinary field, and the third or epistemological perspective focuses on how and what students can know through engaging in the challenge of representing causal accounts through these semiotic tools. We argue that each perspective entails productive constraints on students' meaning-making as they construct and interpret their own representations. Our framework seeks to take into account the interplay of diverse cultural and cognitive resources students use in these meaning-making processes. We outline the basis for this framework before illustrating its explanatory value through a sequence of lessons on the topic of evaporation.

  6. Measuring elementary educators' understanding and readiness for implementing a new framework in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nollmeyer, Gustave Evan

    The NRC's (2012) report, A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas, ushered in a new era of science education. It is unclear how prepared elementary educators are for the framework. This study sought to establish measures for assessing inservice educators' self-reported understanding of the new framework and readiness to implement the ideas in their science instruction. Designing and validating an instrument to assess these constructs followed procedures established in the literature. First, literature on science education was examined to identify themes that could be used in constructing instrument items. This item pool was examined and modified through expert review. Next, the modified instrument was piloted with a small sample, N = 13, of inservice educators. After final adjustments to the instrument, it was used in a large scale validation study. Inservice elementary educators from four states, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah participated in the validation study, N= 167. Since understanding and readiness were determined to assess separate constructs, the two were handled individually during statistical analyses. Exploratory analysis on both scales, understanding and readiness, revealed stable factor models that were further validated through confirmatory factor analysis. The internal consistency reliability of the scales were determined through Cronbach's Alpha. With solid statistical evidence, conclusions were drawn from the study. Each instrument could be used in similar contexts to measure elementary educators' understanding of or readinessto implement the new framework for science education. The unique factor structures of the two scales suggests important differences between understanding and readiness. These differences should inform professional development efforts.

  7. Understanding Preschool Emergent Science in a Cultural Historical Context through Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundberg, Bodil; Areljung, Sofie; Due, Karin; Ekström, Kenneth; Ottander, Christina; Tellgren, Britt

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore how cultural factors interact with preschool teachers' shaping of activities with science content, and also how Activity Theory (AT) as a theoretical framework can be useful for examining interrelations within preschool systems. Qualitative data was collected from three preschools in the form of guided group…

  8. Rockets: Physical science teacher's guide with activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogt, Gregory L.; Rosenberg, Carla R. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This guide begins with background information sections on the history of rocketry, scientific principles, and practical rocketry. The sections on scientific principles and practical rocketry are based on Isaac Newton's three laws of motion. These laws explain why rockets work and how to make them more efficient. The background sections are followed with a series of physical science activities that demonstrate the basic science of rocketry. Each activity is designed to be simple and take advantage of inexpensive materials. Construction diagrams, materials and tools lists, and instructions are included. A brief discussion elaborates on the concepts covered in the activities and is followed with teaching notes and discussion questions. The guide concludes with a glossary of terms, suggested reading list, NASA educational resources, and an evaluation questionnaire with a mailer.

  9. On art and science: an epistemic framework for integrating social science and clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Jason Adam

    2014-06-01

    Calls for incorporating social science into patient care typically have accounted for neither the logistic constraints of medical training nor the methodological fallacies of utilizing aggregate "social facts" in clinical practice. By elucidating the different epistemic approaches of artistic and scientific practices, this paper illustrates an integrative artistic pedagogy that allows clinical practitioners to generate social scientific insights from actual patient encounters. Although there is no shortage of calls to bring social science into medicine, the more fundamental processes of thinking by which art and science proceed have not been addressed to this end. As such, the art of medical practice is conceptualized as an innate gift, and thus little is done to cultivate it. Yet doing so is more important than ever because uncertainty in diagnosing and treating chronic illnesses, the most significant contemporary mortality risks, suggests a re-expanding role for clinical judgment. PMID:24776979

  10. The PROactive innovative conceptual framework on physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Dobbels, Fabienne; de Jong, Corina; Drost, Ellen; Elberse, Janneke; Feridou, Chryssoula; Jacobs, Laura; Rabinovich, Roberto; Frei, Anja; Puhan, Milo A.; de Boer, Willem I.; van der Molen, Thys; Williams, Kate; Pinnock, Hillary; Troosters, Thierry; Karlsson, Niklas; Kulich, Karoly; Rüdell, Katja; Brindicci, Caterina; Higenbottam, Tim; Troosters, Thierry; Dobbels, Fabienne; Decramer, Marc; Tabberer, Margaret; Rabinovich, Roberto A; MacNee, William; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Polkey, Michael; Hopkinson, Nick; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Puhan, Milo; Frei, Anja; van der Molen, Thys; de Jong, Corina; de Boer, Pim; Jarrod, Ian; McBride, Paul; Kamel, Nadia; Rudell, Katja; Wilson, Frederick J.; Ivanoff, Nathalie; Kulich, Karoly; Glendenning, Alistair; Karlsson, Niklas X.; Corriol-Rohou, Solange; Nikai, Enkeleida; Erzen, Damijan

    2014-01-01

    Although physical activity is considered an important therapeutic target in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), what “physical activity” means to COPD patients and how their perspective is best measured is poorly understood. We designed a conceptual framework, guiding the development and content validation of two patient reported outcome (PRO) instruments on physical activity (PROactive PRO instruments). 116 patients from four European countries with diverse demographics and COPD phenotypes participated in three consecutive qualitative studies (63% male, age mean±sd 66±9 years, 35% Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III–IV). 23 interviews and eight focus groups (n = 54) identified the main themes and candidate items of the framework. 39 cognitive debriefings allowed the clarity of the items and instructions to be optimised. Three themes emerged, i.e. impact of COPD on amount of physical activity, symptoms experienced during physical activity, and adaptations made to facilitate physical activity. The themes were similar irrespective of country, demographic or disease characteristics. Iterative rounds of appraisal and refinement of candidate items resulted in 30 items with a daily recall period and 34 items with a 7-day recall period. For the first time, our approach provides comprehensive insight on physical activity from the COPD patients’ perspective. The PROactive PRO instruments’ content validity represents the pivotal basis for empirically based item reduction and validation. PMID:25034563

  11. Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science in West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustina, C.; Fajri, P. N.; Fathoni, F.; Gusti, T. P.; Harifa, A. C.; Hendra, Y.; Hertanti, D. R.; Lusiana, N.; Rohmat, F. I.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Pandjaitan, N.; Santoso, R.; Suharyanto, A.

    2013-12-01

    In hydrologic science and engineering, one challenge is establishing a common framework for discussion among workers from different disciplines. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, nine current or recent graduate students from four Indonesian universities participated in a week of training activities during June 2013. Students had backgrounds in agricultural engineering, civil and environmental engineering, water resources engineering, natural resources management, and soil science. Professors leading the training, which was based at Bogor Agricultural University (IPB) in west Java, included an agricultural engineer, civil engineers, and geologists. Activities in surface-water hydrology included geomorphic assessment of streams (measuring slope, cross-section, and bed-clast size) and gauging stream flow (wading with top-setting rods and a current meter for a large stream, and using a bucket and stopwatch for a small stream). Groundwater-hydrology activities included measuring depth to water in wells, conducting a pumping test with an observation well, and performing vertical electrical soundings to infer hydrostratigraphy. Students also performed relatively simple water-quality measurements (temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, and alkalinity) in streams, wells, and springs. The group analyzed data with commercially-available software such as AQTESOLV for well hydraulics, freeware such as the U.S. Geological Survey alkalinity calculator, and Excel spreadsheets. Results were discussed in the context of landscape position, lithology, and land use.

  12. Generic, Extensible, Configurable Push-Pull Framework for Large-Scale Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Brian M.; Chang, Albert Y.; Freeborn, Dana J.; Crichton, Daniel J.; Woollard, David M.; Mattmann, Chris A.

    2011-01-01

    different underlying communication middleware (at present, both XMLRPC, and RMI). In addition, the framework is entirely suitable in a multi-mission environment and is supporting both NPP Sounder PEATE and the OCO Mission. Both systems involve tasks such as high-throughput job processing, terabyte-scale data management, and science computing facilities. NPP Sounder PEATE is already using the push-pull framework to accept hundreds of gigabytes of IASI (infrared atmospheric sounding interferometer) data, and is in preparation to accept CRIMS (Cross-track Infrared Microwave Sounding Suite) data. OCO will leverage the framework to download MODIS, CloudSat, and other ancillary data products for use in the high-performance Level 2 Science Algorithm. The National Cancer Institute is also evaluating the framework for use in sharing and disseminating cancer research data through its Early Detection Research Network (EDRN).

  13. Framework for coordination of activities in dynamic situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Jörn; Charoy, François; El Khoury, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Recent disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005, have shown several issues for the coordination of human activities in these dynamic situations. Contemporary tools for the coordination used in the disaster response, such as e-mail, Whiteboards or phones, only allow for unstructured coordination, which can cause coordination problems. Hence, we discuss about the current information systems for coordinating the activities in a structured manner and identify their weaknesses in the context of a process modelling effort conducted together with experienced disaster managers. Afterwards, we propose a framework for coordination of activities in dynamic situations. The framework presented in this paper has been implemented as an extension to an open collaboration service. This shows how it can be used in the context of other tools required for disaster response management, such as maps, pictures or videos of the situation. The work described here is the foundation for enabling inter-organisational coordination of activities relevant in other domains, e.g. enterprise support processes, production processes or distributed software development projects. Furthermore, comments by disaster managers show that the concepts are relevant for their work. The expected impact is a more effective and efficient coordination of human activities in dynamic situations by structuring what needs to be coordinated.

  14. Framework for Integrating Science Data Processing Algorithms Into Process Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Crichton, Daniel J.; Chang, Albert Y.; Foster, Brian M.; Freeborn, Dana J.; Woollard, David M.; Ramirez, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    A software framework called PCS Task Wrapper is responsible for standardizing the setup, process initiation, execution, and file management tasks surrounding the execution of science data algorithms, which are referred to by NASA as Product Generation Executives (PGEs). PGEs codify a scientific algorithm, some step in the overall scientific process involved in a mission science workflow. The PCS Task Wrapper provides a stable operating environment to the underlying PGE during its execution lifecycle. If the PGE requires a file, or metadata regarding the file, the PCS Task Wrapper is responsible for delivering that information to the PGE in a manner that meets its requirements. If the PGE requires knowledge of upstream or downstream PGEs in a sequence of executions, that information is also made available. Finally, if information regarding disk space, or node information such as CPU availability, etc., is required, the PCS Task Wrapper provides this information to the underlying PGE. After this information is collected, the PGE is executed, and its output Product file and Metadata generation is managed via the PCS Task Wrapper framework. The innovation is responsible for marshalling output Products and Metadata back to a PCS File Management component for use in downstream data processing and pedigree. In support of this, the PCS Task Wrapper leverages the PCS Crawler Framework to ingest (during pipeline processing) the output Product files and Metadata produced by the PGE. The architectural components of the PCS Task Wrapper framework include PGE Task Instance, PGE Config File Builder, Config File Property Adder, Science PGE Config File Writer, and PCS Met file Writer. This innovative framework is really the unifying bridge between the execution of a step in the overall processing pipeline, and the available PCS component services as well as the information that they collectively manage.

  15. Advanced Science/Event-based Data Service Framework at GES DISC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shie, C. L.; Shen, S.; Kempler, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Service Center (GES DISC) has provided numerous Earth science data, information, and services to various research communities and general publics for decades. To maintain an overall fine service including improving serving our users with advanced data services has been our primary goal. We are developing an advanced science/event-based data service framework. The framework aims to effectively provide users with a sophisticatedly integrated data package via user-friendly discovering and selecting a system-preset science/event topic (e.g., hurricane, volcano, etc.) from an in-developing knowledge database of the framework. A data recipe page related to the Hurricane topic has been developed to demo the concept. More showcases of various subjects such as Volcano, Dust Storm, and Forest Fire are also under development. This framework is in developing on top of existing data services at GES DISC, such as Mirador (data search engine), Giovanni (visualization), OPeNDAP, and data recipes. It also involves other data tools, such as Panoply, GrADS, IDL, etc. The Hurricane Sandy (Oct 22-31 2012) event is used here for a sample description. As Hurricane Sandy being selected as a user case, a table containing nine system-preset data variables (i.e., precipitation, winds, sea surface temperature, sea level pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, aerosols, soil moisture and surface runoff, and trace gases) linked to the respective data products with fine temporal and spatial resolutions from various in-house sources is provided. The "bundled" variable data can thus be readily downloaded through Mirador. The in-house Giovanni is accessible for users to acquire quick views of Level 3 (gridded) variables. For Level 2 (swath) or the Giovanni-unavailable Level 3 data, the system provides a link to data recipes that give a how-to guide to read and visualize the data using offline tools, such as Panoply, GrADS, or IDL.

  16. Mission and science activity scheduling language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Larry G.

    1993-01-01

    To support the distributed and complex operational scheduling required for future National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) missions, a formal, textual language, the Scheduling Applications Interface Language (SAIL), has been developed. Increased geographic dispersion of investigators is leading to distributed mission and science activity planning, scheduling, and operations. SAIL is an innovation which supports the effective and efficient communication of scheduling information among physically dispersed applications in distributed scheduling environments. SAIL offers a clear, concise, unambiguous expression of scheduling information in a readable, hardware independent format. The language concept, syntax, and semantics incorporate language features found useful during five years of research and prototyping with scheduling languages in physically distributed environments. SAIL allows concise specification of mission and science activity plans in a format which promotes repetition and reuse.

  17. Water hyacinth in China: a sustainability science-based management framework.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianbo; Wu, Jianguo; Fu, Zhihui; Zhu, Lei

    2007-12-01

    The invasion of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) has resulted in enormous ecological and economic consequences worldwide. Although the spread of this weed in Africa, Australia, and North America has been well documented, its invasion in China is yet to be fully documented. Here we report that since its introduction about seven decades ago, water hyacinth has infested many water bodies across almost half of China's territory, causing a decline of native biodiversity, alteration of ecosystem services, deterioration of aquatic environments, and spread of diseases affecting human health. Water hyacinth infestations have also led to enormous economic losses in China by impeding water flows, paralyzing navigation, and damaging irrigation and hydroelectricity facilities. To effectively control the rampage of water hyacinth in China, we propose a sustainability science-based management framework that explicitly incorporates principles from landscape ecology and Integrated Pest Management. This framework emphasizes multiple-scale long-term monitoring and research, integration among different control techniques, combination of control with utilization, and landscape-level adaptive management. Sustainability science represents a new, transdisciplinary paradigm that integrates scientific research, technological innovation, and socioeconomic development of particular regions. Our proposed management framework is aimed to broaden the currently dominant biological control-centered view in China and to illustrate how sustainability science can be used to guide the research and management of water hyacinth. PMID:17768654

  18. Water Hyacinth in China: A Sustainability Science-Based Management Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianbo; Wu, Jianguo; Fu, Zhihui; Zhu, Lei

    2007-12-01

    The invasion of water hyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes) has resulted in enormous ecological and economic consequences worldwide. Although the spread of this weed in Africa, Australia, and North America has been well documented, its invasion in China is yet to be fully documented. Here we report that since its introduction about seven decades ago, water hyacinth has infested many water bodies across almost half of China’s territory, causing a decline of native biodiversity, alteration of ecosystem services, deterioration of aquatic environments, and spread of diseases affecting human health. Water hyacinth infestations have also led to enormous economic losses in China by impeding water flows, paralyzing navigation, and damaging irrigation and hydroelectricity facilities. To effectively control the rampage of water hyacinth in China, we propose a sustainability science-based management framework that explicitly incorporates principles from landscape ecology and Integrated Pest Management. This framework emphasizes multiple-scale long-term monitoring and research, integration among different control techniques, combination of control with utilization, and landscape-level adaptive management. Sustainability science represents a new, transdisciplinary paradigm that integrates scientific research, technological innovation, and socioeconomic development of particular regions. Our proposed management framework is aimed to broaden the currently dominant biological control-centered view in China and to illustrate how sustainability science can be used to guide the research and management of water hyacinth.

  19. Engineering design activities and conceptual change in middle school science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittka, Christine G.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the impact of engineering design classroom activities on conceptual change in science, and on attitudes toward and knowledge about engineering. Students were given a situated learning context and a rationale for learning science in an active, inquiry-based method, and worked in small collaborative groups. One eighth-grade physical science teacher and her students participated in a unit on heat transfer and thermal energy. One class served as the control while two others received variations of an engineering design treatment. Data were gathered from teacher and student entrance and exit interviews, audio recordings of student dialog during group work, video recordings and observations of all classes, pre- and posttests on science content and engineering attitudes, and artifacts and all assignments completed by students. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected concurrently, but analysis took place in two phases. Qualitative data were analyzed in an ongoing manner so that the researcher could explore emerging theories and trends as the study progressed. These results were compared to and combined with the results of the quantitative data analysis. Analysis of the data was carried out in the interpretive framework of analytic induction. Findings indicated that students overwhelmingly possessed alternative conceptions about heat transfer, thermal energy, and engineering prior to the interventions. While all three classes made statistically significant gains in their knowledge about heat and energy, students in the engineering design class with the targeted demonstrations made the most significant gains over the other two other classes. Engineering attitudes changed significantly in the two classes that received the engineering design intervention. Implications from this study can inform teachers' use of engineering design activities in science classrooms. These implications are: (1) Alternative conceptions will

  20. From science fair to project-based science: A study of the implementation of an innovation through an existing activity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lisa Jean

    The implementation process is critical to the success of educational innovations. Project-based science is an innovation designed to support students' science learning. Science fair is a pervasive school practice in which students exhibit science projects. Little is known about how science fair may affect the implementation of reform efforts in science education. This study explores the relationship of science fair and project-based science in the classrooms of three science teachers. Two theories are used to understand science fair as an instructional practice. Cultural historical activity theory supports an analysis of the origins and development of science fair. The idea of communities of practice supports a focus on why and how educational practitioners participate in science fair and what meanings the activity holds for them. The study identifies five historically-based design themes that have shaped science fair: general science, project method, scientific method, extra-curricular activity, and laboratory science. The themes provide a new framework for describing teachers' classroom practices for science fair activities and support analysis of the ways their practices incorporate aspects of project-based science. Three case studies in Chicago present ethnographic descriptions of science fair practices within the context of school communities. One focuses on the scientific method as a linear process for doing science, another on knowledge generation through laboratory experiments, and the third on student ability to engage in open-ended inquiry. One teacher reinvents a project-based science curriculum to strengthen students' laboratory-based science fair projects, while another reinvents science fair to teach science as inquiry. In each case, science fair is part of the school's efforts to improve science instruction. The cases suggest that reform efforts help to perpetuate science fair practice. To support systemic improvements in science education, this

  1. Strategic science: new frameworks to bring scientific expertise to environmental disaster response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoepler, Teresa Michelle; Ludwig, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Science is critical to society’s ability to prepare for, respond to, and recover from environmental crises. Natural and technological disasters such as disease outbreaks, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, oil spills, and tsunamis require coordinated scientific expertise across a range of disciplines to shape effective policies and protocols. Five years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, new organizational frameworks have arisen for scientists and engineers to apply their expertise to disaster response and recovery in a variety of capacities. Here, we describe examples of these opportunities, including an exciting new collaboration between the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) and the Department of the Interior’s (DOI) Strategic Sciences Group (SSG).

  2. NASA'S Earth Science Data Stewardship Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Dawn R.; Murphy, Kevin J.; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been collecting Earth observation data for over 50 years using instruments on board satellites, aircraft and ground-based systems. With the inception of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program in 1990, NASA established the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project and initiated development of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). A set of Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) was established at locations based on science discipline expertise. Today, EOSDIS consists of 12 DAACs and 12 Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS), processing data from the EOS missions, as well as the Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership mission, and other satellite and airborne missions. The DAACs archive and distribute the vast majority of data from NASA’s Earth science missions, with data holdings exceeding 12 petabytes The data held by EOSDIS are available to all users consistent with NASA’s free and open data policy, which has been in effect since 1990. The EOSDIS archives consist of raw instrument data counts (level 0 data), as well as higher level standard products (e.g., geophysical parameters, products mapped to standard spatio-temporal grids, results of Earth system models using multi-instrument observations, and long time series of Earth System Data Records resulting from multiple satellite observations of a given type of phenomenon). EOSDIS data stewardship responsibilities include ensuring that the data and information content are reliable, of high quality, easily accessible, and usable for as long as they are considered to be of value.

  3. Modeling of Active Transmembrane Transport in a Mixture Theory Framework

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Morrison, Barclay; Hung, Clark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study formulates governing equations for active transport across semi-permeable membranes within the framework of the theory of mixtures. In mixture theory, which models the interactions of any number of fluid and solid constituents, a supply term appears in the conservation of linear momentum to describe momentum exchanges among the constituents. In past applications, this momentum supply was used to model frictional interactions only, thereby describing passive transport processes. In this study, it is shown that active transport processes, which impart momentum to solutes or solvent, may also be incorporated in this term. By projecting the equation of conservation of linear momentum along the normal to the membrane, a jump condition is formulated for the mechano-electrochemical potential of fluid constituents which is generally applicable to nonequilibrium processes involving active transport. The resulting relations are simple and easy to use, and address an important need in the membrane transport literature. PMID:20213212

  4. Multi-Standard Metadata Retrieval Framework at the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, N. T.; Huang, T.; Armstrong, E. M.; Gangl, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    With the vast amount of Earth Science data available, providing the user community with high quality metadata to facilitate information retrieval and exchange is integral to scientific research. The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archives and distributes data products along with metadata pertinent to the physical state of the ocean. As one of the Earth Science data center for NASA, PO.DAAC is expected to work with multiple metadata standards. Since there is no single metadata standard that meets everyone's needs, a web-based framework has been designed and integrated as part of PO.DAAC's scalable Core Data System to enable users to quickly retrieve metadata in the format that they need. Currently, the framework supports the Open Search specification for data discovery, ISO 19115-2, Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata standards, with new metadata standards still being added. In this talk we will present the architecture behind the framework that makes it possible to support various metadata standards as well as the challenges we encountered.

  5. "Active Science": Integrating Physical Activity and Science Learning into the Afterschool Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Kevin E.; Yan, Zi; McInnis, Kyle J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Afterschool programs offer significant opportunities to increase physical activity levels and improve academic performance of children. Purpose: This study assessed an innovative approach to embed physical activity into science lessons in an afterschool community setting. Methods: Participants were 47 boys and girls (age = 10.8 ± 0.7…

  6. Sustainability Science as a Transdisciplinary Framework for Institutional Transformation at Unity College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkey, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    Interdisciplinary programming in higher education is accepted as necessary for effective instructional delivery of complex environmental problems. Difficulties in sharing resources among disciplinary units and the need for students to sequentially access information from different disciplines limit the effectiveness of this approach. In contrast, transdisciplinary programming requires that the perspectives of various disciplines be simultaneously integrated in problem-focused pedagogy. Unity College, an environmental college in Maine, has recently adopted Sustainability Science (sensu U.S. National Academy of Science) as a framework for transdisciplinary pedagogy throughout all of its degree programs. Sustainability Science is a promising alternative framework that focuses on the dynamics of coupled human-natural systems and is defined by the problems that it addresses rather than by the disciplines it employs. Students are empowered to become brokers of knowledge, while faculty perform a curatorial role to provide students with networked resources generally external to the classroom. Although the transdisciplinary framework is effective for delivery of Sustainability Science in upper division and capstone courses, we propose this approach also for elements of our general education curriculum during the first two years of our baccalaureate programs. Classroom time is liberated for experiential student engagement and recitation. Our experience suggests that transdisciplinary programming can provide students with critical thinking skills and thus enhance the postgraduate value of their baccalaureate degree. We are coordinating the development of this distinctive curriculum delivery with a marketing program that will make Unity College accessible to a wider range of clientele. Our implementation of transdisciplinary programming will occur over a four-year period and requires explicit and fundamental change in essentially all aspects of College administration and

  7. A Decision Support Framework for Science-Based, Multi-Stakeholder Deliberation: A Coral Reef Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, Amanda P.; Small, Mitchell J.; Bradley, Patricia; Fisher, William S.; Vega, Ann; Black, Kelly; Stockton, Tom

    2012-12-01

    We present a decision support framework for science-based assessment and multi-stakeholder deliberation. The framework consists of two parts: a DPSIR (Drivers-Pressures-States-Impacts-Responses) analysis to identify the important causal relationships among anthropogenic environmental stressors, processes, and outcomes; and a Decision Landscape analysis to depict the legal, social, and institutional dimensions of environmental decisions. The Decision Landscape incorporates interactions among government agencies, regulated businesses, non-government organizations, and other stakeholders. It also identifies where scientific information regarding environmental processes is collected and transmitted to improve knowledge about elements of the DPSIR and to improve the scientific basis for decisions. Our application of the decision support framework to coral reef protection and restoration in the Florida Keys focusing on anthropogenic stressors, such as wastewater, proved to be successful and offered several insights. Using information from a management plan, it was possible to capture the current state of the science with a DPSIR analysis as well as important decision options, decision makers and applicable laws with a the Decision Landscape analysis. A structured elicitation of values and beliefs conducted at a coral reef management workshop held in Key West, Florida provided a diversity of opinion and also indicated a prioritization of several environmental stressors affecting coral reef health. The integrated DPSIR/Decision landscape framework for the Florida Keys developed based on the elicited opinion and the DPSIR analysis can be used to inform management decisions, to reveal the role that further scientific information and research might play to populate the framework, and to facilitate better-informed agreement among participants.

  8. A Python Plug-in Based Computational Framework for Spatially Distributed Environmental and Earth Sciences Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willgoose, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    One of the pioneering landform evolution models, SIBERIA, while developed in the 1980’s is still widely used in the science community and is a key component of engineering software used to assess the long-term stability of man-made landforms such as rehabilitated mine sites and nuclear waste repositories. While SIBERIA is very reliable, computationally fast and well tested (both its underlying science and the computer code) the range of emerging applications have challenged the ability of the author to maintain and extend the underlying computer code. Moreover, the architecture of the SIBERIA code is not well suited to collaborative extension of its capabilities without often triggering forking of the code base. This paper describes a new modelling framework designed to supersede SIBERIA (as well as other earth sciences codes by the author) called TelluSim. The design is such that it is potentially more than simply a new landform evolution model, but TelluSim is a more general dynamical system modelling framework using time evolving GIS data as its spatial discretisation. TelluSim is designed as an open modular framework facilitating open-sourcing of the code, while addressing compromises made in the original design of SIBERIA in the 1980’s. An important aspect of the design of TelluSim was to minimise the overhead in interfacing the modules with TelluSim, and minimise any requirement for recoding of existing software, so eliminating a major disadvantage of more complex frameworks. The presentation will discuss in more detail the reasoning behind the design of TelluSim, and experiences of the advantages and disadvantages of using Python relative to other approaches (e.g. Matlab, R). The paper will discuss examples of how TelluSim has facilitated the incorporation and testing of new algorithms, and environmental processes, and the support for novel science and data testing methodologies. It will also discuss plans to link TelluSim with other open source

  9. Science Activities for Children 3 to 9 Years Old.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Bonnie E.

    Activities in the life and physical sciences are provided (in separate sections) for preschool and elementary school students. Life science activities include those related to plants, soil, habitats, fossils, animals, life cycles, food chains, nutrition, and other biologically-oriented topics. Physical science activities include those related to…

  10. Social Sciences Education Framework for California Public Schools, Kindergarten and Grades One Through Twelve. Report of the Statewide Social Sciences Study Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Statewide Social Sciences Study Committee, Sacramento.

    This report contains a curriculum framework to be used in developing and implementing a new social-sciences education program for kindergarten through grade 12 in the California Public Schools. The report, funded by ESEA Title V, describes the framework of the program in the first two parts. The plan is designed to provide students with the…

  11. Inquiry-based science education: towards a pedagogical framework for primary school teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uum, Martina S. J.; Verhoeff, Roald P.; Peeters, Marieke

    2016-02-01

    Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) has been promoted as an inspiring way of learning science by engaging pupils in designing and conducting their own scientific investigations. For primary school teachers, the open nature of IBSE poses challenges as they often lack experience in supporting their pupils during the different phases of an open IBSE project, such as formulating a research question and designing and conducting an investigation. The current study aims to meet these challenges by presenting a pedagogical framework in which four domains of scientific knowledge are addressed in seven phases of inquiry. The framework is based on video analyses of pedagogical interventions by primary school teachers participating in open IBSE projects. Our results show that teachers can guide their pupils successfully through the process of open inquiry by explicitly addressing the conceptual, epistemic, social and/or procedural domain of scientific knowledge in the subsequent phases of inquiry. The paper concludes by suggesting further research to validate our framework and to develop a pedagogy for primary school teachers to guide their pupils through the different phases of open inquiry.

