Science.gov

Sample records for active segment selection

  1. Automatic scale selection for medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Ersin; Wyatt, Christopher L.; Ge, Yaorong

    2001-07-01

    The scale of interesting structures in medical images is space variant because of partial volume effects, spatial dependence of resolution in many imaging modalities, and differences in tissue properties. Existing segmentation methods either apply a single scale to the entire image or try fine-to-coarse/coarse-to-fine tracking of structures over multiple scales. While single scale approaches fail to fully recover the perceptually important structures, multi-scale methods have problems in providing reliable means to select proper scales and integrating information over multiple scales. A recent approach proposed by Elder and Zucker addresses the scale selection problem by computing a minimal reliable scale for each image pixel. The basic premise of this approach is that, while the scale of structures within an image vary spatially, the imaging system is fixed. Hence, sensor noise statistics can be calculated. Based on a model of edges to be detected, and operators to be used for detection, one can locally compute a unique minimal reliable scale at which the likelihood of error due to sensor noise is less than or equal to a predetermined threshold. In this paper, we improve the segmentation method based on the minimal reliable scale selection and evaluate its effectiveness with both simulated and actual medical data.

  2. Systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient model for real-life counter-current chromatography separation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da-Bing; Yi, Lun-Zhao; Qin, Yan-Hua; Yun, Yong-Huan; Deng, Bai-Chuan; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-05-01

    Solvent system selection is the first step toward a successful counter-current chromatography (CCC) separation. This paper introduces a systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient (NRTL-SAC) model, which is efficient in predicting the solute partition coefficient. Firstly, the application of the NRTL-SAC method was extended to the ethyl acetate/n-butanol/water and chloroform/methanol/water solvent system families. Moreover, the versatility and predictive capability of the NRTL-SAC method were investigated. The results indicate that the solute molecular parameters identified from hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water solvent system family are capable of predicting a large number of partition coefficients in several other different solvent system families. The NRTL-SAC strategy was further validated by successfully separating five components from Salvia plebeian R.Br. We therefore propose that NRTL-SAC is a promising high throughput method for rapid solvent system selection and highly adaptable to screen suitable solvent system for real-life CCC separation.

  3. Solving the Swath Segment Selection Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Russell; Smith, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Several artificial-intelligence search techniques have been tested as means of solving the swath segment selection problem (SSSP) -- a real-world problem that is not only of interest in its own right, but is also useful as a test bed for search techniques in general. In simplest terms, the SSSP is the problem of scheduling the observation times of an airborne or spaceborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system to effect the maximum coverage of a specified area (denoted the target), given a schedule of downlinks (opportunities for radio transmission of SAR scan data to a ground station), given the limit on the quantity of SAR scan data that can be stored in an onboard memory between downlink opportunities, and given the limit on the achievable downlink data rate. The SSSP is NP complete (short for "nondeterministic polynomial time complete" -- characteristic of a class of intractable problems that can be solved only by use of computers capable of making guesses and then checking the guesses in polynomial time).

  4. Integrated active contours for texture segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sagiv, Chen; Sochen, Nir A; Zeevi, Yehoshua Y

    2006-06-01

    We address the issue of textured image segmentation in the context of the Gabor feature space of images. Gabor filters tuned to a set of orientations, scales and frequencies are applied to the images to create the Gabor feature space. A two-dimensional Riemannian manifold of local features is extracted via the Beltrami framework. The metric of this surface provides a good indicator of texture changes and is used, therefore, in a Beltrami-based diffusion mechanism and in a geodesic active contours algorithm for texture segmentation. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with that of the edgeless active contours algorithm applied for texture segmentation. Moreover, an integrated approach, extending the geodesic and edgeless active contours approaches to texture segmentation, is presented. We show that combining boundary and region information yields more robust and accurate texture segmentation results. PMID:16764287

  5. Multiclass feature selection for improved pediatric brain tumor segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Shaheen; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2012-03-01

    In our previous work, we showed that fractal-based texture features are effective in detection, segmentation and classification of posterior-fossa (PF) pediatric brain tumor in multimodality MRI. We exploited an information theoretic approach such as Kullback-Leibler Divergence (KLD) for feature selection and ranking different texture features. We further incorporated the feature selection technique with segmentation method such as Expectation Maximization (EM) for segmentation of tumor T and non tumor (NT) tissues. In this work, we extend the two class KLD technique to multiclass for effectively selecting the best features for brain tumor (T), cyst (C) and non tumor (NT). We further obtain segmentation robustness for each tissue types by computing Bay's posterior probabilities and corresponding number of pixels for each tissue segments in MRI patient images. We evaluate improved tumor segmentation robustness using different similarity metric for 5 patients in T1, T2 and FLAIR modalities.

  6. Positive Selection Drives Preferred Segment Combinations during Influenza Virus Reassortment

    PubMed Central

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Liu, Ping; Renzette, Nicholas; Foll, Matthieu; Pham, Serena T.; Venev, Sergey V.; Gallagher, Glen R.; Bolon, Daniel N.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Caffrey, Daniel R.; Schiffer, Celia A.; Kowalik, Timothy F.; Wang, Jennifer P.; Finberg, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has a segmented genome that allows for the exchange of genome segments between different strains. This reassortment accelerates evolution by breaking linkage, helping IAV cross species barriers to potentially create highly virulent strains. Challenges associated with monitoring the process of reassortment in molecular detail have limited our understanding of its evolutionary implications. We applied a novel deep sequencing approach with quantitative analysis to assess the in vitro temporal evolution of genomic reassortment in IAV. The combination of H1N1 and H3N2 strains reproducibly generated a new H1N2 strain with the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein segments originating from H1N1 and the remaining six segments from H3N2. By deep sequencing the entire viral genome, we monitored the evolution of reassortment, quantifying the relative abundance of all IAV genome segments from the two parent strains over time and measuring the selection coefficients of the reassorting segments. Additionally, we observed several mutations coemerging with reassortment that were not found during passaging of pure parental IAV strains. Our results demonstrate how reassortment of the segmented genome can accelerate viral evolution in IAV, potentially enabled by the emergence of a small number of individual mutations. PMID:25713211

  7. Space Adaptation of Active Mirror Segment Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Gregory H.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a three year effort by Blue Line Engineering Co. to advance the state of segmented mirror systems in several separate but related areas. The initial set of tasks were designed to address the issues of system level architecture, digital processing system, cluster level support structures, and advanced mirror fabrication concepts. Later in the project new tasks were added to provide support to the existing segmented mirror testbed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the form of upgrades to the 36 subaperture wavefront sensor. Still later, tasks were added to build and install a new system processor based on the results of the new system architecture. The project was successful in achieving a number of important results. These include the following most notable accomplishments: 1) The creation of a new modular digital processing system that is extremely capable and may be applied to a wide range of segmented mirror systems as well as many classes of Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) control systems such as active structures or industrial automation. 2) A new graphical user interface was created for operation of segmented mirror systems. 3) The development of a high bit rate serial data loop that permits bi-directional flow of data to and from as many as 39 segments daisy-chained to form a single cluster of segments. 4) Upgrade of the 36 subaperture Hartmann type Wave Front Sensor (WFS) of the Phased Array Mirror, Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) testbed at MSFC resulting in a 40 to 5OX improvement in SNR which in turn enabled NASA personnel to achieve many significant strides in improved closed-loop system operation in 1998. 5) A new system level processor was built and delivered to MSFC for use with the PAMELA testbed. This new system featured a new graphical user interface to replace the obsolete and non-supported menu system originally delivered with the PAMELA system. The hardware featured Blue Line's new stackable

  8. Evaluating geodesic active contours in microcalcifications segmentation on mammograms.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Marcelo A; Alvarenga, Andre V; Azevedo, Carolina M; Calas, Maria Julia G; Infantosi, Antonio F C; Pereira, Wagner C A

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring type of cancer among women, and it is the major cause of female cancer-related deaths worldwide. Its incidence is increasing in developed as well as developing countries. Efficient strategies to reduce the high death rates due to breast cancer include early detection and tumor removal in the initial stages of the disease. Clinical and mammographic examinations are considered the best methods for detecting the early signs of breast cancer; however, these techniques are highly dependent on breast characteristics, equipment quality, and physician experience. Computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) systems have been developed to improve the accuracy of mammographic diagnosis; usually such systems may involve three steps: (i) segmentation; (ii) parameter extraction and selection of the segmented lesions and (iii) lesions classification. Literature considers the first step as the most important of them, as it has a direct impact on the lesions characteristics that will be used in the further steps. In this study, the original contribution is a microcalcification segmentation method based on the geodesic active contours (GAC) technique associated with anisotropic texture filtering as well as the radiologists' knowledge. Radiologists actively participate on the final step of the method, selecting the final segmentation that allows elaborating an adequate diagnosis hypothesis with the segmented microcalcifications presented in a region of interest (ROI). The proposed method was assessed by employing 1000 ROIs extracted from images of the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). For the selected ROIs, the rate of adequately segmented microcalcifications to establish a diagnosis hypothesis was at least 86.9%, according to the radiologists. The quantitative test, based on the area overlap measure (AOM), yielded a mean of 0.52±0.20 for the segmented images, when all 2136 segmented microcalcifications were considered. Moreover, a

  9. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Wouters, Johan; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.

  10. Automatic segmentation of brain images: selection of region extraction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Leiguang; Kulikowski, Casimir A.; Mezrich, Reuben S.

    1991-07-01

    In automatically analyzing brain structures from a MR image, the choice of low level region extraction methods depends on the characteristics of both the target object and the surrounding anatomical structures in the image. The authors have experimented with local thresholding, global thresholding, and other techniques, using various types of MR images for extracting the major brian landmarks and different types of lesions. This paper describes specifically a local- binary thresholding method and a new global-multiple thresholding technique developed for MR image segmentation and analysis. The initial testing results on their segmentation performance are presented, followed by a comparative analysis of the two methods and their ability to extract different types of normal and abnormal brain structures -- the brain matter itself, tumors, regions of edema surrounding lesions, multiple sclerosis lesions, and the ventricles of the brain. The analysis and experimental results show that the global multiple thresholding techniques are more than adequate for extracting regions that correspond to the major brian structures, while local binary thresholding is helpful for more accurate delineation of small lesions such as those produced by MS, and for the precise refinement of lesion boundaries. The detection of other landmarks, such as the interhemispheric fissure, may require other techniques, such as line-fitting. These experiments have led to the formulation of a set of generic computer-based rules for selecting the appropriate segmentation packages for particular types of problems, based on which further development of an innovative knowledge- based, goal directed biomedical image analysis framework is being made. The system will carry out the selection automatically for a given specific analysis task.

  11. Lip segmentation under MAP-MRF framework with automatic selection of local observation scale and number of segments.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yiu-Ming; Li, Meng; Cao, Xiaochun; You, Xinge

    2014-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of segmenting lip region from frontal human face image. Supposing each pixel of the target image has an optimal local scale from the segmentation viewpoint, we treat the lip segmentation problem as a combination of observation scale selection and observed data classification. Accordingly, we propose a hierarchical multiscale Markov random field (MRF) model to represent the membership map of each input pixel to a specific segment and local-scale map simultaneously. Subsequently, lip segmentation can be formulated as an optimal problem in the maximum a posteriori (MAP)-MRF framework. Then, we present a rival-penalized iterative algorithm to implement the segmentation, which is independent of the number of predefined segments. The proposed method mainly features two aspects: 1) its performance is independent of the predefined number of segments, and 2) it takes into account the local optimal observation scale for each pixel. Finally, we conduct the experiments on four benchmark databases, i.e. AR, CVL, GTAV, and VidTIMIT. Experimental results show that the proposed method is robust to the segment number that changes with a speaker's appearance, and can enhance the segmentation accuracy by taking advantage of the local optimal observation scale information.

  12. 40 CFR 761.247 - Sample site selection for pipe segment removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample site selection for pipe segment... Natural Gas Pipeline: Selecting Sample Sites, Collecting Surface Samples, and Analyzing Standard PCB Wipe Samples § 761.247 Sample site selection for pipe segment removal. (a) General. (1) Select the...

  13. 40 CFR 761.247 - Sample site selection for pipe segment removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample site selection for pipe segment... Natural Gas Pipeline: Selecting Sample Sites, Collecting Surface Samples, and Analyzing Standard PCB Wipe Samples § 761.247 Sample site selection for pipe segment removal. (a) General. (1) Select the...

  14. 40 CFR 761.247 - Sample site selection for pipe segment removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample site selection for pipe segment... Natural Gas Pipeline: Selecting Sample Sites, Collecting Surface Samples, and Analyzing Standard PCB Wipe Samples § 761.247 Sample site selection for pipe segment removal. (a) General. (1) Select the...

  15. Interactive MRI Segmentation with Controlled Active Vision

    PubMed Central

    Karasev, Peter; Kolesov, Ivan; Chudy, Karol; Muller, Grant; Xerogeanes, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Partitioning Magnetic-Resonance-Imaging (MRI) data into salient anatomic structures is a problem in medical imaging that has continued to elude fully automated solutions. Implicit functions are a common way to model the boundaries between structures and are amenable to control-theoretic methods. In this paper, the goal of enabling a human to obtain accurate segmentations in a short amount of time and with little effort is transformed into a control synthesis problem. Perturbing the state and dynamics of an implicit function’s driving partial differential equation via the accumulated user inputs and an observer-like system leads to desirable closed-loop behavior. Using a Lyapunov control design, a balance is established between the influence of a data-driven gradient flow and the human’s input over time. Automatic segmentation is thus smoothly coupled with interactivity. An application of the mathematical methods to orthopedic segmentation is shown, demonstrating the expected transient and steady state behavior of the implicit segmentation function and auxiliary observer. PMID:24584213

  16. Effects of primary selective laser trabeculoplasty on anterior segment parameters

    PubMed Central

    Guven Yilmaz, Suzan; Palamar, Melis; Yusifov, Emil; Ates, Halil; Egrilmez, Sait; Yagci, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) on the main numerical parameters of anterior segment with Pentacam rotating Scheimpflug camera in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS Pentacam measurements of 45 eyes of 25 (15 females and 10 males) patients (12 with OHT, 13 with POAG) before and after SLT were obtained. Measurements were taken before and 1 and 3mo after SLT. Pentacam parameters were compared between OHT and POAG patients, and age groups (60y and older, and younger than 60y). RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 57.8±13.9 (range 20-77y). Twelve patients (48%) were younger than 60y, while 13 patients (52%) were 60y and older. Measurements of pre-SLT and post-SLT 1mo were significantly different for the parameters of central corneal thickness (CCT) and anterior chamber volume (ACV) (P<0.05). These parameters returned back to pre-SLT values at post-SLT 3mo. Decrease of ACV at post-SLT 1mo was significantly higher in younger than 60y group than 60y and older group. There was no statistically significant difference in Pentacam parameters between OHT and POAG patients at pre- and post-treatment measurements (P>0.05). CONCLUSION SLT leads to significant increase in CCT and decrease in ACV at the 1st month of the procedure. Effects of SLT on these anterior segment parameters, especially for CCT that interferes IOP measurement, should be considered to ensure accurate clinical interpretation. PMID:26558208

  17. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented.

  18. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented. PMID:19904341

  19. Single-Molecule FISH Reveals Non-selective Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    The bunyavirus genome comprises a small (S), medium (M), and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. Although genome segmentation confers evolutionary advantages by enabling genome reassortment events with related viruses, genome segmentation also complicates genome replication and packaging. Accumulating evidence suggests that genomes of viruses with eight or more genome segments are incorporated into virions by highly selective processes. Remarkably, little is known about the genome packaging process of the tri-segmented bunyaviruses. Here, we evaluated, by single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the intracellular spatio-temporal distribution and replication kinetics of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) genome and determined the segment composition of mature virions. The results reveal that the RVFV genome segments start to replicate near the site of infection before spreading and replicating throughout the cytoplasm followed by translocation to the virion assembly site at the Golgi network. Despite the average intracellular S, M and L genome segments approached a 1:1:1 ratio, major differences in genome segment ratios were observed among cells. We also observed a significant amount of cells lacking evidence of M-segment replication. Analysis of two-segmented replicons and four-segmented viruses subsequently confirmed the previous notion that Golgi recruitment is mediated by the Gn glycoprotein. The absence of colocalization of the different segments in the cytoplasm and the successful rescue of a tri-segmented variant with a codon shuffled M-segment suggested that inter-segment interactions are unlikely to drive the copackaging of the different segments into a single virion. The latter was confirmed by direct visualization of RNPs inside mature virions which showed that the majority of virions lack one or more genome segments. Altogether, this study suggests that RVFV genome packaging is a non-selective process. PMID:27548280

  20. Single-Molecule FISH Reveals Non-selective Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments

    PubMed Central

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J.; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The bunyavirus genome comprises a small (S), medium (M), and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. Although genome segmentation confers evolutionary advantages by enabling genome reassortment events with related viruses, genome segmentation also complicates genome replication and packaging. Accumulating evidence suggests that genomes of viruses with eight or more genome segments are incorporated into virions by highly selective processes. Remarkably, little is known about the genome packaging process of the tri-segmented bunyaviruses. Here, we evaluated, by single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the intracellular spatio-temporal distribution and replication kinetics of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) genome and determined the segment composition of mature virions. The results reveal that the RVFV genome segments start to replicate near the site of infection before spreading and replicating throughout the cytoplasm followed by translocation to the virion assembly site at the Golgi network. Despite the average intracellular S, M and L genome segments approached a 1:1:1 ratio, major differences in genome segment ratios were observed among cells. We also observed a significant amount of cells lacking evidence of M-segment replication. Analysis of two-segmented replicons and four-segmented viruses subsequently confirmed the previous notion that Golgi recruitment is mediated by the Gn glycoprotein. The absence of colocalization of the different segments in the cytoplasm and the successful rescue of a tri-segmented variant with a codon shuffled M-segment suggested that inter-segment interactions are unlikely to drive the copackaging of the different segments into a single virion. The latter was confirmed by direct visualization of RNPs inside mature virions which showed that the majority of virions lack one or more genome segments. Altogether, this study suggests that RVFV genome packaging is a non-selective process. PMID:27548280

  1. The origin of segmentation motor activity in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, Jan D; Chen, Ji-Hong; Zhu, Yong Fang; Pawelka, Andrew; McGinn, Ryan J; Bardakjian, Berj L; Parsons, Sean P; Kunze, Wolfgang A; Wu, Richard You; Bercik, Premysl; Khoshdel, Amir; Chen, Sifeng; Yin, Sheng; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Yuanjie; Gao, Qingmin; Li, Kongling; Hu, Xinghai; Zarate, Natalia; Collins, Phillip; Pistilli, Marc; Ma, Junling; Zhang, Ruixue; Chen, David

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation motor activity of the gut that facilitates absorption of nutrients was first described in the late 19th century, but the fundamental mechanisms underlying it remain poorly understood. The dominant theory suggests alternate excitation and inhibition from the enteric nervous system. Here we demonstrate that typical segmentation can occur after total nerve blockade. The segmentation motor pattern emerges when the amplitude of the dominant pacemaker, the slow wave generated by interstitial cells of Cajal associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP), is modulated by the phase of induced lower frequency rhythmic transient depolarizations, generated by ICC associated with the deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP), resulting in a waxing and waning of the amplitude of the slow wave and a rhythmic checkered pattern of segmentation motor activity. Phase-amplitude modulation of the slow waves points to an underlying system of coupled nonlinear oscillators originating in the networks of ICC.

  2. Automatic selection of optimal segmentation scales for high-resolution remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ruijuan; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei

    2013-09-01

    To extract information from high resolution images is a challenge work.Compared tothe traditional pixel-based approach, the advantages of object-oriented classification methods are well documented. However, the appropriate scale parametersofthese methods are difficult to be determined, andthe choices of scale parametersareof high importance, whichwill havea strong effect on the segmentation effectiveness. Whereas the evaluations of the quality of a segmentation method are still mainly based onsubjective judgment, which is a complicated process and lacksstability and reliability. Thus, an objective and unsupervised method needs to beestablished for selecting suitable parameters for a multi-scale segmentation to ensure the bestresults. In this work, a novicemethod is introduced to choose the optimal parameter for themulti-scale segmentation. For large information in band itself and weak relationship among multispectral bands, valuable bands should be selected from original data and weighed by the degreeofcorrelation. Then thresholds of all 3 selected bands ranging from 20 to 200 (intervals of 10)are created in Definiens Professional 8.7. It considers that a segmentation has two desirable properties: each of the resulting segments should be internally homogeneous and should be distinguishable from its neighborhood. Therefore, the global intra-segment and inter-segment heterogeneity indexes are taken into account to identify the optimal segmentation scale. Finally, cubic spline interpolation is applied to select the optimalsegmentation scale. As a result, the measure combining a spatial autocorrelation indicator and a variance indicator shows that the method can improve the precision in global segmentation.

  3. A Marker-Based Approach for the Automated Selection of a Single Segmentation from a Hierarchical Set of Image Segmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Y.; Tilton, J. C.; Benediktsson, J. A.; Chanussot, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Hierarchical SEGmentation (HSEG) algorithm, which combines region object finding with region object clustering, has given good performances for multi- and hyperspectral image analysis. This technique produces at its output a hierarchical set of image segmentations. The automated selection of a single segmentation level is often necessary. We propose and investigate the use of automatically selected markers for this purpose. In this paper, a novel Marker-based HSEG (M-HSEG) method for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. Two classification-based approaches for automatic marker selection are adapted and compared for this purpose. Then, a novel constrained marker-based HSEG algorithm is applied, resulting in a spectral-spatial classification map. Three different implementations of the M-HSEG method are proposed and their performances in terms of classification accuracies are compared. The experimental results, presented for three hyperspectral airborne images, demonstrate that the proposed approach yields accurate segmentation and classification maps, and thus is attractive for remote sensing image analysis.

  4. Active contour based segmentation of resected livers in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelmann, Simon; Oyarzun Laura, Cristina; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The majority of state of the art segmentation algorithms are able to give proper results in healthy organs but not in pathological ones. However, many clinical applications require an accurate segmentation of pathological organs. The determination of the target boundaries for radiotherapy or liver volumetry calculations are examples of this. Volumetry measurements are of special interest after tumor resection for follow up of liver regrow. The segmentation of resected livers presents additional challenges that were not addressed by state of the art algorithms. This paper presents a snakes based algorithm specially developed for the segmentation of resected livers. The algorithm is enhanced with a novel dynamic smoothing technique that allows the active contour to propagate with different speeds depending on the intensities visible in its neighborhood. The algorithm is evaluated in 6 clinical CT images as well as 18 artificial datasets generated from additional clinical CT images.

  5. Selecting salient frames for spatiotemporal video modeling and segmentation.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaomu; Fan, Guoliang

    2007-12-01

    We propose a new statistical generative model for spatiotemporal video segmentation. The objective is to partition a video sequence into homogeneous segments that can be used as "building blocks" for semantic video segmentation. The baseline framework is a Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-based video modeling approach that involves a six-dimensional spatiotemporal feature space. Specifically, we introduce the concept of frame saliency to quantify the relevancy of a video frame to the GMM-based spatiotemporal video modeling. This helps us use a small set of salient frames to facilitate the model training by reducing data redundancy and irrelevance. A modified expectation maximization algorithm is developed for simultaneous GMM training and frame saliency estimation, and the frames with the highest saliency values are extracted to refine the GMM estimation for video segmentation. Moreover, it is interesting to find that frame saliency can imply some object behaviors. This makes the proposed method also applicable to other frame-related video analysis tasks, such as key-frame extraction, video skimming, etc. Experiments on real videos demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  6. Rice chromosome segment substitution line selection utilizing SNP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are a powerful tool for identifying naturally occurring, favorable alleles in unadapted germplasm. Six CSSL libraries in rice (Oryza sativa) are being developed from crosses between three different accessions of the rice progenitor species, O. rufipogon...

  7. Active frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng

    2013-05-01

    Split ring resonator arrays are investigated for use as active elements for the realization of voltage controllable frequency selective surfaces. Finite difference time domain simulations suggest the absorptive and reflective properties of such surfaces can be externally controlled through modifications of the split ring resonator gap impedance. In this work, such voltage-controlled resonance tuning is obtained through the addition of an appropriately designed high electron mobility transistor positioned across the split ring resonator gap. It is shown that a 0.5μm gate length high electron mobility transistor allows voltage controllable switching between the two resonant conditions associated with a split ring resonator and that of a closed loop geometry when the surface is illuminated with THz radiation. Partial switching between these two resonant conditions is observed at larger gate lengths. Such active frequency selective surfaces are proposed, for example, for use as modulators in THz detection schemes and as RF filters in radar applications when scaled to operate at GHz frequencies.

  8. Multiple LREK active contours for knee meniscus ultrasound image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Amir; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Goh, Siew-Li; George, John; Supriyanto, Eko; Lai, Khin W

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of knee meniscus degeneration and displacement in an ultrasound image requires simultaneous segmentation of femoral condyle, meniscus, and tibial plateau in order to determine the area and the position of the meniscus. In this paper, we present an active contour for image segmentation that uses scalable local regional information on expandable kernel (LREK). It includes using a strategy to adapt the size of a local window in order to avoid being confined locally in a homogeneous region during the segmentation process. We also provide a multiple active contours framework called multiple LREK (MLREK) to deal with multiple object segmentation without merging and overlapping between the neighboring contours in the shared boundaries of separate regions. We compare its performance to other existing active contour models and show an improvement offered by our model. We then investigate the choice of various parameters in the proposed framework in response to the segmentation outcome. Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance measures over a set of real knee meniscus ultrasound images indicate a potential application of MLREK for assessment of knee meniscus degeneration and displacement. PMID:25910057

  9. Activity recognition using Video Event Segmentation with Text (VEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Hillary; Jones, Eric K.; Kaluzniacki, Andrew; Blasch, Erik; Tierno, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    Multi-Intelligence (multi-INT) data includes video, text, and signals that require analysis by operators. Analysis methods include information fusion approaches such as filtering, correlation, and association. In this paper, we discuss the Video Event Segmentation with Text (VEST) method, which provides event boundaries of an activity to compile related message and video clips for future interest. VEST infers meaningful activities by clustering multiple streams of time-sequenced multi-INT intelligence data and derived fusion products. We discuss exemplar results that segment raw full-motion video (FMV) data by using extracted commentary message timestamps, FMV metadata, and user-defined queries.

  10. Abdomen and spinal cord segmentation with augmented active shape models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhoubing; Conrad, Benjamin N; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Smith, Seth A; Poulose, Benjamin K; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-07-01

    Active shape models (ASMs) have been widely used for extracting human anatomies in medical images given their capability for shape regularization of topology preservation. However, sensitivity to model initialization and local correspondence search often undermines their performances, especially around highly variable contexts in computed-tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. In this study, we propose an augmented ASM (AASM) by integrating the multiatlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques into the traditional ASM framework. Using AASM, landmark updates are optimized globally via a region-based LS evolution applied on the probability map generated from MALF. This augmentation effectively extends the searching range of correspondent landmarks while reducing sensitivity to the image contexts and improves the segmentation robustness. We propose the AASM framework as a two-dimensional segmentation technique targeting structures with one axis of regularity. We apply AASM approach to abdomen CT and spinal cord (SC) MR segmentation challenges. On 20 CT scans, the AASM segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous/visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. On 28 3T MR scans, AASM yields better performances than other state-of-the-art approaches in segmenting white/gray matter in SC. PMID:27610400

  11. Implicit active contours for automatic brachytherapy seed segmentation in fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Eric; Burdette, Clif; Song, Danny; Fichtinger, Gabor; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2012-02-01

    Motivation: In prostate brachytherapy, intra-operative dosimetry would be ideal to allow for rapid evaluation of the implant quality while the patient is still in the treatment position. Such a mechanism, however, requires 3-D visualization of the currently deposited seeds relative to the prostate. Thus, accurate, robust, and fully-automatic seed segmentation is of critical importance in achieving intra-operative dosimetry. Methodology: Implanted brachytherapy seeds are segmented by utilizing a region-based implicit active contour approach. Overlapping seed clusters are then resolved using a simple yet effective declustering technique. Results: Ground-truth seed coordinates were obtained via a published segmentation technique. A total of 248 clinical C-arm images from 16 patients were used to validate the proposed algorithm resulting in a 98.4% automatic detection rate with a corresponding 2.5% false-positive rate. The overall mean centroid error between the ground-truth and automatic segmentations was measured to be 0.42 pixels, while the mean centroid error for overlapping seed clusters alone was measured to be 0.67 pixels. Conclusion: Based on clinical data evaluation and validation, robust, accurate, and fully-automatic brachytherapy seed segmentation can be achieved through the implicit active contour framework and subsequent seed declustering method.

  12. Segmentation of intensity inhomogeneous brain MR images using active contours.

    PubMed

    Akram, Farhan; Kim, Jeong Heon; Lim, Han Ul; Choi, Kwang Nam

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of intensity inhomogeneous regions is a well-known problem in image analysis applications. This paper presents a region-based active contour method for image segmentation, which properly works in the context of intensity inhomogeneity problem. The proposed region-based active contour method embeds both region and gradient information unlike traditional methods. It contains mainly two terms, area and length, in which the area term practices a new region-based signed pressure force (SPF) function, which utilizes mean values from a certain neighborhood using the local binary fitted (LBF) energy model. In turn, the length term uses gradient information. The novelty of our method is to locally compute new SPF function, which uses local mean values and is able to detect boundaries of the homogenous regions. Finally, a truncated Gaussian kernel is used to regularize the level set function, which not only regularizes it but also removes the need of computationally expensive reinitialization. The proposed method targets the segmentation problem of intensity inhomogeneous images and reduces the time complexity among locally computed active contour methods. The experimental results show that the proposed method yields better segmentation result as well as less time complexity compared with the state-of-the-art active contour methods. PMID:25143780

  13. SU-E-J-132: Automated Segmentation with Post-Registration Atlas Selection Based On Mutual Information

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X; Gao, H; Sharp, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The delineation of targets and organs-at-risk is a critical step during image-guided radiation therapy, for which manual contouring is the gold standard. However, it is often time-consuming and may suffer from intra- and inter-rater variability. The purpose of this work is to investigate the automated segmentation. Methods: The automatic segmentation here is based on mutual information (MI), with the atlas from Public Domain Database for Computational Anatomy (PDDCA) with manually drawn contours.Using dice coefficient (DC) as the quantitative measure of segmentation accuracy, we perform leave-one-out cross-validations for all PDDCA images sequentially, during which other images are registered to each chosen image and DC is computed between registered contour and ground truth. Meanwhile, six strategies, including MI, are selected to measure the image similarity, with MI to be the best. Then given a target image to be segmented and an atlas, automatic segmentation consists of: (a) the affine registration step for image positioning; (b) the active demons registration method to register the atlas to the target image; (c) the computation of MI values between the deformed atlas and the target image; (d) the weighted image fusion of three deformed atlas images with highest MI values to form the segmented contour. Results: MI was found to be the best among six studied strategies in the sense that it had the highest positive correlation between similarity measure (e.g., MI values) and DC. For automated segmentation, the weighted image fusion of three deformed atlas images with highest MI values provided the highest DC among four proposed strategies. Conclusion: MI has the highest correlation with DC, and therefore is an appropriate choice for post-registration atlas selection in atlas-based segmentation. Xuhua Ren and Hao Gao were partially supported by the NSFC (#11405105), the 973 Program (#2015CB856000) and the Shanghai Pujiang Talent Program (#14PJ1404500)

  14. An Investigation of Implicit Active Contours for Scientific Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Weeratunga, S K; Kamath, C

    2003-10-29

    The use of partial differential equations in image processing has become an active area of research in the last few years. In particular, active contours are being used for image segmentation, either explicitly as snakes, or implicitly through the level set approach. In this paper, we consider the use of the implicit active contour approach for segmenting scientific images of pollen grains obtained using a scanning electron microscope. Our goal is to better understand the pros and cons of these techniques and to compare them with the traditional approaches such as the Canny and SUSAN edge detectors. The preliminary results of our study show that the level set method is computationally expensive and requires the setting of several different parameters. However, it results in closed contours, which may be useful in separating objects from the background in an image.

  15. Lung segmentation from HRCT using united geometric active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junwei; Li, Chuanfu; Xiong, Jin; Feng, Huanqing

    2007-12-01

    Accurate lung segmentation from high resolution CT images is a challenging task due to various detail tracheal structures, missing boundary segments and complex lung anatomy. One popular method is based on gray-level threshold, however its results are usually rough. A united geometric active contours model based on level set is proposed for lung segmentation in this paper. Particularly, this method combines local boundary information and region statistical-based model synchronously: 1) Boundary term ensures the integrality of lung tissue.2) Region term makes the level set function evolve with global characteristic and independent on initial settings. A penalizing energy term is introduced into the model, which forces the level set function evolving without re-initialization. The method is found to be much more efficient in lung segmentation than other methods that are only based on boundary or region. Results are shown by 3D lung surface reconstruction, which indicates that the method will play an important role in the design of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system.

  16. Midbrain volume segmentation using active shape models and LBPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olveres, Jimena; Nava, Rodrigo; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Cristóbal, Gabriel; García-Moreno, Carla María.

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to detect different brain structures such as midbrain, white matter, gray matter, corpus callosum, and cerebellum has increased. This fact together with the evidence that midbrain is associated with Parkinson's disease has led researchers to consider midbrain segmentation as an important issue. Nowadays, Active Shape Models (ASM) are widely used in literature for organ segmentation where the shape is an important discriminant feature. Nevertheless, this approach is based on the assumption that objects of interest are usually located on strong edges. Such a limitation may lead to a final shape far from the actual shape model. This paper proposes a novel method based on the combined use of ASM and Local Binary Patterns for segmenting midbrain. Furthermore, we analyzed several LBP methods and evaluated their performance. The joint-model considers both global and local statistics to improve final adjustments. The results showed that our proposal performs substantially better than the ASM algorithm and provides better segmentation measurements.

  17. Segmentation of Coronal Holes Using Active Contours Without Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L. E.; Valluri, M.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2016-09-01

    An application of active contours without edges is presented as an efficient and effective means of extracting and characterizing coronal holes. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the Sun with open magnetic field lines. The detection and characterization of these regions is important for testing theories of their formation and evolution, and also from a space weather perspective because they are the source of the fast solar wind. Coronal holes are detected in full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). The proposed method detects coronal boundaries without determining any fixed intensity value in the data. Instead, the active contour segmentation employs an energy-minimization in which coronal holes are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than the surrounding active regions and quiet Sun. The segmented coronal holes tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind observations, and qualitatively match the coronal holes segmented by other methods. The means to identify a coronal hole without specifying a final intensity threshold may allow this algorithm to be more robust across multiple datasets, regardless of data type, resolution, and quality.

  18. Segmentation of Coronal Holes Using Active Contours Without Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L. E.; Valluri, M.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2016-10-01

    An application of active contours without edges is presented as an efficient and effective means of extracting and characterizing coronal holes. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the Sun with open magnetic field lines. The detection and characterization of these regions is important for testing theories of their formation and evolution, and also from a space weather perspective because they are the source of the fast solar wind. Coronal holes are detected in full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). The proposed method detects coronal boundaries without determining any fixed intensity value in the data. Instead, the active contour segmentation employs an energy-minimization in which coronal holes are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than the surrounding active regions and quiet Sun. The segmented coronal holes tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind observations, and qualitatively match the coronal holes segmented by other methods. The means to identify a coronal hole without specifying a final intensity threshold may allow this algorithm to be more robust across multiple datasets, regardless of data type, resolution, and quality.

  19. Selective data segment monitoring system. [using shift registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, M. N. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High speed data monitoring apparatus is described for displaying the bit pattern of a selected portion of a block of transmitted data comprising a shift register for receiving the transmitted data and for temporarily containing the consecutive data bits. A programmable sync detector for monitoring the contents of the shift register and for generating a sync signal when the shift register contains a predetermined sync code is included. A counter is described for counting the data bits input to the shift register after the sync signal is generated and for generating a count complete signal when a selected number of data bits have been input to the register. A data storage device is used for storing the contents of the shift register at the time the count complete signal is generated.

  20. Automatic segmentation and supervised learning-based selection of nuclei in cancer tissue images.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Kaustav; Gudla, Prabhakar R; Amundsen, Ryan; Meaburn, Karen J; Misteli, Tom; Lockett, Stephen J

    2012-09-01

    Analysis of preferential localization of certain genes within the cell nuclei is emerging as a new technique for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Quantitation requires accurate segmentation of 100-200 cell nuclei in each tissue section to draw a statistically significant result. Thus, for large-scale analysis, manual processing is too time consuming and subjective. Fortuitously, acquired images generally contain many more nuclei than are needed for analysis. Therefore, we developed an integrated workflow that selects, following automatic segmentation, a subpopulation of accurately delineated nuclei for positioning of fluorescence in situ hybridization-labeled genes of interest. Segmentation was performed by a multistage watershed-based algorithm and screening by an artificial neural network-based pattern recognition engine. The performance of the workflow was quantified in terms of the fraction of automatically selected nuclei that were visually confirmed as well segmented and by the boundary accuracy of the well-segmented nuclei relative to a 2D dynamic programming-based reference segmentation method. Application of the method was demonstrated for discriminating normal and cancerous breast tissue sections based on the differential positioning of the HES5 gene. Automatic results agreed with manual analysis in 11 out of 14 cancers, all four normal cases, and all five noncancerous breast disease cases, thus showing the accuracy and robustness of the proposed approach.

  1. Rough-Fuzzy Clustering and Unsupervised Feature Selection for Wavelet Based MR Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Pradipta; Roy, Shaswati

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation is an indispensable process in the visualization of human tissues, particularly during clinical analysis of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. For many human experts, manual segmentation is a difficult and time consuming task, which makes an automated brain MR image segmentation method desirable. In this regard, this paper presents a new segmentation method for brain MR images, integrating judiciously the merits of rough-fuzzy computing and multiresolution image analysis technique. The proposed method assumes that the major brain tissues, namely, gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid from the MR images are considered to have different textural properties. The dyadic wavelet analysis is used to extract the scale-space feature vector for each pixel, while the rough-fuzzy clustering is used to address the uncertainty problem of brain MR image segmentation. An unsupervised feature selection method is introduced, based on maximum relevance-maximum significance criterion, to select relevant and significant textural features for segmentation problem, while the mathematical morphology based skull stripping preprocessing step is proposed to remove the non-cerebral tissues like skull. The performance of the proposed method, along with a comparison with related approaches, is demonstrated on a set of synthetic and real brain MR images using standard validity indices. PMID:25848961

  2. Which mantle below the active rift segments in Afar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pik, Raphael; Stab, Martin; Ancellin, Marie-Anne; Sarah, Medynski; Cloquet, Christophe; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Ayalew, Dereje; Chazot, Gilles; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of mantle sources beneath the Ethiopian volcanic province has long been discussed and debated with a long-lived controversy in identifying mantle reservoirs and locating them in the mantle. One interpretation of the isotopic composition of erupted lavas considers that the Afar mantle plume composition is best expressed by recent lavas from Afar and Gulf of Aden (e.g. Erta Ale, Manda Inakir and the 45°E torus anomaly on the Gulf of Aden) implying that all other volcanics (including other active segments and the initial flood basalt province) result from mixing of this plume component with additional lithospheric and asthenospheric components. A completely opposite view considers that the initial Oligocene continental flood basalts best represent the isotopic composition of the Afar mantle plume, which is subsequently mixed in various proportions with continental lithospheric mantle for generating some of the specific signature of Miocene and Quaternary volcanics. The precise and correct identification of mantle components involved in the generation of magmas is of particular importance because this is the only way to document the participation of mantle during extension and its potential role in break-up processes. In this contribution we provide new isotopic data for central Afar and we revisit the whole data set of the Ethiopian volcanic province in order to: (i) precisely identify the distinct mantle components implicated and (ii) discuss their location and evolution not only considering geochemical mixings, but also taking into account additional characteristics of erupted magmatic suites (volumes, location and relationships with amount of extension and segmentation). This new interpretation of geochemical data allows reconsidering the evolution of mantle in the course of rift evolution. In terms of mantle sources, two populations of active segments are frontally opposed in the volcanic province: those that share exactly the same composition with

  3. Interactive prostate segmentation using atlas-guided semi-supervised learning and adaptive feature selection

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Hyun; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Yinghuan; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurate prostate segmentation is necessary for maximizing the effectiveness of radiation therapy of prostate cancer. However, manual segmentation from 3D CT images is very time-consuming and often causes large intra- and interobserver variations across clinicians. Many segmentation methods have been proposed to automate this labor-intensive process, but tedious manual editing is still required due to the limited performance. In this paper, the authors propose a new interactive segmentation method that can (1) flexibly generate the editing result with a few scribbles or dots provided by a clinician, (2) fast deliver intermediate results to the clinician, and (3) sequentially correct the segmentations from any type of automatic or interactive segmentation methods. Methods: The authors formulate the editing problem as a semisupervised learning problem which can utilize a priori knowledge of training data and also the valuable information from user interactions. Specifically, from a region of interest near the given user interactions, the appropriate training labels, which are well matched with the user interactions, can be locally searched from a training set. With voting from the selected training labels, both confident prostate and background voxels, as well as unconfident voxels can be estimated. To reflect informative relationship between voxels, location-adaptive features are selected from the confident voxels by using regression forest and Fisher separation criterion. Then, the manifold configuration computed in the derived feature space is enforced into the semisupervised learning algorithm. The labels of unconfident voxels are then predicted by regularizing semisupervised learning algorithm. Results: The proposed interactive segmentation method was applied to correct automatic segmentation results of 30 challenging CT images. The correction was conducted three times with different user interactions performed at different time periods, in order to

  4. Segmentation and Tracking of Cytoskeletal Filaments Using Open Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew B.; Li, Hongsheng; Shen, Tian; Huang, Xiaolei; Yusuf, Eddy; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    We use open active contours to quantify cytoskeletal structures imaged by fluorescence microscopy in two and three dimensions. We developed an interactive software tool for segmentation, tracking, and visualization of individual fibers. Open active contours are parametric curves that deform to minimize the sum of an external energy derived from the image and an internal bending and stretching energy. The external energy generates (i) forces that attract the contour toward the central bright line of a filament in the image, and (ii) forces that stretch the active contour toward the ends of bright ridges. Images of simulated semiflexible polymers with known bending and torsional rigidity are analyzed to validate the method. We apply our methods to quantify the conformations and dynamics of actin in two examples: actin filaments imaged by TIRF microscopy in vitro, and actin cables in fission yeast imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:20814909

  5. Classification of physical activities based on body-segments coordination.

    PubMed

    Fradet, Laetitia; Marin, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    Numerous innovations based on connected objects and physical activity (PA) monitoring have been proposed. However, recognition of PAs requires robust algorithm and methodology. The current study presents an innovative approach for PA recognition. It is based on the heuristic definition of postures and the use of body-segments coordination obtained through external sensors. The first part of this study presents the methodology required to define the set of accelerations which is the most appropriate to represent the particular body-segments coordination involved in the chosen PAs (here walking, running, and cycling). For that purpose, subjects of different ages and heterogeneous physical conditions walked, ran, cycled, and performed daily activities at different paces. From the 3D motion capture, vertical and horizontal accelerations of 8 anatomical landmarks representative of the body were computed. Then, the 680 combinations from up to 3 accelerations were compared to identify the most appropriate set of acceleration to discriminate the PAs in terms of body segment coordinations. The discrimination was based on the maximal Hausdorff Distance obtained between the different set of accelerations. The vertical accelerations of both knees demonstrated the best PAs discrimination. The second step was the proof of concept, implementing the proposed algorithm to classify PAs of new group of subjects. The originality of the proposed algorithm is the possibility to use the subject's specific measures as reference data. With the proposed algorithm, 94% of the trials were correctly classified. In conclusion, our study proposed a flexible and extendable methodology. At the current stage, the algorithm has been shown to be valid for heterogeneous subjects, which suggests that it could be deployed in clinical or health-related applications regardless of the subjects' physical abilities or characteristics.

  6. Classification of physical activities based on body-segments coordination.

    PubMed

    Fradet, Laetitia; Marin, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    Numerous innovations based on connected objects and physical activity (PA) monitoring have been proposed. However, recognition of PAs requires robust algorithm and methodology. The current study presents an innovative approach for PA recognition. It is based on the heuristic definition of postures and the use of body-segments coordination obtained through external sensors. The first part of this study presents the methodology required to define the set of accelerations which is the most appropriate to represent the particular body-segments coordination involved in the chosen PAs (here walking, running, and cycling). For that purpose, subjects of different ages and heterogeneous physical conditions walked, ran, cycled, and performed daily activities at different paces. From the 3D motion capture, vertical and horizontal accelerations of 8 anatomical landmarks representative of the body were computed. Then, the 680 combinations from up to 3 accelerations were compared to identify the most appropriate set of acceleration to discriminate the PAs in terms of body segment coordinations. The discrimination was based on the maximal Hausdorff Distance obtained between the different set of accelerations. The vertical accelerations of both knees demonstrated the best PAs discrimination. The second step was the proof of concept, implementing the proposed algorithm to classify PAs of new group of subjects. The originality of the proposed algorithm is the possibility to use the subject's specific measures as reference data. With the proposed algorithm, 94% of the trials were correctly classified. In conclusion, our study proposed a flexible and extendable methodology. At the current stage, the algorithm has been shown to be valid for heterogeneous subjects, which suggests that it could be deployed in clinical or health-related applications regardless of the subjects' physical abilities or characteristics. PMID:27441831

  7. The swath segment selection problem: extending AI search techniques to a novel real-world problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, R.; Smith, B.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the Swath Segment Selection problem (SSSP). The SSSP consists of a constrained geometric covering problem and a capacitated resource problem. It comes from the real-life problem of scheduling on- and off-times for air or space-borne instruments that image a target by flying over and collecting a swath of information.

  8. Two-stage atlas subset selection in multi-atlas based image segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Tingting Ruan, Dan

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fast growing access to large databases and cloud stored data presents a unique opportunity for multi-atlas based image segmentation and also presents challenges in heterogeneous atlas quality and computation burden. This work aims to develop a novel two-stage method tailored to the special needs in the face of large atlas collection with varied quality, so that high-accuracy segmentation can be achieved with low computational cost. Methods: An atlas subset selection scheme is proposed to substitute a significant portion of the computationally expensive full-fledged registration in the conventional scheme with a low-cost alternative. More specifically, the authors introduce a two-stage atlas subset selection method. In the first stage, an augmented subset is obtained based on a low-cost registration configuration and a preliminary relevance metric; in the second stage, the subset is further narrowed down to a fusion set of desired size, based on full-fledged registration and a refined relevance metric. An inference model is developed to characterize the relationship between the preliminary and refined relevance metrics, and a proper augmented subset size is derived to ensure that the desired atlases survive the preliminary selection with high probability. Results: The performance of the proposed scheme has been assessed with cross validation based on two clinical datasets consisting of manually segmented prostate and brain magnetic resonance images, respectively. The proposed scheme demonstrates comparable end-to-end segmentation performance as the conventional single-stage selection method, but with significant computation reduction. Compared with the alternative computation reduction method, their scheme improves the mean and medium Dice similarity coefficient value from (0.74, 0.78) to (0.83, 0.85) and from (0.82, 0.84) to (0.95, 0.95) for prostate and corpus callosum segmentation, respectively, with statistical significance. Conclusions: The authors

  9. Sequential Model Selection based Segmentation to Detect DNA Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianhua; Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Huixia Judy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Array-based CGH experiments are designed to detect genomic aberrations or regions of DNA copy-number variation that are associated with an outcome, typically a state of disease. Most of the existing statistical methods target on detecting DNA copy number variations in a single sample or array. We focus on the detection of group effect variation, through simultaneous study of multiple samples from multiple groups. Rather than using direct segmentation or smoothing techniques, as commonly seen in existing detection methods, we develop a sequential model selection procedure that is guided by a modified Bayesian information criterion. This approach improves detection accuracy by accumulatively utilizing information across contiguous clones, and has computational advantage over the existing popular detection methods. Our empirical investigation suggests that the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the existing detection methods, in particular, in detecting small segments or separating neighboring segments with differential degrees of copy-number variation. PMID:26954760

  10. Identification of Pummelo Cultivars by Using a Panel of 25 Selected SNPs and 12 DNA Segments

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo; Zhong, Guang-yan; Yue, Jian-qiang; Yang, Run-ting; Li, Chong; Li, Yue-jia; Zhong, Yun; Wang, Xuan; Jiang, Bo; Zeng, Ji-wu; Zhang, Li; Yan, Shu-tang; Bei, Xue-jun; Zhou, Dong-guo

    2014-01-01

    Pummelo cultivars are usually difficult to identify morphologically, especially when fruits are unavailable. The problem was addressed in this study with the use of two methods: high resolution melting analysis of SNPs and sequencing of DNA segments. In the first method, a set of 25 SNPs with high polymorphic information content were selected from SNPs predicted by analyzing ESTs and sequenced DNA segments. High resolution melting analysis was then used to genotype 260 accessions including 55 from Myanmar, and 178 different genotypes were thus identified. A total of 99 cultivars were assigned to 86 different genotypes since the known somatic mutants were identical to their original genotypes at the analyzed SNP loci. The Myanmar samples were genotypically different from each other and from all other samples, indicating they were derived from sexual propagation. Statistical analysis showed that the set of SNPs was powerful enough for identifying at least 1000 pummelo genotypes, though the discrimination power varied in different pummelo groups and populations. In the second method, 12 genomic DNA segments of 24 representative pummelo accessions were sequenced. Analysis of the sequences revealed the existence of a high haplotype polymorphism in pummelo, and statistical analysis showed that the segments could be used as genetic barcodes that should be informative enough to allow reliable identification of 1200 pummelo cultivars. The high level of haplotype diversity and an apparent population structure shown by DNA segments and by SNP genotypes, respectively, were discussed in relation to the origin and domestication of the pummelo species. PMID:24732455

  11. Multiatlas whole heart segmentation of CT data using conditional entropy for atlas ranking and selection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Xiahai Qian, Xiaohua; Bai, Wenjia; Shi, Wenzhe; Rueckert, Daniel; Song, Jingjing; Zhan, Songhua; Lian, Yanyun

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is widely used in clinical diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Whole heart segmentation (WHS) plays a vital role in developing new clinical applications of cardiac CT. However, the shape and appearance of the heart can vary greatly across different scans, making the automatic segmentation particularly challenging. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a multiatlas segmentation (MAS) scheme using a new atlas ranking and selection algorithm for automatic WHS of CT data. Research on different MAS strategies and their influence on WHS performance are limited. This work provides a detailed comparison study evaluating the impacts of label fusion, atlas ranking, and sizes of the atlas database on the segmentation performance. Methods: Atlases in a database were registered to the target image using a hierarchical registration scheme specifically designed for cardiac images. A subset of the atlases were selected for label fusion, according to the authors’ proposed atlas ranking criterion which evaluated the performance of each atlas by computing the conditional entropy of the target image given the propagated atlas labeling. Joint label fusion was used to combine multiple label estimates to obtain the final segmentation. The authors used 30 clinical cardiac CT angiography (CTA) images to evaluate the proposed MAS scheme and to investigate different segmentation strategies. Results: The mean WHS Dice score of the proposed MAS method was 0.918 ± 0.021, and the mean runtime for one case was 13.2 min on a workstation. This MAS scheme using joint label fusion generated significantly better Dice scores than the other label fusion strategies, including majority voting (0.901 ± 0.276, p < 0.01), locally weighted voting (0.905 ± 0.0247, p < 0.01), and probabilistic patch-based fusion (0.909 ± 0.0249, p < 0.01). In the atlas ranking study, the proposed criterion based on conditional entropy yielded a performance curve

  12. Selective Invocation of Shape Priors for Deformable Segmentation and Morphologic Classification of Prostate Cancer Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Veltri, Robert; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Christudass, Christhunesa; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Shape based active contours have emerged as a natural solution to overlap resolution. However, most of these shape-based methods are computationally expensive. There are instances in an image where no overlapping objects are present and applying these schemes results in significant computational overhead without any accompanying, additional benefit. In this paper we present a novel adaptive active contour scheme (AdACM) that combines boundary and region based energy terms with a shape prior in a multi level set formulation. To reduce the computational overhead, the shape prior term in the variational formulation is only invoked for those instances in the image where overlaps between objects are identified; these overlaps being identified via a contour concavity detection scheme. By not having to invoke all 3 terms (shape, boundary, region) for segmenting every object in the scene, the computational expense of the integrated active contour model is dramatically reduced, a particularly relevant consideration when multiple objects have to be segmented on very large histopathological images. The AdACM was employed for the task of segmenting nuclei on 80 prostate cancer tissue microarray images from 40 patient studies. Nuclear shape based, architectural and textural features extracted from these segmentations were extracted and found to able to discriminate different Gleason grade patterns with a classification accuracy of 86% via a quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) classifier. On average the AdACM model provided 60% savings in computational times compared to a non-optimized hybrid active contour model involving a shape prior. PMID:25466771

  13. Automatic seed selection for segmentation of liver cirrhosis in laparoscopic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Rahul; Marcinczak, Jan Marek; Grigat, Rolf-Rainer

    2014-03-01

    For computer aided diagnosis based on laparoscopic sequences, image segmentation is one of the basic steps which define the success of all further processing. However, many image segmentation algorithms require prior knowledge which is given by interaction with the clinician. We propose an automatic seed selection algorithm for segmentation of liver cirrhosis in laparoscopic sequences which assigns each pixel a probability of being cirrhotic liver tissue or background tissue. Our approach is based on a trained classifier using SIFT and RGB features with PCA. Due to the unique illumination conditions in laparoscopic sequences of the liver, a very low dimensional feature space can be used for classification via logistic regression. The methodology is evaluated on 718 cirrhotic liver and background patches that are taken from laparoscopic sequences of 7 patients. Using a linear classifier we achieve a precision of 91% in a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that with logistic probability estimates, seeds with high certainty of being cirrhotic liver tissue can be obtained. For example, our precision of liver seeds increases to 98.5% if only seeds with more than 95% probability of being liver are used. Finally, these automatically selected seeds can be used as priors in Graph Cuts which is demonstrated in this paper.

  14. [Segmental angiography of the liver with laparoscopy and electro-coagulation. Selective hepatography (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wannagat, L

    1975-09-01

    Segmental angiography of the liver with laparoscopy and electro-coagulation has high diagnostic value. The circulatory systems of the liver may be studied selectively or in various combinations. Morphologic lesions as well as functional disturbances of liver arteries and veins, the portal vein and to a certain degree lymph vessels can be visualized precisely. An improved indication for shunt operations and a more reliable prognosis may be achieved by direct transhepatic pressure measurements, especially within the hepatic artery and portal vein. An early diagnosis of the Budd-Chiari-Syndrome is enabled by the combined segmental veno- and portography which could not be achieved by the known techniques so far. Complications are rarely seen. In 1070 examinations there was one suspicion for bilihemia, one case of hemobilia, and one case of a subcapsular hematoma. Twice a liver lobe was perforated. There was never a permanent damage to the patient. Biochemical and nuclear medicine studies are suggested.

  15. Automatic segmentation of zona pellucida and its application in cleavage-stage embryo biopsy position selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenan; Ang, Wei Tech; Tan, Steven Yih Min; Latt, Win Tun

    2015-08-01

    A very important step of Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is embryo biopsy, in which process the zona pellucida (ZP) is cut open partially and a part of cellular material is extracted from the embryo. Recognition of the ZP is necessary not only for embryo biopsy, but also for other applications such as zona pellucida thickness variation (ZPTV), embryo dissection, etc. The ZP opening position is closely related to the cell survival rate after the biopsy. Selection of an unsuitable position may cause blastomere lysis after the ZP opening. Normal procedures of ZP recognition and biopsy position selection involve a skilled human embryologist. In order to make the process automatic, we introduce an automatic segmentation method for ZP recognition by using edge detection and ellipse fitting with a value adjustment algorithm in this paper. An application of ZP recognition in embryo biopsy position selection is also introduced. Our ZP recognition algorithm was able to correctly segment 43 out of 45 sample embryo images, achieving a success rate of 96%. Its application in embryo biopsy position selection achieved a success rate of 93%. PMID:26737136

  16. Interactive Medical Image Segmentation using PDE Control of Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Karasev, Peter; Kolesov, Ivan; Fritscher, Karl; Vela, Patricio; Mitchell, Phillip; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of injured or unusual anatomic structures in medical imagery is a problem that has continued to elude fully automated solutions. In this paper, the goal of easy-to-use and consistent interactive segmentation is transformed into a control synthesis problem. A nominal level set PDE is assumed to be given; this open-loop system achieves correct segmentation under ideal conditions, but does not agree with a human expert's ideal boundary for real image data. Perturbing the state and dynamics of a level set PDE via the accumulated user input and an observer-like system leads to desirable closed-loop behavior. The input structure is designed such that a user can stabilize the boundary in some desired state without needing to understand any mathematical parameters. Effectiveness of the technique is illustrated with applications to the challenging segmentations of a patellar tendon in MR and a shattered femur in CT. PMID:23893712

  17. Segmentation of Uterus Using Laparoscopic Ultrasound by an Image-Based Active Contour Approach for Guiding Gynecological Diagnosis and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue-Hao; Lu, Jun; Liu, Jin; Deng, Ying-Yuan; Liu, Wei-Zong; Huang, Xian; Yang, Yong-Heng; Xu, Qin; Yu, Zhi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    In laparoscopic gynecologic surgery, ultrasound has been typically implemented to diagnose urological and gynecological conditions. We applied laparoscopic ultrasonography (using Esaote 7.5~10MHz laparoscopic transducer) on the retrospective analyses of 42 women subjects during laparoscopic extirpation and excision of gynecological tumors in our hospital from August 2011 to August 2013. The objective of our research is to develop robust segmentation technique for isolation and identification of the uterus from the ultrasound images, so as to assess, locate and guide in removing the lesions during laparoscopic operations. Our method enables segmentation of the uterus by the active contour algorithm. We evaluated 42 in-vivo laparoscopic images acquired from the 42 patients (age 39.1 ± 7.2 years old) and selected images pertaining to 4 cases of congenital uterine malformations and 2 cases of pelvic adhesions masses. These cases (n = 6) were used for our uterus segmentation experiments. Based on them, the active contour method was compared with the manual segmentation method by a medical expert using linear regression and the Bland-Altman analysis (used to measure the correlation and the agreement). Then, the Dice and Jaccard indices are computed for measuring the similarity of uterus segmented between computational and manual methods. Good correlation was achieved whereby 84%-92% results fall within the 95% confidence interval in the Student t-test) and we demonstrate that the proposed segmentation method of uterus using laparoscopic images is effective.

  18. Prostate segmentation with local binary patterns guided active appearance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; Lladó, Xavier; Freixenet, Jordi; Vilanova, Joan C.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2011-03-01

    Real-time fusion of Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Trans Rectal Ultra Sound (TRUS) images aid in the localization of malignant tissues in TRUS guided prostate biopsy. Registration performed on segmented contours of the prostate reduces computational complexity and improves the multimodal registration accuracy. However, accurate and computationally efficient segmentation of the prostate in TRUS images could be challenging in the presence of heterogeneous intensity distribution inside the prostate gland, and other imaging artifacts like speckle noise, shadow regions and low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). In this work, we propose to enhance the texture features of the prostate region using Local Binary Patterns (LBP) for the propagation of a shape and appearance based statistical model to segment the prostate in a multi-resolution framework. A parametric model of the propagating contour is derived from Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the prior shape and texture information of the prostate from the training data. The estimated parameters are then modified with the prior knowledge of the optimization space to achieve an optimal segmentation. The proposed method achieves a mean Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) value of 0.94+/-0.01 and a mean segmentation time of 0.68+/-0.02 seconds when validated with 70 TRUS images of 7 datasets in a leave-one-patient-out validation framework. Our method performs computationally efficient and accurate prostate segmentation in the presence of intensity heterogeneities and imaging artifacts.

  19. Texture Guided Active Appearance Model Propagation for Prostate Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; Lladó, Xavier; Freixenet, Jordi; Vilanova, Joan C.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    Fusion of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Trans Rectal Ultra Sound (TRUS) images during TRUS guided prostate biopsy improves localization of the malignant tissues. Segmented prostate in TRUS and MRI improve registration accuracy and reduce computational cost of the procedure. However, accurate segmentation of the prostate in TRUS images can be a challenging task due to low signal to noise ratio, heterogeneous intensity distribution inside the prostate, and imaging artifacts like speckle noise and shadow. We propose to use texture features from approximation coefficients of Haar wavelet transform for propagation of a shape and appearance based statistical model to segment the prostate in a multi-resolution framework. A parametric model of the propagating contour is derived from Principal Component Analysis of prior shape and texture informations of the prostate from the training data. The parameters are then modified with prior knowledge of the optimization space to achieve optimal prostate segmentation. The proposed method achieves a mean Dice Similarity Coefficient value of 0.95±0.01, and mean segmentation time of 0.72±0.05 seconds when validated on 25 TRUS images, grabbed from video sequences, in a leave-one-out validation framework. Our proposed model performs computationally efficient accurate prostate segmentation in presence of intensity heterogeneity and imaging artifacts.

  20. A Typology of Middle School Girls: Audience Segmentation Related to Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Staten, Lisa K.; Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Jobe, Jared B.; Elder, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) combines social ecological and social marketing approaches to promote girls’ participation in physical activity programs implemented at 18 middle schools throughout the United States. Key to the TAAG approach is targeting materials to a variety of audience segments. TAAG segments are individuals who share one or more common characteristic that is expected to correlate with physical activity. Thirteen focus groups with seventh and eighth grade girls were conducted to identify and characterize segments. Potential messages and channels of communication were discussed for each segment. Based on participant responses, six primary segments were identified: athletic, preppy, quiet, rebel, smart, and tough. The focus group information was used to develop targeted promotional tools to appeal to a diversity of girls. Using audience segmentation for targeting persuasive communication is potentially useful for intervention programs but may be sensitive; therefore, ethical issues must be critically examined. PMID:16397160

  1. Fault Segmentation and its Implication to the Evaluation of Future Earthquakes from Active Faults in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, Y.; Yoshioka, T.

    2005-12-01

    Segmentation of active faults is essential for the evaluation both of past and future faulting using geologic data from paleoseismological sites. A behavioral segment is defined as the smallest segment of fault having a characteristic history of faulting. More over, we have to estimate the earthquake segments that can be consist of multiple faulting along a system of behavioral segments. Active fault strands in Japan are segmented into behavioral segments based on fault discontinuity of 2-3 km and larger (Active Fault Res. Group, GSJ, 2000), large bend of fault strand and paleoseismicity. 431 behavioral segments, >= 10 km in length and >= 0.1 m/ky in long-term slip-rate, are identified from a database of active faults in Japan, that is constructed at AFRC, GSJ/AIST. The length of the segments is averaged 21 km and approximately 70 km in maximum. Only 8 segments are exceed 45 km in length. These lengths are very similar to those of historical surface ruptures not only in Japan since 1891 Nobi earthquake, but also in other regions having different tectonic setting. According to the scaling law between fault length and amount of displacement of behavioral segment, a maximum length of ca. 70 km can estimate a slip of ca. 14 m. This amount of slip is as large as world largest slip occurred during the 1931 Fuyun earthquake of M 8, 1999 Chichi earthquake of M 7.4 and the 2001 Central Kunlun earthquake of M 7.9 in East Asia. Recent geological and seismological studies on large earthquakes have revealed that multiple-rupturing is very common during large earthquakes. Therefore, evaluation of simultaneous faulting along a system of active faults is indispensable for the estimation of earthquake size. A Matsuda's (1990) idea of "seismogenic faults", that is divided or grouped based on the geometric discontinuity of 5 km, may useful for the best estimation of earthquake segment. The Japanese behavioral segments are grouped into "seismogenic faults", each consists of about 2

  2. A Typology of Middle School Girls: Audience Segmentation Related to Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staten, Lisa K.; Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Jobe, Jared B.; Elder, John P.

