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Sample records for active seismic experiments

  1. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  2. Active Seismic Imaging Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Patricia A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Evans, John R.

    In September 1985 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will conduct an active seismic experiment in the Medicine Lake area of northern California. The work is supported by the Geothermal Research Program of USGS and by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. We invite interested organizations or individuals to record our explosions from Medicine Lake volcano and surrounding areas not covered by the USGS-LLNL array.

  3. Apollo 14 active seismic experiment.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J S; Kovach, R L

    1972-03-17

    Explosion seismic refraction data indicate that the lunar near-surface rocks at the Apollo 14 site consist of a regolith 8.5 meters thick and characterized by a compressional wave velocity of 104 meters per second. The regolith is underlain by a layer with a compressional wave velocity of 299 meters per second. The thickness of this layer, which we interpret to be the Fra Mauro Formation, is between 16 and 76 meters. The layer immediately beneath this has a velocity greater than 370 meters per second. We found no evidence of permafrost. PMID:17794200

  4. Apollo 14 active seismic experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, J. S.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Explosion seismic refraction data indicate that the lunar near-surface rocks at the Apollo 14 site consist of a regolith 8.5 meters thick and characterized by a compressional wave velocity of 104 meters per second. The regolith is underlain by a layer with a compressional wave velocity of 299 meters per second. The thickness of this layer, which we interpret to be the Fra Mauro Formation, is between 16 and 76 meters. The layer immediately beneath this has a velocity greater than 370 meters per second. We found no evidence of permafrost.

  5. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  6. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  7. An active seismic experiment proposal onboard the NASA 2009 MSL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonné, P.; Experiment Team

    NASA will launch in 2009 a 900 kg class rover to Mars. This rover will land with a new descent system, called the ``sky-crane''. After releasing the rover on the ground, the sky-crane will have a final flight until a hard landing about 2 km away from the rover. The science objectives of the 2009 MSL mission, among others, are to characterize the geology of the landing region at all appropriate spatial scales, to interpret the processes that have formed and modified rocks and regolith and to determine present state, distribution, and cycling of water. We propose to perform with the sky-crane an active seismic experiment for subsurface characterization. This experiment will be conducted after the rover deployment. The proposed idea is to deploy a seismic receiver line by ejecting about 10 seismic nodes from the sky-crane and then to record then the reflected signals from the impact of the sky-crane. Preliminary modeling and tests indicate that a penetration depth of several hundred meters will be reached. The experiment will be used to determine a 2D geological profile of the landing site subsurface, to determine the depth and shape of the dry regolith/icy regolith discontinuity and to identify possible layering structures in the subsurface. In addition, information on the structure of the regolith (mean size of building blocs) and on the presence of liquid water will be obtained by an analysis of the seismic coda and attenuation. The seismic high frequency noise will also be monitored, especially during windy periods, and will be used to get additional information on the subsurface. The proposed experiment is based on a consortium between academics laboratories and seismic industry and will be a first example of a resource oriented experiment on another planet than Earth. The complete mass of the experiment will be 2.5 kg. Seismic nodes will have their own acquisition/power and telemetry system and will be based on high sensitive geophones developed for seismic

  8. An active seismic experiment at Tenerife Island (Canary Island, Spain): Imaging an active volcano edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Yeguas, A.; Ibañez, J. M.; Rietbrock, A.; Tom-Teidevs, G.

    2008-12-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Teide Volcano was carried out on Tenerife, a volcanic island in Spain's Canary Islands. The main objective of the TOM-TEIDEVS experiment is to obtain a 3-dimensional structural image of Teide Volcano using seismic tomography and seismic reflection/refraction imaging techniques. At present, knowledge of the deeper structure of Teide and Tenerife is very limited, with proposed structural models mainly based on sparse geophysical and geological data. This multinational experiment which involves institutes from Spain, Italy, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Mexico will generate a unique high resolution structural image of the active volcano edifice and will further our understanding of volcanic processes.

  9. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono, Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli, Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat; Sugiharto, Anton

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green's functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  10. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    SciTech Connect

    Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  11. Apollo 14 and 16 Active Seismic Experiments, and Apollo 17 Lunar Seismic Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Seismic refraction experiments were conducted on the moon by Apollo astronauts during missions 14, 16, and 17. Seismic velocities of 104, 108, 92, 114 and 100 m/sec were inferred for the lunar regolith at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 landing sites, respectively. These data indicate that fragmentation and comminution caused by meteoroid impacts has produced a layer of remarkably uniform seismic properties moonwide. Brecciation and high porosity are the probable causes of the very low velocities observed in the lunar regolith. Apollo 17 seismic data revealed that the seismic velocity increases very rapidly with depth to 4.7 km/sec at a depth of 1.4 km. Such a large velocity change is suggestive of compositional and textural changes and is compatible with a model of fractured basaltic flows overlying anorthositic breccias. 'Thermal' moonquakes were also detected at the Apollo 17 site, becoming increasingly frequent after sunrise and reaching a maximum at sunset. The source of these quakes could possibly be landsliding.

  12. An Idea for an Active Seismic Experiment on Mars in 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lognonne, Ph.; Banerdt, B.; Giardini, D.; Costard, F.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of liquid water is of prime interest and should have deep implications in the understanding of the Martian hydrological cycle and also in exobiology. In the frame of the 2007 joint CNES-NASA mission to Mars, a set of 4 NETLANDERS developed by an European consortium is expected to be launched in June 2007. We propose to use a second spacecraft going or landing to Mars to release near one of the Netlander a series of artificial metallic meteorites, in order to perform an active seismic experiment providing a seismic profile of the crust and subsurface.

  13. Passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Ewing, M.; Press, F.; Sutton, G.; Dorman, J.; Nakamura, Y.; Toksoz, N.; Lammlein, D.; Duennebier, F.

    1972-01-01

    The establishment of a network of seismic stations on the lunar surface as a result of equipment installed by Apollo 12, 14, and 15 flights is described. Four major discoveries obtained by analyzing seismic data from the network are discussed. The use of the system to detect vibrations of the lunar surface and the use of the data to determine the internal structure, physical state, and tectonic activity of the moon are examined.

  14. Preliminary Results from the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Kiser, Eric; Palomeras, Imma; Zelt, Colin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steve; Harder, Steven; Creagar, Kenneth; Vidale, John; Abers, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    iMUSH (imaging Magma Under Saint Helens) is a US NSF sponsored multi-disciplinary investigation of Mount Saint Helens (MSH), currently the most active volcano in the Cascades arc in the northwestern United States. The project consists of active and passive seismic experiments, extensive magnetotelluric sounding, and geological/geochemical studies involving scientists at 7 institutions in the U.S. and Europe. The long-term goal of the seismic project is to combine analysis of the active source data with that of data from the 70 element broadband seismograph operating from summer 2014 until 2016. Combining seismic and MT analyses with other data, we hope to image the MSH volcanic plumbing system from the surface to the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here we describe preliminary results of the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, conducted in July and August 2014. The active source experiment consisted of twenty-three 454 or 908 kg weight shots recorded by ~3500 seismographs deployed at ~6,000 locations. Of these instruments, ~900 Nodal Seismic instruments were deployed continuously for two weeks in an areal array within 10 km of the MSH summit. 2,500 PASSCAL Texan instruments were deployed twice for five days in 3 areal arrays and 2 dense orthogonal linear arrays that extended from MSH to distances > 80 km. Overall the data quality from the shots is excellent. The seismograph arrays also recorded dozens of micro-earthquakes beneath the MSH summit and along the MSH seismic zone, and numerous other local and regional earthquakes. In addition, at least one low frequency event beneath MSH was recorded during the experiment. At this point we have begun various types of analysis of the data set: We have determined an average 1D Vp structure from stacking short-term/long-term average ratios, we have determined the 2-D Vp structure from ray-trace inversions along the two orthogonal profiles (in the NW-SE and NE-SW directions), and we have made low-fold CMP stacks of the

  15. Field Report on the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Schmandt, B.; Palomeras, I.; Harder, S. H.; Creager, K. C.; Vidale, J. E.; Malone, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    In the second half of July we completed the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, one component of the Imaging Magma Under Saint Helens project. A team of ~75 volunteers deployed 3500 seismographs to ~5920 locations on and around Mount St. Helens over the course of 3 weeks. This instrument deployment was accompanied by 23 shots distributed around the volcano. Instrumentation consisted of ~2550 Reftek 125A (Texan) seismographs with 4.5 Hz geophones, and 920 Nodal Seismic recorders with 10 Hz geophones. The shots were also recorded by the permanent stations of the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network and 70 iMUSH broadband seismographs. Fifteen of the shots, 424 kg each, formed two rings around Mount Saint Helens at 15 km and 30 km radius from the summit. Eight of the shots, 828 kg each, were fired at distances of 50 to 80 km from MSH on NW-SE and NE-SW azimuths. The deployment geometry consisted of two lines oriented NW/SE and NE/SW, and three arrays. The offset of the lines ranged from 150 km to 190 km with an average spacing of 200 m. The first array was centered on the volcano with a radius of 30 km, and required both driving and hiking to deploy. Arrays two and three were set out with, and centered on, the NW/SE line. These arrays had a distance range from MSH of 30-75 km and an azimuth range of about 100 degrees. In addition to this large-scale deployment, we set out 7 beamforming arrays approximately collocated with iMUSH broadband seismographs, and above clusters of seismicity in the region. The aperture of these arrays was about 1 km with an instrument spacing of 100 m. The final deployment ended only days before the AGU abstract deadline, so we have not yet examined all of the data. However, the preliminary indications are that signal to noise is excellent: The shots, several of which registered on PNSN as ML>2.1, carried across the entire array, and were recorded as far away as Seattle and Corvallis on permanent stations. The array also recorded a

  16. Active Source Tomography of Stromboli Volcano (Italy): Results From the 2006 Seismic Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, L.; Patanè, D.; Cocina, O.; Castellano, M.; Sgroi, T.; Favali, P.; de Gori, P.