  12. Elementary teachers committed to actively teaching science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opperman, Julianne Radkowski

    Committed elementary teachers of science and engineering, members of a professional learning community called Collaborative Conversations in STEM, were studied to elicit their perceptions of experiences that influenced their commitment to, and their pedagogical content knowledge of, STEM teaching and learning. The hermeneutic phenomenological interviews enabled the teachers to express their beliefs in their own words. Data analysis employed a theoretical framework that investigated teacher epistemology and knowledge in light of their experiences. Findings revealed a web of lifelong experiences unique to each individual, and evidential of the committed elementary scientist-teachers' present day values, teaching epistemology, lifelong learning, and emotional and intellectual engagement. Scientist-teachers are individuals whose teaching and learning characteristics reflect those of scientists and engineers. Evidence indicated that no single transformative learning experience resulted in those elementary teachers' commitment to STEM teaching and learning, but recent professional development activities were influential. Formal K-16 STEM learning was not uniformly or positively influential to the teachers' commitment to, or knowledge of, STEM. Findings suggest that ongoing professional development for STEM teaching and learning can influence elementary teachers to become committed to actively teaching STEM. The Collaborative Conversations in STEM provided intellectual and emotional engagement that empowered the teachers to provide STEM teaching and learning for their students and their colleagues overcoming impediments encountered in a literacy-focused curriculum. Elementary teachers actively committed to teaching science and engineering can undergo further transformation and emerge as leaders.

  13. a Multidisciplinary Analytical Framework for Studying Active Mobility Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, D.; Hermida, C.; Osorio, P.

    2016-06-01

    Intermediate cities are urged to change and adapt their mobility systems from a high energy-demanding motorized model to a sustainable low-motorized model. In order to accomplish such a model, city administrations need to better understand active mobility patterns and their links to socio-demographic and cultural aspects of the population. During the last decade, researchers have demonstrated the potential of geo-location technologies and mobile devices to gather massive amounts of data for mobility studies. However, the analysis and interpretation of this data has been carried out by specialized research groups with relatively narrow approaches from different disciplines. Consequently, broader questions remain less explored, mainly those relating to spatial behaviour of individuals and populations with their geographic environment and the motivations and perceptions shaping such behaviour. Understanding sustainable mobility and exploring new research paths require an interdisciplinary approach given the complex nature of mobility systems and their social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we introduce the elements for a multidisciplinary analytical framework for studying active mobility patterns comprised of three components: a) Methodological, b) Behavioural, and c) Perceptual. We demonstrate the applicability of the framework by analysing mobility patterns of cyclists and pedestrians in an intermediate city integrating a range of techniques, including: GPS tracking, spatial analysis, auto-ethnography, and perceptual mapping. The results demonstrated the existence of non-evident spatial behaviours and how perceptual features affect mobility. This knowledge is useful for developing policies and practices for sustainable mobility planning.

  14. A Library approach to establish an Educational Data Curation Framework (EDCF) that supports K-12 data science sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, B. D.; Wegner, K.; Smith, S.; Schulze, D. G.; Merwade, V.; Jung, J.; Bessenbacher, A.

    2013-12-01

    It has been the tradition of the libraries to support literacy. Now in the realm of Executive Order, Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for Government Information, May 9, 2013, the library has the responsibility to support geospatial data, big data, earth science data or cyber infrastructure data that may support STEM for educational pipeline stimulation. (Such information can be found at http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/05/09/executive-order-making-open-and-machine-readable-new-default-government-.) Provided is an Educational Data Curation Framework (EDCF) that has been initiated in Purdue research, geospatial data service engagement and outreach endeavors for future consideration and application to augment such data science and climate literacy needs of future global citizens. In addition, this endorsement of this framework by the GLOBE program may facilitate further EDCF implementations, discussion points and prototypes for libraries. In addition, the ECDF will support teacher-led, placed-based and large scale climate or earth science learning systems where such knowledge transfer of climate or earth science data is effectively transferred from higher education research of cyberinfrastructure use such as, NOAA or NASA, to K-12 teachers and school systems. The purpose of this effort is to establish best practices for sustainable K-12 data science delivery system or GLOBE-provided system (http://vis.globe.gov/GLOBE/) where libraries manage the data curation and data appropriateness as data reference experts for such digital data. Here, the Purdue University Libraries' GIS department works to support soils, LIDAR and water science data experiences to support teacher training for an EDCF development effort. Lastly, it should be noted that the interdisciplinary collaboration and demonstration of library supported outreach partners and national organizations such the GLOBE program may best foster EDCF development. This trend in data

  15. Installing hydrolytic activity into a completely de novo protein framework.

    PubMed

    Burton, Antony J; Thomson, Andrew R; Dawson, William M; Brady, R Leo; Woolfson, Derek N

    2016-09-01

    The design of enzyme-like catalysts tests our understanding of sequence-to-structure/function relationships in proteins. Here we install hydrolytic activity predictably into a completely de novo and thermostable α-helical barrel, which comprises seven helices arranged around an accessible channel. We show that the lumen of the barrel accepts 21 mutations to functional polar residues. The resulting variant, which has cysteine-histidine-glutamic acid triads on each helix, hydrolyses p-nitrophenyl acetate with catalytic efficiencies that match the most-efficient redesigned hydrolases based on natural protein scaffolds. This is the first report of a functional catalytic triad engineered into a de novo protein framework. The flexibility of our system also allows the facile incorporation of unnatural side chains to improve activity and probe the catalytic mechanism. Such a predictable and robust construction of truly de novo biocatalysts holds promise for applications in chemical and biochemical synthesis. PMID:27554410

  16. Crosscutting earth science concepts and diverse learners: communicating a framework for climate education. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rife, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    Formal K-12 educators have a myriad of organizations that offer benchmarks, standards, and other frameworks that offer structure to their teaching. Informal educators are often left with little direction to help them offer programming that is both entertaining and informative. All educators have opportunities to integrate earth science concepts in ways that diverse learners can experience to become educated about our climate and the earth systems that impact it. Formal educators also have experience and training in using different methodologies to reach diverse learners that are not always easy for informal educators to access. Frameworks, like the recent group of literacy principles produced by various experts in the fields offer opportunities to support both formal and informal educators as they strive to motivate and inform learners with a diversity of learning modalities. New research suggests that some methods are effective and easy to implement for any educators wishing to approach the topic of earth science and climate education in any setting they function in. Coupling crosscutting earth science content and concepts with different instructional methods yields new insights into best ways to educate all learners in meaningful and lasting ways.

  17. Coalescent: an open-science framework for importance sampling in coalescent theory

    PubMed Central

    Spouge, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In coalescent theory, computer programs often use importance sampling to calculate likelihoods and other statistical quantities. An importance sampling scheme can exploit human intuition to improve statistical efficiency of computations, but unfortunately, in the absence of general computer frameworks on importance sampling, researchers often struggle to translate new sampling schemes computationally or benchmark against different schemes, in a manner that is reliable and maintainable. Moreover, most studies use computer programs lacking a convenient user interface or the flexibility to meet the current demands of open science. In particular, current computer frameworks can only evaluate the efficiency of a single importance sampling scheme or compare the efficiencies of different schemes in an ad hoc manner. Results. We have designed a general framework (http://coalescent.sourceforge.net; language: Java; License: GPLv3) for importance sampling that computes likelihoods under the standard neutral coalescent model of a single, well-mixed population of constant size over time following infinite sites model of mutation. The framework models the necessary core concepts, comes integrated with several data sets of varying size, implements the standard competing proposals, and integrates tightly with our previous framework for calculating exact probabilities. For a given dataset, it computes the likelihood and provides the maximum likelihood estimate of the mutation parameter. Well-known benchmarks in the coalescent literature validate the accuracy of the framework. The framework provides an intuitive user interface with minimal clutter. For performance, the framework switches automatically to modern multicore hardware, if available. It runs on three major platforms (Windows, Mac and Linux). Extensive tests and coverage make the framework reliable and maintainable. Conclusions. In coalescent theory, many studies of computational efficiency consider only

  18. Designing computer learning environments for engineering and computer science: The scaffolded knowledge integration framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linn, Marcia C.

    1995-06-01

    Designing effective curricula for complex topics and incorporating technological tools is an evolving process. One important way to foster effective design is to synthesize successful practices. This paper describes a framework called scaffolded knowledge integration and illustrates how it guided the design of two successful course enhancements in the field of computer science and engineering. One course enhancement, the LISP Knowledge Integration Environment, improved learning and resulted in more gender-equitable outcomes. The second course enhancement, the spatial reasoning environment, addressed spatial reasoning in an introductory engineering course. This enhancement minimized the importance of prior knowledge of spatial reasoning and helped students develop a more comprehensive repertoire of spatial reasoning strategies. Taken together, the instructional research programs reinforce the value of the scaffolded knowledge integration framework and suggest directions for future curriculum reformers.

  19. A Competence-Based Science Learning Framework Illustrated through the Study of Natural Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyao, Sheila G.; Holbrook, Jack; Rannikmäe, Miia; Pagunsan, Marmon M.

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a competence-based learning framework for science teaching, applied to the study of "big ideas", in this case to the study of natural hazards and disaster risk reduction (NH&DRR). The framework focuses on new visions of competence, placing emphasis on nurturing connectedness and behavioral actions toward…

  20. A Framework for Evaluating Science and Technology Electronic Reference Books: A Comparison of Five Platforms in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafferty, Meghan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines what is desirable in online reference books in science and technology and outlines a framework for evaluating their interfaces. The framework considers factors unique to these subject areas like chemical structures and numerical data. Criteria in three categories, navigability, searchability, and results, were applied to five…

  1. Assessing Students' Understandings of Biological Models and Their Use in Science to Evaluate a Theoretical Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grünkorn, Juliane; Upmeier zu Belzen, Annette; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Research in the field of students' understandings of models and their use in science describes different frameworks concerning these understandings. Currently, there is no conjoint framework that combines these structures and so far, no investigation has focused on whether it reflects students' understandings sufficiently (empirical…

  2. Sciencing with Mother Goose: Activities for Integrating Science and Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Carolyn; Bell, Ann

    The pairing of Mother Goose rhymes and nursery tales with the scientific thinking process is an effective instructional strategy linking reading and science learning at the primary level. This paper presents several such pairings which stress the basic science processes in grades K-3 of observing, communicating, comparing, ordering, and…

  3. Edible Earth and Space Science Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.; Shupla, C.

    2014-07-01

    In this workshop we describe using Earth and Space Science demonstrations with edible ingredients to increase student interest. We show how to use chocolate, candy, cookies, popcorn, bagels, pastries, Pringles, marshmallows, whipped cream, and Starburst candy for activities such as: plate tectonics, the interior structure of the Earth and Mars, radioactivity/radioactive dating of rocks and stars, formation of the planets, lunar phases, convection, comets, black holes, curvature of space, dark energy, and the expansion of the Universe. In addition to creating an experience that will help students remember specific concepts, edible activities can be used as a formative assessment, providing students with the opportunity to create something that demonstrates their understanding of the model. The students often eat the demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool for all ages, and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  4. TEAK: topology enrichment analysis framework for detecting activated biological subpathways.

    PubMed

    Judeh, Thair; Johnson, Cole; Kumar, Anuj; Zhu, Dongxiao

    2013-02-01

    To mine gene expression data sets effectively, analysis frameworks need to incorporate methods that identify intergenic relationships within enriched biologically relevant subpathways. For this purpose, we developed the Topology Enrichment Analysis frameworK (TEAK). TEAK employs a novel in-house algorithm and a tailor-made Clique Percolation Method to extract linear and nonlinear KEGG subpathways, respectively. TEAK scores subpathways using the Bayesian Information Criterion for context specific data and the Kullback-Leibler divergence for case-control data. In this article, we utilized TEAK with experimental studies to analyze microarray data sets profiling stress responses in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a public microarray data set, we identified via TEAK linear sphingolipid metabolic subpathways activated during the yeast response to nitrogen stress, and phenotypic analyses of the corresponding deletion strains indicated previously unreported fitness defects for the dpl1Δ and lag1Δ mutants under conditions of nitrogen limitation. In addition, we studied the yeast filamentous response to nitrogen stress by profiling changes in transcript levels upon deletion of two key filamentous growth transcription factors, FLO8 and MSS11. Via TEAK we identified a nonlinear glycerophospholipid metabolism subpathway involving the SLC1 gene, which we found via mutational analysis to be required for yeast filamentous growth. PMID:23268448

  5. Mathematical framework for activity-based cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Gabriel A.; Dudani, Jaideep S.; Carrodeguas, Emmanuel; Mazumdar, Eric V.; Zekavat, Seyedeh M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in nanomedicine are providing sophisticated functions to precisely control the behavior of nanoscale drugs and diagnostics. Strategies that coopt protease activity as molecular triggers are increasingly important in nanoparticle design, yet the pharmacokinetics of these systems are challenging to understand without a quantitative framework to reveal nonintuitive associations. We describe a multicompartment mathematical model to predict strategies for ultrasensitive detection of cancer using synthetic biomarkers, a class of activity-based probes that amplify cancer-derived signals into urine as a noninvasive diagnostic. Using a model formulation made of a PEG core conjugated with protease-cleavable peptides, we explore a vast design space and identify guidelines for increasing sensitivity that depend on critical parameters such as enzyme kinetics, dosage, and probe stability. According to this model, synthetic biomarkers that circulate in stealth but then activate at sites of disease have the theoretical capacity to discriminate tumors as small as 5 mm in diameter—a threshold sensitivity that is otherwise challenging for medical imaging and blood biomarkers to achieve. This model may be adapted to describe the behavior of additional activity-based approaches to allow cross-platform comparisons, and to predict allometric scaling across species. PMID:26417077

  6. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  7. Mathematical framework for activity-based cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Gabriel A; Dudani, Jaideep S; Carrodeguas, Emmanuel; Mazumdar, Eric V; Zekavat, Seyedeh M; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-10-13

    Advances in nanomedicine are providing sophisticated functions to precisely control the behavior of nanoscale drugs and diagnostics. Strategies that coopt protease activity as molecular triggers are increasingly important in nanoparticle design, yet the pharmacokinetics of these systems are challenging to understand without a quantitative framework to reveal nonintuitive associations. We describe a multicompartment mathematical model to predict strategies for ultrasensitive detection of cancer using synthetic biomarkers, a class of activity-based probes that amplify cancer-derived signals into urine as a noninvasive diagnostic. Using a model formulation made of a PEG core conjugated with protease-cleavable peptides, we explore a vast design space and identify guidelines for increasing sensitivity that depend on critical parameters such as enzyme kinetics, dosage, and probe stability. According to this model, synthetic biomarkers that circulate in stealth but then activate at sites of disease have the theoretical capacity to discriminate tumors as small as 5 mm in diameter-a threshold sensitivity that is otherwise challenging for medical imaging and blood biomarkers to achieve. This model may be adapted to describe the behavior of additional activity-based approaches to allow cross-platform comparisons, and to predict allometric scaling across species. PMID:26417077

  8. Development and evaluation of an active instructional framework for undergraduate biology education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysne, Steven John

    The practice of science education in American colleges and universities is changing and the role of faculty is changing as well. There is momentum in higher education to transform our instruction and do a better job at supporting more students' success in science and engineering programs. New teaching approaches are transforming undergraduate science instruction and new research demonstrates that these new approaches are more engaging for students, result in greater achievement, and create more positive attitudes toward science careers. Additionally, teaching scholars have described a paradigm shift toward placing the burden of content coverage on students which allows more time for in-class activities such as discussion and problem solving. Teaching faculty have been asked to redesign their courses and rebrand themselves as facilitators of student learning, rather than purveyors of information, to improve student engagement, achievement, and attitudes. This dissertation is a critical evaluation of both the assumption that active learning improves student achievement and knowledge retention and my own assumptions regarding science education research and my students' resiliency. This dissertation is a collection of research articles, published or in preparation, presenting the chronological development (Chapters 2 and 3) and evaluation (Chapters 4 and 5) of an active instructional model for undergraduate biology instruction. Chapters 1 and 6.provide a broad introduction and summary, respectively. Chapter 2 is an exploration of student engagement through interviews with a variety of students. From these interviews I identified several themes that students felt were important, and science instructors need to address, including the place where learning happens and strategies for better engaging students. Chapter 3 presents a review of the science education literature broadly and more focused review on the how students learn and how faculty teach. Consistent with what

  9. World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times. Course Models for the History-Social Science Framework, Grade 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Stephanie, Ed.; And Others

    This document is a response to teachers' requests for practical assistance in implementing California's history-social science framework. The document offers stimulating ideas to enrich the teaching of history and social science, enliven instruction for every student, focus on essential topics, and help make learning more memorable. Experiences…

  10. Interdisciplinary Priorities for Dissemination, Implementation, and Improvement Science: Frameworks, Mechanics, and Measures.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Julian W; Sankaré, Ibrahima C; Kahn, Katherine L

    2015-12-01

    Much of dissemination, implementation, and improvement (DII) science is conducted by social scientists, healthcare practitioners, and biomedical researchers. While each of these groups has its own venues for sharing methods and findings, forums that bring together the diverse DII science workforce provide important opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaboration and learning. In particular, such forums are uniquely positioned to foster the sharing of three important components of research. First: they allow the sharing of conceptual frameworks for DII science that focus on the use and spread of innovations. Second: they provide an opportunity to share strategies for initiating and governing DII research, including approaches for eliciting and incorporating the research priorities of patients, study participants, and healthcare practitioners, and decision-makers. Third: they allow the sharing of outcome measures well-suited to the goals of DII science, thereby helping to validate these outcomes in diverse contexts, improving the comparability of findings across settings, and elevating the study of the implementation process itself. PMID:26349456

  11. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brewer, Shannon; McManamay, Ryan A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A.; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-05-13

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a bettermore » understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.« less

  12. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Shannon K.; McManamay, Ryan A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A.; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.

  13. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Shannon K; McManamay, Ryan A; Miller, Andrew D; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards. PMID:27177541

  14. Advancing the science of measurement of diagnostic errors in healthcare: the Safer Dx framework

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic errors are major contributors to harmful patient outcomes, yet they remain a relatively understudied and unmeasured area of patient safety. Although they are estimated to affect about 12 million Americans each year in ambulatory care settings alone, both the conceptual and pragmatic scientific foundation for their measurement is under-developed. Health care organizations do not have the tools and strategies to measure diagnostic safety and most have not integrated diagnostic error into their existing patient safety programs. Further progress toward reducing diagnostic errors will hinge on our ability to overcome measurement-related challenges. In order to lay a robust groundwork for measurement and monitoring techniques to ensure diagnostic safety, we recently developed a multifaceted framework to advance the science of measuring diagnostic errors (The Safer Dx framework). In this paper, we describe how the framework serves as a conceptual foundation for system-wide safety measurement, monitoring and improvement of diagnostic error. The framework accounts for the complex adaptive sociotechnical system in which diagnosis takes place (the structure), the distributed process dimensions in which diagnoses evolve beyond the doctor's visit (the process) and the outcomes of a correct and timely “safe diagnosis” as well as patient and health care outcomes (the outcomes). We posit that the Safer Dx framework can be used by a variety of stakeholders including researchers, clinicians, health care organizations and policymakers, to stimulate both retrospective and more proactive measurement of diagnostic errors. The feedback and learning that would result will help develop subsequent interventions that lead to safer diagnosis, improved value of health care delivery and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25589094

  15. Reforming science education in Saudi Arabia: A conceptual framework for the design of Coordinated and Thematic science (CATS) module for grades 7--9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghanem, Ghanem S. D.

    This study was conducted to develop a conceptual framework for the design of science curricula in Saudi middle schools. The methodological procedures of this study also included the assessment of the proposed conceptual framework with science education experts in Saudi Arabia. The development phase consisted of three steps. The first step included the review of related literature. The scope of the literature review included a theoretical background about the various cultural forces which shaped the patterns of education in Saudi Arabia. It also provided an overview of the major emphases in recent reform efforts in science education in the United States as documented by AAAS and NSTA. In the second step, a conceptual framework for the design of science curricula in Saudi middle schools was presented. The development of this conceptual framework took into account the inadequacies of science education in Saudi Arabia and the major emphases of recent reforms in science education (Project 2061, SS&C) and was guided by a set of constructivist assumptions. In the final step, the researcher applied the proposed conceptual framework for the design of coordinated thematic science (CATS) modules using the theme of energy for grades 7--9. The assessment phase was accomplished by investigating the opinions of science education experts in Saudi Arabia (n = 304) for the determination of suitability and actual use of the conceptual framework for the future design of science curricula in Saudi middle schools. The subjects were asked to respond to 92 theoretical principles which could be used for science curriculum design and 43 obstacles which might oppose applying these principles. The data were analyzed utilizing descriptive statistics to investigate the opinions of subjects as well as one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to measure the degree of agreement and disagreement among them. Overall, the findings were strongly supportive of the proposed conceptual framework. It was

  16. Science Activities That Work: Perceptions of Primary School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, Ken

    2002-06-01

    Many primary school teachers in Australia tend to be reluctant to teach science, partly because they are not confident in science and have limited science background knowledge. However, quite a number of primary school teachers still manage to teach some science. When they plan to teach science, many of them use the term science activities that work. Such activities seem to be related to science pedagogical content knowledge for some primary teachers. In order to better understand what the term activities that work means, twenty teachers from several schools were interviewed and asked what they understood by this expression. Themes that emerged suggest that activities that work are hands on, are interesting and motivating for the children, have a clear outcome or result, are manageable in the classroom, use equipment that is readily available, and are preferably used in a context where science is integrated into themes. Implications for curriculum and for preservice teacher education are considered.

  17. LANSCE nuclear science facilities and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald O

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear science activities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) encompass measurements spanning the neutron energy range from thermal to 600 MeV. The neutron sources use spallation of the LANSCE 800 MeV pulsed proton beam with the time-of-flight technique to measure properties of neutron-induced reactions as a function of energy over this large energy range. Current experiments are conducted at the Lujan Center moderated neutron source, the unmoderated WNR target, and with a lead-slowing-down spectrometer. Instruments in use include the DANCE array of BaF{sub 2} scintillators for neutron capture studies, the FIGARO array of liquid scintillator neutron detectors, the GEANIE array of high-resolution HPGe x-ray and gamma-ray detectors, and a number of fission chambers, and other detectors. The LANL capabilities for production and handling of radioactive materials coupled with the neutron sources and detectors at LANSCE are enabling new and challenging measurements for a variety of applications including nuclear energy and nuclear astrophysics. An overview of recent research and examples of results is presented.

  18. Science Activity Planner for the MER Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Fox, Jason M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Powell, Mark W.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Wallick, Michael N.; Mittman, David S.

    2008-01-01

    The Maestro Science Activity Planner is a computer program that assists human users in planning operations of the Mars Explorer Rover (MER) mission and visualizing scientific data returned from the MER rovers. Relative to its predecessors, this program is more powerful and easier to use. This program is built on the Java Eclipse open-source platform around a Web-browser-based user-interface paradigm to provide an intuitive user interface to Mars rovers and landers. This program affords a combination of advanced display and simulation capabilities. For example, a map view of terrain can be generated from images acquired by the High Resolution Imaging Science Explorer instrument aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft and overlaid with images from a navigation camera (more precisely, a stereoscopic pair of cameras) aboard a rover, and an interactive, annotated rover traverse path can be incorporated into the overlay. It is also possible to construct an overhead perspective mosaic image of terrain from navigation-camera images. This program can be adapted to similar use on other outer-space missions and is potentially adaptable to numerous terrestrial applications involving analysis of data, operations of robots, and planning of such operations for acquisition of scientific data.

  19. Maharishi Vedic Science and the Upanga as a Framework for Scientific Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Park

    Maharishi Vedic Science and the Upanga provide criteria to validate complete knowledge. This dissertation investigates how well modern science satisfies these criteria. The goals are to place modern science into a completely unified framework, locate the unmanifest source of any object of knowledge in the unified field, and apply this knowledge for a completely unified experience of nature. Maharishi Vedic Science is a revival of the holistic nature of Vedic Science by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. It accomplishes this through analysis of the properties of the object and by subjective technologies to directly experience the ultimate source of the object. Modern science is an objective approach through repeated experimentation of model-derived hypotheses. Even in this objective approach, physics has developed much more refined understanding of matter than Newton's historical view of matter as separate, hard, and impenetrable. With discovery of the unified field, a standard much closer to the Upanga has been achieved in physics. But the question remains whether a strictly objective approach accounts for both objectivity and subjectivity, as in the Upanga. The most successful physical theory is "The Standard Model", but it does not completely unify fundamental forces. Advanced string and loop quantum gravity theories are progressing toward a mathematically elegant unified field theory. This progress is inexorably from concrete physical to abstract non-physical levels. But because of its objective third-person approach, physics views the unified field as extending the physical. On the other hand, the Upanga incorporate the first-person approach, and identify the unified field as also the most fundamental level of subjectivity, pure consciousness. Recent progress connects quantum field theory to information field theory, which implicitly acknowledges intelligence, meaning, and subjectivity. This field underlies matter and energy, and is underlain itself by the unified field

  20. Leaving the Classroom: A Didactic Framework for Education in Environmental Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopico, Eduardo; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2011-01-01

    In Continuous Education curricula in Spain, the programs on sciences of the environment are aimed toward understandings of sustainability. Teaching practice rarely leaves the classroom for outdoor field studies. At the same time, teaching practice is generally focused on examples of how human activities are harmful for ecosystems. From a pedagogic…

  1. Technology-Enhanced Inquiry Tools in Science Education: An Emerging Pedagogical Framework for Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minchi C.; Hannafin, Michael J.; Bryan, Lynn A.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners have attempted to identify technologies that support students' scientific understanding, activities and support practices that facilitate students' inquiry processes, and methods to sustain technology-enhanced innovations in everyday science classrooms. The purpose of this paper is to examine the findings and…

  2. Frameworks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Mary Ann, Ed.; Baer, Teddi, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Intended for writing teachers, the activities in this issue blend right/left brain lessons--kinesthetic, spatial, and playful--to provide students with prewriting experience. The activities include the following: (1) creativity olympics, such as finding criteria by which large groups of students may subdivide themselves into successively smaller…

  3. One teacher's experience interpreting and enacting a new science curriculum framework: An ethnographic case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Betsy Denton

    What experiences does a teacher have when interpreting and enacting curriculum frameworks and national and state standards? What does a teacher think about as she moves between the text of the written curriculum framework, her own particular experiences, and the context of a classroom? What are the negotiations that a teacher makes as she adopts and adapts curriculum policy for her own classroom? The purpose of this ethnographic case study was to explore these questions in the context of an eighth-grade science class as the teacher interpreted and enacted a new inquiry-based, constructivist curriculum framework. This yearlong study employed qualitative methods of data collection including open-ended interviews, classroom observations, guiding conversations (Cole & Knowles, 2001) and cogenerative dialogues and reflections (Roth & Tobin, 2005) with the teacher, and analysis of classroom artifacts. Constant comparative analysis and narrative analysis were used to analyze data and produce a narrative truth that emphasized verisimilitude or truthlike observations in order to capture one teacher's classroom experiences and advance an empathic form of understanding so the reader could experience the teacher's world. Reflections upon the teacher's story at the conclusion of this study suggest the following educational policy changes and areas of further study: (1) the need for more professional learning experiences for both preservice and practicing teachers that help them construct an understanding of the theoretical frameworks that underlie the curriculum they are enacting, (2) the need for more research, particularly qualitative case studies, describing learning communities in schools and constructivist leaders who have successfully facilitated authentic professional development, (3) the need for curriculum developers to address the pressing issue of depth vs. breadth in curriculum reform, and (4) the need for more studies that show how teachers adapt and improvise

  4. Taking the long view: an emerging framework for translational psychiatric science

    PubMed Central

    Fulford, Kenneth WM; Bortolotti, Lisa; Broome, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Understood in their historical context, current debates about psychiatric classification, prompted by the publication of the DSM-5, open up new opportunities for improved translational research in psychiatry. In this paper, we draw lessons for translational research from three time slices of 20th century psychiatry. From the first time slice, 1913 and the publication of Jaspers' General Psychopathology, the lesson is that translational research in psychiatry requires a pluralistic approach encompassing equally the sciences of mind (including the social sciences) and of brain. From the second time slice, 1959 and a conference in New York from which our present symptom-based classifications are derived, the lesson is that, while reliability remains the basis of psychiatry as an observational science, validity too is essential to effective translation. From the third time slice, 1997 and a conference on psychiatric classification in Dallas that brought together patients and carers with researchers and clinicians, the lesson is that we need to build further on collaborative models of research combining expertise-by-training with expertise-by-experience. This is important if we are to meet the specific challenges to translation presented by the complexity of the concept of mental disorder, particularly as reflected in the diversity of desired treatment outcomes. Taken together, these three lessons – a pluralistic approach, reliability and validity, and closer collaboration among relevant stakeholders – provide an emerging framework for more effective translation of research into practice in 21st century psychiatry. PMID:24890054

  5. Essential Laboratory Activities Guide. Secondary Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duval County Schools, Jacksonville, FL.