    2006-01-01

    The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) combines social ecological and social marketing approaches to promote girls' participation in physical activity programs implemented at 18 middle schools throughout the United States. Key to the TAAG approach is targeting materials to a variety of audience segments. TAAG segments are individuals…

  3. Comparison of segmentation using fast marching and geodesic active contours methods for bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilqis, A.; Widita, R.

    2016-03-01

    Image processing is important in diagnosing diseases or damages of human organs. One of the important stages of image processing is segmentation process. Segmentation is a separation process of the image into regions of certain similar characteristics. It is used to simplify the image to make an analysis easier. The case raised in this study is image segmentation of bones. Bone's image segmentation is a way to get bone dimensions, which is needed in order to make prosthesis that is used to treat broken or cracked bones. Segmentation methods chosen in this study are fast marching and geodesic active contours. This study uses ITK (Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit) software. The success of the segmentation was then determined by calculating its accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. Based on the results, the Active Contours method has slightly higher accuracy and sensitivity values than the fast marching method. As for the value of specificity, fast marching has produced three image results that have higher specificity values compared to those of geodesic active contour's. The result also indicates that both methods have succeeded in performing bone's image segmentation. Overall, geodesic active contours method is quite better than fast marching in segmenting bone images.

  4. NESP: Nonlinear enhancement and selection of plane for optimal segmentation and recognition of scene word images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Anil Prasad, M. N.; Ramakrishnan, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report a breakthrough result on the difficult task of segmentation and recognition of coloured text from the word image dataset of ICDAR robust reading competition challenge 2: reading text in scene images. We split the word image into individual colour, gray and lightness planes and enhance the contrast of each of these planes independently by a power-law transform. The discrimination factor of each plane is computed as the maximum between-class variance used in Otsu thresholding. The plane that has maximum discrimination factor is selected for segmentation. The trial version of Omnipage OCR is then used on the binarized words for recognition. Our recognition results on ICDAR 2011 and ICDAR 2003 word datasets are compared with those reported in the literature. As baseline, the images binarized by simple global and local thresholding techniques were also recognized. The word recognition rate obtained by our non-linear enhancement and selection of plance method is 72.8% and 66.2% for ICDAR 2011 and 2003 word datasets, respectively. We have created ground-truth for each image at the pixel level to benchmark these datasets using a toolkit developed by us. The recognition rate of benchmarked images is 86.7% and 83.9% for ICDAR 2011 and 2003 datasets, respectively.

  5. Fusion set selection with surrogate metric in multi-atlas based image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingting; Ruan, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Multi-atlas based image segmentation sees unprecedented opportunities but also demanding challenges in the big data era. Relevant atlas selection before label fusion plays a crucial role in reducing potential performance loss from heterogeneous data quality and high computation cost from extensive data. This paper starts with investigating the image similarity metric (termed ‘surrogate’), an alternative to the inaccessible geometric agreement metric (termed ‘oracle’) in atlas relevance assessment, and probes into the problem of how to select the ‘most-relevant’ atlases and how many such atlases to incorporate. We propose an inference model to relate the surrogates and the oracle geometric agreement metrics. Based on this model, we quantify the behavior of the surrogates in mimicking oracle metrics for atlas relevance ordering. Finally, analytical insights on the choice of fusion set size are presented from a probabilistic perspective, with the integrated goal of including the most relevant atlases and excluding the irrelevant ones. Empirical evidence and performance assessment are provided based on prostate and corpus callosum segmentation.

  6. Automatic Coronary Artery Segmentation Using Active Search for Branches and Seemingly Disconnected Vessel Segments from Coronary CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hackjoon; Jeon, Byunghwan; Jang, Yeonggul; Hong, Youngtaek; Jung, Sunghee; Ha, Seongmin; Chang, Hyuk-Jae

    2016-01-01

    We propose a Bayesian tracking and segmentation method of coronary arteries on coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). The geometry of coronary arteries including lumen boundary is estimated in Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) framework. Three consecutive sphere based filtering is combined with a stochastic process that is based on the similarity of the consecutive local neighborhood voxels and the geometric constraint of a vessel. It is also founded on the prior knowledge that an artery can be seen locally disconnected and consist of branches which may be seemingly disconnected due to plaque build up. For such problem, an active search method is proposed to find branches and seemingly disconnected but actually connected vessel segments. Several new measures have been developed for branch detection, disconnection check and planar vesselness measure. Using public domain Rotterdam CT dataset, the accuracy of extracted centerline is demonstrated and automatic reconstruction of coronary artery mesh is shown. PMID:27536939

  7. Segmentation of follicular regions on H&E slides using a matching filter and active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem-Boussaid, Kamel; Prescott, Jeffrey; Lozanski, Gerard; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2010-03-01

    Follicular Lymphoma (FL) accounts for 20-25% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas in the United States. The first step in follicular lymphoma grading is the identification of follicles. The goal of this paper is to develop a technique to segment follicular regions in H&E stained images. The method is based on a robust active contour model, which is initialized by a seed point selected inside the follicle manually by the user. The novel aspect of this method is the introduction of a matched filter for the flattening of background in the L channel of the Lab color space. The performance of the algorithm was tested by comparing it against the manual segmentations of trained readers using the Zijbendos similarity index. The mean accuracy of the final segmentation compared to the manual ground truth was 0.71 with a standard deviation of 0.12.

  8. Ultrafast multi-slice spatiotemporally encoded MRI with slice-selective dimension segmented.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Lin; Huang, Jianpan; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Cai, Congbo; Chen, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    As a recently emerging method, spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a high robustness to field inhomogeneity and chemical shift effect. It has been broadened from single-slice scanning to multi-slice scanning. In this paper, a novel multi-slice SPEN MRI method was proposed. In this method, the slice-selective dimension was segmented to lower the specific absorption rate (SAR) and improve the image quality. This segmented method, dubbed SeSPEN method, was theoretically analyzed and demonstrated with phantom, lemon and in vivo rat brain experiments. The experimental results were compared with the results obtained from the spin-echo EPI, spin-echo SPEN method and multi-slice global SPEN method proposed by Frydman and coauthors (abbr. GlSPEN method). All the SPEN images were super-resolved reconstructed using deconvolution method. The results indicate that the SeSPEN method retains the advantage of SPEN MRI with respect to resistance to field inhomogeneity and can provide better signal-to-noise ratio than multi-slice GlSPEN MRI technique. The SeSPEN method has comparable SAR to the GlSPEN method while the T1 signal attenuation effect is alleviated. The proposed method will facilitate the multi-slice SPEN MRI to scan more slices within one scan with better image quality. PMID:27301072

  9. Ultrafast multi-slice spatiotemporally encoded MRI with slice-selective dimension segmented

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Lin; Huang, Jianpan; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Cai, Congbo; Chen, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    As a recently emerging method, spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a high robustness to field inhomogeneity and chemical shift effect. It has been broadened from single-slice scanning to multi-slice scanning. In this paper, a novel multi-slice SPEN MRI method was proposed. In this method, the slice-selective dimension was segmented to lower the specific absorption rate (SAR) and improve the image quality. This segmented method, dubbed SeSPEN method, was theoretically analyzed and demonstrated with phantom, lemon and in vivo rat brain experiments. The experimental results were compared with the results obtained from the spin-echo EPI, spin-echo SPEN method and multi-slice global SPEN method proposed by Frydman and coauthors (abbr. GlSPEN method). All the SPEN images were super-resolved reconstructed using deconvolution method. The results indicate that the SeSPEN method retains the advantage of SPEN MRI with respect to resistance to field inhomogeneity and can provide better signal-to-noise ratio than multi-slice GlSPEN MRI technique. The SeSPEN method has comparable SAR to the GlSPEN method while the T1 signal attenuation effect is alleviated. The proposed method will facilitate the multi-slice SPEN MRI to scan more slices within one scan with better image quality.

  10. Pattern segmentation with activity dependent natural frequency shift and sub-threshold resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtrahman, E.; Zochowski, M.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying distributed pattern formation in brain networks and its content driven dynamical segmentation is an area of intense study. We investigate a theoretical mechanism for selective activation of diverse neural populations that is based on dynamically shifting cellular resonances in functionally or structurally coupled networks. We specifically show that sub-threshold neuronal depolarization from synaptic coupling or external input can shift neurons into and out of resonance with specific bands of existing extracellular oscillations, and this can act as a dynamic readout mechanism during information storage and retrieval. We find that this mechanism is robust and suggest it as a general coding strategy that can be applied to any network with oscillatory nodes.

  11. Poster — Thur Eve — 59: Atlas Selection for Automated Segmentation of Pelvic CT for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mallawi, A; Farrell, T; Diamond, K; Wierzbicki, M

    2014-08-15

    Automated atlas-based segmentation has recently been evaluated for use in planning prostate cancer radiotherapy. In the typical approach, the essential step is the selection of an atlas from a database that best matches the target image. This work proposes an atlas selection strategy and evaluates its impact on the final segmentation accuracy. Prostate length (PL), right femoral head diameter (RFHD), and left femoral head diameter (LFHD) were measured in CT images of 20 patients. Each subject was then taken as the target image to which all remaining 19 images were affinely registered. For each pair of registered images, the overlap between prostate and femoral head contours was quantified using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Finally, we designed an atlas selection strategy that computed the ratio of PL (prostate segmentation), RFHD (right femur segmentation), and LFHD (left femur segmentation) between the target subject and each subject in the atlas database. Five atlas subjects yielding ratios nearest to one were then selected for further analysis. RFHD and LFHD were excellent parameters for atlas selection, achieving a mean femoral head DSC of 0.82 ± 0.06. PL had a moderate ability to select the most similar prostate, with a mean DSC of 0.63 ± 0.18. The DSC obtained with the proposed selection method were slightly lower than the maximums established using brute force, but this does not include potential improvements expected with deformable registration. Atlas selection based on PL for prostate and femoral diameter for femoral heads provides reasonable segmentation accuracy.

  12. An Adaptive Sensor Data Segments Selection Method for Wearable Health Care Services.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Yeh; Lai, Chin-Feng; Hwang, Ren-Hung; Lai, Ying-Hsun; Wang, Ming-Shi

    2015-12-01

    As cloud computing and wearable devices technologies mature, relevant services have grown more and more popular in recent years. The healthcare field is one of the popular services for this technology that adopts wearable devices to sense signals of negative physiological events, and to notify users. The development and implementation of long-term healthcare monitoring that can prevent or quickly respond to the occurrence of disease and accidents present an interesting challenge for computing power and energy limits. This study proposed an adaptive sensor data segments selection method for wearable health care services, and considered the sensing frequency of the various signals from human body, as well as the data transmission among the devices. The healthcare service regulates the sensing frequency of devices by considering the overall cloud computing environment and the sensing variations of wearable health care services. The experimental results show that the proposed service can effectively transmit the sensing data and prolong the overall lifetime of health care services.

  13. Robust x-ray image segmentation by spectral clustering and active shape model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Mahfouz, Mohamed R

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of bone contours from x-ray radiographs plays an important role in joint space width assessment, preoperative planning, and kinematics analysis. We present a robust segmentation method to accurately extract the distal femur and proximal tibia in knee radiographs of varying image quality. A spectral clustering method based on the eigensolution of an affinity matrix is utilized for x-ray image denoising. An active shape model-based segmentation method is employed for robust and accurate segmentation of the denoised x-ray images. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated with x-ray images from the public-use dataset(s), the osteoarthritis initiative, achieving a root mean square error of [Formula: see text] for femur and [Formula: see text] for tibia. The results demonstrate that this method outperforms previous segmentation methods in capturing anatomical shape variations, accounting for image quality differences and guiding accurate segmentation. PMID:27660806

  14. Soft-tissues Image Processing: Comparison of Traditional Segmentation Methods with 2D active Contour Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulka, J.; Gescheidtova, E.; Bartusek, K.

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with modern methods of image processing, especially image segmentation, classification and evaluation of parameters. It focuses primarily on processing medical images of soft tissues obtained by magnetic resonance tomography (MR). It is easy to describe edges of the sought objects using segmented images. The edges found can be useful for further processing of monitored object such as calculating the perimeter, surface and volume evaluation or even three-dimensional shape reconstruction. The proposed solutions can be used for the classification of healthy/unhealthy tissues in MR or other imaging. Application examples of the proposed segmentation methods are shown. Research in the area of image segmentation focuses on methods based on solving partial differential equations. This is a modern method for image processing, often called the active contour method. It is of great advantage in the segmentation of real images degraded by noise with fuzzy edges and transitions between objects. In the paper, results of the segmentation of medical images by the active contour method are compared with results of the segmentation by other existing methods. Experimental applications which demonstrate the very good properties of the active contour method are given.

  15. Label fusion in atlas-based segmentation using a selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE).

    PubMed

    Langerak, Thomas Robin; van der Heide, Uulke A; Kotte, Alexis N T J; Viergever, Max A; van Vulpen, Marco; Pluim, Josien P W

    2010-12-01

    In a multi-atlas based segmentation procedure, propagated atlas segmentations must be combined in a label fusion process. Some current methods deal with this problem by using atlas selection to construct an atlas set either prior to or after registration. Other methods estimate the performance of propagated segmentations and use this performance as a weight in the label fusion process. This paper proposes a selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE), which combines both strategies in an iterative procedure. In subsequent iterations the method refines both the estimated performance and the set of selected atlases. For a dataset of 100 MR images of prostate cancer patients, we show that the results of SIMPLE are significantly better than those of several existing methods, including the STAPLE method and variants of weighted majority voting. PMID:20667809

  16. Influenza A virus nucleoprotein selectively decreases neuraminidase gene-segment packaging while enhancing viral fitness and transmissibility

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Christopher B.; Ince, William L.; Wei, Jiajie; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The influenza A virus (IAV) genome is divided into eight distinct RNA segments believed to be copackaged into virions with nearly perfect efficiency. Here, we describe a mutation in IAV nucleoprotein (NP) that enhances replication and transmission in guinea pigs while selectively reducing neuraminidase (NA) gene segment packaging into virions. We show that incomplete IAV particles lacking gene segments contribute to the propagation of the viral population through multiplicity reactivation under conditions of widespread coinfection, which we demonstrate commonly occurs in the upper respiratory tract of guinea pigs. NP also dramatically altered the functional balance of the viral glycoproteins on particles by selectively decreasing NA expression. Our findings reveal novel functions for NP in selective control of IAV gene packaging and balancing glycoprotein expression and suggest a role for incomplete gene packaging during host adaptation and transmission. PMID:25385602

  17. Multiple Active Contours Guided by Differential Evolution for Medical Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Aceves, I.; Avina-Cervantes, J. G.; Lopez-Hernandez, J. M.; Rostro-Gonzalez, H.; Garcia-Capulin, C. H.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Guzman-Cabrera, R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new image segmentation method based on multiple active contours guided by differential evolution, called MACDE. The segmentation method uses differential evolution over a polar coordinate system to increase the exploration and exploitation capabilities regarding the classical active contour model. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a set of synthetic images with complex objects, Gaussian noise, and deep concavities is introduced. Subsequently, MACDE is applied on datasets of sequential computed tomography and magnetic resonance images which contain the human heart and the human left ventricle, respectively. Finally, to obtain a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the medical image segmentations compared to regions outlined by experts, a set of distance and similarity metrics has been adopted. According to the experimental results, MACDE outperforms the classical active contour model and the interactive Tseng method in terms of efficiency and robustness for obtaining the optimal control points and attains a high accuracy segmentation. PMID:23983809

  18. A new background distribution-based active contour model for three-dimensional lesion segmentation in breast DCE-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Yiping; Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhao, Zuowei; Zhang, Lina

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computerized semiautomatic segmentation method for accurate extraction of three-dimensional lesions from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRIs) of the breast. Methods: The authors propose a new background distribution-based active contour model using level set (BDACMLS) to segment lesions in breast DCE-MRIs. The method starts with manual selection of a region of interest (ROI) that contains the entire lesion in a single slice where the lesion is enhanced. Then the lesion volume from the volume data of interest, which is captured automatically, is separated. The core idea of BDACMLS is a new signed pressure function which is based solely on the intensity distribution combined with pathophysiological basis. To compare the algorithm results, two experienced radiologists delineated all lesions jointly to obtain the ground truth. In addition, results generated by other different methods based on level set (LS) are also compared with the authors’ method. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is evaluated by several region-based metrics such as the overlap ratio. Results: Forty-two studies with 46 lesions that contain 29 benign and 17 malignant lesions are evaluated. The dataset includes various typical pathologies of the breast such as invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinomain situ, scar carcinoma, phyllodes tumor, breast cysts, fibroadenoma, etc. The overlap ratio for BDACMLS with respect to manual segmentation is 79.55% ± 12.60% (mean ± s.d.). Conclusions: A new active contour model method has been developed and shown to successfully segment breast DCE-MRI three-dimensional lesions. The results from this model correspond more closely to manual segmentation, solve the weak-edge-passed problem, and improve the robustness in segmenting different lesions.

  19. Feature Selection Based on Machine Learning in MRIs for Hippocampal Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Chincarini, Andrea; Errico, Rosangela; Longo, Giuseppe; Tateo, Andrea; Bellotti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are frequently associated with structural changes in the brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can show these variations and therefore can be used as a supportive feature for a number of neurodegenerative diseases. The hippocampus has been known to be a biomarker for Alzheimer disease and other neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, it requires accurate, robust, and reproducible delineation of hippocampal structures. Fully automatic methods are usually the voxel based approach; for each voxel a number of local features were calculated. In this paper, we compared four different techniques for feature selection from a set of 315 features extracted for each voxel: (i) filter method based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test; two wrapper methods, respectively, (ii) sequential forward selection and (iii) sequential backward elimination; and (iv) embedded method based on the Random Forest Classifier on a set of 10 T1-weighted brain MRIs and tested on an independent set of 25 subjects. The resulting segmentations were compared with manual reference labelling. By using only 23 feature for each voxel (sequential backward elimination) we obtained comparable state-of-the-art performances with respect to the standard tool FreeSurfer. PMID:26089977

  20. Feature Selection based on Machine Learning in MRIs for Hippocampal Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangaro, Sabina; Amoroso, Nicola; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano; Chincarini, Andrea; Errico, Rosangela; Paolo, Inglese; Longo, Giuseppe; Maglietta, Rosalia; Tateo, Andrea; Riccio, Giuseppe; Bellotti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are frequently associated with structural changes in the brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can show these variations and therefore can be used as a supportive feature for a number of neurodegenerative diseases. The hippocampus has been known to be a biomarker for Alzheimer disease and other neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, it requires accurate, robust, and reproducible delineation of hippocampal structures. Fully automatic methods are usually the voxel based approach; for each voxel a number of local features were calculated. In this paper, we compared four different techniques for feature selection from a set of 315 features extracted for each voxel: (i) filter method based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test; two wrapper methods, respectively, (ii) sequential forward selection and (iii) sequential backward elimination; and (iv) embedded method based on the Random Forest Classifier on a set of 10 T1-weighted brain MRIs and tested on an independent set of 25 subjects. The resulting segmentations were compared with manual reference labelling. By using only 23 feature for each voxel (sequential backward elimination) we obtained comparable state-of-the-art performances with respect to the standard tool FreeSurfer.

  1. SU-E-J-128: Two-Stage Atlas Selection in Multi-Atlas-Based Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, T; Ruan, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In the new era of big data, multi-atlas-based image segmentation is challenged by heterogeneous atlas quality and high computation burden from extensive atlas collection, demanding efficient identification of the most relevant atlases. This study aims to develop a two-stage atlas selection scheme to achieve computational economy with performance guarantee. Methods: We develop a low-cost fusion set selection scheme by introducing a preliminary selection to trim full atlas collection into an augmented subset, alleviating the need for extensive full-fledged registrations. More specifically, fusion set selection is performed in two successive steps: preliminary selection and refinement. An augmented subset is first roughly selected from the whole atlas collection with a simple registration scheme and the corresponding preliminary relevance metric; the augmented subset is further refined into the desired fusion set size, using full-fledged registration and the associated relevance metric. The main novelty of this work is the introduction of an inference model to relate the preliminary and refined relevance metrics, based on which the augmented subset size is rigorously derived to ensure the desired atlases survive the preliminary selection with high probability. Results: The performance and complexity of the proposed two-stage atlas selection method were assessed using a collection of 30 prostate MR images. It achieved comparable segmentation accuracy as the conventional one-stage method with full-fledged registration, but significantly reduced computation time to 1/3 (from 30.82 to 11.04 min per segmentation). Compared with alternative one-stage cost-saving approach, the proposed scheme yielded superior performance with mean and medium DSC of (0.83, 0.85) compared to (0.74, 0.78). Conclusion: This work has developed a model-guided two-stage atlas selection scheme to achieve significant cost reduction while guaranteeing high segmentation accuracy. The benefit

  2. An Adaptive Sensor Data Segments Selection Method for Wearable Health Care Services.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Yeh; Lai, Chin-Feng; Hwang, Ren-Hung; Lai, Ying-Hsun; Wang, Ming-Shi

    2015-12-01

    As cloud computing and wearable devices technologies mature, relevant services have grown more and more popular in recent years. The healthcare field is one of the popular services for this technology that adopts wearable devices to sense signals of negative physiological events, and to notify users. The development and implementation of long-term healthcare monitoring that can prevent or quickly respond to the occurrence of disease and accidents present an interesting challenge for computing power and energy limits. This study proposed an adaptive sensor data segments selection method for wearable health care services, and considered the sensing frequency of the various signals from human body, as well as the data transmission among the devices. The healthcare service regulates the sensing frequency of devices by considering the overall cloud computing environment and the sensing variations of wearable health care services. The experimental results show that the proposed service can effectively transmit the sensing data and prolong the overall lifetime of health care services. PMID:26490152

  3. Selection of the Ground Segment for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Flight Demonstrator (Nexus)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan; Steck, Jane A.; Isaacs, John C., III; Bredeck, Martin J.; Fatig, Curtis Clyde; Zepp, Robert H.; Power, Edward (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nexus was a technology demonstrator project that was designed to bridge from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to its successor, the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). This paper focuses on the process used in designing the ground segment for Nexus and the lessons learned in its development. Ground station cost drivers were: (1) Contact time, (2) Cost of transporting data between the ground stations and control center, and (3) Cost savings via ground automation. We found that reducing the communication requirement in just the first 100 days could have reduced the total ground station cost by 40%. Contact time cost dwarfed the cost trade between automation development and off-shift operations personnel. Real-time Telemetry and Control (T&C) system analysis was divided into: (1) Potential reuse of the Nexus real-time (T&C) system for NGST, (2) Feasibility of using a 'Finite State-Based Modeling' product, and (3) Selecting a Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) versus Government Off The Shelf (GOTS) products. We found that each of the products evaluated in detail (ASIST, EPOCH 2000, and ITOS) could adequately support basic mission requirements. Lessons learned were: (1) Include operations at the beginning of the mission, and (2) Develop an operations concept as soon as possible.

  4. The interaction between developmental bias and natural selection: from centipede segments to a general hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Arthur, W

    2002-10-01

    Do limitations to the ways in which mutations can alter developmental processes help to determine the direction of phenotypic evolution? In the early days of neo-Darwinism, the answer given to this question was an emphatic 'no'. However, recent work, both theoretical and empirical, argues that the answer should at least be 'sometimes', and possibly even a straightforward 'yes'. Here, I examine the key concept of developmental bias, which encompasses both developmental constraint and developmental drive. I review the case of centipede segment number, which is a particularly clear example of developmental bias, but also a rather unusual one. I then consider how, in general terms, developmental bias and natural selection might interact, with the result that it is their interaction, rather than either process on its own, that determines evolutionary direction. Essentially, the whole argument is about the extent to which phenotypic variation is developmentally structured as opposed to amorphous or random. This issue can be traced back to the very beginning of evolutionary biology, and in particular to a difference of opinion between Darwin and Wallace, who emphasized, respectively, character correlation and character independence.

  5. Segmentation of the brain from 3D MRI using a hierarchical active surface template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, John W.; Merickel, Michael B.; Ortega, James M.; Goble, John C.; Brookeman, James R.; Kassell, Neal F.

    1994-05-01

    The accurate segmentation of the brain from three-dimensional medical imagery is important as the basis for visualization, morphometry, surgical planning and intraoperative navigation. The complex and variable nature of brain anatomy makes recognition of the brain boundaries a difficult problem and frustrates segmentation schemes based solely on local image features. We have developed a deformable surface model of the brain as a mechanism for utilizing a priori anatomical knowledge in the segmentation process. The active surface template uses an energy minimization scheme to find a globally consistent surface configuration given a set of potentially ambiguous image features. Solution of the entire 3D problem at once produces superior results to those achieved using a slice by slice approach. We have achieved good results with MR image volumes of both normal and abnormal subjects. Evaluation of the segmentation results has been performed using cadaver studies.

  6. Active appearance model and deep learning for more accurate prostate segmentation on MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ruida; Roth, Holger R.; Lu, Le; Wang, Shijun; Turkbey, Baris; Gandler, William; McCreedy, Evan S.; Agarwal, Harsh K.; Choyke, Peter; Summers, Ronald M.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    Prostate segmentation on 3D MR images is a challenging task due to image artifacts, large inter-patient prostate shape and texture variability, and lack of a clear prostate boundary specifically at apex and base levels. We propose a supervised machine learning model that combines atlas based Active Appearance Model (AAM) with a Deep Learning model to segment the prostate on MR images. The performance of the segmentation method is evaluated on 20 unseen MR image datasets. The proposed method combining AAM and Deep Learning achieves a mean Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 0.925 for whole 3D MR images of the prostate using axial cross-sections. The proposed model utilizes the adaptive atlas-based AAM model and Deep Learning to achieve significant segmentation accuracy.

  7. Comparing demographic, health status and psychosocial strategies of audience segmentation to promote physical activity.

    PubMed

    Boslaugh, Sarah E; Kreuter, Matthew W; Nicholson, Robert A; Naleid, Kimberly

    2005-08-01

    The goal of audience segmentation is to identify population subgroups that are homogeneous with respect to certain variables associated with a given outcome or behavior. When such groups are identified and understood, targeted intervention strategies can be developed to address their unique characteristics and needs. This study compares the results of audience segmentation for physical activity that is based on either demographic, health status or psychosocial variables alone, or a combination of all three types of variables. Participants were 1090 African-American and White adults from two public health centers in St Louis, MO. Using a classification-tree algorithm to form homogeneous groups, analyses showed that more segments with greater variability in physical activity were created using psychosocial versus health status or demographic variables and that a combination of the three outperformed any individual set of variables. Simple segmentation strategies such as those relying on demographic variables alone provided little improvement over no segmentation at all. Audience segmentation appears to yield more homogeneous subgroups when psychosocial and health status factors are combined with demographic variables.

  8. Accelerometry-Derived Physical Activity of First through Third Grade Children during the Segmented School Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Crimarco, Anthony; Brusseau, Timothy A.; Webster, Collin A.; Burns, Ryan D.; Hannon, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Schools should provide children 30 minutes/day of moderate-to-vigorous-physical-activity (MVPA). Determining school day segments that contribute to children's MVPA can inform school-based activity promotion. The purpose of this paper was to identify the proportion of children accumulating 30 minutes/day of school-based MVPA, and to…

  9. Segmental organization of vestibulospinal inputs to spinal interneurons mediating crossed activation of thoracolumbar motoneurons in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Kasumacic, Nedim; Lambert, François M; Coulon, Patrice; Bras, Helene; Vinay, Laurent; Perreault, Marie-Claude; Glover, Joel C

    2015-05-27

    Vestibulospinal pathways activate contralateral motoneurons (MNs) in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of the neonatal mouse exclusively via axons descending ipsilaterally from the vestibular nuclei via the lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST; Kasumacic et al., 2010). Here we investigate how transmission from the LVST to contralateral MNs is mediated by descending commissural interneurons (dCINs) in different spinal segments. We test the polysynaptic nature of this crossed projection by assessing LVST-mediated ventral root (VR) response latencies, manipulating synaptic responses pharmacologically, and tracing the pathway transynaptically from hindlimb extensor muscles using rabies virus (RV). Longer response latencies in contralateral than ipsilateral VRs, near-complete abolition of LVST-mediated calcium responses in contralateral MNs by mephenesin, and the absence of transsynaptic RV labeling of contralateral LVST neurons within a monosynaptic time window all indicate an overwhelmingly polysynaptic pathway from the LVST to contralateral MNs. Optical recording of synaptically mediated calcium responses identifies LVST-responsive ipsilateral dCINs that exhibit segmental differences in proportion and dorsoventral distribution. In contrast to thoracic and lower lumbar segments, in which most dCINs are LVST responsive, upper lumbar segments stand out because they contain a much smaller and more ventrally restricted subpopulation of LVST-responsive dCINs. A large proportion of these upper lumbar LVST-responsive dCINs project to contralateral L5, which contains many of the hindlimb extensor MNs activated by the LVST. A selective channeling of LVST inputs through segmentally and dorsoventrally restricted subsets of dCINs provides a mechanism for targeting vestibulospinal signals differentially to contralateral trunk and hindlimb MNs in the mammalian spinal cord.

  10. Floriculture. Selected Learning Activity Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This series of learning activity packages is based on a catalog of performance objectives, criterion-referenced measures, and performance guides for gardening/groundskeeping developed by the Vocational Education Consortium of States (V-TECS). Learning activity packages are presented in four areas: (1) preparation of soils and planting media, (2)…

  11. An Investigation of the Effects of Different Types of Activities during Pauses in a Segmented Instructional Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheon, Jongpil; Chung, Sungwon; Crooks, Steven M.; Song, Jaeki; Kim, Jeakyeong

    2014-01-01

    Since the complex and transient information in instructional animations requires more cognitive resources, the segmenting principle has been proposed to reduce cognitive overload by providing smaller chunks with pauses between segments. This study examined the effects of different types of activities during pauses in a segmented animation. Four…

  12. COMBINING ATLAS AND ACTIVE CONTOUR FOR AUTOMATIC 3D MEDICAL IMAGE SEGMENTATION.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Atlas based methods and active contours are two families of techniques widely used for the task of 3D medical image segmentation. In this work we present a coupled framework where the two methods are combined together, in order to exploit each's advantage while avoid their respective drawbacks. Indeed, the atlas based methods lacks the flexibility in locally tuning the segmentation boundary; whereas the active contour has the drawback that the final result heavily depends on the initialization as well as the contour evolution energy functional. Therefore, in the proposed work, the atlas based segmentation provides a probability map, which not only supplies the initial contour position, but also defines the contour evolution energy in an on-line fashion. Afterward, the active contour further converges to the desired object boundary. Finally, the method is tested on various 3D medical images to demonstrate its robustness as well as accuracy.

  13. Segmentation and tracking in echocardiographic sequences: active contours guided by optical flow estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, I.; Krucinski, S.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a method for segmentation and tracking of cardiac structures in ultrasound image sequences. The developed algorithm is based on the active contour framework. This approach requires initial placement of the contour close to the desired position in the image, usually an object outline. Best contour shape and position are then calculated, assuming that at this configuration a global energy function, associated with a contour, attains its minimum. Active contours can be used for tracking by selecting a solution from a previous frame as an initial position in a present frame. Such an approach, however, fails for large displacements of the object of interest. This paper presents a technique that incorporates the information on pixel velocities (optical flow) into the estimate of initial contour to enable tracking of fast-moving objects. The algorithm was tested on several ultrasound image sequences, each covering one complete cardiac cycle. The contour successfully tracked boundaries of mitral valve leaflets, aortic root and endocardial borders of the left ventricle. The algorithm-generated outlines were compared against manual tracings by expert physicians. The automated method resulted in contours that were within the boundaries of intraobserver variability.

  14. A partition-based active contour model incorporating local information for image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiao; Wu, Jiaji; Paul, Anand; Jiao, Licheng; Gong, Maoguo

    2014-01-01

    Active contour models are always designed on the assumption that images are approximated by regions with piecewise-constant intensities. This assumption, however, cannot be satisfied when describing intensity inhomogeneous images which frequently occur in real world images and induced considerable difficulties in image segmentation. A milder assumption that the image is statistically homogeneous within different local regions may better suit real world images. By taking local image information into consideration, an enhanced active contour model is proposed to overcome difficulties caused by intensity inhomogeneity. In addition, according to curve evolution theory, only the region near contour boundaries is supposed to be evolved in each iteration. We try to detect the regions near contour boundaries adaptively for satisfying the requirement of curve evolution theory. In the proposed method, pixels within a selected region near contour boundaries have the opportunity to be updated in each iteration, which enables the contour to be evolved gradually. Experimental results on synthetic and real world images demonstrate the advantages of the proposed model when dealing with intensity inhomogeneity images.

  15. A Vessel Active Contour Model for Vascular Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingli; Wang, Wei; Peng, Yu; Wang, Qingjun; Wu, Zhongke; Zhou, Mingquan

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a vessel active contour model based on local intensity weighting and a vessel vector field. Firstly, the energy function we define is evaluated along the evolving curve instead of all image points, and the function value at each point on the curve is based on the interior and exterior weighted means in a local neighborhood of the point, which is good for dealing with the intensity inhomogeneity. Secondly, a vascular vector field derived from a vesselness measure is employed to guide the contour to evolve along the vessel central skeleton into thin and weak vessels. Thirdly, an automatic initialization method that makes the model converge rapidly is developed, and it avoids repeated trails in conventional local region active contour models. Finally, a speed-up strategy is implemented by labeling the steadily evolved points, and it avoids the repeated computation of these points in the subsequent iterations. Experiments using synthetic and real vessel images validate the proposed model. Comparisons with the localized active contour model, local binary fitting model, and vascular active contour model show that the proposed model is more accurate, efficient, and suitable for extraction of the vessel tree from different medical images. PMID:25101262

  16. Complement Activation in Patients with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Wong, Maria; Renner, Brandon; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Giclas, Patricia C.; Joy, Melanie S.; Jalal, Diana; Radeva, Milena K.; Gassman, Jennifer; Gipson, Debbie S.; Kaskel, Frederick; Friedman, Aaron; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent pre-clinical studies have shown that complement activation contributes to glomerular and tubular injury in experimental FSGS. Although complement proteins are detected in the glomeruli of some patients with FSGS, it is not known whether this is due to complement activation or whether the proteins are simply trapped in sclerotic glomeruli. We measured complement activation fragments in the plasma and urine of patients with primary FSGS to determine whether complement activation is part of the disease process. Study Design Plasma and urine samples from patients with biopsy-proven FSGS who participated in the FSGS Clinical Trial were analyzed. Setting and Participants We identified 19 patients for whom samples were available from weeks 0, 26, 52 and 78. The results for these FSGS patients were compared to results in samples from 10 healthy controls, 10 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), 20 patients with vasculitis, and 23 patients with lupus nephritis. Outcomes Longitudinal control of proteinuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Measurements Levels of the complement fragments Ba, Bb, C4a, and sC5b-9 in plasma and urine. Results Plasma and urine Ba, C4a, sC5b-9 were significantly higher in FSGS patients at the time of diagnosis than in the control groups. Plasma Ba levels inversely correlated with the eGFR at the time of diagnosis and at the end of the study. Plasma and urine Ba levels at the end of the study positively correlated with the level of proteinuria, the primary outcome of the study. Limitations Limited number of patients with samples from all time-points. Conclusions The complement system is activated in patients with primary FSGS, and elevated levels of plasma Ba correlate with more severe disease. Measurement of complement fragments may identify a subset of patients in whom the complement system is activated. Further investigations are needed to confirm our findings and to determine the prognostic significance of

  17. 3D active surfaces for liver segmentation in multisequence MRI images.

    PubMed

    Bereciartua, Arantza; Picon, Artzai; Galdran, Adrian; Iriondo, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Biopsies for diagnosis can sometimes be replaced by non-invasive techniques such as CT and MRI. Surgeons require accurate and efficient methods that allow proper segmentation of the organs in order to ensure the most reliable intervention planning. Automated liver segmentation is a difficult and open problem where CT has been more widely explored than MRI. MRI liver segmentation represents a challenge due to the presence of characteristic artifacts, such as partial volumes, noise and low contrast. In this paper, we present a novel method for multichannel MRI automatic liver segmentation. The proposed method consists of the minimization of a 3D active surface by means of the dual approach to the variational formulation of the underlying problem. This active surface evolves over a probability map that is based on a new compact descriptor comprising spatial and multisequence information which is further modeled by means of a liver statistical model. This proposed 3D active surface approach naturally integrates volumetric regularization in the statistical model. The advantages of the compact visual descriptor together with the proposed approach result in a fast and accurate 3D segmentation method. The method was tested on 18 healthy liver studies and results were compared to a gold standard made by expert radiologists. Comparisons with other state-of-the-art approaches are provided by means of nine well established quality metrics. The obtained results improve these methodologies, achieving a Dice Similarity Coefficient of 98.59. PMID:27282235

  18. Research on adaptive segmentation and activity classification method of filamentous fungi image in microbe fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaochun; Hu, Yihua; Wang, Peng; Sun, Dujuan; Hu, Guilan

    2009-10-01

    The paper presents an adaptive segmentation and activity classification method for filamentous fungi image. Firstly, an adaptive structuring element (SE) construction algorithm is proposed for image background suppression. Based on watershed transform method, the color labeled segmentation of fungi image is taken. Secondly, the fungi elements feature space is described and the feature set for fungi hyphae activity classification is extracted. The growth rate evaluation of fungi hyphae is achieved by using SVM classifier. Some experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective for filamentous fungi image processing.

  19. High-resolution CISS MR imaging with and without contrast for evaluation of the upper cranial nerves: segmental anatomy and selected pathologic conditions of the cisternal through extraforaminal segments.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Ari M; Macedo, Leonardo L; Chonka, Zachary D; Ilica, Ahmet T; Choudhri, Asim F; Gallia, Gary L; Aygun, Nafi

    2014-02-01

    The authors review the course and appearance of the major segments of the upper cranial nerves from their apparent origin at the brainstem through the proximal extraforaminal region, focusing on the imaging and anatomic features of particular relevance to high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging evaluation. Selected pathologic entities are included in the discussion of the corresponding cranial nerve segments for illustrative purposes.

  20. Gallbladder Boundary Segmentation from Ultrasound Images Using Active Contour Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciecholewski, Marcin

    Extracting the shape of the gallbladder from an ultrasonography (US) image allows superfluous information which is immaterial in the diagnostic process to be eliminated. In this project an active contour model was used to extract the shape of the gallbladder, both for cases free of lesions, and for those showing specific disease units, namely: lithiasis, polyps and changes in the shape of the organ, such as folds or turns of the gallbladder. The approximate shape of the gallbladder was found by applying the motion equation model. The tests conducted have shown that for the 220 US images of the gallbladder, the area error rate (AER) amounted to 18.15%.

  1. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: Segmentation and classification using 3D active contours

    PubMed Central

    Way, Ted W.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Bogot, Naama; Zhou, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface, (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) of 0.83±0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D AC

  2. Neurotensin Changes Propulsive Activity into a Segmental Motor Pattern in the Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongfei; Chen, Ji-Hong; Yang, Zixian; Huang, Min; Yu, Yuanjie; Tan, Shiyun; Luo, Hesheng; Huizinga, Jan D

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Neurotensin is a gut-brain peptide with both inhibitory and excitatory actions on the colonic musculature; our objective was to understand the implications of this for motor patterns occurring in the intact colon of the rat. Methods The effects of neurotensin with concentrations ranging from 0.1–100 nM were studied in the intact rat colon in vitro, by investigating spatio-temporal maps created from video recordings of colonic motility before and after neurotensin. Results Low concentration of neurotensin (0.1–1 nM) inhibited propagating long distance contractions and rhythmic propagating motor complexes; in its place a slow propagating rhythmic segmental motor pattern developed. The neurotensin receptor 1 antagonist SR-48692 prevented the development of the segmental motor pattern. Higher concentrations of neurotensin (10 nM and 100 nM) were capable of restoring long distance contraction activity and inhibiting the segmental activity. The slow propagating segmental contraction showed a rhythmic contraction—relaxation cycle at the slow wave frequency originating from the interstitial cells of Cajal associated with the myenteric plexus pacemaker. High concentrations given without prior additions of low concentrations did not evoke the segmental motor pattern. These actions occurred when neurotensin was given in the bath solution or intraluminally. The segmental motor pattern evoked by neurotensin was inhibited by the neural conduction blocker lidocaine. Conclusions Neurotensin (0.1–1 nM) inhibits the dominant propulsive motor patterns of the colon and a distinct motor pattern of rhythmic slow propagating segmental contractions develops. This motor pattern has the hallmarks of haustral boundary contractions. PMID:26882114

  3. A novel content-based active contour model for brain tumor segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Jainy; Kumar, Vinod; Gupta, Indra; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Ahuja, Chirag Kamal

    2012-06-01

    Brain tumor segmentation is a crucial step in surgical and treatment planning. Intensity-based active contour models such as gradient vector flow (GVF), magneto static active contour (MAC) and fluid vector flow (FVF) have been proposed to segment homogeneous objects/tumors in medical images. In this study, extensive experiments are done to analyze the performance of intensity-based techniques for homogeneous tumors on brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. The analysis shows that the state-of-art methods fail to segment homogeneous tumors against similar background or when these tumors show partial diversity toward the background. They also have preconvergence problem in case of false edges/saddle points. However, the presence of weak edges and diffused edges (due to edema around the tumor) leads to oversegmentation by intensity-based techniques. Therefore, the proposed method content-based active contour (CBAC) uses both intensity and texture information present within the active contour to overcome above-stated problems capturing large range in an image. It also proposes a novel use of Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix to define texture space for tumor segmentation. The effectiveness of this method is tested on two different real data sets (55 patients - more than 600 images) containing five different types of homogeneous, heterogeneous, diffused tumors and synthetic images (non-MR benchmark images). Remarkable results are obtained in segmenting homogeneous tumors of uniform intensity, complex content heterogeneous, diffused tumors on MR images (T1-weighted, postcontrast T1-weighted and T2-weighted) and synthetic images (non-MR benchmark images of varying intensity, texture, noise content and false edges). Further, tumor volume is efficiently extracted from 2-dimensional slices and is named as 2.5-dimensional segmentation. PMID:22459443

  4. Active-contour-model-based edge restriction and attraction field regularization for brain MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, H.; Qi, Feihu

    2004-11-01

    Constructing 3D models of the object of interest from brain MRI is useful in numerous biomedical imaging application. In general, the construction of the 3D models is generally carried out according to the contours obtained from a 2D segmentation of each MR slice, so the equality of the 3D model strongly depends on the precision of the segmentation process. Active contour model is an effective edge-based method in segmenting an object of interest. However, its application, which segment boundary of anatomical structure of brain MRI, encounters many difficulties due to undesirable properties of brain MRI, for example complex background, intensity inhomogeneity and discontinuous edges. This paper proposes an active contour model to solve the problems of automatically segmenting the object of interest from a brain MRI. In this proposed algorithm, a new method of calculating attraction field has been developed. This method is based on edge restriction and attraction field regularization. Edge restriction introduces prior knowledge about the object of interest to free contours of being affected by edges of other anatomical structures or spurious edges, while attraction field regularization enables our algorithm to extract boundary correctly even at the place, where the edge of object of interest is discontinuous, by diffusing the edge information gotten after edge restriction. When we apply this proposed algorithm to brain MRI, the result shows this proposed algorithm could overcome those difficulties we mentioned above and convergence to object boundary quickly and accurately.

  5. Enzyme catalysis in an aqueous/organic segment flow microreactor: ways to stabilize enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Karande, Rohan; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2010-06-01

    Multiphase flow microreactors benefit from rapid mixing and high mass transfer rates, yet their application in enzymatic catalysis is limited due to the fast inactivation of enzymes used as biocatalysts. Enzyme inactivation during segment flow is due to the large interfacial area between aqueous and organic phases. The Peclet number of the system points to strong convective forces within the segments, and this results in rapid deactivation of the enzyme depending on segment length and flow rate. Addition of surfactant to the aqueous phase or enzyme immobilization prevents the biocatalyst from direct contact with the interface and thus stabilizes the enzyme activity. Almost 100% enzyme activity can be recovered compared to 45% without any enzyme or medium modification. Drop tensiometry measurements point to a mixed enzyme-surfactant interfacial adsorption, and above a certain concentration, the surfactant forms a protective layer between the interface and the biocatalyst in the aqueous compartments. Theoretical models were used to compare adsorption kinetics of the protein to the interface in the segment flow microreactor and in the drop tensiometry measurements. This study is the basis for the development of segment flow microreactors as a tool to perform productive enzymatic catalysis. PMID:20201570

  6. The activation of segmental and tonal information in visual word recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuchu; Lin, Candise Y; Wang, Min; Jiang, Nan

    2013-08-01

    Mandarin Chinese has a logographic script in which graphemes map onto syllables and morphemes. It is not clear whether Chinese readers activate phonological information during lexical access, although phonological information is not explicitly represented in Chinese orthography. In the present study, we examined the activation of phonological information, including segmental and tonal information in Chinese visual word recognition, using the Stroop paradigm. Native Mandarin speakers named the presentation color of Chinese characters in Mandarin. The visual stimuli were divided into five types: color characters (e.g., , hong2, "red"), homophones of the color characters (S+T+; e.g., , hong2, "flood"), different-tone homophones (S+T-; e.g., , hong1, "boom"), characters that shared the same tone but differed in segments with the color characters (S-T+; e.g., , ping2, "bottle"), and neutral characters (S-T-; e.g., , qian1, "leading through"). Classic Stroop facilitation was shown in all color-congruent trials, and interference was shown in the incongruent trials. Furthermore, the Stroop effect was stronger for S+T- than for S-T+ trials, and was similar between S+T+ and S+T- trials. These findings suggested that both tonal and segmental forms of information play roles in lexical constraints; however, segmental information has more weight than tonal information. We proposed a revised visual word recognition model in which the functions of both segmental and suprasegmental types of information and their relative weights are taken into account. PMID:23400856

  7. Convolutional virtual electric field for image segmentation using active contours.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanquan; Zhu, Ce; Zhang, Jiawan; Jian, Yuden

    2014-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF) is an effective external force for active contours; however, it suffers from heavy computation load. The virtual electric field (VEF) model, which can be implemented in real time using fast Fourier transform (FFT), has been proposed later as a remedy for the GVF model. In this work, we present an extension of the VEF model, which is referred to as CONvolutional Virtual Electric Field, CONVEF for short. This proposed CONVEF model takes the VEF model as a convolution operation and employs a modified distance in the convolution kernel. The CONVEF model is also closely related to the vector field convolution (VFC) model. Compared with the GVF, VEF and VFC models, the CONVEF model possesses not only some desirable properties of these models, such as enlarged capture range, u-shape concavity convergence, subject contour convergence and initialization insensitivity, but also some other interesting properties such as G-shape concavity convergence, neighboring objects separation, and noise suppression and simultaneously weak edge preserving. Meanwhile, the CONVEF model can also be implemented in real-time by using FFT. Experimental results illustrate these advantages of the CONVEF model on both synthetic and natural images. PMID:25360586

  8. 3D Filament Network Segmentation with Multiple Active Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and microtubules. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we developed a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D TIRF Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy.

  9. Knee cartilage segmentation using active shape models and local binary patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Germán.; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Segmentation of knee cartilage has been useful for opportune diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). This paper presents a semiautomatic segmentation technique based on Active Shape Models (ASM) combined with Local Binary Patterns (LBP) and its approaches to describe the surrounding texture of femoral cartilage. The proposed technique is tested on a 16-image database of different patients and it is validated through Leave- One-Out method. We compare different segmentation techniques: ASM-LBP, ASM-medianLBP, and ASM proposed by Cootes. The ASM-LBP approaches are tested with different ratios to decide which of them describes the cartilage texture better. The results show that ASM-medianLBP has better performance than ASM-LBP and ASM. Furthermore, we add a routine which improves the robustness versus two principal problems: oversegmentation and initialization.

  10. Segmentation of Bone with Region Based Active Contour Model in PD Weighted MR Images of Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Aysun; Sezer, Hasan Basri; Albayrak, Songul

    2015-01-01

    Proton density (PD) weighted MR images present inhomogeneity problem, low signal to noise ratio (SNR) and cannot define bone borders clearly. Segmentation of PD weighted images is hampered with these properties of PD weighted images which even limit the visual inspection. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of segmentation of humeral head from axial PD MR images with active contour without edge (ACWE) model. We included 219 images from our original data set. We extended the use of speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) in PD MR images by estimation of standard deviation of noise (SDN) from ROI. To overcome the problem of initialization of the initial contour of these region based methods, the location of the initial contour was automatically determined with use of circular Hough transform. For comparison, signed pressure force (SPF), fuzzy C-means, and Gaussian mixture models were applied and segmentation results of all four methods were also compared with the manual segmentation results of an expert. Experimental results on our own database show promising results. This is the first study in the literature to segment normal and pathological humeral heads from PD weighted MR images. PMID:26064185

  11. Learning image based surrogate relevance criterion for atlas selection in segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingting; Ruan, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Picking geometrically relevant atlases from the whole training set is crucial to multi-atlas based image segmentation, especially with extensive data of heterogeneous quality in the Big Data era. Unfortunately, there is very limited understanding of how currently used image similarity criteria reveal geometric relevance, let alone the optimization of them. This paper aims to develop a good image based surrogate relevance criterion to best reflect the underlying inaccessible geometric relevance in a learning context. We cast this surrogate learning problem into an optimization framework, by encouraging the image based surrogate to behave consistently with geometric relevance during training. In particular, we desire a criterion to be small for image pairs with similar geometry and large for those with significantly different segmentation geometry. Validation experiments on corpus callosum segmentation demonstrate the improved quality of the learned surrogate compared to benchmark surrogate candidates.

  12. Infusing and selecting V&V activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    The evolving nature of software development poses a continuing series of challenges for V&V. In response, the V&V community selectively adapts the use of existing V&V activities, and introduces new and improved ones.

  13. Soybean (Glycine max) expansin gene superfamily origins: segmental and tandem duplication events followed by divergent selection among subfamilies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Expansins are plant cell wall loosening proteins that are involved in cell enlargement and a variety of other developmental processes. The expansin superfamily contains four subfamilies; namely, α-expansin (EXPA), β-expansin (EXPB), expansin-like A (EXLA), and expansin-like B (EXLB). Although the genome sequencing of soybeans is complete, our knowledge about the pattern of expansion and evolutionary history of soybean expansin genes remains limited. Results A total of 75 expansin genes were identified in the soybean genome, and grouped into four subfamilies based on their phylogenetic relationships. Structural analysis revealed that the expansin genes are conserved in each subfamily, but are divergent among subfamilies. Furthermore, in soybean and Arabidopsis, the expansin gene family has been mainly expanded through tandem and segmental duplications; however, in rice, segmental duplication appears to be the dominant process that generates this superfamily. The transcriptome atlas revealed notable differential expression in either transcript abundance or expression patterns under normal growth conditions. This finding was consistent with the differential distribution of the cis-elements in the promoter region, and indicated wide functional divergence in this superfamily. Moreover, some critical amino acids that contribute to functional divergence and positive selection were detected. Finally, site model and branch-site model analysis of positive selection indicated that the soybean expansin gene superfamily is under strong positive selection, and that divergent selection constraints might have influenced the evolution of the four subfamilies. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the soybean expansin gene superfamily has expanded through tandem and segmental duplication. Differential expression indicated wide functional divergence in this superfamily. Furthermore, positive selection analysis revealed that divergent selection constraints might have

  14. Controlling retention, selectivity and magnitude of EOF by segmented monolithic columns consisting of octadecyl and naphthyl monolithic segments--applications to RP-CEC of both neutral and charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Karenga, Samuel; El Rassi, Ziad

    2011-04-01

    Monolithic capillaries made of two adjoining segments each filled with a different monolith were introduced for the control and manipulation of the electroosmotic flow (EOF), retention and selectivity in reversed phase-capillary electrochromatography (RP-CEC). These columns were called segmented monolithic columns (SMCs) where one segment was filled with a naphthyl methacrylate monolith (NMM) to provide hydrophobic and π-interactions, while the other segment was filled with an octadecyl acrylate monolith (ODM) to provide solely hydrophobic interaction. The ODM segment not only provided hydrophobic interactions but also functioned as the EOF accelerator segment. The average EOF of the SMC increased linearly with increasing the fractional length of the ODM segment. The neutral SMC provided a convenient way for tuning EOF, selectivity and retention in the absence of annoying electrostatic interactions and irreversible solute adsorption. The SMCs allowed the separation of a wide range of neutral solutes including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are difficult to separate using conventional alkyl-bonded stationary phases. In all cases, the k' of a given solute was a linear function of the fractional length of the ODM or NMM segment in the SMCs, thus facilitating the tailoring of a given SMC to solve a given separation problem. At some ODM fractional length, the fabricated SMC allowed the separation of charged solutes such as peptides and proteins that could not otherwise be achieved on a monolithic column made from NMM as an isotropic stationary phase due to the lower EOF exhibited by this monolith.

  15. Packaged Fault Model for Geometric Segmentation of Active Faults Into Earthquake Source Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, T.; Kumamoto, T.

    2004-12-01

    In Japan, the empirical formula proposed by Matsuda (1975) mainly based on the length of the historical surface fault ruptures and magnitude, is generally applied to estimate the size of future earthquakes from the extent of existing active faults for seismic hazard assessment. Therefore validity of the active fault length and defining individual segment boundaries where propagating ruptures terminate are essential and crucial to the reliability for the accurate assessments. It is, however, not likely for us to clearly identify the behavioral earthquake segments from observation of surface faulting during the historical period, because most of the active faults have longer recurrence intervals than 1000 years in Japan. Besides uncertainties of the datasets obtained mainly from fault trenching studies are quite large for fault grouping/segmentation. This is why new methods or criteria should be applied for active fault grouping/segmentation, and one of the candidates may be geometric criterion of active faults. Matsuda (1990) used _gfive kilometer_h as a critical distance for grouping and separation of neighboring active faults. On the other hand, Nakata and Goto (1998) proposed the geometric criteria such as (1) branching features of active fault traces and (2) characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution along the fault traces as tools to predict rupture length of future earthquakes. The branching during the fault rupture propagation is regarded as an effective energy dissipation process and could result in final rupture termination. With respect to the characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution, especially with strike-slip components, the up-thrown sides along the faults are, in general, located on the fault blocks in the direction of relative strike-slip. Applying these new geometric criteria to the high-resolution active fault distribution maps, the fault grouping/segmentation could be more practically conducted. We tested this model

  16. Image Segmentation Using Active Contours Driven by the Bhattacharyya Gradient Flow

    PubMed Central

    Michailovich, Oleg; Rathi, Yogesh; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of image segmentation by means of active contours, whose evolution is driven by the gradient flow derived from an energy functional that is based on the Bhattacharyya distance. In particular, given the values of a photometric variable (or of a set thereof), which is to be used for classifying the image pixels, the active contours are designed to converge to the shape that results in maximal discrepancy between the empirical distributions of the photometric variable inside and outside of the contours. The above discrepancy is measured by means of the Bhattacharyya distance that proves to be an extremely useful tool for solving the problem at hand. The proposed methodology can be viewed as a generalization of the segmentation methods, in which active contours maximize the difference between a finite number of empirical moments of the “inside” and “outside” distributions. Furthermore, it is shown that the proposed methodology is very versatile and flexible in the sense that it allows one to easily accommodate a diversity of the image features based on which the segmentation should be performed. As an additional contribution, a method for automatically adjusting the smoothness properties of the empirical distributions is proposed. Such a procedure is crucial in situations when the number of data samples (supporting a certain segmentation class) varies considerably in the course of the evolution of the active contour. In this case, the smoothness properties of the empirical distributions have to be properly adjusted to avoid either over- or underestimation artifacts. Finally, a number of relevant segmentation results are demonstrated and some further research directions are discussed. PMID:17990755

  17. MUSE: MUlti-atlas region Segmentation utilizing Ensembles of registration algorithms and parameters, and locally optimal atlas selection.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jimit; Erus, Guray; Ou, Yangming; Resnick, Susan M; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Furth, Susan; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-02-15

    Atlas-based automated anatomical labeling is a fundamental tool in medical image segmentation, as it defines regions of interest for subsequent analysis of structural and functional image data. The extensive investigation of multi-atlas warping and fusion techniques over the past 5 or more years has clearly demonstrated the advantages of consensus-based segmentation. However, the common approach is to use multiple atlases with a single registration method and parameter set, which is not necessarily optimal for every individual scan, anatomical region, and problem/data-type. Different registration criteria and parameter sets yield different solutions, each providing complementary information. Herein, we present a consensus labeling framework that generates a broad ensemble of labeled atlases in target image space via the use of several warping algorithms, regularization parameters, and atlases. The label fusion integrates two complementary sources of information: a local similarity ranking to select locally optimal atlases and a boundary modulation term to refine the segmentation consistently with the target image's intensity profile. The ensemble approach consistently outperforms segmentations using individual warping methods alone, achieving high accuracy on several benchmark datasets. The MUSE methodology has been used for processing thousands of scans from various datasets, producing robust and consistent results. MUSE is publicly available both as a downloadable software package, and as an application that can be run on the CBICA Image Processing Portal (https://ipp.cbica.upenn.edu), a web based platform for remote processing of medical images.

  18. MUSE: MUlti-atlas region Segmentation utilizing Ensembles of registration algorithms and parameters, and locally optimal atlas selection.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jimit; Erus, Guray; Ou, Yangming; Resnick, Susan M; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Furth, Susan; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-02-15

    Atlas-based automated anatomical labeling is a fundamental tool in medical image segmentation, as it defines regions of interest for subsequent analysis of structural and functional image data. The extensive investigation of multi-atlas warping and fusion techniques over the past 5 or more years has clearly demonstrated the advantages of consensus-based segmentation. However, the common approach is to use multiple atlases with a single registration method and parameter set, which is not necessarily optimal for every individual scan, anatomical region, and problem/data-type. Different registration criteria and parameter sets yield different solutions, each providing complementary information. Herein, we present a consensus labeling framework that generates a broad ensemble of labeled atlases in target image space via the use of several warping algorithms, regularization parameters, and atlases. The label fusion integrates two complementary sources of information: a local similarity ranking to select locally optimal atlases and a boundary modulation term to refine the segmentation consistently with the target image's intensity profile. The ensemble approach consistently outperforms segmentations using individual warping methods alone, achieving high accuracy on several benchmark datasets. The MUSE methodology has been used for processing thousands of scans from various datasets, producing robust and consistent results. MUSE is publicly available both as a downloadable software package, and as an application that can be run on the CBICA Image Processing Portal (https://ipp.cbica.upenn.edu), a web based platform for remote processing of medical images. PMID:26679328

  19. Liver segmentation with new supervised method to create initial curve for active contour.

    PubMed

    Zareei, Abouzar; Karimi, Abbas

    2016-08-01

    The liver performs a critical task in the human body; therefore, detecting liver diseases and preparing a robust plan for treating them are both crucial. Liver diseases kill nearly 25,000 Americans every year. A variety of image segmentation methods are available to determine the liver's position and to detect possible liver tumors. Among these is the Active Contour Model (ACM), a framework which has proven very sensitive to initial contour delineation and control parameters. In the proposed method based on image energy, we attempted to obtain an initial segmentation close to the liver's boundary, and then implemented an ACM to improve the initial segmentation. The ACM used in this work incorporates gradient vector flow (GVF) and balloon energy in order to overcome ACM limitations, such as local minima entrapment and initial contour dependency. Additionally, in order to adjust active contour control parameters, we applied a genetic algorithm to produce a proper parameter set close to the optimal solution. The pre-processing method has a better ability to segment the liver tissue during a short time with respect to other mentioned methods in this paper. The proposed method was performed using Sliver CT image datasets. The results show high accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity and low overlap error, MSD and runtime with few ACM iterations. PMID:27286186

  20. Automatic active contour-based segmentation and classification of carotid artery ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Asmatullah; Hassan, Mehdi; Khan, Asifullah; Kim, Jin Young

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present automatic image segmentation and classification technique for carotid artery ultrasound images based on active contour approach. For early detection of the plaque in carotid artery to avoid serious brain strokes, active contour-based techniques have been applied successfully to segment out the carotid artery ultrasound images. Further, ultrasound images might be affected due to rotation, scaling, or translational factors during acquisition process. Keeping in view these facts, image alignment is used as a preprocessing step to align the carotid artery ultrasound images. In our experimental study, we exploit intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement to detect the presence of plaque in the artery. Support vector machine (SVM) classification is employed using these segmented images to distinguish the normal and diseased artery images. IMT measurement is used to form the feature vector. Our proposed approach segments the carotid artery images in an automatic way and further classifies them using SVM. Experimental results show the learning capability of SVM classifier and validate the usefulness of our proposed approach. Further, the proposed approach needs minimum interaction from a user for an early detection of plaque in carotid artery. Regarding the usefulness of the proposed approach in healthcare, it can be effectively used in remote areas as a preliminary clinical step even in the absence of highly skilled radiologists.

  1. Liver segmentation with new supervised method to create initial curve for active contour.

    PubMed

    Zareei, Abouzar; Karimi, Abbas

    2016-08-01

    The liver performs a critical task in the human body; therefore, detecting liver diseases and preparing a robust plan for treating them are both crucial. Liver diseases kill nearly 25,000 Americans every year. A variety of image segmentation methods are available to determine the liver's position and to detect possible liver tumors. Among these is the Active Contour Model (ACM), a framework which has proven very sensitive to initial contour delineation and control parameters. In the proposed method based on image energy, we attempted to obtain an initial segmentation close to the liver's boundary, and then implemented an ACM to improve the initial segmentation. The ACM used in this work incorporates gradient vector flow (GVF) and balloon energy in order to overcome ACM limitations, such as local minima entrapment and initial contour dependency. Additionally, in order to adjust active contour control parameters, we applied a genetic algorithm to produce a proper parameter set close to the optimal solution. The pre-processing method has a better ability to segment the liver tissue during a short time with respect to other mentioned methods in this paper. The proposed method was performed using Sliver CT image datasets. The results show high accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity and low overlap error, MSD and runtime with few ACM iterations.