    2008-12-01

    Stromboli island, located in the Southern Tyrrhenian sea, is the emerged part (about 900 m a.s.l.) of a 3km-high strato-volcano. Its persistent Strombolian activity, documented for over 2000 years, is sometimes interrupted by lava effusions or major explosions. Despite the amount of recent published geophysical studies aimed to clarifying eruption dynamics, the spatial extend and geometrical characteristics of the plumbing system remain poorly understood. In fact, the knowledge of the inner structure and the zones of magma storage is limited to the upper few hundreds meters of the volcanic edifice and P- and S-waves velocity models are available only in restricted areas. In order to obtain a more suitable internal structural and velocity models of the volcano, from 25 November to 2 December 2006, a seismic tomography experiment through active seismics using air-gun sources was carried out and the final Vp model is here presented. The data has been inverted for the Vp structure by using the code Simulps13q, considering a 3D grid of nodes spaced 0.5 km down to 2 km depth, beneath the central part of volcano. The results show a relatively high velocity zones located both in the inner part of the volcanic structure, at about 1km b.s.l. and in the last 200-300 m a.s.l. in correspondence with the volcanic conduit. Slower zones were located around the summit craters in agreement with volcanological and petrological informations for the area. The relatively high velocity zones could suggest the presence of intrusive bodies related to the plumbing system.

  17. TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES an active seismic and passive seismic experiment at Mt. Etna volcano. An integrated marine and onland geophysical survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Jesus. M.; Patane, Domenico; Puglisi, Guisseppe; Zuccarello, Lucciano; Bianco, Francesca; Luehr, Birger; Diaz-Moreno, Alejandro; Prudencio, Janire; Koulakov, Ivan; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Cocina, Ornella; Coltelli, Mauro; Scarfi, Lucciano; De Gori, Pascuale; Carrion, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Etna Volcano is going to carried out on Sicily and Aeolian islands. The main objective of the TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES experiment, beginning in summer 2014, is to perform a high resolution seismic tomography, in velocity and attenuation, in Southern Italy, by using active and passive seismic data, in an area encompassing outstanding volcanoes as Mt. Etna, and Aeolian volcanoes. The achievement of this objective is based on the integration and sharing of the in-situ marine and land experiments and observations and on the implementation of new instruments and monitoring systems. For the purpose, onshore and offshore seismic stations and passive and active seismic data generated both in marine and terrestrial environment will be used. Additionally, other geophysical data, mainly magnetic and gravimetric data will be considered to obtain a joint Upper Mantle-Crust structure that could permit to make progress in the understanding of the dynamic of the region. This multinational experiment which involves institutions from Spain, Italy, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Portugal, Russia, USA and Mexico. During the experiment more than 6.600 air gun shots performed by the Spanish Oceanographic vessel "Sarmiento de Gamboa" will be recorder on a dense local seismic network consisting of 100 on land non-permanent stations, 70 on land permanent stations and 20-25 OBSs. Contemporaneously other marine geophysical measures will be performed using a marine Gravimeter LaCoste&Romberg Air-Sea Gravity System II and a Marine Magnetometer SeaSPY. The experiments will provide a unique data set in terms of data quantity and quality, and it will provide a detailed velocity and attenuation structural image of volcano edifice. The results will be essential in the development and interpretation of future volcanic models. It is noteworthy that this project is fully transversal, multidisciplinary and crosses several

  18. Application of a cross correlation-based picking algorithm to an active seismic experiment in Sicily and Aeolian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Alejandro; Álvarez, Isaac; De la Torre, Ángel; García, Luz; Benítez, Ma Carmen; Cortés, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    The detection of the arrival time of seismic waves or picking is of great importance in many seismology applications. Traditionally, picking has been carried out by human operators. This process is not systematic and relies completely on the expertise and judgment of the analysts. The limitations of manual picking and the increasing amount of data daily stored in the seismic networks worldwide distributed and in active seismic experiments lead to the development of automatic picking algorithms. Current conventional algorithms work with single signals, such as the "short-term average over long-term average" (STA/LTA) algorithm, autoregressive methods or the recently developed "Adaptive Multiband Picking Algorithm" (AMPA). This work proposes a correlation-based picking algorithm, whose main advantage is the fact of using the information of a set of signals, improving the signal to noise ratio and therefore the picking accuracy. The main advantage of this approach is that the algorithm does not require to set up sophisticated parameters, in contrast to other automatic algorithms. The accuracy of the conventional STA/LTA algorithm, the recently developed AMPA algorithm, an autoregressive method, and a preliminary version of the cross correlation-based picking algorithm were assessed using a huge data set composed by active seismic signals from experiments in Tenerife Island (January 2007, Spain). The experiment consisted of the deployment of a dense seismic network on Tenerife Island (125 seismometers in total) and the shooting of air-guns around the island with the Spanish oceanographic vessel Hespérides (6459 air shots in total). Only 110937 signals (13.74% of the total) had the signal to noise ratio enough to be manually picked. Results showed that the use of the cross correlation-based picking algorithm significantly increases the number of signals that can be considered in the tomography. A new active seismic experiment will cover Sicily and Aeolian Islands (TOMO

  19. Modelling Active Faults in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) with OpenQuake: Definition, Design and Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherill, Graeme; Garcia, Julio; Poggi, Valerio; Chen, Yen-Shin; Pagani, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) has, since its inception in 2009, made many contributions to the practice of seismic hazard modeling in different regions of the globe. The OpenQuake-engine (hereafter referred to simply as OpenQuake), GEM's open-source software for calculation of earthquake hazard and risk, has found application in many countries, spanning a diversity of tectonic environments. GEM itself has produced a database of national and regional seismic hazard models, harmonizing into OpenQuake's own definition the varied seismogenic sources found therein. The characterization of active faults in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is at the centre of this process, motivating many of the developments in OpenQuake and presenting hazard modellers with the challenge of reconciling seismological, geological and geodetic information for the different regions of the world. Faced with these challenges, and from the experience gained in the process of harmonizing existing models of seismic hazard, four critical issues are addressed. The challenge GEM has faced in the development of software is how to define a representation of an active fault (both in terms of geometry and earthquake behaviour) that is sufficiently flexible to adapt to different tectonic conditions and levels of data completeness. By exploring the different fault typologies supported by OpenQuake we illustrate how seismic hazard calculations can, and do, take into account complexities such as geometrical irregularity of faults in the prediction of ground motion, highlighting some of the potential pitfalls and inconsistencies that can arise. This exploration leads to the second main challenge in active fault modeling, what elements of the fault source model impact most upon the hazard at a site, and when does this matter? Through a series of sensitivity studies we show how different configurations of fault geometry, and the corresponding characterisation of near-fault phenomena (including

  20. Evaluation and developmental studies of possible active seismic experiments during the post-Apollo period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Seismic velocity studies pertinent to the lunar crust and mantle are briefly summarized. The compressional and shear wave velocities in loose aggregates are discussed along with the effects of temperature on seismic velocity in compacted powders. Abstracts of papers concerning the lunar structure are included.