    This teacher's guide was developed for use in junior and senior high schools in Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida, for the purpose of identifying those secondary science laboratory experiences which are essential to the development of science content knowledge and competency in handling science laboratory equipment and consumables. The guide…

  6. Discovering Science through Art-Based Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberts, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Art and science are intrinsically linked; the essence of art and science is discovery. Both artists and scientists work in a systematic but creative way--knowledge and understanding are built up through pieces of art or a series of labs. In the classroom, integrating science and visual art can provide students with the latitude to think, discover,…

  7. Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    F. Perry; B. Youngs

    2000-11-06

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model (AMR) report is twofold. (1) The first is to present a conceptual framework of igneous activity in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) consistent with the volcanic and tectonic history of this region and the assessment of this history by experts who participated in the Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Analysis (PVHA) (CRWMS M&O 1996). Conceptual models presented in the PVHA are summarized and extended in areas in which new information has been presented. Alternative conceptual models are discussed as well as their impact on probability models. The relationship between volcanic source zones defined in the PVHA and structural features of the YMR are described based on discussions in the PVHA and studies presented since the PVHA. (2) The second purpose of the AMR is to present probability calculations based on PVHA outputs. Probability distributions are presented for the length and orientation of volcanic dikes within the repository footprint and for the number of eruptive centers located within the repository footprint (conditional on the dike intersecting the repository). The probability of intersection of a basaltic dike within the repository footprint was calculated in the AMR ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (CRWMS M&O 2000g) based on the repository footprint known as the Enhanced Design Alternative [EDA II, Design B (CRWMS M&O 1999a; Wilkins and Heath 1999)]. Then, the ''Site Recommendation Design Baseline'' (CRWMS M&O 2000a) initiated a change in the repository design, which is described in the ''Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Consequently, the probability of intersection of a basaltic dike within the repository footprint has also been calculated for the current repository footprint, which is called the 70,000 Metric Tons of Uranium (MTU) No-Backfill Layout (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The calculations for both footprints are presented in this AMR. In addition, the

  8. Geodesic active fields--a geometric framework for image registration.

    PubMed

    Zosso, Dominique; Bresson, Xavier; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we present a novel geometric framework called geodesic active fields for general image registration. In image registration, one looks for the underlying deformation field that best maps one image onto another. This is a classic ill-posed inverse problem, which is usually solved by adding a regularization term. Here, we propose a multiplicative coupling between the registration term and the regularization term, which turns out to be equivalent to embed the deformation field in a weighted minimal surface problem. Then, the deformation field is driven by a minimization flow toward a harmonic map corresponding to the solution of the registration problem. This proposed approach for registration shares close similarities with the well-known geodesic active contours model in image segmentation, where the segmentation term (the edge detector function) is coupled with the regularization term (the length functional) via multiplication as well. As a matter of fact, our proposed geometric model is actually the exact mathematical generalization to vector fields of the weighted length problem for curves and surfaces introduced by Caselles-Kimmel-Sapiro. The energy of the deformation field is measured with the Polyakov energy weighted by a suitable image distance, borrowed from standard registration models. We investigate three different weighting functions, the squared error and the approximated absolute error for monomodal images, and the local joint entropy for multimodal images. As compared to specialized state-of-the-art methods tailored for specific applications, our geometric framework involves important contributions. Firstly, our general formulation for registration works on any parametrizable, smooth and differentiable surface, including nonflat and multiscale images. In the latter case, multiscale images are registered at all scales simultaneously, and the relations between space and scale are intrinsically being accounted for. Second, this method is, to

  9. A framework for integrating and synthesizing data to ask and answer science questions in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, S.

    2014-12-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) published a science strategy that resulted in an organizational pivot toward more focused attention on societal challenges and our ability to predict changes and study mitigation and resilience. The strategy described a number of global dynamics including climate and resource-related critical zone (CZ) impacts and emphasized the need for data integration as a significant underpinning for all of the science questions raised in the report. Organizational changes that came about as a result of the science strategy sparked a new entity called Core Science Systems, which has set as its mission the creation of a Modular Science Framework designed to seamlessly organize and integrate all data, information, and knowledge from the CZ. A part of this grand challenge is directly within the purview of the USGS mission and our science programs, while the data integration framework itself is part of a much larger global scientific cyberinfrastructure. This talk describes current research and development in pursuit of the USGS Modular Science Framework and how the work is being conducted in the context of the broader earth system sciences. Communities of practice under the banner of the Earth Science Information Partners are fostering working relationships vital to cohesion and interoperability between contributing institutions. The National Science Foundation's EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for the 21st Century initiatives are providing some of the necessary building blocks through foundational informatics and data science research. The U.S. Group on Earth Observations is providing leadership and coordination across agencies who operate earth observation systems. The White House Big Data Initiative is providing long term research and development vision to set the stage for sustainable, long term infrastructure across government data agencies. The end result will be a major building block of CZ science.

  10. Family Science Activities for Adult Basic and Literacy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Action Southwest, Waynesburg, PA.

    A staff development project created a series of family science activities to be used in adult basic and literacy education (ABLE) and family literacy programs and a training guide for staff and volunteers. The training guide provides background principles and concepts for science activities. The activities identify materials and indicate ways the…

  11. The Discourse of Design-Based Science Classroom Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Flávio S.; Martalock, Peggy L.; Keser, Tugba

    2015-01-01

    This paper is an initial contribution to a general theory in which science classroom "activity types" and epistemological "discourse practices" are systematically linked. The idea is that activities and discourse are reflexively related, so that different types of science classroom activities (e.g., scientific argumentation,…

  12. Energy and Change. Elementary Science Activity Series, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Frank F.

    This book is number 3 of a series of elementary science books that presents a wealth of ideas for science activities for the elementary school teacher. Each activity includes a standard set of information designed to help teachers determine the activity's appropriateness for their students, plan its implementation, and help children focus on a…

  13. Accommodating Students with Disabilities in Soil Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley-Turnbaugh, S. J.; Murphy, Kate; Levin, E.

    2004-01-01

    Soil science education is lacking in terms of accommodations for persons with disabilities. Individuals with disabilities are often excluded from soil science activities in school, and from soil science careers. GLOBE (Global Learning Observations to Benefit the Environment) is a worldwide, hands-on primary and secondary school-based education and…

  14. Family Science Night: Fun Tips, Activities, and Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Shelley S.

    2013-01-01

    At last! A practical, readable guide for teachers, school leaders, and parent/teacher associations that shows how to plan fun, hands-on science nights! Get easy-to-implement, content-rich tips and ideas that will cultivate positive attitudes toward science! Learn how to involve and actively engage families in their children's science education.…

  15. Leaving the classroom: a didactic framework for education in environmental sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopico, Eduardo; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2011-06-01

    In Continuous Education curricula in Spain, the programs on sciences of the environment are aimed toward understandings of sustainability. Teaching practice rarely leaves the classroom for outdoor field studies. At the same time, teaching practice is generally focused on examples of how human activities are harmful for ecosystems. From a pedagogic point of view, it is less effective to teach environmental science with negative examples such as catastrophe, tragedy, and crisis. Rather, teaching environmental sciences and sustainable development might be focused on positive human-environment relationships, which is both important for the further development of students and educators. Within rural settings, there are many such examples of positive relationships that can be emphasized and integrated into the curriculum. In this article, we propose teaching environmental sciences through immersion in rural cultural life. We discuss how fieldwork serves as a learning methodology. When students are engaged through research with traditional cultural practices of environmental management, which is a part of the real and traditional culture of a region, they better understand how positive pedagogy instead of pedagogy structured around how not-to-do examples, can be used to stimulate the interactions between humans and the environment with their students. In this way, cultural goods serve as teaching resources in science and environmental education. What we present is authentic cases where adults involved in a course of Continuous Education explore `environmentally-friendly' practices of traditional agriculture in Asturias (north of Spain), employing methodologies of cultural studies.

  16. Science Teaching and Learning Activities and Students' Engagement in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Bennett, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the variation in students' reports of engagement in science across science teaching and learning activities. In addition, this study examines student and school characteristics that may be associated with students' levels of engagement in science. Data are drawn from the Programme for…

  17. Teachers' Willingness to Adopt Nature of Science Activities Following a Physical Science Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Lisa A.; Argyle, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The major science education reform documents emphasize the need for K-12 students to have a robust understanding of nature of science (NOS), and inservice teachers consequently need to develop their NOS teaching repertoires. This study investigated the extent to which science teachers were willing to adopt new strategies and activities for…

  18. Promoting the public's interest in meteor science and meteoritics in the framework of the Windows to Science project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    Researchers working in Astronomical and Space Sciences can also play a very important role in education and outreach activities because of the interest of the public in these areas. Besides, direct interaction of the public with the researcher is desirable, as this gives the opportunity to get precise, detailed and interesting information from the main source of scientific data about projects that are currently being developed. With this aim, several initiatives have been developed in order to give access to the public to some of the research projects related to meteor and meteoritic science that are being developed at the University of Huelva, in Spain. These projects are related to the analysis of the flux of meteoroids impacting the Earth and the Moon, the determination of the parent bodies of these particles of interplanetary matter and the analysis of their chemical composition. When these particles survive their violent atmospheric entry and reach the ground they can be recovered as meteorites. Thus, these rocks are unique samples coming from different bodies that provide important keys related to the origin and evolution of the Solar System. One of these initiatives has been developed within the Windows to Science project.

  19. A Framework for Improving the Quality of Research in the Biological Sciences.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Ellis, Lee M; Davies, Erika W; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium to discuss problems in the biological sciences, with emphasis on identifying mechanisms to improve the quality of research. Participants from various disciplines made six recommendations: (i) design rigorous and comprehensive evaluation criteria to recognize and reward high-quality scientific research; (ii) require universal training in good scientific practices, appropriate statistical usage, and responsible research practices for scientists at all levels, with training content regularly updated and presented by qualified scientists; (iii) establish open data at the timing of publication as the standard operating procedure throughout the scientific enterprise; (iv) encourage scientific journals to publish negative data that meet methodologic standards of quality; (v) agree upon common criteria among scientific journals for retraction of published papers, to provide consistency and transparency; and (vi) strengthen research integrity oversight and training. These recommendations constitute an actionable framework that, in combination, could improve the quality of biological research. PMID:27578756

  20. A Framework for Improving the Quality of Research in the Biological Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Lee M.; Davies, Erika W.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Fang, Ferric C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium to discuss problems in the biological sciences, with emphasis on identifying mechanisms to improve the quality of research. Participants from various disciplines made six recommendations: (i) design rigorous and comprehensive evaluation criteria to recognize and reward high-quality scientific research; (ii) require universal training in good scientific practices, appropriate statistical usage, and responsible research practices for scientists at all levels, with training content regularly updated and presented by qualified scientists; (iii) establish open data at the timing of publication as the standard operating procedure throughout the scientific enterprise; (iv) encourage scientific journals to publish negative data that meet methodologic standards of quality; (v) agree upon common criteria among scientific journals for retraction of published papers, to provide consistency and transparency; and (vi) strengthen research integrity oversight and training. These recommendations constitute an actionable framework that, in combination, could improve the quality of biological research. PMID:27578756

  1. A mathematical framework for multiscale science and engineering : the variational multiscale method and interscale transfer operators.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Gregory John; Collis, Samuel Scott; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Parks, Michael L.; Jones, Reese E.; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Scovazzi, Guglielmo; Bochev, Pavel B.

    2007-10-01

    This report is a collection of documents written as part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project A Mathematical Framework for Multiscale Science and Engineering: The Variational Multiscale Method and Interscale Transfer Operators. We present developments in two categories of multiscale mathematics and analysis. The first, continuum-to-continuum (CtC) multiscale, includes problems that allow application of the same continuum model at all scales with the primary barrier to simulation being computing resources. The second, atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) multiscale, represents applications where detailed physics at the atomistic or molecular level must be simulated to resolve the small scales, but the effect on and coupling to the continuum level is frequently unclear.

  2. Living science: Science as an activity of living beings.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Bruce J

    2015-12-01

    The philosophy of science should accommodate itself to the facts of human existence, using all aspects of human experience to adapt more effectively, as individuals, species, and global ecosystem. This has several implications: (1) Our nature as sentient beings interacting with other sentient beings requires the use of phenomenological methods to investigate consciousness. (2) Our embodied, situated, purposeful physical interactions with the world are the foundation of scientific understanding. (3) Aristotle's four causes are essential for understanding living systems and, in particular, the final cause aids understanding the role of humankind, and especially science, in the global ecosystem. (4) In order to fulfill this role well, scientists need to employ the full panoply of human faculties. These include the consciousness faculties (thinking, sensation, feeling, intuition), and therefore, as advocated by many famous scientists, we should cultivate our aesthetic sense, emotions, imagination, and intuition. Our unconscious faculties include archetypal structures common to all humans, which can guide scientific discovery. By striving to engage the whole of human nature, science will fulfill better its function for humans and the global ecosystem. PMID:26276467

  3. Application of the International Life Sciences Institute Key Events Dose-Response Framework to food contaminants.

    PubMed

    Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A

    2012-12-01

    Contaminants are undesirable constituents in food. They may be formed during production of a processed food, present as a component in a source material, deliberately added to substitute for the proper substance, or the consequence of poor food-handling practices. Contaminants may be chemicals or pathogens. Chemicals generally degrade over time and become of less concern as a health threat. Pathogens have the ability to multiply, potentially resulting in an increased threat level. Formal structures have been lacking for systematically generating and evaluating hazard and exposure data for bioactive agents when problem situations arise. We need to know what the potential risk may be to determine whether intervention to reduce or eliminate contact with the contaminant is warranted. We need tools to aid us in assembling and assessing all available relevant information in an expeditious and scientifically sound manner. One such tool is the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF). Developed as an extension of the WHO's International Program on Chemical Safety/ILSI mode of action/human relevance framework, it allows risk assessors to understand not only how a contaminant exerts its toxicity but also the dose response(s) for each key event and the ultimate outcome, including whether a threshold exists. This presentation will illustrate use of the KEDRF with case studies included in its development (chloroform and Listeriaonocytogenes) after its publication in the peer-reviewed scientific literature (chromium VI) and in a work in progress (3-monochloro-1, 2-propanediol). PMID:23077190

  4. The artful mind meets art history: toward a psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation.

    PubMed

    Bullot, Nicolas J; Reber, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the psychological approach, we introduce a psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation. This framework demonstrates that a science of art appreciation must investigate how appreciators process causal and historical information to classify and explain their psychological responses to art. Expanding on research about the cognition of artifacts, we identify three modes of appreciation: basic exposure to an artwork, the artistic design stance, and artistic understanding. The artistic design stance, a requisite for artistic understanding, is an attitude whereby appreciators develop their sensitivity to art-historical contexts by means of inquiries into the making, authorship, and functions of artworks. We defend and illustrate the psycho-historical framework with an analysis of existing studies on art appreciation in empirical aesthetics. Finally, we argue that the fluency theory of aesthetic pleasure can be amended to meet the requirements of the framework. We conclude that scientists can tackle fundamental questions about the nature and appreciation of art within the psycho-historical framework. PMID:23507091

  5. Completing the Link between Exposure Science and Toxicology for Improved Environmental Health Decision Making: The Aggregate Exposure Pathway Framework.

    PubMed

    Teeguarden, Justin G; Tan, Yu-Mei; Edwards, Stephen W; Leonard, Jeremy A; Anderson, Kim A; Corley, Richard A; Kile, Molly L; Simonich, Staci M; Stone, David; Tanguay, Robert L; Waters, Katrina M; Harper, Stacey L; Williams, David E

    2016-05-01

    Driven by major scientific advances in analytical methods, biomonitoring, computation, and a newly articulated vision for a greater impact in public health, the field of exposure science is undergoing a rapid transition from a field of observation to a field of prediction. Deployment of an organizational and predictive framework for exposure science analogous to the "systems approaches" used in the biological sciences is a necessary step in this evolution. Here we propose the aggregate exposure pathway (AEP) concept as the natural and complementary companion in the exposure sciences to the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept in the toxicological sciences. Aggregate exposure pathways offer an intuitive framework to organize exposure data within individual units of prediction common to the field, setting the stage for exposure forecasting. Looking farther ahead, we envision direct linkages between aggregate exposure pathways and adverse outcome pathways, completing the source to outcome continuum for more meaningful integration of exposure assessment and hazard identification. Together, the two frameworks form and inform a decision-making framework with the flexibility for risk-based, hazard-based, or exposure-based decision making. PMID:26759916

  6. Completing the link between exposure science and toxicology for improved environmental health decision making: The aggregate exposure pathway framework

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Tan, Yu -Mei; Edwards, Stephen W.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Anderson, Kim A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kile, Molly L.; Simonich, Staci M.; Stone, David; Tanguay, Robert L.; et al

    2016-01-13

    Here, driven by major scientific advances in analytical methods, biomonitoring, computation, and a newly articulated vision for a greater impact in public health, the field of exposure science is undergoing a rapid transition from a field of observation to a field of prediction. Deployment of an organizational and predictive framework for exposure science analogous to the “systems approaches” used in the biological sciences is a necessary step in this evolution. Here we propose the aggregate exposure pathway (AEP) concept as the natural and complementary companion in the exposure sciences to the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept in the toxicological sciences.more » Aggregate exposure pathways offer an intuitive framework to organize exposure data within individual units of prediction common to the field, setting the stage for exposure forecasting. Looking farther ahead, we envision direct linkages between aggregate exposure pathways and adverse outcome pathways, completing the source to outcome continuum for more meaningful integration of exposure assessment and hazard identification. Together, the two frameworks form and inform a decision-making framework with the flexibility for risk-based, hazard-based, or exposure-based decision making.« less

  7. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE): A Python Framework for Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Agram, P. S.; Sacco, G. F.; Lavalle, M.

    2015-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE, funded by NASA ESTO) provides a modern computing framework for geodetic image processing of InSAR data from a diverse array of radar satellites and aircraft. ISCE is both a modular, flexible, and extensible framework for building software components and applications as well as a toolbox of applications for processing raw or focused InSAR and Polarimetric InSAR data. The ISCE framework contains object-oriented Python components layered to construct Python InSAR components that manage legacy Fortran/C InSAR programs. Components are independently configurable in a layered manner to provide maximum control. Polymorphism is used to define a workflow in terms of abstract facilities for each processing step that are realized by specific components at run-time. This enables a single workflow to work on either raw or focused data from all sensors. ISCE can serve as the core of a production center to process Level-0 radar data to Level-3 products, but is amenable to interactive processing approaches that allow scientists to experiment with data to explore new ways of doing science with InSAR data. The NASA-ISRO SAR (NISAR) Mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystems. ISCE is planned as the foundational element in processing NISAR data, enabling a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data. NISAR will be but one mission in a constellation of radar satellites in the future delivering such data. ISCE currently supports all publicly available strip map mode space-borne SAR data since ERS and is expected to include support for upcoming missions. ISCE has been incorporated into two prototype cloud-based systems that have demonstrated its elasticity in addressing larger data processing problems in a "production" context and its ability to be

  8. A Framework for Evaluation of Climate Science Professional Development Projects: A NICE NASA Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comfort, K.; Bleicher, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose of Presentation This research presents the overall logic model for the evaluation plan for a three-year NASA-funded project focused on teacher professional development. This session will highlight how we are using data to continually revise the evaluation plan, and we will also share insights about communication between the external evaluator and the PI. Objectives and Research Questions PEL leverages three NASA NICE projects with a high school district, providing professional development for teachers, learning opportunities for students, parental involvement and interaction with NASA scientists. PEL aims to increase Climate Science literacy in high school students, with a focus on Hispanic students, through scientific argumentation using authentic NASA data. Our research will concentrate on investigating the following questions: 1. What do we know about the alternative conceptions students' hold about climate science and what is challenging for students? 2. Are students developing climate science literacy, especially in the difficult concept areas, after PEL implementation? 3. How effective is PEL in nurturing scientific argumentation skills? 4. How effective are the resources we are providing in PEL? 5. Is there evidence that teachers are establishing stronger leadership capacity in their schools? Theoretical Framework for PEL Evaluation The expectancy-value theory of achievement motivation (E-V-C) (Fan, 2011; Wigfield & Eccles, 1994) provides a theoretical foundation for the research. Expectancy is the degree to which a teacher or student has reason to expect that they will be successful in school. Value indicates whether they think that performance at school will be worthwhile to them. Cost is the perceived sacrifices that must be undertaken, or factors that can inhibit a successful performance at school. For students, data from an embedded E-V-C investigation will help articulate how E-V-C factors relate to student interest in science, continuing to

  9. Current Activity of the U.S. ASTER Science Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Abrams, M. J.; Hook, S. J.; Pieri, D. C.; Ramsey, M.; Rowan, L. C.; Schmugge, T.; Wessels, R.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. ASTER Science Team is currently engaged in numerous ASTER related activities, many of them jointly with our Japanese colleagues. These include vicarious instrument calibration, algorithm development and validation for higher level data products, assistance to ERSDAC for scheduling activities (primarily for U.S. users), assistance to data users other than Science Team members, and science applications of ASTER data, notably in the areas of glacial monitoring, volcanic monitoring, heat balance determinations, geologic mapping, and cloud studies.

  10. Advancing a distributed multi-scale computing framework for large-scale high-throughput discovery in materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knap, J.; Spear, C. E.; Borodin, O.; Leiter, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the development of a large-scale high-throughput application for discovery in materials science. Our point of departure is a computational framework for distributed multi-scale computation. We augment the original framework with a specialized module whose role is to route evaluation requests needed by the high-throughput application to a collection of available computational resources. We evaluate the feasibility and performance of the resulting high-throughput computational framework by carrying out a high-throughput study of battery solvents. Our results indicate that distributed multi-scale computing, by virtue of its adaptive nature, is particularly well-suited for building high-throughput applications.

  11. Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    F. Perry; R. Youngs

    2004-10-14

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is threefold: (1) Present a conceptual framework of igneous activity in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) consistent with the volcanic and tectonic history of this region and the assessment of this history by experts who participated in the probabilistic volcanic hazard analysis (PVHA) (CRWMS M&O 1996 [DIRS 100116]). Conceptual models presented in the PVHA are summarized and applied in areas in which new information has been presented. Alternative conceptual models are discussed, as well as their impact on probability models. The relationship between volcanic source zones defined in the PVHA and structural features of the YMR are described based on discussions in the PVHA and studies presented since the PVHA. (2) Present revised probability calculations based on PVHA outputs for a repository footprint proposed in 2003 (BSC 2003 [DIRS 162289]), rather than the footprint used at the time of the PVHA. This analysis report also calculates the probability of an eruptive center(s) forming within the repository footprint using information developed in the PVHA. Probability distributions are presented for the length and orientation of volcanic dikes located within the repository footprint and for the number of eruptive centers (conditional on a dike intersecting the repository) located within the repository footprint. (3) Document sensitivity studies that analyze how the presence of potentially buried basaltic volcanoes may affect the computed frequency of intersection of the repository footprint by a basaltic dike. These sensitivity studies are prompted by aeromagnetic data collected in 1999, indicating the possible presence of previously unrecognized buried volcanoes in the YMR (Blakely et al. 2000 [DIRS 151881]; O'Leary et al. 2002 [DIRS 158468]). The results of the sensitivity studies are for informational purposes only and are not to be used for purposes of assessing repository performance.

  12. The Pleasures and the Pitfalls of Plant Science Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Classroom plant activities have long been inexpensive, easy to do, and fun for students, and have become more central to biology teaching. Introduces some plant science activities and their pleasures and pitfalls. (ASK)

  13. Sciencing with Mother Goose: Observation Activities with Chicken Little.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Carolyn

    1996-01-01

    Provides sample observation activities to accompany the nursery tale of Chicken Little. Includes five activities that involve the skills of observing, communicating, comparing, ordering, and categorizing to engage students in hands-on science. (DDR)

  14. Career Activities in Science: Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleep, Gerald; And Others

    The curriculum guide attempts to assemble select activities that represent skills related to careers in science. These learning activities are designed to give junior and senior high school students opportunities to explore concepts and processes in many science-related careers. The broad areas covered are biology, chemistry, physics, and earth…

  15. Agricultural Education Science Activity--Nos. AS 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Curriculum Materials Service.

    This packet contains four science learning activities on the subject of animal science that can be used in agricultural education courses. The activities cover these topics: (1) identifying internal parasites in domestic livestock; (2) the effect of feed preparation on feed palatability and consumption; (3) determining the absorption abilities of…

  16. Engineering Design Activities and Conceptual Change in Middle School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnittka, Christine G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the impact of engineering design classroom activities on conceptual change in science, and on attitudes toward and knowledge about engineering. Students were given a situated learning context and a rationale for learning science in an active, inquiry-based method, and worked in small collaborative…

  17. Hands-On Environmental Science Activities. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutscher, Eugene

    The ability of students to go beyond facts and to think critically, while at the same time enjoying and valuing the learning process, is fundamental to science and environmentalism. This book provides enrichment activities for the science curriculum that provide concrete connections with important world events. Each activity is self-contained and…

  18. A general science-based framework for dynamical spatio-temporal models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wikle, C.K.; Hooten, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Spatio-temporal statistical models are increasingly being used across a wide variety of scientific disciplines to describe and predict spatially-explicit processes that evolve over time. Correspondingly, in recent years there has been a significant amount of research on new statistical methodology for such models. Although descriptive models that approach the problem from the second-order (covariance) perspective are important, and innovative work is being done in this regard, many real-world processes are dynamic, and it can be more efficient in some cases to characterize the associated spatio-temporal dependence by the use of dynamical models. The chief challenge with the specification of such dynamical models has been related to the curse of dimensionality. Even in fairly simple linear, first-order Markovian, Gaussian error settings, statistical models are often over parameterized. Hierarchical models have proven invaluable in their ability to deal to some extent with this issue by allowing dependency among groups of parameters. In addition, this framework has allowed for the specification of science based parameterizations (and associated prior distributions) in which classes of deterministic dynamical models (e. g., partial differential equations (PDEs), integro-difference equations (IDEs), matrix models, and agent-based models) are used to guide specific parameterizations. Most of the focus for the application of such models in statistics has been in the linear case. The problems mentioned above with linear dynamic models are compounded in the case of nonlinear models. In this sense, the need for coherent and sensible model parameterizations is not only helpful, it is essential. Here, we present an overview of a framework for incorporating scientific information to motivate dynamical spatio-temporal models. First, we illustrate the methodology with the linear case. We then develop a general nonlinear spatio-temporal framework that we call general quadratic

  19. Hard-To-Teach Science Concepts: A Framework to Support Learners, Grades 3-5. Hard-to-Teach Science Concepts Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koba, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    Authors Susan Koba and Carol Mitchell introduce teachers of grades 3-5 to their conceptual framework for successful instruction of hard-to-teach science concepts. Their methodology comprises four steps: (1) engage students about their preconceptions and address their thinking; (2) target lessons to be learned; (3) determine appropriate strategies;…

  20. The National Association of Geology Teachers Earth Science Activities Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Victor J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes activities in the "Earth Science Activities" book (available from the author). Activities range from simple to complex, with detailed instructions/information for the teacher to conduct the activity as is or with modification to meet individual class/student needs. Includes sample activity: "Ashfall in Washington-Courtesy of Mount St.…

  1. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader’s theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor’s specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences. PMID:23494568

  2. Still More Science Activities. 20 Exciting Activities To Do!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.

    Science and technology affect every facet of human life. By the 21st century, society will demand that all of its citizens possess basic competencies in the fundamentals of science and the use of technology. As science increasingly becomes the dominant subject of the work place, it is important to begin developing within children an understanding…

  3. Development of a transferable student engagement and knowledge retention framework for the earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsole, Sunay Vasant

    The earth sciences play an important role in engaging students in science and in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines, because of the integrative nature of the disciplines. It then becomes important for us to provide an engaging experience for students taking earth science courses, because it serves a dual purpose of possibly increasing new majors in the discipline and helping to create a science literate population. Given that a majority of students in the larger introductory courses are non-majors, it behooves us to explore alternative engagement techniques and measure their efficacy in student engagement, which in turn can help inform instructional design for advanced geoscience courses. This study focused on creating a highly engaging course using inquiry based learning scenarios inter-spread throughout the semester along with heuristic quizzes (a series of questions in a specific sequence that map to a process) with very specific feedback that help students understand the development of the earth processes. Along with the heuristic quizzes, the course was transformed into an active learning based hybrid course, where the didactic content was uploaded and made available to the students using a learning management system and class time was spent working on application exercises that were developed by me. I chose specific scenarios and processes that the students could possibly encounter in the greater El Paso region to provide a local and situational aspect to the exercises. The course and instructional design process followed a period of 18 months with each semester providing data to jigsaw into the final design. Student performance data, both qualitative (self efficacy, self reported engagement ) as well as quantitative scales (performance on assessments, course grades) was collected over the entire development period. Comparative data of the hybrid course and a traditional course indicate improved student performance in the