  2. An active contour framework based on the Hermite transform for shape segmentation of cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba-J, Leiner; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of cardiac affections is fundamental to address a correct treatment that allows preserving the patient's life. Since heart disease is one of the main causes of death in most countries, analysis of cardiac images is of great value for cardiac assessment. Cardiac MR has become essential for heart evaluation. In this work we present a segmentation framework for shape analysis in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images. The method consists of an active contour model which is guided by the spectral coefficients obtained from the Hermite transform (HT) of the data. The HT is used as model to code image features of the analyzed images. Region and boundary based energies are coded using the zero and first order coefficients. An additional shape constraint based on an elliptical function is used for controlling the active contour deformations. The proposed framework is applied to the segmentation of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of the left ventricle using MR images with short axis view. The segmentation is sequential for both regions: the endocardium is segmented followed by the epicardium. The algorithm is evaluated with several MR images at different phases of the cardiac cycle demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method. Several metrics are used for performance evaluation.

  3. A double-panel active segmented partition module using decoupled analog feedback controllers: numerical model.

    PubMed

    Sagers, Jason D; Leishman, Timothy W; Blotter, Jonathan D

    2009-06-01

    Low-frequency sound transmission has long plagued the sound isolation performance of lightweight partitions. Over the past 2 decades, researchers have investigated actively controlled structures to prevent sound transmission from a source space into a receiving space. An approach using active segmented partitions (ASPs) seeks to improve low-frequency sound isolation capabilities. An ASP is a partition which has been mechanically and acoustically segmented into a number of small individually controlled modules. This paper provides a theoretical and numerical development of a single ASP module configuration, wherein each panel of the double-panel structure is independently actuated and controlled by an analog feedback controller. A numerical model is developed to estimate frequency response functions for the purpose of controller design, to understand the effects of acoustic coupling between the panels, to predict the transmission loss of the module in both passive and active states, and to demonstrate that the proposed ASP module will produce bidirectional sound isolation.

  4. Automatic corpus callosum segmentation using a deformable active Fourier contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachet, Clement; Yvernault, Benjamin; Bhatt, Kshamta; Smith, Rachel G.; Gerig, Guido; Cody Hazlett, Heather; Styner, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is a structure of interest in many neuroimaging studies of neuro-developmental pathology such as autism. It plays an integral role in relaying sensory, motor and cognitive information from homologous regions in both hemispheres. We have developed a framework that allows automatic segmentation of the corpus callosum and its lobar subdivisions. Our approach employs constrained elastic deformation of flexible Fourier contour model, and is an extension of Szekely's 2D Fourier descriptor based Active Shape Model. The shape and appearance model, derived from a large mixed population of 150+ subjects, is described with complex Fourier descriptors in a principal component shape space. Using MNI space aligned T1w MRI data, the CC segmentation is initialized on the mid-sagittal plane using the tissue segmentation. A multi-step optimization strategy, with two constrained steps and a final unconstrained step, is then applied. If needed, interactive segmentation can be performed via contour repulsion points. Lobar connectivity based parcellation of the corpus callosum can finally be computed via the use of a probabilistic CC subdivision model. Our analysis framework has been integrated in an open-source, end-to-end application called CCSeg both with a command line and Qt-based graphical user interface (available on NITRC). A study has been performed to quantify the reliability of the semi-automatic segmentation on a small pediatric dataset. Using 5 subjects randomly segmented 3 times by two experts, the intra-class correlation coefficient showed a superb reliability (0.99). CCSeg is currently applied to a large longitudinal pediatric study of brain development in autism.

  5. Strategy-aligned fuzzy approach for market segment evaluation and selection: a modular decision support system by dynamic network process (DNP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi Nasrabadi, Ali; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimnejad, Sadoullah

    2013-05-01

    In competitive markets, market segmentation is a critical point of business, and it can be used as a generic strategy. In each segment, strategies lead companies to their targets; thus, segment selection and the application of the appropriate strategies over time are very important to achieve successful business. This paper aims to model a strategy-aligned fuzzy approach to market segment evaluation and selection. A modular decision support system (DSS) is developed to select an optimum segment with its appropriate strategies. The suggested DSS has two main modules. The first one is SPACE matrix which indicates the risk of each segment. Also, it determines the long-term strategies. The second module finds the most preferred segment-strategies over time. Dynamic network process is applied to prioritize segment-strategies according to five competitive force factors. There is vagueness in pairwise comparisons, and this vagueness has been modeled using fuzzy concepts. To clarify, an example is illustrated by a case study in Iran's coffee market. The results show that success possibility of segments could be different, and choosing the best ones could help companies to be sure in developing their business. Moreover, changing the priority of strategies over time indicates the importance of long-term planning. This fact has been supported by a case study on strategic priority difference in short- and long-term consideration.

  6. Local adaptive approach toward segmentation of microscopic images of activated sludge flocs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Nisar, Humaira; Ng, Choon Aun; Lo, Po Kim; Yap, Vooi Voon

    2015-11-01

    Activated sludge process is a widely used method to treat domestic and industrial effluents. The conditions of activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (AS-WWTP) are related to the morphological properties of flocs (microbial aggregates) and filaments, and are required to be monitored for normal operation of the plant. Image processing and analysis is a potential time-efficient monitoring tool for AS-WWTPs. Local adaptive segmentation algorithms are proposed for bright-field microscopic images of activated sludge flocs. Two basic modules are suggested for Otsu thresholding-based local adaptive algorithms with irregular illumination compensation. The performance of the algorithms has been compared with state-of-the-art local adaptive algorithms of Sauvola, Bradley, Feng, and c-mean. The comparisons are done using a number of region- and nonregion-based metrics at different microscopic magnifications and quantification of flocs. The performance metrics show that the proposed algorithms performed better and, in some cases, were comparable to the state-of the-art algorithms. The performance metrics were also assessed subjectively for their suitability for segmentations of activated sludge images. The region-based metrics such as false negative ratio, sensitivity, and negative predictive value gave inconsistent results as compared to other segmentation assessment metrics.

  7. Brachial artery vasomotion and transducer pressure effect on measurements by active contour segmentation on ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Theodore W.; Sultan, Laith R.; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Reamer, Courtney B.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To use feed-forward active contours (snakes) to track and measure brachial artery vasomotion on ultrasound images recorded in both transverse and longitudinal views; and to compare the algorithm's performance in each view. Methods: Longitudinal and transverse view ultrasound image sequences of 45 brachial arteries were segmented by feed-forward active contour (FFAC). The segmented regions were used to measure vasomotion artery diameter, cross-sectional area, and distention both as peak-to-peak diameter and as area. ECG waveforms were also simultaneously extracted frame-by-frame by thresholding a running finite-difference image between consecutive images. The arterial and ECG waveforms were compared as they traced each phase of the cardiac cycle. Results: FFAC successfully segmented arteries in longitudinal and transverse views in all 45 cases. The automated analysis took significantly less time than manual tracing, but produced superior, well-behaved arterial waveforms. Automated arterial measurements also had lower interobserver variability as measured by correlation, difference in mean values, and coefficient of variation. Although FFAC successfully segmented both the longitudinal and transverse images, transverse measurements were less variable. The cross-sectional area computed from the longitudinal images was 27% lower than the area measured from transverse images, possibly due to the compression of the artery along the image depth by transducer pressure. Conclusions: FFAC is a robust and sensitive vasomotion segmentation algorithm in both transverse and longitudinal views. Transverse imaging may offer advantages over longitudinal imaging: transverse measurements are more consistent, possibly because the method is less sensitive to variations in transducer pressure during imaging.

  8. Segmentation of hand radiographs by using multi-level connected active appearance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Joost A.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Bernelot Moens, Hein J.

    2005-04-01

    Robust and accurate segmentation methods are important for the computerized evaluation of medical images. For treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, joint damage assessment in radiographs of hands is frequently used for monitoring disease progression. Current clinical scoring methods are based on visual measurements that are time-consuming and subject to intra and inter-reader variance. A solution may be found in the development of partially automated assessment procedures. This requires reliable segmentation algorithms. Our work demonstrates a segmentation method based on multiple connected active appearance models (AAM) with multiple search steps using different quality levels. The quality level can be regulated by setting the image resolution and the number of landmarks in the AAMs. We performed experiments using two models of different quality levels for shape and texture information. Both models included AAMs for the carpal region, the metacarpals, and all phalanges. By starting an iterative search with the faster, low-quality model, we were able to determine the initial parameters of the second, high-quality model. After the second search, the results showed successful segmentation for 22 of 30 test images. For these images, 70% of the landmarks were found within 1.3 mm difference from manual placement by an expert. The multi-level search approach resulted in a reduction of 50% in calculation time compared to a search using a single model. Results are expected to improve when the model is refined by increasing the number of training examples and the resolution of the models.

  9. Medical Image Segmentation Based on a Hybrid Region-Based Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Xu, Haiyong; Liu, Zhen; Zhao, Yiming; Tian, Wenzhe

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid region-based active contour model is presented to segment medical images with intensity inhomogeneity. The energy functional for the proposed model consists of three weighted terms: global term, local term, and regularization term. The total energy is incorporated into a level set formulation with a level set regularization term, from which a curve evolution equation is derived for energy minimization. Experiments on some synthetic and real images demonstrate that our model is more efficient compared with the localizing region-based active contours (LRBAC) method, proposed by Lankton, and more robust compared with the Chan-Vese (C-V) active contour model. PMID:25028593

  10. Integrating multiscale polar active contours and region growing for microcalcifications segmentation in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikidis, N. S.; Karahaliou, A.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Likaki, E.; Panagiotakis, G.; Costaridou, L.

    2009-07-01

    Morphology of individual microcalcifications is an important clinical factor in microcalcification clusters diagnosis. Accurate segmentation remains a difficult task due to microcalcifications small size, low contrast, fuzzy nature and low distinguishability from surrounding tissue. A novel application of active rays (polar transformed active contours) on B-spline wavelet representation is employed, to provide initial estimates of microcalcification boundary. Then, a region growing method is used with pixel aggregation constrained by the microcalcification boundary estimates, to obtain the final microcalcification boundary. The method was tested on dataset of 49 microcalcification clusters (30 benign, 19 malignant), originating from the DDSM database. An observer study was conducted to evaluate segmentation accuracy of the proposed method, on a 5-point rating scale (from 5:excellent to 1:very poor). The average accuracy rating was 3.98±0.81 when multiscale active rays were combined to region growing and 2.93±0.92 when combined to linear polynomial fitting, while the difference in rating of segmentation accuracy was statistically significant (p < 0.05).

  11. Control of the segmentation process by graded MAPK/ERK activation in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Marie-Claire; Dubrulle, Julien; Malapert, Pascale; Chal, Jérome; Pourquié, Olivier

    2005-08-01

    The regular spacing of somites during vertebrate embryogenesis involves a dynamic gradient of FGF signaling that controls the timing of maturation of cells in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). How the FGF signal is transduced by PSM cells is unclear. Here, we first show that the FGF gradient is translated into graded activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway along the PSM in the chicken embryo. Using in ovo electroporation of PSM cells, we demonstrate that constitutive activation of ERK signaling in the PSM blocks segmentation by preventing maturation of PSM cells, thus phenocopying the overexpression of FGF8. Conversely, inhibition of ERK phosphorylation mimics a loss of function of FGF signaling in the PSM. Interestingly, video microscopy analysis of cell movements shows that ERK regulates the motility of PSM cells, suggesting that the decrease of cell movements along the PSM enables mesenchymal PSM cells to undergo proper segmentation. Together, our data demonstrate that ERK is the effector of the gradient of FGF in the PSM that controls the segmentation process.

  12. Influence of the hinge region on complement activation, C1q binding, and segmental flexibility in chimeric human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, L K; Shopes, R J; Oi, V T; Morrison, S L

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized a series of genetically engineered chimeric human IgG3 and IgG4 anti-dansyl (DNS) antibodies with identical antibody-combining sites but different hinge region amino acid compositions to determine how the hinge region influences Fab fragment segmental flexibility, C1q binding, and complement activation. Our data support the correlation between "upper hinge" length and Fab segmental flexibility; moreover, we confirm that a hinge region is essential for C1q binding and complement activation. However, the hinge length by itself is not sufficient for complement activity in IgG molecules. We have demonstrated that the IgG4 hinge, which imparts restricted segmental flexibility, reduces the ability of IgG3 molecules to activate complement. We also find that the IgG3 hinge region, which imparts greater segmental motion, is not sufficient to create complement activation activity in IgG4 anti-DNS antibodies. Finally, we conclude that (i) segmental motion is correlated with "upper hinge" length, (ii) hinge length and segmental flexibility is not enough to alter complement binding and activation, and (iii) segmental flexibility does not correlate with proficiency to activate the complement cascade. PMID:2296577

  13. Segmentation of the common carotid artery with active shape models from 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2012-03-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major cause of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a new segmentation method for outlining both lumen and adventitia (inner and outer walls) of common carotid artery (CCA) from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images for carotid atherosclerosis diagnosis and evaluation. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17× 2× 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80mg atorvastain and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. We investigate the use of Active Shape Models (ASMs) to segment CCA inner and outer walls after statin therapy. The proposed method was evaluated with respect to expert manually outlined boundaries as a surrogate for ground truth. For the lumen and adventitia segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 93.6%+/- 2.6%, 91.8%+/- 3.5%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.28+/- 0.17mm and 0.34 +/- 0.19mm, maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.87 +/- 0.37mm and 0.74 +/- 0.49mm. The proposed algorithm took 4.4 +/- 0.6min to segment a single 3D US images, compared to 11.7+/-1.2min for manual segmentation. Therefore, the method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the fast, safety and economical monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression during therapy.

  14. Segmentation of common carotid artery with active appearance models from ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; He, Wanji; Fenster, Aaron; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-02-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major cause of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a new segmentation method is proposed and evaluated for outlining the common carotid artery (CCA) from transverse view images, which were sliced from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) of 1mm inter-slice distance (ISD), to support the monitoring and assessment of carotid atherosclerosis. The data set consists of forty-eight 3D US images acquired from both left and right carotid arteries of twelve patients in two time points who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more at the baseline. The 3D US data were collected at baseline and three-month follow-up, where seven treated with 80mg atorvastatin and five with placebo. The baseline manual boundaries were used for Active Appearance Models (AAM) training; while the treatment data for segmentation testing and evaluation. The segmentation results were compared with experts manually outlined boundaries, as a surrogate for ground truth, for further evaluation. For the adventitia and lumen segmentations, the algorithm yielded Dice Coefficients (DC) of 92.06%+/-2.73% and 89.67%+/-3.66%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.28+/-0.18 mm and 0.22+/-0.16 mm, maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.71+/-0.28 mm and 0.59+/-0.21 mm, respectively. The segmentation results were also evaluated via Pratt's figure of merit (FOM) with the value of 0.61+/-0.06 and 0.66+/-0.05, which provides a quantitative measure for judging the similarity. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can promote the carotid 3D US usage for a fast, safe and economical monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression during therapy.

  15. Medical image segmentation by combining graph cuts and oriented active appearance models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjian; Udupa, Jayaram K; Bagci, Ulas; Zhuge, Ying; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method based on a strategic combination of the active appearance model (AAM), live wire (LW), and graph cuts (GCs) for abdominal 3-D organ segmentation. The proposed method consists of three main parts: model building, object recognition, and delineation. In the model building part, we construct the AAM and train the LW cost function and GC parameters. In the recognition part, a novel algorithm is proposed for improving the conventional AAM matching method, which effectively combines the AAM and LW methods, resulting in the oriented AAM (OAAM). A multiobject strategy is utilized to help in object initialization. We employ a pseudo-3-D initialization strategy and segment the organs slice by slice via a multiobject OAAM method. For the object delineation part, a 3-D shape-constrained GC method is proposed. The object shape generated from the initialization step is integrated into the GC cost computation, and an iterative GC-OAAM method is used for object delineation. The proposed method was tested in segmenting the liver, kidneys, and spleen on a clinical CT data set and also on the MICCAI 2007 Grand Challenge liver data set. The results show the following: 1) The overall segmentation accuracy of true positive volume fraction TPVF > 94.3% and false positive volume fraction can be achieved; 2) the initialization performance can be improved by combining the AAM and LW; 3) the multiobject strategy greatly facilitates initialization; 4) compared with the traditional 3-D AAM method, the pseudo-3-D OAAM method achieves comparable performance while running 12 times faster; and 5) the performance of the proposed method is comparable to state-of-the-art liver segmentation algorithm. The executable version of the 3-D shape-constrained GC method with a user interface can be downloaded from http://xinjianchen.wordpress.com/research/. PMID:22311862

  16. Active-source seismic imaging below Lake Malawi (Nyasa) from the SEGMeNT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillington, D. J.; Scholz, C. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Accardo, N. J.; McCartney, T.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Kamihanda, G.; Trinhammer, P.; Wood, D. A.; Khalfan, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Nyblade, A.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Mruma, A. H.; Salima, J.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the controls on the initiation and development of magmatism and segmentation in young rift systems. The northern Lake Malawi (Nyasa) rift in the East African Rift System is an early stage rift exhibiting pronounced tectonic segmentation, which is defined in the upper crust by ~100-km-long border faults. Very little volcanism is associated with rifting; the only surface expression of magmatism occurs in an accommodation zone between segments to the north of the lake in the Rungwe Volcanic Province. The SEGMeNT (Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania) project is a multidisciplinary, multinational study that is acquiring a suite of geophysical, geological and geochemical data to characterize deformation and magmatism in the crust and mantle lithosphere along 2-3 segments of this rift. As a part of the SEGMeNT project, we acquired seismic reflection and refraction data in Lake Malawi (Nyasa) in March-April 2015. Over 2000 km of seismic reflection data were acquired with a 500 to 2580 cu in air gun array from GEUS/Aarhus and a 500- to 1500-m-long seismic streamer from Syracuse University over a grid of lines across and along the northern and central basins. Air gun shots from MCS profiles and 1000 km of additional shooting with large shot intervals were also recorded on 27 short-period and 6 broadband lake bottom seismometers from Scripps Oceanographic Institute as a part of the Ocean Bottom Seismic Instrument Pool (OBSIP) as well as the 55-station onshore seismic array. The OBS were deployed along one long strike line and two dip lines. We will present preliminary data and results from seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in the lake and their implications for crustal deformation within and between rift segments. Seismic reflection data image structures up to ~5-6 km below the lake bottom, including syntectonic sediments, intrabasinal faults and other complex horsts. Some intrabasinal faults in both the northern and

  17. Real-time 3D medical structure segmentation using fast evolving active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaotao; Wang, Qiang; Hao, Zhihui; Xu, Kuanhong; Guo, Ping; Ren, Haibing; Jang, Wooyoung; Kim, Jung-bae

    2014-03-01

    Segmentation of 3D medical structures in real-time is an important as well as intractable problem for clinical applications due to the high computation and memory cost. We propose a novel fast evolving active contour model in this paper to reduce the requirements of computation and memory. The basic idea is to evolve the brief represented dynamic contour interface as far as possible per iteration. Our method encodes zero level set via a single unordered list, and evolves the list recursively by adding activated adjacent neighbors to its end, resulting in active parts of the zero level set moves far enough per iteration along with list scanning. To guarantee the robustness of this process, a new approximation of curvature for integer valued level set is proposed as the internal force to penalize the list smoothness and restrain the list continual growth. Besides, list scanning times are also used as an upper hard constraint to control the list growing. Together with the internal force, efficient regional and constrained external forces, whose computations are only performed along the unordered list, are also provided to attract the list toward object boundaries. Specially, our model calculates regional force only in a narrowband outside the zero level set and can efficiently segment multiple regions simultaneously as well as handle the background with multiple components. Compared with state-of-the-art algorithms, our algorithm is one-order of magnitude faster with similar segmentation accuracy and can achieve real-time performance for the segmentation of 3D medical structures on a standard PC.

  18. Segmentation of acne lesion using fuzzy C-means technique with intelligent selection of the desired cluster.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Kamel, Nidal; Dass, Sarat Chandra; Affandi, Azura Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation is the basic and important step for digital image analysis and understanding. Segmentation of acne lesions in the visual spectrum of light is very challenging due to factors such as varying skin tones due to ethnicity, camera calibration and the lighting conditions. In this approach the color image is transformed into various color spaces. The image is decomposed into the specified number of homogeneous regions based on the similarity of color using fuzzy C-means clustering technique. Features are extracted for each cluster and average values of these features are calculated. A new objective function is defined that selects the cluster holding the lesion pixels based on the average value of cluster features. In this study segmentation results are generated in four color spaces (RGB, rgb, YIQ, I1I2I3) and two individual color components (I3, Q). The number of clusters is varied from 2 to 6. The experiment was carried out on fifty images of acne patients. The performance of the proposed technique is measured in terms of the three mostly used metrics; sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Best results were obtained for Q and I3 color components of YIQ and I1I2I3 color spaces with the number of clusters equal to three. These color components show robustness against non-uniform illumination and maximize the gap between the lesion and skin color.

  19. Mesoscale spatial variability of selected aquatic invertebrate community metrics from a minimally impaired stream segment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gebler, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The related topics of spatial variability of aquatic invertebrate community metrics, implications of spatial patterns of metric values to distributions of aquatic invertebrate communities, and ramifications of natural variability to the detection of human perturbations were investigated. Four metrics commonly used for stream assessment were computed for 9 stream reaches within a fairly homogeneous, minimally impaired stream segment of the San Pedro River, Arizona. Metric variability was assessed for differing sampling scenarios using simple permutation procedures. Spatial patterns of metric values suggest that aquatic invertebrate communities are patchily distributed on subsegment and segment scales, which causes metric variability. Wide ranges of metric values resulted in wide ranges of metric coefficients of variation (CVs) and minimum detectable differences (MDDs), and both CVs and MDDs often increased as sample size (number of reaches) increased, suggesting that any particular set of sampling reaches could yield misleading estimates of population parameters and effects that can be detected. Mean metric variabilities were substantial, with the result that only fairly large differences in metrics would be declared significant at ?? = 0.05 and ?? = 0.20. The number of reaches required to obtain MDDs of 10% and 20% varied with significance level and power, and differed for different metrics, but were generally large, ranging into tens and hundreds of reaches. Study results suggest that metric values from one or a small number of stream reach(es) may not be adequate to represent a stream segment, depending on effect sizes of interest, and that larger sample sizes are necessary to obtain reasonable estimates of metrics and sample statistics. For bioassessment to progress, spatial variability may need to be investigated in many systems and should be considered when designing studies and interpreting data.

  20. An automated blood vessel segmentation algorithm using histogram equalization and automatic threshold selection.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Marwan D; Eswaran, C; Mueen, Ahmed

    2011-08-01

    This paper focuses on the detection of retinal blood vessels which play a vital role in reducing the proliferative diabetic retinopathy and for preventing the loss of visual capability. The proposed algorithm which takes advantage of the powerful preprocessing techniques such as the contrast enhancement and thresholding offers an automated segmentation procedure for retinal blood vessels. To evaluate the performance of the new algorithm, experiments are conducted on 40 images collected from DRIVE database. The results show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the other known algorithms in terms of accuracy. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm being simple and easy to implement, is best suited for fast processing applications.

  1. Purification and properties of the light-activated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase of rod outer segments.

    PubMed

    Miki, N; Baraban, J M; Keirns, J J; Boyce, J J; Bitensky, M W

    1975-08-25

    Frog (Rana catesbiana) rod outer segment disc membranes contain a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17) which is activated by light in the presence of ATP. This enzyme is firmly bound to the disc membrane, but can be eluted from the membrane with 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.4 and 2 mM EDTA. The eluted phosphodiesterase has reduced activity, but can be activated approximately 10-fold by polycations such as protamine and polylysine. The eluted phosphodiesterase can no longer be activated by light in the presence of ATP, that is, activation by light apparently depends on the native orientation of phosphodiesterase in relationship to other disc membrane components. The eluted phosphodiesterase was purified to homogeneity as judged by analytical polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and polyacrylamide gel isoelectric focusing. The over-all purification from intact retina was approximately 925-fold. The purification of phosphodiesterase from the isolated rod outer segment preparation was about 185-fold with a 28% yield. Phosphodiesterase accounts for approximately 0.5% of the disc membrane protein. The eluted phosphodiesterase (inactive form) has a sedimentation coefficient of 12.4 S corresponding to an approximate molecular weight of 240,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separates the purified phosphodiesterase into two subunits of 120,000 and 110,000 daltons. With cyclic 3':5'-GMP (cGMP) as substrate the Km for the purified phosphodiesterase is 70 muM. Protamine increases the Vmax without changing the Km for cGMP. The isoelectric point (pI) of the native dimer is 5.7. Limited exposure of the eluted phosphodiesterase (inactive form) to trypsin produces a somewhat greater activation than is obtained with 0.5 mg/ml of protamine. The trypsin-activated phosphodiesterase has a sedimentation coefficient of 7.8 S corresponding to an approximate molecular weight of 170,000. The 110,000-dalton subunit is much less sensitive to trypsin

  2. Efficient brain lesion segmentation using multi-modality tissue-based feature selection and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Fiot, Jean-Baptiste; Cohen, Laurent D; Raniga, Parnesh; Fripp, Jurgen

    2013-09-01

    Support vector machines (SVM) are machine learning techniques that have been used for segmentation and classification of medical images, including segmentation of white matter hyper-intensities (WMH). Current approaches using SVM for WMH segmentation extract features from the brain and classify these followed by complex post-processing steps to remove false positives. The method presented in this paper combines advanced pre-processing, tissue-based feature selection and SVM classification to obtain efficient and accurate WMH segmentation. Features from 125 patients, generated from up to four MR modalities [T1-w, T2-w, proton-density and fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR)], differing neighbourhood sizes and the use of multi-scale features were compared. We found that although using all four modalities gave the best overall classification (average Dice scores of 0.54  ±  0.12, 0.72  ±  0.06 and 0.82  ±  0.06 respectively for small, moderate and severe lesion loads); this was not significantly different (p = 0.50) from using just T1-w and FLAIR sequences (Dice scores of 0.52  ±  0.13, 0.71  ±  0.08 and 0.81  ±  0.07). Furthermore, there was a negligible difference between using 5 × 5 × 5 and 3 × 3 × 3 features (p = 0.93). Finally, we show that careful consideration of features and pre-processing techniques not only saves storage space and computation time but also leads to more efficient classification, which outperforms the one based on all features with post-processing. PMID:23303595

  3. Locally constrained active contour: a region-based level set for ovarian cancer metastasis segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Shijun; Linguraru, Marius George; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of ovarian cancer metastases is clinically useful to evaluate tumor growth and determine follow-up treatment. We present a region-based level set algorithm with localization constraints to segment ovarian cancer metastases. Our approach is established on a representative region-based level set, Chan-Vese model, in which an active contour is driven by region competition. To reduce over-segmentation, we constrain the level set propagation within a narrow image band by embedding a dynamic localization function. The metastasis intensity prior is also estimated from image regions within the level set initialization. The localization function and intensity prior force the level set to stop at the desired metastasis boundaries. Our approach was validated on 19 ovarian cancer metastases with radiologist-labeled ground-truth on contrast-enhanced CT scans from 15 patients. The comparison between our algorithm and geodesic active contour indicated that the volume overlap was 75+/-10% vs. 56+/-6%, the Dice coefficient was 83+/-8% vs. 63+/-8%, and the average surface distance was 2.2+/-0.6mm vs. 4.4+/-0.9mm. Experimental results demonstrated that our algorithm outperformed traditional level set algorithms.

  4. Lung nodule segmentation and recognition using SVM classifier and active contour modeling: a complete intelligent system.

    PubMed

    Keshani, Mohsen; Azimifar, Zohreh; Tajeripour, Farshad; Boostani, Reza

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a novel method for lung nodule detection, segmentation and recognition using computed tomography (CT) images is presented. Our contribution consists of several steps. First, the lung area is segmented by active contour modeling followed by some masking techniques to transfer non-isolated nodules into isolated ones. Then, nodules are detected by the support vector machine (SVM) classifier using efficient 2D stochastic and 3D anatomical features. Contours of detected nodules are then extracted by active contour modeling. In this step all solid and cavitary nodules are accurately segmented. Finally, lung tissues are classified into four classes: namely lung wall, parenchyma, bronchioles and nodules. This classification helps us to distinguish a nodule connected to the lung wall and/or bronchioles (attached nodule) from the one covered by parenchyma (solitary nodule). At the end, performance of our proposed method is examined and compared with other efficient methods through experiments using clinical CT images and two groups of public datasets from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and ANODE09. Solid, non-solid and cavitary nodules are detected with an overall detection rate of 89%; the number of false positive is 7.3/scan and the location of all detected nodules are recognized correctly. PMID:23369568

  5. Selecting One of Several Mating Types through Gene Segment Joining and Deletion in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, Marcella D.; Hamilton, Eileen P.; Xiong, Jie; Lawson, Michael J.; Yuan, Dongxia; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Miao, Wei; Orias, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Tetrahymena thermophila has seven mating types. Cells can mate only when they recognize cells of a different mating type as non-self. As a ciliate, Tetrahymena separates its germline and soma into two nuclei. During growth the somatic nucleus is responsible for all gene transcription while the germline nucleus remains silent. During mating, a new somatic nucleus is differentiated from a germline nucleus and mating type is decided by a stochastic process. We report here that the somatic mating type locus contains a pair of genes arranged head-to-head. Each gene encodes a mating type-specific segment and a transmembrane domain that is shared by all mating types. Somatic gene knockouts showed both genes are required for efficient non-self recognition and successful mating, as assessed by pair formation and progeny production. The germline mating type locus consists of a tandem array of incomplete gene pairs representing each potential mating type. During mating, a complete new gene pair is assembled at the somatic mating type locus; the incomplete genes of one gene pair are completed by joining to gene segments at each end of germline array. All other germline gene pairs are deleted in the process. These programmed DNA rearrangements make this a fascinating system of mating type determination. PMID:23555191

  6. AUTOMATED ACTIN FILAMENT SEGMENTATION, TRACKING AND TIP ELONGATION MEASUREMENTS BASED ON OPEN ACTIVE CONTOUR MODELS.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongsheng; Shen, Tian; Smith, Matthew B; Fujiwara, Ikuko; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2009-06-28

    This paper presents an automated method for actin filament segmentation and tracking for measuring tip elongation rates in Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) images. The main contributions of the paper are: (i) we use a novel open active contour model for filament segmentation and tracking, which is fast and robust against noise; (ii) different strategies are proposed to solve the filament intersection problem, which is shown to be the main difficulty in filament tracking; and (iii) this fully automated method avoids the need of human interaction and thus reduces required time for the entire elongation measurement process on an image sequence. Application to experimental results demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of this method.

  7. [Segmentation of medical images based on dyadic wavelet transform and active contour model].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Wang, Huinan; Chang, Linfeng; Shao, Xiaoli

    2008-12-01

    The interference of noise and the weak edge characteristic of symptom information on medical images prevent the traditional methods of segmentation from having good effects. In this paper is proposed a boundary detection method of focus which is based on dyadic wavelet transform and active contour model. In this method, the true edge points are detected by dyadic wavelet transform and linked by improved fast active contour model algorithm. The result of experiment on MRI of brain shows that the method can remove the influence of noise effective and detect the contour of brain tumor actually. PMID:19166191

  8. Infrared active polarimetric imaging system controlled by image segmentation algorithms: application to decamouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannier, Nicolas; Goudail, François; Plassart, Corentin; Boffety, Matthieu; Feneyrou, Patrick; Leviandier, Luc; Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    We describe an active polarimetric imager with laser illumination at 1.5 µm that can generate any illumination and analysis polarization state on the Poincar sphere. Thanks to its full polarization agility and to image analysis of the scene with an ultrafast active-contour based segmentation algorithm, it can perform adaptive polarimetric contrast optimization. We demonstrate the capacity of this imager to detect manufactured objects in different types of environments for such applications as decamouflage and hazardous object detection. We compare two imaging modes having different number of polarimetric degrees of freedom and underline the characteristics that a polarimetric imager aimed at this type of applications should possess.

  9. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC): application to breast lesion segmentation on DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agner, Shannon C.; Xu, Jun; Rosen, Mark; Karthigeyan, Sudha; Englander, Sarah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Spectral embedding (SE), a graph-based manifold learning method, has previously been shown to be useful in high dimensional data classification. In this work, we present a novel SE based active contour (SEAC) segmentation scheme and demonstrate its applications in lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhance magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this work, we employ SE on DCE-MRI on a per voxel basis to embed the high dimensional time series intensity vector into a reduced dimensional space, where the reduced embedding space is characterized by the principal eigenvectors. The orthogonal eigenvector-based data representation allows for computation of strong tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space and also yields improved region statistics that serve as optimal stopping criteria for SEAC. We demonstrate both analytically and empirically that the tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space are stronger than the corresponding gradients in the original grayscale intensity space. On a total of 50 breast DCE-MRI studies, SEAC yielded a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 3.2+/-2.1 pixels and mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.74+/-0.13 compared to manual ground truth segmentation. An active contour in conjunction with fuzzy c-means (FCM+AC), a commonly used segmentation method for breast DCE-MRI, produced a corresponding MAD of 7.2+/-7.4 pixels and mean DSC of 0.58+/-0.32. In conjunction with a set of 6 quantitative morphological features automatically extracted from the SEAC derived lesion boundary, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.73, for discriminating between 10 benign and 30 malignant lesions; the corresponding SVM classifier with the FCM+AC derived morphological features yielded an AUC of 0.65.

  10. Accurate Morphology Preserving Segmentation of Overlapping Cells based on Active Contours.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Csaba; Jermyn, Ian H; Kato, Zoltan; Rahkama, Vesa; Östling, Päivi; Mikkonen, Piia; Pietiäinen, Vilja; Horvath, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The identification of fluorescently stained cell nuclei is the basis of cell detection, segmentation, and feature extraction in high content microscopy experiments. The nuclear morphology of single cells is also one of the essential indicators of phenotypic variation. However, the cells used in experiments can lose their contact inhibition, and can therefore pile up on top of each other, making the detection of single cells extremely challenging using current segmentation methods. The model we present here can detect cell nuclei and their morphology even in high-confluency cell cultures with many overlapping cell nuclei. We combine the "gas of near circles" active contour model, which favors circular shapes but allows slight variations around them, with a new data model. This captures a common property of many microscopic imaging techniques: the intensities from superposed nuclei are additive, so that two overlapping nuclei, for example, have a total intensity that is approximately double the intensity of a single nucleus. We demonstrate the power of our method on microscopic images of cells, comparing the results with those obtained from a widely used approach, and with manual image segmentations by experts. PMID:27561654

  11. Accurate Morphology Preserving Segmentation of Overlapping Cells based on Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Csaba; Jermyn, Ian H.; Kato, Zoltan; Rahkama, Vesa; Östling, Päivi; Mikkonen, Piia; Pietiäinen, Vilja; Horvath, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The identification of fluorescently stained cell nuclei is the basis of cell detection, segmentation, and feature extraction in high content microscopy experiments. The nuclear morphology of single cells is also one of the essential indicators of phenotypic variation. However, the cells used in experiments can lose their contact inhibition, and can therefore pile up on top of each other, making the detection of single cells extremely challenging using current segmentation methods. The model we present here can detect cell nuclei and their morphology even in high-confluency cell cultures with many overlapping cell nuclei. We combine the “gas of near circles” active contour model, which favors circular shapes but allows slight variations around them, with a new data model. This captures a common property of many microscopic imaging techniques: the intensities from superposed nuclei are additive, so that two overlapping nuclei, for example, have a total intensity that is approximately double the intensity of a single nucleus. We demonstrate the power of our method on microscopic images of cells, comparing the results with those obtained from a widely used approach, and with manual image segmentations by experts. PMID:27561654

  12. A validated active contour method driven by parabolic arc model for detection and segmentation of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tasel, Serdar F; Mumcuoglu, Erkan U; Hassanpour, Reza Z; Perkins, Guy

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies reveal that mitochondria take substantial responsibility in cellular functions that are closely related to aging diseases caused by degeneration of neurons. These studies emphasize that the membrane and crista morphology of a mitochondrion should receive attention in order to investigate the link between mitochondrial function and its physical structure. Electron microscope tomography (EMT) allows analysis of the inner structures of mitochondria by providing highly detailed visual data from large volumes. Computerized segmentation of mitochondria with minimum manual effort is essential to accelerate the study of mitochondrial structure/function relationships. In this work, we improved and extended our previous attempts to detect and segment mitochondria from transmission electron microcopy (TEM) images. A parabolic arc model was utilized to extract membrane structures. Then, curve energy based active contours were employed to obtain roughly outlined candidate mitochondrial regions. Finally, a validation process was applied to obtain the final segmentation data. 3D extension of the algorithm is also presented in this paper. Our method achieved an average F-score performance of 0.84. Average Dice Similarity Coefficient and boundary error were measured as 0.87 and 14nm respectively.

  13. A Comparative Study on Feature Selection for Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using FABC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupaşcu, Carmen Alina; Tegolo, Domenico; Trucco, Emanuele

    This paper presents a comparative study on five feature selection heuristics applied to a retinal image database called DRIVE. Features are chosen from a feature vector (encoding local information, but as well information from structures and shapes available in the image) constructed for each pixel in the field of view (FOV) of the image. After selecting the most discriminatory features, an AdaBoost classifier is applied for training. The results of classifications are used to compare the effectiveness of the five feature selection methods.

  14. An in vitro method for recording single unit afferent activity from mesenteric nerves innervating isolated segments of rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, K A; Cervero, F

    1986-04-01

    A technique has been developed for recording single unit afferent activity from mesenteric nerves in isolated segments of rat distal ileum in vitro. The preparation consists of a 3-cm segment of ileum, containing a single neurovascular bundle, held horizontally in an organ bath. One end of the segment is attached to a tension transducer to record changes in longitudinal tension of the gut muscle and the other is connected to a pressure transducer to record changes in intra-luminal pressure. Electromyographic activity of the smooth muscle is recorded using glass-insulated tungsten microelectrodes inserted in the wall of the gut. Afferent nerve activity is recorded with a monopolar platinum wire electrode from filaments of the mesenteric nerves that run between the artery and vein supplying the segment. This preparation permits the detailed analysis of the electrical activity of intestinal afferent nerve fibres correlated with mechanical and chemical events occurring naturally in the gut or imposed experimentally on it.

  15. Transmembrane segments of complement receptor 3 do not participate in cytotoxic activities but determine receptor structure required for action of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin.

    PubMed

    Wald, Tomas; Osickova, Adriana; Masin, Jiri; Liskova, Petra M; Petry-Podgorska, Inga; Matousek, Tomas; Sebo, Peter; Osicka, Radim

    2016-04-01

    Adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT or AC-Hly) of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis penetrates phagocytes expressing the integrin complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18, α(M)β(2) or Mac-1). CyaA translocates its adenylate cyclase (AC) enzyme domain into cell cytosol and catalyzes unregulated conversion of ATP to cAMP, thereby subverting cellular signaling. In parallel, CyaA forms small cation-selective membrane pores that permeabilize cells for potassium efflux, contributing to cytotoxicity of CyaA and eventually provoking colloid-osmotic cell lysis. To investigate whether the single-pass α-helical transmembrane segments of CR3 subunits CD11b and CD18 do directly participate in AC domain translocation and/or pore formation by the toxin, we expressed in CHO cells variants of CR3 that contained artificial transmembrane segments, or lacked the transmembrane segment(s) at all. The results demonstrate that the transmembrane segments of CR3 are not directly involved in the cytotoxic activities of CyaA but serve for maintaining CR3 in a conformation that is required for efficient toxin binding and action. PMID:26802078

  16. Antimicrobial activities of selected Cyathus species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2004-02-01

    Twelve selected Cyathus species were tested for their abilities to produce antimicrobial metabolites. Most of them were found to produce secondary exo-metabolites that could induce morphological abnormalities of rice pathogenic fungi Pyricularia oryzae. Some extracts from the cultivated liquid obviously inhibited human pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Activities against six human pathogenic bacteria were also obtained from some of these extracts. PMID:15119855

  17. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna B; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-07-19

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such nonequilibrium networks. Here we connect concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory, and transition rate theory to understand how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Our combined theoretical and numerical analysis identifies symmetry-based rules that make it possible to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. The conceptual framework developed here is applicable to a broad class of biological and nonbiological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models. PMID:27382186

  18. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Images Based on Level Set Segmentation and ReliefF Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongmei; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study established a fully automated computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the classification of malignant and benign masses via breast magnetic resonance imaging (BMRI). A breast segmentation method consisting of a preprocessing step to identify the air-breast interfacing boundary and curve fitting for chest wall line (CWL) segmentation was included in the proposed CAD system. The Chan-Vese (CV) model level set (LS) segmentation method was adopted to segment breast mass and demonstrated sufficiently good segmentation performance. The support vector machine (SVM) classifier with ReliefF feature selection was used to merge the extracted morphological and texture features into a classification score. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity measurements for the leave-half-case-out resampling method were 92.3%, 98.2%, and 76.2%, respectively. For the leave-one-case-out resampling method, the measurements were 90.0%, 98.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. PMID:25628755

  19. Selective Activation of the Infraspinatus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sung-Min; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Lee, Won-Hwee; Kim, Su-Jung; Park, Kyue-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Context: To improve selective infraspinatus muscle strength and endurance, researchers have recommended selective shoulder external-rotation exercise during rehabilitation or athletic conditioning programs. Although selective strengthening of the infraspinatus muscle is recommended for therapy and training, limited information is available to help clinicians design a selective strengthening program. Objective: To determine the most effective of 4 shoulder external-rotation exercises for selectively stimulating infraspinatus muscle activity while minimizing the use of the middle trapezius and posterior deltoid muscles. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 30 healthy participants (24 men, 6 women; age = 22.6 ± 1.7 years, height = 176.2 ± 4.5 cm, mass = 65.6 ± 7.4 kg) from a university population. Intervention(s): The participants were instructed to perform 4 exercises: (1) prone horizontal abduction with external rotation (PER), (2) side-lying wiper exercise (SWE), (3) side-lying external rotation (SER), and (4) standing external-rotation exercise (STER). Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography signals were recorded from the infraspinatus, middle trapezius, and posterior deltoid muscles. Differences among the exercise positions were tested using a 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustment. Results: The infraspinatus muscle activity was greater in the SWE (55.98% ± 18.79%) than in the PER (46.14% ± 15.65%), SER (43.38% ± 22.26%), and STER (26.11% ± 15.00%) (F3,87 = 19.97, P < .001). Furthermore, the SWE elicited the least amount of activity in the middle trapezius muscle (F3,87 = 20.15, P < .001). Posterior deltoid muscle activity was similar in the SWE and SER but less than that measured in the PER and STER (F3,87 = 25.10, P < .001). Conclusions: The SWE was superior to the PER, SER, and STER in maximizing infraspinatus activity with the least

  20. The large soybean (Glycine max) WRKY TF family expanded by segmental duplication events and subsequent divergent selection among subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background WRKY genes encode one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors in higher plants, and its members regulate important biological process such as growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although the soybean genome sequence has been published, functional studies on soybean genes still lag behind those of other species. Results We identified a total of 133 WRKY members in the soybean genome. According to structural features of their encoded proteins and to the phylogenetic tree, the soybean WRKY family could be classified into three groups (groups I, II, and III). A majority of WRKY genes (76.7%; 102 of 133) were segmentally duplicated and 13.5% (18 of 133) of the genes were tandemly duplicated. This pattern was not apparent in Arabidopsis or rice. The transcriptome atlas revealed notable differential expression in either transcript abundance or in expression patterns under normal growth conditions, which indicated wide functional divergence in this family. Furthermore, some critical amino acids were detected using DIVERGE v2.0 in specific comparisons, suggesting that these sites have contributed to functional divergence among groups or subgroups. In addition, site model and branch-site model analyses of positive Darwinian selection (PDS) showed that different selection regimes could have affected the evolution of these groups. Sites with high probabilities of having been under PDS were found in groups I, II c, II e, and III. Together, these results contribute to a detailed understanding of the molecular evolution of the WRKY gene family in soybean. Conclusions In this work, all the WRKY genes, which were generated mainly through segmental duplication, were identified in the soybean genome. Moreover, differential expression and functional divergence of the duplicated WRKY genes were two major features of this family throughout their evolutionary history. Positive selection analysis revealed that the different groups have

  1. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  2. TWO NOVEL ACM (ACTIVE CONTOUR MODEL) METHODS FOR INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND IMAGE SEGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chi Hau; Potdat, Labhesh; Chittineni, Rakesh

    2010-02-22

    One of the attractive image segmentation methods is the Active Contour Model (ACM) which has been widely used in medical imaging as it always produces sub-regions with continuous boundaries. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is a catheter based medical imaging technique which is used for quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic disease. Two methods of ACM realizations are presented in this paper. The gradient descent flow based on minimizing energy functional can be used for segmentation of IVUS images. However this local operation alone may not be adequate to work with the complex IVUS images. The first method presented consists of basically combining the local geodesic active contours and global region-based active contours. The advantage of combining the local and global operations is to allow curves deforming under the energy to find only significant local minima and delineate object borders despite noise, poor edge information and heterogeneous intensity profiles. Results for this algorithm are compared to standard techniques to demonstrate the method's robustness and accuracy. In the second method, the energy function is appropriately modified and minimized using a Hopfield neural network. Proper modifications in the definition of the bias of the neurons have been introduced to incorporate image characteristics. The method overcomes distortions in the expected image pattern, such as due to the presence of calcium, and employs a specialized structure of the neural network and boundary correction schemes which are based on a priori knowledge about the vessel geometry. The presented method is very fast and has been evaluated using sequences of IVUS frames.

  3. Volcanic evolution of an active magmatic rift segment on a 100 Kyr timescale: exposure dating of lavas from the Manda Hararo/Dabbahu segment of the Afar Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Vye, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Yirgu, G.

    2012-12-01

    the 2005 rifting episode. This second magmatic centre supplies magma to the remaining 2/3 of the segment, but scarcely impacts its Northern termination (where the Dabbahu activity predominates) - except during extraordinary events when dykes are long enough to reach those parts, as in 2005. The eruption ages of the different lava units correlates with their degrees of differentiation, allowing different magmatic cycles of about a few tens of years each to be distinguished. During the first recorded magmatic cycle (~70 ka to ~55 ka), Dabbahu is built of wide-spreading pāhoehoe flows around localised eruptive centres. The resulting topography of the volcanic edifice remains low, and is only slightly affected by rift-related fault activity, with the development of minor scarps. The second recorded magmatic cycle (~50 ka to ~20 ka) coincides with a strong development of Dabbahu topography - underlined by the change in lava morphology with well channelized 'a'ā flows since 50 ka. Tectonic activity also clearly increases over this period, with the initiation of the major fault scarps of the rift, which have been dated at around 35 ka. Our study underlines the role of the magma supply and availability beneath Dabbahu in the evolution both topographies of Dabbahu volcano and of the rift depression morphology.

  4. Geomorphic signatures of active tectonics in the Trans-Yamuna segment of the western Doon valley, northwest Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, George; Sah, Madho P.

    Being involved in the late orogenic movements of the sub-Himalaya, the Doon valley and its Quaternary formations have received considerable attention from Earth scientists in the study of active tectonics and paleoseismic events. Study of aerial photographs and satellite data, and selected field checks not only confirmed neotectonic features already reported by various authors but also revealed the presence of more such features. In response to active tectonics, these features have affected very young terraces and Quaternary sediments in the Trans-Yamuna segment of the Doon valley in the western sub-Himalaya. In the present study, an attempt has been made to understand the neotectonic implications of these movements on landforms in and around Sataun-Sirmuri Tal. Ground evidence indicates that the area has experienced at least three major tectonic impulses since the generation of the Main Boundary Thrust. The major tectonic disturbances are most likely due to co-seismic activity along the ongoing Himalayan tectonic processes. In this paper, we discuss some of the strong geomorphic signatures, such as lineament and active fault traces, pressure ridges, sag ponds, alluvial fans, river terraces and finally landslides, which are indicative of active tectonics in this area. On the basis of the present-day geomorphic configuration of this sub-Himalayan basin, a possible evolutionary history is also presented.

  5. Reducing the thrombogenicity of ion-selective electrode membranes through the use of a silicone-modified segmented polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, M J; Badr, I H; Gao, D; Bachas, L G

    2001-11-01

    The susceptibility of segmented polyurethanes (SPUs) to in vivo oxidative cleavage and hydrolysis constitutes a drawback in the use of these materials in the fabrication of implantable devices. The introduction of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) groups into the polymer main chain has been previously reported to enhance the stability of SPUs. Herein, we evaluated the use of BioSpan-S, a silicone-modified SPU, in the design of membranes for cation-selective electrodes. The resulting electrodes exhibited good potentiometric response with all of the tested ionophores (valinomycin, sodium ionophore X, and nonactin). The obtained selectivity coefficients meet the selectivity requirements for the determination of sodium and potassium in blood. Moreover, as reflected by SEM studies, membranes prepared with BioSpan-S showed less adhesion of platelets than membranes prepared with conventional poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC). These results lead to the conclusion that BioSpan-S would be an appropriate candidate for the fabrication of implantable ion-selective electrodes. PMID:11721937

  6. Brain Activation of Negative Feedback in Rule Acquisition Revealed in a Segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Bihua; Cai, Xueli; Gao, Heming; Li, Fuhong

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the brain activation associated with the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition. In each trial of a segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, participants were provided with three reference cards and one target card, and were asked to match one of three reference cards to the target card based on a classification rule. Participants received feedback after each match. Participants would acquire the rule after one negative feedback (1-NF condition) or two successive negative feedbacks (2-NF condition). The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results indicated that lateral prefrontal-to-parietal cortices were more active in the 2-NF condition than in the 1-NF condition. The activation in the right lateral prefrontal cortex and left posterior parietal cortex increased gradually with the amount of negative feedback. These results demonstrate that the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition might be modulated by the lateral prefronto-parietal loop. PMID:26469519

  7. 40 CFR 761.247 - Sample site selection for pipe segment removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... selected in the procedure at paragraph (c)(2) or (c)(3) of this section is a porous surface (for example, there is significant corrosion so that the wipe material will be shredded), then move the sample site... porous surface. For purposes of this subpart, natural gas pipe with a thin porous corrosion...

  8. 40 CFR 761.247 - Sample site selection for pipe segment removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... selected in the procedure at paragraph (c)(2) or (c)(3) of this section is a porous surface (for example, there is significant corrosion so that the wipe material will be shredded), then move the sample site... porous surface. For purposes of this subpart, natural gas pipe with a thin porous corrosion...

  9. Influence of bacterial toxins on the GTPase activity of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.O.; Gureeva, A.A.

    1986-05-10

    The action of cholera toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the activator N/sub s/ protein, and pertussis toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the inhibitor N/sub i/ protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, on transducin, the GTP-binding protein of the rod outer segments of the retina, was investigated. It was shown that under the action of pertussis and cholera toxins, the GTPase activity of transducin is inhibited. Pertussin toxin inhibits the GTPase of native retinal rod outer segments by 30-40%, while GTPase of homogeneous transducin produces a 70-80% inhibition. The action of toxins on transducin depends on the presence and nature of the guanylic nucleotide with which incubation is performed. On the basis of the data obtained it is suggested that pertussis toxin interacts with pretransducin and with the transducin-GDP complex, while cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates the transducin-GTP complex and does not act on transducin lacking GTP.

  10. A novel 3D partitioned active shape model for segmentation of brain MR images.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zheen; Aylward, Stephen R; Teoh, Earn Khwang

    2005-01-01

    A 3D Partitioned Active Shape Model (PASM) is proposed in this paper to address the problems of the 3D Active Shape Models (ASM). When training sets are small. It is usually the case in 3D segmentation, 3D ASMs tend to be restrictive. This is because the allowable region spanned by relatively few eigenvectors cannot capture the full range of shape variability. The 3D PASM overcomes this limitation by using a partitioned representation of the ASM. Given a Point Distribution Model (PDM), the mean mesh is partitioned into a group of small tiles. In order to constrain deformation of tiles, the statistical priors of tiles are estimated by applying Principal Component Analysis to each tile. To avoid the inconsistency of shapes between tiles, training samples are projected as curves in one hyperspace instead of point clouds in several hyperspaces. The deformed points are then fitted into the allowable region of the model by using a curve alignment scheme. The experiments on 3D human brain MRIs show that when the numbers of the training samples are limited, the 3D PASMs significantly improve the segmentation results as compared to 3D ASMs and 3D Hierarchical ASMs.

  11. CT liver volumetry using geodesic active contour segmentation with a level-set algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Epstein, Mark L.; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Obajuluwa, Ademola; Xu, Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi; Baron, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Automatic liver segmentation on CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. Our purpose was to develop an accurate automated liver segmentation scheme for measuring liver volumes. We developed an automated volumetry scheme for the liver in CT based on a 5 step schema. First, an anisotropic smoothing filter was applied to portal-venous phase CT images to remove noise while preserving the liver structure, followed by an edge enhancer to enhance the liver boundary. By using the boundary-enhanced image as a speed function, a fastmarching algorithm generated an initial surface that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic-active-contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour-evolution refined the initial surface so as to more precisely fit the liver boundary. The liver volume was calculated based on the refined liver surface. Hepatic CT scans of eighteen prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multi-detector CT system. Automated liver volumes obtained were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as "gold standard." The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1,520 cc, whereas the mean manual volume was 1,486 cc, with the mean absolute difference of 104 cc (7.0%). CT liver volumetrics based on an automated scheme agreed excellently with "goldstandard" manual volumetrics (intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (p(F<=f)=0.32), and required substantially less completion time. Our automated scheme provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring liver volumes.

  12. HOSVD-Based 3D Active Appearance Model: Segmentation of Lung Fields in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhu; Kang, Wanjun; Hu, Haihui; Wang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    An Active Appearance Model (AAM) is a computer vision model which can be used to effectively segment lung fields in CT images. However, the fitting result is often inadequate when the lungs are affected by high-density pathologies. To overcome this problem, we propose a Higher-order Singular Value Decomposition (HOSVD)-based Three-dimensional (3D) AAM. An evaluation was performed on 310 diseased lungs form the Lung Image Database Consortium Image Collection. Other contemporary AAMs operate directly on patterns represented by vectors, i.e., before applying the AAM to a 3D lung volume,it has to be vectorized first into a vector pattern by some technique like concatenation. However, some implicit structural or local contextual information may be lost in this transformation. According to the nature of the 3D lung volume, HOSVD is introduced to represent and process the lung in tensor space. Our method can not only directly operate on the original 3D tensor patterns, but also efficiently reduce the computer memory usage. The evaluation resulted in an average Dice coefficient of 97.0 % ± 0.59 %, a mean absolute surface distance error of 1.0403 ± 0.5716 mm, a mean border positioning errors of 0.9187 ± 0.5381 pixel, and a Hausdorff Distance of 20.4064 ± 4.3855, respectively. Experimental results showed that our methods delivered significant and better segmentation results, compared with the three other model-based lung segmentation approaches, namely 3D Snake, 3D ASM and 3D AAM. PMID:27277277

  13. Selective Activation of Microglia Facilitates Synaptic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Anna K.; Gruber-Schoffnegger, Doris; Drdla-Schutting, Ruth; Gerhold, Katharina J.; Malcangio, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is thought to be initiated by neurons only, with the prevailing view assigning glial cells mere specify supportive functions for synaptic transmission and plasticity. We now demonstrate that glial cells can control synaptic strength independent of neuronal activity. Here we show that selective activation of microglia in the rat is sufficient to rapidly facilitate synaptic strength between primary afferent C-fibers and lamina I neurons, the first synaptic relay in the nociceptive pathway. Specifically, the activation of the CX3CR1 receptor by fractalkine induces the release of interleukin-1β from microglia, which modulates NMDA signaling in postsynaptic neurons, leading to the release of an eicosanoid messenger, which ultimately enhances presynaptic neurotransmitter release. In contrast to the conventional view, this form of plasticity does not require enhanced neuronal activity to trigger the events leading to synaptic facilitation. Augmentation of synaptic strength in nociceptive pathways represents a cellular model of pain amplification. The present data thus suggest that, under chronic pain states, CX3CR1-mediated activation of microglia drives the facilitation of excitatory synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn, which contributes to pain hypersensitivity in chronic pain states. PMID:25788673

  14. Biochemical construction and selection of hybrid plasmids containing specific segments of the Escherichia coli genome.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, L; Carbon, J

    1975-01-01

    Using a poly(dA-dT) "connector" method, a population of annealed hybrid circular DNAs was constructed in vitro; each hybrid DNA circle containing one full-length molecule of poly(dT)-tailed DNA from E1 colicinogenic factor (Col E1) fragmented by EcoRI endonuclease annealed to any one of a collection of poly(dA)-tailed linear DNA fragments of the entire E. coli genome. This annealed, but unligated, hybrid DNA was used to transform several different auxotrophic mutants of E. coli, and by direct selection, bacterial clones were isolated which contained specific hybrid plasmids. In this manner, bacterial strains containing Col E1 hybrid plasmids carrying the entire tryptophan operon or the arabinsoe and leucine operons were isolated. The methods described should allow the molecular cloning of any portion of the E. coli genome by selection from a pool of DNA molecules containing at least several hundred different hybrids representing the entire bacterial genome. Images PMID:1105581

  15. Dynamics of Active Sensing and perceptual selection.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Charles E; Wilson, Donald A; Radman, Thomas; Scharfman, Helen; Lakatos, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Sensory processing is often regarded as a passive process in which biological receptors like photoreceptors and mechanoreceptors transduce physical energy into a neural code. Recent findings, however, suggest that: first, most sensory processing is active, and largely determined by motor/attentional sampling routines; second, owing to rhythmicity in the motor routine, as well as to its entrainment of ambient rhythms in sensory regions, sensory inflow tends to be rhythmic; third, attentional manipulation of rhythms in sensory pathways is instrumental to perceptual selection. These observations outline the essentials of an Active Sensing paradigm, and argue for increased emphasis on the study of sensory processes as specific to the dynamic motor/attentional context in which inputs are acquired. PMID:20307966

  16. Dynamics of Active Sensing and Perceptual Selection

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Charles E; Wilson, Donald A.; Radman, Thomas; Scharfman, Helen; Lakatos, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Sensory processing is often regarded as a passive process in which a biological sensors like photo- and mechanoreceptors transducer physical energy into a neural code. Recent findings, however, suggest that: 1) most sensory processing is active, and largely determined by motor/attentional sampling routines, 2) due to rhythmicity in the motor routine, as well as to its entrainment of ambient rhythms in sensory regions, sensory inflow tends to be rhythmic, and 3) attentional manipulation of rhythms in sensory pathways is instrumental to perceptual selection. These observations outline the essentials of an Active Sensing paradigm, and argue for increased emphasis on the study of sensory processes as specific to the dynamic motor/attentional context in which inputs are acquired. PMID:20307966

  17. Brain MR image segmentation using local and global intensity fitting active contours/surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Chunming; Sun, Quansen; Xia, Deshen; Kao, Chiu-Yen

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an improved region-based active contour/surface model for 2D/3D brain MR image segmentation. Our model combines the advantages of both local and global intensity information, which enable the model to cope with intensity inhomogeneity. We define an energy functional with a local intensity fitting term and an auxiliary global intensity fitting term. In the associated curve evolution, the motion of the contour is driven by a local intensity fitting force and a global intensity fitting force, induced by the local and global terms in the proposed energy functional, respectively. The influence of these two forces on the curve evolution is complementary. When the contour is close to object boundaries, the local intensity fitting force became dominant, which attracts the contour toward object boundaries and finally stops the contour there. The global intensity fitting force is dominant when the contour is far away from object boundaries, and it allows more flexible initialization of contours by using global image information. The proposed model has been applied to both 2D and 3D brain MR image segmentation with promising results.

  18. An efficient topology adaptation system for parametric active contour segmentation of 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhau, Jochen; Scherzer, Otmar

    2008-03-01

    Active contour models have already been used succesfully for segmentation of organs from medical images in 3D. In implicit models, the contour is given as the isosurface of a scalar function, and therefore topology adaptations are handled naturally during a contour evolution. Nevertheless, explicit or parametric models are often preferred since user interaction and special geometric constraints are usually easier to incorporate. Although many researchers have studied topology adaptation algorithms in explicit mesh evolutions, no stable algorithm is known for interactive applications. In this paper, we present a topology adaptation system, which consists of two novel ingredients: A spatial hashing technique is used to detect self-colliding triangles of the mesh whose expected running time is linear with respect to the number of mesh vertices. For the topology change procedure, we have developed formulas by homology theory. During a contour evolution, we just have to choose between a few possible mesh retriangulations by local triangle-triangle intersection tests. Our algorithm has several advantages compared to existing ones: Since the new algorithm does not require any global mesh reparametrizations, it is very efficient. Since the topology adaptation system does not require constant sampling density of the mesh vertices nor especially smooth meshes, mesh evolution steps can be performed in a stable way with a rather coarse mesh. We apply our algorithm to 3D ultrasonic data, showing that accurate segmentation is obtained in some seconds.

  19. Positron emission tomography detects tissue metabolic activity in myocardial segments with persistent thallium perfusion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunken, R.; Schwaiger, M.; Grover-McKay, M.; Phelps, M.E.; Tillisch, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1987-09-01

    Positron emission tomography with /sup 13/N-ammonia and /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose was used to assess myocardial perfusion and glucose utilization in 51 myocardial segments with a stress thallium defect in 12 patients. Myocardial infarction was defined by a concordant reduction in segmental perfusion and glucose utilization, and myocardial ischemia was identified by preservation of glucose utilization in segments with rest hypoperfusion. Of the 51 segments studied, 36 had a fixed thallium defect, 11 had a partially reversible defect and 4 had a completely reversible defect. Only 15 (42%) of the 36 segments with a fixed defect and 4 (36%) of the 11 segments with a partially reversible defect exhibited myocardial infarction on study with positron tomography. In contrast, residual myocardial glucose utilization was identified in the majority of segments with a fixed (58%) or a partially reversible (64%) thallium defect. All of the segments with a completely reversible defect appeared normal on positron tomography. Apparent improvement in the thallium defect on delayed images did not distinguish segments with ischemia from infarction. Thus, positron emission tomography reveals evidence of persistent tissue metabolism in the majority of segments with a fixed or partially resolving stress thallium defect, implying that markers of perfusion alone may underestimate the extent of viable tissue in hypoperfused myocardial segments.

  20. Dynamic synchronization of ongoing neuronal activity across spinal segments regulates sensory information flow

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Hernández, E; Chávez, D; Rudomin, P

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on the correlation between spontaneous cord dorsum potentials recorded in the lumbar spinal segments of anaesthetized cats suggested the operation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that modulates, in a differential manner, transmission along pathways mediating Ib non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition and pathways mediating primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition. In order to gain further insight into the possible neuronal mechanisms that underlie this process, we have measured changes in the correlation between the spontaneous activity of individual dorsal horn neurones and the cord dorsum potentials associated with intermittent activation of these inhibitory pathways. We found that high levels of neuronal synchronization within the dorsal horn are associated with states of incremented activity along the pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition relative to pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. It is suggested that ongoing changes in the patterns of functional connectivity within a distributed ensemble of dorsal horn neurones play a relevant role in the state-dependent modulation of impulse transmission along inhibitory pathways, among them those involved in the central control of sensory information. This feature would allow the same neuronal network to be involved in different functional tasks. Key points We have examined, in the spinal cord of the anaesthetized cat, the relationship between ongoing correlated fluctuations of dorsal horn neuronal activity and state-dependent activation of inhibitory reflex pathways. We found that high levels of synchronization between the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones occur in association with the preferential activation of spinal pathways leading to primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition relative to activation of pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. It is suggested that changes in synchronization of ongoing activity within a

  1. [Segment analysis of the target market of physiotherapeutic services].