  1. Use of active source geophones for passive source imaging: Examples from Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE), USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, A.; O'rourke, C. T.; Haines, S. S.; Yang, Z.; Worthington, L. L.; Miller, K. C.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we explore the variety of active and passive source deep seismic imaging that can be performed using continous wavefield recordings from a dense array of industry-style geophones. The data in this study were acquired during the 2009-10 EarthScope FlexArray Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment(BASE) in central Wyoming, USA. In addition to traditional active and passive source seismic data acquisition, BASE included a deployment of 850 Reftek RT125 " Texan" dataloggers that produced continuous recording over 14 days. Ground motion was recorded via Geospace GS-11 4.5 Hz single channel vertical component geophones. The geophones were deployed in a grid of three E-W lines and two N-S lines across the Bighorn Mountains. We find that the high frequency geophones effectively record the P waves of teleseismic earthquakes. During the 15 days of continuous recording we observed 57 teleseismic events with pickable P-wave arrivals across the array, providing over 10,000 travel times (P, PKiKP, Pdiff, Pn) suitable for teleseismic tomography. The full waveforms can be used to extract additional information about the subsurface. We have successfully utilized teleseismic receiver-side crustal reverberation phases as virtual sources to mimic crustal reflection profiles (Yang et al., 2012). After depth conversion, we find a coherent phase that correlates well with the top of the Madison Formation under the Powder River and Bighorn Basins that flank the Bighorn Mountains. In addition, we combine the phases PpPdp from single-channel geophone recordings and Ps from three-component recordings to constrain the average Vp /Vs ratio for the sedimentary strata. Following Haines (2011), we are exploring the use of interferometric processing of active source blasts. In principle, virtual source and receiver gathers can be created through cross-correlation of full wavefields. The seismic interferometry provides a means of simulating alternative acquisition geometries, and has the

  2. Theoretical and practical considerations for the design of the iMUSH active-source seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Harder, S. H.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.; Vidale, J. E.; Moran, S. C.; Malone, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The multi-disciplinary imaging of Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) experiment seeks to understand the details of the magmatic system that feeds Mount St. Helens using active- and passive-source seismic, magnetotelluric, and petrologic data. The active-source seismic component of this experiment will take place in the summer of 2014 utilizing all of the 2600 PASSCAL 'Texan' Reftek instruments which will record twenty-four 1000-2000 lb shots distributed around the Mount St. Helens region. The instruments will be deployed as two consecutive refraction profiles centered on the volcano, and a series of areal arrays. The actual number of areal arrays, as well as their locations, will depend strongly on the length of the experiment (3-4 weeks), the number of instrument deployers (50-60), and the time it will take per deployment given the available road network. The current work shows how we are balancing these practical considerations against theoretical experiment designs in order to achieve the proposed scientific goals with the available resources. One of the main goals of the active-source seismic experiment is to image the magmatic system down to the Moho (35-40 km). Calculating sensitivity kernels for multiple shot/receiver offsets shows that direct P waves should be sensitive to Moho depths at offsets of 150 km, and therefore this will likely be the length of the refraction profiles. Another primary objective of the experiment is to estimate the locations and volumes of different magma accumulation zones beneath the volcano using the areal arrays. With this in mind, the optimal locations of these arrays, as well as their associated shots, are estimated using an eigenvalue analysis of the approximate Hessian for each possible experiment design. This analysis seeks to minimize the number of small eigenvalues of the approximate Hessian that would amplify the propagation of data noise into regions of interest in the model space, such as the likely locations of magma

  3. Active source seismic experiment investigating the formation of the Ontong Java Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Noguchi, N.; Coffin, M. F.; Kawagle, S. A.; Verave, R. T.; Kodaira, S.; Fukao, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) is one of the largest oceanic plateaus and possibly the most voluminous large igneous province (LIP) on Earth, and is thought to have formed by a non-plate tectonic mechanism such as 1) a plume head, 2) a bolide impact, or 3) atypical seafloor spreading. Due to massive magmatism over short durations of geological time, formations of the OJP and LIPs in general likely have had global scale environmental impacts (e.g., Oceanic Anoxic Events). Therefore, understanding how LIPs form is important not only for illuminating solid Earth processes, but also for advancing knowledge of associated environmental, including biospheric, changes. On the basis of the OJP’s shallow bathymetry, its crust has long been thought to be thicker than normal oceanic crust. However, previous seismic and gravimetric analyses of its crustal thickness produced inconsistent results. To understand how the OJP formed, we conducted a seismic survey using a multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophone streamer and 100 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) in February-March 2010 (EOS, submitted). New MCS data confirm that sediment approximately 1 s (two-way travel time) thick covers the uppermost OJP. Sediment layers are generally flat-lying, except near seamounts, in a local depression, and around some faults. Because of the flat-lying seafloor and shallow water depths, several water-bottom multiples of large amplitude characterize the MCS data, making identification of sub-basement reflections challenging. On the northernmost part of the seismic line, a reflection event at about 12 s (two-way travel time) differs unambiguously from multiple reflections, and may represent the base of the OJP’s crust. OBS data show first refraction arrivals within 100-km offsets. First arrivals with an apparent velocity of 7 km/s can be identified at offsets greater than 100 km. This may indicate a thick high velocity (~7 km/s) layer in the OJP’s lower crust. This high velocity layer may be

  4. iMUSH: The design of the Mount St. Helens high-resolution active source seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Eric; Levander, Alan; Harder, Steve; Abers, Geoff; Creager, Ken; Vidale, John; Moran, Seth; Malone, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Mount St. Helens is one of the most societally relevant and geologically interesting volcanoes in the United States. Although much has been learned about the shallow structure of this volcano since its eruption in 1980, important questions still remain regarding its magmatic system and connectivity to the rest of the Cascadia arc. For example, the structure of the magma plumbing system below the shallowest magma chamber under the volcano is still only poorly known. This information will be useful for hazard assessment for the southwest Washington area, and also for gaining insight into fundamental scientific questions such as the assimilation and differentiation processes that lead to the formation of continental crust. As part of the multi-disciplinary imaging of Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) experiment, funded by NSF GeoPRISMS and EarthScope, an active source seismic experiment will be conducted in late summer 2014. The experiment will utilize all of the 2600 IRIS/PASSCAL/USArray Texan instruments. The instruments will be deployed as two 1000-instrument consecutive refraction profiles (one N/S and one WNW/ESE). Each of these profiles will be accompanied by two 1600-instrument areal arrays at varying distances from Mount St. Helens. Finally, one 2600-instrument areal array will be centered on Mount St. Helens. These instruments will record a total of twenty-four 500-1000 kg shots. Each refraction profile will have an average station spacing of 150 m, and a total length of 150 km. The stations in the areal arrays will be separated by ~1 km. A critical step in the success of this project is to develop an experimental setup that can resolve the most interesting aspects of the magmatic system. In particular, we want to determine the distribution of shot locations that will provide good coverage throughout the entire model space, while still allowing us to focus on regions likely to contain the magmatic plumbing system. In this study, we approach this problem by

  5. Shallow lunar structure determined from the passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Lammlein, D.; Latham, G.

    1975-01-01

    Data relevant to the shallow structure of the moon obtained at the Apollo seismic stations are compared with previously published results of the active seismic experiments. It is concluded that the lunar surface is covered by a layer of low seismic velocity which appears to be equivalent to the lunar regolith defined previously by geological observations. This layer is underlain by a zone of distinctly higher seismic velocity at all of the Apollo landing sites. The regolith thicknesses at the Apollo 11, 12, and 15 sites are estimated from the shear-wave resonance to be 4.4, 3.7, and 4.4 m, respectively. These thicknesses and those determined at the other Apollo sites by the active seismic experiments appear to be correlated with the age determinations and the abundances of extralunar components at the sites.

  6. Seismic Holography of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The basic goal of the project was to extend holographic seismic imaging techniques developed under a previous NASA contract, and to incorporate phase diagnostics. Phase-sensitive imaging gives us a powerful probe of local thermal and Doppler perturbations in active region subphotospheres, allowing us to map thermal structure and flows associated with "acoustic moats" and "acoustic glories". These remarkable features were discovered during our work, by applying simple acoustic power holography to active regions. Included in the original project statement was an effort to obtain the first seismic images of active regions on the Sun's far surface.

  7. Emergency preparedness activities during an ongoing seismic swarm: the experience of the 2011-2012 Pollino (Southern Italy) sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, A.; Mucciarelli, M.; Chiauzzi, L.; De Costanzo, G.; Loperte, G.