  4. A Programme-Wide Training Framework to Facilitate Scientific Communication Skills Development amongst Biological Sciences Masters Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Divan, Aysha; Mason, Sam

    2016-01-01

    In this article we describe the effectiveness of a programme-wide communication skills training framework incorporated within a one-year biological sciences taught Masters course designed to enhance the competency of students in communicating scientific research principally to a scientific audience. In one class we analysed the numerical marks…

  5. World History and Geography: Ancient Civilizations. Course Models for the History-Social Science Framework: Grade 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Ralph, Ed.; Brooks, Diane

    This document outlines ancient civilization teaching models for California sixth graders. It is another response to teachers' requests for practical assistance in implementing the "History-Social Science Framework." Units include: (1) Early Humankind and the Development of Human Societies; (2) The Beginnings of Civilization in the Near East and…

  6. The Knowledge-Learning-Instruction Framework: Bridging the Science-Practice Chasm to Enhance Robust Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; Corbett, Albert T.; Perfetti, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Despite the accumulation of substantial cognitive science research relevant to education, there remains confusion and controversy in the application of research to educational practice. In support of a more systematic approach, we describe the Knowledge-Learning-Instruction (KLI) framework. KLI promotes the emergence of instructional principles of…

  7. United States History and Geography: Making a New Nation. Course Models for the History-Social Science Framework. Grade 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This publication is a response to teachers' requests for practical assistance in implementing the history and social science framework for California's public schools. The document sets out resources that are useful in teaching U.S. history and geography for fifth grade students. Participants in a summer institute worked in grade level groups to…

  8. An Integrative Framework for the Analysis of Multiple and Multimodal Representations for Meaning-Making in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Kok-Sing; Delgado, Cesar; Moje, Elizabeth Birr

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an integrative framework for analyzing science meaning-making with representations. It integrates the research on multiple representations and multimodal representations by identifying and leveraging the differences in their units of analysis in two dimensions: timescale and compositional grain size. Timescale considers the…

  9. Analysis of Physical Science Textbooks for Conceptual Frameworks on Acids, Bases and Neutralization: Implications for Students' Conceptual Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erduran, Sibel

    Eight physical science textbooks were analyzed for coverage on acids, bases, and neutralization. At the level of the text, clarity and coherence of statements were investigated. The conceptual framework for this topic was represented in a concept map which was used as a coding tool for tracing concepts and links present in textbooks. Cognitive…

  10. Studying Activities That Take Place in Speech Interactions: A Theoretical and Methodological Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Dizier de Almeida, Valérie; Colletta, Jean-Marc; Auriac-Slusarczyk, Emmanuelle; Specogna, Antonietta; Simon, Jean-Pascal; Fiema, Gabriela; Luxembourger, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a theoretical and methodological framework based on a pluralistic, concerted approach to the study of activities that take place in and through speech interactions. The framework has a general scope, applying to any collective activity taking form through language interactions. It contributes to a fuller understanding of the…

  11. Completing the Link between Exposure Science and Toxicology for Improved Environmental Health Decision Making: The Aggregate Exposure Pathway Framework

    PubMed Central

    Teeguarden, Justin. G.; Tan, Yu-Mei; Edwards, Stephen W.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Anderson, Kim A.; Corley, Richard A.; Harding, Anna K; Kile, Molly L.; Simonich, Staci M; Stone, David; Tanguay, Robert L.; Waters, Katrina M.; Harper, Stacey L.; Williams, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Driven by major scientific advances in analytical methods, biomonitoring, computational tools, and a newly articulated vision for a greater impact in public health, the field of exposure science is undergoing a rapid transition from a field of observation to a field of prediction. Deployment of an organizational and predictive framework for exposure science analogous to the “systems approaches” used in the biological sciences is a necessary step in this evolution. Here we propose the Aggregate Exposure Pathway (AEP) concept as the natural and complementary companion in the exposure sciences to the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) concept in the toxicological sciences. Aggregate exposure pathways offer an intuitive framework to organize exposure data within individual units of prediction common to the field, setting the stage for exposure forecasting. Looking farther ahead, we envision direct linkages between aggregate exposure pathways and adverse outcome pathways, completing the source to outcome continuum for more efficient integration of exposure assessment and hazard identification. Together, the two pathways form and inform a decision-making framework with the flexibility for risk-based, hazard-based, or exposure-based decision making. PMID:26759916

  12. Integrating Science and Technology: Using Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge as a Framework to Study the Practices of Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, Rose M.; Dawson, Kara; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined how teachers involved in a yearlong technology integration initiative planned to enact technological, pedagogical, and content practices in science lessons. These science teachers, engaged in an initiative to integrate educational technology in inquiry-based science lessons, provided a total of 525 lesson plans for this…

  13. Technical activities 1980: Center for Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtman, J. B., Jr.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1980-10-01

    Part of the National Measurement Laboratory, one of the principal laboratories comprising the National Bureau of Standards, the Materials Science Center is organized in six divisions, each having responsibility in different areas of materials science appropriate to the major classes of materials metals, polymers, and ceramics and glass. These Divisions vary in their balance between theory and experiments, between direct standards work and research, and in their orientation toward industrial and Government needs and the needs of other components of the scientific and technical community. Achievements reported relate to signal processing and imaging; fracture theory; conformational changes in polymers; chemical stability and corrosion; fracture deformation; polymer science and standards; metallurgy and alloys; ceramics, glass, and solid state; and reactor radiation.

  14. Energy Storage. Teachers Guide. Science Activities in Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Mary Lynn, Ed.

    Included in this science activities energy package for students in grades 4-10 are 12 activities related to energy storage. Each activity is outlined on the front and back of a single sheet and is introduced by a key question. Most of the activities can be completed in the classroom with materials readily available in any community. Among the…

  15. Computer Science and Telecommunications Board summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.

    1992-03-27

    The Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) considers technical and policy issues pertaining to computer science, telecommunications, and associated technologies. CSTB actively disseminates the results of its completed projects to those in a position to help implement their recommendations or otherwise use their insights. It provides a forum for the exchange of information on computer science, computing technology, and telecommunications. This report discusses the major accomplishments of CSTB.

  16. The Effect of Physical Activity on Science Competence and Attitude towards Science Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkenborg, Ann Maria

    This study examines the effect of physical activity on science instruction. To combat the implications of physical inactivity, schools need to be willing to consider all possible opportunities for students to engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Integrating physical activity with traditional classroom content is one instructional method to consider. Researchers have typically focused on integration with English/language arts (ELA) and mathematics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of physical activity on science competence and attitude towards science. Fifty-three third grade children participated in this investigation; one group received science instruction with a physical activity intervention while the other group received traditional science instruction. Participants in both groups completed a modified version of What I Really Think of Science attitude scale (Pell & Jarvis, 2001) and a physical science test of competence prior to and following the intervention. Children were videotaped during science instruction and their movement coded to measure the proportion of time spent in MVPA. Results revealed that children in the intervention group demonstrated greater MVPA during the instructional period. A moderate to large effect size (partial eta squared = .091) was seen in the intervention group science competence post-test indicating greater understanding of force, motion, work, and simple machines concepts than that of the control group who were less physically active. There was no statistically significant attitude difference between the intervention and control groups post-test, (F(1,51) = .375, p = .543). These results provide evidence that integration can effectively present physical science content and have a positive impact on the number of minutes of health-enhancing physical activity in a school day.

  17. Health science education: reviewing a framework for problem-based learning.

    PubMed

    McCarlie, V Wallace; Orr, Daniel L

    2010-05-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) has become one pedagogical approach to gain currency in recent decades, its foundational underpinnings have remained obscure. This investigation seeks to elucidate the theoretical framework or assumptions upon which PBL operates. We have situated core PBL principles in the larger context of health science education, which underwent dramatic changes at the beginning of the twentieth century. The fundamental problem at that time in dental education was moving beyond a lecture-based and apprentice curriculum (students memorizing facts) to a critical thinking-based curriculum. We trace these developments and especially the principles that one thinker, who does not easily fit into any one school of thought, used to frame the problem. We found that the principles underlying the idea of PBL have existed for over a century in varying academic alleys outside of dentistry (including constructivist thought). Despite our technological advances, many of the core challenges of a century ago remain challenges today. Although PBL is certainly not the only way to provide dental students an opportunity to best develop critical thinking, it nevertheless provides an environment in which the learning process may be enhanced. PMID:20442425

  18. Progress toward a Semantic eScience Framework; building on advanced cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinness, D. L.; Fox, P. A.; West, P.; Rozell, E.; Zednik, S.; Chang, C.

    2010-12-01

    The configurable and extensible semantic eScience framework (SESF) has begun development and implementation of several semantic application components. Extensions and improvements to several ontologies have been made based on distinct interdisciplinary use cases ranging from solar physics, to biologicl and chemical oceanography. Importantly, these semantic representations mediate access to a diverse set of existing and emerging cyberinfrastructure. Among the advances are the population of triple stores with web accessible query services. A triple store is akin to a relational data store where the basic stored unit is a subject-predicate-object tuple. Access via a query is provided by the W3 Recommendation language specification SPARQL. Upon this middle tier of semantic cyberinfrastructure, we have developed several forms of semantic faceted search, including provenance-awareness. We report on the rapid advances in semantic technologies and tools and how we are sustaining the software path for the required technical advances as well as the ontology improvements and increased functionality of the semantic applications including how they are integrated into web-based portals (e.g. Drupal) and web services. Lastly, we indicate future work direction and opportunities for collaboration.

  19. Applying organizational science to health care: a framework for collaborative practice.

    PubMed

    Dow, Alan W; DiazGranados, Deborah; Mazmanian, Paul E; Retchin, Sheldon M

    2013-07-01

    Developing interprofessional education (IPE) curricula that improve collaborative practice across professions has proven challenging. A theoretical basis for understanding collaborative practice in health care settings is needed to guide the education and evaluation of health professions trainees and practitioners and support the team-based delivery of care. IPE should incorporate theory-driven, evidence-based methods and build competency toward effective collaboration.In this article, the authors review several concepts from the organizational science literature and propose using these as a framework for understanding how health care teams function. Specifically, they outline the team process model of action and planning phases in collaborative work; discuss leadership and followership, including how locus (a leader's integration into a team's usual work) and formality (a leader's responsibility conferred by the traditional hierarchy) affect team functions; and describe dynamic delegation, an approach to conceptualizing escalation and delegation within health care teams. For each concept, they identify competencies for knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors to aid in the development of innovative curricula to improve collaborative practice. They suggest that gaining an understanding of these principles will prepare health care trainees, whether team leaders or members, to analyze team performance, adapt behaviors that improve collaboration, and create team-based health care delivery processes that lead to improved clinical outcomes. PMID:23702530

  20. NASA's Earth Science Gateway within the GEOSS Architecture Framework and in Support of Distributed Global Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameh, N.; Cole, M.; Bambacus, M.; Thomas, R.

    2007-12-01

    Progress continues within the arena of interoperability towards greater discovery, access, and use of scientific data regarding improved societal benefit and decision solutions. The Group on Earth Observation System of Systems has developed multiple pilot projects in which many of these maturing and emerging technologies are being interconnected, tested, and implemented as operational systems. Within this network of components are data stores, registries, catalogs, portals, models, work-process flows, satellites, UAVs, and many more components. The pilots tackle the intricate process of ensuring these components properly work together within the framework of open-standards based interoperability, and enabling the vision of a distributed, comprehensible, global system of scientific tools and data for the lay-person as well as the researcher. This paper will concentrate on the NASA Earth Science Gateway (http://esg.gsfc.nasa.gov) view of interconnections to the registries, catalogs, models, and so on, that support this System of Systems. This paper covers what standards were used, how components can be connected and tested, where difficulties emerged, where we have seen return on investment, and how this level of interoperability is progressing.

  1. Applying Organizational Science to Health Care: A Framework for Collaborative Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Alan W.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Mazmanian, Paul E.; Retchin, Sheldon M.

    2013-01-01

    Developing interprofessional education (IPE) curricula that improve collaborative practice across professions has proven challenging. A theoretical basis for understanding collaborative practice in health care settings is needed to guide the education and evaluation of health professions trainees and practitioners and support the team-based delivery of care. IPE should incorporate theory-driven, evidence-based methods and build competency toward effective collaboration. In this article, the authors review several concepts from the organizational science literature and propose using these as a framework for understanding how health care teams function. Specifically, they outline the team process model of action and planning phases in collaborative work; discuss leadership and followership, including how locus (a leader’s integration into a team’s usual work) and formality (a leader’s responsibility conferred by the traditional hierarchy) affect team functions; and describe dynamic delegation, an approach to conceptualizing escalation and delegation within health care teams. For each concept, they identify competencies for knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors to aid in the development of innovative curricula to improve collaborative practice. They suggest that gaining an understanding of these principles will prepare health care trainees, whether team leaders or members, to analyze team performance, adapt behaviors that improve collaboration, and create team-based health care delivery processes that lead to improved clinical outcomes. PMID:23702530

  2. Quality management science in clinical chemistry: a dynamic framework for continuous improvement of quality.

    PubMed

    Westgard, J O; Burnett, R W; Bowers, G N

    1990-10-01

    Current quality assurance approaches will not be adequate to satisfy the needs for quality in the next decade. Quality management science (QMS), as evolving in industry today, provides the dynamic framework necessary to provide continuous improvement of quality. QMS emphasizes the importance of defining quality goals based on the needs and expectations (implied needs) of customers. The laboratory can develop customer-friendly goals and measures of quality by recognizing that customers' experiences are represented by a totality of results. Quality goals and measures are best communicated as "total performance" by specifying a limit and percentile of the distribution, rather than a mean and standard deviation. Application of quality goals within the laboratory will usually require partitioning the total performance goal into components and translating those components into specifications to guide the operation and management of production processes. QMS also extends beyond technical processes to people processes and provides guidance for improving the quality of worklife and caring for the laboratory's most essential resource--our people. PMID:2208645

  3. Essential elements of a framework for future space exploration and use: the role of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, John; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    The objective of the COSPAR Panel on Exploration (PEX) is to provide independent scientific advice to support the development of exploration programs and to safeguard the potential scientific assets of solar system objects. The Outer Space Treaty (OST) of 1967 provides (Article I) for “exploration and use of outer space” as well as an obligation for States to authorize and supervise space activities (Article VI) so “that national activities are carried out in conformity with the provisions set forth in the. . Treaty,” while the provisions of Article IX of the Treaty include pursuing “studies of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and conduct[ing] exploration of them so as to avoid their harmful contamination." In short, the Treaty provides for many activities to take place in outer space, but it also leaves to the future the definitions of “harmful contamination,” “adverse changes,” and even “use.” In order to provide for both protection and use in outer space, and therefore to provide for both scientific and economic exploration, an extension of the OST (or its replacement) will be required. Whatever policy choices are made in constructing such a framework, it is clear that scientific understanding of the solar system, and each of its individual planetary bodies, will be required to determine the balance—and it may be a dynamic balance—between protection and use of outer space environments. This paper will consider the role of scientific advice and continuing research and education within such a framework, and as an essential complement to the necessary regulation distinguishing between protection and use of different locations in outer space.

  4. Designing Inquiry-Oriented Science Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Mr. Smith and Ms. D'Amico are two veteran science teachers in a well-performing school district. Both teachers use weekly lab exercises and experiments as formative assessments. In their middle school classrooms, children are engaged and eager to learn. As students walk into Mr. Smith's classroom, a prescribed, step-by-step procedure of the day's…

  5. Creating Aliens: The Ultimate Life Sciences Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beltramo, Dan

    2001-01-01

    Describes a seven-week project completed by the author's eighth-grade science students (as they studied "the chemistry of living things") in which they designed an alien and its world using the scientific concepts that they learned in class. Compares class presentations using PowerPoint software to presentations using posterboard. (SR)

  6. Ideas and Activities for Physical Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappetta, Eugene L., Ed.

    This manual is designed to supplement an existing physical science curriculum and to assist in providing the learning experiences required to implement an effective course. The first chapter outlines the purposes of this manual and provides a set of teaching tips. Topics such as electricity, wave motion, light, sound, periodic table and nuclear…

  7. Assessing the impact participation in science journalism activities has on scientific literacy among high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Cathy

    As part of the National Science Foundation Science Literacy through Science Journalism (SciJourn) research and development initiative (http://www.scijourn.org ; Polman, Saul, Newman, and Farrar, 2008) a quasi-experimental design was used to investigate what impact incorporating science journalism activities had on students' scientific literacy. Over the course of a school year students participated in a variety of activities culminating in the production of science news articles for Scijourner, a regional print and online high school science news magazine. Participating teachers and SciJourn team members collaboratively developed activities focused on five aspects of scientific literacy: placing information into context, recognizing relevance, evaluating factual accuracy, use of multiple credible sources and information seeking processes. This study details the development process for the Scientific Literacy Assessment (SLA) including validity and reliability studies, evaluates student scientific literacy using the SLA, examines student SLA responses to provide a description of high school students' scientific literacy, and outlines implications of the findings in relation to the National Research Council's A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (2012) and classroom science teaching practices. Scientifically literate adults acting as experts in the assessment development phase informed the creation of a scoring guide that was used to analyze student responses. Experts tended to draw on both their understanding of science concepts and life experiences to formulate answers; paying close attention to scientific factual inaccuracies, sources of information, how new information fit into their view of science and society as well as targeted strategies for information seeking. Novices (i.e., students), in contrast, tended to ignore factual inaccuracies, showed little understanding about source credibility and suggested

  8. Critters: K-6 Life Science Activities. Project AIMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Maureen Murphy; And Others

    Project AIMS (Activities to Integrate Mathematics and Science) has as its purpose the integration of subject matter in grades K-9. Field testing of the curriculum materials produced by AIMS indicates that this integration produces the following beneficial results: (1) mathematics becomes more meaningful, hence more useful; (2) science is…

  9. Teaching Science Methods Courses with Web-Enhanced Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec M.

    Learning science in today's classroom does not have to be restricted to text-based curricular resources. Web sites present learners with a wide range of science activities in various formats ranging from text-only information to providing authentic real-time data sets and interactive simulations. This paper discusses reasons for using the Internet…

  10. Activities in Planetary Geology for the Physical and Earth Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Alli, Richard, Ed.; Greely, Ronald, Ed.

    The activities in this guide deal with concepts in planetary geology, but they can be generalized to illustrate broad problems in the earth sciences. They are designed to supplement or introduce topics usually encountered in earth science courses. The exercises, organized into independent units which can be presented in any order, are appropriate…

  11. Small Wonders. Hands-On Science Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdue, Peggy K.

    Children are natural scientists and are constantly questioning and challenging the world around them. This book is designed to help preschool and primary teachers see the science in common things. It is a book of manipulative activities that are designed to nurture a child's natural curiosity as well as integrate science with other areas.…

  12. Kids Can Make a Difference! Environmental Science Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dashefsky, H. Steven

    This book of more than 160 environmental science activities is designed to help students understand environmental issues, ask questions, and find solutions to the problems. Introductory sections address: (1) the nature of major global problems and a history of environmental concern; (2) basic environmental science terminology and scientific study…

  13. Video: Animals; Electric Current; Force; Science Activities. Learning in Science Project. Working Papers 51-54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Beverley; And Others

    Four papers to be used in conjunction with video-tapes developed by the Learning in Science Project are presented. Topic areas of the papers focus on: (1) animals; (2) electric current; (3) force; and (4) science activities. The first paper presents transcripts of class discussions focusing on the scientific meaning of the word animal. The second…

  14. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities in the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association received an award of Cooperative Agreement #NCC5-356 on September 29, 1998. The mission of this activity, know as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, USRA recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members.

  15. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities In the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David

    2002-01-01

    The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members. This paper is the final report from this now completed Cooperative Agreement.

  16. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities in the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David; Marshall, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association received an award of Cooperative Agreement NCC5-356 on September 29, 1998. The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, USRA recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members.

  17. Preservice Elementary Science Teachers' Connections among Aspects of NOS: Toward a Consistent, Overarching Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgelen, Sinan; Hanuscin, Deborah L.; Yilmaz-Tuzun, Ozgul

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the connections elementary preservice science teachers made among various aspects of nature of science (NOS). Totally, 45 preservice science teachers who were enrolled in the Laboratory Application in Science II course participated in the study. The course provided meaningful and practical inquiry-based experiences, as well as…

  18. Learning Science in a First Grade Science Activity: A Vygotskian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepardson, Daniel P.

    1999-01-01

    Synthesizes the key aspects of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory of learning. Interprets classroom vignettes and child interviews from a first-grade science activity in light of Vygotsky's theory. (Author/CCM)

  19. Early Adolescence: Active Science for Middle Schoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Michael; Griffin, Nancy

    1980-01-01

    Describes activities appropriate for involving middle school students as active participants in the learning process. Topics discussed include archaeology, bulletin boards, dramatizations, physics experiments using the human body, oceanography, and ecology. (CS)

  20. Mars Exploration Rover Operations with the Science Activity Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffrey S. Norris; Powell, Mark W.; Vona, Marsette A.; Backes, Paul G.; Wick, Justin V.

    2005-01-01

    The Science Activity Planner (SAP) is the primary science operations tool for the Mars Exploration Rover mission and NASA's Software of the Year for 2004. SAP utilizes a variety of visualization and planning capabilities to enable the mission operations team to direct the activities of the Spirit and Opportunity rovers. This paper outlines some of the challenging requirements that drove the design of SAP and discusses lessons learned from the development and use of SAP in mission operations.

  1. Agricultural Science Lab Activities. Instructor Guide. Volume 27, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gregory W.; And Others

    This instructor guide contains 20 laboratory activities for grades 9-10 Agricultural Science I-II classes. The activities are cross-referenced to Missouri Core Competencies and Key Skills. The activities are organized into the following areas: introductory (microscope use); animal nutrition (absorption of nutrients, bacteria and disease, enzyme…

  2. Career Activities in Science: Grades 7, 8, 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boise City Independent School District, ID.

    The career activities guide in science, part of an Idaho State Department of Vocational Education career exploration series for grades 7, 8, and 9, is designed as supplementary material to enrich the regular curriculum. Any one activity in the guide might be used without involving any other activities. The cross-referenced index indicates grades,…

  3. Classroom Activities and Demonstrations for Use in Behavioral Science Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cology, Lorry J.

    This compilation provides descriptions of and resource materials for 25 classroom activities or demonstrations for behavioral science courses. For each activity, the following information is provided: subject area, source, time required and materials needed. In addition, discussion questions and comments on the value and use of the activities are…

  4. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  5. Attention Science Teachers: Classroom Activities with Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAZWRAP, The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program.

    This collection of 10 activities is designed to give students a better grasp of concepts relating to groundwater, aquifers, and hydrology. Activities can be conducted as a demonstration (especially for younger students) or as a laboratory activity for students in higher grades. The guide contains an introduction for teachers and students, a…

  6. The Effect of Physical Activity on Science Competence and Attitude towards Science Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinkenborg, Ann Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effect of physical activity on science instruction. To combat the implications of physical inactivity, schools need to be willing to consider all possible opportunities for students to engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Integrating physical activity with traditional classroom content is one…

  7. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and its Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffries, Craig M.

    1997-01-01

    The Board will provide oversight of the earth science and resource activities within the National Research Council, provide a review of research and public activities in the solid-earth sciences, and provide analyses and recommendations relevant to the supply, delivery, and associated impacts of and issues related to hydrocarbon, metallic, and non-metallic mineral resources. The Board will monitor the status of the earth sciences, assess the health of the disciplines, and identify research opportunities, and will respond to specific agency requests.

  8. A Disability Studies Framework for Policy Activism in Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses disability studies and the social model of disability as theoretical foundations for policy activism in postsecondary education. The social model is discussed and a model for policy activism is described. A case study of how disability studies and policy activism can be applied is provided utilizing the "3C Project to Provide…

  9. Reference Framework for Active Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naithani, Pranav

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in this paper traces the history of active learning and further utilizes the available literature to define the meaning and importance of active learning in higher education. The study highlights common practical problems faced by students and instructors in implementing active learning in higher education and further identifies…

  10. Teachers' Knowing How to Use Technology: Exploring a Conceptual Framework for Purposeful Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Tony; Denning, Tim; Higgins, Chris; Loveless, Avril

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project to apply and validate a conceptual framework of clusters of purposeful learning activity involving ICT tools. The framework, which is based in a socio-cultural perspective, is described as "DECK", and comprises the following major categories of the use of digital technologies to support learning: distributed…

  11. Implementation science in cancer prevention and control: a framework for research and programs in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Sivaram, Sudha; Sanchez, Michael A; Rimer, Barbara K; Samet, Jonathan M; Glasgow, Russell E

    2014-11-01

    Implementation science is a set of tools, principles, and methodologies that can be used to bring scientific evidence into action, improve health care quality and delivery, and improve public health. As the burden of cancer increases in low- and middle-income countries, it is important to plan cancer control programs that are both evidence based and delivered in ways that are feasible, cost-effective, contextually appropriate, and sustainable. This review presents a framework for using implementation science for cancer control planning and implementation and discusses potential areas of focus for research and programs in low- and middle-income countries interested in integrating research into practice and policy. PMID:25178984

  12. Implementation Science in Cancer Prevention and Control: A framework for research and programs in low and middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Michael A.; Rimer, Barbara K.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Glasgow, Russell E.

    2014-01-01

    Implementation Science is a set of tools, principles and methodologies that can be used to bring scientific evidence into action, improve health care quality and delivery and improve public health. As the burden of cancer increases in low- and middle-income countries, it is important to plan cancer control programs that are both evidence-based and delivered in ways that are feasible, cost-effective, contextually appropriate and sustainable. This review presents a framework for using implementation science for cancer control planning and implementation and discusses potential areas of focus for research and programs in low and middle-income countries interested in integrating research into practice and policy. PMID:25178984

  13. Blogs and Social Network Sites as Activity Systems: Exploring Adult Informal Learning Process through Activity Theory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Gyeong Mi; Lee, Romee

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to explore adult user activities and informal learning processes as reflected in their blogs and social network sites (SNS). Using the assumption that a web-based space is an activity system in which learning occurs, typical features of the components were investigated and each activity system then…

  14. Present and future Solar System missions in the framework of the ESA Science Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The Science Directorate is in charge of developing the "Science Mandatory Programme". Through the science programme, ESA implements scientific projects to achieve ambitious objectives. On this ground, science challenges and advancement in technologies work together in a synergistic endeavour. Both long-term science planning and mission calls are bottom-up processes, relying on broad community input and peer review. The Cosmic Vision program is since 2005 the implementation tool for the science mandatory programme. I will present an overview of the space missions in operation, under development and for study with particular emphasis on those visiting the Solar System.

  15. Empowering Students in Science through Active Learning: Voices From Inside the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Sabrina Ann

    Preparing students for success in the 21st century has shifted the focus of science education from acquiring information and knowledge to mastery of critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teacher and student perspectives of the relationship between (a) active learning, problem solving, and achievement in science and (b) the conditions that help facilitate this environment. Adapting a social constructivist theoretical framework, high school science teachers and students were interviewed, school records analyzed, curriculum documents studied, and classes observed. The findings revealed that students were engaged with the material in an active learning environment, which led to a sense of involvement, interest, and meaningful learning. Students felt empowered to take ownership of their learning, developed the critical thinking skills necessary to solve problems independently and became aware of how they learn best, which students reported as interactive learning. Moreover, student reflections revealed that an active environment contributed to deeper understanding and higher skills through interaction and discussion, including questioning, explaining, arguing, and contemplating scientific concepts with their peers. Recommendations are for science teachers to provide opportunities for students to work actively, collaborate in groups, and discuss their ideas to develop the necessary skills for achievement and for administrators to facilitate the conditions needed for active learning to occur.

  16. Science teachers' online strategies for seeking inquiry-based lesson activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenell, Elizabeth Ann

    This paper reports the findings of a mixed methods study that examines how 9th grade science teachers engage in online searches for inquiry-based activities in two different search engines---Google and the Digital Library for Earth System Education. The goal of this dissertation was two-fold: (a) to detail science teacher search behaviors during a realistic online search task related to their teaching, and (b) the effect of search engine affordances on those search practices. At the center of the dissertation activities were an experimental task and talk-aloud protocols of the teachers engaged in the task. The task itself asked teacher participants to search for earth science activities linking the concept of volcanism to plate tectonics. In addition to the experiment and talk-aloud protocol, a demographic survey, content knowledge evaluation, inquiry-based activity evaluation, and post-task structured interview were conducted. Because substantial prior research in non-educational areas has shown that task domain influences search behaviors, it was expected that the science teaching domain would have its own particular influence on teachers' online information seeking. The concept of task domain was developed in terms of an information seeking framework developed by Marchionini (1995). The Marchionini (1995) model of information seeking was used as a guiding framework for the dissertation investigations. The objectives of this dissertation were to characterize the behaviors and products of real-world online information seeking by 9th grade science teachers, and to inform the work of educational software designers.