    PubMed

    Babaskin, D V

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the possibilities to analyse selected segments of the target market of physiotherapeutic services provided by medical and preventive-facilities of two major types. The main features of a target segment, such as provision of therapeutic massage, are illustrated in terms of two characteristics, namely attractiveness to the users and the ability of a given medical facility to satisfy their requirements. Based on the analysis of portfolio of the available target segments the most promising ones (winner segments) were selected for further marketing studies. This choice does not exclude the possibility of involvement of other segments of medical services in marketing activities.

  2. Telomerase activity concentrates in the mitotically active segments of human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, R D; Wright, W E; Shay, J W; Taylor, R S

    1997-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme capable of adding hexanucleotide repeats onto the ends of linear chromosomal DNA. Whereas normal somatic cells with a limited replicative capacity fail to express telomerase activity, most immortal eukaryotic cells do. Cells of renewal tissues (e.g., skin, intestine, blood) require an extensive proliferative capacity. Some cells in such renewal tissues also express telomerase activity, most likely to prevent rapid erosion of their telomeres during cell proliferation. In this study, we measured the levels of telomerase activity in dissected compartments of the human hair follicle: hair shaft, gland-containing fragment, upper intermediate fragment (where it is thought undifferentiated stem cells reside), lower intermediate fragment, and in the bulb-containing fragment (an area with high mitotic activity containing a more differentiated pool of keratinocytes). In anagen follicles, high levels of telomerase activity were found almost exclusively in the bulb-containing fragment of the follicles, with low levels of telomerase in the bulge area (intermediate fragments) and gland-containing fragment. In comparison, catagen follicles had low levels of telomerase activity in the bulb-containing fragments as well as in other compartments. Such observations indicate that, in anagen hair follicles, the fragments containing cells actively dividing (e.g., transient amplifying cells) express telomerase activity, whereas fragments containing cells with low mitotic activity, for example, quiescent stem cells, express low levels of telomerase activity. PMID:8980299

  3. Selection of active spaces for multiconfigurational wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Sebastian; Boguslawski, Katharina; Reiher, Markus; Janowski, Tomasz; Pulay, Peter

    2015-06-28

    The efficient and accurate description of the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems is still a largely unsolved problem. The usual procedures start with a multiconfigurational (usually a Complete Active Space, CAS) wavefunction which accounts for static correlation and add dynamical correlation by perturbation theory, configuration interaction, or coupled cluster expansion. This procedure requires the correct selection of the active space. Intuitive methods are unreliable for complex systems. The inexpensive black-box unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) criterion postulates that the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) charge natural orbitals with fractional occupancy (e.g., between 0.02 and 1.98) constitute the active space. UNOs generally approximate the CAS orbitals so well that the orbital optimization in CAS Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) may be omitted, resulting in the inexpensive UNO-CAS method. A rigorous testing of the UNO criterion requires comparison with approximate full configuration interaction wavefunctions. This became feasible with the advent of Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) methods which can approximate highly correlated wavefunctions at affordable cost. We have compared active orbital occupancies in UNO-CAS and CASSCF calculations with DMRG in a number of strongly correlated molecules: compounds of electronegative atoms (F{sub 2}, ozone, and NO{sub 2}), polyenes, aromatic molecules (naphthalene, azulene, anthracene, and nitrobenzene), radicals (phenoxy and benzyl), diradicals (o-, m-, and p-benzyne), and transition metal compounds (nickel-acetylene and Cr{sub 2}). The UNO criterion works well in these cases. Other symmetry breaking solutions, with the possible exception of spatial symmetry, do not appear to be essential to generate the correct active space. In the case of multiple UHF solutions, the natural orbitals of the average UHF density should be used. The problems of the UNO criterion and their potential solutions

  4. Selection of active spaces for multiconfigurational wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Sebastian; Boguslawski, Katharina; Janowski, Tomasz; Reiher, Markus; Pulay, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The efficient and accurate description of the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems is still a largely unsolved problem. The usual procedures start with a multiconfigurational (usually a Complete Active Space, CAS) wavefunction which accounts for static correlation and add dynamical correlation by perturbation theory, configuration interaction, or coupled cluster expansion. This procedure requires the correct selection of the active space. Intuitive methods are unreliable for complex systems. The inexpensive black-box unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) criterion postulates that the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) charge natural orbitals with fractional occupancy (e.g., between 0.02 and 1.98) constitute the active space. UNOs generally approximate the CAS orbitals so well that the orbital optimization in CAS Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) may be omitted, resulting in the inexpensive UNO-CAS method. A rigorous testing of the UNO criterion requires comparison with approximate full configuration interaction wavefunctions. This became feasible with the advent of Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) methods which can approximate highly correlated wavefunctions at affordable cost. We have compared active orbital occupancies in UNO-CAS and CASSCF calculations with DMRG in a number of strongly correlated molecules: compounds of electronegative atoms (F2, ozone, and NO2), polyenes, aromatic molecules (naphthalene, azulene, anthracene, and nitrobenzene), radicals (phenoxy and benzyl), diradicals (o-, m-, and p-benzyne), and transition metal compounds (nickel-acetylene and Cr2). The UNO criterion works well in these cases. Other symmetry breaking solutions, with the possible exception of spatial symmetry, do not appear to be essential to generate the correct active space. In the case of multiple UHF solutions, the natural orbitals of the average UHF density should be used. The problems of the UNO criterion and their potential solutions are discussed

  5. Selection of active spaces for multiconfigurational wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sebastian; Boguslawski, Katharina; Janowski, Tomasz; Reiher, Markus; Pulay, Peter

    2015-06-28

    The efficient and accurate description of the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems is still a largely unsolved problem. The usual procedures start with a multiconfigurational (usually a Complete Active Space, CAS) wavefunction which accounts for static correlation and add dynamical correlation by perturbation theory, configuration interaction, or coupled cluster expansion. This procedure requires the correct selection of the active space. Intuitive methods are unreliable for complex systems. The inexpensive black-box unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) criterion postulates that the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) charge natural orbitals with fractional occupancy (e.g., between 0.02 and 1.98) constitute the active space. UNOs generally approximate the CAS orbitals so well that the orbital optimization in CAS Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) may be omitted, resulting in the inexpensive UNO-CAS method. A rigorous testing of the UNO criterion requires comparison with approximate full configuration interaction wavefunctions. This became feasible with the advent of Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) methods which can approximate highly correlated wavefunctions at affordable cost. We have compared active orbital occupancies in UNO-CAS and CASSCF calculations with DMRG in a number of strongly correlated molecules: compounds of electronegative atoms (F2, ozone, and NO2), polyenes, aromatic molecules (naphthalene, azulene, anthracene, and nitrobenzene), radicals (phenoxy and benzyl), diradicals (o-, m-, and p-benzyne), and transition metal compounds (nickel-acetylene and Cr2). The UNO criterion works well in these cases. Other symmetry breaking solutions, with the possible exception of spatial symmetry, do not appear to be essential to generate the correct active space. In the case of multiple UHF solutions, the natural orbitals of the average UHF density should be used. The problems of the UNO criterion and their potential solutions are discussed

  6. Active Optics for a Segmented Primary Mirror on a Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article investigates the active optical control of segments in the primary mirror to correct for wavefront errors in the Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA). Although an exact assessment of improvement in signal blur radius cannot be made until a more detailed preliminary structural design is completed, analytical tools are identified for a time when such designs become available. A brief survey of appropriate sensing approaches is given. Since the choice of control algorithm and architecture depends on the particular sensing system used, typical control systems, estimated complexities, and the type of equipment required are discussed. Once specific sensor and actuator systems are chosen, the overall control system can be optimized using methods identified in the literature.

  7. Active Contours Using Additive Local and Global Intensity Fitting Models for Intensity Inhomogeneous Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Soomro, Shafiullah; Kim, Jeong Heon; Soomro, Toufique Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an improved region based active contour method with a level set formulation. The proposed energy functional integrates both local and global intensity fitting terms in an additive formulation. Local intensity fitting term influences local force to pull the contour and confine it to object boundaries. In turn, the global intensity fitting term drives the movement of contour at a distance from the object boundaries. The global intensity term is based on the global division algorithm, which can better capture intensity information of an image than Chan-Vese (CV) model. Both local and global terms are mutually assimilated to construct an energy function based on a level set formulation to segment images with intensity inhomogeneity. Experimental results show that the proposed method performs better both qualitatively and quantitatively compared to other state-of-the-art-methods. PMID:27800011

  8. Primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and soluble factor urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, Hernán

    2013-11-01

    Primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) may be due to genetic or acquired etiologies and is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome with high morbidity that often leads to end-stage renal failure. The different available therapeutic approaches are unsuccessful, in part due to partially deciphered heterogeneous and complex pathophysiological mechanisms. Moreover, the term FSGS, even in its primary form, comprises a histological description shared by a number of different causes with completely different molecular pathways of disease. This review focuses on the latest developments regarding the pathophysiology of primary acquired FSGS caused by soluble factor urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor, a circulating permeability factor involved in proteinuria and edema formation, and describes recent advances with potential success in therapy.

  9. A synthetic segment of surfactant protein A: structure, in vitro surface activity, and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Walther, F J; David-Cu, R; Leung, C; Bruni, R; Hernández-Juviel, J; Gordon, L M; Waring, A J

    1996-06-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a 248-residue, water-soluble, lipid-associating protein found in lung surfactant. Analysis of the amino acid sequence using the Eisenberg hydrophobic moment algorithm predicts that the SP-A segment spanning residues 114-144 has high hydrophobic moments, typical of lipid-associating amphipathic domains. The secondary structure, in vitro surface activity and in vivo lung activity of this SP-A sequence were studied with a 31-residue synthetic peptide analog (A114-144). Analysis of the secondary structure using circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated association with lipid dispersions and a dominant helical content. Surface activity measurements of A114-144 with surfactant lipid dispersions and the hydrophobic surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B/C) showed that A114-144 enhances surface activity under conditions of dynamic compression and respreading on a Langmuir/Wilhelmy surface balance. Synthetic surfactant dispersions containing A114-144 improved lung compliance in spontaneously breathing, 28-d premature rabbits to a greater degree than surfactant dispersions with synthetic SP-B/C and synthetic surfactant lipids alone. These observations indicate that inclusion of A114-144 may improve synthetic preparations currently used for surfactant replacement therapy.

  10. Nanostructured electrocatalysts with tunable activity and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Kühl, Stefanie; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-04-01

    The field of electrocatalysis has undergone tremendous advancement in the past few decades, in part owing to improvements in catalyst design at the nanoscale. These developments have been crucial for the realization of and improvement in alternative energy technologies based on electrochemical reactions such as fuel cells. Through the development of novel synthesis methods, characterization techniques and theoretical methods, rationally designed nanoscale electrocatalysts with tunable activity and selectivity have been achieved. This Review explores how nanostructures can be used to control electrochemical reactivity, focusing on three model reactions: O2 electroreduction, CO2 electroreduction and ethanol electrooxidation. The mechanisms behind nanoscale control of reactivity are discussed, such as the presence of low-coordinated sites or facets, strain, ligand effects and bifunctional effects in multimetallic materials. In particular, studies of how particle size, shape and composition in nanostructures can be used to tune reactivity are highlighted.

  11. Coevolution of active vision and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Kato, Toshifumi; Marocco, Davide; Sauser, Eric

    2004-03-01

    We show that complex visual tasks, such as position- and size-invariant shape recognition and navigation in the environment, can be tackled with simple architectures generated by a coevolutionary process of active vision and feature selection. Behavioral machines equipped with primitive vision systems and direct pathways between visual and motor neurons are evolved while they freely interact with their environments. We describe the application of this methodology in three sets of experiments, namely, shape discrimination, car driving, and robot navigation. We show that these systems develop sensitivity to a number of oriented, retinotopic, visual-feature-oriented edges, corners, height, and a behavioral repertoire to locate, bring, and keep these features in sensitive regions of the vision system, resembling strategies observed in simple insects. PMID:15052484

  12. Coevolution of active vision and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Kato, Toshifumi; Marocco, Davide; Sauser, Eric

    2004-03-01

    We show that complex visual tasks, such as position- and size-invariant shape recognition and navigation in the environment, can be tackled with simple architectures generated by a coevolutionary process of active vision and feature selection. Behavioral machines equipped with primitive vision systems and direct pathways between visual and motor neurons are evolved while they freely interact with their environments. We describe the application of this methodology in three sets of experiments, namely, shape discrimination, car driving, and robot navigation. We show that these systems develop sensitivity to a number of oriented, retinotopic, visual-feature-oriented edges, corners, height, and a behavioral repertoire to locate, bring, and keep these features in sensitive regions of the vision system, resembling strategies observed in simple insects.

  13. Active Geodesics: Region-based Active Contour Segmentation with a Global Edge-based Constraint.

    PubMed

    Appia, Vikram; Yezzi, Anthony

    2011-11-01

    We present an active geodesic contour model in which we constrain the evolving active contour to be a geodesic with respect to a weighted edge-based energy through its entire evolution rather than just at its final state (as in the traditional geodesic active contour models). Since the contour is always a geodesic throughout the evolution, we automatically get local optimality with respect to an edge fitting criterion. This enables us to construct a purely region-based energy minimization model without having to devise arbitrary weights in the combination of our energy function to balance edge-based terms with the region-based terms. We show that this novel approach of combining edge information as the geodesic constraint in optimizing a purely region-based energy yields a new class of active contours which exhibit both local and global behaviors that are naturally responsive to intuitive types of user interaction. We also show the relationship of this new class of globally constrained active contours with traditional minimal path methods, which seek global minimizers of purely edge-based energies without incorporating region-based criteria. Finally, we present some numerical examples to illustrate the benefits of this approach over traditional active contour models.

  14. Myocardial Iron Loading Assessment by Automatic Left Ventricle Segmentation with Morphological Operations and Geodesic Active Contour on T2* images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun-Gang; Ko, Jacky Kl; Shi, Lin; Guan, Yuefeng; Li, Linong; Qin, Jing; Heng, Pheng-Ann; Chu, Winnie Cw; Wang, Defeng

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial iron loading thalassemia patients could be identified using T2* magnetic resonance images (MRI). To quantitatively assess cardiac iron loading, we proposed an effective algorithm to segment aligned free induction decay sequential myocardium images based on morphological operations and geodesic active contour (GAC). Nine patients with thalassemia major were recruited (10 male and 16 female) to undergo a thoracic MRI scan in the short axis view. Free induction decay images were registered for T2* mapping. The GAC were utilized to segment aligned MR images with a robust initialization. Segmented myocardium regions were divided into sectors for a region-based quantification of cardiac iron loading. Our proposed automatic segmentation approach achieve a true positive rate at 84.6% and false positive rate at 53.8%. The area difference between manual and automatic segmentation was 25.5% after 1000 iterations. Results from T2* analysis indicated that regions with intensity lower than 20 ms were suffered from heavy iron loading in thalassemia major patients. The proposed method benefited from abundant edge information of the free induction decay sequential MRI. Experiment results demonstrated that the proposed method is feasible in myocardium segmentation and was clinically applicable to measure myocardium iron loading.

  15. Myocardial Iron Loading Assessment by Automatic Left Ventricle Segmentation with Morphological Operations and Geodesic Active Contour on T2* images

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun-gang; Ko, Jacky KL; Shi, Lin; Guan, Yuefeng; Li, Linong; Qin, Jing; Heng, Pheng-Ann; Chu, Winnie CW; Wang, Defeng

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial iron loading thalassemia patients could be identified using T2* magnetic resonance images (MRI). To quantitatively assess cardiac iron loading, we proposed an effective algorithm to segment aligned free induction decay sequential myocardium images based on morphological operations and geodesic active contour (GAC). Nine patients with thalassemia major were recruited (10 male and 16 female) to undergo a thoracic MRI scan in the short axis view. Free induction decay images were registered for T2* mapping. The GAC were utilized to segment aligned MR images with a robust initialization. Segmented myocardium regions were divided into sectors for a region-based quantification of cardiac iron loading. Our proposed automatic segmentation approach achieve a true positive rate at 84.6% and false positive rate at 53.8%. The area difference between manual and automatic segmentation was 25.5% after 1000 iterations. Results from T2* analysis indicated that regions with intensity lower than 20 ms were suffered from heavy iron loading in thalassemia major patients. The proposed method benefited from abundant edge information of the free induction decay sequential MRI. Experiment results demonstrated that the proposed method is feasible in myocardium segmentation and was clinically applicable to measure myocardium iron loading. PMID:26215336

  16. [Research on K-means clustering segmentation method for MRI brain image based on selecting multi-peaks in gray histogram].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoxue; Yu, Haizhong; Chen, Hao

    2013-12-01

    To solve the problem of traditional K-means clustering in which initial clustering centers are selected randomly, we proposed a new K-means segmentation algorithm based on robustly selecting 'peaks' standing for White Matter, Gray Matter and Cerebrospinal Fluid in multi-peaks gray histogram of MRI brain image. The new algorithm takes gray value of selected histogram 'peaks' as the initial K-means clustering center and can segment the MRI brain image into three parts of tissue more effectively, accurately, steadily and successfully. Massive experiments have proved that the proposed algorithm can overcome many shortcomings caused by traditional K-means clustering method such as low efficiency, veracity, robustness and time consuming. The histogram 'peak' selecting idea of the proposed segmentootion method is of more universal availability.

  17. 15 CFR 922.21 - Selection of active candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Selection of active candidates. 922.21... Selection of active candidates. (a) The Secretary shall, from time to time, select a limited number of sites from the SEL for Active Candidate consideration based on a preliminary assessment of the...

  18. 15 CFR 922.21 - Selection of active candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Selection of active candidates. 922.21... Selection of active candidates. (a) The Secretary shall, from time to time, select a limited number of sites from the SEL for Active Candidate consideration based on a preliminary assessment of the...

  19. 15 CFR 922.21 - Selection of active candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Selection of active candidates. 922.21... Selection of active candidates. (a) The Secretary shall, from time to time, select a limited number of sites from the SEL for Active Candidate consideration based on a preliminary assessment of the...

  20. 15 CFR 922.21 - Selection of active candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Selection of active candidates. 922.21... Selection of active candidates. (a) The Secretary shall, from time to time, select a limited number of sites from the SEL for Active Candidate consideration based on a preliminary assessment of the...

  1. 15 CFR 922.21 - Selection of active candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Selection of active candidates. 922.21... Selection of active candidates. (a) The Secretary shall, from time to time, select a limited number of sites from the SEL for Active Candidate consideration based on a preliminary assessment of the...

  2. Calcineurin signaling mediates activity-dependent relocation of the axon initial segment.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark D; Sammons, Rosanna P; Lebron, Sabrina; Dumitrescu, Adna S; Watkins, Thomas B K; Uebele, Victor N; Renger, John J; Grubb, Matthew S

    2013-04-17

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is a specialized neuronal subcompartment located at the beginning of the axon that is crucially involved in both the generation of action potentials and the regulation of neuronal polarity. We recently showed that prolonged neuronal depolarization produces a distal shift of the entire AIS structure away from the cell body, a change associated with a decrease in neuronal excitability. Here, we used dissociated rat hippocampal cultures, with a major focus on the dentate granule cell (DGC) population, to explore the signaling pathways underlying activity-dependent relocation of the AIS. First, a pharmacological screen of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) showed that AIS relocation is triggered by activation of L-type Cav1 VGCCs with negligible contribution from any other VGCC subtypes. Additional pharmacological analysis revealed that downstream signaling events are mediated by the calcium-sensitive phosphatase calcineurin; inhibition of calcineurin with either FK506 or cyclosporin A totally abolished both depolarization- and optogenetically-induced activity-dependent AIS relocation. Furthermore, calcineurin activation is sufficient for AIS plasticity, because expression of a constitutively active form of the phosphatase resulted in relocation of the AIS of DGCs without a depolarizing stimulus. Finally, we assessed the role of calcineurin in other forms of depolarization-induced plasticity. Neither membrane resistance changes nor spine density changes were affected by FK506 treatment, suggesting that calcineurin acts via a separate pathway to modulate AIS plasticity. Together, these results emphasize calcineurin as a vital player in the regulation of intrinsic plasticity as governed by the AIS. PMID:23595753

  3. Segmental basal cell naevus syndrome caused by an activating mutation in smoothened.

    PubMed

    Khamaysi, Z; Bochner, R; Indelman, M; Magal, L; Avitan-Hersh, E; Sarig, O; Sprecher, E; Bergman, R

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant sonic hedgehog signalling, mostly due to PTCH1 mutations, has been shown to play a central role in the pathogenesis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), as well as in basal cell naevus syndrome (BCNS). Mutations in smoothened (SMO) encoding a receptor for sonic hedgehog have been reported in sporadic BCCs but not in BCNS. We report a case with multiple BCCs, pits and comedones in a segmental distribution over the upper part of the body, along with other findings compatible with BCNS. Histopathologically, there were different types of BCC. A heterozygous mutation (c.1234C>T, p.L412F) in SMO was detected in three BCCs but not in peripheral blood lymphocytes or the uninvolved skin. These were compatible with the type 1 mosaic form of BCNS. The p.L412F mutation was found experimentally to result in increased SMO transactivating activity, and the patient responded to vismodegib therapy. Activating mutations in SMO may cause BCNS. The identification of a gain-of-function mutation in SMO causing a type 1 mosaic form of BCNS further expands our understanding of the pathogenesis of BCC, with implications for the treatment of these tumours, whether sporadic or inherited. PMID:26822128

  4. Active Gaze Control Improves Optic Flow-Based Segmentation and Steering

    PubMed Central

    Raudies, Florian; Mingolla, Ennio; Neumann, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    An observer traversing an environment actively relocates gaze to fixate objects. Evidence suggests that gaze is frequently directed toward the center of an object considered as target but more likely toward the edges of an object that appears as an obstacle. We suggest that this difference in gaze might be motivated by specific patterns of optic flow that are generated by either fixating the center or edge of an object. To support our suggestion we derive an analytical model that shows: Tangentially fixating the outer surface of an obstacle leads to strong flow discontinuities that can be used for flow-based segmentation. Fixation of the target center while gaze and heading are locked without head-, body-, or eye-rotations gives rise to a symmetric expansion flow with its center at the point being approached, which facilitates steering toward a target. We conclude that gaze control incorporates ecological constraints to improve the robustness of steering and collision avoidance by actively generating flows appropriate to solve the task. PMID:22719889

  5. SEGMENTATION OF ELASTOGRAPHIC IMAGES USING A COARSE-TO-FINE ACTIVE CONTOUR MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wu; Zagzebski, James A.; Varghese, Tomy; Dyer, Charles R.; Techavipoo, Udomchai; Hall, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Delineation of radiofrequency-ablation-induced coagulation (thermal lesion) boundaries is an important clinical problem that is not well addressed by conventional imaging modalities. Elastography, which produces images of the local strain after small, externally applied compressions, can be used for visualization of thermal coagulations. This paper presents an automated segmentation approach for thermal coagulations on 3-D elastographic data to obtain both area and volume information rapidly. The approach consists of a coarse-to-fine method for active contour initialization and a gradient vector flow, active contour model for deformable contour optimization with the help of prior knowledge of the geometry of general thermal coagulations. The performance of the algorithm has been shown to be comparable to manual delineation of coagulations on elastograms by medical physicists (r = 0.99 for volumes of 36 radiofrequency-induced coagulations). Furthermore, the automatic algorithm applied to elastograms yielded results that agreed with manual delineation of coagulations on pathology images (r = 0.96 for the same 36 lesions). This algorithm has also been successfully applied on in vivo elastograms. PMID:16530098

  6. Binding of the transcription activator NRI (NTRC) to a supercoiled DNA segment imitates association with the natural enhancer: an electron microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Révet, B; Brahms, S; Brahms, G

    1995-08-01

    Electron microscopic visualization indicates that the transcription activator NRI (NTRC) binds with exceptional selectivity and efficiency to a sequence-induced superhelical (spiral) segment inserted upstream of the glnA promoter, accounting for its observed ability to substitute for the natural glnA enhancer. The cooperative binding of NRI to the spiral insert leads to protein oligomerization which, at higher concentration, promotes selective coating of the entire superhelical segment with protein. Localization of NRI at apical loops is observed with negatively supercoiled plasmid DNA. With a linear plasmid, bending of DNA is observed. We confirm that NRI is a DNA-bending protein, consistent with its high affinity for spiral DNA. These results prove that spiral DNA without any homology to the NRI-binding sequence site can substitute for the glnA enhancer by promoting cooperative activator binding to DNA and facilitating protein oligomerization. Similar mechanisms might apply to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic activator proteins that share the ability to bend DNA and act efficiently as multimers.

  7. Segment alignment control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, JEAN-N.; Lorell, Ken R.

    1988-01-01

    The segmented primary mirror for the LDR will require a special segment alignment control system to precisely control the orientation of each of the segments so that the resulting composite reflector behaves like a monolith. The W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope will utilize a primary mirror made up of 36 actively controlled segments. Thus the primary mirror and its segment alignment control system are directly analogous to the LDR. The problems of controlling the segments in the face of disturbances and control/structures interaction, as analyzed for the TMT, are virtually identical to those for the LDR. The two systems are briefly compared.

  8. Segmentation of solid subregion of high grade gliomas in MRI images based on active contour model (ACM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, P.; Win, M. T.; Wong, J. H. D.; Abdullah, N. A.; Ramli, N.

    2016-03-01

    Gliomas are tumours arising from the interstitial tissue of the brain which are heterogeneous, infiltrative and possess ill-defined borders. Tumour subregions (e.g. solid enhancing part, edema and necrosis) are often used for tumour characterisation. Tumour demarcation into substructures facilitates glioma staging and provides essential information. Manual segmentation had several drawbacks that include laborious, time consuming, subjected to intra and inter-rater variability and hindered by diversity in the appearance of tumour tissues. In this work, active contour model (ACM) was used to segment the solid enhancing subregion of the tumour. 2D brain image acquisition data using 3T MRI fast spoiled gradient echo sequence in post gadolinium of four histologically proven high-grade glioma patients were obtained. Preprocessing of the images which includes subtraction and skull stripping were performed and then followed by ACM segmentation. The results of the automatic segmentation method were compared against the manual delineation of the tumour by a trainee radiologist. Both results were further validated by an experienced neuroradiologist and a brief quantitative evaluations (pixel area and difference ratio) were performed. Preliminary results of the clinical data showed the potential of ACM model in the application of fast and large scale tumour segmentation in medical imaging.

  9. Whole abdominal wall segmentation using augmented active shape models (AASM) with multi-atlas label fusion and level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes.

  10. Whole Abdominal Wall Segmentation using Augmented Active Shape Models (AASM) with Multi-Atlas Label Fusion and Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes. PMID:27127333

  11. Active fault, fault growth and segment linkage along the Janauri anticline (frontal foreland fold), NW Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Javed N.; Shah, Afroz A.; Sahoo, Ajit K.; Puhan, B.; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Shinde, Dattatraya P.; Juyal, Navin; Singhvi, Ashok K.; Rath, Shishir K.

    2010-03-01

    The 100 km long frontal foreland fold — the Janauri anticline in NW Himalayan foothills represents a single segment formed due to inter-linking of the southern (JS1) and the northern (JS2) Janauri segments. This anticline is a product of the fault related fold growth that facilitated lateral propagation by acquiring more length and linkage of smaller segments giving rise to a single large segment. The linked portion marked by flat-uplifted surface in the central portion represents the paleo-water gap of the Sutlej River. This area is comparatively more active in terms of tectonic activity, well justified by the occurrence of fault scarps along the forelimb and backlimb of the anticline. Occurrence of active fault scarps on either side of the anticline suggests that the slip accommodated in the frontal part is partitioned between the main frontal thrust i.e. the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) and associated back-thrust. The uplift in the piedmont zone along southern portion of Janauri anticline marked by dissected younger hill range suggests fore-landward propagation of tectonic activity along newly developed Frontal Piedmont Thrust (FPT), an imbricated emergent thrust branching out from the HFT system. We suggests that this happened because the southern segment JS1 does not linked-up with the northwestern end of Chandigarh anticline segment (CS). In the northwestern end of the Janauri anticline, due to no structural asperity the tectonic activity on HFT was taken-up by two (HF1 — in the frontal part and HF2 — towards the hinterland side) newly developed parallel active faults ( Hajipur Fault) branched from the main JS2 segment. The lateral propagation and movements along HF1 and HF2 resulted in uplift of the floodplain as well as responsible for the northward shift of the Beas River. GPR and trench investigations suggest that earthquakes during the recent past were accompanied with surface rupture. OSL (optical stimulated luminescence) dates from the trench

  12. Markov random field driven region-based active contour model (MaRACel): application to medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Monaco, James P; Madabhushi, Anant

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a Markov random field (MRF) driven region-based active contour model (MaRACel) for medical image segmentation. State-of-the-art region-based active contour (RAC) models assume that every spatial location in the image is statistically independent of the others, thereby ignoring valuable contextual information. To address this shortcoming we incorporate a MRF prior into the AC model, further generalizing Chan & Vese's (CV) and Rousson and Deriche's (RD) AC models. This incorporation requires a Markov prior that is consistent with the continuous variational framework characteristic of active contours; consequently, we introduce a continuous analogue to the discrete Potts model. To demonstrate the effectiveness of MaRACel, we compare its performance to those of the CV and RD AC models in the following scenarios: (1) the qualitative segmentation of a cancerous lesion in a breast DCE-MR image and (2) the qualitative and quantitative segmentations of prostatic acini (glands) in 200 histopathology images. Across the 200 prostate needle core biopsy histology images, MaRACel yielded an average sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 71%, 95%, 74% with respect to the segmented gland boundaries; the CV and RD models have corresponding values of 19%, 81%, 20% and 53%, 88%, 56%, respectively.

  13. Improving semi-automated segmentation by integrating learning with active sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Jing; Okada, Kazunori; Brown, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Interactive segmentation algorithms such as GrowCut usually require quite a few user interactions to perform well, and have poor repeatability. In this study, we developed a novel technique to boost the performance of the interactive segmentation method GrowCut involving: 1) a novel "focused sampling" approach for supervised learning, as opposed to conventional random sampling; 2) boosting GrowCut using the machine learned results. We applied the proposed technique to the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumor segmentation, and evaluated on a dataset of ten cases from a multiple center pharmaceutical drug trial. The results showed that the proposed system has the potential to reduce user interaction while maintaining similar segmentation accuracy.

  14. A novel method for the automatic segmentation of activity data from a wrist worn device: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Amor, James D; Ahanathapillai, Vijayalakshmi; James, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Activity monitoring is used in a number of fields in order to assess the physical activity of the user. Applications include health and well-being, rehabilitation and enhancing independent living. Data are often gathered from multiple accelerometers and analysis focuses on multi-parametric classification. For longer term monitoring this is unsuitable and it is desirable to develop a method for the precise analysis of activity data with respect to time. This paper presents the initial results of a novel approach to this problem which is capable of segmenting activity data collected from a single accelerometer recording naturalized activity.

  15. [The motor activity study segment as pilot study of The Child and Adolescent Health Survey].

    PubMed

    Kahl, H; Emmel, J

    2002-12-01

    In the Health Survey for Children and Adolescents the examination of motor activity is one aspect of physical health covered by the study. This underlines the importance of physical activity for physical development in early years. This first representative child and adolescent study for Germany intends to obtain data on motor activity and to allow for the implementation of specific intervention programmes encouraging physical activity. The specific general conditions under which the survey is conducted restrict the selection and scope of possible instruments to a minimal programme, including fitness tests, strength in combination with endurance and coordinative skills as well as flexibility. In a pilot study the suitability, feasibility and the obtained evidence of selected single motor tests were tested. This article explains the choice of instruments and methods used in the examination of physical fitness. It also discusses methodological difficulties which affect the standardisation of tests and the requirements regarding personnel. A major concern of the pilot study was the evaluation of tested instruments with regard to gender and age differences. For the main survey the following tests are recommended: coordination (balancing backwards, one-leg-footing, sideway jumping), perseverance (sit-ups, push-ups), and flexibility (trunk bending).

  16. Allosteric coupling between proximal C-terminus and selectivity filter is facilitated by the movement of transmembrane segment 4 in TREK-2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    TREK-2, a member of two-pore-domain potassium channel family, regulates cellular excitability in response to diverse stimuli. However, how such stimuli control channel function remains unclear. Here, by characterizing the responses of cytosolic proximal C-terminus deletant (ΔpCt) and transmembrane segment 4 (M4)-glycine hinge mutant (G312A) to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an activator of TREK-2, we show that the transduction initiated from pCt domain is allosterically coupled with the conformation of selectivity filter (SF) via the movements of M4, without depending on the original status of SF. Moreover, ΔpCt and G312A also exhibited blunted responses to extracellular alkalization, a model to induce SF conformational transition. These results suggest that the coupling between pCt domain and SF is bidirectional, and M4 movements are involved in both processes. Further mechanistic exploration reveals that the function of Phe316, a residue close to the C-terminus of M4, is associated with such communications. However, unlike TREK-2, M4-hinge of TREK-1 only controls the transmission from pCt to SF, rather than SF conformational changes triggered by pHo changes. Together, our findings uncover the unique gating properties of TREK-2, and elucidate the mechanisms for how the extracellular and intracellular stimuli harness the pore gating allosterically. PMID:26879043

  17. In vitro construction of bacteriophage lambda carrying segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome: selection of hybrids containing the gene for DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J R; Panasenko, S M; Lehman, I R; Davis, R W

    1975-09-01

    DNA from lambdagt-lambdaB bacteriophage was cleaved with EcoRI endonuclease and fragments from EcoRI-digested E. coli DNA were inserted. This DNA was used to infect E. coli, and phages containing the gene for DNA ligase were isolated by genetic selection. Two different hybrids were found with the same E. coli segment inserted in opposite orientations. Both hybrids produced similar levels of ligase as measured in crude extracts of infected cells.

  18. In vitro construction of bacteriophage lambda carrying segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome: selection of hybrids containing the gene for DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Panasenko, S M; Lehman, I R; Davis, R W

    1975-01-01

    DNA from lambdagt-lambdaB bacteriophage was cleaved with EcoRI endonuclease and fragments from EcoRI-digested E. coli DNA were inserted. This DNA was used to infect E. coli, and phages containing the gene for DNA ligase were isolated by genetic selection. Two different hybrids were found with the same E. coli segment inserted in opposite orientations. Both hybrids produced similar levels of ligase as measured in crude extracts of infected cells. Images PMID:1103146

  19. Selective Activation and Disengagement of Moral Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandura, Albert

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes psychological mechanisms by which moral control is selectively disengaged from inhumane conduct in ordinary and unusual circumstances. Explores the symptoms of moral exclusion as described in the literature. Presents categories that unify theory on moral exclusion and contribute practical classifications for use in empirical studies. (JS)

  20. Review of selected geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. H.; Feynman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic activity indexes are reviewed. Classifications of magnetograms from single observatories and the global range of potential associated with the equivalent currents which could have produced the variations monitored at a large array of recording sides are addressed. Principal magnetic activity indexes discussed include: the auroral electrojet index and its associated indexes (AU, AL and AO) useful for auroral zone studies; the Kp, ap, aa and am indexes which are measures of midlatitude geomagnetic activity; and the Dst index of magnetic activity recorded at low latitudes. It is concluded that geomagnetic activity indexes are useful in studies of the interaction between solar activity, the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind, the magnetosphere, ring current, field aligned currents, and ionospheric currents.

  1. Graph-based active learning of agglomeration (GALA): a Python library to segment 2D and 3D neuroimages.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Kennedy, Ryan; Plaza, Stephen M; Chakraborty, Anirban; Katz, William T

    2014-01-01

    The aim in high-resolution connectomics is to reconstruct complete neuronal connectivity in a tissue. Currently, the only technology capable of resolving the smallest neuronal processes is electron microscopy (EM). Thus, a common approach to network reconstruction is to perform (error-prone) automatic segmentation of EM images, followed by manual proofreading by experts to fix errors. We have developed an algorithm and software library to not only improve the accuracy of the initial automatic segmentation, but also point out the image coordinates where it is likely to have made errors. Our software, called gala (graph-based active learning of agglomeration), improves the state of the art in agglomerative image segmentation. It is implemented in Python and makes extensive use of the scientific Python stack (numpy, scipy, networkx, scikit-learn, scikit-image, and others). We present here the software architecture of the gala library, and discuss several designs that we consider would be generally useful for other segmentation packages. We also discuss the current limitations of the gala library and how we intend to address them. PMID:24772079

  2. Biological activities of selected basidiomycetes from Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Fatimi, M; Schröder, G; Kreisel, H; Lindequist, U

    2013-03-01

    In a previous paper we demonstrated the results of biological screening of Yemeni basidiomycetes. The present study was aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and the antioxidant activity of further basidiomycetes collected in Yemen. Dichloromethane, methanol and aqueous extracts of the fruiting bodies of 25 species were screened in vitro for their antibacterial activities against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphyloccocus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus flavus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), against six human fungal pathogens (Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor sp., Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes) and against one non human pathogenic fungus (Candida maltosa). The results indicated that 75 extracts exhibited activity against one or more of the bacteria. The methanol extracts of Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Chlorophyllum molybdites, Coriolopsis polyzona, Ganoderma xylonoides, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata showed activity against all tested bacteria. The highest antibacterial activity was exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Trametes cingulata and Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Coriolopsis polyzona, Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes lactinea. The methanol extracts of Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Pycnoporus sanguineus showed considerable antifungal activities against the tested fungal strains. Strong antioxidative effects employing the DPPH assay were exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides, Hexagonia velutina, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata. Our previous and presented studies about 48 basidiomycetes collected in Yemen provide evidence that basidiomycetes from the Arabic region so far should attract more attention as potential source for new biologically active

  3. Use of community-level data in the National Children’s Study to establish the representativeness of segment selection in the Queens Vanguard Site

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The WHO Multiple Exposures Multiple Effects (MEME) framework identifies community contextual variables as central to the study of childhood health. Here we identify multiple domains of neighborhood context, and key variables describing the dimensions of these domains, for use in the National Children’s Study (NCS) site in Queens. We test whether the neighborhoods selected for NCS recruitment, are representative of the whole of Queens County, and whether there is sufficient variability across neighborhoods for meaningful studies of contextual variables. Methods Nine domains (demographic, socioeconomic, households, birth rated, transit, playground/greenspace, safety and social disorder, land use, and pollution sources) and 53 indicator measures of the domains were identified. Geographic information systems were used to create community-level indicators for US Census tracts containing the 18 study neighborhoods in Queens selected for recruitment, using US Census, New York City Vital Statistics, and other sources of community-level information. Mean and inter-quartile range values for each indicator were compared for Tracts in recruitment and non-recruitment neighborhoods in Queens. Results Across the nine domains, except in a very few instances, the NCS segment-containing tracts (N = 43) were not statistically different from those 597 populated tracts in Queens not containing portions of NCS segments; variability in most indicators was comparable in tracts containing and not containing segments. Conclusions In a diverse urban setting, the NCS segment selection process succeeded in identifying recruitment areas that are, as a whole, representative of Queens County, for a broad range of community-level variables. PMID:22668454

  4. Antiprotease activity of selected Slovak medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Jedinak, A; Valachova, M; Maliar, T; Sturdik, E

    2010-02-01

    Fifty-six methanol extracts obtained from the barks, flowers, leaves and stems of 30 Slovak trees, bushes and herbs used in the traditional medicine of the Small Carpathians, Slovakia, have been screened for antiprotease (trypsin, thrombin and urokinase) activity using chromogenic bioassay. In this study, 14 extracts showed the strong inhibition activity to protease trypsin with IC50 values below 10 microg/mL. The highest inhibition activities were observed for methanol extracts of Acer platanoides IC50 = 1.8 microg/mL, Rhus typhina IC50 = 1.2 microg/mL and Tamarix gallica IC50 = 1.7 microg/mL. However, the results of extracts tested on thrombin were generally different from those observed for trypsin. The most marked inhibition activity to thrombin were estimated for extracts of Castanea sativa IC50 = 73.2 microg/mL, Larix decidua IC50 = 96.9 microg/mL and Rhus typhina IC50 = 20.5 microg/mL. In addition, Acer platanoides and Rhus typhina were the only extracts which showed inhibition activity to urokinase with IC50 = 171.1 microg/mL and IC50 = 38.3 microg/mL, respectively. In addition, Rhus typhina showed the broadest spectrum of inhibition activity to all tested serine proteases and seems to be a prospective new source of natural products as inhibitors of serine proteases.

  5. Concurrent multimodality image segmentation by active contours for radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    El Naqa, Issam; Yang Deshan; Apte, Aditya; Khullar, Divya; Mutic, Sasa; Zheng Jie; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Grigsby, Perry; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging information is regularly used now in radiotherapy treatment planning for cancer patients. The authors are investigating methods to take advantage of all the imaging information available for joint target registration and segmentation, including multimodality images or multiple image sets from the same modality. In particular, the authors have developed variational methods based on multivalued level set deformable models for simultaneous 2D or 3D segmentation of multimodality images consisting of combinations of coregistered PET, CT, or MR data sets. The combined information is integrated to define the overall biophysical structure volume. The authors demonstrate the methods on three patient data sets, including a nonsmall cell lung cancer case with PET/CT, a cervix cancer case with PET/CT, and a prostate patient case with CT and MRI. CT, PET, and MR phantom data were also used for quantitative validation of the proposed multimodality segmentation approach. The corresponding Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.90{+-}0.02 (p<0.0001) with an estimated target volume error of 1.28{+-}1.23% volume. Preliminary results indicate that concurrent multimodality segmentation methods can provide a feasible and accurate framework for combining imaging data from different modalities and are potentially useful tools for the delineation of biophysical structure volumes in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  6. Geodynamic significance of the TRM segment in the East African Rift: active tectonics and paleostress in western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, D.; Kervyn, F.; Macheyeki, A. S.; Temu, E. B.

    2012-04-01

    The Tanganyika-Rukwa-Malawi (TRM) rift segment in western Tanzania is a key sector for understanding the opening dynamics of the East African rift system (EARS). In an oblique opening model, it is considered as a dextral transfer fault zone that accommodates the general opening of the EARS in a NW-SE direction. In an orthogonal opening model, it accommodates pure dip-slip normal faulting with extension orthogonal to the rift segments and a general E-W extension for the entire EARS. We investigated the active tectonic architecture and paleostress evolution of the Ufipa plateau and adjacent Rukwa basin and in order to define their geodynamic role in the development of the EARS and highlight their pre-rift brittle tectonic history. The active fault architecture, fault-kinematic analysis and paleostress reconstruction show that the recent to active fault systems that control the rift structure develop in a pure extensional setting with extension direction orthogonal to the trend of the TRM segment. Two pre-rift brittle events are evidenced. An older brittle thrusting is related to the interaction between the Bangweulu block and the Tanzanian craton during the late Pan-African (early Paleozoic). It was followed by a transpressional inversion during the early Mesozoic. This inversion stage caused dextral strike-slip faulting along the fault systems that now control the major rift structures. It has been erroneously interpreted as related to the late Cenozoic EARS which instead is characterized by pure normal faulting.

  7. Automatic segmentation of head and neck CT images for radiotherapy treatment planning using multiple atlases, statistical appearance models, and geodesic active contours

    SciTech Connect

    Fritscher, Karl D. Sharp, Gregory; Peroni, Marta; Zaffino, Paolo; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Schubert, Rainer

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) is a precondition for intensity modulated radiation therapy. However, manual delineation of OARs is time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability. Because of image artifacts and low image contrast between different structures, however, the number of available approaches for autosegmentation of structures in the head-neck area is still rather low. In this project, a new approach for automated segmentation of head-neck CT images that combine the robustness of multiatlas-based segmentation with the flexibility of geodesic active contours and the prior knowledge provided by statistical appearance models is presented. Methods: The presented approach is using an atlas-based segmentation approach in combination with label fusion in order to initialize a segmentation pipeline that is based on using statistical appearance models and geodesic active contours. An anatomically correct approximation of the segmentation result provided by atlas-based segmentation acts as a starting point for an iterative refinement of this approximation. The final segmentation result is based on using model to image registration and geodesic active contours, which are mutually influencing each other. Results: 18 CT images in combination with manually segmented labels of parotid glands and brainstem were used in a leave-one-out cross validation scheme in order to evaluate the presented approach. For this purpose, 50 different statistical appearance models have been created and used for segmentation. Dice coefficient (DC), mean absolute distance and max. Hausdorff distance between the autosegmentation results and expert segmentations were calculated. An average Dice coefficient of DC = 0.81 (right parotid gland), DC = 0.84 (left parotid gland), and DC = 0.86 (brainstem) could be achieved. Conclusions: The presented framework provides accurate segmentation results for three important structures in the head neck area. Compared to a

  8. [The effect of selected tannery chemical compounds on selected bacteria of activated sludge].

    PubMed

    Mendrycka, M; Mierzejewski, J; Lidacki, A; Smiechowski, K

    2000-01-01

    Influence of tannery chemical compounds on the selected bacteria of the activated sludge was investigated. The chromium compounds must be diluted to 1:15-1:20 to loss its activity on the bacteria. Other compounds like: natrium chloratum, natrium formate and greased oils have any influence on the growth of the selected bacteria. PMID:11286092

  9. Age, Episodicity and Migration of Hydrothermal Activity within the Axial Valley, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Kelley, D. S.; Clague, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Tivey, M. K.; Delaney, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits record the history of high-temperature venting along the Endeavour Segment. Active venting is currently located within five discreet vent fields, with minor diffuse venting occurring between the fields. However, inactive and/or extinct sulfide structures are found throughout the entire axial valley of the ridge segment, suggesting that hydrothermal activity has been more vigorous in the past or focused venting has migrated with time. Here, we present age constraints from U-series dating of 44 sulfide samples collected by manned submersible from between the Mothra Field in the south to Sasquatch in the north. Samples are dated using 226Ra/Ba ratios from hydrothermal barite that precipitates along with the sulfide minerals. Most samples have been collected from within or near the active vent fields. Fifteen samples from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) show a spectrum of ages from present to 2,430 years old, indicating that this field has been continuously active for at least ~2,400 years. MEF appears to be oldest currently active field. This minimum value for the age of hydrothermal activity also provides a minimum age of the axial valley itself. Ages from thirteen samples from the High-Rise Field indicate continuous venting for at least the past ~1,250 years. These age data are used in conjunction with age constraints of the volcanic flows to develop an integrated volcanic, hydrothermal and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment. The total volume of hydrothermal sulfide within the axial valley, determined from high-resolution bathymetry, is used in conjunction with the age constraints of the sulfide material to determine the mass accumulation rates of sulfide along the Endeavour Segment. These data can be used to calibrate the efficiency of sulfide deposition from the hydrothermal vents, and provide a time-integrated history of heat, fluid and chemical fluxes at the ridge-segment scale. The comparison of time-integrated rates with

  10. Structure activity relationships of selected naphthalene derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Dumont, J.N.; Sankey, F.D.; Schmoyer, R.L. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-two derivatives of naphthalene were assayed under an acute static regime with biological activity being monitored as population growth of Tetrahymena pyriformis. Activity varied over one log unit. Substituent constant structure-activity analyses revealed the model, log BR = 0.282Ha + 0.352..pi.. + 0.692F + 0.334/sup 1/X/sub sub//sup v/ - 0.326R + 0.027, to be best and to account for 85% of the variation in log BR (BR, biological response; Ha, hydrogen acceptance; ..pi.., hydrophobic substituent constant; F, polar electronic substituent constant, /sup 1/X/sub sub//sup v/, substituent molar connectivity index; R, resonance electronic substituent constant). The Ha and ..pi.. parameters are the most important, accounting for 71% of the log BR variability. 21 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

  11. Selected Technology Lab Activities Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    These materials supplement state guides for junior high or middle school technology education programs. The materials show instructors how to implement 81 hours of new technology-related activities into existing programs. Introductory materials include a rationale, philosophy, and goals for technology education. Areas of instruction are as…

  12. Genetic analysis of in vivo-selected viral variants causing chronic infection: importance of mutation in the L RNA segment of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, R; Simon, R S; Matloubian, M; Kolhekar, S R; Southern, P J; Freedman, D M

    1988-01-01

    Viral variants with different biological properties are present in the central nervous systems (CNS) and lymphoid tissues of mice persistently infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Viral isolates from the CNS are similar to the original Armstrong LCMV strain and induce potent virus-specific T-cell responses in adult mice, and the infection is rapidly cleared. In contrast, LCMV isolates derived from spleens of carrier mice cause persistent infections in adult mice. This chronic infection is associated with low levels of antiviral T-cell responses. In this study, we genetically characterized two independently derived spleen variants by making recombinants (reassortants) between the spleen isolates and wild-type (wt) LCMV and showed that the ability to persist in adult mice and the associated suppression of T-cell responses segregates with the large (L) RNA segment. In addition, we analyzed a revertant (isolated from the CNS) derived from one of the spleen variants. By comparing the biological properties of three reassortants that contained the same S segment but had the L segment of either the original wt Armstrong LCMV, the spleen variant derived from it, or the CNS revertant derived from the spleen variant, we were able to show unequivocally that biologically relevant mutations occurred in the L segment not only during generation of the spleen variant from wt LCMV but also in reversion of the spleen variant to the wt phenotype. Thus, our results showed that (i) genetic alterations in the L genomic segment were involved in organ-specific selection of viral variants, and (ii) these mutations profoundly affected the ability of LCMV to cause chronic infections in adult mice. Images PMID:3261347

  13. A segmented multi-loop antenna for selective excitation of azimuthal mode number in a helicon plasma source.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, S; Tanikawa, T; Motomura, T

    2014-09-01

    A flat type, segmented multi-loop antenna was developed in the Tokai Helicon Device, built for producing high-density helicon plasma, with a diameter of 20 cm and an axial length of 100 cm. This antenna, composed of azimuthally splitting segments located on four different radial positions, i.e., r = 2.8, 4.8, 6.8, and 8.8 cm, can excite the azimuthal mode number m of 0, ±1, and ±2 by a proper choice of antenna feeder parts just on the rear side of the antenna. Power dependencies of the electron density ne were investigated with a radio frequency (rf) power less than 3 kW (excitation frequency ranged from 8 to 20 MHz) by the use of various types of antenna segments, and n(e) up to ~5 × 10(12) cm(-3) was obtained after the density jump from inductively coupled plasma to helicon discharges. Radial density profiles of m = 0 and ±1 modes with low and high rf powers were measured. For the cases of these modes after the density jump, the excited mode structures derived from the magnetic probe measurements were consistent with those expected from theory on helicon waves excited in the plasma. PMID:25273728

  14. A segmented multi-loop antenna for selective excitation of azimuthal mode number in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Motomura, T.

    2014-09-15

    A flat type, segmented multi-loop antenna was developed in the Tokai Helicon Device, built for producing high-density helicon plasma, with a diameter of 20 cm and an axial length of 100 cm. This antenna, composed of azimuthally splitting segments located on four different radial positions, i.e., r = 2.8, 4.8, 6.8, and 8.8 cm, can excite the azimuthal mode number m of 0, ±1, and ±2 by a proper choice of antenna feeder parts just on the rear side of the antenna. Power dependencies of the electron density n{sub e} were investigated with a radio frequency (rf) power less than 3 kW (excitation frequency ranged from 8 to 20 MHz) by the use of various types of antenna segments, and n{sub e} up to ∼5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} was obtained after the density jump from inductively coupled plasma to helicon discharges. Radial density profiles of m = 0 and ±1 modes with low and high rf powers were measured. For the cases of these modes after the density jump, the excited mode structures derived from the magnetic probe measurements were consistent with those expected from theory on helicon waves excited in the plasma.

  15. Highly active and highly selective aromatization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Santilli, D.S.; Long, J.J.; Lewis, R.T.

    1987-10-06

    This patent describes a reforming catalyst comprising an L zeolite containing platinum metal and at least one promoter metal selected from the group consisting of iron, cobalt, titanium, and rare earth metal. The catalyst has a platinum to promoter metal mole ratio of less than 10:1. The patent also includes a method of preparing the reforming catalyst of claim 1, comprising steps of: (a) forming an aqueous solution of alkali hydroxide, aluminum hydroxide, and ferric salt; (b) combining the solution with an aqueous solution of silica to form a thickening gel in a mother liquor; (c) heating the thickening gel to form an L zeolite; (d) cooling the gel containing the L zeolite; (e) decanting the mother liquor from the gel; (f) filtering the L zeolite from the gel; (g) washing the filtered L zeolite; (h) drying the washed L zeolite; (i) adding platinum to the dried L zeolite to form a catalyst; (j) drying the catalyst; and (k) calcining the dried catalyst.

  16. Anticancer activity of selected Colocasia gigantia fractions.

    PubMed

    Pornprasertpol, Apichai; Sereemaspun, Amornpun; Sooklert, Kanidta; Satirapipatkul, Chutimon; Sukrong, Suchada

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the anticancer potential of the extract of Colocasia gigantea C. gigantea), a plant member of the Araceae family. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of C. gigantea extract on cervical cancer (Hela) and human white blood cells (WBC) in vitro. The authors then identified the bioactive ingredients that demonstrated cytotoxicity on tested cells and evaluated those bioactive ingredients using the bioassay-guided fractionation method. The results showed that not all parts of C. gigantea promote cytotoxic activity. The dichloromethane leaf fraction showed significant cell proliferation effect on Hela cells, but not on WBCs. Only the n-hexane tuber fraction (Fr. 1T) exhibited significant cytotoxicity on Hela cells (IC50 = 585 μg/ml) and encouraged WBC cell proliferation. From GC-Mass spectrometry, 4,22-Stigmastadiene-3-one, Diazoprogesterone, 9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-, hexyl ester and Oleic Acid were the components of Fr 1T that demonstrated cytotoxic potential. In conclusion, C. gigantea's Fr 1T shows potential for cervical cancer treatment.

  17. Anticancer activity of selected Colocasia gigantia fractions.

    PubMed

    Pornprasertpol, Apichai; Sereemaspun, Amornpun; Sooklert, Kanidta; Satirapipatkul, Chutimon; Sukrong, Suchada

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the anticancer potential of the extract of Colocasia gigantea C. gigantea), a plant member of the Araceae family. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of C. gigantea extract on cervical cancer (Hela) and human white blood cells (WBC) in vitro. The authors then identified the bioactive ingredients that demonstrated cytotoxicity on tested cells and evaluated those bioactive ingredients using the bioassay-guided fractionation method. The results showed that not all parts of C. gigantea promote cytotoxic activity. The dichloromethane leaf fraction showed significant cell proliferation effect on Hela cells, but not on WBCs. Only the n-hexane tuber fraction (Fr. 1T) exhibited significant cytotoxicity on Hela cells (IC50 = 585 μg/ml) and encouraged WBC cell proliferation. From GC-Mass spectrometry, 4,22-Stigmastadiene-3-one, Diazoprogesterone, 9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-, hexyl ester and Oleic Acid were the components of Fr 1T that demonstrated cytotoxic potential. In conclusion, C. gigantea's Fr 1T shows potential for cervical cancer treatment. PMID:25764620

  18. Selected demonstration and educational products/activities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.J.; Mann, H.C.

    1992-07-01

    The information in this paper was assembled for several informal presentations to a variety of visitor groups during the summer of 1992. A number of staff members at TVA`s National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) found it useful as a quick overview for their use and for their sharing with external colleagues and customers. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive list or explanation of all products and services available from NFERC. However, the authors believe it will give a flavor and tenor of some of the ongoing activities of the Center, especially those activities relating to the retail fertilizer dealer. Programs over the years have focused on key aspects of nutrient efficiency and management. TVA is uniquely positioned to assist the fertilizer industry and US agriculture in protecting the environment from potential adverse environmental impacts of agriculture, especially for fertilizer and the attendant agrichemicals. TVA has the technical base and an ongoing working relationship with the fertilizer industry in technology development and introduction. Dealer education is very important in TVA programs in two aspects: (1) education for the dealer in meeting new environmental stewardship challenges from an operational perspective; and (2) education for the dealer in meeting the site-specific information needs of the farmer.

  19. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P. M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. The Lucky Strike segment hosts three active hydrothermal fields: Capelinhos, Ewan, and the known Main Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field (MLSHF). Capelinhos is located 1.3 km E of the axis and the MLSHF, and consists of a ~20 m sulfide mound with black smoker vents. Ewan is located ~1.8 km south from the MLSHF along the axial graben, and displays only diffuse flow along and around scarps of collapse structures associated with fault scarps. At the MLSHF we have identified an inactive site, thus broadening the extent of this field. Heat flux estimates from these new sites are relatively low and correspond to ~10% of the heat flux estimated for the Main field, with an integrated heatflux of 200-1200 MW. Overall, most of the flux (up to 80-90%) is associated with diffuse outflow, with the Ewan site showing solely diffuse flow and Capelinhos mostly focused flow. Microbathymetry also reveals a large, off-axis (~2.4 km) hydrothermal field, similar to the TAG mound in size, on the flanks of a rifted volcano. The association of these fields to a central volcano, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the ridge segment, suggest that sustained hydrothermal activity is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build central volcanoes. Hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust exploits permeable fault zones. Central volcanoes are thus associated with long-lived hydrothermal activity, and these sites may play a major role in the distribution and biogeography of vent communities.

  20. The Use of Attitude Segmentation in Selecting Market Targets and Choosing a New Product Name: Application to an Automated Teller System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauldin, Charles R.; And Others

    Ninety-six subjects were randomly chosen from 386 bank customers who responded to a questionnaire using subjective variables to segment or label respondents. A review of subjective segmentation studies revealed that the studies can be divided into three approaches--benefit segmentation, attitude segmentation, and life style segmentation. Choosing…

  1. A weighted mean shift, normalized cuts initialized color gradient based geodesic active contour model: applications to histopathology image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Janowczyk, Andrew; Chandran, Sharat; Madabhushi, Anant

    2010-03-01

    While geodesic active contours (GAC) have become very popular tools for image segmentation, they are sensitive to model initialization. In order to get an accurate segmentation, the model typically needs to be initialized very close to the true object boundary. Apart from accuracy, automated initialization of the objects of interest is an important pre-requisite to being able to run the active contour model on very large images (such as those found in digitized histopathology). A second limitation of GAC model is that the edge detector function is based on gray scale gradients; color images typically being converted to gray scale prior to computing the gradient. For color images, however, the gray scale gradient results in broken edges and weak boundaries, since the other channels are not exploited for the gradient determination. In this paper we present a new geodesic active contour model that is driven by an accurate and rapid object initialization scheme-weighted mean shift normalized cuts (WNCut). WNCut draws its strength from the integration of two powerful segmentation strategies-mean shift clustering and normalized cuts. WNCut involves first defining a color swatch (typically a few pixels) from the object of interest. A multi-scale mean shift coupled normalized cuts algorithm then rapidly yields an initial accurate detection of all objects in the scene corresponding to the colors in the swatch. This detection result provides the initial boundary for GAC model. The edge-detector function of the GAC model employs a local structure tensor based color gradient, obtained by calculating the local min/max variations contributed from each color channel (e.g. R,G,B or H,S,V). Our color gradient based edge-detector function results in more prominent boundaries compared to classical gray scale gradient based function. We evaluate segmentation results of our new WNCut initialized color gradient based GAC (WNCut-CGAC) model against a popular region-based model (Chan

  2. COMPARISON OF RANDOM AND SYSTEMATIC SITE SELECTION FOR ASSESSING ATTAINMENT OF AQUATIC LIFE USES IN SEGMENTS OF THE OHIO RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a description of field work and data analysis results comparing a design comparable to systematic site selection with one based on random selection of sites. The report is expected to validate the use of random site selection in the bioassessment program for the O...

  3. Silica dust exposures during selected construction activities.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Mary Ellen; Seixas, Noah; Majar, Maria; Camp, Janice; Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This study characterized exposure for dust-producing construction tasks. Eight common construction tasks were evaluated for quartz and respirable dust exposure by collecting 113 personal task period samples for cleanup; demolition with handheld tools; concrete cutting; concrete mixing; tuck-point grinding; surface grinding; sacking and patching concrete; and concrete floor sanding using both time-integrating filter samples and direct-reading respirable dust monitors. The geometric mean quartz concentration was 0.10 mg/m(3) (geometric standard deviation [GSD]=4.88) for all run time samples, with 71% exceeding the threshold limit value. Activities with the highest exposures were surface grinding, tuck-point grinding, and concrete demolition (GM[GSD] of 0.63[4.12], 0.22[1.94], and 0.10[2.60], respectively). Factors recorded each minute were task, tool, work area, respiratory protection and controls used, estimated cross draft, and whether anyone nearby was making dust. Factors important to exposure included tool used, work area configuration, controls employed, cross draft, and in some cases nearby dust. More protective respirators were employed as quartz concentration increased, although respiratory protection was found to be inadequate for 42% of exposures. Controls were employed for only 12% of samples. Exposures were reduced with three controls: box fan for surface grinding and floor sanding, and vacuum/shroud for surface grinding, with reductions of 57, 50, and 71%, respectively. Exposures were higher for sweeping compound, box fan for cleanup, ducted fan dilution, and wetted substrate. Construction masons and laborers are frequently overexposed to silica. The usual protection method, respirators, was not always adequate, and engineering control use was infrequent and often ineffective.

  4. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P.-M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment, to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. We have identified a new on-axis site with diffuse flow, Ewan, and an active vent structure ∼1.2 km from the axis, Capelinhos. These sites are minor relative to the Main field, and our total heatflux estimate for all active sites (200-1200 MW) is only slightly higher than previously published estimates. We also identify fossil sites W of the main Lucky Strike field. A circular feature ∼200 m in diameter located on the flanks of a rifted off-axis central volcano is likely a large and inactive hydrothermal edifice, named Grunnus. We find no indicator of focused hydrothermal activity elsewhere along the segment, suggesting that the enhanced melt supply and the associated melt lenses, required to form central volcanoes, also sustain hydrothermal circulation to form and maintain large and long-lived hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal discharge to the seafloor occurs along fault traces, suggesting focusing of hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust along permeable fault zones.