    2012-04-01

    Facing natural disasters effects can be a very difficult task lacking suitable activities and tools to preventively prepare the involved community (people, authorities, professionals, …) to the expected events. Therefore, a suite of preventive actions should be carried out to mitigate natural risks, in particular working to reduce the territorial vulnerability with respect to the specific natural hazard at hand, and to increase people response capacity. In fact, building social capacity helps to increase the risk perception and the people capacity to adapt to and cope with natural hazards. Since October 2011 a seismic swarm is affecting the Pollino mountain range, Southern Italy. At present the sequence is still ongoing, with more than 500 events with M>1, at least 40 well perceived by the population and a maximum magnitude at 3.6. The area mainly affected by the seismic sequence includes 12 villages, with a total population of about 50.000 inhabitants and, according to the current seismic hazard map it has high seismicity level. Such area was hit by a magnitude Ml=5.7 event in 1998 that produced macroseismic intensity not higher that VII-VIII degree of MCS scale and caused one dead, some injured and widespread damage in at least six municipalities. During the sequence, the National Department of Civil Protection (DPC) and the Civil Protection of Basilicata Region decided to put in action some measures aimed at verifying and enhancing emergency preparedness. These actions have been carried out with a constant and fruitful collaboration among the main stakeholders involved (scientific community, local and national governmental agencies, civil protection volunteers, etc) trough the following main activities: 1. collaboration between scientific community and the local and national offices of Civil Protection especially in the relationship with local authorities (e.g. mayors, which are civil protection authorities in their municipality); 2. interaction between DPC

  8. The Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The completed data set obtained from the 4-station Apollo seismic network includes signals from approximately 11,800 events of various types. Four data sets for use by other investigators, through the NSSDC, are in preparation. Some refinement of the lunar model based on seismic data can be expected, but its gross features remain as presented two years ago. The existence of a small, molten core remains dependent upon the analysis of signals from a single, far-side impact. Analysis of secondary arrivals from other sources may eventually resolve this issue, as well as continued refinement of the magnetic field measurements. Evidence of considerable lateral heterogeneity within the moon continues to build. The mystery of the much meteoroid flux estimate derived from lunar seismic measurements, as compared with earth-based estimates, remains; although, significant correlations between terrestrial and lunar observations are beginning to emerge.

  9. 2013 East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE): implosion data, Hayward, Calif

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Strayer, Luther M.; Goldman, Mark R.; Criley, Coyn J.; Garcia, Susan; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Marisol K.; Chan, Joanne; Gordon, Leslie C.; Haefner, Scott; Blair, James Luke; Gandhok, Gini; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2015-01-01

    In August 2013, the California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) in Hayward, California imploded a 13-story building (Warren Hall) that was deemed unsafe because of its immediate proximity to the active trace of the Hayward Fault. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the CSUEB collaborated on a program to record the seismic waves generated by the collapse of the building. We refer to this collaboration as the East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE). The principal objective of recording the seismic energy was to observe ground shaking as it radiated from the source, but the data also may be useful for other purposes. For example, the seismic data may be useful in evaluating the implosion process as it relates to structural engineering purposes. This report provides the metadata needed to utilize the seismic data.

  10. Meteoroid flux from passive seismic experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F.; Dorman, J.; Lammlein, D.; Latham, G.; Nakamura, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The meteoroid flux hitting the moon is recomputed using new information on the decrease of seismic signal amplitude with range. The new data are principally 17 large meteoroid impacts whose locations have been computed from recordings at all four of the operating Passive Seismic Experiment stations. These data suggest a rapid decrease in amplitudes beyond about 2200 km (chord range) which was not suspected earlier. The new estimate predicts the abundance of meteoroids with masses between 500 and 50,000 g. The result is considerably lower than estimates from earth-based observations, and close to our previous estimate from long-period lunar seismic data.

  11. Application of a cross correlation-based picking algorithm to active seismic signals from experiments in Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Yeguas, A.; Granados, M.; Garcia, L.; Benitez, C.; De la Torre, A.; Alvarez, I.; Diaz, A.; Ibañez, J.

    2013-12-01

    The detection of the arrival time of seismic waves or picking is of great importance in many seismology applications. Traditionally, picking has been carried out by human operators. This process is not systematic and relies completely on the expertise and judgment of the analysts. The limitations of manual picking and the increasing amount of data daily stored in the seismic networks worldwide distributed led to the development of automatic picking algorithms. The accuracy of conventional 'short-term average over long-term average' (STA/LTA) algorithm, the recently developed 'Adaptive Multiband Picking Algorithm' (AMPA) and the proposed cross correlation-based picking algorithm have been assessed using a huge data set composed by active seismic signals from experiments in Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). The experiment consisted of the deployment of a dense seismic network on Tenerife Island (125 seismometers in total) and the shooting of air-guns around the island with the Spanish Oceanographic Vessel Hespérides (6459 air shots in total). Thus, more than 800.000 signals were recorded and subsequently manually picked. Since the sources and receivers locations are known and considering that the ship travelled a small distance between two consecutive shots, a picking algorithm based on cross-correlation has been proposed. The main advantage of this approach is that the algorithm does not require to set up sophisticated parameters, in contrast to other automatic algorithms. This work was supported in part by the CEI BioTic Granada project (COD55), the Spanish mineco project APASVO (TEC2012-31551), the Spanish micinn project EPHESTOS (CGL2011-29499-C02-01) and the EU project MED-SUV.

  12. Experiments on Seismic Metamaterials: Molding Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brûlé, S.; Javelaud, E. H.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.

    2014-04-01

    Materials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles' velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations.

  13. Experiments on seismic metamaterials: molding surface waves.

    PubMed

    Brûlé, S; Javelaud, E H; Enoch, S; Guenneau, S

    2014-04-01

    Materials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles' velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations. PMID:24745420

  14. The LUSI Seismic Experiment: Deployment of a Seismic Network around LUSI, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Haryanto, Iyan; Masturyono, Masturyono; Hadi, Soffian; Rohadi, Suprianto; Suardi, Iman; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Lusi eruption started in northeast Java, Indonesia the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. Lusi is located few kilometres to the NE of the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. Lusi sits upon the Watukosek fault system. From this volcanic complex originates the Watukosek fault system that was reactivated by the M6.3 earthquake in 2006 and is still periodically reactivated by the frequent seismicity. To date Lusi is still active and erupting gas, water, mud and clasts. Gas and water data show that the Lusi plumbing system is connected with the neighbouring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. This makes the Lusi eruption a "sedimentary hosted geothermal system". To verify and characterise the occurrence of seismic activity and how this perturbs the connected Watukosek fault, the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic system and the ongoing Lusi eruption, we deployed 30 seismic stations (short-period and broadband) in this region of the East Java basin. The seismic stations are more densely distributed around LUSI and the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. Fewer stations are positioned around the volcanic arc. Our study sheds light on the seismic activity along the Watukosek fault system and describes the waveforms associated to the geysering activity of Lusi. The initial network aims to locate small event that may not be captured by the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG) seismic network and it will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-Arjuno Welirang region and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. Such variations will then be ideally related to

  15. The SEIS Experiment: A Mars Seismic Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schibler, P.; Lognonne, P.; Giardini, D.; Banerdt, B.; Karczewski, J. F.; Mimoun, D.; Zweifel, P.; Pike, T.; Ammann, J.; Anglade, A.

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will integrate a VBB (Very Broad Band) two axis seismometer, a three axis Short Period seismometer and a series of environmental sensors for pressure, infra-sounds and temperature. IPGP (France) has the overall responsibility of the experiment and is responsible for the VBB and environmental sensors. ETHZ (Switzerland) is responsible for the electronics of the experiment and JPL (USA) for the SP (Short Period) sensors. SEIS instrument was first proposed and accepted for NetLander mission (and will also be in charge of data acquisition for SPICE experiment). This seismic package should also be proposed for future missions.

  16. Seismic experiments, nuclear dismantlement go hand in hand in Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, William; Kluchko, Luke J.

    Unique seismic experiments involving large chemical explosions at different depths have been conducted in Kazakhstan, thanks to nuclear dismantlement activity there. Collaborative efforts of several bodies have provided this creative, cost-efficient extension of the dismantling work, improving technical monitoring and verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT).For the past several years, the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) has been closing the nuclear test tunnels and bore-holes at the former Soviet nuclear test site nearSemipalatinsk, eastern Kazakhstan, as part of the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) Program. The existence of this program and the infrastructure that was in place to implement it made it possible to conduct the seismic experiments. As a result, benchmark data have been collected on the variations in seismic signals from explosions at different burial depths.