  17. Aviation Science Activities for Elementary Grades. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This guide contains the procedures and lists of materials needed for 105 aviation activities, demonstrations, and experiments. These activities, demonstrations, and experiments (suitable for students in all elementary grades) are organized into three sections by major topic area: (1) properties of air; (2) factors related to airplane flight; and…

  18. Rapidly assessing the activation conditions and porosity of metal-organic frameworks using thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, TM; Bloch, ED; Long, JR

    2015-01-01

    A methodology utilizing a thermogravimetric analyzer to monitor propane uptake following incremental increases of the temperature is demonstrated as a means of rapidly identifying porous materials and determining the optimum activation conditions of metal-organic frameworks.

  19. Creating Nurturing Environments: A Science-Based Framework for Promoting Child Health and Development within High-Poverty Neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Komro, Kelli A.; Flay, Brian R.; Biglan, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Living in poverty and living in areas of concentrated poverty pose multiple risks for child development and for overall health and wellbeing. Poverty is a major risk factor for several mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders, as well as for other developmental challenges and physical health problems. In this paper, the Promise Neighborhoods Research Consortium describes a science-based framework for the promotion of child health and development within distressed high-poverty neighborhoods. We lay out a model of child and adolescent developmental outcomes, and integrate knowledge of potent and malleable influences to define a comprehensive intervention framework to bring about a significant increase in the proportion of young people in high-poverty neighborhoods who will develop successfully. Based on a synthesis of research from diverse fields, we designed the Creating Nurturing Environments framework to guide community-wide efforts to improve child outcomes and reduce health and educational inequalities. PMID:21468644

  20. Predictors of African American Adolescent Sexual Activity: An Ecological Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandara, Jelani; Murray, Carolyn B.; Bangi, Audrey K.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated predictors of African American adolescent sexual activity, testing an ecological model of risk factors influencing sexual activity. Data collected over three years indicated that risk factors at the personal, familial, and extrafamilial levels of adolescents' social ecology related to being a virgin or not. Males and older adolescents…

  1. A Competence-Based Science Learning Framework Illustrated Through the Study of Natural Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyao, Sheila G.; Holbrook, Jack; Rannikmäe, Miia; Pagunsan, Marmon M.

    2015-09-01

    This article proposes a competence-based learning framework for science teaching, applied to the study of 'big ideas', in this case to the study of natural hazards and disaster risk reduction (NH&DRR). The framework focuses on new visions of competence, placing emphasis on nurturing connectedness and behavioral actions toward resilience and sustainability. The framework draws together competences familiarly expressed as cognitive knowledge and skills, plus dispositions and adds connectedness and action-related behaviors, and applies this by means of a progression shift associated with NH&DRR from abilities to capabilities. The target is enhanced scientific literacy approached through an education through science focus, amplified through the study of a big idea, promotion of sustained resilience in the face of disaster and the taking of responsibilities for behavioral actions. The framework is applied to a learning progression for each interrelated education dimension, thus serving as a guide for both the development of abilities and as a platform for stimulating student capabilities within instruction and assessment.

  2. Developing Science Literacy for Bilingual Learners: A Framework for Effective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquierdo, J. Joy; Almaguer, Isela

    2012-01-01

    In today's schools, many teachers of bilingual learners find teaching science a challenge. Teachers of bilingual learners tend to focus on increasing second-language proficiency and not on science literacy. When second-language development is the target, the development of science literacy can lose priority. This article introduces the framework…

  3. Critical Reading of Science-Based News Reports: Establishing a Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClune, Billy; Jarman, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    A recognised aim of science education is to promote critical engagement with science in the media. Evidence would suggest that this is challenging for both teachers and pupils and that science education does not yet adequately prepare young people for this task. Furthermore, in the absence of clear guidance as to what this means and how this may…

  4. Exploring Middle School Students' Representational Competence in Science: Development and Verification of a Framework for Learning with Visual Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippett, Christine Diane

    Scientific knowledge is constructed and communicated through a range of forms in addition to verbal language. Maps, graphs, charts, diagrams, formulae, models, and drawings are just some of the ways in which science concepts can be represented. Representational competence---an aspect of visual literacy that focuses on the ability to interpret, transform, and produce visual representations---is a key component of science literacy and an essential part of science reading and writing. To date, however, most research has examined learning from representations rather than learning with representations. This dissertation consisted of three distinct projects that were related by a common focus on learning from visual representations as an important aspect of scientific literacy. The first project was the development of an exploratory framework that is proposed for use in investigations of students constructing and interpreting multimedia texts. The exploratory framework, which integrates cognition, metacognition, semiotics, and systemic functional linguistics, could eventually result in a model that might be used to guide classroom practice, leading to improved visual literacy, better comprehension of science concepts, and enhanced science literacy because it emphasizes distinct aspects of learning with representations that can be addressed though explicit instruction. The second project was a metasynthesis of the research that was previously conducted as part of the Explicit Literacy Instruction Embedded in Middle School Science project (Pacific CRYSTAL, http://www.educ.uvic.ca/pacificcrystal). Five overarching themes emerged from this case-to-case synthesis: the engaging and effective nature of multimedia genres, opportunities for differentiated instruction using multimodal strategies, opportunities for assessment, an emphasis on visual representations, and the robustness of some multimodal literacy strategies across content areas. The third project was a mixed

  5. Uncertainty in Driftless Area Cold-Water Fishery Decision Making and a Framework for Stakeholder-Based Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The paradigm of stakeholder-based science is becoming more popular as organizations such as the U.S. Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers adopt it as a way of providing practicable climate change information to practitioners. One of the key issues stakeholders face in adopting climate change information into their decision processes is how uncertainty is addressed and communicated. In this study, we conducted a series of semi-structured interviews with managers and scientists working on stream habitat restoration of cold-water fisheries in the Driftless Area of Wisconsin that were focused on how they interpret and manage uncertainty and what types of information they need to make better decisions. One of the important lessons we learned from the interviews is that if researchers are going to provide useful climate change information to stakeholders, they need to understand where and how decisions are made and what adaptation measures are actually available in a given decision arena. This method of incorporating social science methods into climate science production can provide a framework for researchers from the Climate Science Centers and others who are interested in pursuing stakeholder-based science. By indentifying a specific ecological system and conducting interviews with actors who work on that system, researchers will be able to gain a better understanding of how their climate change science can fit into existing or shape new decision processes. We also interpreted lessons learned from our interviews via existing literature in areas such as stakeholder-based modeling and the decision sciences to provide guidance specific to the stakeholder-based science process.

  6. Conservation II. Science Activities in Energy. [Student's and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to the conservation of energy. Eleven student activities using art, economics, arithmetic, and other skills and disciplines help teachers directly involve students in exploring scientific questions and making…

  7. Agricultural Education Science Activity--Nos. PS 1-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Curriculum Materials Service.

    This packet contains six science learning activities that can be used in agricultural education courses. The activities cover these topics: (1) determining the effects of soil drainage on plant growth and development; (2) determining the effect of soil compaction on plant growth and development; (3) inoculating legume seeds to promote nodule…

  8. Practising Active Science with Child Refugees: A Clinical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrier, Frédéric

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, pilot sessions in Rwanda and Nepal are analysed to evaluate the therapeutic benefit of active science for traumatised child refugees. The nature of the activities, choice of tools, organisation of the sessions, group size, and the role of the educators are investigated. Despite the lack of quantitative assessment, practical…

  9. A Scooter Inquiry: An Integrated Science, Mathematics, and Technology Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Do-Yong; O'Brien, George; Eraso, Mario; McClintock, Edwin

    2002-01-01

    Describes an inquiry-based scooter activity in which students learn the mathematical concepts of measurement and proportionality and the science concepts of force, motion, velocity, and acceleration while using their problem solving skills. Explains strengths and weaknesses of the activity and includes suggestions for assessment. (YDS)

  10. Agricultural Education Science Activity--Nos. AEM 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Curriculum Materials Service.

    This packet contains four science learning activities that can be used in agricultural education courses. The activities cover these topics: (1) determining the effect of air pressure on fluid flow; (2) how lubrication and oil viscosity affect friction; (3) determining relative strengths of wood fasteners; and (4) determining the effects of…

  11. Agricultural Education Science Activity--Nos. SS 2-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Curriculum Materials Service.

    This packet contains three science learning activities that can be used in agricultural education courses. The activities cover these topics: (1) determining the effects of soil particle size on capillary action; (2) measuring levels of eroded soil particles in streams; and (3) determining the effects of soil cover and texture on surface erosion.…

  12. Automated Scheduling of Science Activities for Titan Encounters by Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Trina L.; Knight, Russel L.; Mohr, Dave

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of automated planning and scheduling techniques for large missions, we have adapted ASPEN (Activity Scheduling and Planning Environment) [1] and CLASP (Compressed Large-scale Activity Scheduling and Planning) [2] to the domain of scheduling high-level science goals into conflict-free operations plans for Titan encounters by the Cassini spacecraft.

  13. Biomass I. Science Activities in Energy [and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to biomass as a form of energy. (The word biomass is used to describe all solid material of animal or vegetable origin from which energy may be extracted.) Twelve student activities using art, economics,…

  14. The discourse of design-based science classroom activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Flávio S.; Martalock, Peggy L.; Keser, Tugba

    2015-06-01

    This paper is an initial contribution to a general theory in which science classroom activity types and epistemological discourse practices are systematically linked. The idea is that activities and discourse are reflexively related, so that different types of science classroom activities (e.g., scientific argumentation, modeling, and design) recruit characteristically distinct forms of participants' (students and teacher) discourse. Such a general theory would eventually map out the full spectrum of discourse practices (and their patterns of manifestation) across various kinds of science classroom activities, and reveal new relationships between forms of both discourse and activities. Because this defines a complex and long-term project, here our aim is simply to delineate this larger theoretical program and to illustrate it with a detailed case study—namely, that of mapping out and characterizing the discourse practices of design- based science classroom activities. To do so, we draw on data from an activity that is prototypically design-based—i.e., one in which students iteratively design and refine an artifact (in this case, pictorial representations of moving objects)—and examine the structure and dynamics of the whole-class discourse practices that emerge around these representational forms. We then compare and contrast these discourse practices to those of an activity that is prototypical of scientific argumentation (taken from the literature)—i.e., one in which students argue between competing theories and explanations of a phenomenon—and begin to illustrate the kinds of insights our theoretical program might afford.

  15. Agricultural Education Science Activity--Nos. GGEB 1-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Curriculum Materials Service.

    This packet contains two science learning activities that can be used in agricultural education courses. The first activity, "Using Ethanol as a Solvent," is intended to help students describe the characteristics of a solvent, to enhance student observational skills dealing with physical changes, and to demonstrate the acid or alkaline nature of…

  16. Silent Students' Participation in a Large Active Learning Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Active learning in large science classrooms furthers opportunities for students to engage in the content and in meaningful learning, yet students can still remain anonymously silent. This study aims to understand the impact of active learning on these silent students in a large General Chemistry course taught via Socratic questioning and…

  17. Positioning activated carbon amendment technologies in a novel framework for sediment management.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, Darya; Rakowska, Magdalena I; Reible, Danny; Harmsen, Joop; Cornelissen, Gerard; van Veggel, Marc; Hale, Sarah E; Grotenhuis, Tim; Koelmans, Albert A

    2015-04-01

    Contaminated sediments can pose serious threats to human health and the environment by acting as a source of toxic chemicals. The amendment of contaminated sediments with strong sorbents like activated C (AC) is a rapidly developing strategy to manage contaminated sediments. To date, a great deal of attention has been paid to the technical and ecological features and implications of sediment remediation with AC, although science in this field still is rapidly evolving. This article aims to provide an update on the recent literature on these features, and provides a comparison of sediment remediation with AC to other sediment management options, emphasizing their full-scale application. First, a qualitative overview of advantages of current alternatives to remediate contaminated sediments is presented. Subsequently, AC treatment technology is critically reviewed, including current understanding of the effectiveness and ecological safety for the use of AC in natural systems. Finally, this information is used to provide a novel framework for supporting decisions concerning sediment remediation and beneficial reuse. PMID:25641867

  18. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) for the 3D Visualization of Integrated Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, David; Moreland, John; Baru, Chaitan; Crosby, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Data integration is increasingly important as we strive to combine data from disparate sources and assemble better models of the complex processes operating at the Earth's surface and within its interior. These data are often large, multi-dimensional, and subject to differing conventions for data structures, file formats, coordinate spaces, and units of measure. When visualized, these data require differing, and sometimes conflicting, conventions for visual representations, dimensionality, symbology, and interaction. All of this makes the visualization of integrated Earth science data particularly difficult. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) is an open-source data integration and visualization suite of applications and libraries being developed by the GEON project at the University of California, San Diego, USA. Funded by the NSF, the project is leveraging virtual globe technology from NASA's WorldWind to create interactive 3D visualization tools that combine and layer data from a wide variety of sources to create a holistic view of features at, above, and beneath the Earth's surface. The OEF architecture is open, cross-platform, modular, and based upon Java. The OEF's modular approach to software architecture yields an array of mix-and-match software components for assembling custom applications. Available modules support file format handling, web service communications, data management, user interaction, and 3D visualization. File parsers handle a variety of formal and de facto standard file formats used in the field. Each one imports data into a general-purpose common data model supporting multidimensional regular and irregular grids, topography, feature geometry, and more. Data within these data models may be manipulated, combined, reprojected, and visualized. The OEF's visualization features support a variety of conventional and new visualization techniques for looking at topography, tomography, point clouds, imagery, maps, and feature geometry. 3D data such as

  19. A Conceptual Framework for Responsive Global Engagement in Communication Sciences and Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyter, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    The field of speech-language pathology needs a conceptual framework to guide the provision of services in a globalized world. Proposed in this article is a conceptual framework designed to facilitate responsive global engagement for professionals such as speech-language pathologists, who are increasingly serving diverse populations around the…

  20. [Analysis of the Hungarian participation in the 6th European Union Framework Programme for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration in the thematic priority area of the life sciences].

    PubMed

    Pörzse, Gábor; Temesi, Alfréda

    2007-07-22

    The European Union launched the 6th Framework Programme for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration in 2002. Initially, Hungary participated in the 6th Framework Programme as an associate member, but since 2004 it has taken part as a Member State. Besides mobilizing their own resources, research organizations entering winning bids to framework programme tenders enjoy considerable financial support from the European Union, while participating states also contribute to the costs of the cooperation from their national budgets. Therefore, it is very important to recognize and evaluate the achievements of domestic participation. By collecting, processing and analyzing available data, the authors evaluate the bid activity and the successfulness of Hungarian research organizations in the thematic priority area covering life sciences of the 6th Framework Programme. When judging success, the authors not only consider the level of Community financial contribution, but also the participation of Hungarian researchers in international research networks. The article contains an analysis of the submitted and supported works from various aspects such as by year, calls for bids, research fields etc. for projects in the implementation of which Hungarian partners were also involved. The authors present the cost settlement methodologies applied, and traditional and new project types. They analyse the activity of coordinators and outline European expectations with regard to the participation of small and medium-sized enterprises and women. One of the important objectives of the analysis is to draw conclusions so that participants will be able to adapt them during the 7th Framework Programme, 2007-2013. PMID:17631471

  1. Activity Based Astronomy for Primary Science Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginns, Ian

    Print materials in astronomy such as books, journals, charts, and posters are typically the sources of information for teachers and children about the moon, the sun, lunar and solar eclipses, planetary sizes, distances of planets from the sun, planetary atmospheres, and so on. This paper describes and analyzes a number of activities designed to…

  2. Ocean Planet. Interdisciplinary Marine Science Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Barbara

    The Ocean Planet is a traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution designed to share with the public what recent research has revealed about the oceans and to encourage ocean conservation. This booklet of lessons and activities adapts several themes from the exhibition for use in middle and high school classrooms. Lesson plans include:…

  3. A Conceptual Framework Based on Activity Theory for Mobile CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurita, Gustavo; Nussbaum, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for collaborative group activities that promote student social interaction in the classroom. Handheld computers interconnected by a wireless network allow people who work on a common task to interact face to face while maintaining the mediation afforded by a technology-based system. Wirelessly interconnected handhelds open up new…

  4. Cognitive Activities in Complex Science Text and Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromley, Jennifer G.; Snyder-Hogan, Lindsey E.; Luciw-Dubas, Ulana A.

    2010-01-01

    Ainsworth's (2006) DeFT framework posits that different representations may lead learners to use different strategies. We wanted to investigate whether students use different strategies, and more broadly, different cognitive activities in diagrams vs. in running text. In order to do so, we collected think-aloud protocol and other measures from 91…

  5. a Spatio-Temporal Framework for Modeling Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touyz, J.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Nelson, F. E.; Apanasovich, T. V.

    2015-07-01

    The Arctic is experiencing an unprecedented rate of environmental and climate change. The active layer (the uppermost layer of soil between the atmosphere and permafrost that freezes in winter and thaws in summer) is sensitive to both climatic and environmental changes, and plays an important role in the functioning, planning, and economic activities of Arctic human and natural ecosystems. This study develops a methodology for modeling and estimating spatial-temporal variations in active layer thickness (ALT) using data from several sites of the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring network, and demonstrates its use in spatial-temporal interpolation. The simplest model's stochastic component exhibits no spatial or spatio-temporal dependency and is referred to as the naïve model, against which we evaluate the performance of the other models, which assume that the stochastic component exhibits either spatial or spatio-temporal dependency. The methods used to fit the models are then discussed, along with point forecasting. We compare the predicted fit of the various models at key study sites located in the North Slope of Alaska and demonstrate the advantages of space-time models through a series of error statistics such as mean squared error, mean absolute and percent deviance from observed data. We find the difference in performance between the spatio-temporal and remaining models is significant for all three error statistics. The best stochastic spatio-temporal model increases predictive accuracy, compared to the naïve model, of 33.3%, 36.2% and 32.5% on average across the three error metrics at the key sites for a one-year hold out period.

  6. A multi-layered governance framework for incorporating social science insights into adapting to the health impacts of climate change

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Kathryn J.; Ebi, Kristie; Friel, Sharon; McMichael, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Addressing climate change and its associated effects is a multi-dimensional and ongoing challenge. This includes recognizing that climate change will affect the health and wellbeing of all populations over short and longer terms, albeit in varied ways and intensities. That recognition has drawn attention to the need to take adaptive actions to lessen adverse impacts over the next few decades from unavoidable climate change, particularly in developing country settings. A range of sectors is responsible for appropriate adaptive policies and measures to address the health risks of climate change, including health services, water and sanitation, trade, agriculture, disaster management, and development. Objectives To broaden the framing of governance and decision-making processes by using innovative methods and assessments to illustrate the multi-sectoral nature of health-related adaptation to climate change. This is a shift from sector-specific to multi-level systems encompassing sectors and actors, across temporal and spatial scales. Design A review and synthesis of the current knowledge in the areas of health and climate change adaptation governance and decision-making processes. Results A novel framework is presented that incorporates social science insights into the formulation and implementation of adaptation activities and policies to lessen the health risks posed by climate change. Conclusion Clarification of the roles that different sectors, organizations, and individuals occupy in relation to the development of health-related adaptation strategies will facilitate the inclusion of health and wellbeing within multi-sector adaptation policies, thereby strengthening the overall set of responses to minimize the adverse health effects of climate change. PMID:24028938

  7. The effect of inquiry science activity in educational productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kinya

    This is a study the effect of inquiry science activity on the science achievement of junior high school students. Since the post-sputnik curriculum improvement project, science educators have supported the effect of inquiry activities. In terms of the effect of laboratory activity, however, the literature review indicated that the controlled experimental studies have failed to present the effect of laboratory activities. For example, Blosser suggested more rigid experimental design, such as longer treatment and larger sample. On the other hand, some of the recent case studies of effect of laboratory are successful to support the effect and the other recent classroom ethnographic studies indicated that the laboratory activities are implemented in inappropriate situation. This study investigates the effect of inquiry activities by using the national survey to balance the internal and external validity. In order to control the environmental effect and student aptitude, the study adopted the structural model of science achievement suggested by Reynolds and Walberg in 1991. The study utilized the extensive student and teacher data reports from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY) to examine these differences and interactions quantitatively. The study utilized two independent variables: (1) teachers' report of the degree of their teaching emphasis on inquiry skill, and (2) teachers' report of the frequency of hands-on method. The effects of these instructional qualities are estimated in terms of the science achievement score of their student. The study utilized path analysis techniques in order to understand the complex relationship among the nine productivity factors; which are (1) motivation, (2) prior ability, (3) development, (4) home environment, (5) peer environment, (6) media environment, (7) classroom environment, (8) instructional quantity, and (9) instructional quality. The result failed to support the effectiveness of the hands-on science teaching

  8. Applying Science: Opportunities to Inform Disease Management Policy with Cooperative Research within a One Health Framework

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Jason K.; Kracalik, Ian T.; Fair, Jeanne Marie

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the current saiga antelope die off in Kazakhstan each represent very real and difficult to manage public or veterinary health crises. They also illustrate the importance of stable and funded surveillance and sound policy for intervention or disease control. While these two events highlight extreme cases of infectious disease (Ebola) or (possible) environmental exposure (saiga), diseases such as anthrax, brucellosis, tularemia, and plague are all zoonoses that pose risks and present surveillance challenges at the wildlife-livestock–human interfaces. These four diseases are also considered important actors in the threat of biological terror activities and have a long history as legacy biowarfare pathogens. This paper reviews recent studies done cooperatively between American and institutions within nations of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) focused on spatiotemporal, epidemiological, and ecological patterns of these four zoonoses. We examine recent studies and discuss the possible ways in which techniques, including ecological niche modeling, disease risk modeling, and spatiotemporal cluster analysis, can inform disease surveillance, control efforts, and impact policy. Our focus is to posit ways to apply science to disease management policy and actual management or mitigation practices. Across these examples, we illustrate the value of cooperative studies that bring together modern geospatial and epidemiological analyses to improve our understanding of the distribution of pathogens and diseases in livestock, wildlife, and humans. For example, ecological niche modeling can provide national level maps of pathogen distributions for surveillance planning, while space-time models can identify the timing and location of significant outbreak events for defining active control strategies. We advocate for the need to bring the results and the researchers from cooperative studies into the meeting rooms where policy is negotiated

  9. Applying Science: Opportunities to Inform Disease Management Policy with Cooperative Research within a One Health Framework.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Kracalik, Ian T; Fair, Jeanne Marie

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the current saiga antelope die off in Kazakhstan each represent very real and difficult to manage public or veterinary health crises. They also illustrate the importance of stable and funded surveillance and sound policy for intervention or disease control. While these two events highlight extreme cases of infectious disease (Ebola) or (possible) environmental exposure (saiga), diseases such as anthrax, brucellosis, tularemia, and plague are all zoonoses that pose risks and present surveillance challenges at the wildlife-livestock-human interfaces. These four diseases are also considered important actors in the threat of biological terror activities and have a long history as legacy biowarfare pathogens. This paper reviews recent studies done cooperatively between American and institutions within nations of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) focused on spatiotemporal, epidemiological, and ecological patterns of these four zoonoses. We examine recent studies and discuss the possible ways in which techniques, including ecological niche modeling, disease risk modeling, and spatiotemporal cluster analysis, can inform disease surveillance, control efforts, and impact policy. Our focus is to posit ways to apply science to disease management policy and actual management or mitigation practices. Across these examples, we illustrate the value of cooperative studies that bring together modern geospatial and epidemiological analyses to improve our understanding of the distribution of pathogens and diseases in livestock, wildlife, and humans. For example, ecological niche modeling can provide national level maps of pathogen distributions for surveillance planning, while space-time models can identify the timing and location of significant outbreak events for defining active control strategies. We advocate for the need to bring the results and the researchers from cooperative studies into the meeting rooms where policy is negotiated and

  10. Children and their 4-H animal projects: How children use science in agricultural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emo, Kenneth Roy

    Many children are introduced to science through informal educational programs. 4-H, an educational youth program, has a history of introducing scientific practices into agriculture. The purpose of this ethnographically-driven case study is to examine how science informs the actions of children raising market animals in a 4-H project. For two years the researcher collected data on 4-H children with market animal projects. Observations, interviews, and artifacts gathered are interpreted using the framework of activity theory. This study provides evidence for how the context of an activity system influences individual actions. Rules developed by the organization guide the actions of children to incorporate physical and psychological tools of science into their project to achieve the object: producing animals of proper weight and quality to be competitive in the county fair. Children learn the necessary actions from a community of practitioners through which expertise is distributed. Children's learning is demonstrated by the way their participation in their project changes with time, from receiving assistance from others to developing expertise in which they provide assistance to others. The strength of this educational experience is how children apply specific tools of science in ways that provide meaning and relevancy to their 4-H activity.

  11. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and its activities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) coordinates, the National Research Council`s advice to the federal government on solid-earth science issues. The board identifies opportunities for advancing basic research and understanding, reports on applications of earth sciences in such areas as disaster mitigation and resource utilization, and analyzes the scientific underpinnings and credibility of earth science information for resource, environmental and other applications and policy decision. Committees operating under the guidance of the Board conducts studies addressing specific issues within the earth sciences. The current committees are as follows: Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data; Mapping Sciences Committee; Committee on Seismology; Committee on Geodesy; Rediscovering Geography Committee; Committee on Research Programs of the US Bureau of Mines. The following recent reports are briefly described: research programs of the US Bureau of Mines, first assessment 1994; Mount Rainier, active cascade volcano; the national geomagnetic initiative; reservoir class field demonstration program; solid-earth sciences and society; data foundation for the national spatial infrastructure; promoting the national spatial data infrastructure through partnerships; toward a coordinated spatial data infrastructure for the nation; and charting a course into the digital era; guidance to the NOAA`s nautical charting mission.

  12. e-Science Partnerships: Towards a Sustainable Framework for School-Scientist Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falloon, Garry

    2013-01-01

    In late 2006, the New Zealand Government embarked on a series of initiatives to explore how the resources and expertise of eight, small, state-owned science research institutes could be combined efficiently to support science teaching in schools. Programmes were developed to enable students and teachers to access and become involved in local…

  13. A Curriculum Framework for Geographical Information Science (GISc) Training at South African Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    du Plessis, H.; van Niekerk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Geographical information science (GISc) is one of the fastest growing industries worldwide. Being a relatively new discipline, universities often provide training as part of geography, surveying, town planning, environmental and computer science programmes. This complicates professional accreditation assessments as the content, outcomes, extent…

  14. Inquiry-Based Science Education: Towards a Pedagogical Framework for Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Uum, Martina S. J.; Verhoeff, Roald P.; Peeters, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) has been promoted as an inspiring way of learning science by engaging pupils in designing and conducting their own scientific investigations. For primary school teachers, the open nature of IBSE poses challenges as they often lack experience in supporting their pupils during the different phases of an open…

  15. The Retention of Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: A Framework for Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jeffry L.; Massiha, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Women make up 47% of the total U.S. workforce, but are less represented in engineering, computer sciences, and the physical sciences. In addition, race and ethnicity are salient factors and minority women comprise fewer than 1 in 10 scientist or engineer. In this paper, a review of the literature is under taken that explores the many challenges…

  16. Development of a Framework to Measure Science Teachers' Inquiry Perceptions and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stephen L.