  5. Selective neuronal staining in tardigrades and onychophorans provides insights into the evolution of segmental ganglia in panarthropods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although molecular analyses have contributed to a better resolution of the animal tree of life, the phylogenetic position of tardigrades (water bears) is still controversial, as they have been united alternatively with nematodes, arthropods, onychophorans (velvet worms), or onychophorans plus arthropods. Depending on the hypothesis favoured, segmental ganglia in tardigrades and arthropods might either have evolved independently, or they might well be homologous, suggesting that they were either lost in onychophorans or are a synapomorphy of tardigrades and arthropods. To evaluate these alternatives, we analysed the organisation of the nervous system in three tardigrade species using antisera directed against tyrosinated and acetylated tubulin, the amine transmitter serotonin, and the invertebrate neuropeptides FMRFamide, allatostatin and perisulfakinin. In addition, we performed retrograde staining of nerves in the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli in order to compare the serial locations of motor neurons within the nervous system relative to the appendages they serve in arthropods, tardigrades and onychophorans. Results Contrary to a previous report from a Macrobiotus species, our immunocytochemical and electron microscopic data revealed contralateral fibres and bundles of neurites in each trunk ganglion of three tardigrade species, including Macrobiotus cf. harmsworthi, Paramacrobiotus richtersi and Hypsibius dujardini. Moreover, we identified additional, extra-ganglionic commissures in the interpedal regions bridging the paired longitudinal connectives. Within the ganglia we found serially repeated sets of serotonin- and RFamid-like immunoreactive neurons. Furthermore, our data show that the trunk ganglia of tardigrades, which include the somata of motor neurons, are shifted anteriorly with respect to each corresponding leg pair, whereas no such shift is evident in the arrangement of motor neurons in the onychophoran nerve cords. Conclusions Taken

  6. Overlapping cell nuclei segmentation using a spatially adaptive active physical model.

    PubMed

    Plissiti, Marina E; Nikou, Christophoros

    2012-11-01

    A method for the segmentation of overlapping nuclei is presented, which combines local characteristics of the nuclei boundary and a priori knowledge about the expected shape of the nuclei. A deformable model whose behavior is driven by physical principles is trained on images containing a single nuclei, and attributes of the shapes of the nuclei are expressed in terms of modal analysis. Based on the estimated modal distribution and driven by the image characteristics, we develop a framework to detect and describe the unknown nuclei boundaries in images containing two overlapping nuclei. The problem of the estimation of an accurate nucleus boundary in the overlapping areas is successfully addressed with the use of appropriate weight parameters that control the contribution of the image force in the total energy of the deformable model. The proposed method was evaluated using 152 images of conventional Pap smears, each containing two overlapping nuclei. Comparisons with other segmentation methods indicate that our method produces more accurate nuclei boundaries which are closer to the ground truth.

  7. Reconstruction of the activity of point sources for the accurate characterization of nuclear waste drums by segmented gamma scanning.

    PubMed

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This work improves the reliability and accuracy in the reconstruction of the total isotope activity content in heterogeneous nuclear waste drums containing point sources. The method is based on χ(2)-fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution measured during a drum rotation in segmented gamma scanning. A new description of the analytical calculation of the angular count rate distribution is introduced based on a more precise model of the collimated detector. The new description is validated and compared to the old description using MCNP5 simulations of angular dependent count rate distributions of Co-60 and Cs-137 point sources. It is shown that the new model describes the angular dependent count rate distribution significantly more accurate compared to the old model. Hence, the reconstruction of the activity is more accurate and the errors are considerably reduced that lead to more reliable results. Furthermore, the results are compared to the conventional reconstruction method assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution.

  8. Automated compromised right lung segmentation method using a robust atlas-based active volume model with sparse shape composition prior in CT.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinghao; Yan, Zhennan; Lasio, Giovanni; Huang, Junzhou; Zhang, Baoshe; Sharma, Navesh; Prado, Karl; D'Souza, Warren

    2015-12-01

    To resolve challenges in image segmentation in oncologic patients with severely compromised lung, we propose an automated right lung segmentation framework that uses a robust, atlas-based active volume model with a sparse shape composition prior. The robust atlas is achieved by combining the atlas with the output of sparse shape composition. Thoracic computed tomography images (n=38) from patients with lung tumors were collected. The right lung in each scan was manually segmented to build a reference training dataset against which the performance of the automated segmentation method was assessed. The quantitative results of this proposed segmentation method with sparse shape composition achieved mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of (0.72, 0.81) with 95% CI, mean accuracy (ACC) of (0.97, 0.98) with 95% CI, and mean relative error (RE) of (0.46, 0.74) with 95% CI. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons suggest that this proposed method can achieve better segmentation accuracy with less variance than other atlas-based segmentation methods in the compromised lung segmentation.

  9. β-Arrestin-Dependent Dopaminergic Regulation of Calcium Channel Activity in the Axon Initial Segment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungchil; Ben-Shalom, Roy; Ahn, Misol; Liptak, Alayna T; van Rijn, Richard M; Whistler, Jennifer L; Bender, Kevin J

    2016-08-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiate a variety of signaling cascades, depending on effector coupling. β-arrestins, which were initially characterized by their ability to "arrest" GPCR signaling by uncoupling receptor and G protein, have recently emerged as important signaling effectors for GPCRs. β-arrestins engage signaling pathways that are distinct from those mediated by G protein. As such, arrestin-dependent signaling can play a unique role in regulating cell function, but whether neuromodulatory GPCRs utilize β-arrestin-dependent signaling to regulate neuronal excitability remains unclear. Here, we find that D3 dopamine receptors (D3R) regulate axon initial segment (AIS) excitability through β-arrestin-dependent signaling, modifying CaV3 voltage dependence to suppress high-frequency action potential generation. This non-canonical D3R signaling thereby gates AIS excitability via pathways distinct from classical GPCR signaling pathways.

  10. New Region-Scalable Discriminant and Fitting Energy Functional for Driving Geometric Active Contours in Medical Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel region-based geometric active contour model that uses region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional for handling the intensity inhomogeneity and weak boundary problems in medical image segmentation. The region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional is defined to capture the image intensity characteristics in local and global regions for driving the evolution of active contour. The discriminant term in the model aims at separating background and foreground in scalable regions while the fitting term tends to fit the intensity in these regions. This model is then transformed into a variational level set formulation with a level set regularization term for accurate computation. The new model utilizes intensity information in the local and global regions as much as possible; so it not only handles better intensity inhomogeneity, but also allows more robustness to noise and more flexible initialization in comparison to the original global region and regional-scalable based models. Experimental results for synthetic and real medical image segmentation show the advantages of the proposed method in terms of accuracy and robustness. PMID:25110513

  11. Advances in selective activation of muscles for non-invasive motor neuroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Koutsou, Aikaterini D; Moreno, Juan C; Del Ama, Antonio J; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, José L

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive neuroprosthetic (NP) technologies for movement compensation and rehabilitation remain with challenges for their clinical application. Two of those major challenges are selective activation of muscles and fatigue management. This review discusses how electrode arrays improve the efficiency and selectivity of functional electrical stimulation (FES) applied via transcutaneous electrodes. In this paper we review the principles and achievements during the last decade on techniques for artificial motor unit recruitment to improve the selective activation of muscles. We review the key factors affecting the outcome of muscle force production via multi-pad transcutaneous electrical stimulation and discuss how stimulation parameters can be set to optimize external activation of body segments. A detailed review of existing electrode array systems proposed by different research teams is also provided. Furthermore, a review of the targeted applications of existing electrode arrays for control of upper and lower limb NPs is provided. Eventually, last section demonstrates the potential of electrode arrays to overcome the major challenges of NPs for compensation and rehabilitation of patient-specific impairments. PMID:27296478

  12. Advances in selective activation of muscles for non-invasive motor neuroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Koutsou, Aikaterini D; Moreno, Juan C; Del Ama, Antonio J; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, José L

    2016-06-13

    Non-invasive neuroprosthetic (NP) technologies for movement compensation and rehabilitation remain with challenges for their clinical application. Two of those major challenges are selective activation of muscles and fatigue management. This review discusses how electrode arrays improve the efficiency and selectivity of functional electrical stimulation (FES) applied via transcutaneous electrodes. In this paper we review the principles and achievements during the last decade on techniques for artificial motor unit recruitment to improve the selective activation of muscles. We review the key factors affecting the outcome of muscle force production via multi-pad transcutaneous electrical stimulation and discuss how stimulation parameters can be set to optimize external activation of body segments. A detailed review of existing electrode array systems proposed by different research teams is also provided. Furthermore, a review of the targeted applications of existing electrode arrays for control of upper and lower limb NPs is provided. Eventually, last section demonstrates the potential of electrode arrays to overcome the major challenges of NPs for compensation and rehabilitation of patient-specific impairments.

  13. Genome segment 6 of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus encodes a structural protein with ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chavali, Venkata R.M.; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Ghorai, Suvankar; Roy, Sobhan; Das, Amit K.; Ghosh, Ananta K.

    2008-07-20

    The genome segment 6 (S6) of the 11 double stranded RNA genomes from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus was converted into cDNA, cloned and sequenced. S6 consisted of 1944 nucleotides with an ORF of 607 amino acids and could encode a protein of 68 kDa, termed P68. Motif scan and molecular docking analysis of P68 showed the presence of two cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) domains and ATP binding sites. The ORF of AmCPV S6 was expressed in E. coli as His-tag fusion protein and polyclonal antibody was raised. Immunoblot analysis of virus infected gut cells and purified polyhedra using raised anti-p68 polyclonal antibody showed that S6 encodes a viral structural protein. Fluorescence and ATPase assay of soluble P68 produced in Sf-9 cells via baculovirus expression system showed its ability to bind and cleave ATP. These results suggest that P68 may bind viral RNA through CBS domains and help in replication and transcription through ATP binding and hydrolysis.

  14. Multi-segmented piezoelectric mirrors as active/adaptive optics components.

    PubMed

    Signorato, R; Hignette, O; Goulon, J

    1998-05-01

    The angular acceptance of piezoelectric (Pzt) bimorph mirrors is limited by the maximum length of commercially available Pzt ceramic plates. To overcome this limit and manufacture longer devices, several (2n + 1) 150 mm-long bimorph Pzt stacks were assembled side-to-side. Two prototype mirrors, 450 (n = 1) and 750 (n = 2) mm long, were designed, assembled, polished and optically characterized. They are fully UHV compatible and are now installed in the monochromatic section of the ESRF beamlines ID26 and ID32. Both mirrors cover the full range of required bending radii (1 km concave-3.5 km convex). Junctions between segments do not spoil the optical surface quality. The surface slope error r.m.s. can be kept well below 1 arcsec over the full bending range. Adaptive compensation for low-frequency figure errors was shown to be easy and reliable. After compensation, residual shape errors are of the order of 40 nm r.m.s. over 700 mm. PMID:15263657

  15. Active control of adaptive optics system in a large segmented mirror telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, M.; Agrawal, B. N.

    2014-02-01

    For a large adaptive optics system such as a large segmented mirror telescope (SMT), it is often difficult, although not impossible, to directly apply common multi-input multi-output (MIMO) controller design methods due to the computational burden imposed by the large dimension of the system model. In this article, a practical controller design method is proposed which significantly reduces the system dimension for a system where the dimension required to represent the dynamics of the plant is much smaller than the dimension of the full plant model. The proposed method decouples the dynamic and static parts of the plant model by a modal decomposition technique to separately design a controller for each part. Two controllers are then combined using the so-called sensitivity decoupling method so that the resulting feedback loop becomes the superposition of the two individual feedback loops of the dynamic and static parts. A MIMO controller was designed by the proposed method using the H ∞ loop-shaping technique for an SMT model to be compared with other controllers proposed in the literature. Frequency-domain analysis and time-domain simulation results show the superior performance of the proposed controller.

  16. Transient and selective suppression of neural activity with infrared light

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Austin R.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2013-01-01

    Analysis and control of neural circuitry requires the ability to selectively activate or inhibit neurons. Previous work showed that infrared laser light selectively excited neural activity in endogenous unmyelinated and myelinated axons. However, inhibition of neuronal firing with infrared light was only observed in limited cases, is not well understood and was not precisely controlled. Using an experimentally tractable unmyelinated preparation for detailed investigation and a myelinated preparation for validation, we report that it is possible to selectively and transiently inhibit electrically-initiated axonal activation, as well as to both block or enhance the propagation of action potentials of specific motor neurons. Thus, in addition to previously shown excitation, we demonstrate an optical method of suppressing components of the nervous system with functional spatiotemporal precision. We believe this technique is well-suited for non-invasive investigations of diverse excitable tissues and may ultimately be applied for treating neurological disorders. PMID:24009039

  17. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: I -- Mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M.; Prakash, T.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Heteroflocculation has been determined to be another major reason for loss in selectivity for flocculation process. In a mathematical model developed earlier, conditions for controlling heteroflocculation were discussed. Blocking active sites to control selective adsorption of a flocculant oil a desirable solid surface is discussed. It has been demonstrated that the lower molecular weight fraction of a flocculant which is incapable of flocculating the particles is an efficient site blocking agent. The major application of selective flocculation has been in mineral processing but many potential uses exist in biological and other colloidal systems. These include purification of ceramic powders, separating hazardous solids from chemical waste, and removal of deleterious components from paper pulp.

  18. Thinking Outside the Box: Rectilinear Shapes Selectively Activate Scene-Selective Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Echavarria, Cesar E.; Tootell, Roger B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, an intriguing area was found in human visual cortex. This area (the parahippocampal place area [PPA]) was initially interpreted as responding selectively to images of places. However, subsequent studies reported that PPA also responds strongly to a much wider range of image categories, including inanimate objects, tools, spatial context, landmarks, objectively large objects, indoor scenes, and/or isolated buildings. Here, we hypothesized that PPA responds selectively to a lower-level stimulus property (rectilinear features), which are common to many of the above higher-order categories. Using a novel wavelet image filter, we first demonstrated that rectangular features are common in these diverse stimulus categories. Then we tested whether PPA is selectively activated by rectangular features in six independent fMRI experiments using progressively simplified stimuli, from complex real-world images, through 3D/2D computer-generated shapes, through simple line stimuli. We found that PPA was consistently activated by rectilinear features, compared with curved and nonrectangular features. This rectilinear preference was (1) comparable in amplitude and selectivity, relative to the preference for category (scenes vs faces), (2) independent of known biases for specific orientations and spatial frequency, and (3) not predictable from V1 activity. Two additional scene-responsive areas were sensitive to a subset of rectilinear features. Thus, rectilinear selectivity may serve as a crucial building block for category-selective responses in PPA and functionally related areas. PMID:24828628

  19. An Efficient Correction Algorithm for Eliminating Image Misalignment Effects on Co-Phasing Measurement Accuracy for Segmented Active Optics Systems.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dan; Xu, Shuyan; Nie, Haitao; Wang, Zongyang

    2016-01-01

    The misalignment between recorded in-focus and out-of-focus images using the Phase Diversity (PD) algorithm leads to a dramatic decline in wavefront detection accuracy and image recovery quality for segmented active optics systems. This paper demonstrates the theoretical relationship between the image misalignment and tip-tilt terms in Zernike polynomials of the wavefront phase for the first time, and an efficient two-step alignment correction algorithm is proposed to eliminate these misalignment effects. This algorithm processes a spatial 2-D cross-correlation of the misaligned images, revising the offset to 1 or 2 pixels and narrowing the search range for alignment. Then, it eliminates the need for subpixel fine alignment to achieve adaptive correction by adding additional tip-tilt terms to the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) of the out-of-focus channel. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed correction algorithm to improve the measurement accuracy during the co-phasing of segmented mirrors. With this alignment correction, the reconstructed wavefront is more accurate, and the recovered image is of higher quality.

  20. An Efficient Correction Algorithm for Eliminating Image Misalignment Effects on Co-Phasing Measurement Accuracy for Segmented Active Optics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Dan; Xu, Shuyan; Nie, Haitao; Wang, Zongyang

    2016-01-01

    The misalignment between recorded in-focus and out-of-focus images using the Phase Diversity (PD) algorithm leads to a dramatic decline in wavefront detection accuracy and image recovery quality for segmented active optics systems. This paper demonstrates the theoretical relationship between the image misalignment and tip-tilt terms in Zernike polynomials of the wavefront phase for the first time, and an efficient two-step alignment correction algorithm is proposed to eliminate these misalignment effects. This algorithm processes a spatial 2-D cross-correlation of the misaligned images, revising the offset to 1 or 2 pixels and narrowing the search range for alignment. Then, it eliminates the need for subpixel fine alignment to achieve adaptive correction by adding additional tip-tilt terms to the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) of the out-of-focus channel. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed correction algorithm to improve the measurement accuracy during the co-phasing of segmented mirrors. With this alignment correction, the reconstructed wavefront is more accurate, and the recovered image is of higher quality. PMID:26934045

  1. Selective Activation of Striatal Fast Spiking Interneurons during Choice Execution

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Gregory J.; Stoetzner, Colin R.; Wiltschko, Alexander B.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2010-01-01

    Basal ganglia circuits are essential for the organization and execution of voluntary actions. Within the striatum, fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) are thought to tightly regulate the activity of medium-spiny projection neurons (MSNs) through feed-forward inhibition, yet few studies have investigated the functional contributions of FSIs in behaving animals. We recorded presumed MSNs and FSIs together with motor cortex and globus pallidus (GP) neurons, in rats performing a simple choice task. MSN activity was widely distributed across the task sequence, especially near reward receipt. By contrast, FSIs showed a coordinated pulse of increased activity as chosen actions were initiated, in conjunction with a sharp decrease in GP activity. Both MSNs and FSIs were direction-selective, but neighboring MSNs and FSIs showed opposite selectivity. Our findings suggest that individual FSIs participate in local striatal information processing, but more global disinhibition of FSIs by GP is important for initiating chosen actions while suppressing unwanted alternatives. PMID:20696383

  2. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  3. Group II-activated lumbosacral interneurones with an ascending projection to midlumbar segments of the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, P J; Riddell, J S

    1989-01-01

    1. In anaesthetized cats, single-unit microelectrode recordings were made in the lateral funiculus at L6, from the axons of lumbosacral interneurones discharged by hindlimb group II muscle afferents. 2. The level of the ascending projection of these interneurones was investigated by antidromic activation of their axons in the lateral funiculus from different spinal levels. The majority of units encountered were found to have an ascending projection to at least the L4 level and, of these, most (85%) did not project beyond the L4 or L3 segments of the cord. 3. The axons studied were discharged by group II afferents primarily from knee extensor muscles. Some units were discharged in addition by cutaneous and/or joint afferents. 4. The implications of this ascending projection are discussed. PMID:2778739

  4. Active contours driven by local and global intensity fitting energy with application to brain MR image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Chunming; Sun, Quansen; Xia, Deshen; Kao, Chiu-Yen

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we propose an improved region-based active contour model in a variational level set formulation. We define an energy functional with a local intensity fitting term, which induces a local force to attract the contour and stops it at object boundaries, and an auxiliary global intensity fitting term, which drives the motion of the contour far away from object boundaries. Therefore, the combination of these two forces allows for flexible initialization of the contours. This energy is then incorporated into a level set formulation with a level set regularization term that is necessary for accurate computation in the corresponding level set method. The proposed model is first presented as a two-phase level set formulation and then extended to a multi-phase formulation. Experimental results show the advantages of our method in terms of accuracy and robustness. In particular, our method has been applied to brain MR image segmentation with desirable results.

  5. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  6. An automated approach for segmentation of intravascular ultrasound images based on parametric active contour models.

    PubMed

    Vard, Alireza; Jamshidi, Kamal; Movahhedinia, Naser

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a fully automated approach to detect the intima and media-adventitia borders in intravascular ultrasound images based on parametric active contour models. To detect the intima border, we compute a new image feature applying a combination of short-term autocorrelations calculated for the contour pixels. These feature values are employed to define an energy function of the active contour called normalized cumulative short-term autocorrelation. Exploiting this energy function, the intima border is separated accurately from the blood region contaminated by high speckle noise. To extract media-adventitia boundary, we define a new form of energy function based on edge, texture and spring forces for the active contour. Utilizing this active contour, the media-adventitia border is identified correctly even in presence of branch openings and calcifications. Experimental results indicate accuracy of the proposed methods. In addition, statistical analysis demonstrates high conformity between manual tracing and the results obtained by the proposed approaches.

  7. A segment of gamma ENaC mediates elastase activation of Na+ transport.

    PubMed

    Adebamiro, Adedotun; Cheng, Yi; Rao, U Subrahmanyeswara; Danahay, Henry; Bridges, Robert J

    2007-12-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) that mediates regulated Na(+) reabsorption by epithelial cells in the kidney and lungs can be activated by endogenous proteases such as channel activating protease 1 and exogenous proteases such as trypsin and neutrophil elastase (NE). The mechanism by which exogenous proteases activate the channel is unknown. To test the hypothesis that residues on ENaC mediate protease-dependent channel activation wild-type and mutant ENaC were stably expressed in the FRT epithelial cell line using a tripromoter human ENaC construct, and protease-induced short-circuit current activation was measured in aprotinin-treated cells. The amiloride-sensitive short circuit current (I(Na)) was stimulated by aldosterone (1.5-fold) and dexamethasone (8-fold). Dexamethasone-treated cells were used for all subsequent studies. The serum protease inhibitor aprotinin decreased baseline I(Na) by approximately 50% and I(Na) could be restored to baseline control values by the exogenous addition of trypsin, NE, and porcine pancreatic elastase (PE) but not by thrombin. All protease experiments were thus performed after exposure to aprotinin. Because NE recognition of substrates occurs with a preference for binding valines at the active site, several valines in the extracellular loops of alpha and gamma ENaC were sequentially substituted with glycines. This scan yielded two valine residues in gamma ENaC at positions 182 and 193 that resulted in inhibited responses to NE when simultaneously changed to other amino acids. The mutations resulted in decreased rates of activation and decreased activated steady-state current levels. There was an approximately 20-fold difference in activation efficiency of NE against wild-type ENaC compared to a mutant with glycine substitutions at positions 182 and 193. However, the mutants remain susceptible to activation by trypsin and the related elastase, PE. Alanine is the preferred P(1) position residue for PE and substitution of

  8. Objectively measured physical activity in four-year-old British children: a cross-sectional analysis of activity patterns segmented across the day

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about preschool-aged children’s levels of physical activity (PA) over the course of the day. Using time-stamped data, we describe the levels and patterns of PA in a population-based sample of four-year-old British children. Methods Within the Southampton Women’s Survey the PA levels of 593 4-year-old children (51% female) were measured using (Actiheart) accelerometry for up to 7 days. Three outcome measures: minutes spent sedentary (<20 cpm); in light (LPA: ≥20 – 399 cpm) and in moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA: ≥400 cpm) were derived. Average daily activity levels were calculated and then segmented across the day (morning, afternoon and evening). MVPA was log-transformed. Two-level random intercept models were used to analyse associations between activity level and temporal and demographic factors. Results Children were active for 67% (mean 568.5 SD 79.5 minutes) of their daily registered time on average, with 88% of active time spent in LPA. All children met current UK guidelines of 180 minutes of daily activity. There were no differences in children’s average daily levels of sedentary activity and LPA by temporal and demographic factors: differences did emerge when activity was segmented across the day. Sex differences were largest in the morning, with girls being more sedentary, spending fewer minutes in LPA and 18% less time in MVPA than boys. Children were more sedentary and less active (LPA and MVPA) in the morning if they attended childcare full-time compared to part-time, and on weekend mornings compared to weekdays. The reverse was true for weekend afternoons and evenings. Children with more educated mothers were less active in the evenings. Children were less sedentary and did more MVPA on summer evenings compared to winter evenings. Conclusions Preschool-aged children meet current physical activity guidelines, but with the majority of their active time spent in LPA, investigation of the importance of activity

  9. Mitochondrial Nitroreductase Activity Enables Selective Imaging and Therapeutic Targeting.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Zhang, Yanmin; Khdour, Omar M; Kaye, Justin B; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-09-21

    Nitroreductase (NTR) activities have been known for decades, studied extensively in bacteria and also in systems as diverse as yeast, trypanosomes, and hypoxic tumors. The putative bacterial origin of mitochondria prompted us to explore the possible existence of NTR activity within this organelle and to probe its behavior in a cellular context. Presently, by using a profluorescent near-infrared (NIR) dye, we characterize the nature of NTR activity localized in mammalian cell mitochondria. Further, we demonstrate that this mitochondrially localized enzymatic activity can be exploited both for selective NIR imaging of mitochondria and for mitochondrial targeting by activating a mitochondrial poison specifically within that organelle. This constitutes a new mechanism for mitochondrial imaging and targeting. These findings represent the first use of mitochondrial enzyme activity to unmask agents for mitochondrial fluorescent imaging and therapy, which may prove to be more broadly applicable.

  10. pSnakes: a new radial active contour model and its application in the segmentation of the left ventricle from echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    de Alexandria, Auzuir Ripardo; Cortez, Paulo César; Bessa, Jessyca Almeida; da Silva Félix, John Hebert; de Abreu, José Sebastião; de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C

    2014-10-01

    Active contours are image segmentation methods that minimize the total energy of the contour to be segmented. Among the active contour methods, the radial methods have lower computational complexity and can be applied in real time. This work aims to present a new radial active contour technique, called pSnakes, using the 1D Hilbert transform as external energy. The pSnakes method is based on the fact that the beams in ultrasound equipment diverge from a single point of the probe, thus enabling the use of polar coordinates in the segmentation. The control points or nodes of the active contour are obtained in pairs and are called twin nodes. The internal energies as well as the external one, Hilbertian energy, are redefined. The results showed that pSnakes can be used in image segmentation of short-axis echocardiogram images and that they were effective in image segmentation of the left ventricle. The echo-cardiologist's golden standard showed that the pSnakes was the best method when compared with other methods. The main contributions of this work are the use of pSnakes and Hilbertian energy, as the external energy, in image segmentation. The Hilbertian energy is calculated by the 1D Hilbert transform. Compared with traditional methods, the pSnakes method is more suitable for ultrasound images because it is not affected by variations in image contrast, such as noise. The experimental results obtained by the left ventricle segmentation of echocardiographic images demonstrated the advantages of the proposed model. The results presented in this paper are justified due to an improved performance of the Hilbert energy in the presence of speckle noise.

  11. Automatic segmentation of cell nuclei in Feulgen-stained histological sections of prostate cancer and quantitative evaluation of segmentation results.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Birgitte; Albregtsen, Fritz; Danielsen, Håvard E

    2012-07-01

    Digital image analysis of cell nuclei is useful to obtain quantitative information for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. However, the lack of a reliable automatic nuclear segmentation is a limiting factor for high-throughput nuclear image analysis. We have developed a method for automatic segmentation of nuclei in Feulgen-stained histological sections of prostate cancer. A local adaptive thresholding with an object perimeter gradient verification step detected the nuclei and was combined with an active contour model that featured an optimized initialization and worked within a restricted region to improve convergence of the segmentation of each nucleus. The method was tested on 30 randomly selected image frames from three cases, comparing the results from the automatic algorithm to a manual delineation of 924 nuclei. The automatic method segmented a few more nuclei compared to the manual method, and about 73% of the manually segmented nuclei were also segmented by the automatic method. For each nucleus segmented both manually and automatically, the accuracy (i.e., agreement with manual delineation) was estimated. The mean segmentation sensitivity/specificity were 95%/96%. The results from the automatic method were not significantly different from the ground truth provided by manual segmentation. This opens the possibility for large-scale nuclear analysis based on automatic segmentation of nuclei in Feulgen-stained histological sections.

  12. Long-term memories in online users' selecting activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xue; Hou, Lei; Stephen, Mutua; Yang, Huijie

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the long-term memory effect in the behavior of online users. Two user-oriented online movie systems are used in this study. Due to the short length of the series, the balanced estimation of diffusion entropy approach is used to evaluate scaling-invariance in selecting activities of users in the two online movie systems. Our results indicate that persistence (long-term memory) exists widely in the movie selecting series. However, there is generally significant difference between a user's objective and subjective behaviors. Additionally, statistically, the long-term memory depends on activity levels, as results show that the much more active a users' group, the stronger the long-term memory will be. These findings provide a new criterion for constructing reasonable models, and can help understand how individuals' behaviors form a collective behavior of an online society.

  13. 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey selected tabulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey (NTACS) provides detailed activity data for a sample of trucks covered in the 1987 Truck Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS) for days selected at random over a 12-month period ending in 1990. The NTACS was conducted by the US Bureau of the Census for the US Department of Transportation (DOT). A Public Use File for the NTACS was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a reimbursable agreement with the DOT. The content of the Public Use File and the detailed design of the NTACS are described in the ORNL Report [open quotes]Technical Documentation for the 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey Public Use File[close quotes]. (1992). ORNL Technical Report No. TM-12188, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. The main purpose of this summary report is to provide selected tables based on the public use file.

  14. Can acute low back pain result from segmental spinal buckling during sub-maximal activities? A review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Richard; Fung, Joyce

    2005-02-01

    This paper provides a review of the current literature supporting the hypothesis that segmental spine buckling resulting in tissue damage may be a primary cause of sudden onset low back pain, even during activities that are sub-maximal with respect to loading and muscle activation. While a temporal link exists, it is supported primarily by anecdotal and clinical reports. More pertinent to this review is the biological plausibility of segmental spine buckling as a mechanism of acute injury, supported by modelling studies as well as current knowledge of tissue mechanics and neurophysiology. One antithesis, however, is the low incidence of low back injuries reported during sub-maximal tasks. In order to account for this discrepancy, several predisposing factors are addressed, both constant and situation-dependent, which may contribute to the occurrence of segmental spinal buckling during sub-maximal activities. PMID:15681264

  15. Identifying Benefit Segments among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Joseph D.

    1991-01-01

    Using concept of market segmentation (dividing market into distinct groups requiring different product benefits), surveyed 398 college students to determine benefit segments among students selecting a college to attend and factors describing each benefit segment. Identified one major segment of students (classroomers) plus three minor segments…

  16. Cytoprotective-selective activated protein C therapy for ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mosnier, Laurent O.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.; Griffin, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite years of research and efforts to translate stroke research to clinical therapy, ischemic stroke remains a major cause of death, disability, and diminished quality of life. Primary and secondary preventive measures combined with improved quality of care have made significant progress. However, no novel drug for ischemic stroke therapy has been approved in the past decade. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of activated protein C (APC) in rodent stroke models. In addition to its natural anticoagulant functions, APC conveys multiple direct cytoprotective effects on many different cell types that involve multiple receptors including protease activated receptor (PAR) 1, PAR3, and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR). Application of molecular engineered APC variants with altered selectivity profiles to rodent stroke models demonstrated that the beneficial effects of APC primarily require its cytoprotective activities but not its anticoagulant activities. Extensive basic, preclinical, and clinical research provided a compelling rationale based on strong evidence for translation of APC therapy that has led to the clinical development of the cytoprotective-selective APC variant, 3K3A-APC, for ischemic stroke. Recent identification of non-canonical PAR1 and PAR3 activation by APC that give rise to novel tethered-ligands capable of inducing biased cytoprotective signaling as opposed to the canonical signaling provides a mechanistic explanation for how APC-mediated PAR activation can selectively induce cytoprotective signaling pathways. Collectively, these paradigm-shifting discoveries provide detailed insights into the receptor targets and the molecular mechanisms for neuroprotection by cytoprotective-selective 3K3A-APC, which is currently a biologic drug in clinical trials for ischemic stroke. PMID:25230930

  17. Selective optimization of side activities: the SOSA approach.

    PubMed

    Wermuth, Camille G

    2006-02-01

    Selective optimization of side activities of drug molecules (the SOSA approach) is an intelligent and potentially more efficient strategy than HTS for the generation of new biological activities. Only a limited number of highly diverse drug molecules are screened, for which bioavailability and toxicity studies have already been performed and efficacy in humans has been confirmed. Once the screening has generated a hit it will be used as the starting point for a drug discovery program. Using traditional medicinal chemistry as well as parallel synthesis, the initial 'side activity' is transformed into the 'main activity' and, conversely, the initial 'main activity' is significantly reduced or abolished. This strategy has a high probability of yielding safe, bioavailable, original and patentable analogues. PMID:16533714

  18. DNA interaction, antitumor and antimicrobial activities of three-dimensional chitosan ring produced from the body segments of a diplopod.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Akyuz, Bahar; Bulut, Esra; Sargin, Idris; Tan, Gamze; Erdonmez, Demet; Maheta, Mansi; Satkauskas, Saulius; Mickevičius, Saulius

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available chitins and the chitin isolated from mushrooms, insect cuticles, shells of shrimp, crab and crayfish reported in the literature are in forms of powder, flake or granule. Three-dimensional chitins have been only known from the sponges but still three-dimensional chitosan has not been reported yet. In this study, we produced three-dimensional chitin and chitosan rings from the body segments of a diplopod species (Julus terrestris). Obtained chitin and chitosan rings were characterized (by FT-IR, SEM, TGA, XRD, dilute solution viscometry and EA) and compared with commercial chitin and chitosan. The interactions with plasmid DNA was studied at varying concentrations of chitosan (0.04, 0.4 and 4mg/mL). Antitumor activity tests were conducted (L929 and HeLa), low cytotoxicity and high antiproliferative activity was observed. Antimicrobial activities of J. terrestris chitosan were investigated on twelve microorganisms and maximum inhibition (15.6±1.154mm) was recorded for common human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:27112853

  19. DNA interaction, antitumor and antimicrobial activities of three-dimensional chitosan ring produced from the body segments of a diplopod.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Akyuz, Bahar; Bulut, Esra; Sargin, Idris; Tan, Gamze; Erdonmez, Demet; Maheta, Mansi; Satkauskas, Saulius; Mickevičius, Saulius

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available chitins and the chitin isolated from mushrooms, insect cuticles, shells of shrimp, crab and crayfish reported in the literature are in forms of powder, flake or granule. Three-dimensional chitins have been only known from the sponges but still three-dimensional chitosan has not been reported yet. In this study, we produced three-dimensional chitin and chitosan rings from the body segments of a diplopod species (Julus terrestris). Obtained chitin and chitosan rings were characterized (by FT-IR, SEM, TGA, XRD, dilute solution viscometry and EA) and compared with commercial chitin and chitosan. The interactions with plasmid DNA was studied at varying concentrations of chitosan (0.04, 0.4 and 4mg/mL). Antitumor activity tests were conducted (L929 and HeLa), low cytotoxicity and high antiproliferative activity was observed. Antimicrobial activities of J. terrestris chitosan were investigated on twelve microorganisms and maximum inhibition (15.6±1.154mm) was recorded for common human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

  20. Continuity, segmentation and faulting type of active fault zones of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake inferred from analyses of a gravity gradient tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Nayuta; Yoshihiro, Hiramatsu; Sawada, Akihiro

    2016-10-01

    We analyze Bouguer anomalies in/around the focal region of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake to examine features, such as continuity, segmentation and faulting type, of the active fault zones related to the earthquake. Several derivatives and structural parameters calculated from a gravity gradient tensor are applied to highlight the features. First horizontal and vertical derivatives, as well as a normalized total horizontal derivative, characterize well the continuous subsurface fault structure along the Futagawa fault zone. On the other hand, the Hinagu fault zone is not clearly detected by these derivatives, especially in the case of the Takano-Shirahata segment, suggesting a difference of cumulative vertical displacement between the two fault zones. The normalized total horizontal derivative and the dimensionality index indicate a discontinuity of the subsurface structure of the Hinagu fault zone, that is, a segment boundary between the Takano-Shirahata and the Hinagu segments. The aftershock distribution does not extend beyond this segment boundary. In other words, this segment boundary controls the southern end of the rupture area of the foreshock. We also recognize normal fault structures dipping to the northwest in some areas of the fault zones from estimations of dip angles.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. The Surgical Overcorrection of Lenke Type 1 Deformities with Selective Fusion Segments: What Happens to the Coronal Balance?

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Sinan; Akman, Yunus Emre; Mert, Murat; Carkci, Engin; Tuzuner, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of our study is to determine the alterations on coronal balance after overcorrection of Lenke type 1 curve, retrospectively. Methods Datas of 34 patients (29 female, 5 male patients; mean age, 16.3±3.3 years; range, 13-24 years) surgically treated for scoliosis between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed, retrospectively. The adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients with Lenke type 1 curve treated with only posterior pedicle screw and postoperative thoracic curves less than 10° by Cobb method on frontal plane were enrolled in this study. Mean follow-up period was 52.5±29.7 months. Results The mean amount of the preoperative thoracic curves was measured as 41.2°±6.1° (range, 30°-56°). The mean amount of the early postoperative thoracic curves was measured as 6.5°±1.8° (range, 3°-9°). The mean amount of the thoracic curves was measured as 8.5°±4.6° (range, 3°-22°) during the last follow-up (p=0.01). The mean preoperative coronal balance was measured as 8.5mm(range, 1-30mm). The mean early postoperative coronal balance was measured as 3.5mm(range, 0-36 mm). The mean coronal balance was measured as 5.5mm(range, 0-38mm) during the last follow-up (p>0.05). Conclusion We suggest that Lenke type 1B and 1C should be carefully evaluated and the fusion levels should be accurately selected in order to maintain the correction of coronal balance. We suggest that selective fusion with overcorrection in Lenke type 1A are applied to curves that can be corrected lumbar curve at the preoperative bending radiograph and curves that not have coronal decompensation and >10° distal junctional kyphosis, preoperatively. PMID:27799996

  2. Fluid Chemistry and Dissolved Gasses on the Endeavour Segment from 1991 to 2005: Lasting Effects of Volcanic Activity on Field and Segment Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, B. A.; Lilley, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    A time series analysis of dissolved gas data including over 350 samples from the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge reveals several interesting patterns. At the main field most species are quite stable between 1991-1998 and the perturbations in fluid chemistry that accompanied the magmatic event in 1999 are well documented. (Lilley et al., 2003; Seyfried et al., 2004) However after the event, some areas, especially the southern portion of the main field, seem to have returned not to their pre-event concentrations but settled to new levels for some species. These changes may indicate a shift in subsurface fluid flow or phase separation which can be more easily interpreted as part of this long time series data set. When the data are examined on the regional scale, methane concentrations in particular point to a difference in fluid chemistry between the southern fields (Mothra and Main) and northern fields (High Rise, Salty Dawg, and Sasquatch). This difference has become more marked after 1999 and may point to a change in fluid interaction with a proposed subsurface sedimentary source.

  3. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.

  4. Distribution of topical ocular nepafenac and its active metabolite amfenac to the posterior segment of the eye.

    PubMed

    Chastain, James E; Sanders, Mark E; Curtis, Michael A; Chemuturi, Nagendra V; Gadd, Martha E; Kapin, Michael A; Markwardt, Kerry L; Dahlin, David C

    2016-04-01

    Nepafenac ophthalmic suspensions, 0.1% (NEVANAC(®)) and 0.3% (ILEVRO™), are topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) products approved in the United States, Europe and various other countries to treat pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery. NEVANAC is also approved in Europe for the reduction in the risk of postoperative macular edema (ME) associated with cataract surgery in diabetic patients. The efficacy against ME suggests that topical administration leads to distribution of nepafenac or its active metabolite amfenac to the posterior segment of the eye. This article evaluates the ocular distribution of nepafenac and amfenac and the extent of local delivery to the posterior segment of the eye, following topical ocular instillation in animal models. Nepafenac ophthalmic suspension was instilled unilaterally in New Zealand White rabbits as either a single dose (0.1%; one drop) or as multiple doses (0.3%, one drop, once-daily for 4 days, or 0.1% one drop, three-times daily for 3 days and one morning dose on day 4). Nepafenac (0.3%) was also instilled unilaterally in cynomolgus monkeys as multiple doses (one drop, three-times daily for 7 days). Nepafenac and amfenac concentrations in harvested ocular tissues were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Locally-distributed compound concentrations were determined as the difference in levels between dosed and undosed eyes. In single-dosed rabbit eyes, peak concentrations of locally-distributed nepafenac and amfenac showed a trend of sclera > choroid > retina. Nepafenac peak levels in sub-samples posterior to the eye equator and inclusive of the posterior pole (E-PP) were 55.1, 4.03 and 2.72 nM, respectively, at 0.25 or 0.50 h, with corresponding amfenac peak levels of 41.9, 3.10 and 0.705 nM at 1 or 4 h. By comparison, peak levels in sclera, choroid and retina sub-samples in a band between the ora serrata and the equator (OS-E) were 13- to 40-fold

  5. Selected advanced aerodynamic and active control concepts development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A summary is presented of results obtained during analysis, design and test activities on six selected technical tasks directed at exploratory improvement of fuel efficiency for new and derivative transports. The work included investigations into the potential offered by natural laminar flow, improved surface coatings and advanced high lift concepts. Similar investigations covering optimum low-energy flight path control, integrated application of active controls and evaluation of primary flight control systems reliability and maintenance are also summarized. Recommendations are included for future work needed to exploit potential advancements.

  6. Antibacterial Activity of Barringtonia acutangula against Selected Urinary Tract Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S; Panda, P K; Mishra, S R; Parida, R K; Ellaiah, P; Dash, S K

    2008-09-01

    Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn belonging to family Barringtoniaceae was investigated to evaluate In vitro antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, petroleum ether and chloroform extracts against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli the major urinary tract infection causing pathogens were tested by disc diffusion assay method and the minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated. Ethanol (95%) extract exhibited broader spectrum of inhibition followed by chloroform, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts against the urinary tract pathogens under test. An attempt has been made to compare the activity of extracts with standard antibiotics against selected urinary tract infection causing pathogens. PMID:21394275

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Barringtonia acutangula against Selected Urinary Tract Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, S.; Panda, P. K.; Mishra, S. R.; Parida, R. K.; Ellaiah, P.; Dash, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn belonging to family Barringtoniaceae was investigated to evaluate In vitro antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, petroleum ether and chloroform extracts against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli the major urinary tract infection causing pathogens were tested by disc diffusion assay method and the minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated. Ethanol (95%) extract exhibited broader spectrum of inhibition followed by chloroform, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts against the urinary tract pathogens under test. An attempt has been made to compare the activity of extracts with standard antibiotics against selected urinary tract infection causing pathogens. PMID:21394275

  8. Increasing the hydrogenation activity of commercial catalysts for selective hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Khashagul`gova, N.S.; Freiman, L.L.; Zelentsov, Yu.N.

    1994-07-01

    The catalysts generally used in hydrodewaxing or selective hydrocracking of n-paraffins are zeolites with the pentasil structure: TsVK, TsVM, TsVN, and Ultrasil. For use in the production of high-quality transformer oils from paraffinic feedstocks, these catalysts have not only a high cracking activity but also an adequate hydrogenating activity. Catalysts containing a nickel-molybdenum complex (or nickel molybdate synthesized by a specific method) are higher in hydrogenating activity in comparison with catalysts in which the metals are introduced by coextrusion or impregnation. Precipitation of a nickel-molybdenum complex on a solid support (aluminosilicate or zeolite) tends to increase its hydrogenating activity, so that the content of the hydrogenating metals in the catalyst can be reduced. This report describes studies on catalysts based on TsVM and TsVN high-silica zeolites.

  9. Shifting boundaries of retinoic acid activity control hindbrain segmental gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Ioan Ovidiu; Gresh, Lionel; Barra, Jacqueline; Duester, Gregg

    2005-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) generated by Raldh2 in paraxial mesoderm is required for specification of the posterior hindbrain, including restriction of Hoxb1 expression to presumptive rhombomere 4 (r4). Hoxb1 expression requires 3' and 5' RA response elements for widespread induction up to r4 and for r3/r5 repression, but RA has previously been detected only from r5-r8, and vHnf1 is required for repression of Hoxb1 posterior to r4 in zebrafish. We demonstrate in mouse embryos that an RA signal initially travels from the paraxial mesoderm to r3, forming a boundary next to the r2 expression domain of Cyp26a1 (which encodes an RA-degrading enzyme). After Hoxb1 induction, the RA boundary quickly shifts to r4/r5, coincident with induction of Cyp26c1 in r4. A functional role for Cyp26c1 in RA degradation was established through examination of RA-treated embryos. Analysis of Raldh2-/- and vHnf1-/- embryos supports a direct role for RA in Hoxb1 induction up to r4 and repression in r3/r5, as well as an indirect role for RA in Hoxb1 repression posterior to r4 via RA induction of vHnf1 up to the r4/r5 boundary. Our findings suggest that Raldh2 and Cyp26 generate shifting boundaries of RA activity, such that r3-r4 receives a short pulse of RA and r5-r8 receives a long pulse of RA. These two pulses of RA activity function to establish expression of Hoxb1 and vHnf1 on opposite sides of the r4/r5 boundary.

  10. Antioxidant activity of various extracts of selected gourd vegetables.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Baljeet S; Yadav, Roshanlal; Yadav, Ritika B; Garg, Munish

    2016-04-01

    Study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative activity of methanolic (ME), ethanolic (EE) and butanolic extracts (BE) of selected gourd vegetables. The antioxidant activity was investigated using different assays namely ferric thiocyanate test (FTC), thiobarbituric acid test (TBA), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and DPPH free radicals scavenging test. A densitometric HPTLC analysis was performed for the analysis of phenolic acids and flavonoids. Different extracts of the selected gourd vegetables revealed different antioxidant activity. Different extracts of Lagenaria siceraria, Momordica charantia and Luffa cylindrica revealed significantly higher (p < 0.05) concentrations of total phenols, flavonids, tannins and carotenoids content and also the antioxidant activity in comparison to remaining vegetable extracts. Correlation studies indicated that FRAP test best described the antioxidant activity of phenols, flavonoids and carotenoids (r = 0.854, 0.692 and 0.915 respectively). HPTLC profiles revealed the presence of maximum number of phenolic acids and flavonoids in L. siceraria and M. charantia. PMID:27413209

  11. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C.

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  12. Active Batch Selection via Convex Relaxations with Guaranteed Solution Bounds.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shayok; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Sun, Qian; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Ye, Jieping

    2015-10-01

    Active learning techniques have gained popularity to reduce human effort in labeling data instances for inducing a classifier. When faced with large amounts of unlabeled data, such algorithms automatically identify the exemplar instances for manual annotation. More recently, there have been attempts towards a batch mode form of active learning, where a batch of data points is simultaneously selected from an unlabeled set. In this paper, we propose two novel batch mode active learning (BMAL) algorithms: BatchRank and BatchRand. We first formulate the batch selection task as an NP-hard optimization problem; we then propose two convex relaxations, one based on linear programming and the other based on semi-definite programming to solve the batch selection problem. Finally, a deterministic bound is derived on the solution quality for the first relaxation and a probabilistic bound for the second. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research effort to derive mathematical guarantees on the solution quality of the BMAL problem. Our extensive empirical studies on 15 binary, multi-class and multi-label challenging datasets corroborate that the proposed algorithms perform at par with the state-of-the-art techniques, deliver high quality solutions and are robust to real-world issues like label noise and class imbalance.

  13. Detection of activated parietal epithelial cells on the glomerular tuft distinguishes early focal segmental glomerulosclerosis from minimal change disease.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Bart; Stucker, Fabien; Wetzels, Jack; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Ronco, Pierre; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; D'Agati, Vivette; Fogo, Agnes B; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Boor, Peter; Floege, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Moeller, Marcus J

    2014-12-01

    In rodents, parietal epithelial cells (PECs) migrating onto the glomerular tuft participate in the formation of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) lesions. We investigated whether immunohistologic detection of PEC markers in the initial biopsies of human patients with first manifestation of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome with no immune complexes can improve the sensitivity to detect sclerotic lesions compared with standard methods. Ninety-five renal biopsies were stained for claudin-1 (PEC marker), CD44 (activated PECs), and LKIV69 (PEC matrix); 38 had been diagnosed as early primary FSGS and 57 as minimal change disease. PEC markers were detected on the tuft in 87% of the biopsies of patients diagnosed as primary FSGS. PEC markers were detected in FSGS lesions from the earliest stages of disease. In minimal change disease, no PEC activation was observed by immunohistology. However, in 25% of biopsies originally diagnosed as minimal change disease the presence of small lesions indicative of a sclerosing process were detected, which were undetectable on standard periodic acid-Schiff staining, even though only a single histologic section for each PEC marker was evaluated. Staining for LKIV69 detected lesions with the highest sensitivity. Two novel PEC markers A-kinase anchor protein 12 and annexin A3 exhibited similar sensitivity. In summary, detection of PECs on the glomerular tuft by immunostaining improves the differentiation between minimal change disease and primary FSGS and may serve to guide clinical decision making.

  14. Patient Selection and Activity Planning Guide for Selective Internal Radiotherapy With Yttrium-90 Resin Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Wan-Yee; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lai, Hee Kit; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Leung, Thomas W.T.; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Salem, Riad; Sangro, Bruno; Shuter, Borys; Wang, Shih-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) resin microspheres can improve the clinical outcomes for selected patients with inoperable liver cancer. This technique involves intra-arterial delivery of {beta}-emitting microspheres into hepatocellular carcinomas or liver metastases while sparing uninvolved structures. Its unique mode of action, including both {sup 90}Y brachytherapy and embolization of neoplastic microvasculature, necessitates activity planning methods specific to SIRT. Methods and Materials: A panel of clinicians experienced in {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT was convened to integrate clinical experience with the published data to propose an activity planning pathway for radioembolization. Results: Accurate planning is essential to minimize potentially fatal sequelae such as radiation-induced liver disease while delivering tumoricidal {sup 90}Y activity. Planning methods have included empiric dosing according to degree of tumor involvement, empiric dosing adjusted for the body surface area, and partition model calculations using Medical Internal Radiation Dose principles. It has been recommended that at least two of these methods be compared when calculating the microsphere activity for each patient. Conclusions: Many factors inform {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT activity planning, including the therapeutic intent, tissue and vasculature imaging, tumor and uninvolved liver characteristics, previous therapies, and localization of the microsphere infusion. The influence of each of these factors has been discussed.

  15. Image segmentation using random features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Geoff; Gao, Junbin; Antolovich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for selecting random features via compressed sensing to improve the performance of Normalized Cuts in image segmentation. Normalized Cuts is a clustering algorithm that has been widely applied to segmenting images, using features such as brightness, intervening contours and Gabor filter responses. Some drawbacks of Normalized Cuts are that computation times and memory usage can be excessive, and the obtained segmentations are often poor. This paper addresses the need to improve the processing time of Normalized Cuts while improving the segmentations. A significant proportion of the time in calculating Normalized Cuts is spent computing an affinity matrix. A new algorithm has been developed that selects random features using compressed sensing techniques to reduce the computation needed for the affinity matrix. The new algorithm, when compared to the standard implementation of Normalized Cuts for segmenting images from the BSDS500, produces better segmentations in significantly less time.

  16. Activated Sludge. Selected Instructional Activities and References. Instructional Resources Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Clinton L.; Walasek, James B.

    This monograph contains a variety of selected materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction. Part I presents a brief discussion of the activated sludge process in wastewater treatment operations. Part II, Instructional Units, contains selected portions of existing programs which may be utilized in…

  17. Seismic activity in the transitional segment of Southern Andes after Maule 2010 megathrust earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Diego; Lupi, Matteo; Bataille, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown that after large magnitude earthquakes the region of volcanic arc affected by the megathrust slip is marked by an increase of volcanic activity in the following decades. The Mw = 8.8 Maule 2010 earthquake induced a rupture zone about 500 km long spanning from 33.5°S to 38.5°S. GPS and InSar data show that several volcanic edifices in the Southern Andes underwent a rapid subsidence (from days to months) after the Maule earthquake. To identify the post seismic deformation taking place in the volcanic arc after the Maule earthquake we deployed 20 seismic stations from November 2013 to March 2015 from 35°S to 39°S. We recorded ˜ 600 seismic events larger than Mw = 2.0, concentrated along the slab and beneath the volcanic chain. No events were detected at depths greater than 60 km beneath the volcanic arc. After a preliminary localization, the crustal events were relocated using an improved 1D velocity model. For the largest seismic events we inverted for moment tensor solutions. The moment tensor solution suggest a dominant N-NNE dextral strike-slip local stress field regime. This is in agreement with the direction of ancient geological structures inferred in the basement that were suggested to be reactivated by supra-lithostatic fluid pressures.

  18. Spatially Offset Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Selection and Spectroscopic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, R. Scott; Comerford, Julia M.; Greene, Jenny E.; Pooley, David

    2016-09-01

    We present a sample of 18 optically selected and X-ray-detected spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In nine systems, the X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) is spatially offset from the galactic stellar core that is located within the 3″ diameter SDSS spectroscopic fiber. In 11 systems, the X-ray AGN is spatially offset from a stellar core that is located outside the fiber, with an overlap of two. To build the sample, we cross-matched Type II AGNs selected from the SDSS galaxy catalog with archival Chandra imaging and employed our custom astrometric and registration procedure. The projected angular (physical) offsets span a range of 0.″6 (0.8 kpc) to 17.″4 (19.4 kpc), with a median value of 2.″7 (4.6 kpc). The offset nature of an AGN is an unambiguous signature of a galaxy merger, and these systems can be used to study the properties of AGNs in galaxy mergers without the biases introduced by morphological merger selection techniques. In this paper (Paper I), we use our sample to assess the kinematics of AGN photoionized gas in galaxy mergers. We find that spectroscopic offset AGN selection may be up to {89}-16+7% incomplete due to small projected velocity offsets. We also find that the magnitude of the velocity offsets are generally larger than expected if our spatial selection introduces a bias toward face-on orbits, suggesting the presence of complex kinematics in the emission line gas of AGNs in galaxy mergers.

  19. Evaluation of Anatomical and Functional Hip Joint Center Methods: The Effects of Activity Type, Gender, and Proximal Reference Segment.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, C A; Fowler, J; Chase, S; Steeves, K; Landry, J; Mohamed, A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate hip joint center (HJC) location is critical when studying hip joint biomechanics. The HJC is often determined from anatomical methods, but functional methods are becoming increasingly popular. Several studies have examined these methods using simulations and in vivo gait data, but none has studied high-range of motion activities, such a chair rise, nor has HJC prediction been compared between males and females. Furthermore, anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) marker visibility during chair rise can be problematic, requiring a sacral cluster as an alternative proximal segment; but functional HJC has not been explored using this approach. For this study, the quality of HJC measurement was based on the joint gap error (JGE), which is the difference in global HJC between proximal and distal reference segments. The aims of the present study were to: (1) determine if JGE varies between pelvic and sacral referenced HJC for functional and anatomical methods, (2) investigate which functional calibration motion results in the lowest JGE and if the JGE varies depending on movement type (gait versus chair rise) and gender, and (3) assess whether the functional HJC calibration results in lower JGE than commonly used anatomical approaches and if it varies with movement type and gender. Data were collected on 39 healthy adults (19 males and 20 females) aged 14-50 yr old. Participants performed four hip "calibration" tests (arc, cross, star, and star-arc), as well as gait and chair rise (activities of daily living (ADL)). Two common anatomical methods were used to estimate HJC and were compared to HJC computed using a published functional method with the calibration motions above, when using pelvis or sacral cluster as the proximal reference. For ADL trials, functional methods resulted in lower JGE (12-19 mm) compared to anatomical methods (13-34 mm). It was also found that women had significantly higher JGE compared to men and JGE was significantly higher for

  20. Evaluation of Anatomical and Functional Hip Joint Center Methods: The Effects of Activity Type, Gender, and Proximal Reference Segment.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, C A; Fowler, J; Chase, S; Steeves, K; Landry, J; Mohamed, A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate hip joint center (HJC) location is critical when studying hip joint biomechanics. The HJC is often determined from anatomical methods, but functional methods are becoming increasingly popular. Several studies have examined these methods using simulations and in vivo gait data, but none has studied high-range of motion activities, such a chair rise, nor has HJC prediction been compared between males and females. Furthermore, anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) marker visibility during chair rise can be problematic, requiring a sacral cluster as an alternative proximal segment; but functional HJC has not been explored using this approach. For this study, the quality of HJC measurement was based on the joint gap error (JGE), which is the difference in global HJC between proximal and distal reference segments. The aims of the present study were to: (1) determine if JGE varies between pelvic and sacral referenced HJC for functional and anatomical methods, (2) investigate which functional calibration motion results in the lowest JGE and if the JGE varies depending on movement type (gait versus chair rise) and gender, and (3) assess whether the functional HJC calibration results in lower JGE than commonly used anatomical approaches and if it varies with movement type and gender. Data were collected on 39 healthy adults (19 males and 20 females) aged 14-50 yr old. Participants performed four hip "calibration" tests (arc, cross, star, and star-arc), as well as gait and chair rise (activities of daily living (ADL)). Two common anatomical methods were used to estimate HJC and were compared to HJC computed using a published functional method with the calibration motions above, when using pelvis or sacral cluster as the proximal reference. For ADL trials, functional methods resulted in lower JGE (12-19 mm) compared to anatomical methods (13-34 mm). It was also found that women had significantly higher JGE compared to men and JGE was significantly higher for

  1. Perceptual expectation evokes category-selective cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Esterman, Michael; Yantis, Steven

    2010-05-01

    Selective visual attention directed to a location (even in the absence of a stimulus) increases activity in the corresponding regions of visual cortex and enhances the speed and accuracy of target perception. We further explored top-down influences on perceptual representations by manipulating observers' expectations about the category of an upcoming target. Observers viewed a display in which an object (either a face or a house) gradually emerged from a state of phase-scrambled noise; a cue established expectation about the object category. Observers were faster to categorize faces (gender discrimination) or houses (structural discrimination) when the category of the partially scrambled object matched their expectation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that this expectation was associated with anticipatory increases in category-specific visual cortical activity, even in the absence of object- or category-specific visual information. Expecting a face evoked increased activity in face-selective cortical regions in the fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus. Conversely, expecting a house increased activity in parahippocampal gyrus. These results suggest that visual anticipation facilitates subsequent perception by recruiting, in advance, the same cortical mechanisms as those involved in perception. PMID:19759124

  2. Different peroxidase activities and expression of abiotic stress-related peroxidases in apical root segments of wheat genotypes with different drought stress tolerance under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Csiszár, Jolán; Gallé, Agnes; Horváth, Edit; Dancsó, Piroska; Gombos, Magdolna; Váry, Zsolt; Erdei, László; Györgyey, János; Tari, Irma

    2012-03-01

    One-week-old seedlings of Triticum aestivum L. cv. Plainsman V, a drought tolerant; and Cappelle Desprez, a drought sensitive wheat cultivar were subjected gradually to osmotic stress using polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) reaching 400 mOsm on the 11th day. Compared to controls cv. Plainsman V maintained the root growth and relative water content of root tissues, while these parameters were decreased in the drought sensitive cv. Cappelle Desprez under PEG-mediated osmotic stress. Simultaneously, H(2)O(2) content in 1-cm-long apical segment of roots comprising the proliferation and elongation zone, showed a transient increase in cv. Plainsman V and a permanent raise in cv. Cappelle Desprez. Measurements of the transcript levels of selected class III peroxidase (TaPrx) coding sequences revealed significant differences between the two cultivars on the 9th day, two days after applying 100 mOsm PEG. The abundance of TaPrx04 transcript was enhanced transitionally in the root apex of cv. Plainsman V but decreased in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress while the expression of TaPrx01, TaPrx03, TaPrx19, TaPrx68, TaPrx107 and TaPrx109-C decreased to different extents in both cultivars. After a transient decrease, activities of soluble peroxidase fractions of crude protein extracts rose in both cultivars on day 11, but the activities of cell wall-bound fractions increased only in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress. Parallel with high H(2)O(2) content of the tissues, certain isoenzymes of covalently bound fraction in cv. Cappelle Desprez showed increased activity suggesting that they may limit the extension of root cell walls in this cultivar.

  3. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  4. Toxicity and mutagenic activity of some selected Nigerian plants.

    PubMed

    Sowemimo, A A; Fakoya, F A; Awopetu, I; Omobuwajo, O R; Adesanya, S A

    2007-09-25

    The toxicity and mutagenic potential of most African plants implicated in the management of cancer have not been investigated. The ethanolic extracts of selected Nigerian plants were subsequently studied using the brine shrimp lethality tests, inhibition of telomerase activity and induction of chromosomal aberrations in vivo in rat lymphocytes. Morinda lucida root bark, Nymphaea lotus whole plant and Garcinia kola root were active in the three test systems. Bryophyllum calycinum whole plant, Annona senegalensis root, Hymenocardia acida stem bark, Erythrophleum suaveolens leaves and Spondiathus preussii stem bark were toxic to brine shrimps and caused chromosomal damage in rat lymphocytes. Ficus exasperata leaves, Chrysophyllum albidum root bark and Hibiscus sabdariffa leaves were non-toxic to all the three test systems. Chenopodium ambrosioides whole plant was non-toxic to brine shrimps and rat lymphocyte chromosomes but showed inhibition in the conventional telomerase assay indicating a possible selectivity for human chromosomes. The result justified the use of the first eight plants and Chenopodium ambrosioides in the management of cancer in south west Nigeria although they appear to be non-selective and their mode of action may be different from plant to plant. All these plants except Chenopodium ambrosioides are also mutagenic and cytotoxic.

  5. Selective glucocorticoid receptor-activating adjuvant therapy in cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Sundahl, Nora; Clarisse, Dorien; Bracke, Marc; Offner, Fritz; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Beck, Ilse M.

    2016-01-01

    Although adverse effects and glucocorticoid resistance cripple their chronic use, glucocorticoids form the mainstay therapy for acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, and play an important role in treatment protocols of both lymphoid malignancies and as adjuvant to stimulate therapy tolerability in various solid tumors. Glucocorticoid binding to their designate glucocorticoid receptor (GR), sets off a plethora of cell-specific events including therapeutically desirable effects, such as cell death, as well as undesirable effects, including chemotherapy resistance, systemic side effects and glucocorticoid resistance. In this context, selective GR agonists and modulators (SEGRAMs) with a more restricted GR activity profile have been developed, holding promise for further clinical development in anti-inflammatory and potentially in cancer therapies. Thus far, the research into the prospective benefits of selective GR modulators in cancer therapy limped behind. Our review discusses how selective GR agonists and modulators could improve the therapy regimens for lymphoid malignancies, prostate or breast cancer. We summarize our current knowledge and look forward to where the field should move to in the future. Altogether, our review clarifies novel therapeutic perspectives in cancer modulation via selective GR targeting. PMID:27713909

  6. The Great 2006 and 2007 Kuril Earthquakes, Forearc Segmentation and Seismic Activity of the Central Kuril Islands Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, B. V.; Ivashchenko, A. I.; Dozorova, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a structural study of the Central Kuril Islands forearc region, where the great megathrust tsunamigenic earthquake ( M w 8.3) occurred on November 15, 2006. Based on new bathymetry and seismic profiles obtained during two research cruises of R/V Akademik Lavrentiev in 2005 and 2006, ten crustal segments with along-arc length ranging from 30 to 100 km, separated by NS- and NW-trending transcurrent faults were identified within the forearc region. The transcurrent faults may serve as barriers impeding stress transfer between the neighboring segments, so that stress accumulated within separate forearc segments is usually released by earthquakes of moderate-to-strong magnitudes. However, the great November 15, 2006 earthquake ruptured seven of the crustal segments probably following a 226-year gap since the last great earthquake in 1780. The geographic extent of earthquake rupture zones, aftershock areas and earthquake clusters correlate well with forearc crustal segments identified using the geophysical data. Based on segmented structure of the Central Kuril Islands forearc region, we consider and discuss three scenarios of a great earthquake occurrence within this area. Although the margin is segmented, we suggest that a rupture could occupy the entire seismic gap with a total length of about 500 km. In such a case, the earthquake magnitude M w might exceed 8.5, and such an event might generate tsunami waves significantly exceeding in height to those produced by the great 2006-2007 Kuril earthquakes.

  7. Region-based Active Contour Model based on Markov Random Field to Segment Images with Intensity Non-Uniformity and Noise.