  17. Juan de Fuca Plate Ridge-to-Trench Experiment: initial results from active source seismic imaging of the Juan de Fuca plate and Cascadia fore-arc (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Canales, J.; Carton, H. D.; Han, S.; Gibson, J. C.; Janiszewski, H. A.; Horning, G.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Abers, G. A.; Trehu, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Active source seismic data were acquired during the Juan de Fuca Ridge-to-Trench experiment (June-July 2012) to characterize the evolution and structure of the Juan de Fuca plate from formation at the ridge, through evolution in the plate interior, to subduction at the Cascadia trench. The survey provides plate-scale images of the sediments, crust, and shallowest mantle along two ridge-perpendicular transects, one extending from Axial seamount to the Oregon margin near Hydrate Ridge and the other from near Endeavour segment to Grays Harbor offshore Washington. In addition, a 450 km long trench-parallel line ~10 km seaward of the Cascadia deformation front was acquired to characterize variations in plate structure along the margin. Coincident long-streamer (8 km) multi-channel seismic (MCS) and wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data were collected along each transect. Using these data, our current investigations focus on the properties of the thick sediment blanket covering the Juan de Fuca plate and evidence for fluid flow at the deformation front, crustal structure within the plate interior and near the deformation front, and tracking the downgoing plate beneath the margin. Highlights include the discovery of numerous pockmarks on the seafloor providing evidence of active fluid flow up to 60 km west of the deformation front. Along the Oregon transect, a bright decollement horizon is imaged at ~1sec twtt above basement whereas at the Washington margin, protothrusts of the deformation front reach to the top of the oceanic crust. Variations in sediment properties are documented within the margin-parallel transect with changes in the stratigraphic level of decollement. While crustal thickness is quite uniform along the margin (~ 6 km), variations in crustal reflectivity and in shallowest mantle velocities are observed over ~30-50 km length scales that could be related to structural variations in the Cascadia subduction zone. Further landward, the top of the

  18. A Community Seismic Experiment in the ENAM Primary Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    Eastern North America (ENAM) was chosen as a GeoPRISMS Rift Initiation and Evolution primary site because it represents a mature continental margin with onshore and offshore rift basins in which the record of extension and continental break-up is preserved. The degree to which syn-rift magmatism and preexisting lithospheric weaknesses controlled the evolution of the margin can be further investigated if we image its 3-D structure at small and large length scales with active-source and earthquake seismic imaging. In the Summer of 2012 we submitted a proposal to the US National Science Foundation for an ambitious plan for data acquisition on a 400 km wide section of the mid-Atlantic East Coast margin around Cape Hatteras, from unextended continental lithosphere onshore to mature oceanic lithosphere offshore. This area includes an important along-strike transition in the morphology of the margin from the Carolina Trough to the Baltimore Canyon Trough, and two major fracture zones that are associated with significant offsets at the modern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The study area also covers several features representing the post-rift modification of the margin by slope instability and fluid flow. As the Earthscope Transportable Array reaches the East Coast of the US in 2013 and 2014, we will have an unprecedented opportunity to image the detailed structure of the rifted margin. To make effective use of the research infrastructure, including the seismic vessel R/V Marcus Langseth, the Earthscope seismic instrumentation, and US OBS Instrument Pool, we propose to collect a suite of seismic data at the mid-Atlantic margin in the context of a community-driven experiment with completely open data access. This multi-faceted seismic experiment offers an immense opportunity for education of young scientists. We propose an integrated education effort during and after acquisition. The science and field parties for data acquisition will largely consist of young scientists, who will be

  19. Patterns of seismic activity preceding large earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Bruce E.; Carlson, J. M.; Langer, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    A mechanical model of seismic faults is employed to investigate the seismic activities that occur prior to major events. The block-and-spring model dynamically generates a statistical distribution of smaller slipping events that precede large events, and the results satisfy the Gutenberg-Richter law. The scaling behavior during a loading cycle suggests small but systematic variations in space and time with maximum activity acceleration near the future epicenter. Activity patterns inferred from data on seismicity in California demonstrate a regional aspect; increased activity in certain areas are found to precede major earthquake events. One example is given regarding the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 which is located near a fault section associated with increased activity levels.

  20. Active Seismic Monitoring for Earthquake Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonova, M.; Korneev, V.

    2005-12-01

    Earthquake prediction remains high priority issue for disaster prevention. Study of the M6.0 2004 Parkfield and M7.0 1989 Loma Prieta strike-slip earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) reveal seismicity peaks in the surrounding crust several months prior to the main events. Earthquakes directly within the SAF zone were intentionally excluded from the analysis because they manifest stress-release processes rather than stress accumulation. The observed increase in seismicity is interpreted as a signature of the increasing stress level in the surrounding crust, while the peak that occurs several months prior to the main event and the subsequent decrease in seismicity are attributed to damage-induced softening processes. Furthermore, in both cases there is a distinctive zone of low seismic activity that surrounds the epicentral region in the pre-event period. The increase of seismicity in the crust surrounding a potential future event and the development of a low-seismicity epicentral zone can be regarded as promising precursory information that could help signal the arrival of large earthquakes. We modeled the seismicity precursor phenomena using finite-element 2D model capable to replicate non-linear breaking of elastic rock. The distinctive seismicity peak was observed for a model simulating SAF properties at Park field. Such peaks are likely to be a good mid-term precursors allowing to declare alerts several months before earthquakes and pointing on their epicenter regions. The short tern alerts require use of active sources and their proper placement in order to monitor the developments of rock softening processes.

  1. Seismic-while-drilling data processing with seismic interferometry in the Daqing Oilfield experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongtao 1Huang, Weichuan 24Li, Yuquan

    2014-03-01

    Seismic interferometry was used to process the data collected with seismic-while-drilling (SWD) experiments at the Daqing Oilfield. The experiments simultaneously recorded the data at the drilling stem and on the ground. After conducting the frequency and the energy property analysis, the data was processed using the correlation and deconvolution method. Seismic data was then obtained from excitation of the drill bit. The result maps show that the deconvolution method can suppress the source effects and enhance the resolution of the profile, and that the vertical stacks enhance the seismic response of the subsurface. The interferometry process after band-filtering can obtain maps with very high resolution. Seismic interferometry by deconvolution shows great advantages based on the results of this experimental data. The method can also be applied to the SWD data and the ambient seismic data to obtain better processing results.

  2. Multiharmonic model of seismic activity in Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Valeev, S. G.; Faskhutdinova, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the uniform catalogue of earthquakes of the minimum energy class 8.5 for 1962-2008, multiharmonic models of seismic activity in Kamchatka are developed. The main harmonic components with periods from a few days to 12 years are identified. Both the entire catalogue and its modified versions obtained by the elimination of aftershocks and clusters, as well as nonoverlapping time series were used to study the stability of the models. The forward-prediction testing showed that in the models with weekly averaged initial data, periods of increased and reduced seismic activity lasting for several weeks are predicted with high confidence on an interval of up to 1.8% of the education period. This testifies for the presence of deterministic components in the seismic activity.

  3. IRIS Controlled Source Seismic Experiments: Continental Structure, Instrumentation, and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2004-12-01

    The controlled-source seismology program of IRIS/PASSCAL has made major contributions to the study of continental structure and evolution. It has also undergone major developments in seismic instrumentation. The first PASSCAL experiments (1984/85) targeted the Basin and Range Province and the Ouachita orogenic belt. The Basin and Range study provided remarkably clear images of this thin, highly-extended crust, while the Ouachita experiment tested competing hypotheses for the deep structure of this Paleozoic orogen. However, both of these projects were limited by a lack of seismic instruments. The situation improved in the late 1980's with the benefit of a mixed array of 600 seismic recorders from the USGS, Stanford, and the Geological Survey of Canada. The resolution achieved with these instruments was revolutionary. Results include the imaging of such remarkable features as crustal-scale duplexes in the Brooks Range compressional orogen of northern Alaska, and of crustal "core complexes" in the extended crust of southwest Arizona. The 3-channel PASSCAL Jr. instrument was developed, leading to experiments in which ˜1000 instruments were deployed, including three-component recording. This complex mix of instruments served the community well for several years, but required large, complex instrument centers and lots of technical support. With input from PASSCAL and the international community, a newly designed, compact instrument (the Texan) was finalized in the spring of 1998, and the first 200 instruments was delivered to the Univ. of Texas-El Paso in late 1998. The present instrument pool of Texans exceeds 1,400 and these have been used on such projects as the high-resolution imaging of the Los Angeles and San Fernando basins (LARSE I and II experiments), where active thrust faults have been imaged. Controlled-source seismic experiments are now very numerous. During calendar year 2004 alone, portable Texan instruments have traveled from Venezuela to Denmark

  4. Regional Observation of Seismic Activity in Baekdu Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geunyoung; Che, Il-Young; Shin, Jin-Soo; Chi, Heon-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Seismic unrest in Baekdu Mountain area between North Korea and Northeast China region has called attention to geological research community in Northeast Asia due to her historical and cultural importance. Seismic bulletin shows level of seismic activity in the area is higher than that of Jilin Province of Northeast China. Local volcanic observation shows a symptom of magmatic unrest in period between 2002 and 2006. Regional seismic data have been used to analyze seismic activity of the area. The seismic activity could be differentiated from other seismic phenomena in the region by the analysis.

  5. Observations of seismic activity in Southern Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirova, T.; Hofstetter, R.