    For more than a decade, there has been a call for reform in science education. This effort stresses the creation of a scientifically literate population. Required in this effort to create a more scientifically literate populace is an understanding of the Nature of Science (NOS) on the part of the average citizen. This call for reform recognizes…

  17. Integrating Science and Literacy Instruction: A Framework for Bridging the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Gene; Taylor, Vickie

    2006-01-01

    There is vast research that substantiates the integration of science and literacy; however, there are very few books that correlate findings and address specific practices. "Integrating Science and Literary Instruction" connects scientifically based research and best instructional practices in literacy and integrates this with the inquiry-based…

  18. A Framework for Analyzing Cognitive Demand and Content-Practices Integration: Task Analysis Guide in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekkumru-Kisa, Miray; Stein, Mary Kay; Schunn, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Many countries, including the United States, emphasize the importance of developing students' scientific habits of mind and their capacity to think deeply about scientific ideas in an integrated fashion. Recent science education policies in the United States portray a related vision of science teaching and learning that is meant to guide the…

  19. Critical Reading of Science-Based News Reports: Establishing a knowledge, skills and attitudes framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClune, Billy; Jarman, Ruth

    2010-04-01

    A recognised aim of science education is to promote critical engagement with science in the media. Evidence would suggest that this is challenging for both teachers and pupils and that science education does not yet adequately prepare young people for this task. Furthermore, in the absence of clear guidance as to what this means and how this may be achieved it is difficult for teachers to develop approaches and resources that address the matter and that systematically promote such critical engagement within their teaching programmes. Twenty-six individuals with recognised expertise or interest in science in the media, drawn from a range of disciplines and areas of practice, constituted a specialist panel in this study. The question this research sought to answer was "what are the elements of knowledge, skill, and attitude which underpin critical reading of science-based news reports?" During in-depth individual interviews the panel were asked to explore what they considered to be essential elements of knowledge, skills, and attitude which people need to enable them to respond critically to news reports with a science component. Analysis of the data revealed 14 fundamental elements which together contribute to an individual's capacity to engage critically with science-based news. These are classified in five categories "knowledge of science", "knowledge of writing and language", "knowledge about news, newspapers and journalism", "skills", and "attitudes". Illustrative profiles of each category along with indicators of critical engagement are presented. The implications for curriculum planning and pedagogy are considered.

  20. The Distinction between Experimental and Historical Sciences as a Framework for Improving Classroom Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Inquiry experiences in secondary science classrooms are heavily weighted toward experimentation. We know, however, that many fields of science (e.g., evolutionary biology, cosmology, and paleontology), while they may utilize experiments, are not justified by experimental methodologies. With the focus on experimentation in schools, these fields of…

  1. Exploring Science Educators' Cosmological Worldviews through the Binoculars of an Argumentation Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunniyi, M. B.

    2011-01-01

    The mandate of the new South African curriculum for educators to enact a science-indigenous knowledge curriculum in their classrooms is not only challenging to their cosmological beliefs, it is equally challenging to their instructional practices. This is because science educators (teachers) in South Africa have been schooled largely in western…

  2. Towards a Framework of Socio-Linguistic Analysis of Science Textbooks: The Greek Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimopoulos, Kostas; Koulaidis, Vasilis; Sklaveniti, Spyridoula

    2005-09-01

    This study aims at presenting a grid for analysing the way the language employed in Greek school science textbooks tends to project pedagogic messages. These messages are analysed for the different school science subjects (i.e., Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and educational levels (i.e., primary and lower secondary level). The analysis is made using the dimensions of content specialisation (classification) and social-pedagogic relationships (framing) promoted by the language of the school science textbooks as well as the elaboration and abstraction of the corresponding linguistic code (formality), thus combining pedagogical and socio-linguistic perspectives. Classification and formality are used to identify the ways science textbooks tend to position students in relation to the interior of the corresponding specialised body of knowledge (i.e., in terms of content and code) while framing is used to identify the ways science textbooks tend to position students as learning subjects within the school science discourse. The results show that the kind of pedagogic messages projected by the textbooks depends mainly on the educational level and not particularly on the specific discipline. As the educational level rises a gradual move towards more specialised forms of scientific knowledge (mainly in terms of code) with a parallel increase in the students' autonomy in accessing the textbook material is noticed. The implications concern the way both students and teachers approach science textbooks as well as the roles they can undertake by internalising the textbooks' pedagogic messages and also the way science textbooks are authored.

  3. Science Support: The Building Blocks of Active Data Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, A.

    2013-12-01

    While the scientific method is built on reproducibility and transparency, and results are published in peer reviewed literature, we have come to the digital age of very large datasets (now of the order of petabytes and soon exabytes) which cannot be published in the traditional way. To preserve reproducibility and transparency, active curation is necessary to keep and protect the information in the long term, and 'science support' activities provide the building blocks for active data curation. With the explosive growth of data in all fields in recent years, there is a pressing urge for data centres to now provide adequate services to ensure long-term preservation and digital curation of project data outputs, however complex those may be. Science support provides advice and support to science projects on data and information management, from file formats through to general data management awareness. Another purpose of science support is to raise awareness in the science community of data and metadata standards and best practice, engendering a culture where data outputs are seen as valued assets. At the heart of Science support is the Data Management Plan (DMP) which sets out a coherent approach to data issues pertaining to the data generating project. It provides an agreed record of the data management needs and issues within the project. The DMP is agreed upon with project investigators to ensure that a high quality documented data archive is created. It includes conditions of use and deposit to clearly express the ownership, responsibilities and rights associated with the data. Project specific needs are also identified for data processing, visualization tools and data sharing services. As part of the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), the Centre for Environmental Data Archival (CEDA) fulfills this science support role of facilitating atmospheric and Earth observation data generating projects to ensure

  4. What Preparatory Science is Needed in Coronal Structure and Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus will launch in six short years! Before then, we need to accomplish a great deal of science in order to be able to maximize the return of these missions. Preparatory science is especially important for exploratory missions such as SO and SPP, because they truly will be going "where no mission has gone before". Such preparatory science may include all types of research: theory, modeling, data exploitation, and supporting observations. This meeting provides an opportunity for the community to define and begin this critical preparatory work. In this talk I will provide an overview of our state of knowledge in coronal structure and activity, describe what I believe are the most promising opportunities for advances by SO and SPP, and lead a discussion on what programs need to be implemented now in order to achieve these science advances by the time SO and SPP launch.

  5. Developing a framework for critical science agency through case study in a conceptual physics context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sreyashi Jhumki; Calabrese Barton, Angela; Clairmont, Neil; Locke, Donya

    2009-06-01

    In this manuscript we examine how two students develop and express agency in and through high school physics. We tell the stories of two youth from a low-income, urban community to elucidate the important components of critical science agency in a physics context, and to situate a set of claims about how youth develop and express this concept. This research is part of a larger multiyear study of democratic practice in middle- and high-school science. We present three claims: (a) that critical science agency is intimately related to the leveraging and development of identity, (b) that critical science agency involves the strategic deployment of resources , and (c) that developing critical science agency is an iterative and generative process. Two university researchers have co-written this paper with the two students whose experiences serve as the cases under investigation, to provide both an "emic" perspective and student-focused voices that complement and challenge the researchers' voices.

  6. Science Art: Projects and Activities That Teach Science Concepts and Develop Process Skills. Grades 2-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schecter, Deborah

    The activities in this collection are designed to help teachers bring the worlds of science and art into the classroom. Each activity is both a hands-on science investigation and an art experience. As students create satisfying art projects, they utilize science skills such as observing, predicting, investigating, and communicating. The projects…

  7. An OpenEarth Framework (OEF) for Integrating and Visualizing Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, J. L.; Nadeau, D. R.; Baru, C.; Crosby, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The integration of data is essential to make transformative progress in understanding the complex processes operating at the Earth’s surface and within its interior. While our current ability to collect massive amounts of data, develop structural models, and generate high-resolution dynamics models is well developed, our ability to quantitatively integrate these data and models into holistic interpretations of Earth systems is poorly developed. We lack the basic tools to realize a first-order goal in Earth science of developing integrated 4D models of Earth structure and processes using a complete range of available constraints, at a time when the research agenda of major efforts such as EarthScope demand such a capability. Among the challenges to 3D data integration are data that may be in different coordinate spaces, units, value ranges, file formats, and data structures. While several file format standards exist, they are infrequently or incorrectly used. Metadata is often missing, misleading, or relegated to README text files along side the data. This leaves much of the work to integrate data bogged down by simple data management tasks. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) being developed by GEON addresses these data management difficulties. The software incorporates file format parsers, data interpretation heuristics, user interfaces to prompt for missing information, and visualization techniques to merge data into a common visual model. The OEF’s data access libraries parse formal and de facto standard file formats and map their data into a common data model. The software handles file format quirks, storage details, caching, local and remote file access, and web service protocol handling. Heuristics are used to determine coordinate spaces, units, and other key data features. Where multiple data structure, naming, and file organization conventions exist, those heuristics check for each convention’s use to find a high confidence interpretation of the data. When

  8. Learning Activity Package, Physical Science 92, LAPs 1-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, G. J.

    This set of nine teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in physical science covers the topics of scientific equipment and procedures; measure of time, length, area, and volume; water; oxygen and oxidation; atmospheric pressure; motion; machines; carbon; and light and sound. Each unit contains a rationale…

  9. Activities in planetary geology for the physical and earth sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalli, R.; Greeley, R.

    1982-01-01

    A users guide for teaching activities in planetary geology, and for physical and earth sciences is presented. The following topics are discussed: cratering; aeolian processes; planetary atmospheres, in particular the Coriolis Effect and storm systems; photogeologic mapping of other planets, Moon provinces and stratigraphy, planets in stereo, land form mapping of Moon, Mercury and Mars, and geologic features of Mars.

  10. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  11. Developing a Repertoire of Activities for Teaching Physical Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Peggy W.

    This activity manual is divided into 15 units which focus on: the nature of science; metric measurements; properties of matter; energy; atomic structure; chemical reactions; acids, bases, and salts; temperature and heat; readioactivity; mechanics; wave motion, sound, and light; static charges and current electricity magnetism and electromagnetism;…

  12. A Sample Science Education Activity in Multicultural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onder, Ismail; Kaplan, Aysun Oztuna; Besoluk, Senol

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a sample activity developed in the workshops called "Science education in multicultural environment" of the program "Integrative teaching in multicultural environment" was presented. Workshops about varied subjects were carried out by participants representing four countries and participants developed teaching materials by getting…

  13. Scientific and administrative activities at the Lunar Science Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The scientific and administrative activities of the Lunar Science Institute during the period 15 July through 31 December 1973 are reported. The subjects discussed are: (1) contributions of the organization, (2) organization of the staff, (3) administration functions, and (4) scientific and professional meetings held at the institute.

  14. Science on the Web: Web Activities Using Scientific Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poppe, Barbara; McAlister, Deborah; Richardson, Lisa

    This guide is intended to help teachers learn about using special software tools for the World Wide Web. It makes use of the scientific data produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other government agencies. Activities in this booklet include: (1) "Finding People in Cyberspace"; (2) "Finding Science on the Web";…

  15. Solar energy education. Renewable energy activities for general science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Renewable energy topics are integrated with the study of general science. The literature is provided in the form of a teaching manual and includes such topics as passive solar homes, siting a home for solar energy, and wind power for the home. Other energy topics are explored through library research activities. (BCS)

  16. Microgravity: Teacher's Guide with Activities for Physical Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, Gregory L.; Wargo, Michael J.

    This teacher's guide to microgravity contains 16 student science activities with full background information to facilitate an understanding of the concepts of microgravity for teachers and students. Topics covered in the background sections include the definitions of gravity and microgravity, creating microgravity, the fluid state, combustion…

  17. Active Classroom Participation in a Group Scribbles Primary Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wenli; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2011-01-01

    A key stimulus of learning efficacy for students in the classroom is active participation and engagement in the learning process. This study examines the nature of teacher-student and student-student discourse when leveraged by an interactive technology--Group Scribbles (GS) in a Primary 5 Science classroom in Singapore which supports rapid…

  18. Earth Science Big Data Activities at Research Data Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Baumann, Peter; Evans, Ben; Riedel, Morris

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation we introduce Earth science related activities of the Big Data Interest Group (BDIG) in Research Data Alliance (RDA). "RDA is an international organization focused on the development of infrastructure and community activities that reduce barriers to data sharing and exchange, and the acceleration of data driven innovation worldwide." The participation of researchers in RDA is voluntary. As the name implies, an Interest Group is a collection of participants sharing the same interest. The BDIG seeks to address community needs on all things having to do with Big Data. The ultimate goal of RDA Big Data Interest Group is to produce a set of recommendation documents to advise diverse research communities with respect to: • How to select an appropriate Big Data solution for a particular science application to realize optimal value? and • What are the best practices in dealing with various data and computing issues associated with such a solution? The primary means to reaching such recommendations is through the establishment and work of Working Groups, each of which focuses on a specific issue. Although BDIG is not specific to Earth science, its recent activities revolve mostly around it. We introduce some of these activities that are designed to advance our knowledge and to characterize Big Data in Earth science.

  19. 101 Environmental Education Activities. Booklet 5--Science & Social Studies (Interdisciplinary) Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Helen, Comp.

    Forestry is the main focus of this fifth booklet in the series "101 Environmental Education Activities" by the Upper Mississippi River ECO-Center. Designed for students in the intermediate grades and junior high school, the booklet contains 9 science and social studies activities and 5 interdisciplinary activities. Most activity descriptions…

  20. Earth Science Activities: A Guide to Effective Elementary School Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanis, Ira B.; Yasso, Warren E.

    The primary emphasis of this book is on new or revised earth science activities that promote concept development rather than mere verification of concepts learned by passive means. Chapter 2 describes philosophies, strategies, methods, and techniques to guide preservice and inservice teachers, school building administrators, and curriculum…

  1. Social Activism in Elementary Science Education: A Science, Technology, and Society Approach to Teach Global Warming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Benjamin T.; Ma, Li; Lee, Okhee; Lambert, Julie

    2006-01-01

    As part of a large-scale instructional intervention research, this study examined elementary students' science knowledge and awareness of social activism with regard to an increased greenhouse effect and global warming. The study involved fifth-grade students from five elementary schools of varying demographic makeup in a large urban school…

  2. A Preliminary Examination of Science Backroom Roles and Activities for Robotic Lunar Surface Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, T.; Deans, M.; Smith, T.; Lee, P.; Heldmann, J.; Pacis, E.; Schreckenghost, D.; Landis, R.; Osborn, J.; Kring, D.; Heggy, E.; Mishkin, A.; Snook, K.; Stoker, C.

    2008-07-01

    To understand the utility of a science backroom for the current lunar architecture, we are developing a new ground control structure for human and robot surface activity. In June 2008, we began examining this structure through a series of analog field tests.

  3. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and its activities

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza, Dr. Anthony R.

    2000-02-23

    This 1999 annual report of the activities of the National Research Council's (NRC) Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) begins with an introduction to the Board. This report (1) lists activities of the Board sustained by Department of Energy support, (2) presents accomplishments of the Board, (3) describes current and proposed studies of the Board, and (4) provides a brief review of the Board's future plans.

  4. Supporting Grade 5-8 Students in Constructing Explanations in Science: The Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning Framework for Talk and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Katherine L.; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    By providing a variety of strategies, scenarios, examples of student writing, classroom video clips from across all science content areas, rubrics, and guidelines for designing assessment items, "Supporting Grade 5-8 Students in Constructing Explanations in Science: The Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning Framework for Talk and Writing" provides…

  5. Towards Culturally Relevant Classroom Science: A Theoretical Framework Focusing on Traditional Plant Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mpofu, Vongai; Otulaja, Femi S.; Mushayikwa, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical framework is an important component of a research study. It grounds the study and guides the methodological design. It also forms a reference point for the interpretation of the research findings. This paper conceptually examines the process of constructing a multi-focal theoretical lens for guiding studies that aim to accommodate…

  6. PRESENTED AT: TURNOVO, BULGARIA: LANDSCAPE SCIENCES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT: A NATO FRAMEWORK FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An international pilot study has been developed to explore the possibility of quantifying and assessing environmental condition, processes of land degradation, and subsequent impacts on natural and human resources. The purpose of the study is to foster a framework for scientific...

  7. Science Activities for Teachers and Families To Explore with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdi, S. Wali; Freilich, Mark B.; Taylor, Satomi Izumi

    1998-01-01

    Describes science activities for preschool through primary-grade children, focusing on goals of science education, science processes, and characteristics of high-quality science activities. Notes that hands-on activities explore scientific concepts such as volume, gravity, heat conductivity, and condensation. (KB)

  8. Learning Activities That Combine Science Magic Activities with the 5E Instructional Model to Influence Secondary-School Students' Attitudes to Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jang-Long; Cheng, Meng-Fei; Chang, Ying-Chi; Li, Hsiao-Wen; Chang, Jih-Yuan; Lin, Deng-Min

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how learning materials based on Science Magic activities affect student attitudes to science. A quasi-experimental design was conducted to explore the combination of Science Magic with the 5E Instructional Model to develop learning materials for teaching a science unit about friction. The participants…

  9. Primary Bilingual Science Activities Handbook, Grades K-2, Spanish/English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Santa Irizarry; Best, Nancy Dougherty

    This handbook consists of 60 science activities, 20 each for kindergarten, grade 1, and grade 2. Each activity has five parts: (1) a science concept; (2) behavioral objectives; (3) motivational activity; (4) suggested class activity; and (5) questions. Activities are selected from the biological, earth, and physical sciences. The handbook is…

  10. Science Teacher Education in the Twenty-First Century: a Pedagogical Framework for Technology-Integrated Social Constructivism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, Miri

    2016-01-01

    Changes in our global world have shifted the skill demands from acquisition of structured knowledge to mastery of skills, often referred to as twenty-first century competencies. Given these changes, a sequential explanatory mixed methods study was undertaken to (a) examine predominant instructional methods and technologies used by teacher educators, (b) identify attributes for learning and teaching in the twenty-first century, and (c) develop a pedagogical framework for promoting meaningful usage of advanced technologies. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected via an online survey, personal interviews, and written reflections with science teacher educators and student teachers. Findings indicated that teacher educators do not provide sufficient models for the promotion of reform-based practice via web 2.0 environments, such as Wikis, blogs, social networks, or other cloud technologies. Findings also indicated four attributes for teaching and learning in the twenty-first century: (a) adapting to frequent changes and uncertain situations, (b) collaborating and communicating in decentralized environments, (c) generating data and managing information, and (d) releasing control by encouraging exploration. Guided by social constructivist paradigms and twenty-first century teaching attributes, this study suggests a pedagogical framework for fostering meaningful usage of advanced technologies in science teacher education courses.

  11. Undergraduate research experiences support science career decisions and active learning.

    PubMed

    Lopatto, David

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability of student evaluations of summer undergraduate research experiences using the SURE (Survey of Undergraduate Research Experiences) and a follow-up survey disseminated 9 mo later. The survey further examines the hypothesis that undergraduate research enhances the educational experience of science undergraduates, attracts and retains talented students to careers in science, and acts as a pathway for minority students into science careers. Undergraduates participated in an online survey on the benefits of undergraduate research experiences. Participants indicated gains on 20 potential benefits and reported on career plans. Most of the participants began or continued to plan for postgraduate education in the sciences. A small group of students who discontinued their plans for postgraduate science education reported significantly lower gains than continuing students. Women and men reported similar levels of benefits and similar patterns of career plans. Undergraduate researchers from underrepresented groups reported higher learning gains than comparison students. The results replicated previously reported data from this survey. The follow-up survey indicated that students reported gains in independence, intrinsic motivation to learn, and active participation in courses taken after the summer undergraduate research experience. PMID:18056301

  12. A framework for leveling informatics content across four years of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) curriculum.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Noreen; Borycki, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    While there are several published statements of nursing informatics competencies needed for the Bachelor of Science in nursing (BSN) graduate, faculty at schools of nursing has little guidance on how to incorporate the teaching of such competencies into curricula that are already overloaded with required content. The authors present a framework for addressing nursing informatics content within teaching plans that already exist in virtually all BSN programs. The framework is based on an organization of curriculum content that moves the learner from elementary to complex nursing concepts and ideas as a means to level the content. Further, the framework is organized around four broad content areas included in all curricula: professional responsibility, care delivery, community and population-based nursing, and leadership/management. Examples of informatics content to be addressed at each level and content area are provided. Lastly a practice-appraisal tool, the UVIC Informatics Practice Appraisal - BSN is presented as a means to track student learning and outcomes across the four years of a BSN program. PMID:23388314

  13. IsoWAN: A NASA Science and Engineering Information and Services Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsmeyer, David J.; Chow, Edward T.; Conroy, Michael P.; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We believe that the next evolutionary step in supporting wide-area application and services delivery to customers is a network framework that provides for collocation of applications and services at distinct sites in the network, an interconnection between these sites that is performance optimized for these applications, and value-added services for applications. We use the term IsoWAN to describe an advanced, isolated network interconnect services framework that will enable applications to be more secure, and able to access and be in use in both local and remote environments. The main functions of an IsoWAN are virtual localization of application services, an application service interface, coordinated delivery of applications and associated data to the customer, and supporting collaborative application development for customers. An initial pilot network between three NASA Centers: Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Marshall Space Flight Center, has been built and its properties will be discussed.

  14. Rural Science Education Research and the Frameworks that Give It Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, J. Steve

    2007-01-01

    Research in science education has evolved rapidly over the past ten to twelve years due to the growth of two components of most published research. Though it might be argued that they are not really new, these two components are today necessarily explicit whereas they were more implicit in the past. As research has become increasingly qualitative…

  15. An Integrated Framework for Improved Computer Science Education: Strategies, Implementations, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, Leen-Kiat; Samal, Ashok; Nugent, Gwen

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Reinventing Computer Science Curriculum Project at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Motivated by rapid and significant changes in the information technology and computing areas, high diversity in student aptitudes, and high dropout rates, the project designed and implemented an integrated instructional/research…

  16. A Framework for Designing Effective Professional Development: Science Teachers' Perspectives in a Context of Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EL-Deghaidy, Heba; Mansour, Nasser; Aldahmash, Abdulwali; Alshamrani, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores science teachers' experiences, views, and preferences of what constitutes effective teacher professional development. The research method utilised both quantitative and qualitative analyses. The former was used with responses from closed-ended questions while responses to an open-ended question were analysed qualitatively. The…

  17. Upper Secondary School Physical Science Curricula in New Zealand after the National Qualifications Framework Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Taylor, T. G. Neil

    2007-01-01

    The recent structural reforms in New Zealand education have given schools and teachers unprecedented freedom in curricular design and delivery. Using official educational award statistics for 2004 and data arising from a study of 23 schools' upper secondary science curricula in the same year, this study represents an early monitoring of the impact…

  18. A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Science, engineering, and technology permeate nearly every facet of modern life and hold the key to solving many of humanity's most pressing current and future challenges. The United States' position in the global economy is declining, in part because U.S. workers lack fundamental knowledge in these fields. To address the critical issues of U.S.…

  19. A Framework for Practical Work in Science and Scientific Literacy through Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gott, R.; Duggan, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper draws on earlier work on ideas that underpin the collection and use of evidence in science in schools. It establishes that different types of practical work share the same procedural underpinnings. It then takes the work of Toulmin on argumentation to suggest that the idea of the "public claim" can be used to forge a link between…

  20. Collision of Epistemological Frameworks: Religion and Social Science's Unshared Understanding of Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Religious scholars and social science experts frequently differ and sometimes clash when writing and discussing issues of ethics. Sometimes unshared understandings on fundamental world-view issues is the etiology for these differences. Differences in defining truth, whether philosophically or empirically, often is at the root etiology in these…

  1. Establishing a Pedagogical Framework for the Multicultural Course in Communication Sciences and Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton-Ikard, RaMonda; Munoz, Maria L.; Thomas-Tate, Shurita; Keller-Bell, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of a model for teaching a foundational course in multicultural (MC) issues and to demonstrate how it can be modified for use in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) by integrating 3 primary dimensions of cultural competence: awareness, knowledge, and skills. Method: This tutorial begins by establishing the…

  2. A Comparative Framework for Studying the Histories of the Humanities and Science.

    PubMed

    Bod, Rens

    2015-06-01

    While the humanities and the sciences have a closely connected history, there are no general histories that bring the two fields together on an equal footing. This paper argues that there is a level at which some humanistic and scientific disciplines can be brought under a common denominator and compared. This is at the level of underlying methods, especially at the level of formalisms and rule systems used by different disciplines. The essay formally compares linguistics and computer science by noting that the same grammar formalism was used in the 1950s for describing both human and. programming languages. Additionally, it examines the influence of philology on molecular biology, and vice versa, by recognizing that the tree-formalism and rule system used for text reconstruction was also employed in DNA genetics. It also shows that rule systems for source criticism in history are used in forensic science, evidence-based medicine, and jurisprudence. This paper thus opens up a new comparative approach within which the histories of the humanities and the sciences can be examined on a common level. PMID:26353441

  3. Informatics Science and Technology for Development in Latin America: Towards a Conceptual Framework for Comparative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogeboom, Richard L.

    The information-based technologies and the accompanying managerial sciences have come to symbolize the ideology of progress and operate as a material instrumentality in social governance systems. Developing countries have incorporated the technologies, but have lacked a developed knowledge or service sector; the linkage of…

  4. Frameworks for Africa-UK Research Collaboration in the Social Sciences and Humanities: African University Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harle, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    This report was commissioned by the British Academy's Africa Panel to examine the challenges facing African universities when undertaking collaborative research with UK and other international partners, particularly in the social sciences and humanities. It draws principally on a consultation undertaken by the Association of Commonwealth…

  5. Computer Science Education as a Cultural Encounter: A Socio-Cultural Framework for Articulating Teaching Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolikant, Yifat Ben-David

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates the power of the cultural encounter metaphor in explaining learning and teaching difficulties, using as an example computer science education (CSE). CSE is envisioned as an encounter between veterans of two computer-oriented cultures, that of the teachers and that of the students. Forty questionnaires administered to CS…

  6. Supporting Reform-Oriented Secondary Science Teaching Through the Use of a Framework to Analyze Construction of Scientific Explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Gail; Parker, Joyce M.; Kaldaras, Leonora

    2016-08-01

    The Next-Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for a different approach to learning science. They promote three-dimensional (3D) learning that blends disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts and scientific practices. In this study, we examined explanations constructed by secondary science teacher candidates (TCs) as a scientific practice outlined in the NGSS necessary for supporting students' learning of science in this 3D way. We examined TCs' ability to give explanations that include explicit statements of underlying reasons for natural phenomena, as opposed to simply describing patterns or laws. In their methods courses, TCs were taught to organize explanations into a what/how/why framework, where what refers to what happens in specific cases (data or observations); how refers to how things usually happen and is equivalent to patterns or laws; and why refers to causal explanations or models. We examined TCs' ability to do this spontaneously and in a resource-rich environment as a first step in gauging their preparedness for NGSS-aligned teaching. We found that (1) the ability of TCs to articulate complete and accurate causal scientific explanations for phenomena exists along a continuum; (2) TCs in our sample whose explanations fell on the upper end of this continuum were more likely to provide complete and accurate explanations even in the absence of support from explicit standards; and (3) teacher candidate's ability to construct complete and accurate explanations did not correlate with cross-course performance or academic major. The implications of these findings for the preparation of teachers for NGSS-based science instruction are discussed.

  7. Supporting Reform-Oriented Secondary Science Teaching Through the Use of a Framework to Analyze Construction of Scientific Explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Gail; Parker, Joyce M.; Kaldaras, Leonora

    2016-05-01

    The Next-Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for a different approach to learning science. They promote three-dimensional (3D) learning that blends disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts and scientific practices. In this study, we examined explanations constructed by secondary science teacher candidates (TCs) as a scientific practice outlined in the NGSS necessary for supporting students' learning of science in this 3D way. We examined TCs' ability to give explanations that include explicit statements of underlying reasons for natural phenomena, as opposed to simply describing patterns or laws. In their methods courses, TCs were taught to organize explanations into a what/how/why framework, where what refers to what happens in specific cases (data or observations); how refers to how things usually happen and is equivalent to patterns or laws; and why refers to causal explanations or models. We examined TCs' ability to do this spontaneously and in a resource-rich environment as a first step in gauging their preparedness for NGSS-aligned teaching. We found that (1) the ability of TCs to articulate complete and accurate causal scientific explanations for phenomena exists along a continuum; (2) TCs in our sample whose explanations fell on the upper end of this continuum were more likely to provide complete and accurate explanations even in the absence of support from explicit standards; and (3) teacher candidate's ability to construct complete and accurate explanations did not correlate with cross-course performance or academic major. The implications of these findings for the preparation of teachers for NGSS-based science instruction are discussed.

  8. Geo-Semantic Framework for Integrating Long-Tail Data and Model Resources for Advancing Earth System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, M.; Kumar, P.