    PubMed

    Shahvaran, Zahra; Kazemi, Kamran; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh; Jafarian, Nassim

    2012-01-01

    This paper represents a new region-based active contour model that can be used to segment images with intensity non-uniformity and high-level noise. The main idea of our proposed method is to use Gaussian distributions with different means and variances with incorporation of intensity non-uniformity model for image segmentation. In order to integrate the spatial information between neighboring pixels in our proposed method, we use Markov Random Field. Our experiments on synthetic images and cerebral magnetic resonance images show the advantages of the proposed method over state-of-art methods, i.e. local Gaussian distribution fitting.

  8. Evaluation of image features and search strategies for segmentation of bone structures in radiographs using Active Shape Models.

    PubMed

    Behiels, Gert; Maes, Frederik; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Suetens, Paul

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate various image features and different search strategies for fitting Active Shape Models (ASM) to bone object boundaries in digitized radiographs. The original ASM method iteratively refines the pose and shape parameters of the point distribution model driving the ASM by a least squares fit of the shape to update the target points at the estimated object boundary position, as determined by a suitable object boundary criterion. We propose an improved search procedure that is more robust against outlier configurations in the boundary target points by requiring subsequent shape changes to be smooth, which is imposed by a smoothness constraint on the displacement of neighbouring target points at each iteration and implemented by a minimal cost path approach. We compare the original ASM search method and our improved search algorithm with a third method that does not rely on iteratively refined target point positions, but instead optimizes a global Bayesian objective function derived from statistical a priori contour shape and image models. Extensive validation of these methods on a database containing more than 400 images of the femur, humerus and calcaneus using the manual expert segmentation as ground truth shows that our minimal cost path method is the most robust. We also evaluate various measures for capturing local image appearance around each boundary point and conclude that the Mahalanobis distance applied to normalized image intensity profiles extracted normal to the shape is the most suitable criterion among the tested ones for guiding the ASM optimization. PMID:11836134

  9. Analysis of the structural behaviour of colonic segments by inflation tests: Experimental activity and physio-mechanical model.

    PubMed

    Carniel, Emanuele L; Mencattelli, Margherita; Bonsignori, Gabriella; Fontanella, Chiara G; Frigo, Alessandro; Rubini, Alessandro; Stefanini, Cesare; Natali, Arturo N

    2015-11-01

    A coupled experimental and computational approach is provided for the identification of the structural behaviour of gastrointestinal regions, accounting for both elastic and visco-elastic properties. The developed procedure is applied to characterize the mechanics of gastrointestinal samples from pig colons. Experimental data about the structural behaviour of colonic segments are provided by inflation tests. Different inflation processes are performed according to progressively increasing top pressure conditions. Each inflation test consists of an air in-flow, according to an almost constant increasing pressure rate, such as 3.5 mmHg/s, up to a prescribed top pressure, which is held constant for about 300 s to allow the development of creep phenomena. Different tests are interspersed by 600 s of rest to allow the recovery of the tissues' mechanical condition. Data from structural tests are post-processed by a physio-mechanical model in order to identify the mechanical parameters that interpret both the non-linear elastic behaviour of the sample, as the instantaneous pressure-stretch trend, and the time-dependent response, as the stretch increase during the creep processes. The parameters are identified by minimizing the discrepancy between experimental and model results. Different sets of parameters are evaluated for different specimens from different pigs. A statistical analysis is performed to evaluate the distribution of the parameters and to assess the reliability of the experimental and computational activities.

  10. Selected physical activities and the risk of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Levi, F.; La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; Franceschi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between various indicators of physical activity and endometrial cancer risk was analysed using data of a case-control study conducted in 1988-1991 in Switzerland and Italy on 274 histologically confirmed cases and 572 controls admitted to hospital for acute, non neoplastic, non hormone-related diseases. Using a self-rated assessment of total physical activity, there was a systematic tendency for the cases to report more frequently 'low' or 'very low' physical activity. The relative risks were similar for 'very high' or 'moderately high' physical activity, but increased in the two lowest levels, with point estimates, in various decades of age, between 1.3 and 2.3 for 'moderately low' and over 2.5 for 'very low' physical activity. Although the association was apparently stronger at older ages, all the trends in risk were significant. Allowance for major identified potential distorting factors, including body mass index and a measure of total energy intake, could explain only in part the association, and the inverse trends in risk remained statistically significant. When selected types of physical activity were analysed, no association was observed with climbing stairs or walking, but the risk estimates for the lowest level of activity was over 4 for housework, and between 1.5 and 1.9 for sport and leisure and occupational activity. Thus, the present findings suggest that a moderate or high physical activity is an indicator of reduced endometrial cancer risk, although this observation still requires epidemiologic confirmation and clearer definition from a pathogenic point of view. PMID:8471444

  11. Segmentation of knee cartilage by using a hierarchical active shape model based on multi-resolution transforms in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Madeleine; Escalante-Ramirez, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by the morphological degeneration of cartilage. Efficient segmentation of cartilage is important for cartilage damage diagnosis and to support therapeutic responses. We present a method for knee cartilage segmentation in magnetic resonance images (MRI). Our method incorporates the Hermite Transform to obtain a hierarchical decomposition of contours which describe knee cartilage shapes. Then, we compute a statistical model of the contour of interest from a set of training images. Thereby, our Hierarchical Active Shape Model (HASM) captures a large range of shape variability even from a small group of training samples, improving segmentation accuracy. The method was trained with a training set of 16- MRI of knee and tested with leave-one-out method.

  12. An Automatic Segmentation Method Combining an Active Contour Model and a Classification Technique for Detecting Polycomb-group Proteinsin High-Throughput Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Gregoretti, Francesco; Cesarini, Elisa; Lanzuolo, Chiara; Oliva, Gennaro; Antonelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The large amount of data generated in biological experiments that rely on advanced microscopy can be handled only with automated image analysis. Most analyses require a reliable cell image segmentation eventually capable of detecting subcellular structures.We present an automatic segmentation method to detect Polycomb group (PcG) proteins areas isolated from nuclei regions in high-resolution fluorescent cell image stacks. It combines two segmentation algorithms that use an active contour model and a classification technique serving as a tool to better understand the subcellular three-dimensional distribution of PcG proteins in live cell image sequences. We obtained accurate results throughout several cell image datasets, coming from different cell types and corresponding to different fluorescent labels, without requiring elaborate adjustments to each dataset. PMID:27659985

  13. Multineuronal vectorization is more efficient than time-segmental vectorization for information extraction from neuronal activities in the inferior temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hidekazu; Tamura, Hiroshi; Tate, Shunta; Kawashima, Takahiro; Suzuki, Shinya S; Fujita, Ichiro

    2010-08-01

    In order for patients with disabilities to control assistive devices with their own neural activity, multineuronal spike trains must be efficiently decoded because only limited computational resources can be used to generate prosthetic control signals in portable real-time applications. In this study, we compare the abilities of two vectorizing procedures (multineuronal and time-segmental) to extract information from spike trains during the same total neuron-seconds. In the multineuronal vectorizing procedure, we defined a response vector whose components represented the spike counts of one to five neurons. In the time-segmental vectorizing procedure, a response vector consisted of components representing a neuron's spike counts for one to five time-segment(s) of a response period of 1 s. Spike trains were recorded from neurons in the inferior temporal cortex of monkeys presented with visual stimuli. We examined whether the amount of information of the visual stimuli carried by these neurons differed between the two vectorizing procedures. The amount of information calculated with the multineuronal vectorizing procedure, but not the time-segmental vectorizing procedure, significantly increased with the dimensions of the response vector. We conclude that the multineuronal vectorizing procedure is superior to the time-segmental vectorizing procedure in efficiently extracting information from neuronal signals.

  14. Left-ventricle segmentation in real-time 3D echocardiography using a hybrid active shape model and optimal graph search approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Abiose, Ademola K.; Campbell, Dwayne N.; Sonka, Milan; Martins, James B.; Wahle, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of the left ventricular shape and motion patterns associated with left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is essential for diagnosis and treatment planning in congestive heart failure. Real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) used for LVMD analysis is frequently limited by heavy speckle noise or partially incomplete data, thus a segmentation method utilizing learned global shape knowledge is beneficial. In this study, the endocardial surface of the left ventricle (LV) is segmented using a hybrid approach combining active shape model (ASM) with optimal graph search. The latter is used to achieve landmark refinement in the ASM framework. Optimal graph search translates the 3D segmentation into the detection of a minimum-cost closed set in a graph and can produce a globally optimal result. Various information-gradient, intensity distributions, and regional-property terms-are used to define the costs for the graph search. The developed method was tested on 44 RT3DE datasets acquired from 26 LVMD patients. The segmentation accuracy was assessed by surface positioning error and volume overlap measured for the whole LV as well as 16 standard LV regions. The segmentation produced very good results that were not achievable using ASM or graph search alone.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of selected South African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nearly 3,000 plant species are used as medicines in South Africa, with approximately 350 species forming the most commonly traded and used medicinal plants. In the present study, twelve South African medicinal plants were selected and tested for their antimicrobial activities against eight microbial species belonging to fungi, Mycobacteria, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods The radiometric respiratory technique using the BACTEC 460 system was used for susceptibility testing against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for other antimicrobial assays. Results The results of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations indicated that the methanol extracts from Acacia karoo, Erythrophleum lasianthum and Salvia africana were able to prevent the growth of all the tested microorganisms. All other samples showed selective activities. MIC values below 100 μg/ml were recorded with A. karoo, C. dentate, E. lasianthum, P. obligun and S. africana on at least one of the nine tested microorganisms. The best activity (MIC value of 39.06 μg/ml) was noted with S. africana against E. coli, S. aureus and M. audouinii, and Knowltonia vesitoria against M. tuberculosis. Conclusion The overall results of the present work provide baseline information for the possible use of the studied South African plant extracts in the treatment of microbial infections. PMID:22704594

  16. High selective antileishmanial activity of vanadium complex with stilbene derivative.

    PubMed

    Machado, Patrícia de Almeida; Mota, Vinícius Zamprogno; Cavalli, Ana Clara de Lima; de Carvalho, Gustavo Senra Gonçalves; Da Silva, Adilson David; Gameiro, Jacy; Cuin, Alexandre; Coimbra, Elaine Soares

    2015-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a group of disease caused by different species of the parasite Leishmania affecting millions of people worldwide. Conventional therapy relies on multiple parenteral injections with pentavalent antimonials which exhibit high toxicity and various side effects have been reported. Hence, the research for an effective and low toxic effect drug is necessary. In the present work, the synthesis, spectroscopic and analytical characterizations of stilbene derivative (H2Salophen) and its vanadium complex (VOSalophen) are reported. Besides the chemical ancillary information, investigation of the leishmanicidal effects of these compounds were provided. The biological assays against promastigote and amastigote forms of L. amazonensis have been shown that VOSalophen exhibited a strong antiparasitic activity (IC50 of 6.65 and 3.51 μM, respectively). Furthermore, the leishmanicidal activity was concentration and time-dependent. Regarding toxicity and selectivity on mammalian cells, VOSalophen have not caused significant damage to human erythrocytes in all concentrations tested and VOSalophen was almost seven times more destructive for the intracellular parasite than for macrophages. Furthermore, the leishmanicidal activity of VOSalophen in promastigote forms of L. amazonensis could be associated to mitochondrial dysfunction and increase of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In L. amazonensis-infected macrophages, VOSalophen induces ROS production and a microbicidal action NO-dependent. Our biological results indicate the effective and selective action of VOSalophen against L. amazonensis and the leishmanicidal effect can be associated to parasite disorders and immumodulatory effects.

  17. Selective antimicrobial activity of maggots against pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jaklic, Domen; Lapanje, Ales; Zupancic, Klemen; Smrke, Dragica; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2008-05-01

    Maggot therapy, also known as biosurgery, is an ancient method for the healing of chronic infected wounds. Although clinicians have reported on the beneficial activities of the Lucilia sericata larvae that have been used for healing chronic wounds, the selectivity of this therapy against the different pathogenic micro-organisms that are found in chronic wounds has never been analysed. In the present study, we have investigated the in vitro activities of larval excreta/secreta both against selected bacterial strains that frequently occur in chronically infected wounds, and against bacteria isolated directly from the larvae and their excreta/secreta. Additionally, the antibacterial activities were investigated in in vivo studies, by comparing bacterial diversity in wounds before and after the application of L. sericata larvae. In conclusion, larval therapy is highly recommended, particularly for the treatment of wounds infected with Gram-positive bacteria, like Staphylococcus aureus, but less so for wounds infected with Gram-negative bacteria, especially Proteus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. strains. Bacteria from the genus Vagococcus were resistant to the maggot excreta/secreta.

  18. Antimycobacterial and cytotoxic activity of selected medicinal plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Nguta, Joseph M.; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Addo, Phyllis G.A.; Otchere, Isaac; Kissi-Twum, Abena

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains an ongoing threat to human health. Several medicinal plants are used traditionally to treat tuberculosis in Ghana. The current study was designed to investigate the antimycobacterial activity and cytotoxicity of crude extracts from five selected medicinal plants. Material and methods The microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) was used for antimycobacterial studies while the CellTiter 96® AQueous Assay, which is composed of solutions of a novel tetrazolium compound [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] and an electron coupling reagent (phenazine methosulfate) PMS, was used for cytotoxic studies. Correlation coefficients were used to compare the activity of crude extracts against nonpathogenic strains and the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp.tuberculosis. Results Results of the MIC determinations indicated that all the crude extracts were active on all the three tested mycobacterial strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration values as low as 156.3 µg/mL against M. tuberculosis; Strain H37Ra (ATCC® 25,177™) were recorded from the leaves of Solanum torvum Sw. (Solanaceae). Cytotoxicity of the extracts varied, and the leaves from S. torvum had the most promising selectivity index. Activity against M. tuberculosis; Strain H37Ra was the best predictor of activity against pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp.tuberculosis (correlation coefficient=0.8). Conclusion The overall results of the present study provide supportive data on the use of some medicinal plants for tuberculosis treatment. The leaves of Solanum torvum are a potential source of anti-TB natural products and deserve further investigations to develop novel anti-TB agents against sensitive and drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. PMID:26875647

  19. Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Noh, Joong S.; Agarwal, Rajiv K.

    1990-10-02

    Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

  20. Gastrocnemius and soleus are selectively activated when adding knee extensor activity to plantar flexion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito; Chino, Kentaro; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2014-08-01

    The gastrocnemius is a biarticular muscle that acts not only as a plantar flexor, but also as a knee flexor, meaning that it is an antagonist during knee extension. In contrast, the soleus is a monoarticular plantar flexor. Based on this anatomical difference, these muscles' activities should be selectively activated during simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension, which occur during many activities of daily living. This study examined the selective activation of gastrocnemius and soleus activities when voluntary isometric activation of knee extensors was added to voluntary isometric plantar flexion. Ten male volunteers performed isometric plantar flexion at 10%, 20%, and 30% of maximum effort. During each plantar flexion task, isometric knee extension was added at 0%, 50%, and 100% of maximum effort. When knee extension was added, the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the medial gastrocnemius was significantly depressed (P=.002), whereas that of the soleus was significantly increased (P<.001) regardless of the plantar flexion level. These results suggest that plantar flexion with concurrent knee extensor activity leads to selective activation of the soleus and depression of the synergistic activity of the gastrocnemius.

  1. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia.

    PubMed

    Felšöciová, Soňa; Kačániová, Miroslava; Horská, Elena; Vukovič, Nenad; Hleba, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana; Rovná, Katarina; Stričík, Michal; Hajduová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Mentha piperita, Chamomilla recutita L., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia hortensis L., Origanum vulgare L., Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Thymus vulgaris L., Origanum vulgare L. for antifungal activity against five Penicillium species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseofulvum. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against Penicillium fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: Pimpinella anisum, Chamomilla recutita L., Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be Origanum vulgare L. and Pimpinella anisum. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Rosmarinus officinalis. PMID:25780826

  2. Participation of people with disabilities in selected activities.

    PubMed

    Dowler, J M; Jordan-Simpson, D A

    1990-01-01

    The Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS) surveyed disabled Canadians. The survey measured participation in selected cultural and leisure activities, the satisfaction of disabled people with their level of participation, and barriers to participation. Of those surveyed, 98.0% reported doing one or a combination of the following: watching television; listening to radio, records or tapes; reading. Those with speaking and "other" limitations used the telephone less than those with other types of limitations; similarly, those with severe disabilities used the telephone less than those with less-severe disabilities. Participation decreased with age for activities such as doing arts or crafts, gardening, and talking on the telephone. Those aged 65 and over were more likely to be satisfied with their activity than younger people. Overall, 47.4% of those with a severe disability wanted to do more, compared to 34.0% with a moderate disability and 26.2% with a slight disability. The physical inability to do more was the most-often cited barrier to increasing activity: 53.9% of men and 55.7% of women said it was a barrier. PMID:2151649

  3. Participation of people with disabilities in selected activities.

    PubMed

    Dowler, J M; Jordan-Simpson, D A

    1990-01-01

    The Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS) surveyed disabled Canadians. The survey measured participation in selected cultural and leisure activities, the satisfaction of disabled people with their level of participation, and barriers to participation. Of those surveyed, 98.0% reported doing one or a combination of the following: watching television; listening to radio, records or tapes; reading. Those with speaking and "other" limitations used the telephone less than those with other types of limitations; similarly, those with severe disabilities used the telephone less than those with less-severe disabilities. Participation decreased with age for activities such as doing arts or crafts, gardening, and talking on the telephone. Those aged 65 and over were more likely to be satisfied with their activity than younger people. Overall, 47.4% of those with a severe disability wanted to do more, compared to 34.0% with a moderate disability and 26.2% with a slight disability. The physical inability to do more was the most-often cited barrier to increasing activity: 53.9% of men and 55.7% of women said it was a barrier.

  4. Fermi Observations of TeV-Selected Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Di Bernardo, G.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Foschini, L.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Reyes, L. C.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-12-01

    We report on observations of TeV-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) made during the first 5.5 months of observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). In total, 96 AGNs were selected for study, each being either (1) a source detected at TeV energies (28 sources) or (2) an object that has been studied with TeV instruments and for which an upper limit has been reported (68 objects). The Fermi observations show clear detections of 38 of these TeV-selected objects, of which 21 are joint GeV-TeV sources, and 29 were not in the third EGRET catalog. For each of the 38 Fermi-detected sources, spectra and light curves are presented. Most can be described with a power law of spectral index harder than 2.0, with a spectral break generally required to accommodate the TeV measurements. Based on an extrapolation of the Fermi spectrum, we identify sources, not previously detected at TeV energies, which are promising targets for TeV instruments. Evidence for systematic evolution of the γ-ray spectrum with redshift is presented and discussed in the context of interaction with the extragalactic background light.

  5. Vibrational spectra and antimicrobial activity of selected bivalent cation benzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borawska, M. H.; Koczoń, P.; Piekut, J.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2009-02-01

    Selected bands of FT-IR spectra of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) benzoates of both solid state and water solution, were assigned to appropriate molecular vibrations. Next evaluation of electronic charge distribution in both carboxylic anion and aromatic ring of studied compounds was performed. Classical plate tests and turbidimetry measurements, monitoring growth of bacteria Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and yeasts Pichia anomala and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during 24 h of incubation, in optimal growth conditions (control) and in medium with addition of studied benzoate (concentration of 0.01% expressed as the concentration of benzoic acid), proved antimicrobial activity of studied compounds against investigated micro-organisms. PLS (partially least square) and PCR (principal component regression) techniques were applied to build a model, correlating spectral data reflecting molecular structure of studied compounds, with degree of influence of those compounds on growth of studied micro-organisms. Statistically significant correlation within cross validation diagnostic of PLS-1 calibration was found, when log 1/T of selected spectral regions of water solution samples were used as input data. The correlation coefficients between predicted with PLS calibration based on created 1, 2 or 3 factor models, and actual values of antimicrobial activity were: 0.70; 0.76, 0.81 for P. anomala, B. subtilis, and E. coli, respectively. Log(PRESS) values of appropriate models were 2.10, 2,39 and 3.23 for P. anomala, B. subtilis, and E. coli, respectively.

  6. Active link selection for efficient semi-supervised community detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Jin, Di; Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Several semi-supervised community detection algorithms have been proposed recently to improve the performance of traditional topology-based methods. However, most of them focus on how to integrate supervised information with topology information; few of them pay attention to which information is critical for performance improvement. This leads to large amounts of demand for supervised information, which is expensive or difficult to obtain in most fields. For this problem we propose an active link selection framework, that is we actively select the most uncertain and informative links for human labeling for the efficient utilization of the supervised information. We also disconnect the most likely inter-community edges to further improve the efficiency. Our main idea is that, by connecting uncertain nodes to their community hubs and disconnecting the inter-community edges, one can sharpen the block structure of adjacency matrix more efficiently than randomly labeling links as the existing methods did. Experiments on both synthetic and real networks demonstrate that our new approach significantly outperforms the existing methods in terms of the efficiency of using supervised information. It needs ~13% of the supervised information to achieve a performance similar to that of the original semi-supervised approaches. PMID:25761385

  7. Biochemical approaches to selective antifungal activity. Focus on azole antifungals.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bossche, H; Marichal, P; Gorrens, J; Coene, M C; Willemsens, G; Bellens, D; Roels, I; Moereels, H; Janssen, P A

    1989-01-01

    Azole antifungals (e.g. the imidazoles: miconazole, clotrimazole, bifonazole, imazalil, ketoconazole, and the triazoles: diniconazole, triadimenol, propiconazole, fluconazole and itraconazole) inhibit in fungal cells the 14 alpha-demethylation of lanosterol or 24-methylenedihydrolanosterol. The consequent inhibition of ergosterol synthesis originates from binding of the unsubstituted nitrogen (N-3 or N-4) of their imidazole or triazole moiety to the heme iron and from binding of their N-1 substituent to the apoprotein of a cytochrome P-450 (P-450(14)DM) of the endoplasmic reticulum. Great differences in both potency and selectivity are found between the different azole antifungals. For example, after 16h of growth of Candida albicans in medium supplemented with [14C]-acetate and increasing concentrations of itraconazole, 100% inhibition of ergosterol synthesis is achieved at 3 x 10(-8) M. Complete inhibition of this synthesis by fluconazole is obtained at 10(-5) M only. The agrochemical imidazole derivative, imazalil, shows high selectivity, it has almost 80 and 98 times more affinity for the Candida P-450(s) than for those of the piglet testes microsomes and bovine adrenal mitochondria, respectively. However, the topically active imidazole antifungal, bifonazole, has the highest affinity for P-450(s) of the testicular microsomes. The triazole antifungal itraconazole inhibits at 10(-5) M the P-450-dependent aromatase by 17.9, whereas 50% inhibition of this enzyme is obtained at about 7.5 x 10(-6)M of the bistriazole derivative fluconazole. The overall results show that both the affinity for the fungal P-450(14)DM and the selectivity are determined by the nitrogen heterocycle and the hydrophobic N-1 substituent of the azole antifungals. The latter has certainly a greater impact. The presence of a triazole and a long hypdrophobic nonligating portion form the basis for itraconazole's potency and selectivity.

  8. Inner and outer coronary vessel wall segmentation from CCTA using an active contour model with machine learning-based 3D voxel context-aware image force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivalingam, Udhayaraj; Wels, Michael; Rempfler, Markus; Grosskopf, Stefan; Suehling, Michael; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated approach to coronary vessel segmentation, which involves calcification or soft plaque delineation in addition to accurate lumen delineation, from 3D Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography data. Adequately virtualizing the coronary lumen plays a crucial role for simulating blood ow by means of fluid dynamics while additionally identifying the outer vessel wall in the case of arteriosclerosis is a prerequisite for further plaque compartment analysis. Our method is a hybrid approach complementing Active Contour Model-based segmentation with an external image force that relies on a Random Forest Regression model generated off-line. The regression model provides a strong estimate of the distance to the true vessel surface for every surface candidate point taking into account 3D wavelet-encoded contextual image features, which are aligned with the current surface hypothesis. The associated external image force is integrated in the objective function of the active contour model, such that the overall segmentation approach benefits from the advantages associated with snakes and from the ones associated with machine learning-based regression alike. This yields an integrated approach achieving competitive results on a publicly available benchmark data collection (Rotterdam segmentation challenge).

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Xanthohumol and Its Selected Structural Analogues.

    PubMed

    Stompor, Monika; Żarowska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of structural analogues of xanthohumol 1, a flavonoid compound found in hops (Humulus lupulus). The agar-diffusion method using filter paper disks was applied. Biological tests performed for selected strains of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, fungi (Alternaria sp.), and yeasts (Rhodotorula rubra, Candida albicans) revealed that compounds with at least one hydroxyl group-all of them have it at the C-4 position-demonstrated good activity. Our research showed that the strain S. aureus was more sensitive to chalcones than to the isomers in which the heterocyclic ring C is closed (flavanones). The strain R. rubra was moderately sensitive to only one compound: 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8. Loss of the hydroxyl group in the B-ring of 4'-methoxychalcones or its replacement by a halogen atom (-Cl, -Br), nitro group (-NO₂), ethoxy group (-OCH₂CH₃), or aliphatic substituent (-CH₃, -CH₂CH₃) resulted in the loss of antimicrobial activity towards both R. rubra yeast and S. aureus bacteria. Xanthohumol 1, naringenin 5, and chalconaringenin 7 inhibited growth of S. aureus, whereas 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8 was active towards two strains: S. aureus and R. rubra. PMID:27187329

  10. Highly selective antibacterial activities of silver nanoparticles against Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ju; Rong, Kaifeng; Zhao, Huiping; Li, Fei; Lu, Zhong; Chen, Rong

    2013-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different sizes (5, 15 and 55 nm) were synthesized via simple method, and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). The antibacterial activities of the prepared AgNPs against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli), Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) were evaluated by inhibition zone, inhibition curve, and colony counting methods. The results showed that the AgNPs exhibited obvious bacterium-selective and size-dependent antibacterial activities. The Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and B. subtilis were more sensitive to AgNPs than Gram-negative bacterium E. coli. Interestingly, AgNPs displayed remarkably antibacterial activities against B. subtilis among Gram-positive bacteria, regardless of whether in separately or cocultured bacteria. It also showed that AgNPs with 5 nm in size presented the highest antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The effects of AgNPs on the membrane leakage of the reducing sugars from three bacteria were also measured by 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid method. The leakage amount of reducing sugars from B. subtilis was the highest among the tested bacteria, indicating that AgNPs could damage the structure of bacteria cell membrane and resulted in the leakage of reducing sugars, leading to the death of bacteria.

  11. Bipartite functions of the CREB co-activators selectively direct alternative splicing or transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Amelio, Antonio L; Caputi, Massimo; Conkright, Michael D

    2009-09-16

    The CREB regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) regulate many biological processes by integrating and converting environmental inputs into transcriptional responses. Although the mechanisms by which CRTCs sense cellular signals are characterized, little is known regarding how CRTCs contribute to the regulation of cAMP inducible genes. Here we show that these dynamic regulators, unlike other co-activators, independently direct either pre-mRNA splice-site selection or transcriptional activation depending on the cell type or promoter context. Moreover, in other scenarios, the CRTC co-activators coordinately regulate transcription and splicing. Mutational analyses showed that CRTCs possess distinct functional domains responsible for regulating either pre-mRNA splicing or transcriptional activation. Interestingly, the CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein lacks the splicing domain and is incapable of altering splice-site selection despite robustly activating transcription. The differential usage of these distinct domains allows CRTCs to selectively mediate multiple facets of gene regulation, indicating that co-activators are not solely restricted to coordinating alternative splicing with increase in transcriptional activity.

  12. Segmentation of the common carotid artery walls based on a frequency implementation of active contours: segmentation of the common carotid artery walls.

    PubMed

    Bastida-Jumilla, M Consuelo; Menchón-Lara, Rosa M; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Sancho-Gómez, José Luis

    2013-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most extended cardiovascular diseases nowadays. Although it may be unnoticed during years, it also may suddenly trigger severe illnesses such as stroke, embolisms or ischemia. Therefore, an early detection of atherosclerosis can prevent adult population from suffering more serious pathologies. The intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) has been used as an early and reliable indicator of atherosclerosis for years. The IMT is manually computed from ultrasound images, a process that can be repeated as many times as necessary (over different ultrasound images of the same patient), but also prone to errors. With the aim to reduce the inter-observer variability and the subjectivity of the measurement, a fully automatic computer-based method based on ultrasound image processing and a frequency-domain implementation of active contours is proposed. The images used in this work were obtained with the same ultrasound scanner (Philips iU22 Ultrasound System) but with different spatial resolutions. The proposed solution does not extract only the IMT but also the CCA diameter, which is not as relevant as the IMT to predict future atherosclerosis evolution but it is a statistically interesting piece of information for the doctors to determine the cardiovascular risk. The results of the proposed method have been validated by doctors, and these results are visually and numerically satisfactory when considering the medical measurements as ground truth, with a maximum deviation of only 3.4 pixels (0.0248 mm) for IMT. PMID:22552539

  13. Recurrent Selection for Transgene Activity Levels in Maize Results in Proxy Selection for a Native Gene with the Same Promoter.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Anastasia L; Schroder, Megan N; Scott, M Paul

    2016-01-01

    High activity levels of a transgene can be very useful, making a transgene easier to evaluate for safety and efficacy. High activity levels can also increase the economic benefit of the production of high value proteins in transgenic plants. The goal of this research is to determine if recurrent selection for activity of a transgene will result in higher activity, and if selection for activity of a transgene controlled by a native promoter will also increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter. To accomplish this goal we used transgenic maize containing a construct encoding green fluorescent protein controlled by the promoter for the maize endosperm-specific 27 kDa gamma zein seed storage protein. We carried out recurrent selection for fluorescence intensity in two breeding populations. After three generations of selection, both selected populations were significantly more fluorescent and had significantly higher levels of 27 kDa gamma zein than the unselected control populations. These higher levels of the 27 kDa gamma zein occurred independently of the presence of the transgene. The results show that recurrent selection can be used to increase activity of a transgene and that selection for a transgene controlled by a native promoter can increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter via proxy selection. Moreover, the increase in native gene protein level is maintained in the absence of the transgene, demonstrating that proxy selection can be used to produce non-transgenic plants with desired changes in gene expression.

  14. Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components

    SciTech Connect

    N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

    2011-08-01

    There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and

  15. Acetylcholine activity in selective striatal regions supports behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ragozzino, Michael E; Mohler, Eric G; Prior, Margaret; Palencia, Carlos A; Rozman, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Daily living often requires individuals to flexibly respond to new circumstances. There is considerable evidence that the striatum is part of a larger neural network that supports flexible adaptations. Cholinergic interneurons are situated to strongly influence striatal output patterns which may enable flexible adaptations. The present experiments investigated whether acetylcholine actions in different striatal regions support behavioral flexibility by measuring acetylcholine efflux during place reversal learning. Acetylcholine efflux selectively increased in the dorsomedial striatum, but not dorsolateral or ventromedial striatum during place reversal learning. In order to modulate the M2-class of autoreceptors, administration of oxotremorine sesquifumurate (100 nM) into the dorsomedial striatum, concomitantly impaired reversal learning and an increase in acetylcholine output. These effects were reversed by the m(2) muscarinic receptor antagonist, AF-DX-116 (20 nM). The effects of oxotremorine sesquifumurate and AF-DX-116 on acetylcholine efflux were selective to behaviorally-induced changes as neither treatment affected acetylcholine output in a resting condition. In contrast to reversal learning, acetylcholine efflux in the dorsomedial striatum did not change during place acquisition. The results reveal an essential role for cholinergic activity and define its locus of control to the dorsomedial striatum in cognitive flexibility.

  16. Serum cholesterol selectively regulates glucocorticoid sensitivity through activation of JNK.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Caratti, Giorgio; Ince, Louise M; Poolman, Toryn M; Trebble, Peter J; Holt, Cathy M; Ray, David W; Matthews, Laura C

    2014-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (Gc) are potent anti-inflammatory agents with wide clinical application. We have previously shown that increased serum concentration significantly attenuates regulation of a simple Gc-responsive reporter. We now find that glucocorticoid receptor (GR) regulation of some endogenous transactivated but not transrepressed genes is impaired, suggesting template specificity. Serum did not directly affect GR expression, activity or trafficking, implicating GR crosstalk with other signalling pathways. Indeed, a JNK inhibitor completely abolished the serum effect. We identified the Gc modulating serum component as cholesterol. Cholesterol loading mimicked the serum effect, which was readily reversed by JNK inhibition. Chelation of serum cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or inhibition of cellular cholesterol synthesis with simvastatin potentiated the Gc response. To explore the effect in vivo we used ApoE(-/-) mice, a model of hypercholesterolaemia. Consistent with our in vitro studies, we find no impact of elevated cholesterol on the expression of GR, or on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, measured by dexamethasone suppression test. Instead we find selective Gc resistance on some hepatic target genes in ApoE(-/-) mice. Therefore, we have discovered an unexpected role for cholesterol as a selective modulator of Gc action in vivo. Taken together these findings reveal a new environmental constraint on Gc action with relevance to both inflammation and cancer.

  17. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides with High Anticancer Activity and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Hao; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Chih, Ya-Han; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung; Chou, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Jya-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy to boost anticancer activity and reduce normal cell toxicity of short antimicrobial peptides by adding positive charge amino acids and non-nature bulky amino acid β-naphthylalanine residues to their termini. Among the designed peptides, K4R2-Nal2-S1 displayed better salt resistance and less toxicity to hRBCs and human fibroblast than Nal2-S1 and K6-Nal2-S1. Fluorescence microscopic studies indicated that the FITC-labeled K4R2-Nal2-S1 preferentially binds cancer cells and causes apoptotic cell death. Moreover, a significant inhibition in human lung tumor growth was observed in the xenograft mice treated with K4R2-Nal2-S1. Our strategy provides new opportunities in the development of highly effective and selective antimicrobial and anticancer peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:25970292

  18. Phenolic profile and antioxidant activity in selected seeds and sprouts.

    PubMed

    Pająk, Paulina; Socha, Robert; Gałkowska, Dorota; Rożnowski, Jacek; Fortuna, Teresa

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of germination on the phenolic acids and flavonoids profile, as well as antioxidant activity (AA), in selected edible seeds of mung beans, radish, broccoli and sunflower. Germination increased the total phenolic (TP) and flavonoid (TF) levels, as well as the AA of the seeds, and influenced the profile of free and bound phenolic compounds. Among the samples, mung bean was characterised by lowest levels of TP and TF, as well as AA, evaluated using ABTS, DPPH and FRAP assays. Sunflower and radish sprouts were the most rich in phenolic compounds. Insignificant amounts of free phenolic acids were found in the free phenolic acid fraction; alkaline hydrolysis of the seeds and sprouts extracts provided the majority of the phenolic acids. The amounts of free and bound flavonoids were inconsiderable both for seeds and sprouts. PMID:24054243

  19. Phenolic profile and antioxidant activity in selected seeds and sprouts.

    PubMed

    Pająk, Paulina; Socha, Robert; Gałkowska, Dorota; Rożnowski, Jacek; Fortuna, Teresa

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of germination on the phenolic acids and flavonoids profile, as well as antioxidant activity (AA), in selected edible seeds of mung beans, radish, broccoli and sunflower. Germination increased the total phenolic (TP) and flavonoid (TF) levels, as well as the AA of the seeds, and influenced the profile of free and bound phenolic compounds. Among the samples, mung bean was characterised by lowest levels of TP and TF, as well as AA, evaluated using ABTS, DPPH and FRAP assays. Sunflower and radish sprouts were the most rich in phenolic compounds. Insignificant amounts of free phenolic acids were found in the free phenolic acid fraction; alkaline hydrolysis of the seeds and sprouts extracts provided the majority of the phenolic acids. The amounts of free and bound flavonoids were inconsiderable both for seeds and sprouts.

  20. Computer-Assisted Segmentation of Videocapsule Images Using Alpha-Divergence-Based Active Contour in the Framework of Intestinal Pathologies Detection

    PubMed Central

    Meziou, L.; Histace, A.; Precioso, F.; Romain, O.; Dray, X.; Granado, B.; Matuszewski, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract through natural orifices is a challenge for endoscopists. Videoendoscopy is currently the “gold standard” technique for diagnosis of different pathologies of the intestinal tract. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has been developed in the 1990s as an alternative to videoendoscopy to allow direct examination of the gastrointestinal tract without any need for sedation. Nevertheless, the systematic postexamination by the specialist of the 50,000 (for the small bowel) to 150,000 images (for the colon) of a complete acquisition using WCE remains time-consuming and challenging due to the poor quality of WCE images. In this paper, a semiautomatic segmentation for analysis of WCE images is proposed. Based on active contour segmentation, the proposed method introduces alpha-divergences, a flexible statistical similarity measure that gives a real flexibility to different types of gastrointestinal pathologies. Results of segmentation using the proposed approach are shown on different types of real-case examinations, from (multi)polyp(s) segmentation, to radiation enteritis delineation. PMID:25587264

  1. Wearable Multi-Frequency and Multi-Segment Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Unobtrusively Tracking Body Fluid Shifts during Physical Activity in Real-Field Applications: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Federica; Magnani, Alessandro; Maggioni, Martina A.; Stahn, Alexander; Rampichini, Susanna; Merati, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy (BIS) allows assessing the composition of body districts noninvasively and quickly, potentially providing important physiological/clinical information. However, neither portable commercial instruments nor more advanced wearable prototypes simultaneously satisfy the demanding needs of unobtrusively tracking body fluid shifts in different segments simultaneously, over a broad frequency range, for long periods and with high measurements rate. These needs are often required to evaluate exercise tests in sports or rehabilitation medicine, or to assess gravitational stresses in aerospace medicine. Therefore, the aim of this work is to present a new wearable prototype for monitoring multi-segment and multi-frequency BIS unobtrusively over long periods. Our prototype guarantees low weight, small size and low power consumption. An analog board with current-injecting and voltage-sensing electrodes across three body segments interfaces a digital board that generates square-wave current stimuli and computes impedance at 10 frequencies from 1 to 796 kHz. To evaluate the information derivable from our device, we monitored the BIS of three body segments in a volunteer before, during and after physical exercise and postural shift. We show that it can describe the dynamics of exercise-induced changes and the effect of a sit-to-stand maneuver in active and inactive muscular districts separately and simultaneously. PMID:27187389

  2. Wearable Multi-Frequency and Multi-Segment Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Unobtrusively Tracking Body Fluid Shifts during Physical Activity in Real-Field Applications: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Villa, Federica; Magnani, Alessandro; Maggioni, Martina A; Stahn, Alexander; Rampichini, Susanna; Merati, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy (BIS) allows assessing the composition of body districts noninvasively and quickly, potentially providing important physiological/clinical information. However, neither portable commercial instruments nor more advanced wearable prototypes simultaneously satisfy the demanding needs of unobtrusively tracking body fluid shifts in different segments simultaneously, over a broad frequency range, for long periods and with high measurements rate. These needs are often required to evaluate exercise tests in sports or rehabilitation medicine, or to assess gravitational stresses in aerospace medicine. Therefore, the aim of this work is to present a new wearable prototype for monitoring multi-segment and multi-frequency BIS unobtrusively over long periods. Our prototype guarantees low weight, small size and low power consumption. An analog board with current-injecting and voltage-sensing electrodes across three body segments interfaces a digital board that generates square-wave current stimuli and computes impedance at 10 frequencies from 1 to 796 kHz. To evaluate the information derivable from our device, we monitored the BIS of three body segments in a volunteer before, during and after physical exercise and postural shift. We show that it can describe the dynamics of exercise-induced changes and the effect of a sit-to-stand maneuver in active and inactive muscular districts separately and simultaneously. PMID:27187389

  3. The yin–yang of kinase activation and unfolding explains the peculiarity of Val600 in the activation segment of BRAF

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Christina; Benisty, Hannah; Lloréns-Rico, Veronica; Serrano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Many driver mutations in cancer are specific in that they occur at significantly higher rates than – presumably – functionally alternative mutations. For example, V600E in the BRAF hydrophobic activation segment (AS) pocket accounts for >95% of all kinase mutations. While many hypotheses tried to explain such significant mutation patterns, conclusive explanations are lacking. Here, we use experimental and in silico structure-energy statistical analyses, to elucidate why the V600E mutation, but no other mutation at this, or any other positions in BRAF’s hydrophobic pocket, is predominant. We find that BRAF mutation frequencies depend on the equilibrium between the destabilization of the hydrophobic pocket, the overall folding energy, the activation of the kinase and the number of bases required to change the corresponding amino acid. Using a random forest classifier, we quantitatively dissected the parameters contributing to BRAF AS cancer frequencies. These findings can be applied to genome-wide association studies and prediction models. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12814.001 PMID:26744778

  4. Highly Selective Synthesis of Catalytically Active Monodisperse Rhodium Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Grass, M.E.; Kuhn, J.N.; Tao, F.; Habas, S.E.; Huang, W.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-02-21

    Synthesis of monodisperse and shape-controlled colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) is of increasing scientific interest and technological significance. Recently, shape control of Pt, Pd, Ag, Au, and Rh NCs has been obtained by tuning growth kinetics in various solution-phase approaches, including modified polyol methods, seeded growth by polyol reduction, thermolysis of organometallics, and micelle techniques. Control of reduction kinetics of the noble metal precursors and regulation of the relative growth rates of low-index planes (i.e. {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace}) via selective adsorption of selected chemical species are two keys for achieving shape modification of noble metal NCs. One application for noble metal NCs of well-defined shape is in understanding how NC faceting (determines which crystallographic planes are exposed) affects catalytic performance. Rh NCs are used in many catalytic reactions, including hydrogenation, hydroformylation, hydrocarbonylation, and combustion reactions. Shape manipulation of Rh NCs may be important in understanding how faceting on the nanoscale affects catalytic properties, but such control is challenging and there are fewer reports on the shape control of Rh NCs compared to other noble metals. Xia and coworkers obtained Rh multipods exhibiting interesting surface plasmonic properties by a polyol approach. The Somorjai and Tilley groups synthesized crystalline Rh multipods, cubes, horns and cuboctahedra, via polyol seeded growth. Son and colleagues prepared catalytically active monodisperse oleylamine-capped tetrahedral Rh NCs for the hydrogenation of arenes via an organometallic route. More recently, the Somorjai group synthesized sizetunable monodisperse Rh NCs using a one-step polyol technique. In this Communication, we report the highly selective synthesis of catalytically active, monodisperse Rh nanocubes of < 10 nm by a seedless polyol method. In this approach, Br{sup -} ions from trimethyl

  5. A Deterministic Approach to Active Debris Removal Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidtke, A.; Lewis, H.; Armellin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Many decisions, with widespread economic, political and legal consequences, are being considered based on space debris simulations that show that Active Debris Removal (ADR) may be necessary as the concerns about the sustainability of spaceflight are increasing. The debris environment predictions are based on low-accuracy ephemerides and propagators. This raises doubts about the accuracy of those prognoses themselves but also the potential ADR target-lists that are produced. Target selection is considered highly important as removal of many objects will increase the overall mission cost. Selecting the most-likely candidates as soon as possible would be desirable as it would enable accurate mission design and allow thorough evaluation of in-orbit validations, which are likely to occur in the near-future, before any large investments are made and implementations realized. One of the primary factors that should be used in ADR target selection is the accumulated collision probability of every object. A conjunction detection algorithm, based on the smart sieve method, has been developed. Another algorithm is then applied to the found conjunctions to compute the maximum and true probabilities of collisions taking place. The entire framework has been verified against the Conjunction Analysis Tools in AGIs Systems Toolkit and relative probability error smaller than 1.5% has been achieved in the final maximum collision probability. Two target-lists are produced based on the ranking of the objects according to the probability they will take part in any collision over the simulated time window. These probabilities are computed using the maximum probability approach, that is time-invariant, and estimates of the true collision probability that were computed with covariance information. The top-priority targets are compared, and the impacts of the data accuracy and its decay are highlighted. General conclusions regarding the importance of Space Surveillance and Tracking for the

  6. Geodynamic significance of the TRM segment in the East African Rift (W-Tanzania): Active tectonics and paleostress in the Ufipa plateau and Rukwa basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, D.; Kervyn, F.; Macheyeki, A. S.; Temu, E. B.

    2012-04-01

    The Tanganyika-Rukwa-Malawi (TRM) rift segment in western Tanzania is a key sector for understanding the opening dynamics of the East African rift system (EARS). In an oblique opening model, it is considered as a dextral transfer fault zone that accommodates the general opening of the EARS in an NW-SE direction. In an orthogonal opening model, it accommodates pure dip-slip normal faulting with extension orthogonal to the rift segments and a general E-W extension for the entire EARS. The central part of the TRM rift segment is well exposed in the Ufipa plateau and Rukwa basin, within the Paleoproterozoic Ubende belt. It is also one of the most seismically active regions of the EARS. We investigated the active tectonic architecture and paleostress evolution of the Ufipa plateau and adjacent Rukwa basin and in order to define their geodynamic role in the development of the EARS and highlight their pre-rift brittle tectonic history. The active fault architecture, fault-kinematic analysis and paleostress reconstruction show that the recent to active fault systems that control the rift structure develop in a pure extensional setting with extension direction orthogonal to the trend of the TRM segment. Two pre-rift brittle events are evidenced. An older brittle thrusting is related to the interaction between the Bangweulu block and the Tanzanian craton during the late Pan-African (early Paleozoic). It was followed by a transpressional inversion during the early Mesozoic. This inversion stage is the best expressed in the field and caused dextral strike-slip faulting along the fault systems that now control the major rift structures. It has been erroneously interpreted as related to the late Cenozoic EARS which instead is characterized by pure normal faulting (our third and last stress stage).

  7. Statistical Segmentation of Tone Sequences Activates the Left Inferior Frontal Cortex: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abla, Dilshat; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Word segmentation, that is, discovering the boundaries between words that are embedded in a continuous speech stream, is an important faculty for language learners; humans solve this task partly by calculating transitional probabilities between sounds. Behavioral and ERP studies suggest that detection of sequential probabilities (statistical…

  8. Selective activation of mechanosensitive ion channels using magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Steven; McBain, Stuart; Dobson, Jon; El Haj, Alicia J

    2008-08-01

    This study reports the preliminary development of a novel magnetic particle-based technique that permits the application of highly localized mechanical forces directly to specific regions of an ion-channel structure. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to directly and selectively activate a mechanosensitive ion channel of interest, namely TREK-1. It is shown that manipulation of particles targeted against the extended extracellular loop region of TREK-1 leads to changes in whole-cell currents consistent with changes in TREK-1 activity. Responses were absent when particles were coated with RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide or when magnetic fields were applied in the absence of magnetic particles. It is concluded that changes in whole-cell current are the result of direct force application to the extracellular loop region of TREK-1 and thus these results implicate this region of the channel structure in mechano-gating. It is hypothesized that the extended loop region of TREK-1 may act as a tension spring that acts to regulate sensitivity to mechanical forces, in a nature similar to that described for MscL. The development of a technique that permits the direct manipulation of mechanosensitive ion channels in real time without the need for pharmacological drugs has huge potential benefits not only for basic biological research of ion-channel gating mechanisms, but also potentially as a tool for the treatment of human diseases caused by ion-channel dysfunction.

  9. A quantitative geomorphological approach to constraining the volcanic and tectonic evolution of the active Dabbahu rift segment, Afar, Ethiopia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, Sarah; Pik, Raphaël; Burnard, Peter; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Blard, Pierre-Henri; France, Lydéric; Dumont, Stéphanie; Grandin, Raphaël; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Benedetti, Lucilla; Ayalew, Dereje; Yirgu, Gezahegn

    2013-04-01

    In the Afar depression (Ethiopia), extension is organised along rift segments that morphologically resemble oceanic rifts. Segmentation results from interactions between dyke injection and volcanism, as observed during the well-documented 2005 rifting event on the Dabbahu rift segment. This tectono-volcanic crisis was observed in detail via remote sensing techniques, providing invaluable information on the present-day tectonic - magmatic interplay during a sequence of dyke intrusions. However, lack of data remains on timescales of 1 to 100 kyr, the period over which the main morphology of the rift is acquired. The Dabbahu rift segment represents an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of rift morphology as a response to volcanic and tectonic influences. We use cosmogenic nuclides (3He and 36Cl) to determine the ages of young (<100 kyr) lava flows and to date the initiation and movement of fault scarps, which cut the lavas. Where possible, we analysed vertical profiles along fault scarps, in an attempt to distinguish individual tectonic events that offset the scarp, estimate their amplitudes and date the recurrence intervals. These geochronological constraints, combined with major & trace element compositions, field mapping and digital mapping (Landsat, ASTER and SPOT imagery), provide valuable insights on the magmatic and tectonic history of the segment. The results show that over the last 100 ka, the northern part of the Dabbahu segment was supplied by at least two different magma reservoirs, which can be identified from their distinctive chemistries. The main reservoir is located beneath Dabbahu volcano at the northern tip of the rift segment, and has been supplied with magma for at least 72 ka. The second reservoir is located further south on the rift axis and corresponds to the current mid-segment magma chamber, which was responsible for the 2005 rifting episode. Two magmatic cycles linked to the Dabbahu magma chamber were recorded, lasting 20-30 kyr

  10. A hybrid framework of multiple active appearance models and global registration for 3D prostate segmentation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; Lladó, Xavier; Freixenet, Jordi; Mitra, Jhimli; Vilanova, Joan C.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2012-02-01

    Real-time fusion of Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Trans Rectal Ultra Sound (TRUS) images aid in the localization of malignant tissues in TRUS guided prostate biopsy. Registration performed on segmented contours of the prostate reduces computational complexity and improves the multimodal registration accuracy. However, accurate and computationally efficient 3D segmentation of the prostate in MR images could be a challenging task due to inter-patient shape and intensity variability of the prostate gland. In this work, we propose to use multiple statistical shape and appearance models to segment the prostate in 2D and a global registration framework to impose shape restriction in 3D. Multiple mean parametric models of the shape and appearance corresponding to the apex, central and base regions of the prostate gland are derived from principal component analysis (PCA) of prior shape and intensity information of the prostate from the training data. The estimated parameters are then modified with the prior knowledge of the optimization space to achieve segmentation in 2D. The 2D segmented slices are then rigidly registered with the average 3D model produced by affine registration of the ground truth of the training datasets to minimize pose variations and impose 3D shape restriction. The proposed method achieves a mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) value of 0.88+/-0.11, and mean Hausdorff distance (HD) of 3.38+/-2.81 mm when validated with 15 prostate volumes of a public dataset in leave-one-out validation framework. The results achieved are better compared to some of the works in the literature.

  11. Preparation and use of photocatalytically active segmented Ag|ZnO and coaxial TiO2-Ag nanowires made by templated electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Maijenburg, A Wouter; Rodijk, Eddy J B; Maas, Michiel G; Ten Elshof, Johan E

    2014-05-02

    Photocatalytically active nanostructures require a large specific surface area with the presence of many catalytically active sites for the oxidation and reduction half reactions, and fast electron (hole) diffusion and charge separation. Nanowires present suitable architectures to meet these requirements. Axially segmented Ag|ZnO and radially segmented (coaxial) TiO2-Ag nanowires with a diameter of 200 nm and a length of 6-20 µm were made by templated electrodeposition within the pores of polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) or anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes, respectively. In the photocatalytic experiments, the ZnO and TiO2 phases acted as photoanodes, and Ag as cathode. No external circuit is needed to connect both electrodes, which is a key advantage over conventional photo-electrochemical cells. For making segmented Ag|ZnO nanowires, the Ag salt electrolyte was replaced after formation of the Ag segment to form a ZnO segment attached to the Ag segment. For making coaxial TiO2-Ag nanowires, a TiO2 gel was first formed by the electrochemically induced sol-gel method. Drying and thermal annealing of the as-formed TiO2 gel resulted in the formation of crystalline TiO2 nanotubes. A subsequent Ag electrodeposition step inside the TiO2 nanotubes resulted in formation of coaxial TiO2-Ag nanowires. Due to the combination of an n-type semiconductor (ZnO or TiO2) and a metal (Ag) within the same nanowire, a Schottky barrier was created at the interface between the phases. To demonstrate the photocatalytic activity of these nanowires, the Ag|ZnO nanowires were used in a photocatalytic experiment in which H2 gas was detected upon UV illumination of the nanowires dispersed in a methanol/water mixture. After 17 min of illumination, approximately 0.2 vol% H2 gas was detected from a suspension of ~0.1 g of Ag|ZnO nanowires in a 50 ml 80 vol% aqueous methanol solution.

  12. Preparation and Use of Photocatalytically Active Segmented Ag|ZnO and Coaxial TiO2-Ag Nanowires Made by Templated Electrodeposition

    PubMed Central

    Maijenburg, A. Wouter; Rodijk, Eddy J.B.; Maas, Michiel G.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytically active nanostructures require a large specific surface area with the presence of many catalytically active sites for the oxidation and reduction half reactions, and fast electron (hole) diffusion and charge separation. Nanowires present suitable architectures to meet these requirements. Axially segmented Ag|ZnO and radially segmented (coaxial) TiO2-Ag nanowires with a diameter of 200 nm and a length of 6-20 µm were made by templated electrodeposition within the pores of polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) or anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes, respectively. In the photocatalytic experiments, the ZnO and TiO2 phases acted as photoanodes, and Ag as cathode. No external circuit is needed to connect both electrodes, which is a key advantage over conventional photo-electrochemical cells. For making segmented Ag|ZnO nanowires, the Ag salt electrolyte was replaced after formation of the Ag segment to form a ZnO segment attached to the Ag segment. For making coaxial TiO2-Ag nanowires, a TiO2 gel was first formed by the electrochemically induced sol-gel method. Drying and thermal annealing of the as-formed TiO2 gel resulted in the formation of crystalline TiO2 nanotubes. A subsequent Ag electrodeposition step inside the TiO2 nanotubes resulted in formation of coaxial TiO2-Ag nanowires. Due to the combination of an n-type semiconductor (ZnO or TiO2) and a metal (Ag) within the same nanowire, a Schottky barrier was created at the interface between the phases. To demonstrate the photocatalytic activity of these nanowires, the Ag|ZnO nanowires were used in a photocatalytic experiment in which H2 gas was detected upon UV illumination of the nanowires dispersed in a methanol/water mixture. After 17 min of illumination, approximately 0.2 vol% H2 gas was detected from a suspension of ~0.1 g of Ag|ZnO nanowires in a 50 ml 80 vol% aqueous methanol solution. PMID:24837535

  13. Antioxidant activity of selected Spanish wines in corn oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, C; Satué-Gracia, M T; Frankel, E N

    2000-11-01

    Wines contain phenolic compounds that may be useful for preventing lipid oxidation as dietary antioxidants. This study was aimed at evaluating the antioxidant activity in corn oil emulsions of seventeen selected Spanish wines and two California wines. The inhibition of hydroperoxide formation at 10 microM gallic acid equivalents (GAE) varied from 8.4% to 40.2% with the red wines, from 20.9% to 45.8% with the rosé wines, and from 6.5% to 47.0% with the white wines. The inhibition of hydroperoxide formation at 20 microM GAE varied from 11.9% to 34.1% with the red wines, from 0.1% to 34. 5% with the rosé wines, and from 3.3% to 37.2% with the white wines. The inhibition of hexanal formation at 10 microM GAE varied from 23. 6% to 64.4% with the red wines, from 42.7% to 68.5% with the rosé wines, and from 28.4% to 68.8% with the white wines. The inhibition of hexanal formation at 20 microM GAE varied from 33.0% to 46.3% with the red wines, from 11.3% to 66.5% with the rosé wines, and from -16.7% to +21.0% with the white wines. The antioxidant effect decreased with increasing concentration. This antioxidant activity was related to the five main groups of phenolic compounds identified in wines by HPLC. The relative antioxidant activity correlated positively with the total phenol content of wines (by the Folin-Ciocalteu method and by HPLC), benzoic acids, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, and flavonols, for the inhibition of hydroperoxides and hexanal at 10 and 20 microM GAE.

  14. Phasing a segmented telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykin, Irina; Yacobi, Lee; Adler, Joan; Ribak, Erez N.

    2015-02-01

    A crucial part of segmented or multiple-aperture systems is control of the optical path difference between the segments or subapertures. In order to achieve optimal performance we have to phase subapertures to within a fraction of the wavelength, and this requires high accuracy of positioning for each subaperture. We present simulations and hardware realization of a simulated annealing algorithm in an active optical system with sparse segments. In order to align the optical system we applied the optimization algorithm to the image itself. The main advantage of this method over traditional correction methods is that wave-front-sensing hardware and software are no longer required, making the optical and mechanical system much simpler. The results of simulations and laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of this optimization algorithm to correct both piston and tip-tilt errors.

  15. Segmental neuromyotonia

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Ajay; Junewar, Vivek; Sahu, Ritesh; Shukla, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral focal neuromyotonia has been rarely reported in fingers or extraocular muscles. We report a case of segmental neuromyotonia in a 20-year-old boy who presented to us with intermittent tightness in right upper limb. Electromyography revealed myokymic and neuromyotonic discharges in proximal as well as distal muscles of the right upper limb. Patient's symptoms responded well to phenytoin therapy. Such an atypical involvement of two contiguous areas of a single limb in neuromyotonia has not been reported previously. Awareness of such an atypical presentation of the disease can be important in timely diagnosis and treatment of a patient. PMID:26167035

  16. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  17. The Wnt3a/β-catenin target gene Mesogenin1 controls the segmentation clock by activating a Notch signaling program

    PubMed Central

    Chalamalasetty, Ravindra B.; Dunty, William C.; Biris, Kristin K.; Ajima, Rieko; Iacovino, Michelina; Beisaw, Arica; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Chapman, Deborah L.; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Kyba, Michael; Yamaguchi, Terry P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Segmentation is an organizing principle of body plans. The segmentation clock, a molecular oscillator best illustrated by the cyclic expression of Notch signaling genes, controls the periodic cleavage of somites from unsegmented presomitic mesoderm (PSM) during vertebrate segmentation. Wnt3a controls the spatiotemporal expression of cyclic Notch genes, however the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Transcriptional profiling of Wnt3a−/− embryos led to the identification of the bHLH transcription factor, Mesogenin1 (Msgn1), as a direct target gene of Wnt3a. To identify Msgn1 targets, we performed genome-wide studies of Msgn1 activity in embryonic stem cells. Here we show that Msgn1 is a major transcriptional activator of a Notch signaling program, synergizing with Notch to trigger clock gene expression. Msgn1 also indirectly regulates cyclic genes in the Fgf and Wnt pathways. Thus, Msgn1 is a central component of a transcriptional cascade that translates a spatial Wnt3a gradient into a temporal pattern of clock gene expression. PMID:21750544

  18. Differential activation of transcription versus recombination of transgenic T cell receptor beta variable region gene segments in B and T lineage cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have tested the ability of the T cell receptor beta (TCR-beta) transcriptional enhancer (E beta) to confer transcriptional activation and tissue-specific V(D)J recombination of TCR-beta V, D, and J segments in a transgenic minilocus recombination substrate. We find that the minimal E beta element, as previously shown for a DNA segment that contained the E mu element, promotes a high level of substrate D to J beta rearrangement in both B and T cells, but only promotes V beta to DJ beta rearrangement in T cells. Thus, both the E mu and E beta elements similarly direct V(D)J recombination of this substrate in vivo, supporting a general role for transcriptional enhancers in the normal regulation of this rearrangement process. Surprisingly, however, we found that both the V beta and DJ beta portion of the constructs were transcribed in an enhancer-dependent fashion (conferred by either E mu or E beta) in both B and T lineage cells, including normal precursor B cells propagated in culture. These findings indicate that, at least in some contexts, transcriptional activation, per se, is not sufficient to confer V(D)J recombinational accessibility to a substrate V gene segment. PMID:8006587

  19. Interactive cell segmentation based on phase contrast optics.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Su, Zhou; Zheng, Shibao; Yang, Hua; Wei, Sha

    2014-01-01

    Cell segmentation in phase contrast microscopy images lays a crucial foundation for numerous subsequent computer-aided cell image analysis, but it encounters many unsolved challenges due to image qualities and artifacts caused by phase contrast optics. Addressing the unsolved challenges, the authors propose an interactive cell segmentation scheme over phase retardation features. After partitioning the images into phase homogeneous atoms, human annotations are propagated to unlabeled atoms over an affinity graph that is learned based on discrimination analysis. Then, an active query strategy is proposed for which the most informative unlabeled atom is selected for annotation, which is also propagated to the other unlabeled atoms. Cell segmentation converges to quality results after several rounds of interactions involving both the user's intentions and characteristics of image features. Experimental results demonstrate that cells with different optical properties are well segmented via the proposed approach.

  20. Examination of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

    2004-12-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterize the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs, selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed in the National Institute of Public Health in Poland. Over 180 of pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. A surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains: Actonel 5 mg tabl. (risedronate), Aldan 10 mg tabl. (amlodipine), Aleras 10 mg tabl. (cetirisine), Aspicam 15 mg tabl. (meloxicam), Baikadent 6 mg/g gel (flavons of Scutellariae), Debretin 100 mg tabl. (trimebutine), Ferro-Duo 100 mg tabl. (ferrum), Gastrovent 145 mg caps. (bismuth citrate), Ibum 200 mg caps., Upfen 200 mg tabl. (ibuprofen), Lastet 100 mg caps. (etoposide), Legalon 70 mg tabl. (sylimarin), Madopar 125 tabl. (benserazide, levodopa), Moxenil 100 mg tabl. (nimesulide), Neurotin 800 mg tabl. (gabapentin), Propranolol 40 mg tabl. (propranolol), Rexetin 20 mg tabl. (paroxetine), Salipax 20 mg caps. (fluoxetine), Selofen 10 mg caps. (zaleplon) Stenorol 0.6% powder (halofuginone), Stimuloton 50 mg tabl. (sertraline), Superoptim 0.3 mg tabl. (hipericine), Uversan 50 mg tabl. (arbutine from Arctostaphylos uva ursi). S. aureus strain was susceptible to the most of the drugs listed above. The lowest inhibitory concentration was found for sertraline and hipericine (0.16 and 0.075 mg/mL, respectively).