    2013-04-01

    Recent seismic activity in southern Lebanon is of particular interest since the tectonic framework of this region is poorly understood. In addition, seismicity in this region is very infrequent compared with the Roum fault to the east, which is seismically active. Between early 2008 and the end of 2010, intense seismic activity occurred in the area. This was manifested by several swarm-like sequences and continuous trickling seismicity over many days, amounting in total to more than 900 earthquakes in the magnitude range of 0.5 ≤ M d ≤ 5.2. The region of activity extended in a 40-km long zone mainly in a N-S direction and was located about 10 km west of the Roum fault. The largest earthquake, with a duration magnitude of M d = 5.2, occurred on February 15, 2008, and was located at 33.327° N, 35.406° E at a depth of 3 km. The mean-horizontal peak ground acceleration observed at two nearby accelerometers exceeded 0.05 g, where the strongest peak horizontal acceleration was 55 cm/s2 at about 20 km SE of the epicenter. Application of the HypoDD algorithm yielded a pronounced N-S zone, parallel to the Roum fault, which was not known to be seismically active. Focal mechanism, based on full waveform inversion and the directivity effect of the strongest earthquake, suggests left-lateral strike-slip NNW-SSE faulting that crosses the NE-SW traverse faults in southern Lebanon.

  6. Seismic activity of Erebus volcano, antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada

    1987-11-01

    Mount Erebus is presently the only Antarctic volcano with sustained eruptive activity in the past few years. It is located on Ross Island and a convecting anorthoclase phonolite lava lake has occupied the summit crater of Mount Erebus from January 1973 to September 1984. A program to monitor the seismic activity of Mount Erebus named IMESS was started in December 1980 as an international cooperative program among Japan, the United States and New Zealand. A new volcanic episode began on 13 September, 1984 and continued until December. Our main observations from the seismic activity from 1982 1985 are as follows: (1) The average numbers of earthquakes which occurred around Mount Erebus in 1982, 1983 and January August 1984 were 64, 134 and 146 events per day, respectively. Several earthquake swarms occurred each year. (2) The averag number of earthquakes in 1985 is 23 events per day, with only one earthquake swarm. (3) A remarkable decrease of the background seismicity is recognized before and after the September 1984 activity. (4) Only a few earthquakes were located in the area surrounding Erebus mountain after the September 1984 activity. A magma reservoir is estimated to be located in the southwest area beneath the Erebus summit, based on the hypocenter distributions of earthquakes.

  7. Mammoth Mountain, California broadband seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P. B.; Pitt, A. M.; Wilkinson, S. K.; Chouet, B. A.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Prejean, S. G.; Read, C.; Shelly, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a young cumulo-volcano located on the southwest rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Current volcanic processes beneath Mammoth Mountain are manifested in a wide range of seismic signals, including swarms of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes, upper and mid-crustal long-period earthquakes, swarms of brittle-failure earthquakes in the lower crust, and shallow (3-km depth) very-long-period earthquakes. Diffuse emissions of C02 began after a magmatic dike injection beneath the volcano in 1989, and continue to present time. These indications of volcanic unrest drive an extensive monitoring effort of the volcano by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program. As part of this effort, eleven broadband seismometers were deployed on Mammoth Mountain in November 2011. This temporary deployment is expected to run through the fall of 2013. These stations supplement the local short-period and broadband seismic stations of the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) and provide a combined network of eighteen broadband stations operating within 4 km of the summit of Mammoth Mountain. Data from the temporary stations are not available in real-time, requiring the merging of the data from the temporary and permanent networks, timing of phases, and relocation of seismic events to be accomplished outside of the standard NCSN processing scheme. The timing of phases is accomplished through an interactive Java-based phase-picking routine, and the relocation of seismicity is achieved using the probabilistic non-linear software package NonLinLoc, distributed under the GNU General Public License by Alomax Scientific. Several swarms of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes, spasmodic bursts of high-frequency earthquakes, a few long-period events located within or below the edifice of Mammoth Mountain and numerous mid-crustal long-period events have been recorded by the network. To date, about 900 of the ~2400 events occurring beneath Mammoth Mountain since November 2011 have

  8. Field experiment in Soultz-sous-Forêts, 1993: Changes of the pattern of induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Vladimir; Ponomarev, Alexander; Bernard, Pascal; Bourouis, Seid

    2013-12-01

    The data of the known field experiment on water injection in the borehole were analyzed. Parameters of self-similarity of seismicity were estimated in comparison with the changes of water pressure. Changes of seismicity parameters that indicate the redistribution of the failure from lower scales to upper are revealed. The total number of earthquakes per series of the water initiation found to be depended exponentially on the water pressure and seismic activity maximum is delayed gradually relative to beginning of initiation. The growth of induced seismicity zone in time differs from diffusion model for water flow in the porous medium. Analysis carried out from laboratory data indicates that diffusion growth of the failure area may be realized in the dry specimen, without fluid. It could be assumed that both kinetic processes — water and the failure diffusion — can be significant for the development of seismicity induced by the water injection.

  9. The Mars SEIS Experiment: A Mars Seismic Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimoun, D.; Lognonne, P.; Banerdt, W. B.; Schibler, P.; Giardini, D.; Pont, G.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars SEIS experiment. The SEIS experiment was first proposed by IPGP (and accepted) for the NetLander mission. It integrates two VBB (Very Broad Band) seismometers, a three axis Short Period seismometer and a series of environmental sensors for pressure, infra-sounds and temperature. IPGP (France) has the overall responsibility of the experiment and is responsible for the seismic and environmental sensors. ETHZ (Switzerland) is responsible for the electronics of the experiment and JPL (USA) for the SP (Short Period) sensors. As NetLander mission has been cancelled (while fortunately the development still goes on), this seismic package can be proposed for future Mars missions.

  10. Ionospheric Response Due to Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Signatures of the seismic activity in the ionospheric F2 region have been studied by analyzing the measurement of electron and ion temperatures during the occurrence of earthquake. The ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data recorded by the RPA payload aboard the Indian SROSS-C2 satellite during the period from January 1995 to December 2000 were used for the altitude range 430-630 km over Indian region. The normal day's electron and ion temperatures have been compared to the temperatures recorded during the seismic activity. The details of seismic events were obtained from USGS earthquake data information website. It has been found that the average electron temperature is enhanced during the occurrence of earthquakes by 1.2 to 1.5 times and this enhancement was for ion temperature ranging from 1.1to 1.3 times over the normal day's average temperatures. The above careful quantitative analysis of ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data shows the consistent enhancement in the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures. It is expected that the seismogenic vertical electrical field propagates up to the ionospheric heights and induces Joule heating that may cause the enhancement in ionospheric temperatures.

  11. Seismic Evidence for an Active Southern Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. E.; Velasco, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Competing models exist to explain what caused the Earth’s crust to spread apart 29 million years ago to create a region known today as the Rio Grande Rift (RGR). The RGR extends from central Colorado through New Mexico to northern Mexico, near El Paso. A growing body of evidence shows that geologic activity still occurs in the RGR, with a continuation of faulting, seismicity and a small widening rate. We map of the seismic velocity structure and crustal thickness using data from the Rio Grande Rift Seismic TRAnsect (RISTRA) experiment and the EarthScope Transportable Array (USArray) dataset. In addition to the data we collected from the RISTRA experiment and USArray dataset, we also acquired receiver functions from the EarthScope Automatic Receiver Survey (EARS) website (http://www.earthscope.org/data) and waveform data from the Incorporated Research Institutes for Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC). In particular, we requested seismograms from the IRIS DMC database where we acquired teleseismic events from Jan 2000 to Dec 2009. This includes 7,259 seismic events with a minimum magnitude of 5.5 and 106,389 continuous waveforms. This data was preprocessed (merged, rotated) using a program called Standing Order of Data (SOD). We computed receiver functions and receiver function stacks for all data in the Southern Rio Grande Rift (SRGR). We map the crustal thickness, seismic velocity, and mantle structure to better determine the nature of tectonic activity that is presently taking place and further investigate the regional extension of the Southern Rio Grande Rift (SRGR). Here we present results of the crustal and velocity structure using the kriging interpolation scheme and interpret our results in relation to southern RGR deformation and extension.

  12. Results from the Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Ewing, M.; Lammlein, D.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results from the Apollo Seismic Network suggest that primitive differentiation occurred in the outer shell of the moon to a depth of approximately 300 km and the central region of the moon is presently molten to a radius of between 200 and 300 km. If early melting to a depth of 300 to 400 km was a consequence of accretional energy, very short accretion times are required. It was shown that the best model for the zone of original differentiation is a crust 40 to 80 km thick, ranging in composition from anorthositic gabbro to gabbro, and overlying an ultramafic cumulate about 250 km thick. The best candidate for the molten core appears to be iron or iron sulphide. A new class of seismic signals recently were identified that may correspond to shallow moonquakes. These are rare, but much more energetic than the more numerous, deep moonquakes.