    2014-12-01

    Often, scientists and small research groups collect data, which target to address issues and have limited geographic or temporal range. A large number of such collections together constitute a large database that is of immense value to Earth Science studies. Complexity of integrating these data include heterogeneity in dimensions, coordinate systems, scales, variables, providers, users and contexts. They have been defined as long-tail data. Similarly, we use "long-tail models" to characterize a heterogeneous collection of models and/or modules developed for targeted problems by individuals and small groups, which together provide a large valuable collection. Complexity of integrating across these models include differing variable names and units for the same concept, model runs at different time steps and spatial resolution, use of differing naming and reference conventions, etc. Ability to "integrate long-tail models and data" will provide an opportunity for the interoperability and reusability of communities' resources, where not only models can be combined in a workflow, but each model will be able to discover and (re)use data in application specific context of space, time and questions. This capability is essential to represent, understand, predict, and manage heterogeneous and interconnected processes and activities by harnessing the complex, heterogeneous, and extensive set of distributed resources. Because of the staggering production rate of long-tail models and data resulting from the advances in computational, sensing, and information technologies, an important challenge arises: how can geoinformatics bring together these resources seamlessly, given the inherent complexity among model and data resources that span across various domains. We will present a semantic-based framework to support integration of "long-tail" models and data. This builds on existing technologies including: (i) SEAD (Sustainable Environmental Actionable Data) which supports curation

  9. Game-display board activities for science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C. M.; Mak, S. Y.; Suen, Y. M.; Sze, Paul

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents samples of game-display board activities developed by the instructors, technicians, and teacher-participants of the course "The Teaching of Integrated Science" within the Postgraduate Diploma in Education program offered by the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Designed for junior high science classes, the board activities employ ideas from traditional seatwork and end-of-chapter exercises, such as matching, multiple choice, word puzzles and summary tables. The activities are carried out by means of a vertical magnetic white board and magnetic backed word and picture cards. Unlike ordinary paper-and-pencil exercises which are usually done by students individually, game-display board activities facilitate classroom interaction by providing a center of attention to every student. Moreover, because of the game element involved, these activities foster group cooperation as well as allow whole-class participation. Comprehensive samples of the activities will be provided in this paper. A study of the teacher-participants' attitudes toward the activities will also be reported.

  10. Realist complex intervention science: Applying realist principles across all phases of the Medical Research Council framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Adam; Jamal, Farah; Moore, Graham; Evans, Rhiannon E.; Murphy, Simon; Bonell, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The integration of realist evaluation principles within randomised controlled trials (‘realist RCTs’) enables evaluations of complex interventions to answer questions about what works, for whom and under what circumstances. This allows evaluators to better develop and refine mid-level programme theories. However, this is only one phase in the process of developing and evaluating complex interventions. We describe and exemplify how social scientists can integrate realist principles across all phases of the Medical Research Council framework. Intervention development, modelling, and feasibility and pilot studies need to theorise the contextual conditions necessary for intervention mechanisms to be activated. Where interventions are scaled up and translated into routine practice, realist principles also have much to offer in facilitating knowledge about longer-term sustainability, benefits and harms. Integrating a realist approach across all phases of complex intervention science is vital for considering the feasibility and likely effects of interventions for different localities and population subgroups. PMID:27478401

  11. Proposed Social Sciences Education Framework for California Public Schools. Report of the Statewide Social Sciences Study Committee to the State Curriculum Commission and the California State Board of Education. Kindergarten and Grades One through Twelve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This framework is intended to be a flexible starting point for innovation, evaluation, and revision of curriculum and instructional programs. Here the social sciences also include: area studies (citizenship, conservation, comparative religions, ethnic studies, and contemporary affairs), and are linked with the natural sciences in comparing man…

  12. 2008 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Family and Consumer Sciences. (Program CIP: 19.9999 - Family and Consumer Sciences)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosetti, Pamela; Byrd, Jenean; West, Brenda; Bigham, Melody

    2008-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  13. A Framework For Using GPS Data In Physical Activity And Sedentary Behavior Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska, Marta M.; Schipperijn, Jasper; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are increasingly applied in activity studies, yet significant theoretical and methodological challenges remain. This paper presents a framework for integrating GPS data with other technologies to create dynamic representations of behaviors in context. Utilizing more accurate and sensitive measures to link behavior and environmental exposures allows for new research questions and methods to be developed. PMID:25390297

  14. Activity Theory as a Conceptual Framework for Understanding Teacher Approaches to Information and Communication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasavvidis, Ilias

    2009-01-01

    While the issue of teachers' perspectives on the barriers to technology use has received considerable attention, teacher concerns have not been studied in a systematic and holistic way. The present paper examines teacher concerns regarding a proposed technology-based innovation using Activity Theory as a theoretical framework. Fifty-one teachers…

  15. Using the RE-AIM framework to evaluate physical activity public health programs in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity (PA) public health programming has been widely used in Mexico; however, few studies have documented individual and organizational factors that might be used to evaluate their public health impact. The RE-AIM framework is an evaluation tool that examines individual and organizationa...

  16. A Framework for Physical Activity Programs within School-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Acker, Ragnar; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; De Martelaer, Kristine; Seghers, Jan; Kirk, David; Haerens, Leen; De Cocker, Katrien; Cardon, Greet

    2011-01-01

    School-community partnerships have shown their potential as incubators for innovations and for contributing to comprehensive physical activity (PA) programs. However, implementation frameworks for school-community partnerships that allow local tailoring of PA programs remain scarce. The present paper aims at documenting the composition of a…

  17. Designing a robust activity recognition framework for health and exergaming using wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Alshurafa, Nabil; Xu, Wenyao; Liu, Jason J; Huang, Ming-Chun; Mortazavi, Bobak; Roberts, Christian K; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2014-09-01

    Detecting human activity independent of intensity is essential in many applications, primarily in calculating metabolic equivalent rates and extracting human context awareness. Many classifiers that train on an activity at a subset of intensity levels fail to recognize the same activity at other intensity levels. This demonstrates weakness in the underlying classification method. Training a classifier for an activity at every intensity level is also not practical. In this paper, we tackle a novel intensity-independent activity recognition problem where the class labels exhibit large variability, the data are of high dimensionality, and clustering algorithms are necessary. We propose a new robust stochastic approximation framework for enhanced classification of such data. Experiments are reported using two clustering techniques, K-Means and Gaussian Mixture Models. The stochastic approximation algorithm consistently outperforms other well-known classification schemes which validate the use of our proposed clustered data representation. We verify the motivation of our framework in two applications that benefit from intensity-independent activity recognition. The first application shows how our framework can be used to enhance energy expenditure calculations. The second application is a novel exergaming environment aimed at using games to reward physical activity performed throughout the day, to encourage a healthy lifestyle. PMID:24235280

  18. S.E.A. Lab. Science Experiments and Activities. Marine Science for High School Students in Chemistry, Biology and Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Kathy, Ed.

    A series of science experiments and activities designed for secondary school students taking biology, chemistry, physics, physical science or marine science courses are outlined. Each of the three major sections--chemistry, biology, and physics--addresses concepts that are generally covered in those courses but incorporates aspects of marine…

  19. Report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity for the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    This report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) has been prepared in response to a recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board that, ''Given the complex nature of the fusion effort, an integrated program planning process is an absolute necessity.'' We, therefore, undertook this activity in order to integrate the various elements of the program, to improve communication and performance accountability across the program, and to show the inter-connectedness and inter-dependency of the diverse parts of the national fusion energy sciences program. This report is based on the September 1999 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee's (FESAC) report ''Priorities and Balance within the Fusion Energy Sciences Program''. In its December 5,2000, letter to the Director of the Office of Science, the FESAC has reaffirmed the validity of the September 1999 report and stated that the IPPA presents a framework and process to guide the achievement of the 5-year goals listed in the 1999 report. The National Research Council's (NRC) Fusion Assessment Committee draft final report ''An Assessment of the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Program'', reviewing the quality of the science in the program, was made available after the IPPA report had been completed. The IPPA report is, nevertheless, consistent with the recommendations in the NRC report. In addition to program goals and the related 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year objectives, this report elaborates on the scientific issues associated with each of these objectives. The report also makes clear the relationships among the various program elements, and cites these relationships as the reason why integrated program planning is essential. In particular, while focusing on the science conducted by the program, the report addresses the important balances between the science and energy goals of the program, between the MFE and IFE approaches, and between the domestic and international aspects

  20. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for earth science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A teaching manual is provided to aid teachers in introducing renewable energy topics to earth science students. The main emphasis is placed on solar energy. Activities for the student include a study of the greenhouse effect, solar gain for home heating, measuring solar radiation, and the construction of a model solar still to obtain fresh water. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate a solar still, the greenhouse effect and measurement of the altitude and azimuth of the sun are included. (BCS)

  1. INDIGO: Building a DataCloud Framework to support Open Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin; de Lucas, Jesus Marco; Aguilar, Fenando; Fiore, Sandro; Rossi, Massimiliano; Ferrari, Tiziana

    2016-04-01

    New solutions are required to support Data Intensive Science in the emerging panorama of e-infrastructures, including Grid, Cloud and HPC services. The architecture proposed by the INDIGO-DataCloud (INtegrating Distributed data Infrastructures for Global ExplOitation) (https://www.indigo-datacloud.eu/) H2020 project, provides the path to integrate IaaS resources and PaaS platforms to provide SaaS solutions, while satisfying the requirements posed by different Research Communities, including several in Earth Science. This contribution introduces the INDIGO DataCloud architecture, describes the methodology followed to assure the integration of the requirements from different research communities, including examples like ENES, LifeWatch or EMSO, and how they will build their solutions using different INDIGO components.

  2. Map, Excite, Jump, and Measure: An Outreach Activity That Utilizes Seismology to Engage Students in Technology, Science, Engineering, and Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lee, S.; Tekverk, K.; Rooney, K.; Boxerman, J.

    2013-12-01

    We designed and will present a lesson plan to teach students STEM concepts through seismology. The plan addresses new generation science standards in the Framework for K-12 Science Education as well AAAS Benchmarks for Science Literacy. The plan can be executed at a facility with a seismometer in a research facility or university, on a field trip, but it can also be used in a school setting with a school seismometer. Within the lesson plan, the students first use technology to obtain earthquake location data and map them. Next, the students learn about the science of earthquakes, which is followed by an engineering activity in which the students design a hypothetical seismometer and interact with the actual seismometer and live data display. Lastly the students use mathematics to locate an earthquake through trilateration. The lesson plan has been fine-tuned through implementation with over 150 students from grades 3-12 from the Chicago area.

  3. Configurable User Interface Framework for Data Discovery in Cross-Disciplinary and Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozell, E.; Wang, H.; West, P.; Zednik, S.; Fox, P.

    2012-04-01

    Use cases for data discovery and analysis vary widely when looking across disciplines and levels of expertise. Domain experts across disciplines may have a thorough understanding of self-describing data formats, such as netCDF, and the software packages that are compatible. However, they may be unfamiliar with specific vocabulary terms used to describe the data parameters or instrument packages in someone else's collection, which are often useful in data discovery. Citizen scientists may struggle with both expert vocabularies and knowledge of existing tools for analyzing and visualizing data. There are some solutions for each problem individually. For expert vocabularies, semantic technologies like the Resource Description Framework (RDF) have been used to map terms from an expert vocabulary to layperson terminology. For data analysis and visualization, tools can be mapped to data products using semantic technologies as well. This presentation discusses a solution to both problems based on the S2S Framework, a configurable user interface (UI) framework for Web services. S2S unifies the two solutions previously described using a data service abstraction ("search services") and a UI abstraction ("widgets"). Using the OWL Web Ontology Language, S2S defines a vocabulary for describing search services and their outputs, and the compatibility of those outputs with UI widgets. By linking search service outputs to widgets, S2S can automatically compose UIs for search and analysis of data, making it easier for citizen scientists to manipulate data. We have also created Linked Data widgets for S2S, which can leverage distributed RDF resources to present alternative views of expert vocabularies. This presentation covers some examples where we have applied these solutions to improve data discovery for both cross-disciplinary and non-expert users.

  4. Metal-organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Phoebe K; Wheatley, Paul S; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A; Megson, Ian L; Chapman, Karena W; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E

    2012-04-02

    Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

  5. Promoting Female Students' Learning Motivation towards Science by Exercising Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen-jin, Kuo; Chia-ju, Liu; Shi-an, Leou

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design different hands-on science activities and investigate which activities could better promote female students' learning motivation towards science. This study conducted three types of science activities which contains nine hands-on activities, an experience scale and a learning motivation scale for data…

  6. Education of natural science in the work of the Municipal Center for Extracurricular Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokin, I.

    2012-04-01

    . The necessity for key competences to improve their educational achievements is a part of the strategies of the European Union for spiritual growth, professional realization and sustainable development. The basic knowledge in the field of natural sciences and technologies is one of the eight equally important key competences presented in the European Reference Framework adopted in 2006 by the European Parliament and the Council of Europe. The educative work through extracurricular activities provides an opportunity to acquire these skills and so to achieve the inter-subject standards in education. The used methods and modes of work are active with regard to the realized activities: project training (method of J. Dewey), working groups, round tables, role games, learning and upbringing through cooperation (method of Kegan).

  7. Elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education aligned with STEM designed projects created by Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade students in a Reggio Emilio project approach setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, Nicole

    This paper examines how elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education standards (National Research Council 2011)---specifically the cross-cutting concept "cause and effect" are aligned with early childhood students' creation of projects of their choice. The study took place in a Reggio Emilio-inspired, K-12 school, in a multi-aged kindergarten, first and second grade classroom with 14 students. Students worked on their projects independently with the assistance of their peers and teachers. The students' projects and the alignment with the Next Generation Science Standards' New Framework were analyzed by using pre and post assessments, student interviews, and discourse analysis. Results indicate that elements of the New Framework for K-12 Science Education emerged through students' project presentation, particularly regarding the notion of "cause and effect". More specifically, results show that initially students perceived the relationship between "cause and effect" to be negative.

  8. Enhancing Earth Science And IT Literacy Through Environmental Science Information Technology Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuff, K. E.; Molinaro, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Environmental Science Information Technology Activities (ESITA) program provides grades 9 and 10 students with under-represented minority backgrounds in the East San Francisco Bay Area with real-world opportunities to learn about and apply information technologies through a series of project-based activities related to environmental science. Supported by the NSF Information Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program, ESITA activities engage students in the use of newly acquired information technology (IT) skills and understandings while performing air and water quality research investigations. One project that ESITA students have become involved in relates to the currently relevant issue of elevated levels of lead found in drinking waters in Washington, D.C. Students based in the Bay Area have initiated and maintained E-mail correspondence with children who attend elementary schools in the D.C. area. After receiving a thorough explanation of required sampling procedures devised by the Bay Area students, the elementary school children have sent 500 ml water samples from their homes and schools to Berkeley along with information about the locations from which the water samples were collected. These samples were then prepared for lead analysis at Lawrence Hall of Science by ESITA students, who used resulting data to perform a preliminary assessment of the geospatial distribution of lead trouble spots throughout Washington, DC. Later, ESITA student scientists will work with students from the UC Berkeley School of Public Health to develop surveys and questionnaires that generate high quality information useful with regard to assessing the impact of the current lead crisis on younger children in the Washington, D.C. area. Through the application of new understandings to current, real-world environmental problems and issues such as that related to lead, positive changes in students' attitudes towards IT and science have occurred, which accompany

  9. On the Design of Smart Homes: A Framework for Activity Recognition in Home Environment.

    PubMed

    Cicirelli, Franco; Fortino, Giancarlo; Giordano, Andrea; Guerrieri, Antonio; Spezzano, Giandomenico; Vinci, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    A smart home is a home environment enriched with sensing, actuation, communication and computation capabilities which permits to adapt it to inhabitants preferences and requirements. Establishing a proper strategy of actuation on the home environment can require complex computational tasks on the sensed data. This is the case of activity recognition, which consists in retrieving high-level knowledge about what occurs in the home environment and about the behaviour of the inhabitants. The inherent complexity of this application domain asks for tools able to properly support the design and implementation phases. This paper proposes a framework for the design and implementation of smart home applications focused on activity recognition in home environments. The framework mainly relies on the Cloud-assisted Agent-based Smart home Environment (CASE) architecture offering basic abstraction entities which easily allow to design and implement Smart Home applications. CASE is a three layered architecture which exploits the distributed multi-agent paradigm and the cloud technology for offering analytics services. Details about how to implement activity recognition onto the CASE architecture are supplied focusing on the low-level technological issues as well as the algorithms and the methodologies useful for the activity recognition. The effectiveness of the framework is shown through a case study consisting of a daily activity recognition of a person in a home environment. PMID:27468841

  10. Improving condition severity classification with an efficient active learning based framework.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Nir; Boland, Mary Regina; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Elovici, Yuval; Hripcsak, George; Shahar, Yuval; Moskovitch, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Classification of condition severity can be useful for discriminating among sets of conditions or phenotypes, for example when prioritizing patient care or for other healthcare purposes. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) represent a rich source of labeled information that can be harnessed for severity classification. The labeling of EHRs is expensive and in many cases requires employing professionals with high level of expertise. In this study, we demonstrate the use of Active Learning (AL) techniques to decrease expert labeling efforts. We employ three AL methods and demonstrate their ability to reduce labeling efforts while effectively discriminating condition severity. We incorporate three AL methods into a new framework based on the original CAESAR (Classification Approach for Extracting Severity Automatically from Electronic Health Records) framework to create the Active Learning Enhancement framework (CAESAR-ALE). We applied CAESAR-ALE to a dataset containing 516 conditions of varying severity levels that were manually labeled by seven experts. Our dataset, called the "CAESAR dataset," was created from the medical records of 1.9 million patients treated at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). All three AL methods decreased labelers' efforts compared to the learning methods applied by the original CAESER framework in which the classifier was trained on the entire set of conditions; depending on the AL strategy used in the current study, the reduction ranged from 48% to 64% that can result in significant savings, both in time and money. As for the PPV (precision) measure, CAESAR-ALE achieved more than 13% absolute improvement in the predictive capabilities of the framework when classifying conditions as severe. These results demonstrate the potential of AL methods to decrease the labeling efforts of medical experts, while increasing accuracy given the same (or even a smaller) number of acquired conditions. We also demonstrated that the methods included in

  11. A unified framework for activity recognition-based behavior analysis and action prediction in smart homes.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Iram; Fahim, Muhammad; Lee, Young-Koo; Lee, Sungyoung

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, activity recognition in smart homes is an active research area due to its applicability in many applications, such as assistive living and healthcare. Besides activity recognition, the information collected from smart homes has great potential for other application domains like lifestyle analysis, security and surveillance, and interaction monitoring. Therefore, discovery of users common behaviors and prediction of future actions from past behaviors become an important step towards allowing an environment to provide personalized service. In this paper, we develop a unified framework for activity recognition-based behavior analysis and action prediction. For this purpose, first we propose kernel fusion method for accurate activity recognition and then identify the significant sequential behaviors of inhabitants from recognized activities of their daily routines. Moreover, behaviors patterns are further utilized to predict the future actions from past activities. To evaluate the proposed framework, we performed experiments on two real datasets. The results show a remarkable improvement of 13.82% in the accuracy on average of recognized activities along with the extraction of significant behavioral patterns and precise activity predictions with 6.76% increase in F-measure. All this collectively help in understanding the users" actions to gain knowledge about their habits and preferences. PMID:23435057

  12. A Unified Framework for Activity Recognition-Based Behavior Analysis and Action Prediction in Smart Homes

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Iram; Fahim, Muhammad; Lee, Young-Koo; Lee, Sungyoung

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, activity recognition in smart homes is an active research area due to its applicability in many applications, such as assistive living and healthcare. Besides activity recognition, the information collected from smart homes has great potential for other application domains like lifestyle analysis, security and surveillance, and interaction monitoring. Therefore, discovery of users common behaviors and prediction of future actions from past behaviors become an important step towards allowing an environment to provide personalized service. In this paper, we develop a unified framework for activity recognition-based behavior analysis and action prediction. For this purpose, first we propose kernel fusion method for accurate activity recognition and then identify the significant sequential behaviors of inhabitants from recognized activities of their daily routines. Moreover, behaviors patterns are further utilized to predict the future actions from past activities. To evaluate the proposed framework, we performed experiments on two real datasets. The results show a remarkable improvement of 13.82% in the accuracy on average of recognized activities along with the extraction of significant behavioral patterns and precise activity predictions with 6.76% increase in F-measure. All this collectively help in understanding the users” actions to gain knowledge about their habits and preferences. PMID:23435057

  13. A role of decision-making competency in science learning utilizing a social valuation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuo, Akihito

    2005-11-01

    The role of decision-making in learning performance has been an occasional topic in the research literature in science education, but rarely has it been a central issue in the field. Nonetheless, recent studies regarding the topic in several fields other than education, such as cognitive neuroscience and social choice theory, indicate the fundamental importance(s) of the topic. This study focuses on a possible role of decision-making in science learning. Initially the study was designed to probe the decision-making ability of elementary school children with a modified version of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). The experiment involved six Montessori 3rd and 4th grade students as the experimental group and eight public school 3rd and 4th grade students as the control group. The result of the modified IGT revealed a tendency in choice trajectories favoring children at the Montessori school. However, the probabilistic value went below the statistically significant level set by the U test. A further study focused on the impact of better decision-making ability revealed in the first experiment on performances with a science learning module that emphasized collective reasoning. The instruction was based on a set of worksheets with multiple choices on which students were asked to make predictions with and to provide supportive arguments regarding outcomes of experiments introduced in the worksheet. Then the whole class was involved with a real experiment to see which choice was correct. The findings in the study indicated that the Montessori students often obtained higher scores than non-Montessori students in making decision with a tendency of consistency in terms of their choices of the alternatives on the worksheets. The findings of the experiments were supported by a correlational analysis that was performed at the end of study. Although no statistically significant correlations were found, there was a tendency for positively associative shifts between the scores of the

  14. Data Prospecting Framework - a new approach to explore "big data" in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, R.; Rushing, J.; Lin, A.; Kuo, K.

    2012-12-01

    Due to advances in sensors, computation and storage, cost and effort required to produce large datasets have been significantly reduced. As a result, we are seeing a proliferation of large-scale data sets being assembled in almost every science field, especially in geosciences. Opportunities to exploit the "big data" are enormous as new hypotheses can be generated by combining and analyzing large amounts of data. However, such a data-driven approach to science discovery assumes that scientists can find and isolate relevant subsets from vast amounts of available data. Current Earth Science data systems only provide data discovery through simple metadata and keyword-based searches and are not designed to support data exploration capabilities based on the actual content. Consequently, scientists often find themselves downloading large volumes of data, struggling with large amounts of storage and learning new analysis technologies that will help them separate the wheat from the chaff. New mechanisms of data exploration are needed to help scientists discover the relevant subsets We present data prospecting, a new content-based data analysis paradigm to support data-intensive science. Data prospecting allows the researchers to explore big data in determining and isolating data subsets for further analysis. This is akin to geo-prospecting in which mineral sites of interest are determined over the landscape through screening methods. The resulting "data prospects" only provide an interaction with and feel for the data through first-look analytics; the researchers would still have to download the relevant datasets and analyze them deeply using their favorite analytical tools to determine if the datasets will yield new hypotheses. Data prospecting combines two traditional categories of data analysis, data exploration and data mining within the discovery step. Data exploration utilizes manual/interactive methods for data analysis such as standard statistical analysis and

  15. The application of language-game theory to the analysis of science learning: Developing an interpretive classroom-level learning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadibasir, Mohammad

    In this study an interpretive learning framework that aims to measure learning on the classroom level is introduced. In order to develop and evaluate the value of the framework, a theoretical/empirical study is designed. The researcher attempted to illustrate how the proposed framework provides insights on the problem of classroom-level learning. The framework is developed by construction of connections between the current literature on science learning and Wittgenstein's language-game theory. In this framework learning is defined as change of classroom language-game or discourse. In the proposed framework, learning is measured by analysis of classroom discourse. The empirical explanation power of the framework is evaluated by applying the framework in the analysis of learning in a fifth-grade science classroom. The researcher attempted to analyze how students' colloquial discourse changed to a discourse that bears more resemblance to science discourse. The results of the empirical part of the investigation are presented in three parts: first, the gap between what students did and what they were supposed to do was reported. The gap showed that students during the classroom inquiry wanted to do simple comparisons by direct observation, while they were supposed to do tool-assisted observation and procedural manipulation for a complete comparison. Second, it was illustrated that the first attempt to connect the colloquial to science discourse was done by what was immediately intelligible for students and then the teacher negotiated with students in order to help them to connect the old to the new language-game more purposefully. The researcher suggested that these two events in the science classroom are critical in discourse change. Third, it was illustrated that through the academic year, the way that students did the act of comparison was improved and by the end of the year more accurate causal inferences were observable in classroom communication. At the end of the

  16. Experimental and credentialing capital: an adaptable framework for facilitating science outreach for underrepresented youth.

    PubMed

    Drazan, John F; D'Amato, Anthony R; Winkelman, Max A; Littlejohn, Aaron J; Johnson, Christopher; Ledet, Eric H; Eglash, Ron

    2015-08-01

    Increasing the numbers of black, latino and native youth in STEM careers is both an important way to reduce poverty in low income communities, and a contribution to the diversity of thought and experience that drives STEM research. But underrepresented youth are often alienated from STEM. Two new forms of social capital have been identified that can be combined to create a learning environment in which students and researchers can meet and explore an area of shared interest. Experimental capital refers to the intrinsic motivation that students can develop when they learn inquiry techniques for exploring topics that they feel ownership over. Credentialing capital denotes a shared interest and ability between all parties engaged in the experimental endeavor. These two forms of social capital form an adaptable framework for researchers to use to create effective outreach programs. In this case study sports biomechanics was utilized as the area of shared interest and understanding the slam dunk was used as experimental capital. PMID:26737094

  17. The use of ethical frameworks by students following a new science course for 16 18 year-olds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Michael

    2008-09-01

    There has been a move in recent years towards the greater inclusion of social and ethical issues within science courses. This paper examines a new context-based course for 16 18 year-olds (Salters-Nuffield Advanced Biology) who are studying biology in England and Wales. The course is taught through contexts and has an emphasis on social issues and the development of ethical reasoning. Examination of a sample of reports written by students in 2005 as part of the course’s summative assessment shows that utilitarian ethical reasoning is used widely and that the other ethical frameworks to which students are introduced in the course—rights and duties, autonomy and virtue ethics—are used substantially less often. In addition, students mostly argue anthropocentrically though many of them argue ecocentrically and/or biocentrically too.

  18. Integrated Modeling in Earth and Space Sciences: An Information Theoretic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Kalnay, E.

    2011-12-01

    Most natural phenomena exhibit multiscale behavior, which is an underlying reason for the challenges in modeling them. The recognition that the key problems, such as extreme events, natural hazards and climate change, require multi-disciplinary approaches to develop models that integrate many natural and anthropogenic phenomena, demand new approaches in the modeling of such systems. Information theory, which emphasizes the inherent features in observational data independent of modeling assumptions, can be used to develop a framework for multi-disciplinary models by integrating the data of the leading processes in multiple systems. An important measure of the inter-relationship among the different phenomena is the lead time among them. The widely used quantities such as the cross-correlation function represent the linear dependence among the variables and are limited in their ability to describe complex driven systems which are essentially nonlinear. The mutual information function, which represents the expectation of the average degree of dependence incorporating all orders of nonlinearity, provides the characteristic times inherent in the data and can be used as the first step to the development of integrated models. This function is used in two systems with widely separated time scales. The first case is the solar wind - magnetosphere interaction and the correlated data yield ~ 5 hr as the inherent time scale for the magnetospheric processes. The second case is a study of the inter-relationship between natural and anthropogenic phenomena and the mutual information functions were computed from the data of the global gross product, temperature and population. These functions show a time delay of ~15 yrs between the changes in global temperature and population as well as gross product, thus providing a measure of the interdependency among the variables underlying climate change. The results from studies of extreme events and an information theoretic modeling

  19. Analyzing Activities in the Course of Science Education, According to Activity Theory: The Case of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodoraki, Xarikleia; Plakitsi, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we analyze activities on the topic of sound, which are performed in the science education laboratory lessons in the third-year students of the Department of Early Childhood Education at the University of Ioannina. The analysis of the activities is based on one of the most modern learning theories of CHAT (Cultural Historical…

  20. Framework of Consciousness from Semblance of Activity at Functionally LINKed Postsynaptic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Vadakkan, Kunjumon I.

    2010-01-01

    Consciousness is seen as a difficult “binding” problem. Binding, a process where different sensations evoked by an item are associated in the nervous system, can be viewed as a process similar to associative learning. Several reports that consciousness is associated with some form of memory imply that different forms of memories have a common feature contributing to consciousness. Based on a proposed synaptic mechanism capable of explaining different forms of memory, we developed a framework for consciousness. It is based on the formation of semblance of sensory stimulus from (1) synaptic semblances when excitatory postsynaptic potentials arrive at functionally LINKed postsynaptic membranes, and (2) network semblances when these potentials summate to elicit action potential initiating activity in a network of neurons. It is then possible to derive a framework for consciousness as a multi-dimensional semblance. According to this framework, a continuum of semblances formed from background sensory stimuli and oscillating neuronal activities serve to maintain consciousness. Feasibility of this framework to explain various physiological and pathological states of consciousness, its subjective nature and qualia is examined. PMID:21833231

  1. The GIANT Encyclopedia of Science Activities for Children 3 to 6: More Than 600 Science Activities Written by Teachers for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charner, Kathy, Ed.