  1. Examination of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

    2004-12-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterize the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs, selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed in the National Institute of Public Health in Poland. Over 180 of pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. A surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains: Actonel 5 mg tabl. (risedronate), Aldan 10 mg tabl. (amlodipine), Aleras 10 mg tabl. (cetirisine), Aspicam 15 mg tabl. (meloxicam), Baikadent 6 mg/g gel (flavons of Scutellariae), Debretin 100 mg tabl. (trimebutine), Ferro-Duo 100 mg tabl. (ferrum), Gastrovent 145 mg caps. (bismuth citrate), Ibum 200 mg caps., Upfen 200 mg tabl. (ibuprofen), Lastet 100 mg caps. (etoposide), Legalon 70 mg tabl. (sylimarin), Madopar 125 tabl. (benserazide, levodopa), Moxenil 100 mg tabl. (nimesulide), Neurotin 800 mg tabl. (gabapentin), Propranolol 40 mg tabl. (propranolol), Rexetin 20 mg tabl. (paroxetine), Salipax 20 mg caps. (fluoxetine), Selofen 10 mg caps. (zaleplon) Stenorol 0.6% powder (halofuginone), Stimuloton 50 mg tabl. (sertraline), Superoptim 0.3 mg tabl. (hipericine), Uversan 50 mg tabl. (arbutine from Arctostaphylos uva ursi). S. aureus strain was susceptible to the most of the drugs listed above. The lowest inhibitory concentration was found for sertraline and hipericine (0.16 and 0.075 mg/mL, respectively). PMID:15909927

  2. Cellular image segmentation using n-agent cooperative game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimock, Ian B.; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2016-03-01

    Image segmentation is an important problem in computer vision and has significant applications in the segmentation of cellular images. Many different imaging techniques exist and produce a variety of image properties which pose difficulties to image segmentation routines. Bright-field images are particularly challenging because of the non-uniform shape of the cells, the low contrast between cells and background, and imaging artifacts such as halos and broken edges. Classical segmentation techniques often produce poor results on these challenging images. Previous attempts at bright-field imaging are often limited in scope to the images that they segment. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm for automatically segmenting cellular images. The algorithm incorporates two game theoretic models which allow each pixel to act as an independent agent with the goal of selecting their best labelling strategy. In the non-cooperative model, the pixels choose strategies greedily based only on local information. In the cooperative model, the pixels can form coalitions, which select labelling strategies that benefit the entire group. Combining these two models produces a method which allows the pixels to balance both local and global information when selecting their label. With the addition of k-means and active contour techniques for initialization and post-processing purposes, we achieve a robust segmentation routine. The algorithm is applied to several cell image datasets including bright-field images, fluorescent images and simulated images. Experiments show that the algorithm produces good segmentation results across the variety of datasets which differ in cell density, cell shape, contrast, and noise levels.

  3. Two new iridoids from selected Penstemon species--antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Sybilla M; Graikou, Konstantia; Sotiroudis, Georgios; Głowniak, Kazimierz; Chinou, Ioanna

    2013-01-01

    Eighteen secondary metabolites, belonging to three different chemical groups, were isolated from the methanolic extracts of the aerial parts of selected penstemon plants [Penstemon fruticosus (Pursh) Greene var. fruticosus, Penstemon palmeri Gray and Penstemon venustus Doug. ex Lindl.], and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral evidence. Six iridoid glucosides (1-6), three phenylpropanoid glucosides (13-15) and two acetophenone derivatives (16,17), obtained from P. fruticosus, five iridoids (2, 7-10), one phenylpropanoid glucoside (15) and two acetophenones (16, 18), isolated from P. palmeri while three iridoids (2, 11, 12) and three phenylpropanoids (13-15) were identified in P. venustus. Two of the iridoid glucosides (4, 5) from P. fruticosus are new natural products named accordingly as cis- and trans- forms of 10-O-p-methoxycinnamoylaucubin. All isolated compounds, as well as crude methanolic extracts, were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against six Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and three human pathogenic fungi.

  4. Anticancer activities of selected species of North American lichen extracts.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Gajendra; El-Naggar, Atif M; St Clair, Larry L; O'Neill, Kim L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of human deaths in the USA. Despite continuous efforts to treat cancer over the past 50 years, human mortality rates have not decreased significantly. Natural products, such as lichens, have been good sources of anticancer drugs. This study reports the cytotoxic activity of crude extracts of 17 lichen species against Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells. Out of the 17 lichen species, extracts from 14 species showed cytotoxicity against Raji cells. On the basis of IC50 values, we selected Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa and Tuckermannopsis ciliaris to study the mechanism of cell death. Viability of normal lymphocytes was not affected by the extracts of X. chlorochroa and T. ciliaris. We found that extracts from both lichens decreased proliferation, accumulated cells at the G0 /G1 stage, and caused apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Both lichen extracts also caused upregulation of p53. The T. ciliaris extract upregulated the expression of TK1 but X. chlorochroa did not. We also found that usnic, salazinic, constictic, and norstictic acids were present in the extract of X. chlorochroa, whereas protolichesterinic acid in T. ciliaris extracts. Our data demonstrate that lichen extracts merit further research as a potential source of anticancer drugs.

  5. Classification and segmentation of intracardiac masses in cardiac tumor echocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Strzelecki, Michal; Materka, Andrzej; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Krzeminska-Pakula, Maria; Kasprzak, Jaroslaw D

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes an automatic method for classification and segmentation of different intracardiac masses in tumor echocardiograms. Identification of mass type is highly desirable, since to different treatment options for cardiac tumors (surgical resection) and thrombi (effective anticoagulant treatment) are possible. Correct diagnosis of the character of intracardiac mass in a living patient is a true challenge for a cardiologist; therefore, an objective image analysis method may be useful in heart diseases diagnosis. Image texture analysis is used to distinguish various types of masses. The presented methods assume that image texture encodes important histological features of masses and, therefore, texture numerical parameters enable the discrimination and segmentation of a mass. The recently developed technique based on the network of synchronized oscillators is proposed for the image segmentation. This technique is based on a 'temporary correlation' theory, which attempts to explain scene recognition as it would be performed by a human brain. This theory assumes that different groups of neural cells encode different properties of homogeneous image regions (e.g. shape, color, texture). Monitoring of temporal activity of cell groups leads to scene segmentation. A network of synchronized oscillators was successfully used for segmentation of Brodatz textures and medical textured images. The advantage of this network is its ability to detect texture boundaries. It can be also manufactured as a VLSI chip, for a very fast image segmentation. The accuracy of locating of analyzed tissues in the image should be assessed to evaluate a segmentation technique. The new evaluation method based on measurement of physical textured test objects was proposed. Firstly, a series of object images was obtained by the use of different devices (scanner, digital camera and TV camera). Secondly, the images were segmented using oscillator network and feedforward artificial neural

  6. Recurrent Selection for Transgene Activity Levels in Maize Results in Proxy Selection for a Native Gene with the Same Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Anastasia L.; Schroder, Megan N.; Scott, M. Paul

    2016-01-01

    High activity levels of a transgene can be very useful, making a transgene easier to evaluate for safety and efficacy. High activity levels can also increase the economic benefit of the production of high value proteins in transgenic plants. The goal of this research is to determine if recurrent selection for activity of a transgene will result in higher activity, and if selection for activity of a transgene controlled by a native promoter will also increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter. To accomplish this goal we used transgenic maize containing a construct encoding green fluorescent protein controlled by the promoter for the maize endosperm-specific 27kDa gamma zein seed storage protein. We carried out recurrent selection for fluorescence intensity in two breeding populations. After three generations of selection, both selected populations were significantly more fluorescent and had significantly higher levels of 27kDa gamma zein than the unselected control populations. These higher levels of the 27kDa gamma zein occurred independently of the presence of the transgene. The results show that recurrent selection can be used to increase activity of a transgene and that selection for a transgene controlled by a native promoter can increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter via proxy selection. Moreover, the increase in native gene protein level is maintained in the absence of the transgene, demonstrating that proxy selection can be used to produce non-transgenic plants with desired changes in gene expression. PMID:26895451

  7. Automated segmentation of cerebral vasculature with aneurysms in 3DRA and TOF-MRA using geodesic active regions: An evaluation study

    SciTech Connect

    Bogunovic, Hrvoje; Pozo, Jose Maria; Villa-Uriol, Maria Cruz; and others

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the suitability of an improved version of an automatic segmentation method based on geodesic active regions (GAR) for segmenting cerebral vasculature with aneurysms from 3D x-ray reconstruction angiography (3DRA) and time of flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) images available in the clinical routine. Methods: Three aspects of the GAR method have been improved: execution time, robustness to variability in imaging protocols, and robustness to variability in image spatial resolutions. The improved GAR was retrospectively evaluated on images from patients containing intracranial aneurysms in the area of the Circle of Willis and imaged with two modalities: 3DRA and TOF-MRA. Images were obtained from two clinical centers, each using different imaging equipment. Evaluation included qualitative and quantitative analyses of the segmentation results on 20 images from 10 patients. The gold standard was built from 660 cross-sections (33 per image) of vessels and aneurysms, manually measured by interventional neuroradiologists. GAR has also been compared to an interactive segmentation method: isointensity surface extraction (ISE). In addition, since patients had been imaged with the two modalities, we performed an intermodality agreement analysis with respect to both the manual measurements and each of the two segmentation methods. Results: Both GAR and ISE differed from the gold standard within acceptable limits compared to the imaging resolution. GAR (ISE) had an average accuracy of 0.20 (0.24) mm for 3DRA and 0.27 (0.30) mm for TOF-MRA, and had a repeatability of 0.05 (0.20) mm. Compared to ISE, GAR had a lower qualitative error in the vessel region and a lower quantitative error in the aneurysm region. The repeatability of GAR was superior to manual measurements and ISE. The intermodality agreement was similar between GAR and the manual measurements. Conclusions: The improved GAR method outperformed ISE qualitatively as well as

  8. Accurate and Fully Automatic Hippocampus Segmentation Using Subject-Specific 3D Optimal Local Maps Into a Hybrid Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Gkontra, Polyxeni; Daras, Petros; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the structural integrity of the hippocampus (HC) is an essential step toward prevention, diagnosis, and follow-up of various brain disorders due to the implication of the structural changes of the HC in those disorders. In this respect, the development of automatic segmentation methods that can accurately, reliably, and reproducibly segment the HC has attracted considerable attention over the past decades. This paper presents an innovative 3-D fully automatic method to be used on top of the multiatlas concept for the HC segmentation. The method is based on a subject-specific set of 3-D optimal local maps (OLMs) that locally control the influence of each energy term of a hybrid active contour model (ACM). The complete set of the OLMs for a set of training images is defined simultaneously via an optimization scheme. At the same time, the optimal ACM parameters are also calculated. Therefore, heuristic parameter fine-tuning is not required. Training OLMs are subsequently combined, by applying an extended multiatlas concept, to produce the OLMs that are anatomically more suitable to the test image. The proposed algorithm was tested on three different and publicly available data sets. Its accuracy was compared with that of state-of-the-art methods demonstrating the efficacy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:27170866

  9. Excellent activity and selectivity of Cu-SSZ-13 in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2010-10-21

    Superior activity and selectivity of a Cu ion-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 were observed, in comparison to Cu-beta and Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites. Cu-SSZ-13 was not only more active in the NOx SCR reaction over the entire temperature range studied (up to 550 °C), but also more selective toward nitrogen formation, resulting in significantly lower amounts of NOx by-products (i.e., NO2 and N2O) than the other two zeolites. In addition, Cu-SSZ-13 demonstrated the highest activity and N2 formation selectivity in the oxidation of NH3. The results of this study strongly suggest that Cu-SSZ-13 is a promising candidate as a catalyst for NOx SCR with great potential in after-treatment systems for either mobile or stationary sources.

  10. Targeted Overexpression of TGF-α in the Corneal Epithelium of Adult Transgenic Mice Induces Changes in Anterior Segment Morphology and Activates Noncanonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Liu, Hongshan; Yamanaka, Osamu; Hardie, William D.; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Liu, Chia-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) transduces its signal through the epidermal growth factor receptor and is essential for corneal epithelial homeostasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that overexpression of TGF-α in the developing eye leads to anterior segment dysgenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we examined the effects of TGF-α overexpression on adult ocular surface homeostasis. Methods. Binary Tet-On transgenic Krt12rtTA/tet-O-TGF-α mice were subjected to doxycycline (Dox) induction to overexpress TGF-α in the corneal epithelium. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured by noninvasive tonometry. The enucleated eyes of the experimental mice were subjected to histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and biochemistry examination. Results. Histologic and immunofluorescent examination showed that double-transgenic mice overexpressing TGF-α manifested peripheral anterior synechiae. Elevation of IOP, activation of glial cells, and loss of retinal ganglion cells were also observed. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the expressions of genes (RXRα, PITX2, and FOXC1) related to anterior segment dysgenesis were downregulated. Canonical Wnt signaling was suppressed, whereas noncanonical Wnt ligands (Wnt4 and Wnt5a) were upregulated. Increased myosin light chain phosphorylation suggested that noncanonical Wnt signaling is activated in affected eyes. Conclusions. Overexpression of TGF-α in the corneal epithelium induces changes in anterior segment morphology. Corneal endothelial abnormalities are associated with the activation of the noncanonical Wnt and RhoA/ROCK signaling axis, indicating a potential application of RhoA/ROCK inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy for certain types of secondary angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:23412089

  11. Exploring Genetic Drift and Natural Selection through a Simulation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maret, Timothy J.; Rissing, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on the development of a laboratory exercise that would allow students to explore the concept of genetic drift. Discusses the concept of genetic drift that is coincident with natural selection and that closely models the real world. (DDR)

  12. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1993-02-17

    Preliminary investigations of these manganese oxide materials show that the different oxides exhibit different selectivity toward methanol and other products. It seems that there is a correlation between the initial O/Mn ratio of the oxide and methanol selectivity. These conclusions are supported by the results displayed in Figures 1 and 2. The main product of the manganese oxide-catalyzed CO hydrogenation is methanol except on Mao, which shows the lowest methanol selectivity, but the highest CO[sub 2] yield. Preliminarily, the results suggest that the higher the O/Mn ratio of the precursor oxide, the higher will be the methanol selectivity, while the CO[sub 2] and methane selectivities will be lower. The higher CO[sub 2] and C[sub 2], C[sub 3] and C[sub 4] hydrocarbon selectivities over the Mao catalyst compared to the other manganese oxides tested, indicates that Mao acts more like a water-gas shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalyst.

  13. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, A.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1994-07-26

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace. 5 figs.

  14. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Andrew H.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1994-01-01

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace.

  15. Effect of Selectively Introducing Arginine and D-Amino Acids on the Antimicrobial Activity and Salt Sensitivity in Analogs of Human Beta-Defensins

    PubMed Central

    Olli, Sudar; Rangaraj, Nandini; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the antimicrobial activity of C-terminal analogs of human β-defensins HBD-1and-3 wherein lysines have been selectively replaced by L- and D-arginines and L-isoleucine substituted with its D-enantiomer. The analogs exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. Physiological concentration of NaCl did not attenuate the activity of the peptides against Gram-negative bacteria considerably, while some attenuation of activity was observed against S. aureus. Variable attenuation of activity was observed in the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+. Introduction of D-amino acids abrogated the need for a disulfide bridge for exhibiting activity. Confocal images of carboxyfluorescein (CF) labeled peptides indicated initial localization on the membrane and subsequent translocation into the cell. Analogs corresponding to cationic rich segments of human defensins substituted with L- and D-arginine, could be attractive candidates for development as future therapeutic drugs. PMID:24086767

  16. Use of a lag differential reinforcement contingency to increase varied selections of classroom activities.

    PubMed

    Cammilleri, Anthony P; Hanley, Gregory P

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of a lag differential reinforcement contingency on 2 students' activity selections using reversal designs. Results showed that the lag contingency was responsible for promoting increased novel selections, engagement in diverse activities, and greater progress with respect to programmed academic activities.

  17. Use of a Lag Differential Reinforcement Contingency to Increase Varied Selections of Classroom Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cammilleri, Anthony P.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of a lag differential reinforcement contingency on 2 students' activity selections using reversal designs. Results showed that the lag contingency was responsible for promoting increased novel selections, engagement in diverse activities, and greater progress with respect to programmed academic activities.

  18. Losac, the First Hemolin that Exhibits Procogulant Activity through Selective Factor X Proteolytic Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Flores, Miryam Paola; Furlin, Daniel; Ramos, Oscar H. P.; Balan, Andrea; Konno, Katsuhiro; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Envenoming by the contact of human skin with Lonomia obliqua caterpillars promotes a hemorrhagic syndrome characterized by a consumptive coagulopathy. Losac (Lonomia obliqua Stuart factor activator) is a component of the bristle of L. obliqua that is probably partially responsible for the observed syndrome because it activates factor X and is recognized by an effective antilonomic serum. Here we unveil the proteolytic activity of Losac and demonstrate the feasibility of its recombinant production. On the other hand, Losac has no homology to known proteases, but it can be inhibited by PMSF, a serine protease inhibitor. Instead, it shows closer homology to members of the hemolin family of proteins, a group of cell adhesion molecules. The recombinant protein (rLosac) shortened the coagulation time of normal and deficient plasmas, whereas it was ineffective in factor X-deficient plasma unless reconstituted with this protein. rLosac was able to activate factor X in a dose- and time-dependent manner but not γ-carboxyglutamic acid domainless factor X. Moreover, phospholipids and calcium ions increased rLosac activity. Also, rLosac had no effect on fibrin or fibrinogen, indicating its specificity for blood coagulation activation. Linear double reciprocal plots indicate that rLosac follows a Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Cleavage of factor X by rLosac resulted in fragments that are compatible with those generated by RVV-X (a well known factor X activator). Together, our results validate Losac as the first protein from the hemolin family exhibiting procoagulant activity through selective proteolysis on coagulation factor X. PMID:21177860

  19. Feature selection for wearable smartphone-based human activity recognition with able bodied, elderly, and stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Capela, Nicole A; Lemaire, Edward D; Baddour, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Human activity recognition (HAR), using wearable sensors, is a growing area with the potential to provide valuable information on patient mobility to rehabilitation specialists. Smartphones with accelerometer and gyroscope sensors are a convenient, minimally invasive, and low cost approach for mobility monitoring. HAR systems typically pre-process raw signals, segment the signals, and then extract features to be used in a classifier. Feature selection is a crucial step in the process to reduce potentially large data dimensionality and provide viable parameters to enable activity classification. Most HAR systems are customized to an individual research group, including a unique data set, classes, algorithms, and signal features. These data sets are obtained predominantly from able-bodied participants. In this paper, smartphone accelerometer and gyroscope sensor data were collected from populations that can benefit from human activity recognition: able-bodied, elderly, and stroke patients. Data from a consecutive sequence of 41 mobility tasks (18 different tasks) were collected for a total of 44 participants. Seventy-six signal features were calculated and subsets of these features were selected using three filter-based, classifier-independent, feature selection methods (Relief-F, Correlation-based Feature Selection, Fast Correlation Based Filter). The feature subsets were then evaluated using three generic classifiers (Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine, j48 Decision Tree). Common features were identified for all three populations, although the stroke population subset had some differences from both able-bodied and elderly sets. Evaluation with the three classifiers showed that the feature subsets produced similar or better accuracies than classification with the entire feature set. Therefore, since these feature subsets are classifier-independent, they should be useful for developing and improving HAR systems across and within populations.

  20. Feature selection for wearable smartphone-based human activity recognition with able bodied, elderly, and stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Capela, Nicole A; Lemaire, Edward D; Baddour, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Human activity recognition (HAR), using wearable sensors, is a growing area with the potential to provide valuable information on patient mobility to rehabilitation specialists. Smartphones with accelerometer and gyroscope sensors are a convenient, minimally invasive, and low cost approach for mobility monitoring. HAR systems typically pre-process raw signals, segment the signals, and then extract features to be used in a classifier. Feature selection is a crucial step in the process to reduce potentially large data dimensionality and provide viable parameters to enable activity classification. Most HAR systems are customized to an individual research group, including a unique data set, classes, algorithms, and signal features. These data sets are obtained predominantly from able-bodied participants. In this paper, smartphone accelerometer and gyroscope sensor data were collected from populations that can benefit from human activity recognition: able-bodied, elderly, and stroke patients. Data from a consecutive sequence of 41 mobility tasks (18 different tasks) were collected for a total of 44 participants. Seventy-six signal features were calculated and subsets of these features were selected using three filter-based, classifier-independent, feature selection methods (Relief-F, Correlation-based Feature Selection, Fast Correlation Based Filter). The feature subsets were then evaluated using three generic classifiers (Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine, j48 Decision Tree). Common features were identified for all three populations, although the stroke population subset had some differences from both able-bodied and elderly sets. Evaluation with the three classifiers showed that the feature subsets produced similar or better accuracies than classification with the entire feature set. Therefore, since these feature subsets are classifier-independent, they should be useful for developing and improving HAR systems across and within populations. PMID:25885272

  1. Mast Cell-dependent Mesenteric Afferent Activation by Mucosal Supernatant From Different Bowel Segments of Guinea Pigs With Post-infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Bai, Tao; Qian, Wei; Li, Rui; Hou, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Mesenteric afferent nerves (MANs) play a pivotal role in the visceral-nociceptive perception. Inappropriate activation of MANs may be involved in the pathogenesis of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed the effects of mucosal mediators from different bowel segments of guinea pigs with PI-IBS on MAN firing and the role of mast cells. Methods PI-IBS was induced in guinea pigs by Trichinella spiralis infection. Inflammation in terminal ileum, proximal and distal colon was scored with hematoxylin-eosin staining, and mast cell infiltration was assessed with immunofluorescence. We determined the effects of supernatant extracted from the mucosa of different bowel segments of PI-IBS on MANs activity, and assessed the role of mast cells in this process. Results Eight weeks after infection, intestinal inflammation resolved, whereas mast cell numbers increased significantly in terminal ileum and proximal colon (P < 0.05) compared with findings in controls. Mucosal supernatant from different bowel segments of PI-IBS models, but not from controls, significantly enhanced the frequency of MAN firing (terminal ileum 41.01 ± 7.60 Hz vs. 26.55 ± 0.67 Hz, P = 0.001; proximal colon 45.90 ± 11.20 Hz vs. 30.88 ± 6.92 Hz, P = 0.002; distal colon 48.25 ± 9.70 Hz vs. 29.47 ± 6.13 Hz, P < 0.001). In addition, the excitatory effects were inhibited by mast cell stabilizer Nasmil (terminal ileum, 32.71 ± 2.52 Hz, P = 0.030; proximal colon, 30.94 ± 4.44 Hz, P = 0.002; distal colon, 27.15 ± 5.83 Hz, P < 0.001). Conclusions Supernatant from the intestinal mucosa of different bowel segments of PI-IBS models markedly enhanced the MAN firing in a mast cell-dependent manner, indicating that mast cell-mediated MAN activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PI-IBS. PMID:25843076

  2. Energy Expenditure of Selected Household Activities during Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Freedson, Patty S.; Roberts, Dawn E.; Schmidt, Michael D.; Fragala, Maren S.

    2007-01-01

    Accurately measuring pregnancy physical activity is critical to assess the percentage of pregnant women meeting the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) guidelines. In addition, valid assessment of pregnancy physical activity is important for epidemiologic studies assessing the relationship between physical activity and…

  3. Selective Activation of Neuronal Targets With Sinusoidal Electric Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Eddington, Donald K.; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Electric stimulation of the CNS is being evaluated as a treatment modality for a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and sensory disorders. Despite considerable success in some applications, existing stimulation techniques offer little control over which cell types or neuronal substructures are activated by stimulation. The ability to more precisely control neuronal activation would likely improve the clinical outcomes associated with these applications. Here, we show that specific frequencies of sinusoidal stimulation can be used to preferentially activate certain retinal cell types: photoreceptors are activated at 5 Hz, bipolar cells at 25 Hz, and ganglion cells at 100 Hz. In addition, low-frequency stimulation (≤25 Hz) did not activate passing axons but still elicited robust synaptically mediated responses in ganglion cells; therefore, elicited neural activity is confined to within a focal region around the stimulating electrode. Our results suggest that sinusoidal stimulation provides significantly improved control over elicited neural activity relative to conventional pulsatile stimulation. PMID:20810683

  4. In vitro phytotoxicity and antioxidant activity of selected flavonoids.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Laura; Mencherini, Teresa; Mancini, Emilia; Aquino, Rita Patrizia; De Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge of flavonoids involved in plant-plant interactions and their mechanisms of action are poor and, moreover, the structural characteristics required for these biological activities are scarcely known. The objective of this work was to study the possible in vitro phytotoxic effects of 27 flavonoids on the germination and early radical growth of Raphanus sativus L. and Lepidium sativum L., with the aim to evaluate the possible structure/activity relationship. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of the same compounds was also evaluated. Generally, in response to various tested flavonoids, germination was only slightly affected, whereas significant differences were observed in the activity of the various tested flavonoids against radical elongation. DPPH test confirms the antioxidant activity of luteolin, quercetin, catechol, morin, and catechin. The biological activity recorded is discussed in relation to the structure of compounds and their capability to interact with cell structures and physiology. No correlation was found between phytotoxic and antioxidant activities.

  5. In Vitro Phytotoxicity and Antioxidant Activity of Selected Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Laura; Mencherini, Teresa; Mancini, Emilia; Aquino, Rita Patrizia; De Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge of flavonoids involved in plant-plant interactions and their mechanisms of action are poor and, moreover, the structural characteristics required for these biological activities are scarcely known. The objective of this work was to study the possible in vitro phytotoxic effects of 27 flavonoids on the germination and early radical growth of Raphanus sativus L. and Lepidium sativum L., with the aim to evaluate the possible structure/activity relationship. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of the same compounds was also evaluated. Generally, in response to various tested flavonoids, germination was only slightly affected, whereas significant differences were observed in the activity of the various tested flavonoids against radical elongation. DPPH test confirms the antioxidant activity of luteolin, quercetin, catechol, morin, and catechin. The biological activity recorded is discussed in relation to the structure of compounds and their capability to interact with cell structures and physiology. No correlation was found between phytotoxic and antioxidant activities. PMID:22754304

  6. A Multiatlas Segmentation Using Graph Cuts with Applications to Liver Segmentation in CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An atlas-based segmentation approach is presented that combines low-level operations, an affine probabilistic atlas, and a multiatlas-based segmentation. The proposed combination provides highly accurate segmentation due to registrations and atlas selections based on the regions of interest (ROIs) and coarse segmentations. Our approach shares the following common elements between the probabilistic atlas and multiatlas segmentation: (a) the spatial normalisation and (b) the segmentation method, which is based on minimising a discrete energy function using graph cuts. The method is evaluated for the segmentation of the liver in computed tomography (CT) images. Low-level operations define a ROI around the liver from an abdominal CT. We generate a probabilistic atlas using an affine registration based on geometry moments from manually labelled data. Next, a coarse segmentation of the liver is obtained from the probabilistic atlas with low computational effort. Then, a multiatlas segmentation approach improves the accuracy of the segmentation. Both the atlas selections and the nonrigid registrations of the multiatlas approach use a binary mask defined by coarse segmentation. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach performs better than atlas selections and nonrigid registrations in the entire ROI. The segmentation results are comparable to those obtained by human experts and to other recently published results. PMID:25276219

  7. Position paper - peer review and design verification of selected activities

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, M.D.

    1994-09-01

    Position Paper to develop and document a position on the performance of independent peer reviews on selected design and analysis components of the Title I (preliminary) and Title II (detailed) design phases of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility project.

  8. Fault kinematics and tectonic stress in the seismically active Manyara Dodoma Rift segment in Central Tanzania Implications for the East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macheyeki, Athanas S.; Delvaux, Damien; De Batist, Marc; Mruma, Abdulkarim

    2008-07-01

    The Eastern Branch of the East African Rift System is well known in Ethiopia (Main Ethiopian Rift) and Kenya (Kenya or Gregory Rift) and is usually considered to fade away southwards in the North Tanzanian Divergence, where it splits into the Eyasi, Manyara and Pangani segments. Further towards the south, rift structures are more weakly expressed and this area has not attracted much attention since the mapping and exploratory works of the 1950s. In November 4, 2002, an earthquake of magnitude Mb = 5.5 struck Dodoma, the capital city of Tanzania. Analysis of modern digital relief, seismological and geological data reveals that ongoing tectonic deformation is presently affecting a broad N-S trending belt, extending southward from the North Tanzanian Divergence to the region of Dodoma, forming the proposed "Manyara-Dodoma Rift segment". North of Arusha-Ngorongoro line, the rift is confined to a narrow belt (Natron graben in Tanzania) and south of it, it broadens into a wide deformation zone which includes both the Eyasi and Manyara grabens. The two-stage rifting model proposed for Kenya and North Tanzania also applies to the Manyara-Dodoma Rift segment. In a first stage, large, well-expressed topographic and volcanogenic structures were initiated in the Natron, Eyasi and Manyara grabens during the Late Miocene to Pliocene. From the Middle Pleistocene onwards, deformations related to the second rifting stage propagated southwards to the Dodoma region. These young structures have still limited morphological expressions compared to the structures formed during the first stage. However, they appear to be tectonically active as shown by the high concentration of moderate earthquakes into earthquake swarms, the distribution of He-bearing thermal springs, the morphological freshness of the fault scarps, and the presence of open surface fractures. Fault kinematic and paleostress analysis of geological fault data in basement rocks along the active fault lines show that recent

  9. Examining Non-Linear Associations between Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and All-Cause Mortality Using Segmented Cox Regression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    Healthy adults are advised to perform at least 150 min of moderate-intensity physical activity weekly, but this advice is based on studies using self-reports of questionable validity. This study examined the dose-response relationship of accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behaviors on all-cause mortality using segmented Cox regression to empirically determine the break-points of the dose-response relationship. Data from 7006 adult participants aged 18 or above in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey waves 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 were included in the analysis and linked with death certificate data using a probabilistic matching approach in the National Death Index through December 31, 2011. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were measured using ActiGraph model 7164 accelerometer over the right hip for 7 consecutive days. Each minute with accelerometer count <100; 1952-5724; and ≥5725 were classified as sedentary, moderate-intensity physical activity, and vigorous-intensity physical activity, respectively. Segmented Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of time spent in sedentary behaviors, moderate-intensity physical activity, and vigorous-intensity physical activity and all-cause mortality, adjusted for demographic characteristics, health behaviors, and health conditions. Data were analyzed in 2016. During 47,119 person-year of follow-up, 608 deaths occurred. Each additional hour per day of sedentary behaviors was associated with a HR of 1.15 (95% CI 1.01, 1.31) among participants who spend at least 10.9 h per day on sedentary behaviors, and each additional minute per day spent on moderate-intensity physical activity was associated with a HR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.91, 0.96) among participants with daily moderate-intensity physical activity ≤14.1 min. Associations of moderate physical activity and sedentary behaviors on all-cause mortality were independent of each other. To conclude, evidence from this

  10. High School Girls' Perceptions of Selected Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Bretzing, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    High school students, and particularly girls, are not very active (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006). To help girls develop the abilities to enjoy lifetime, healthy physical activity, physical educators need to provide curricula that will achieve this goal. In the process, they need to make sure they are aligned with the current…

  11. Selected Energy Education Activities for Pennsylvania Middle School Grades. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Nancy; And Others

    These activities are intended to help increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage students to become energy conservationists. The document is divided into sections according to discipline area. A final section is devoted to interdisciplinary activities involving several discipline areas integrated with the energy…

  12. How targets select activation or repression in response to Wnt.

    PubMed

    Murgan, Sabrina; Bertrand, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    In metazoans, the Wnt signaling pathway plays a key role in the regulation of binary decisions during development. During this process different sets of target genes are activated in cells where the Wnt pathway is active (classic target genes) versus cells where the pathway is inactive (opposite target genes). While the mechanism of transcriptional activation is well understood for classic target genes, how opposite target genes are activated in the absence of Wnt remains poorly characterized. Here we discuss how the key transcriptional mediator of the Wnt pathway, the TCF family member POP-1, regulates opposite target genes during C. elegans development. We examine recent findings suggesting that the direction of the transcriptional output (activation or repression) can be determined by the way TCF is recruited and physically interacts with its target gene. PMID:27123368

  13. Combining registration and active shape models for the automatic segmentation of the lymph node regions in head and neck CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Antong; Deeley, Matthew A.; Niermann, Kenneth J.; Moretti, Luigi; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the state of the art technique for head and neck cancer treatment. It requires precise delineation of the target to be treated and structures to be spared, which is currently done manually. The process is a time-consuming task of which the delineation of lymph node regions is often the longest step. Atlas-based delineation has been proposed as an alternative, but, in the authors' experience, this approach is not accurate enough for routine clinical use. Here, the authors improve atlas-based segmentation results obtained for level II-IV lymph node regions using an active shape model (ASM) approach. Methods: An average image volume was first created from a set of head and neck patient images with minimally enlarged nodes. The average image volume was then registered using affine, global, and local nonrigid transformations to the other volumes to establish a correspondence between surface points in the atlas and surface points in each of the other volumes. Once the correspondence was established, the ASMs were created for each node level. The models were then used to first constrain the results obtained with an atlas-based approach and then to iteratively refine the solution. Results: The method was evaluated through a leave-one-out experiment. The ASM- and atlas-based segmentations were compared to manual delineations via the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) for volume overlap and the Euclidean distance between manual and automatic 3D surfaces. The mean DSC value obtained with the ASM-based approach is 10.7% higher than with the atlas-based approach; the mean and median surface errors were decreased by 13.6% and 12.0%, respectively. Conclusions: The ASM approach is effective in reducing segmentation errors in areas of low CT contrast where purely atlas-based methods are challenged. Statistical analysis shows that the improvements brought by this approach are significant.

  14. ACTIVE-EYES: an adaptive pixel-by-pixel image-segmentation sensor architecture for high-dynamic-range hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Marc P; Euliss, Gary W; McFadden, Michael J; Coyle, Kevin M; Milojkovic, Predrag; Haney, Michael W; van der Gracht, Joeseph; Athale, Ravindra A

    2002-10-10

    The ACTIVE-EYES (adaptive control for thermal imagers via electro-optic elements to yield an enhanced sensor) architecture, an adaptive image-segmentation and processing architecture, based on digital micromirror (DMD) array technology, is described. The concept provides efficient front-end processing of multispectral image data by adaptively segmenting and routing portions of the scene data concurrently to an imager and a spectrometer. The goal is to provide a large reduction in the amount of data required to be sensed in a multispectral imager by means of preprocessing the data to extract the most useful spatial and spectral information during detection. The DMD array provides the flexibility to perform a wide range of spatial and spectral analyses on the scene data. The spatial and spectral processing for different portions of the input scene can be tailored in real time to achieve a variety of preprocessing functions. Since the detected intensity of individual pixels may be controlled, the spatial image can be analyzed with gain varied on a pixel-by-pixel basis to enhance dynamic range. Coarse or fine spectral resolution can be achieved in the spectrometer by use of dynamically controllable or addressable dispersion elements. An experimental prototype, which demonstrated the segmentation between an imager and a grating spectrometer, was demonstrated and shown to achieve programmable pixelated intensity control. An information theoretic analysis of the dynamic-range control aspect was conducted to predict the performance enhancements that might be achieved with this architecture. The results indicate that, with a properly configured algorithm, the concept achieves the greatest relative information recovery from a detected image when the scene is made up of a relatively large area of moderate-dynamic-range pixels and a relatively smaller area of strong pixels that would tend to saturate a conventional sensor. PMID:12389978

  15. In vitro evaluation of the antimicrobial activities of selected lozenges.

    PubMed

    Richards, R M; Xing, D K

    1993-12-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial activities of 10 lozenges (Merothol, Merocets, Merocaine, Strepsils (two varieties), Dequacaine, Dequacets, Zensyls, Tyrozets, and Labosept) were determined by use of a microtiter counting method with Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans as the test organisms. Merothol, Merocets, Merocaine, and both Strepsils formulations all reduced the counts of both S. aureus and S. pyogenes suspensions by approximately 6 log cycles within 5 and 20 min, respectively. Merothol, Merocets, and Merocaine also caused a reduction in the counts of the C. albicans suspension approximately 5 log cycles within 40 min, but no other lozenge formulation showed rapid and marked activity against C. albicans. Dequacaine and Dequacets showed marked but much slower activities against this yeast. Zensyls caused an approximately 6-log-cycle reduction in bacterial counts within 40 min, and Dequacaine, Dequacets, and Tyrozets showed marked but slower antibacterial activities. This work confirmed by a statistically sound in vitro method the in vivo antibacterial activities reported for Merothol, Merocets, and Merocaine, demonstrated equivalent antibacterial activities for Strepsils, and indicated that Merothol, Merocets, and Merocaine also showed marked activities against C. albicans. PMID:8308699

  16. Distribution of alpha-amylase activity in selected broiler tissues.

    PubMed

    Rodeheaver, D P; Wyatt, R D

    1986-02-01

    In an examination of broiler alpha-amylase, significant variation in the serum enzyme activity level was noted, adult levels were lower than those of young chicks. Analysis of alpha-amylase activity in various body fluids and tissues of 11-day and 7-week-old broilers indicated that the liver cannot be considered a source of alpha-amylase, although there was activity in both liver tissue and bile of 10 units/g wet weight and 35 units/100 ml, respectively. Fluid from the oral cavity had low levels of alpha-amylase activity, less than 100 units/100 ml, which decreased with age, indicating that the salivary glands may synthesize some alpha-amylase but are not a primary source. Sonication of the pancreatic homogenates was found to significantly increase the apparent activity of alpha-amylase 35-fold over unsonicated homogenates. The pancreas was the major source of alpha-amylase with activities ranging from 89 X 10(2) to 445 X 10(2) units/g wet weight. The level of activity increased with age of the bird. The electrophoretic zymograms of serum, liver, and pancreatic homogenates indicate a similar pancreatic origin for the alpha-amylase found in each tissue or fluid.

  17. Antifungal activities of selected aromatic plants growing wild in Greece.

    PubMed

    Soković, M; Tzakou, O; Pitarokili, D; Couladis, M

    2002-10-01

    Essential oils of Origanum onites, Satureja thymbra, Salvia fruticosa (Greek sage), and Salvia pomifera subsp. calycina plants growing wild in Greece and their components carvacrol, camphor, and 1,8-cineole, were assayed for antifungal activity against 13 fungal species. Among the fungi tested were food poisoning, plant, animals and human pathogenic species. The oils presented various degrees of inhibition against all the fungi investigated. The highest and broadest activity was shown by the carvacrol content oils (O. onites and S. thymbra), while the oil of sage was the least effective. Carvacrol exhibited the highest and 1,8-cineole the lowest level of antifungal activity among the components tested. PMID:12428445

  18. MRI brain tumor segmentation and necrosis detection using adaptive Sobolev snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhmani, Arie; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Brain tumor segmentation in brain MRI volumes is used in neurosurgical planning and illness staging. It is important to explore the tumor shape and necrosis regions at di erent points of time to evaluate the disease progression. We propose an algorithm for semi-automatic tumor segmentation and necrosis detection. Our algorithm consists of three parts: conversion of MRI volume to a probability space based on the on-line learned model, tumor probability density estimation, and adaptive segmentation in the probability space. We use manually selected acceptance and rejection classes on a single MRI slice to learn the background and foreground statistical models. Then, we propagate this model to all MRI slices to compute the most probable regions of the tumor. Anisotropic 3D di usion is used to estimate the probability density. Finally, the estimated density is segmented by the Sobolev active contour (snake) algorithm to select smoothed regions of the maximum tumor probability. The segmentation approach is robust to noise and not very sensitive to the manual initialization in the volumes tested. Also, it is appropriate for low contrast imagery. The irregular necrosis regions are detected by using the outliers of the probability distribution inside the segmented region. The necrosis regions of small width are removed due to a high probability of noisy measurements. The MRI volume segmentation results obtained by our algorithm are very similar to expert manual segmentation.

  19. Selective Hyposmia in Parkinson Disease: Association with Hippocampal Dopamine Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Gedela, Satyanarayana; Herath, Priyantha; Constantine, Gregory M.; Moore, Robert Y.

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and has been attributed to early pathological deposition of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in primary olfactory centers. However, olfactory deficits do not always worsen over time despite progression of disease raising the possibility of additional pathobiological mechanisms contributing to olfactory functions in PD, such as changes in olfactory neurotransmitter functions. Neurotransmitter changes, such as altered dopaminergic status, may also better explain the selective nature of odor identification deficits in PD. Proper odor identification depends on higher order structures, such as the hippocampus, for olfactory cognitive or memory processing. Using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), we previously identified 3 odors (banana, licorice, dill pickle, labeled as UPSIT-3) that PD subjects most frequently failed to recognize compared to age- and gender matched controls. We also identified 6 odors that were equally successfully identified by controls and PD subjects (NPD-Olf6). A ratio of UPSIT-3 divided by NPD-Olf6 scores provides another descriptor of selective hyposmia in PD (“olfactory ratio”). In this study we investigated the pathophysiology of hyposmia in PD using dopamine transporter (DAT) PET. Twenty-nine PD patients (Hoehn and Yahr stages I-III; 7f/22m; age 60.2±10.8) underwent olfactory testing using the UPSIT and [11C]β-CFT DAT PET. DAT binding potentials (BP) were assessed in the hippocampus, amygdala, ventral and dorsal striatum. We found that correlation coefficients between total UPSIT scores and regional brain DAT BP were highest for the hippocampus (Rs=0.54, P=0.002) and lower for the amygdala (Rs=0.44, P=0.02), ventral (Rs=0.48, P=0.008) and dorsal striatum (Rs=0.39, P=0.03). Correlations were most significant for the selective hyposmia measures and hippocampal DAT: UPSIT-3 (Rs=0.65, P=0.0001) and the olfactory ratio (Rs=0.74, P<0.0001). We

  20. The 1995 Mw 7.2 Gulf of Aqaba Earthquake revisited: Identifying active fault segments by joint inversion of geodetic and teleseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, H.; Feng, G.; Heimann, S.; Jonsson, S.; Mai, P. M.; Nikkhoo, M.

    2015-12-01

    The largest earthquakes in Saudi Arabia occur at the northwestern boundary of the Arabian plate on a system of left-lateral transform faults extending from the Red Sea in the South and North through the Gulf of Aqaba. The last major earthquake along this boundary occurred in November 1995 and in a complex tectonic setting offshore in the Gulf of Aqaba, consisting of several transform faults and pull-apart basins. Various authors have studied this earthquake in the past, either by using geodetic radar (InSAR) or teleseismic (P and S waves) data, and several source models of the earthquake rupture and the active fault segments have been proposed. However, these source models differ significantly from each other and it still remains unclear which fault segments within the Gulf were activated during the event. There are various reasons for these differences. Teleseismic data alone cannot locate the event well, whereas the lack of near field co-seismic displacement data (due to the event's offshore location) and the quasi north-south oriented strike-slip faulting of the earthquake result in a low SNR in the radar data. Consequently, the uncertainties of inferred model parameters are large and have not been properly estimated so far. In this work, we use radar data from two additional tracks that have not been used before, which provides a more complete displacement field of the earthquake. By using multiple aperture radar interferometry it is possible to better constrain the south-north oriented strike-slip component. In addition, we include both the geodetic data and the teleseismic data in a joint inversion setup allowing combining the strengths of each dataset to constrain the model parameters. By including the full data-variance covariance-matrixes in Bayesian inference sampling, we estimate the model-uncertainties and the related range of likely source models. Consequently, we re-evaluate, which fault segments were activated during the earthquake in the Gulf of

  1. ST segment depression: the possible role of global repolarization dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hopenfeld, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Background At least some clinical data suggests that, regardless of which major coronary artery is narrowed, the early ST segment body surface pattern is characterized by a minimum near precordial lead V5 and a broad area of left precordial negative potentials. Some clinical data also suggests that late ST segment potentials can localize an ischemic heart region. Objective A computer model of a heart/torso system was implemented to study the relationship between transmembrane potentials throughout the heart and clinically observed body surface potential patterns during the early and late ST segments in ischemic patients. Methods Transmembrane potentials were selected to produce body surface potentials that matched the clinical data. Results The early ST segment pattern was matched by assigning: (i) an epicardial transmembrane potential gradient that is consistent with the normal activation/repolarization sequence, according to which the left lateral epicardium activates relatively late; (ii) an endocardial transmembrane potential distribution with the lowest transmembrane potentials in the ischemic region; and (iii) overall lower transmembrane potentials to the endocardium compared to the epicardium. Late ST segment potentials, which localized the area of the ischemic region, were generated by reducing the epicardial transmembrane potential gradient and increasing the endocardial transmembrane potential gradient. Conclusion The non-localizing nature of early ST segment depression could be due to global epicardial and endocardial transmembrane potential gradients related to the activation/repolarization sequence, whereas the possibly localizing nature of late ST segment depression could be due to the relative removal of the epicardial gradient, and an increase of the transmembrane potential gradient across the endocardium. PMID:17291348

  2. The activity of selected glycosidases in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Bierc, Marcin; Minarowski, Lukasz; Woźniak, Lukasz; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Knas, Malgorzata; Szajda, Slawomir; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2010-09-30

    The monitoring of the patients after salivary gland tumors surgery is an important clinical issue. Still imperfect diagnostic procedures also remain a challenge for searching new sensitive and specific biomarkers of neoplastic processes in salivary glands. The aim of the presented study was an the assessment of the activity of HEX, with its isoforms HEX-A and HEX-B, GLU, GAL, MAN and FUC in salivary gland tumor tissues in comparison to a healthy salivary gland tissues taken during autopsy. A group of 42 patients with benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, aged 25-65 were examined. Fragments of salivary gland tumor tissue, fragments of healthy tissue removed during autopsy, blood serum and saliva were collected from patients with salivary gland tumors and healthy volunteers. In salivary gland tumor tissue the activity of HEX, HEX-A, HEX-B, GAL, FUC was considerably higher than in comparison to healthy salivary gland tissue and ascending trend of activity of GLU, MAN was also noticed. The activity of all lysosomal exoglycosidases in blood serum in patients with salivary gland tumors was considerably higher in comparison to healthy volunteers blood serum. The considerably higher activity of HEX, HEX-A, GLU, GAL, MAN, FUC and descending trend of activity of HEX-B were noticed in saliva of patients with salivary gland tumors in comparison to healthy volunteers. The assessment of HEX in blood serum and saliva of patients with salivary gland tumor can be possibly used in diagnostics and monitoring of salivary glands tumors.

  3. An efficient method for accurate segmentation of LV in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana K., Venkata; Mitra, Abhishek; Srikrishnan, V.; Jo, Hyun Hee; Bidesi, Anup

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images is a challenging task because of high variability in the image intensity. This is due to a) wash-in and wash-out of the contrast agent over time and b) poor contrast around the epicardium (outer wall) region. Current approaches for segmentation of the endocardium (inner wall) usually involve application of a threshold within the region of interest, followed by refinement techniques like active contours. A limitation of this method is under-segmentation of the inner wall because of gradual loss of contrast at the wall boundary. On the other hand, the challenge in outer wall segmentation is the lack of reliable boundaries because of poor contrast. There are four main contributions in this paper to address the aforementioned issues. First, a seed image is selected using variance based approach on 4D time-frame images over which initial endocardium and epicardium is segmented. Secondly, we propose a patch based feature which overcomes the problem of gradual contrast loss for LV endocardium segmentation. Third, we propose a novel Iterative-Edge-Refinement (IER) technique for epicardium segmentation. Fourth, we propose a greedy search algorithm for propagating the initial contour segmented on seed-image across other time frame images. We have experimented our technique on five contrast-enhanced cardiac MR Datasets (4D) having a total of 1097 images. The segmentation results for all 1097 images have been visually inspected by a clinical expert and have shown good accuracy.

  4. The calcium-sensor guanylate cyclase activating protein type 2 specific site in rod outer segment membrane guanylate cyclase type 1.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Fik-Rymarkiewicz, Ewa; Venkataraman, Venkateswar; Krishnan, Ramalingam; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm; Sharma, Rameshwar K

    2005-05-17

    The rod outer segment membrane guanylate cyclase type 1 (ROS-GC1), originally identified in the photoreceptor outer segments, is a member of the subfamily of Ca(2+)-modulated membrane guanylate cyclases. In phototransduction, its activity is tightly regulated by its two Ca(2+)-sensor protein parts, GCAP1 and GCAP2. This study maps the GCAP2-modulatory site in ROS-GC1 through the use of multiple techniques involving surface plasmon resonance binding studies with soluble ROS-GC1 constructs, coimmunoprecipitation, functional reconstitution experiments with deletion mutants, and peptide competition assays. The findings show that the sequence motif of the core GCAP2-modulatory site is Y965-N981 of ROS-GC1. The site is distinct from the GCAP1-modulatory site. It, however, partially overlaps with the S100B-regulatory site. This indicates that the Y965-N981 motif tightly controls the Ca(2+)-dependent specificity of ROS-GC1. Identification of the site demonstrates an intriguing topographical feature of ROS-GC1. This is that the GCAP2 module transmits the Ca(2+) signals to the catalytic domain from its C-terminal side and the GCAP1 module from the distant N-terminal side.

  5. Brain aneurysm segmentation in CTA and 3DRA using geodesic active regions based on second order prototype features and nonparametric density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Monica; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2005-04-01

    Coupling the geodesic active contours model with statistical information based on regions introduces robustness in the segmentation of images with weak or inhomogeneous gradients. In the estimation of the probability density function for each region take part the definition of the features that describe the image inside the different regions and the method of density estimation itself. A Gaussian Mixture Model is frequently proposed for density estimation. This approach is based on the assumption that the intensity distribution of the image is the most discriminant feature in a region. However, the use of second order features provides a better discrimination of the different regions, as these features represent more accurately the local properties of the image manifold. Due to the high dimensionality of the problem, the use of non parametric density estimation methods becomes necessary. In this article, we present a novel method of introducing the second order information of an image for non parametric estimation of the probability density functions of the different tissues that are present in medical images. The novelty of the method stems on the use of the response of the image under an orthogonal harmonic operator set projected onto a prototype space for feature generation. The technique described here is applied to the segmentation of brain aneurysms in Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) and 3D Rotational Angiography (3DRA) showing a qualitative improvement from the Gaussian Mixture Model approach.

  6. Enzymatically active high-flux selectively gas-permeable membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Rempe, Susan; FU, Yaqin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    An ultra-thin, catalyzed liquid transport medium-based membrane structure fabricated with a porous supporting substrate may be used for separating an object species such as a carbon dioxide object species. Carbon dioxide flux through this membrane structures may be several orders of magnitude higher than traditional polymer membranes with a high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Other gases such as molecular oxygen, molecular hydrogen, and other species including non-gaseous species, for example ionic materials, may be separated using variations to the membrane discussed.

  7. Quantitative ultraviolet skin exposure in children during selected outdoor activities.

    PubMed

    Melville, S K; Rosenthal, F S; Luckmann, R; Lew, R A

    1991-06-01

    We determined the cumulative exposure of 3 body sites to ultraviolet radiation from sunlight for 126 children observed from 1-3 d during a variety of common recreational activities at a girl scout camp, baseball camp and community baseball field. Median arm exposure to children playing baseball at a camp ranged from 27.6% to 33.2% of the possible ambient exposure. These exposures are similar to adult exposures reported for comparable activities. Median exposure to the arm at the girl scout camp during mixed activities ranged from 9.0% to 26.5% of possible ambient exposure. At the girl scout camp, exposure both within and between activity groups varied substantially and were more variable than the baseball players' exposure. Arm exposure was greater than cheek and forehead exposure for all subject groups, with an arm-to-cheek exposure ratio ranging from 1.7 to 2.3. For organized sports, such as baseball, it may be possible to assign a single exposure estimate for use in epidemiologic studies or risk estimates. However, for less uniform outdoor activities, wide variability in exposure makes it more difficult to predict an individual's exposure.

  8. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  9. Cytotoxic and antimicrobial activity of selected Cameroonian edible plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Cameroon, the use of edible plants is an integral part of dietary behavior. However, evidence of the antimicrobial as well as the cytotoxic effects of many of them has not been investigated. In the present study, aqueous and methanol extracts from barks, seeds, leaves and roots of three Cameroonian edible plants namely Garcina lucida, Fagara heitzii and Hymenocardia lyrata were evaluated for their cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities. Methods Antibacterial and antifungal activities were assessed by the broth micro-dilution method meanwhile the cytotoxicity was performed using sulphorhodamine B assay (SRB) against the human leukemia THP-1, the alveolar epithelial A549, prostate cancer PC-3, breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 and cervical cancer HeLa cell lines. Results The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the seven tested extracts ranged from 62.5 μg/ml to 1000 μg/ml. The methanol (MeOH) extract from the roots of H. lyrata showed the highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and S. epidermitis. The best antifungal activity was obtained with the MeOH extract from the leaves of G. lucida against C. tropicalis (MIC value of 62.5 μg/ml). The in vitro antiproliferative activity revealed that, extract from the bark of F. heitzii and extract from H. lyrata roots had significant cytotoxic activity on THP-1 (IC50 8.4 μg/ml) and PC-3 (IC50 9.5 μg/ml) respectively. Conclusion Our findings suggest that Cameroonian spices herein studied could be potentially useful for the development of therapeutic agents against bacterial infections as well as for prostate and leukemia cancer. PMID:23565827

  10. Selective Activation of Transcription by a Novel CCAAT Binding Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sankar N.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Karsenty, Gerard; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    1988-07-01

    A novel CCAAT binding factor (CBF) composed of two different subunits has been extensively purified from rat liver. Both subunits are needed for specific binding to DNA. Addition of this purified protein to nuclear extracts of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stimulates transcription from several promoters including the α 2(I) collagen, the α 1(I) collagen, the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (RSV-LTR), and the adenovirus major late promoter. Point mutations in the CCAAT motif that show either no binding or a decreased binding of CBF likewise abolish or reduce activation of transcription by CBF. Activation of transcription requires, therefore, the specific binding of CBF to its recognition sites.

  11. Evidence that Highly Conserved Residues of Transmembrane Segment 6 of Escherichia coli MntH Are Important for Transport Activity

    PubMed Central

    Haemig, Heather A.H.; Moen, Patrick J.; Brooker, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Nramp (natural resistance-associated macrophage protein) family members have been characterized in mammals, yeast, and bacteria as divalent metal ion/H+ symporters. In previous work, a bioinformatic approach was used for the identification of residues that are conserved within the Nramp family [ref.1. Haemig, H.A. and R.J. Brooker, (2004) J Membr. Biol, 201(2): 97-107]. Based on site-directed mutagenesis of highly conserved negatively charged residues, a model was proposed for the metal binding site of the E.coli homolog, MntH. In this study, we have focused on the highly conserved residues, including two histidines, of transmembrane segment 6 (TMS-6). Multiple mutants were made at the eight conserved sites (i.e., Gly-205, Ala-206, Met-209, Pro-210, His-211, Leu-215, His-216, and Ser-217) in TMS-6 of E. coli MntH. Double mutants involving His-211 and His-216 were also made. The results indicate the side chain volume of these residues is critically important for function. In most cases, only substitutions that are closest in side chain volume still permit transport. In addition, the Km for metal binding is largely unaffected by mutations in TMS-6, whereas Vmax values were decreased in all mutants characterized kinetically. Thus, these residues do not appear to play a role in metal binding. Instead, they may comprise an important face on TMS-6 that is critical for protein conformational changes during transport. Also, in contrast to other studies, our data do not strongly indicate that the conserved histidine residues play a role in pH regulation of metal transport. PMID:20441230

  12. Importance of surface carbide formation on the activity and selectivity of Pd surfaces in the selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Burch, Robbie; Hardacre, Christopher; Hu, P.; Hughes, Philip

    2016-04-01

    A recent experimental investigation (Kim et al. J. Catal. 306 (2013) 146-154) on the selective hydrogenation of acetylene over Pd nanoparticles with different shapes concluded that Pd(100) showed higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) for acetylene hydrogenation. However, our recent density functional calculations (Yang et al. J. Catal. 305 (2013) 264-276) observed that the clean Pd(111) surface should result in higher activity and ethylene selectivity compared with the clean Pd(100) surface for acetylene hydrogenation. In the current work, using density functional theory calculations, we find that Pd(100) in the carbide form gives rise to higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) carbide. These results indicate that the catalyst surface is most likely in the carbide form under the experimental reaction conditions. Furthermore, the adsorption energies of hydrogen atoms as a function of the hydrogen coverage at the surface and subsurface sites over Pd(100) are compared with those over Pd(111), and it is found that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms is always less favoured on Pd(100) over the whole coverage range. This suggests that the Pd(100) hydride surface will be less stable than the Pd(111) hydride surface, which is also in accordance with the experimental results reported.

  13. Effects of novel subtype selective M-current activators on spinal reflexes in vitro: Comparison with retigabine.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Baz, Jorge; Lopez-Garcia, Jose A; Rivera-Arconada, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    The activation of Kv7 channels and the resulting M-current is a powerful mechanism to control neuronal excitability with profound effects in pain pathways. Despite the lack of specific data on the expression and role of these channels in nociceptive processing, much attention has been paid at exploring their potential value as targets for analgesia. Here we have characterized the spinal actions of two novel subunit selective Kv7 activators, ICA-069673 and ML213, and compared their effects to those of retigabine that acts with similar affinity on all neuronal Kv7 channels. Spinal reflexes were recorded in a mouse spinal cord in vitro preparation to allow the testing of the compounds on native spinal pathways at known concentrations. As retigabine, novel compounds depressed spinal segmental transmission with particularly strong effects on wind up, showing an adequate pro-analgesic profile. ML213 presented the highest potency. In contrast to retigabine, the effects of ICA-069673 and ML213 were blocked by XE-991 even at the highest concentrations used, suggesting specific effect on Kv7 channels. In addition, the effects of ICA-069673 on repetitive stimulation are consistent with a mode of action involving state or activity dependent interaction with the channels. Compared to retigabine, novel Kv7 openers maintain strong depressant effects on spinal nociceptive transmission showing an improved specificity on Kv7 channels. The differential effects obtained with these Kv7 openers may indicate the existence of several Kv7 conformations in spinal circuits. PMID:27263036

  14. Effects of novel subtype selective M-current activators on spinal reflexes in vitro: Comparison with retigabine.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Baz, Jorge; Lopez-Garcia, Jose A; Rivera-Arconada, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    The activation of Kv7 channels and the resulting M-current is a powerful mechanism to control neuronal excitability with profound effects in pain pathways. Despite the lack of specific data on the expression and role of these channels in nociceptive processing, much attention has been paid at exploring their potential value as targets for analgesia. Here we have characterized the spinal actions of two novel subunit selective Kv7 activators, ICA-069673 and ML213, and compared their effects to those of retigabine that acts with similar affinity on all neuronal Kv7 channels. Spinal reflexes were recorded in a mouse spinal cord in vitro preparation to allow the testing of the compounds on native spinal pathways at known concentrations. As retigabine, novel compounds depressed spinal segmental transmission with particularly strong effects on wind up, showing an adequate pro-analgesic profile. ML213 presented the highest potency. In contrast to retigabine, the effects of ICA-069673 and ML213 were blocked by XE-991 even at the highest concentrations used, suggesting specific effect on Kv7 channels. In addition, the effects of ICA-069673 on repetitive stimulation are consistent with a mode of action involving state or activity dependent interaction with the channels. Compared to retigabine, novel Kv7 openers maintain strong depressant effects on spinal nociceptive transmission showing an improved specificity on Kv7 channels. The differential effects obtained with these Kv7 openers may indicate the existence of several Kv7 conformations in spinal circuits.

  15. Analysis of Selection Activities to Supplement Approval Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loup, Jean L.; Snoke, Helen Lloyd

    1991-01-01

    Describes two surveys of libraries by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) that were conducted to compare approval plans and to determine alternative acquisitions methods for materials in philosophy and political science. Time spent by selectors is examined, collection evaluation activities are described, and implications for resource…

  16. Antioxidant activities of selective gluten free ancient grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ancient grains were known for special nutritional values along with gluten free qualities. Amaranth, quinoa, teff, buckwheat flours were evaluated for pasting properties, water holding capacity, phenolic contents, and antioxidant activities (free and bound). They all had higher water holding capacit...

  17. Thrombomodulin Binding Selects the Catalytically Active Form of Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Handley, Lindsey D; Treuheit, Nicholas A; Venkatesh, Varun J; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Human α-thrombin is a serine protease with dual functions. Thrombin acts as a procoagulant, cleaving fibrinogen to make the fibrin clot, but when bound to thrombomodulin (TM), it acts as an anticoagulant, cleaving protein C. A minimal TM fragment consisting of the fourth, fifth, and most of the sixth EGF-like domain (TM456m) that has been prepared has much improved solubility, thrombin binding capacity, and anticoagulant activity versus those of previous TM456 constructs. In this work, we compare backbone amide exchange of human α-thrombin in three states: apo, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK)-bound, and TM456m-bound. Beyond causing a decreased level of amide exchange at their binding sites, TM and PPACK both cause a decreased level of amide exchange in other regions including the γ-loop and the adjacent N-terminus of the heavy chain. The decreased level of amide exchange in the N-terminus of the heavy chain is consistent with the historic model of activation of serine proteases, which involves insertion of this region into the β-barrel promoting the correct conformation of the catalytic residues. Contrary to crystal structures of thrombin, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results suggest that the conformation of apo-thrombin does not yet have the N-terminus of the heavy chain properly inserted for optimal catalytic activity, and that binding of TM allosterically promotes the catalytically active conformation. PMID:26468766

  18. Effects of selected surfactants on soil microbial activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants (surface-active agents) facilitate and accentuate the emulsifying, dispersing, spreading, and wetting properties of liquids. Surfactants are used in industry to reduce the surface tension of liquid and to solubilize compounds. For agricultural pest management, surfactants are an import...

  19. Comparison of the Electromyographic Activation Level and Unilateral Selectivity of Erector Spinae during Different Selected Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Lan-Yuen; Wang, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yu-Han; Yang, Chich-Haung; Hou, Yi-You; Harn, Hans I-Chen; You, Yu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    For patients with scoliosis, core stabilization exercises may be beneficial in improving muscle strength and trunk dynamic control. However, few studies have examined whether the erector spinae (ES) activation status during unilateral spinal extensor strengthening meets the guideline for patients with spinal scoliosis. To determine ES activation…

  20. Characterization of selected waste tanks from the active LLLW system

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Griest, W.H.

    1996-08-01

    From September 1989 through January of 1990, there was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid-Low Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The purpose of this report is to summarize additional analytical data collected from some of the active waste tanks from November 1993 through February 1996. The analytical data for this report was collected for several unrelated projects which had different data requirements. The overall analyte list was similar for these projects and the level of quality assurance was the same for all work reported. the new data includes isotopic ratios for uranium and plutonium and an evaluation of the denature ratios to address criticality concerns. Also, radionuclides not previously measured in these waste tanks, including 99Tc and 237Np, are provided in this report.

  1. Screening of selected Indian medicinal plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Vinutha, B; Prashanth, D; Salma, K; Sreeja, S L; Pratiti, D; Padmaja, R; Radhika, S; Amit, A; Venkateshwarlu, K; Deepak, M

    2007-01-19

    Seventy-six plant extracts including methanolic and successive water extracts from 37 Indian medicinal plants were investigated for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity (in vitro). Results indicated that methanolic extracts to be more active than water extracts. The potent AChE inhibiting methanolic plant extracts included Withania somnifera (root), Semecarpus anacardium (stem bark), Embelia ribes (Root), Tinospora cordifolia (stem), Ficus religiosa (stem bark) and Nardostachys jatamansi (rhizome). The IC(50) values obtained for these extracts were 33.38, 16.74, 23.04, 38.36, 73.69 and 47.21mug/ml, respectively. These results partly substantiate the traditional use of these herbs for improvement of cognition. PMID:16950584

  2. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1992-07-30

    In methanol dehydration by K-doped Rh-Mo/[gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], while higher K levels reduced the dehydration propensity of the surface, at higher levels the potassium oxide layer formed after doping and calcining the surface interferes detrimentally with the Rh-Mo active metallic sites. Silica- and alumina-supported catalysts with 0.5% Rh loading were synthesized and tested for hydrogenation of CO.