  13. Results from the Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathum, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Ewing, M.; Lammlein, D.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results from the Apollo seismic network suggest that primitive differentiation occurred in the outer shell of the moon to a depth of approximately 300 km; and the central region of the moon is presently molten to a radius of between 200 and 300 km. If early melting to a depth of 300 to 400 km was a consequence of accretional energy, very short accretion times are required. The best model for the zone of original differentiation appears to be a crust 40 to 80 km thick, ranging in composition from anorthositic gabbro to gabbro; overlying an ultramafic cumulate (olivine-pyroxene) about 250 km thick. The best candidate for the molten core appears to be iron or iron sulphide. A new class of seismic signals has recently been identified that may correspond to shallow moonquakes. These are rare, but much more energetic than the more numerous, deep moonquakes.

  14. Participation in the Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, F.; Toksoez, M. N.; Dainty, A.

    1972-01-01

    Computer programs which were written to read digital tapes containing lunar seismic data were studied. Interpreting very early parts of the lunar seismogram as seismic body-wave phases enabled the determination of the structure of the outer part of the moon in the Fra Mauro region. The crust in the Fra Mauro region is 60 to 65 km-thick, overlaying a high velocity mantle. The crust is further divided into an upper part, 25 km thick, apparently made of material similar to the surficial basalts, and a lower part of seemingly different composition, possibly an anorthositic gabbro. The generation of the exceedingly long reverberating wave-train observed in lunar seismogram was also studied. This is believed to be due to an intense scattering layer with very high quality coefficient overlying a more homogeneous elastic medium. Titles and abstracts of related published papers are included.

  15. Explosives for Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Explosive charges of various sizes were investigated for use in lunar seismic studies. Program logistics, and the specifications for procurement of bulk explosives are described. The differential analysis, thermal properties, and detonation velocity measurements on HNS/Teflon 7C 90/10 are reported along with the field tests of the hardware. It is concluded that nearly all large explosive charges crack after fabrication, from aging or thermal shock. The cracks do not affect the safety, or reliability of the explosives.

  16. Geyser's Eruptive Activity in Broadband Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim

    2010-05-01

    A geyser is a spring characterized by intermittent discharge of water ejected turbulently and accompanied by a vapor phase (steam). The formation of geysers is due to particular hydrogeological conditions, which exist in only a few places on Earth, so they are a fairly rare phenomenon. The reasons of geyser periodicity and specifics of the activity for every particular geyser are not completely clear yet. So almost for all known geysers it is necessary to develop the personal model. In given study we first use seismic method for detection of possible hidden feature of geyser's eruptive activity in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. Broadband seismic records of geyser generated signals were obtained in hydrothermal field. The Valley of the Geysers belongs to Kronotskiy State Natural Biosphere Reserve and the UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site "Volcanoes of Kamchatka". Neither seismological nor geophysical investigations were carried out here earlier. In September, 2009 seismic observation was organized in geyser's field by 24-bit digital output broadband seismometers (GURALP CMG-6TD flat velocity response 0.033-50 Hz). Four geysers were surveyed: the fountain type Big and Giant geysers; the cone type Pearl geyser and the short-period Gap geyser. Seismometers were set as possible close to the geyser's surface vent (usually at the distance near 3-5 m). Main parameters of the eruptions for the investigated geysers: - The Giant geyser is the most powerful among the regular active geysers in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. The height of the fountain reaches 30 meters, the mass of water erupted is about 40-60 tons. The main cycle of activity varies significantly: in 1945 the intervals between eruptions was near 3 hours, nowadays it is 5-6 hours. As a geyser of fountain type, the Giant geyser erupts from the 2*3 m2 pool of water. - The Big geyser was flooded by the lake after the natural catastrophe (giant mud-stone avalanche, formed by landslide, bed into Geiyzernaya

  17. Assessing the role of fluids in episodic tremor and slip events using active seismic sources: results from a prototype experiment in Cascadia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, F.; Silver, P. G.; Nigbor, R.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, the so-called episodic tremor and slip (ETS) that consist of seismically recorded tremor events with characteristic frequencies of 1-15 Hz and slow slip events observed by GPS and strainmeters with durations of order weeks were widely observed in a variety of environments worldwide. While the community continues to make interesting observations, the underlying physical process remains poorly understood. There have been many proposed mechanisms, most of which invoke fluids. Many observations suggest that ETS can be triggered by very small stresses despite the high confining pressures at the depth of ETS, which has led many to conclude that fluids at the slab interface are under lithostatic pressure, and that furthermore there is likely fluid flow at the time of ETS events. Thus far, there is little data with which to evaluate these ideas. We have been interested in determining whether or not there are spatiotemporal structural changes in the crust and upper-most mantle associated with this phenomenon. We conducted a control-source experiment in Cascadia to examine the feasibility of using the reflection/scattering waves from the slab interface to look for structural changes that may reflect the migration of fluids. We selected a highly repeatable source, an eccentric-mass “shaker” designed for engineering studies, as the seismic source. The shaker was provided by NEES@UCLA. A 15’x15’ cement pad for installing the shaker was built on basaltic bedrock that is part of the Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Crescent Formation. We deployed arrays of short period instruments at two distances from the source: 30km and 90km away. The 90km array was deployed at the site of a previous deployment of the A of A team at Big Skidder Hill. Including our stations and those of A of A, we had 32 seismometers in all. The array has a station spacing of 60-100 m and an aperture about 1 to 1.5 km. During our experiment period, we were able to record a quarry blast near our

  18. Third Party Borehole Seismic Experiments During the Ocean Drilling Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, S. A.; Stephen, R. A.; Hoskins, H.; Bolmer, T.

    2003-12-01

    Third party borehole seismic experiments on the Ocean Drilling Program began with an oblique seismic experiment on Leg 102 at Site 418 in the Western Atlantic. Upper ocean crust here is characterized by a normal seismic layer 2 vertical velocity gradient, lateral velocity variations, azimuthal anisotropy, and azimuth dependent scattering. A normal incidence VSP was run on Leg 118 in the gabbro sequence at Hole 735B on the Southwest Indian Ridge. The vertical seismic velocity inferred from arrival times is similar to that observed horizontally by refraction in ocean layer 3, but attenuation is anomalously high, which prompted the hypothesis that the gabbro cored may not actually represent the bulk of Layer 3 material. The VSP data acquired at Hole 504B in the eastern equatorial Pacific on Legs 111 and 148 helped to constrain the P and S velocity structure at the site and showed that upper layer 3 at this site, at a depth of over 2 km into the crust, consisted of the lower portion of the sheeted dikes rather than gabbro. Both offset and normal incidence VSPs were run on Leg 164 to study the seismic velocity structure of gas hydrates on the Blake Ridge. A new innovation on ODP was the deployment of broadband seismometers in boreholes. Whereas the conventional VSPs and offset VSPs mentioned above operate in the frequency range from 1 to 100Hz, broadband seismometers are used in earthquake seismology and operate in the range from 0.001 to 10Hz. The first broadband seismometer test was carried out from the drill ship on Leg 128 in the Japan Sea. Subsequently 4 permanent broadband borehole seismic observatories were installed in the Western Pacific and Japan Trench on Legs 186, 191 and 195. The ODP era also saw the development of systems for re-entering boreholes from conventional research vessels after the drill ship left the site. Borehole seismic experiments and installations that used this wireline re-entry technology were carried out in DSDP Holes 534 (Blake

  19. Small Arrays for Seismic Intruder Detections: A Simulation Based Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarka, A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic sensors such as geophones and fiber optic have been increasingly recognized as promising technologies for intelligence surveillance, including intruder detection and perimeter defense systems. Geophone arrays have the capability to provide cost effective intruder detection in protecting assets with large perimeters. A seismic intruder detection system uses one or multiple arrays of geophones design to record seismic signals from footsteps and ground vehicles. Using a series of real-time signal processing algorithms the system detects, classify and monitors the intruder's movement. We have carried out numerical experiments to demonstrate the capability of a seismic array to detect moving targets that generate seismic signals. The seismic source is modeled as a vertical force acting on the ground that generates continuous impulsive seismic signals with different predominant frequencies. Frequency-wave number analysis of the synthetic array data was used to demonstrate the array's capability at accurately determining intruder's movement direction. The performance of the array was also analyzed in detecting two or more objects moving at the same time. One of the drawbacks of using a single array system is its inefficiency at detecting seismic signals deflected by large underground objects. We will show simulation results of the effect of an underground concrete block at shielding the seismic signal coming from an intruder. Based on simulations we found that multiple small arrays can greatly improve the system's detection capability in the presence of underground structures. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344

  20. Bighorns Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE): Amplitude Response to Different Seismic Charge Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, S. H., Killer, K. C., Worthington, L. L., Snelson, C. M.