    This book presents science activities developed by teachers for children ages 3-6 years old. The activities aim to develop science skills including communication, observation, estimation, measurement, cause and effect, investigation, and evaluation in children by using their curiosity as a staring point. Activities include age suggestions, address…

  2. Bayesian framework for assessing the value of scientific space systems: Value of information approach with application to earth science spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brathwaite, Joy; Saleh, Joseph H.

    2013-03-01

    Space systems play an important role in today's society by generating or transmitting information from source to sink(s). The acquisition of the space system is often justified by the type, quantity and quality of information provided or transmitted. This work posits that the value of a class of space systems derives from and can be assessed through the value of information these systems provide. To this effect, a Bayesian framework is developed to assess system value in which systems are viewed as information sources, and stakeholders as information recipients. Information has value to stakeholders as it helps to update their beliefs, enabling them to make decisions that can yield higher expected pay-offs than in the absence of information. This increase in expected pay-offs is ascribed to the value of the system. Based on this idea, a new metric, Value-of-Design (VOD), is introduced to quantify the value of a class of space systems with unpriced services. The Bayesian framework assesses the Value-of-Design for the space system by considering the impact of the information transmitted on the actions taken by stakeholders, and estimating the resulting pay-offs from these actions. The framework here developed is then applied to the case of an Earth Science satellite that provides hurricane information to oil rig operators in the Gulf of Mexico. Probability models of stakeholders' beliefs, and economic models of pay-offs are developed and integrated with a spacecraft design tool. Results from the application point to clusters of payload instruments that yielded higher information value, and minimum information thresholds below which it is difficult to justify the acquisition of the system. Additionally, the system is analyzed in Cost-VOD trade space to provide program managers with additional insights into the coupling of a system's predicted value generation and its associated lifecycle cost.

  3. An Analysis of the Learning Activities Covered in the 5th Grade Science Textbooks Based on 2005 and 2013 Turkish Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydogdu, Cemil; Idin, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the learning activities covered in 5th grade elementary science textbooks which depend on 2005 and 2013 elementary science curricula. Two elementary science textbooks [which] depend on 2005 science curriculum and two elementary science textbooks [which] depend on 2013 science curriculum were researched. The…

  4. An Analysis of the Learning Activities Covered in the 5th Grade Science Textbooks Based on 2005 and 2013 Turkish Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydogdu, Cemil; Idin, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the learning activities covered in 5th grade elementary science textbooks which depend on 2005 and 2013 elementary science curricula. Two elementary science textbooks depends on 2005 science curriculum and two elementary science textbooks depend on 2013 science curriculum were researched. The study is a…

  5. Modeling the Activities of Scientists: Prospective Science Teachers' Poster Presentations in An STS Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Alev; Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Kilic, Ziya; Kilic, Esma; Aydogdu, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    In this study, prospective science teachers' (PSTs) views about their poster presentations were investigated. These posters were developed through PSTs' online and library research and scientific mini-symposiums in chemistry related topics in the framework of science, technology and society course (STS). During the first four weeks of STS course,…

  6. Prioritizing Active Learning: An Exploration of Gateway Courses in Political Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Candace C.; Miller, Melissa K.

    2011-01-01

    Prior research in political science and other disciplines demonstrates the pedagogical and practical benefits of active learning. Less is known, however, about the extent to which active learning is used in political science classrooms. This study assesses the prioritization of active learning in "gateway" political science courses, paying…

  7. Early Earth Science Activities in the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Glaser, S. D.; Moore, J. R.; Hart, K.; King, G.; Regan, T.; Bang, S. S.; Sani, R. K.; Roggenthen, W. M.

    2007-12-01

    On July 10, 2007, the former Homestake Mine, Lead, South Dakota, was selected as the development site for the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory, to become the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake. Work on refurbishment and certification of the Ross Shaft began in August 2007 to effect pumping of water that had reached the 5000 level in late July. Completion of this work will allow a physics and geosciences laboratory to be constructed on the 4,850 ft level (1,478 m from the surface). Concurrent with reentry operations, several earth science research activities have been initiated. These early activities are as follows: (1) Seismic monitoring system: Accelerometers will be installed in surface boreholes and underground drifts as they become available as a result of the reentry work. (2) Evaluation of the 300 level (91 m), which has multiple locations for horizontal access, is ongoing. This near- surface level, with varying overburden thicknesses, offers excellent opportunities to investigate the "critical zone" in terms of hydrology, ecology, and geochemistry, yielding measurements of both moisture and carbon fluxes to evaluate fluid exchanges with the atmosphere. (3) Water and soil samples were collected in the Ross Shaft as part of the first reentry work. Molecular survey of microbial diversity showed the presence of mesophilic and thermophilic cellulose-degrading microorganisms. (4) Supercritical carbon dioxide injection experiments are being planned that will take advantage of three pairs of existing, nearly vertical, open 8-inch (0.2 m) boreholes that are easily accessible from the Ross Shaft. The candidate holes are located between the 1550 and the 2900 levels and are between 90 to 180 m in length (5) Monitoring of the response of the water during the dewatering operations will be facilitated by the use of existing boreholes. Ultimately, the dewatering operation provide access to the 8000 level (depth of 2,438 m

  8. Framework for the Integration of Multi-Instrument Pipelines in the BepiColombo Science Operations Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, F.; Vallejo, J. C.; Martínez, S.; Ortiz, I.; Macfarlane, A.; Osuna, P.; Gill, R.; Casale, M.

    2015-09-01

    BepiColombo is an interdisciplinary ESA mission to explore the planet Mercury in cooperation with JAXA. The mission consists of two separate orbiters: ESA's Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and JAXA's Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which are dedicated to the detailed study of the planet and its magnetosphere. The MPO scientific payload comprises eleven instruments packages covering different disciplines developed by several European teams. This paper describes the design and development approach of the framework required to support the operation of the distributed BepiColombo MPO instruments pipelines, developed and operated from different locations, but designed as a single entity. An architecture based on primary-redundant configuration, fully integrated into the BepiColombo Science Operations Control System (BSCS), has been selected, where some instrument pipelines will be operated from the instrument team's data processing centres, having a pipeline replica that can be run from the Science Ground Segment (SGS), while others will be executed as primary pipelines from the SGS, adopting the SGS the pipeline orchestration role.

  9. A Gaussian process framework for modelling stellar activity signals in radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpaul, V.; Aigrain, S.; Osborne, M. A.; Reece, S.; Roberts, S.

    2015-09-01

    To date, the radial velocity (RV) method has been one of the most productive techniques for detecting and confirming extrasolar planetary candidates. Unfortunately, stellar activity can induce RV variations which can drown out or even mimic planetary signals - and it is notoriously difficult to model and thus mitigate the effects of these activity-induced nuisance signals. This is expected to be a major obstacle to using next-generation spectrographs to detect lower mass planets, planets with longer periods, and planets around more active stars. Enter Gaussian processes (GPs) which, we note, have a number of attractive features that make them very well suited to disentangling stellar activity signals from planetary signals. We present here a GP framework we developed to model RV time series jointly with ancillary activity indicators (e.g. bisector velocity spans, line widths, chromospheric activity indices), allowing the activity component of RV time series to be constrained and disentangled from e.g. planetary components. We discuss the mathematical details of our GP framework, and present results illustrating its encouraging performance on both synthetic and real RV data sets, including the publicly available Alpha Centauri B data set.

  10. ActiveCC--A Collaborative Framework for Supporting the Implementation of Active Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabicher, Sonja; Derntl, Michael; Motschnig-Pitrik, Renate

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the challenges resulting from the design and implementation of a modular, flexible curriculum of computer science. It is intended to share the processes and structures that are being employed in order to cooperatively approach desired qualities and qualifications. In addition, the paper shares goals, strategies, and…

  11. Learning about Earth Science: Tables and Tabulations. Superific Science Book X. A Good Apple Science Activity Book for Grades 5-8+.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Lorraine

    In an effort to provide science teachers with the tables and scales most often used in teaching earth science, this document was designed to coordinate each table with meaningful activities, projects and experiments. The major areas covered by the booklet are: (1) electromagnetic waves (with activities about light waves and sound waves); (2) the…

  12. Activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-01-01

    This annual report presents activities at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the period April 1992-March 1993. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are arranged with twelve sections. The first section on special researches deals with continuing research projects entitled: (1) 'Biological Risk Evaluation in Public Exposure'; (2) 'Exposure Assessment in the Environment and the Public Through Food Chain'; (3) 'Medical Use of Accelerated Heavy Ions'; and (4) 'Preliminary Study for the Demonstration of Dose-Response Relationships in Low-Dose Range'. All projects except for project (4) will be finished up to March 1993. The section of assigned researches covers four titles. The section of ordinary researches covers physics (four titles), pharmacochemistry (four), biology (three), genetics (four), physiopathology (four), cytological radiation injuries (three), internal exposure (four), environmental science (four), clinical research (four), clinical research for radiation injuries (three), medical use of heavy particles (three), environmental radiation ecology (three), and aquatic radiation ecology (two). The section on technical aids gives an overview of technical services, radiation safety, animal and plant management, and cyclotron management. Appendices give the information on personnel in NIRS.

  13. The Effects of Aesthetic Science Activities on Improving At-Risk Families Children's Anxiety About Learning Science and Positive Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zuway-R.; Lin, Huann-shyang; Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Chia-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of aesthetic science activities on improving elementary school at-risk families' children's positive thinking, attitudes toward science, and decreasing their anxiety about learning science. Thirty-six 4th-grade children from at-risk families volunteered to participate in a 12-week intervention and formed the experimental group; another 97 typical 4th graders were randomly selected to participant in the assessment and were used as the comparison group. The treatment for experimental group children emphasized scaffolding aesthetic science activities and inquiry strategies. The Elementary School Student Questionnaire was administered to assess all children's positive thinking, attitudes toward science, and anxiety about learning science. In addition, nine target children from the experimental group with the lowest scores on either positive thinking, or attitudes toward science, or with the highest scores on anxiety about learning science in the pre-test were recruited to be interviewed at the end of the intervention and observed weekly. Confirmatory factor analyses, analyses of covariance, and content theme analysis assessed the similarities and differences between groups. It was found that the at-risk families' children were motivated by the treatment and made significant progress on positive thinking and attitudes toward science, and also decreased their anxiety about learning science. The findings from interviews and classroom observations also revealed that the intervention made differences in children's affective perceptions of learning science. Implication and research recommendation are discussed.

  14. Robust Muscle Activity Onset Detection Using an Unsupervised Electromyogram Learning Framework

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Rymer, William Z.; Zhou, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Accurate muscle activity onset detection is an essential prerequisite for many applications of surface electromyogram (EMG). This study presents an unsupervised EMG learning framework based on a sequential Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to detect muscle activity onsets. The distribution of the logarithmic power of EMG signal was characterized by a two-component GMM in each frequency band, in which the two components respectively correspond to the posterior distribution of EMG burst and non-burst logarithmic powers. The parameter set of the GMM was sequentially estimated based on maximum likelihood, subject to constraints derived from the relationship between EMG burst and non-burst distributions. An optimal threshold for EMG burst/non-burst classification was determined using the GMM at each frequency band, and the final decision was obtained by a voting procedure. The proposed novel framework was applied to simulated and experimental surface EMG signals for muscle activity onset detection. Compared with conventional approaches, it demonstrated robust performance for low and changing signal to noise ratios in a dynamic environment. The framework is applicable for real-time implementation, and does not require the assumption of non EMG burst in the initial stage. Such features facilitate its practical application. PMID:26038820

  15. Computer Science Research Institute 2004 annual report of activities.

    SciTech Connect

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. During this period the CSRI hosted 166 visitors representing 81 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 65 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 4 workshops. These 4 CSRI sponsored workshops had 140 participants--74 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 66 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 14 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  16. Computer Science Research Institute 2005 annual report of activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Bernadette M.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Ceballos, Deanna Rose; Womble, David Eugene

    2008-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. During this period, the CSRI hosted 182 visitors representing 83 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these, 60 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 105 participants, 78 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 27 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 12 long-term collaborative research projects and 3 Sabbaticals.

  17. Computer Science Research Institute 2003 annual report of activities.

    SciTech Connect

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. During this period the CSRI hosted 164 visitors representing 78 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 78 were summer students or faculty members. The CSRI partially sponsored 5 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 178 participants--137 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 41 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 18 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  18. Designing Collaborative Developmental Standards by Refactoring of the Earth Science Models, Libraries, Workflows and Frameworks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirvis, E.; Iredell, M.

    2015-12-01

    reverse engineering tools/APIs. We will also inform on collaborative efforts in the restructuring of the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) - the multi- model and coupling framework, and transitioning FEE verification methodology.

  19. The Science ELF: Assessing the enquiry levels framework as a heuristic for professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Lindsay B.; Bell, Randy L.; Whitworth, Brooke A.; Maeng, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized an explanatory sequential mixed methods approach to explore randomly assigned treatment and control participants' frequency of inquiry instruction in secondary science classrooms. Eleven treatment participants received professional development (PD) that emphasized a structured approach to inquiry instruction, while 10 control participants received no PD. Two representative treatment participants were interviewed and observed to provide an in-depth understanding of inquiry instruction and factors affecting implementation. Paired t-tests were used to analyze quantitative data from observation forms, and a constant comparative approach was used to analyze qualitative data from surveys, interviews, purposeful observations and artifacts. Results indicated that treatment participants implemented inquiry significantly more frequently than control participants (p < .01). Two treatment participants' instruction revealed that both used a similar structure of inquiry but employed different types of interactions and emphasized different scientific practices. These differences may be explained by the participants' understandings of and beliefs about inquiry and structuring inquiry. The present study has the potential to inform how methods of structuring inquiry instruction and teaching scientific practices are addressed in teacher preparation.

  20. Grounding a new information technology implementation framework in behavioral science: a systematic analysis of the literature on IT use.

    PubMed

    Kukafka, Rita; Johnson, Stephen B; Linfante, Allison; Allegrante, John P

    2003-06-01

    Many interventions to improve the success of information technology (IT) implementations are grounded in behavioral science, using theories, and models to identify conditions and determinants of successful use. However, each model in the IT literature has evolved to address specific theoretical problems of particular disciplinary concerns, and each model has been tested and has evolved using, in most cases, a more or less restricted set of IT implementation procedures. Functionally, this limits the perspective for taking into account the multiple factors at the individual, group, and organizational levels that influence use behavior. While a rich body of literature has emerged, employing prominent models such as the Technology Adoption Model, Social-Cognitive Theory, and Diffusion of Innovation Theory, the complexity of defining a suitable multi-level intervention has largely been overlooked. A gap exists between the implementation of IT and the integration of theories and models that can be utilized to develop multi-level approaches to identify factors that impede usage behavior. We present a novel framework that is intended to guide synthesis of more than one theoretical perspective for the purpose of planning multi-level interventions to enhance IT use. This integrative framework is adapted from PRECEDE/PROCEDE, a conceptual framework used by health planners in hundreds of published studies to direct interventions that account for the multiple determinants of behavior. Since we claim that the literature on IT use behavior does not now include a multi-level approach, we undertook a systematic literature analysis to confirm this assertion. Our framework facilitated organizing this literature synthesis and our analysis was aimed at determining if the IT implementation approaches in the published literature were characterized by an approach that considered at least two levels of IT usage determinants. We found that while 61% of studies mentioned or referred to

  1. Decision-making framework for the application of in-situ activated carbon amendment to sediment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongju; Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Gala, William R; Hoelen, Thomas P; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2016-04-01

    This study provides a decision-support framework and a design methodology for preliminary evaluation of field application of in-situ activated carbon (AC) amendment to sediment to control the (bio)availability of hydrophobic organic contaminants. The decision-making framework comprises four sequential steps: screening assessment, input parameter determination, model prediction, and evaluation for process optimization. The framework allows the application of state-of-the-art experimental and modeling techniques to assess the effectiveness of the treatment under different field conditions and is designed for application as a part of a feasibility study. Through a stepwise process it is possible to assess the effectiveness of in-situ AC amendment with a proper consideration of different site conditions and application scenarios possible in the field. The methodology incorporates the effect of various parameters on performance including: site-specific kinetic coefficients, varied AC dose and particle size, sediment and AC sorption parameters, and pore-water velocity. The modeling framework allows comparison of design alternatives for treatment optimization and estimation of long-term effectiveness over a period of 10-20 years under slow mass transfer in the field. PMID:26736169

  2. Assessing the Impact Participation in Science Journalism Activities Has on Scientific Literacy among High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrar, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    As part of the National Science Foundation Science Literacy through Science Journalism (SciJourn) research and development initiative (http://www.scijourn.org; Polman, Saul, Newman, and Farrar, 2008) a quasi-experimental design was used to investigate what impact incorporating science journalism activities had on students' scientific literacy.…

  3. An Analysis of Teacher Discourse that Introduces Real Science Activities to High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pei-Ling; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2009-01-01

    Most academic science educators encourage teachers to provide their students with access to more authentic science activities. What can and do teachers say to increase students' interests in participating in opportunities to do real science? What are the discursive "resources" they draw on to introduce authentic science to students? The purpose of…

  4. Fostering implementation of health services research findings into practice: a consolidated framework for advancing implementation science

    PubMed Central

    Damschroder, Laura J; Aron, David C; Keith, Rosalind E; Kirsh, Susan R; Alexander, Jeffery A; Lowery, Julie C

    2009-01-01

    Background Many interventions found to be effective in health services research studies fail to translate into meaningful patient care outcomes across multiple contexts. Health services researchers recognize the need to evaluate not only summative outcomes but also formative outcomes to assess the extent to which implementation is effective in a specific setting, prolongs sustainability, and promotes dissemination into other settings. Many implementation theories have been published to help promote effective implementation. However, they overlap considerably in the constructs included in individual theories, and a comparison of theories reveals that each is missing important constructs included in other theories. In addition, terminology and definitions are not consistent across theories. We describe the Consolidated Framework For Implementation Research (CFIR) that offers an overarching typology to promote implementation theory development and verification about what works where and why across multiple contexts. Methods We used a snowball sampling approach to identify published theories that were evaluated to identify constructs based on strength of conceptual or empirical support for influence on implementation, consistency in definitions, alignment with our own findings, and potential for measurement. We combined constructs across published theories that had different labels but were redundant or overlapping in definition, and we parsed apart constructs that conflated underlying concepts. Results The CFIR is composed of five major domains: intervention characteristics, outer setting, inner setting, characteristics of the individuals involved, and the process of implementation. Eight constructs were identified related to the intervention (e.g., evidence strength and quality), four constructs were identified related to outer setting (e.g., patient needs and resources), 12 constructs were identified related to inner setting (e.g., culture, leadership engagement

  5. INSA Virtual Labs: a new R+D framework for innovative space science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardesin Moinelo, Alejandro; Sanchez Portal, Miguel

    2012-10-01

    The company INSA (Ingeniería y Servicios Aeroespaciales) has given support to ESA Scientific missions for more than 20 years and is one of the main companies present in the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) in Madrid since its creation. INSA personnel at ESAC provide high level technical and scientific support to ESA for all Astronomy and Solar System missions. In order to improve and maintain the scientific and technical competences among the employees, a research group has been created with the name "INSA Virtual Labs". This group coordinates all the R+D activities carried out by INSA personnel at ESAC and aims to establish collaborations and improve synergies with other research groups, institutes and universities. This represents a great means to improve the visibility of these activities towards the scientific community and serves as breeding ground for new innovative ideas and future commercial products.

  6. Space suit bioenergetics: framework and analysis of unsuited and suited activity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Newman, Dava J

    2007-11-01

    Metabolic costs limit the duration and intensity of extravehicular activity (EVA), an essential component of future human missions to the Moon and Mars. Energetics Framework: We present a framework for comparison of energetics data across and between studies. This framework, applied to locomotion, differentiates between muscle efficiency and energy recovery, two concepts often confused in the literature. The human run-walk transition in Earth gravity occurs at the point for which energy recovery is approximately the same for walking and running, suggesting a possible role for recovery in gait transitions. Muscular Energetics: Muscle physiology limits the overall efficiency by which chemical energy is converted through metabolism to useful work. Unsuited Locomotion: Walking and running use different methods of energy storage and release. These differences contribute to the relative changes in the metabolic cost of walking and running as gravity is varied, with the metabolic cost of locomoting at a given velocity changing in proportion to gravity for running and less than in proportion for walking. Space Suits: Major factors affecting the energetic cost of suited movement include suit pressurization, gravity, velocity, surface slope, and space suit configuration. Apollo lunar surface EVA traverse metabolic rates, while unexpectedly low, were higher than other activity categories. The Lunar Roving Vehicle facilitated even lower metabolic rates, thus longer duration EVAs. Muscles and tendons act like springs during running; similarly, longitudinal pressure forces in gas pressure space suits allow spring-like storage and release of energy when suits are self-supporting. PMID:18018432

  7. NASA's Future Active Remote Sensing Missing for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Jonathan B.

    2000-01-01

    Since the beginning of space remote sensing of the earth, there has been a natural progression widening the range of electromagnetic radiation used to sense the earth, and slowly, steadily increasing the spatial, spectral, and radiometric resolution of the measurements. There has also been a somewhat slower trend toward active measurements across the electromagnetic spectrum, motivated in part by increased resolution, but also by the ability to make new measurements. Active microwave instruments have been used to measure ocean topography, to study the land surface. and to study rainfall from space. Future NASA active microwave missions may add detail to the topographical studies, sense soil moisture, and better characterize the cryosphere. Only recently have active optical instruments been flown in space by NASA; however, there are currently several missions in development which will sense the earth with lasers and many more conceptual active optical missions which address the priorities of NASA's earth science program. Missions are under development to investigate the structure of the terrestrial vegetation canopy, to characterize the earth's ice caps, and to study clouds and aerosols. Future NASA missions may measure tropospheric vector winds and make vastly improved measurements of the chemical components of the earth's atmosphere.

  8. Recent Electric Propulsion Development Activities for NASA Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    (The primary source of electric propulsion development throughout NASA is managed by the In-Space Propulsion Technology Project at the NASA Glenn Research Center for the Science Mission Directorate. The objective of the Electric Propulsion project area is to develop near-term electric propulsion technology to enhance or enable science missions while minimizing risk and cost to the end user. Major hardware tasks include developing NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT), developing a long-life High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HIVHAC), developing an advanced feed system, and developing cross-platform components. The objective of the NEXT task is to advance next generation ion propulsion technology readiness. The baseline NEXT system consists of a high-performance, 7-kW ion thruster; a high-efficiency, 7-kW power processor unit (PPU); a highly flexible advanced xenon propellant management system (PMS); a lightweight engine gimbal; and key elements of a digital control interface unit (DCIU) including software algorithms. This design approach was selected to provide future NASA science missions with the greatest value in mission performance benefit at a low total development cost. The objective of the HIVHAC task is to advance the Hall thruster technology readiness for science mission applications. The task seeks to increase specific impulse, throttle-ability and lifetime to make Hall propulsion systems applicable to deep space science missions. The primary application focus for the resulting Hall propulsion system would be cost-capped missions, such as competitively selected, Discovery-class missions. The objective of the advanced xenon feed system task is to demonstrate novel manufacturing techniques that will significantly reduce mass, volume, and footprint size of xenon feed systems over conventional feed systems. This task has focused on the development of a flow control module, which consists of a three-channel flow system based on a piezo-electrically actuated

  9. Platinum nanoparticles encapsulated metal-organic frameworks for the electrochemical detection of telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Ling, Pinghua; Lei, Jianping; Jia, Li; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-01-21

    A simple and rapid electrochemical sensor is constructed for the detection of telomerase activity based on the electrocatalysis of platinum nanoparticle (Pt NP) encapsulated metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are synthesized by one-pot encapsulation of Pt NPs into prototypal MOFs, UiO-66-NH2. Integrating with the efficient electrocatalysis of Pt@MOFs towards NaBH4 oxidation, this biosensor shows the wide dynamic correlation of telomerase activity from 5 × 10(2) to 10(7) HeLa cells mL(-1) and the telomerase activity in a single HeLa cell was calculated to be 2.0 × 10(-11) IU, providing a powerful platform for detecting telomerase activity. PMID:26612011

  10. Science Action Labs Part 3: Puzzlers. An Innovative Collection of Hands-On Science Activities and Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevick, Ed

    This book contains hands-on science laboratory activities for grades 4 through 9 that use discrepant events to challenge students. All of the "puzzlers" are based upon science principles and include directions for building gadgets that explain the "puzzlers." Topics covered include: volume conservation, magnetic phenomena, optical illusions,…

  11. Square Wheels and Other Easy-To-Build Hands-On Science Activities. An Exploratorium Science Snackbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathjen, Don; Doherty, Paul

    This book, part of The Exploratorium science "snackbook" series, explains science with a hands-on approach. Activities include: (1) "3-D Shadow"; (2) "Bits and Bytes"; (3) "Circuit Workbench"; (4) "Diamagnetic Repulsion"; (5) "Film Can Racer"; (6) "Fractal Patterns"; (7) "Hoop Nightmares"; (8) "Hydraulic Arm"; (9) "Hyperbolic Slot"; (10) "Light…

  12. Stepping Stones to Science: True Tales and Awesome Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haven, Kendall

    Science is filled with moments of long-sought understanding, and smaller moments of personal insight and victory. Thirteen such moments from physical, biological, and earth sciences appear in this book of stories. They each link well with the primary science curriculum. Each demonstrates the "doing" of science in which a preeminent scientist…

  13. Activity Matters: Understanding Student Interest in School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swarat, Su; Ortony, Andrew; Revelle, William

    2012-01-01

    A genuine interest in science is an important part of scientific literacy, and thus a critical goal for science education. Recent studies, however, have found that school science has not been effective in meeting this goal, an important reason for which is the lack of knowledge about what makes science interesting (or not) to the students. Using…

  14. Synchronizing Substrate Activation Rates in Multicomponent Reactions with Metal-Organic Framework Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2016-05-01

    A study on the influence of the cation coordination number, number of Lewis acid centers, concurrent existence of Lewis base sites, and structure topology on the catalytic activity of six new indium MOFs, has been carried out for multicomponent reactions (MCRs). The new indium polymeric frameworks, namely [In8 (OH)6 (popha)6 (H2 O)4 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-16), [In(popha)(2,2'-bipy)]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-17), [In3 (OH)3 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-18), [In2 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)2 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-19), [In(OH)(Hpopha)]⋅0.5 (1,7-phen) (InPF-20), and [In(popha)(1,10-phen)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-21) (InPF=indium polymeric framework, H3 popha=5-(4-carboxy-2-nitrophenoxy)isophthalic acid, phen=phenanthroline, bipy=bipyridine), have been hydrothermally obtained by using both conventional heating (CH) and microwave (MW) procedures. These indium frameworks show efficient Lewis acid behavior for the solvent-free cyanosilylation of carbonyl compounds, the one pot Passerini 3-component (P-3CR) and the Ugi 4-component (U-4CR) reactions. In addition, InPF-17 was found to be a highly reactive, recyclable, and environmentally benign catalyst, which allows the efficient synthesis of α-aminoacyl amides. The relationship between the Lewis base/acid active site and the catalytic performance is explained by the 2D seven-coordinated indium framework of the catalyst InPF-17. This study is an attempt to highlight the main structural and synthetic factors that have to be taken into account when planning a new, effective MOF-based heterogeneous catalyst for multicomponent reactions. PMID:27010759

  15. Innovative Project Activities in Science [From the NSTA Study of Innovative Project Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes four projects chosen as innovative project activities in science which exhibited identification of unique or novel problems and creative approaches to their solutions. Projects included a study of fish in Lake Erie, a goat raising project, an analysis of terrestrial plant ecology and soil composition, and a study of marine and wetlands…

  16. Active Galaxies Educational Unit: An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science and Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    As a part of its educational effort, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education and Public Outreach group at Sonoma State University (SSU) has put together a series of activities based on the science of one of NASA's exciting space missions, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). GLAST is a NASA satellite planned…

  17. Examination of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Activities Using Problem Based Learning Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekici, Didem Inel

    2016-01-01

    In this study, both the activities prepared by pre-service science teachers regarding the Problem Based Learning method and the pre-service science teachers' views regarding the method were examined before and after applying their activities in a real class environment. 69 pre-service science teachers studying in the 4th grade of the science…

  18. Common Features of Professional Development Activities for Mathematics and Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer-Packenham, Patricia S.; Bolyard, Johnna J.; Oh, Hana; Cerar, Nancy Irby

    2011-01-01

    This study examines professional development activities provided for mathematics and science teachers in the National Science Foundation's Math and Science Partnership Program by analyzing a cross-sectional sample of over 2000 professional development (PD) activities in the program. Data were gathered from secondary source documents and surveys to…

  19. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-06-10

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes--although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms. PMID:24821756

  20. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L.; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K.; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes—although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms. PMID:24821756