  3. Stereochemical Assignment of Strigolactone Analogues Confirms Their Selective Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Artuso, Emma; Ghibaudi, Elena; Lace, Beatrice; Marabello, Domenica; Vinciguerra, Daniele; Lombardi, Chiara; Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram; Novero, Mara; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Scarpi, Dina; Parisotto, Stefano; Deagostino, Annamaria; Venturello, Paolo; Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Bier, Ariel; Prandi, Cristina

    2015-11-25

    Strigolactones (SLs) are new plant hormones with various developmental functions. They are also soil signaling chemicals that are required for establishing beneficial mycorrhizal plant/fungus symbiosis. In addition, SLs play an essential role in inducing seed germination in root-parasitic weeds, which are one of the seven most serious biological threats to food security. There are around 20 natural SLs that are produced by plants in very low quantities. Therefore, most of the knowledge on SL signal transduction and associated molecular events is based on the application of synthetic analogues. Stereochemistry plays a crucial role in the structure-activity relationship of SLs, as compounds with an unnatural D-ring configuration may induce biological effects that are unrelated to SLs. We have synthesized a series of strigolactone analogues, whose absolute configuration has been elucidated and related with their biological activity, thus confirming the high specificity of the response. Analogues bearing the R-configured butenolide moiety showed enhanced biological activity, which highlights the importance of this stereochemical motif. PMID:26502774

  4. Antioxidant and anticancer activities of selected persian gulf algae.

    PubMed

    Namvar, F; Baharara, J; Mahdi, A A

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of red (Gracillaria corticata), green (Ulva fasciata) and brown (Sargassum ilicifolium) seaweeds alcoholic extract, against five important human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, HepG2, and HT-29) proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were evaluated. The reducing activity and total polyphenol content were also investigated. MTT assay was used for cytotoxicity test. Morphological alterations were examined using phase contrast, fluorescent and electron microscopy. All the extracts were antiproliferative against all the cancer cell lines, dose-dependently, with G. corticata methanol extract (GCME) having the greatest inhibition activity against MCF-7 cell line. The percentage of apoptosis increased from 18 to 78 %. The cell cycle analysis also showed that GCME can induce apoptosis which confirm by TEM. Algal extract reducing activities were as follows: G. corticata > S. ilicifolium > U. fasciata. The GCME is a good source of potential complementary and alternative functional food for prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:24478544

  5. ICA model order selection of task co-activation networks

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Kimberly L.; McKay, D. Reese; Fox, Peter M.; Riedel, Michael C.; Uecker, Angela M.; Beckmann, Christian F.; Smith, Stephen M.; Fox, Peter T.; Laird, Angela R.

    2013-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has become a widely used method for extracting functional networks in the brain during rest and task. Historically, preferred ICA dimensionality has widely varied within the neuroimaging community, but typically varies between 20 and 100 components. This can be problematic when comparing results across multiple studies because of the impact ICA dimensionality has on the topology of its resultant components. Recent studies have demonstrated that ICA can be applied to peak activation coordinates archived in a large neuroimaging database (i.e., BrainMap Database) to yield whole-brain task-based co-activation networks. A strength of applying ICA to BrainMap data is that the vast amount of metadata in BrainMap can be used to quantitatively assess tasks and cognitive processes contributing to each component. In this study, we investigated the effect of model order on the distribution of functional properties across networks as a method for identifying the most informative decompositions of BrainMap-based ICA components. Our findings suggest dimensionality of 20 for low model order ICA to examine large-scale brain networks, and dimensionality of 70 to provide insight into how large-scale networks fractionate into sub-networks. We also provide a functional and organizational assessment of visual, motor, emotion, and interoceptive task co-activation networks as they fractionate from low to high model-orders. PMID:24339802

  6. Truncation of the A,A(∗),A' helices segment impairs the actin bundling activity of mammalian eEF1A1.

    PubMed

    Vlasenko, Dmytro O; Novosylna, Oleksandra V; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2015-05-01

    Translation elongation factor eEF1A is a G-protein which has a crucial role in the ribosomal polypeptide elongation and possesses a number of non-translational functions. Here, we show that the A,A(∗),A' helices segment of mammalian eEF1A is dispensable for the eEF1A*eEF1Bα complex formation. The A,A(∗),A' helices region did not interact with actin; however, its removal eliminates the actin bundling activity of eEF1A, probably due to the destruction of a dimeric structure of eEF1A. The translation function of monomers and the actin-bundling function of dimers of mammalian eEF1A is suggested.

  7. Active flow management in preparative chromatographic separations: a preliminary investigation into enhanced separation using a curtain flow inlet fitting and segmented flow outlet fitting.

    PubMed

    Camenzuli, Michelle; Ritchie, Harald J; Ladine, James R; Shalliker, R Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Active flow management in the form of curtain flow sample introduction and segmented outlet flow control has been shown to enable sample to elute through a chromatography column under the principles of the "infinite diameter column". Such an elution process avoids the detrimental effects of the heterogeneity of particle-packed chromatographic columns by injecting the sample directly into the radial core region of the column, thus avoiding wall effects. The process described herein illustrates how the principles of the infinite diameter column can be applied using conventional injection devices suitable for long-term analysis that requires robust protocols. Using this approach, sensitivity in separation was 2.5 times greater than conventional chromatography, yielding a product at twice the concentration. Benefits of curtain flow injection are thus relevant to both preparative-scale and analytical-scale separations.

  8. Computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in CT by means of geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kenji; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Epstein, Mark L.; Obajuluwa, Ademola M.; Xu Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Computerized liver extraction from hepatic CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in hepatic CT. Methods: The authors developed a computerized liver extraction scheme based on geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set contour evolution. First, an anisotropic diffusion filter was applied to portal-venous-phase CT images for noise reduction while preserving the liver structure, followed by a scale-specific gradient magnitude filter to enhance the liver boundaries. Then, a nonlinear grayscale converter enhanced the contrast of the liver parenchyma. By using the liver-parenchyma-enhanced image as a speed function, a fast-marching level-set algorithm generated an initial contour that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic active contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour evolution refined the initial contour to define the liver boundaries more precisely. The liver volume was then calculated using these refined boundaries. Hepatic CT scans of 15 prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multidetector CT system. The liver volumes extracted by the computerized scheme were compared to those traced manually by a radiologist, used as ''gold standard.''Results: The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1504 cc, whereas the mean gold standard manual volume was 1457 cc, resulting in a mean absolute difference of 105 cc (7.2%). The computer-estimated liver volumetrics agreed excellently with the gold-standard manual volumetrics (intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (F=0.77; p(F{<=}f)=0.32). The average accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and percent volume error were 98.4%, 91.1%, 99.1%, and 7.2%, respectively. Computerized CT liver volumetry would require substantially less completion time

  9. Evaluation of Antileishmanial Activity of Selected Brazilian Plants and Identification of the Active Principles

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Meyre-Silva, Christiane; Niero, Rivaldo; Bolda Mariano, Luisa Nathália; Gomes do Nascimento, Fabiana; Vicente Farias, Ingrid; Gazoni, Vanessa Fátima; dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Giménez, Alberto; Gutierrez-Yapu, David; Salamanca, Efrain; Malheiros, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated extracts, fractions, and isolated compounds from some selected Brazilian medicinal plants against strains of promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and L. brasiliensis in vitro. The cell viability was determined, comparing the results with reference standards. The dichloromethane fractions of the roots, stems, and leaves of Allamanda schottii showed IC50 values between 14.0 and 2.0 μg/mL. Plumericin was the main active compound, with IC50 of 0.3 and 0.04 μg/mL against the two species of Leishmania analyzed. The hexane extract of Eugenia umbelliflora fruits showed IC50 of 14.3 and 5.7 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. The methanolic extracts of the seeds of Garcinia achachairu and guttiferone A presented IC50 values of 35.9 and 10.4 μg/mL, against L. amazonensis, respectively. The ethanolic extracts of the stem barks of Rapanea ferruginea and the isolated compound, myrsinoic acid B, presented activity against L. brasiliensis with IC50 of 24.1 and 6.1 μg/mL. Chloroform fraction of Solanum sisymbriifolium exhibited IC50 of 33.8 and 20.5 μg/mL, and cilistol A was the main active principle, with IC50 of 6.6 and 3.1 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. It is concluded that the analyzed plants are promising as new and effective antiparasitic agents. PMID:23840252

  10. Relative contributions of 2D and 3D cues in a texture segmentation task, implications for the roles of striate and extrastriate cortex in attentional selection.

    PubMed

    Zhaoping, Li; Guyader, Nathalie; Lewis, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence has given strong support to the theory that the primary visual cortex (V1) realizes a bottom-up saliency map (A. R. Koene & L. Zhaoping, 2007; Z. Li, 2002; L. Zhaoping, 2008a; L. Zhaoping & K. A. May, 2007). Unlike the conventional models of texture segmentation, this theory predicted that segmenting two textures in an image I(rel) comprising obliquely oriented bars would become much more difficult when a task-irrelevant texture I(ir) of spatially alternating horizontal and vertical bars is superposed on the original texture I(rel). The irrelevant texture I(ir) interferes with I(rel)'s ability to direct attention. This predicted interference was confirmed (L. Zhaoping & K. A. May, 2007) in the form of a prolonged task reaction time (RT). In this study, we investigate whether and how 3D depth perception, believed to be processed mostly beyond V1 and starting in V2 (J. S. Bakin, K. Nakayama, & C. D. Gilbert, 2000; B. G. Cumming & A. J. Parker, 2000; F. T. Qiu & R. von der Heydt, 2005; R. von der Heydt, H. Zhou, & H. S. Friedman, 2000), contribute additionally to direct attention. We measured the reduction of the interference or the RT when the position of the texture grid for I(ir) was offset horizontally from that for I(rel), forming an offset, 2D, stimulus. This reduction was compared with that when this positional offset was only present in the input image to one eye, or when it was in the opposite directions in the images for the two eyes, creating a 3D stimulus with a depth separation between I(ir) and I(rel). The contribution by 3D processes to attentional guidance would be manifested by any extra RT reduction associated with the 3D stimulus over the offset 2D stimulus. This 3D contribution was not present unless the task was so difficult that RT (by button press) based on 2D cues alone was longer than about 1 second. Our findings suggest that, without other top-down factors, V1 plays a dominant role in attentional guidance during an

  11. Stimulation of phospholipase A2 activity in bovine rod outer segments by the beta gamma subunits of transducin and its inhibition by the alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Jelsema, C L; Axelrod, J

    1987-01-01

    In the rod outer segments (ROS) of bovine retina, light activation of phospholipase A2 has been shown to occur by a transducin-dependent mechanism. In this report, the transducin-mediated stimulation of phospholipase A2 is shown to require dissociation of the alpha beta gamma heterotrimer. Addition of transducin to dark-adapted transducin-poor ROS stimulated phospholipase A2 activity only with coincident exposure to white light or, in the dark, with addition of the hydrolysis-resistant GTP analog, guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[gamma-S]). Both light and GTP[gamma-S] induced dissociation of the transducin subunits and led to severalfold increases in the phospholipase A2 activity of transducin-rich, but not transducin-poor, ROS. In contrast, pertussis toxin treatment of transducin, which stabilizes the associated state of this G protein, prevented the stimulation of phospholipase A2 by exogenous transducin in the presence of light. Addition of purified transducin subunits to dark-adapted transducin-poor ROS revealed that phospholipase A2 stimulation occurred by action of the beta gamma subunits. This is in contrast to the transducin-mediated increase in cGMP phosphodiesterase activity, where activation occurs by action of the alpha subunit. The alpha subunit, which itself slightly stimulated phospholipase A2 activity, inhibited the beta gamma-induced stimulation of phospholipase A2. This inhibition appears to be the result of subunit reassociation since addition of GTP[gamma-S] abolished the inhibitory effect of the alpha subunit on the beta gamma-induced increase in phospholipase A2, while pertussis toxin treatment of the subunits further inhibited phospholipase A2 activity. Modulation of phospholipase A2 activity by the transducin subunit is, therefore, a mode of action for these subunits in signal transduction. PMID:3108876

  12. A method for active surveillance of selected communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, M J

    2000-09-01

    In 1991, an initiative was launched in the Western Pacific Region of WHO to eradicate poliomyelitis by the year 2000. Confirmation of eradication requires a certification process, in which specific criteria must be met. A hospital-based surveillance system was developed. It was sensitive enough to detect, at least one case of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) per 100,000 children under age 15 per year, which is considered the "background rate" of AFP. This system was instituted in 1997 in most countries in the Pacific, and included measles and neonatal tetanus as well as AFP. By mid-1998, 53 hospitals in the Pacific were submitting monthly forms indicating whether or not AFP, suspect measles, or neonatal tetanus had been seen in the preceding month. Compliance was excellent, with over 80% of forms submitted to WHO in 1998, thus meeting the certification standard. In 1999 a proposal was made to expand this method, in selected countries, to encompass most conditions presenting with acute fever plus rash, thus including, for example, cases of rubella and dengue. Important aspects of such surveillance include the capacity to confirm diagnoses in the laboratory, and to take effective public health action. A coordinated laboratory network had been established previously for virological analysis of stool specimens for conditions causing AFP, but laboratory support for other conditions is currently the responsibility of individual hospitals to arrange.

  13. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  14. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  15. Ribosome display for selection of active dihydrofolate reductase mutants using immobilized methotrexate on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumio; Ebihara, Takashi; Mie, Masayasu; Yanagida, Yasuko; Endo, Yaeta; Kobatake, Eiry; Aizawa, Masuo

    2002-03-01

    Ribosome display was applied to the selection of an enzyme. As a model, we selected and amplified the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene by ribosome display utilizing a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system based on binding affinity to its substrate analog, methotrexate, immobilized on agarose beads. After three rounds of selection, the DHFR gene could be effectively selected and preferentially amplified from a small proportion in a mixture also containing competitive genes. Active enzymes were expressed and amplified and by sequence analysis, four mutants of DHFR were identified. These mutants showed as much activity as the wild-type enzyme.

  16. Segmentation and determination of joint space width in foot radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, O.; de Muinck Keizer, D. M.; Bernelot Moens, H. J.; Slump, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis is frequently assessed using radiographs of hands and feet. Evaluation includes measurements of the joint space width (JSW) and detection of erosions. Current visual scoring methods are timeconsuming and subject to inter- and intra-observer variability. Automated measurement methods avoid these limitations and have been fairly successful in hand radiographs. This contribution aims at foot radiographs. Starting from an earlier proposed automated segmentation method we have developed a novel model based image analysis algorithm for JSW measurements. This method uses active appearance and active shape models to identify individual bones. The model compiles ten submodels, each representing a specific bone of the foot (metatarsals 1-5, proximal phalanges 1-5). We have performed segmentation experiments using 24 foot radiographs, randomly selected from a large database from the rheumatology department of a local hospital: 10 for training and 14 for testing. Segmentation was considered successful if the joint locations are correctly determined. Segmentation was successful in only 14%. To improve results a step-by-step analysis will be performed. We performed JSW measurements on 14 randomly selected radiographs. JSW was successfully measured in 75%, mean and standard deviation are 2.30+/-0.36mm. This is a first step towards automated determination of progression of RA and therapy response in feet using radiographs.

  17. Ice-active characteristics of soil bacteria selected by ice-affinity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sandra L; Kelley, Deborah L; Walker, Virginia K

    2006-10-01

    As an initial screen for microorganisms that produce ice-active macromolecules, ice-affinity was used to select microorganisms from soil consortia originating from three temperate regions. Once selected and subsequently purified to single colonies, these microbes were putatively identified by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing and assayed for various ice-active properties. Ice-affinity selection appeared to select for bacteria with ice-associating activities: inhibition of ice recrystallization; ice nucleation; ice shaping. Although none of these activities were observed in Paenibacillus amyloliticus C8, others such as Chryseobacterium sp. GL8, demonstrated both ice recrystallization inhibition and ice-shaping activities. Pseudomonas borealis DL7 was classified as a type I ice nucleator, Flavobacterium sp. GL7, was identified as a type III ice nucleator and Acinetobacter radioresistens DL5 demonstrated ice recrystallization inhibition. In all, 19 different culturable bacteria were selected from the thousands of microbes in late-summer collected soil samples. Many of the selected microbes have been previously reported in glacial ice cores or polar sea ice, and of five isolates that were further characterized, four showed ice-associating activities. These results indicate the significant potential of ice-affinity selection even with temperate climate soils, suggesting that sampling in more extreme and remote areas is not required for the isolation of ice-active bacteria. PMID:16958762

  18. Multi-segment trunk models used to investigate the crunch factor in golf and their relationship with selected swing and launch parameters.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Chivers, Paola; Sato, Kimitake; Burnett, Angus

    2016-10-01

    The use of multi-segment trunk models to investigate the crunch factor in golf may be warranted. The first aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the trunk and lower trunk for crunch factor-related variables (trunk lateral bending and trunk axial rotation velocity). The second aim was to determine the level of association between crunch factor-related variables with swing (clubhead velocity) and launch (launch angle). Thirty-five high-level amateur male golfers (Mean ± SD: age = 23.8 ± 2.1 years, registered golfing handicap = 5 ± 1.9) without low back pain had kinematic data collected from their golf swing using a 10-camera motion analysis system operating at 500 Hz. Clubhead velocity and launch angle were collected using a validated real-time launch monitor. A positive relationship was found between the trunk and lower trunk for axial rotation velocity (r(35) = .47, P < .01). Cross-correlation analysis revealed a strong coupling relationship for the crunch factor (R(2) = 0.98) between the trunk and lower trunk. Using generalised linear model analysis, it was evident that faster clubhead velocities and lower launch angles of the golf ball were related to reduced lateral bending of the lower trunk. PMID:26930121

  19. Multi-segment trunk models used to investigate the crunch factor in golf and their relationship with selected swing and launch parameters.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Chivers, Paola; Sato, Kimitake; Burnett, Angus

    2016-10-01

    The use of multi-segment trunk models to investigate the crunch factor in golf may be warranted. The first aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the trunk and lower trunk for crunch factor-related variables (trunk lateral bending and trunk axial rotation velocity). The second aim was to determine the level of association between crunch factor-related variables with swing (clubhead velocity) and launch (launch angle). Thirty-five high-level amateur male golfers (Mean ± SD: age = 23.8 ± 2.1 years, registered golfing handicap = 5 ± 1.9) without low back pain had kinematic data collected from their golf swing using a 10-camera motion analysis system operating at 500 Hz. Clubhead velocity and launch angle were collected using a validated real-time launch monitor. A positive relationship was found between the trunk and lower trunk for axial rotation velocity (r(35) = .47, P < .01). Cross-correlation analysis revealed a strong coupling relationship for the crunch factor (R(2) = 0.98) between the trunk and lower trunk. Using generalised linear model analysis, it was evident that faster clubhead velocities and lower launch angles of the golf ball were related to reduced lateral bending of the lower trunk.

  20. Active fault segments as potential earthquake sources: Inferences from integrated geophysical mapping of the Magadi fault system, southern Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuria, Z. N.; Woldai, T.; van der Meer, F. D.; Barongo, J. O.

    2010-06-01

    Southern Kenya Rift has been known as a region of high geodynamic activity expressed by recent volcanism, geothermal activity and high rate of seismicity. The active faults that host these activities have not been investigated to determine their subsurface geometry, faulting intensity and constituents (fluids, sediments) for proper characterization of tectonic rift extension. Two different models of extension direction (E-W to ESE-WNW and NW-SE) have been proposed. However, they were based on limited field data and lacked subsurface investigations. In this research, we delineated active fault zones from ASTER image draped on ASTER DEM, together with relocated earthquakes. Subsequently, we combined field geologic mapping, electrical resistivity, ground magnetic traverses and aeromagnetic data to investigate the subsurface character of the active faults. Our results from structural studies identified four fault sets of different age and deformational styles, namely: normal N-S; dextral NW-SE; strike slip ENE-WSW; and sinistral NE-SW. The previous studies did not recognize the existence of the sinistral oblique slip NE-SW trending faults which were created under an E-W extension to counterbalance the NW-SE faults. The E-W extension has also been confirmed from focal mechanism solutions of the swarm earthquakes, which are located where all the four fault sets intersect. Our findings therefore, bridge the existing gap in opinion on neo-tectonic extension of the rift suggested by the earlier authors. Our results from resistivity survey show that the southern faults are in filled with fluid (0.05 and 0.2 Ωm), whereas fault zones to the north contain high resistivity (55-75 Ωm) material. The ground magnetic survey results have revealed faulting activity within active fault zones that do not contain fluids. In addition, the 2D inversion of the four aero-magnetic profiles (209 km long) revealed: major vertical to sub vertical faults (dipping 75-85° east or west); an

  1. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1992-02-07

    Results of the pyridine adsorption, studies on native and K-doped alumina provide fundamental grounding for the observed methanol dehydration activity of these samples. Both the reactor studies and the pyridine adsorption studies support the conclusion that the K-doped sample had reduced Lewis acidity. Moreover, we were able to measurably alter the acidity of the support surface by our ion exchange treatment. More significantly, when reactor results for transition-metal loaded samples are reconsidered in combination with their surface characteristics suggested by our pyridine adsorption studies, our hypothesis that Rh and Mo have ultimately titrated the support surface seems all the more convincing. Hence, in light of the pyridine adsorption results, the attenuation of a transition-metal based decomposition pathway for methanol on the metal-loaded samples-as seen in the reactor testing-is all the more reasonable.

  2. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Lis; de Sousa, Bruno; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria LS; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  3. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

  4. An assessment of selected solar energy industry activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessner, J. D.

    1980-11-01

    The past, present, and near-term conditions of four industries based on solar energy technologies are examined-solar heating; photovoltaics; concentrating solar collectors for process heat and electric power applications; and passive components such as skylights and greenhouses. The report identifies key, unresolved issues for government policies intended to influence future solar industrial development; assesses the past and current federal role in these industries; and draws tentative conclusions about how government policies have affected their evolution. This evolution is compared to the evolution of typical, innovation-based industries. For each of the four solar industries researched, the collected data are discussed as follows: characteristics of sales; the government role; investment strategies and R & D activities; near-term trends; and comparisons with other industries.

  5. Mycobactericidal activity of selected disinfectants using a quantitative suspension test.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, P A; Babb, J R; Fraise, A P

    1999-02-01

    In this study, a quantitative suspension test carried out under both clean and dirty conditions was used to assess the activity of various instrument and environmental disinfectants against the type strain NCTC 946 and an endoscope washer disinfector isolate of Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium fortuitum NCTC 10,394, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 Rv NCTC 7416 and a clinical isolate of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The disinfectants tested were; a chlorine releasing agent, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) at 1000 ppm and 10,000 ppm av Cl; chlorine dioxide at 1100 ppm av ClO2 (Tristel, MediChem International Limited); 70% industrial methylated spirits (IMS); 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde (Asep, Galan); 10% succinedialdehyde and formaldehyde mixture (Gigasept, Schulke & Mayr); 0.35% peracetic acid (NuCidex, Johnson & Johnson); and a peroxygen compound at 1% and 3% (Virkon, Antec International). Results showed that the clinical isolate of MAI was much more resistant than M. tuberculosis to all the disinfectants, while the type strains of M. chelonae and M. fortuitum were far more sensitive. The washer disinfector isolate of M. chelonae was extremely resistant to 2% alkaline activated glutaraldehyde and appeared to be slightly more resistant than the type strain to Nu-Cidex, Gigasept, Virkon and the lower concentration of NaDCC. This study has shown peracetic acid (Nu-Cidex), chlorine dioxide (Tristel), alcohol (IMS) and high concentrations of a chlorine releasing agent (NaDCC) are rapidly mycobactericidal. Glutaraldehyde, although effective, is a slow mycobactericide. Gigasept and Virkon are poor mycobactericidal agents and are not therefore recommended for instruments or spillage if mycobacteria are likely to be present. PMID:10063473

  6. Dynamic model for selective metabolic activation in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Selkirk, J.K.; MacLeod, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations predict the relative ease of formation of carbonium ions from 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene-9,10-oxide or from either of the 2 symmetrical bay regions of B(e)P, and suggest their attraction to cellular nucleophiles. When both isomers were metabolized by hamster embryo fibroblasts (HEF) and the products analyzed, the results showed that the probable reason for benzo(e)pyrene's lack of carcinogenicity was its metabolic preference to attack the molecule away from the bay-region area. Particularly striking was the absence of any evidence for the formation of a significant amount of B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol. This suggests a metabolic basis for the relative lack of carcinogenic and mutagenic activity of B(e)P. The reason for this is not clear but may be due to physical or chemical factors such as membrane solubility or stereochemical requirements of the active site of the enzyme. The bay-region theory of PAH carcinogenesis predicts that carbonium ion formation from 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(e)pyrene-11, 12-oxide, if formed, would be energetically favorable. Thus, the inability of HEF and microcomes to form B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol, the precursor of its potentially highly reactive diol-epoxide, would explain the relative inertness of B(e)P in several biological systems. As the subtle biochemical interactions of the various carcinogen intermediates become clarified, it becomes apparent that susceptibility and resistance to malignant transformation are based on a complex set of both chemical and physical parameters. It is becoming clear that metabolism kinetics, membrane interaction, and the role of nuclear metabolism help dictate the passage of the carcinogen and its reactive intermediates into and through the metabolic machinery of the cell. (ERB)

  7. SELECTED PAPERS FROM PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM SEGMENTS OF UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY'S ANNUAL CONFERENCE (15TH, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, MARCH 11-13, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Cerebral Palsy Association, New York, NY.

    THIS PUBLICATION PRESENTS SELECTED PAPERS FROM THE UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY ASSOCIATION'S 15TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE, MARCH 13, 1965. PAPERS ARE--(1) "S IS TO TURN" BY PAUL V. CARLSON, (2) "CERTAIN ASPECTS OF THE FUNCTIONAL STATUS OF THE FETUS IN UTERO" BY FORREST H. ADAMS, (3) "ENCEPHALITIS--COMMON CAUSES AND AFTER EFFECTS" BY JOHN M. ADAMS, (4) "BRAIN…

  8. Efficient threshold for volumetric segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdescu, Dumitru D.; Brezovan, Marius; Stanescu, Liana; Stoica Spahiu, Cosmin; Ebanca, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in effective understanding of digital images. However, the research on the existence of general purpose segmentation algorithm that suits for variety of applications is still very much active. Among the many approaches in performing image segmentation, graph based approach is gaining popularity primarily due to its ability in reflecting global image properties. Volumetric image segmentation can simply result an image partition composed by relevant regions, but the most fundamental challenge in segmentation algorithm is to precisely define the volumetric extent of some object, which may be represented by the union of multiple regions. The aim in this paper is to present a new method to detect visual objects from color volumetric images and efficient threshold. We present a unified framework for volumetric image segmentation and contour extraction that uses a virtual tree-hexagonal structure defined on the set of the image voxels. The advantage of using a virtual tree-hexagonal network superposed over the initial image voxels is that it reduces the execution time and the memory space used, without losing the initial resolution of the image.

  9. Repellent activity of selected essential oils against Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Choochote, W; Chaithong, U; Kamsuk, K; Jitpakdi, A; Tippawangkosol, P; Tuetun, B; Champakaew, D; Pitasawat, B

    2007-07-01

    Essential oils extracted from ten plant species were screened for repellency against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Three oils; Zanthoxylum piperitum, Anethum graveolens and Kaempferia galanga, exerted protection against A. aegypti, with median complete-protection times of 1, 0.5 and 0.25 h, respectively. The protection times were increased significantly by incorporating 10% vanillin. The highest potential was established from Z. piperitum oil +10% vanillin (2.5 h, range=1-2.5 h). Mixtures from pairs of the effective oils possessed slight repellency that ranged from 0-0.5 h. None of the oil combinations repelled A. aegypti for longer than their constituent oil alone. With vanillin added, however, each oil mixture provided improved protection, which was approximately equal to oil on its own. GC/MS analysis revealed that the main component of Z. piperitum fruit oil was limonene (37.99%), with minor amounts of sabinene (13.30%) and beta-myrcene (7.17%). Repellent testing of stored samples of Z. piperitum fruit oil against A. aegypti demonstrated that repellent activity of those kept at -20 degrees C or 4 degrees C was present for a period of at least 3 months. Therefore, the essential oil of Z. piperitum fruit may prove useful in the development of mosquito repellents as an effective personal protection measure against mosquito bites. PMID:17512681

  10. Toward a generic evaluation of image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Jaime S; Corte-Real, Luís

    2005-11-01

    Image segmentation plays a major role in a broad range of applications. Evaluating the adequacy of a segmentation algorithm for a given application is a requisite both to allow the appropriate selection of segmentation algorithms as well as to tune their parameters for optimal performance. However, objective segmentation quality evaluation is far from being a solved problem. In this paper, a generic framework for segmentation evaluation is introduced after a brief review of previous work. A metric based on the distance between segmentation partitions is proposed to overcome some of the limitations of existing approaches. Symmetric and asymmetric distance metric alternatives are presented to meet the specificities of a wide class of applications. Experimental results confirm the potential of the proposed measures. PMID:16279178

  11. Spatial Correlation Function of the Chandra Selected Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2006-01-01

    two groups. We have also found that the correlation between X-ray luminosity and clustering amplitude is weak, which, however, is fully consistent with the expectation using the simplest relations between X-ray luminosity, black hole mass, and dark halo mass. We study the evolution of the AGN clustering by dividing the samples into 4 redshift bins over 0.1 Mpc< z <3.0 Mpc. We find a very mild evolution in the clustering amplitude, which show the same evolution trend found in optically selected quasars in the 2dF survey. We estimate the evolution of the bias, and find that the bias increases rapidly with redshift (b(z = 0.45) = 0.95 +/- 0.15 and b(z = 2.07) = 3.03 +/- 0.83): The typical mass of the dark matter halo derived from the bias estimates show little change with redshift. The average halo mass is found to be log (M(sub halo)/M(sun))approximates 12.1. Subject headings: cosmology: observations - large-scale structure of the universe - x-rays: diffuse background - galaxies: nuclei

  12. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  13. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2015-11-11

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding.

  14. Integrated segmentation of cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajemba, Peter; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Scott, Richard; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2011-03-01

    Automatic segmentation of cellular structures is an essential step in image cytology and histology. Despite substantial progress, better automation and improvements in accuracy and adaptability to novel applications are needed. In applications utilizing multi-channel immuno-fluorescence images, challenges include misclassification of epithelial and stromal nuclei, irregular nuclei and cytoplasm boundaries, and over and under-segmentation of clustered nuclei. Variations in image acquisition conditions and artifacts from nuclei and cytoplasm images often confound existing algorithms in practice. In this paper, we present a robust and accurate algorithm for jointly segmenting cell nuclei and cytoplasm using a combination of ideas to reduce the aforementioned problems. First, an adaptive process that includes top-hat filtering, Eigenvalues-of-Hessian blob detection and distance transforms is used to estimate the inverse illumination field and correct for intensity non-uniformity in the nuclei channel. Next, a minimum-error-thresholding based binarization process and seed-detection combining Laplacian-of-Gaussian filtering constrained by a distance-map-based scale selection is used to identify candidate seeds for nuclei segmentation. The initial segmentation using a local maximum clustering algorithm is refined using a minimum-error-thresholding technique. Final refinements include an artifact removal process specifically targeted at lumens and other problematic structures and a systemic decision process to reclassify nuclei objects near the cytoplasm boundary as epithelial or stromal. Segmentation results were evaluated using 48 realistic phantom images with known ground-truth. The overall segmentation accuracy exceeds 94%. The algorithm was further tested on 981 images of actual prostate cancer tissue. The artifact removal process worked in 90% of cases. The algorithm has now been deployed in a high-volume histology analysis application.

  15. Balanced amplification: a new mechanism of selective amplification of neural activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brendan K; Miller, Kenneth D

    2009-02-26

    In cerebral cortex, ongoing activity absent a stimulus can resemble stimulus-driven activity in size and structure. In particular, spontaneous activity in cat primary visual cortex (V1) has structure significantly correlated with evoked responses to oriented stimuli. This suggests that, from unstructured input, cortical circuits selectively amplify specific activity patterns. Current understanding of selective amplification involves elongation of a neural assembly's lifetime by mutual excitation among its neurons. We introduce a new mechanism for selective amplification without elongation of lifetime: "balanced amplification." Strong balanced amplification arises when feedback inhibition stabilizes strong recurrent excitation, a pattern likely to be typical of cortex. Thus, balanced amplification should ubiquitously contribute to cortical activity. Balanced amplification depends on the fact that individual neurons project only excitatory or only inhibitory synapses. This leads to a hidden feedforward connectivity between activity patterns. We show in a detailed biophysical model that this can explain the cat V1 observations.

  16. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  17. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  18. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  19. Sipunculans and segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kristof, Alen; Brinkmann, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Comparative molecular, developmental and morphogenetic analyses show that the three major segmented animal groups—Lophotrochozoa, Ecdysozoa and Vertebrata—use a wide range of ontogenetic pathways to establish metameric body organization. Even in the life history of a single specimen, different mechanisms may act on the level of gene expression, cell proliferation, tissue differentiation and organ system formation in individual segments. Accordingly, in some polychaete annelids the first three pairs of segmental peripheral neurons arise synchronously, while the metameric commissures of the ventral nervous system form in anterior-posterior progression. Contrary to traditional belief, loss of segmentation may have occurred more often than commonly assumed, as exemplified in the sipunculans, which show remnants of segmentation in larval stages but are unsegmented as adults. The developmental plasticity and potential evolutionary lability of segmentation nourishes the controversy of a segmented bilaterian ancestor versus multiple independent evolution of segmentation in respective metazoan lineages. PMID:19513266

  20. Station Tour: Russian Segment

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1...

  1. Gaps-in-noise detection and gender identification from noise-vocoded vowel segments: Comparing performance of active musicians to non-musicians.

    PubMed

    Donai, Jeremy J; Jennings, Mariah B

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated performance on a gender identification and temporal resolution task among active musicians and age-matched non-musicians. Brief duration (i.e., 50 and 100 ms) vowel segments produced by four adult male and four adult female speakers were spectro-temporally degraded using various parameters and presented to both groups for gender identification. Gap detection thresholds were measured using the gaps-in-noise (GIN) test. Contrary to the stated hypothesis, a significant difference in gender identification was not observed between the musician and non-musician listeners. A significant difference, however, was observed on the temporal resolution task, with the musician group achieving approximately 2 ms shorter gap detection thresholds on the GIN test compared to the non-musician counterparts. These results provide evidence supporting the potential benefits of musical training on temporal processing abilities, which have implications for the processing of speech in degraded listening environments and the enhanced processing of the fine-grained temporal aspects of the speech signal. The results also support the GIN test as an instrument sensitive to temporal processing differences among active musicians and non-musicians. PMID:27250197

  2. Light piping driven photosynthesis in the soil: Low-light adapted active photosynthetic apparatus in the under-soil hypocotyl segments of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kakuszi, Andrea; Sárvári, Éva; Solti, Ádám; Czégény, Gyula; Hideg, Éva; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Bóka, Károly; Böddi, Béla

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic activity was identified in the under-soil hypocotyl part of 14-day-old soil-grown bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Magnum) cultivated in pots under natural light-dark cycles. Electron microscopic, proteomic and fluorescence kinetic and imaging methods were used to study the photosynthetic apparatus and its activity. Under-soil shoots at 0-2cm soil depth featured chloroplasts with low grana and starch grains and with pigment-protein compositions similar to those of the above-soil green shoot parts. However, the relative amounts of photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes were higher; in addition a PIP-type aquaporin protein was identified in the under-soil thylakoids. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction measurements showed that the above- and under-soil hypocotyl segments had similar photochemical yields at low (10-55μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)) light intensities. However, at higher photon flux densities the electron transport rate decreased in the under-soil shoot parts due to inactivation of the PSII reaction centers. These properties show the development of a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus driven by light piping of the above-soil shoot. The results of this paper demonstrate that the classic model assigning source and sink functions to above- and under-soil tissues is to be refined, and a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus in under-soil bean hypocotyls is capable of contributing to its own carbon supply.

  3. Relative motion of transmembrane segments S0 and S4 during voltage sensor activation in the human BK(Ca) channel.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Antonios; Kohanteb, Azadeh P; Olcese, Riccardo

    2010-12-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel α subunits possess a unique transmembrane helix referred to as S0 at their N terminus, which is absent in other members of the voltage-gated channel superfamily. Recently, S0 was found to pack close to transmembrane segments S3 and S4, which are important components of the BK(Ca) voltage-sensing apparatus. To assess the role of S0 in voltage sensitivity, we optically tracked protein conformational rearrangements from its extracellular flank by site-specific labeling with an environment-sensitive fluorophore, tetramethylrhodamine maleimide (TMRM). The structural transitions resolved from the S0 region exhibited voltage dependence similar to that of charge-bearing transmembrane domains S2 and S4. The molecular determinant of the fluorescence changes was identified in W203 at the extracellular tip of S4: at hyperpolarized potential, W203 quenches the fluorescence of TMRM labeling positions at the N-terminal flank of S0. We provide evidence that upon depolarization, W203 (in S4) moves away from the extracellular region of S0, lifting its quenching effect on TMRM fluorescence. We suggest that S0 acts as a pivot component against which the voltage-sensitive S4 moves upon depolarization to facilitate channel activation.

  4. Light piping driven photosynthesis in the soil: Low-light adapted active photosynthetic apparatus in the under-soil hypocotyl segments of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kakuszi, Andrea; Sárvári, Éva; Solti, Ádám; Czégény, Gyula; Hideg, Éva; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Bóka, Károly; Böddi, Béla

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic activity was identified in the under-soil hypocotyl part of 14-day-old soil-grown bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Magnum) cultivated in pots under natural light-dark cycles. Electron microscopic, proteomic and fluorescence kinetic and imaging methods were used to study the photosynthetic apparatus and its activity. Under-soil shoots at 0-2cm soil depth featured chloroplasts with low grana and starch grains and with pigment-protein compositions similar to those of the above-soil green shoot parts. However, the relative amounts of photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes were higher; in addition a PIP-type aquaporin protein was identified in the under-soil thylakoids. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction measurements showed that the above- and under-soil hypocotyl segments had similar photochemical yields at low (10-55μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)) light intensities. However, at higher photon flux densities the electron transport rate decreased in the under-soil shoot parts due to inactivation of the PSII reaction centers. These properties show the development of a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus driven by light piping of the above-soil shoot. The results of this paper demonstrate that the classic model assigning source and sink functions to above- and under-soil tissues is to be refined, and a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus in under-soil bean hypocotyls is capable of contributing to its own carbon supply. PMID:27318297

  5. Selective tumor DNA synthesis inhibition: in vivo prodrug activation by an exogenous enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tschiersch, B; Schwabe, K; Sydow, G; Graffi, A

    1977-11-01

    Using the combination of alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Aspergillus niger with beta-peltatin A-alpha-L-arabinofuranoside, the selective effect of a new cancer of chemotherapy method based on a pH-dependent activation of cancerostatic prodrugs by exogenous enzymes was studied. In comparative experiments the selectivity of prodrug activation was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation in tumor and normal tissues of CBA mice inoculated im with the transplantable mammary carcinoma, MA-21224. The results show that this special type of carrier principle may lead to a higher degree of selectivity than the usual direct application of cancerostatic drugs.

  6. Altered expression of enzymes regulating the activity of endothelin-1 in the lower segment of the human amnion during labor.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Tomomi; Iwase, Akira; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Mano, Yukio; Yamamoto, Eiko; Nakano, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Yumi; Li, Hua; Sumigama, Seiji; Itakura, Atsuo; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2013-09-01

    The level of endothelin (ET)-1, a uterotonin, increases in amniotic fluid during labor. The known metallopeptidases include ET-converting enzyme (ECE), which converts inactive precursor to potent ET-1, and neutral endopeptidase (NEP), which inactivates ET-1. These enzymes are present in fetal membranes, and the aims of this study were to establish the protein expression of the enzymes within the amnion of human fetal membranes. Expressions were compared between amnions obtained before and after term labor using a Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The localization of these enzymes was determined using immunohistochemistry. The protein expression of the enzymes and output of bioactive ET-1 in human amnion epithelial cells (HAECs) and mesenchymal cells (HAMCs) were investigated with and without proinflammatory cytokines, oxytocin, and prostaglandin treatment. The effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid, were also examined. The protein expression of ECE-1 was significantly increased (P < 0.01), whereas that of NEP was significantly decreased, followed by increased ET-1 (P < 0.01), in the amnion obtained after labor (P < 0.01). HAECs and HAMCs primarily expressed ECE-1 and NEP, respectively. The protein expression of ECE-1 was significantly induced (P < 0.01). However, the NEP levels were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by treatment with TNFalpha and IL1beta followed by the 7.5-fold and 6.5-fold increase of ET-1 (P < 0.01), respectively, in the HAECs. ET-1 was increased 2-fold by S1P (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the altered expression of enzymes regulating the activity of ET-1 during parturition is controlled by inflammatory cytokines.

  7. Recent progress in research on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha-selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Hiroyuki

    2004-08-01

    The understanding of the functions of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor a (PPARalpha) as a regulator of lipid and lipoprotein homeostasis, and the rapid development of parallel high-throughput screening assays to evaluate the activity toward other PPAR subtypes (PPARdelta and PPARgamma), have provided an opportunity to develop novel PPARalpha-selective, PPARalpha/gamma dual and PPAR pan agonists for the treatment of various metabolic diseases. This review focuses on the molecular pharmacology of PPARalpha, and summarizes recent literature and patent applications disclosing medicinal chemistry strategies to identify new PPARalpha-selective agonists. The species selectivity of some classes of PPARalpha-selective agonists in response to in vitro PPARalpha transactivation activity is also reported. PMID:15334308

  8. Synthesis, biological activities and pharmacokinetic properties of new fluorinated derivatives of selective PDE4D inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brullo, Chiara; Massa, Matteo; Villa, Carla; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Rivera, Daniela; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Fedele, Ernesto; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Bertoni, Simona; Flammini, Lisa; Bruno, Olga

    2015-07-01

    A new series of selective PDE4D inhibitors has been designed and synthesized by replacing 3-methoxy group with 3-difluoromethoxy isoster moiety in our previously reported cathecolic structures. All compounds showed a good PDE4D3 inhibitory activity, most of them being inactive toward other PDE4 isoforms (PDE4A4, PDE4B2 and PDE4C2). Compound 3b, chosen among the synthesized compounds as the most promising in terms of inhibitory activity, selectivity and safety, showed an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to its non fluorinated analogue. Spontaneous locomotor activity, assessed in an open field apparatus, showed that, differently from rolipram and diazepam, selective PDE4D inhibitors, such as compounds 3b, 5b and 7b, did not affect locomotion, whereas compound 1b showed a tendency to reduce the distance traveled and to prolong the immobility period, possibly due to a poor selectivity.

  9. Prothymosin alpha selectively enhances estrogen receptor transcriptional activity by interacting with a repressor of estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Martini, P G; Delage-Mourroux, R; Kraichely, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    2000-09-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTalpha) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTalpha interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTalpha, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTalpha increases the magnitude of ERalpha transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERbeta transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTalpha or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTalpha (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTalpha or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTalpha, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTalpha to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain

  10. 40 CFR 60.2115 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic precipitator, or a... electrostatic precipitator, or a dry scrubber or limit emissions in some other manner, including material..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an...

  11. DT-MRI segmentation using graph cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2007-03-01

    An important problem in medical image analysis is the segmentation of anatomical regions of interest. Once regions of interest are segmented, one can extract shape, appearance, and structural features that can be analyzed for disease diagnosis or treatment evaluation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is a relatively new medical imaging modality that captures unique water diffusion properties and fiber orientation information of the imaged tissues. In this paper, we extend the interactive multidimensional graph cuts segmentation technique to operate on DT-MRI data by utilizing latest advances in tensor calculus and diffusion tensor dissimilarity metrics. The user interactively selects certain tensors as object ("obj") or background ("bkg") to provide hard constraints for the segmentation. Additional soft constraints incorporate information about both regional tissue diffusion as well as boundaries between tissues of different diffusion properties. Graph cuts are used to find globally optimal segmentation of the underlying 3D DT-MR image among all segmentations satisfying the constraints. We develop a graph structure from the underlying DT-MR image with the tensor voxels corresponding to the graph vertices and with graph edge weights computed using either Log-Euclidean or the J-divergence tensor dissimilarity metric. The topology of our segmentation is unrestricted and both obj and bkg segments may consist of several isolated parts. We test our method on synthetic DT data and apply it to real 2D and 3D MRI, providing segmentations of the corpus callosum in the brain and the ventricles of the heart.

  12. Moderate Physical Activity and Its Relationship to Select Measures of a Healthy Diet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakely, Frank; Dunnagan, Tim; Haynes, George; Moore, Sylvia; Pelican, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    In rural communities, physical activity may influence and predict nutritional behaviors. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if an individual's stage of participation in moderate physical activity was related to select measures of a healthy diet. Data were collected using a mail-in survey from a random sample conducted in the…

  13. Binding among Select Episodic Elements Is Altered via Active Short-Term Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Donna J.; Voss, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Of the many elements that comprise an episode, are any disproportionately bound to the others? We tested whether active short-term retrieval selectively increases binding. Individual objects from multiobject displays were retrieved after brief delays. Memory was later tested for the other objects. Cueing with actively retrieved objects facilitated…

  14. Physical Activity Patterns and Self-Efficacy of Selected College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Matt; Drolet, Judy C.; Ogletree, Roberta J.

    2010-01-01

    Much attention has been given to the fact that Americans are becoming less active. This study was designed to examine the levels of exercise-specific self-efficacy and physical activity rates in a selected group of college students. Students were recruited as they entered a fitness facility. Participation consisted of completing a survey that…

  15. What is a segment?

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Roberta L; Patel, Nipam H

    2013-12-17

    Animals have been described as segmented for more than 2,000 years, yet a precise definition of segmentation remains elusive. Here we give the history of the definition of segmentation, followed by a discussion on current controversies in defining a segment. While there is a general consensus that segmentation involves the repetition of units along the anterior-posterior (a-p) axis, long-running debates exist over whether a segment can be composed of only one tissue layer, whether the most anterior region of the arthropod head is considered segmented, and whether and how the vertebrate head is segmented. Additionally, we discuss whether a segment can be composed of a single cell in a column of cells, or a single row of cells within a grid of cells. We suggest that 'segmentation' be used in its more general sense, the repetition of units with a-p polarity along the a-p axis, to prevent artificial classification of animals. We further suggest that this general definition be combined with an exact description of what is being studied, as well as a clearly stated hypothesis concerning the specific nature of the potential homology of structures. These suggestions should facilitate dialogue among scientists who study vastly differing segmental structures.

  16. Singing-related neural activity distinguishes two putative pallidal cell types in the songbird basal ganglia: comparison to the primate internal and external pallidal segments

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Jesse H.; Adler, Avital; Bergman, Hagai; Fee, Michale S.

    2010-01-01

    The songbird area X is a basal ganglia homologue that contains two pallidal cell types—local neurons that project within the basal ganglia and output neurons that project to the thalamus. Based on these projections, it has been proposed that these classes are structurally homologous to the primate external (GPe) and internal (GPi) pallidal segments. To test the hypothesis that the two area X pallidal types are functionally homologous to GPe and GPi neurons, we recorded from neurons in area X of singing juvenile male zebra finches, and directly compare their firing patterns to neurons recorded in the primate pallidus. In area X, we find two cell classes that exhibited high firing (HF) rates (>60Hz) characteristic of pallidal neurons. HF-1 neurons, like most GPe neurons we examined, exhibited large firing rate modulations, including bursts and long pauses. In contrast, HF-2 neurons, like GPi neurons, discharged continuously without bursts or long pauses. To test if HF-2 neurons were the output neurons that project to the thalamus, we next recorded directly from pallidal axon terminals in thalamic nucleus DLM, and found that all terminals exhibited singing-related firing patterns indistinguishable from HF-2 neurons. Our data show that singing-related neural activity distinguishes two putative pallidal cell types in area X: thalamus-projecting neurons that exhibit activity similar to the primate GPi, and non-thalamus-projecting neurons that exhibit activity similar to the primate GPe. These results suggest that song learning in birds and motor learning in mammals employ conserved basal ganglia signaling strategies. PMID:20484651

  17. Adolescent Friendships, BMI, and Physical Activity: Untangling Selection and Influence Through Longitudinal Social Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, Sandra D; Schaefer, David R; Price, Chara D; Vest, Andrea E

    2013-09-01

    Bioecological theory suggests that adolescents' health is a result of selection and socialization processes occurring between adolescents and their microsettings. This study examines the association between adolescents' friends and health using a social network model and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,896, mean age = 15.97 years). Results indicated evidence of friend influence on BMI and physical activity. Friendships were more likely among adolescents who engaged in greater physical activity and who were similar to one another in BMI and physical activity. These effects emerged after controlling for alternative friend selection factors, such as endogenous social network processes and propinquity through courses and activities. Some selection effects were moderated by gender, popularity, and reciprocity.

  18. Adolescent Friendships, BMI, and Physical Activity: Untangling Selection and Influence Through Longitudinal Social Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simpkins, Sandra D.; Schaefer, David R.; Price, Chara D.; Vest, Andrea E.

    2012-01-01

    Bioecological theory suggests that adolescents’ health is a result of selection and socialization processes occurring between adolescents and their microsettings. This study examines the association between adolescents’ friends and health using a social network model and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,896, mean age = 15.97 years). Results indicated evidence of friend influence on BMI and physical activity. Friendships were more likely among adolescents who engaged in greater physical activity and who were similar to one another in BMI and physical activity. These effects emerged after controlling for alternative friend selection factors, such as endogenous social network processes and propinquity through courses and activities. Some selection effects were moderated by gender, popularity, and reciprocity. PMID:24222971

  19. Screening of NOS activity and selectivity of newly synthesized acetamidines using RP-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Maccallini, Cristina; Di Matteo, Mauro; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Bruno, Isabella; De Filippis, Barbara; Giampietro, Letizia; Mollica, Adriano; Amoroso, Rosa

    2016-02-20

    Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) inhibitors could play a powerful role in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, novel acetamidine derivatives of NOS were synthesized and the inhibitor activity was evalued. To screen the activity and selectivity, the l-citrulline residue, after the enzymatic NOS assay, was derivatized with o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) and then evaluated by RP-HPLC method with fluorescence detection. All compounds did not affect the activity of endothelial and neuronal isoforms, while nine of them possessed a percentage of iNOS activity at 10μM lower than 50%, and were selected for IC50 evaluation. Among them, a compound emerged as a very potent (IC50 of 53nM) and selective iNOS inhibitor. PMID:26689740

  20. Articulatory gestures are individually selected in production

    PubMed Central

    Tilsen, Sam; Goldstein, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Most models of speech planning and production incorporate a selection mechanism, whereby units are activated in parallel and chosen for execution sequentially. The lowest level units which can be selected are assumed to be segments, i.e. consonants and vowels. The features or articulatory gestures affiliated with segments are presumed to be automatically selected as a consequence of segmental selection. An alternative possibility is that articulatory gestures themselves are subject to a selection process; this predicts that there can be circumstances in which gestures affiliated with the same segment fail to co-occur. We conducted a stop-signal task in which subjects produced /pa/- or /ka/-initial monosyllables and disyllables in response to a go-signal; on 50% of trials subjects halted production as quickly as possible when given a stop-signal within ±300 ms of the go-signal. Articulatory kinematics were recorded using a speech magnetometer. We found that vowel-affiliated gestures of glottal adduction, tongue body lowering, and bilabial opening did not necessarily co-occur in the context of halting speech. This finding indicates that gestures are selected individually, rather than as an automatic consequence of segmental selection. PMID:23002316

  1. User-driven segmentation approach: interactive snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Tobias; Heiland, Marc; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2002-05-01

    For diagnostics and therapy planning, the segmentation of medical images is an important pre-processing step. Currently, manual segmentation tools are most common in clinical routine. Because the work is very time-consuming, there is a large interest in tools assisting the physician. Most of the known segmentation techniques suffer from an inadequate user interface, which prevents their use in a clinical environment. The segmentation of medical images is very difficult. A promising method to overcome difficulties such as imaging artifacts are active contour models. In order to enhance the clinical usability, we propose a user-driven segmentation approach. Following this way, we developed a new segmentation method, which we call interactive snakes. Thereto, we elaborated an interaction style which is more intuitive to the clinical user and derived a new active contour model. The segmentation method provides a very tight coupling with the user. The physician is interactively attaching boundary markers to the image, whereby he is able to bring in his knowledge. At the same time, the segmentation is updated in real-time. Interactive snakes are a comprehensible segmentation method for the clinical use. It is reasonable to employ them both as a core tool and as an editing tool for incorrect results.

  2. The evaluation of the activity of medicinal remedies of plant and animal origin on the regeneration of the earthworms' tail segments.

    PubMed

    Bybin, Viktor Alexandrovich; Stom, Daevard Iosifovich

    2014-01-01

    Now, in the global community there is enough hard recommendation to replace the vertebrate test animals into simpler organisms at the development, testing, and evaluation of the quality pharmaceuticals. The feature of planarian to regenerate in new individual planarian from a piece, which is only 1/7 of the original animal, allowed to create the alternative methods of testing of drugs, dietary supplements, water quality, influence of electromagnetic fields, and other radiations. The tests on planarian can replace the ones that are held today on mammals. However, the lacks of the bioassays based on the planarian regeneration are the need for complex and expensive video equipment for recording the regrowth of worms' body, the difficulties of culturing of flatworms and fairly long period of response. These difficulties can be avoided by using another group of the worms of type Annelida. The new individual can be fully recovered only from the front half of the body in many species of earthworms. Thus, the influence of the pharmaceuticals from earthworms, mummy, and Orthilia secunda on the ability of earthworms to regenerate lost tail segments has been investigated. The relations of the activity of preparations tested with doses and the time of the storage have been revealed. The principal possibility of applicability of the test reaction studied as a way to evaluate the effects and quality of remedies based on medicinal plants and earthworms has been shown. PMID:26692755

  3. The evaluation of the activity of medicinal remedies of plant and animal origin on the regeneration of the earthworms’ tail segments

    PubMed Central

    Bybin, Viktor Alexandrovich; Stom, Daevard Iosifovich

    2015-01-01

    Now, in the global community there is enough hard recommendation to replace the vertebrate test animals into simpler organisms at the development, testing, and evaluation of the quality pharmaceuticals. The feature of planarian to regenerate in new individual planarian from a piece, which is only 1/7 of the original animal, allowed to create the alternative methods of testing of drugs, dietary supplements, water quality, influence of electromagnetic fields, and other radiations. The tests on planarian can replace the ones that are held today on mammals. However, the lacks of the bioassays based on the planarian regeneration are the need for complex and expensive video equipment for recording the regrowth of worms’ body, the difficulties of culturing of flatworms and fairly long period of response. These difficulties can be avoided by using another group of the worms of type Annelida. The new individual can be fully recovered only from the front half of the body in many species of earthworms. Thus, the influence of the pharmaceuticals from earthworms, mummy, and Orthilia secunda on the ability of earthworms to regenerate lost tail segments has been investigated. The relations of the activity of preparations tested with doses and the time of the storage have been revealed. The principal possibility of applicability of the test reaction studied as a way to evaluate the effects and quality of remedies based on medicinal plants and earthworms has been shown. PMID:26692755

  4. Selective disruption of high sensitivity heat activation but not capsaicin activation of TRPV1 channels by pore turret mutations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Yang, Fan; Cao, Xu; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Wang, KeWei; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 is a highly heat-sensitive ion channel. Although chemical activation and heat activation of TRPV1 elicit similar pungent, painful sensation, the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic activation remains mysterious. In particular, where the temperature sensor is located and whether heat and capsaicin share a common activation pathway are debated. To address these fundamental issues, we searched for channel mutations that selectively affected one form of activation. We found that deletion of the first 10 amino acids of the pore turret significantly reduced the heat response amplitude and shifted the heat activation threshold, whereas capsaicin activation remained unchanged. Removing larger portions of the turret disrupted channel function. Introducing an artificial sequence to replace the deleted region restored sensitive capsaicin activation in these nonfunctional channels. The heat activation, however, remained significantly impaired, with the current exhibiting diminishing heat sensitivity to a level indistinguishable from that of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv7.4. Our results demonstrate that heat and capsaicin activation of TRPV1 are structurally and mechanistically distinct processes, and the pore turret is an indispensible channel structure involved in the heat activation process but is not part of the capsaicin activation pathway. Synergistic effect of heat and capsaicin on TRPV1 activation may originate from convergence of the two pathways on a common activation gate.

  5. Marketing ambulatory care to women: a segmentation approach.

    PubMed

    Harrell, G D; Fors, M F

    1985-01-01

    Although significant changes are occurring in health care delivery, in many instances the new offerings are not based on a clear understanding of market segments being served. This exploratory study suggests that important differences may exist among women with regard to health care selection. Five major women's segments are identified for consideration by health care executives in developing marketing strategies. Additional research is suggested to confirm this segmentation hypothesis, validate segmental differences and quantify the findings.

  6. The ompA 5' untranslated RNA segment functions in Escherichia coli as a growth-rate-regulated mRNA stabilizer whose activity is unrelated to translational efficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Emory, S A; Belasco, J G

    1990-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the long-lived Escherichia coli ompA message can function in vivo as an mRNA stabilizer. Substitution of this ompA mRNA segment for the corresponding segment of the labile bla gene transcripts prolongs their lifetime by a factor of 6. We show here that the function of this ompA mRNA stabilizer requires the presence of a 115-nucleotide ompA RNA segment that lies upstream of the ribosome-binding site. Although deletion of this segment reduced the half-life of the ompA transcript by a factor of 5, its absence had almost no effect on the translational efficiency of ompA mRNA. Like the ompA transcript, but unlike bla mRNA, hybrid ompA-bla messages containing the complete ompA 5' UTR were significantly less stable under conditions of slow bacterial growth. We conclude that the stabilizing activity of the ompA 5' UTR is growth rate regulated and that the mechanism of mRNA stabilization by this RNA segment is not related to the spacing between translating ribosomes. Images PMID:1695894

  7. Genome-Wide Investigation of Hsf Genes in Sesame Reveals Their Segmental Duplication Expansion and Their Active Role in Drought Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Komivi; Diouf, Diaga; Cissé, Ndiaga

    2016-01-01

    Sesame is a survivor crop cultivated for ages in arid areas under high temperatures and limited water conditions. Since its entire genome has been sequenced, revealing evolution, and functional characterization of its abiotic stress genes became a hot topic. In this study, we performed a whole-genome identification and analysis of Hsf gene family in sesame. Thirty genes encoding Hsf domain were found and classified into 3 major classes A, B, and C. The class A members were the most representative one and Hsf genes were distributed in 12 of the 16 linkage groups (except the LG 8, 9, 13, and 16). Evolutionary analysis revealed that, segmental duplication events which occurred around 67 MYA, were the primary force underlying Hsf genes expansion in sesame. Comparative analysis also suggested that sesame has retained most of its Hsf genes while its relatives viz. tomato and potato underwent extensive gene losses during evolution. Continuous purifying selection has played a key role in the maintenance of Hsf genes in sesame. Expression analysis of the Hsf genes in sesame revealed their putative involvement in multiple tissue-/developmental stages. Time-course expression profiling of Hsf genes in response to drought stress showed that 90% Hsfs are drought responsive. We infer that classes B-Hsfs might be the primary regulators of drought response in sesame by cooperating with some class A genes. This is the first insight into this gene family and the results provide some gene resources for future gene cloning and functional studies toward the improvement in stress tolerance of sesame. PMID:27790233

  8. Selective activation of SHP2 activity by cisplatin revealed by a novel chemical probe-based assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chun-Chen; Chu, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2) is known to participate in several different signaling pathways to mediate cell growth, survival, migration, and differentiation. However, due to the lack of proper analytical tools, it is unclear whether the phosphatase activity of SHP2 is activated in most studies. We have previously developed an activity-based probe LCL2 that formed covalent linkage with catalytically active protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, by combining LCL2 with a SHP2 specific antibody, we established an assay system that enables the direct monitoring of SHP2 activity upon cisplatin treatment of cancer cells. The protocol is advantageous over conventional colorimetric or in-gel PTP assays as it is specific and does not require the use of radioisotope reagents. Using this assay, we found SHP2 activity was selectively activated by cisplatin. Moreover, the activation of SHP2 appeared to be specific for cisplatin as other DNA damage agents failed to activate the activity. Although the role of SHP2 activation by cisplatin treatments is still unclear to us, our results provide the first direct evidence for the activation of SHP2 during cisplatin treatments. More importantly, the concept of using activity-based probe in conjunction with target-specific antibodies could be extended to other enzyme classes.

  9. What is a segment?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Animals have been described as segmented for more than 2,000 years, yet a precise definition of segmentation remains elusive. Here we give the history of the definition of segmentation, followed by a discussion on current controversies in defining a segment. While there is a general consensus that segmentation involves the repetition of units along the anterior-posterior (a-p) axis, long-running debates exist over whether a segment can be composed of only one tissue layer, whether the most anterior region of the arthropod head is considered segmented, and whether and how the vertebrate head is segmented. Additionally, we discuss whether a segment can be composed of a single cell in a column of cells, or a single row of cells within a grid of cells. We suggest that ‘segmentation’ be used in its more general sense, the repetition of units with a-p polarity along the a-p axis, to prevent artificial classification of animals. We further suggest that this general definition be combined with an exact description of what is being studied, as well as a clearly stated hypothesis concerning the specific nature of the potential homology of structures. These suggestions should facilitate dialogue among scientists who study vastly differing segmental structures. PMID:24345042

  10. Deriving structure from evolution: metazoan segmentation.

    PubMed

    François, Paul; Hakim, Vincent; Siggia, Eric D

    2007-01-01

    Segmentation is a common feature of disparate clades of metazoans, and its evolution is a central problem of evolutionary developmental biology. We evolved in silico regulatory networks by a mutation/selection process that just rewards the number of segment boundaries. For segmentation controlled by a static gradient, as in long-germ band insects, a cascade of adjacent repressors reminiscent of gap genes evolves. For sequential segmentation controlled by a moving gradient, similar to vertebrate somitogenesis, we invariably observe a very constrained evolutionary path or funnel. The evolved state is a cell autonomous 'clock and wavefront' model, with the new attribute of a separate bistable system driven by an autonomous clock. Early stages in the evolution of both modes of segmentation are functionally similar, and simulations suggest a possible path for their interconversion. Our computation illustrates how complex traits can evolve by the incremental addition of new functions on top of pre-existing traits.

  11. Monitoring fish distributions along electrofishing segments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrofishing is widely used to monitor fish species composition and relative abundance in streams and lakes. According to standard protocols, multiple segments are selected in a body of water to monitor population relative abundance as the ratio of total catch to total sampling effort. The standard protocol provides an assessment of fish distribution at a macrohabitat scale among segments, but not within segments. An ancillary protocol was developed for assessing fish distribution at a finer scale within electrofishing segments. The ancillary protocol was used to estimate spacing, dispersion, and association of two specie