    2010-09-02

    Contrary to popular belief, charge weight is not the most important engineering parameter determining the seismic amplitudes generated by a shot. The scientific literature has long claimed that the relationship, A ~R2L1/2, where A is the seismic amplitude generated by a shot, R is the radius of the seismic charge and L is the length of that charge, holds. Assuming the coupling to the formation and the pressure generated by the explosive are constants, this relationship implies that the one should be able to increase the charge radius while decreasing the charge length and obtain more seismic amplitude with less charge weight. This has significant implications for the economics of lithospheric seismic shots, because shallower holes and small charge sizes decrease cost. During the Bighorns Array Seismic Experiment (BASE) conducted in the summer of 2010, 24 shots with charge sizes ranging from 110 to 900 kg and drill hole diameters of 300 and 450 mm were detonated and recorded by an array of up to 2000 single-channel Texan seismographs. Maximum source-receiver offset of 300 km. Five of these shots were located within a one-acre square in an effort to eliminate coupling effects due to differing geological formations. We present a quantitative comparison of the data from these five shots to experimentally test the equation above.

  1. Seismic active control by neural networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.

    1998-01-01

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to activate structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feed-forward neural network architecture and an adaptive back-propagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the back-propagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator's capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  2. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  3. The seismicity of Ethiopia; active plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohr, P.

    1981-01-01

    Ethiopia, descended from the semimythical Kingdom of Punt, lies at the strategic intersection of Schmidt's jigsaw puzzle where the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the African Rift System meet. Because of geologically recent uplift combined with rapid downcutting erosion by rivers, notably the Blue Nile (Abbay), Ethiopia is the most mountainous country in Africa. It is also the most volcanically active, while its historical seismicity matches that of the midocean ridges. And, in a sense, Ethiopia is host to an evoloving ocean ridge system. 

  4. Structural evolution beneath Sakurajima Volcano, Japan, revealed through rounds of controlled seismic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Tomoki; Iguchi, Masato; Tameguri, Takeshi; Nakamichi, Haruhisa

    2016-04-01

    Structural evolution beneath an active volcano is detected as the variation of seismic reflectivity through controlled seismic experiments, which is interpreted as being associated with discharging magma. The target of the present study is Sakurajima Volcano, which is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan. Six rounds of seismic experiments with controlled sources have been conducted annually at the volcano. Two seismic reflection profiles are obtained from the datasets for each successful round of experiments. The experiments reveal clear annual variation in seismic reflectivity at a depth of 6.2 km in the northeastern part of Sakurajima. The reflectivity is maximum in December 2009 upon the first intrusion of magma and decreases gradually until December 2013, which coincides with the inflation and deflation cycle of Sakurajima Volcano. Reflectivity variation occurred in the embedded clear reflector at depth. An evolving sandwiched structure in the intermediate layer is used as the reflector model. Lower-velocity magma embedded in the intermediate layer and its succeeding velocity increment explain the variation range of reflectivity. This is interpreted as a temperature decrease associated with discharging magma at depth. The present study describes a new approach for instantaneously sensing magma properties and for monitoring active volcanoes.

  5. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  6. Study of Local Seismic Events in Lithuania and Adjacent Areas Using Data from the PASSEQ Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janutyte, Ilma; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Motuza, Gediminas

    2013-05-01

    The territory of Lithuania and adjacent areas of the East European Craton have always been considered a region of low seismicity. Two recent earthquakes with magnitudes of more than 5 in the Kaliningrad District (Russian Federation) on 21 September 2004 motivated re-evaluation of the seismic hazard in Lithuania and adjacent territories. A new opportunity to study seismicity in the region is provided by the PASSEQ (Pasive Seismic Experiment) project that aimed to study the lithosphere-asthenosphere structure around the Trans-European Suture Zone. Twenty-six seismic stations of the PASSEQ temporary seismic array were installed in the territory of Lithuania. The stations recorded a number of local and regional seismic events originating from Lithuania and adjacent areas. This data can be used to answer the question of whether there exist seismically active tectonic zones in Lithuania that could be potentially hazardous for critical industrial facilities. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to find any natural tectonic seismic events in Lithuania and to obtain more general view of seismicity in the region. In order to do this, we make a manual review of the continuous data recorded by the PASSEQ seismic stations in Lithuania. From the good quality data, we select and relocate 45 local seismic events using the well-known LocSAT and VELEST location algortithms. In order to discriminate between possible natural events, underwater explosions and on-shore blasts, we analyse spatial distribution of epicenters and temporal distribution of origin times and perform both visual analysis of waveforms and spectral analysis of recordings. We show that the relocated seismic events can be grouped into five clusters (groups) according to their epicenter coordinates and origin and that several seismic events might be of tectonic origin. We also show that several events from the off-shore region in the Baltic Sea (at the coasts of the Kaliningrad District of the Russian Federation) are

  7. Structure and seismic activity of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, M.; Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Laigle, M.; Ruiz Fernandez, M.; Kopp, H.; Hirn, A.; Flueh, E. R.; Thales Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Several active and passive seismic experiments conducted in 2007 in the framework of the European program "Thales Was Right" and of the French ANR program "Subsismanti" provided a unique set of geophysical data highlighting the deep structure of the central part of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, offshore Dominica and Martinique, and its seismic activity during a period of 8 months. The region is characterized by a relatively low rate of seismicity that is often attributed to the slow (2 cm/yr) subduction of the old, 90 My, Atlantic lithosphere beneath the Caribbean Plate. Based on tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic data, the forearc can clearly be divided into an inner forearc, characterised by a high vertical velocity gradient in the igneous crust, and an outer forearc with lower crustal velocity gradient. The thick, high velocity, inner forearc is possibly the extension at depth of the Mesozoic Caribbean crust outcropping in La Désirade Island. The outer forearc, up to 70 km wide in the northern part of the study area, is getting narrower to the south and disappears offshore Martinique. Based on its seismic velocity structure with velocities higher than 6 km/s the backstop consists, at least partly, of magmatic rocks. The outer forearc is also highly deformed and faulted within the subducting trend of the Tiburon Ridge. With respect to the inner forearc velocity structure the outer forearc basement could either correspond to an accreted oceanic terrane or made of highly fractured rocks. The inner forearc is a dense, poorly deformable crustal block, tilted southward as a whole. It acts as a rigid buttress increasing the strain within both the overriding and subducting plates. This appears clearly in the current local seismicity affecting the subducting and the overriding plates that is located beneath the inner forearc. We detected earthquakes beneath the Caribbean forearc and in the Atlantic oceanic plate as well. The main seismic activity is

  8. Seismic image of a CO2 reservoir beneath a seismically active volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Pitt, A.M.; Foulger, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a seismically active volcano 200 000 to 50 000 years old, situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Since 1989 it has shown evidence of unrest in the form of earthquake swarms (Hill et al. 1990), volcanic 'long-period' earthquakes (Pitt and Hill 1994), increased output of magmatic 3He (Sorey et al. 1993) and the emission of about 500 tonnes day-1 of CO2 (Farrar et al. 1995; Hill 1996; M. Sorey, personal communication, 1997) which has killed trees and poses a threat to human safety. Local-earthquake tomography shows that in mid-1989 areas of subsequent tree-kill were underlain by extensive regions where the ratio of the compressional and shear elastic-wave speeds Vp/VS was about 9% lower than in the surrounding rocks. Theory (Mavko and Mukerji 1995), experiment (Ito, DeVilbiss and Nur 1979) and experience at other geothermal/volcanic areas (Julian et al. 1996) and at petroleum reservoirs (Harris et al. 1996) indicate that Vp/VS is sensitive to pore-fluid compressibility, through its effect on Vp. The observed Vp/VS anomaly is probably caused directly by CO2, and seismic Vp/VS tomography is thus a promising tool for monitoring gas concentration and movement in volcanoes, which may in turn be related to volcanic activity.

  9. Seismic image of a CO2 reservoir beneath a seismically active volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, Bruce R; Pitt, A. M.; Foulger, G. R.

    1998-04-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a seismically active volcano 200000 to 50000 years old, situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Since 1989 it has shown evidence of unrest in the form of earthquake swarms (Hill et al. 1990), volcanic `long-period' earthquakes (Pitt & Hill 1994), increased output of magmatic 3He (Sorey et al. 1993) and the emission of about 500 tonnes day -1 of CO2 (Farrar et al. 1995; Hill 1996; M. Sorey, personal communication, 1997), which has killed trees and poses a threat to human safety. Local-earthquake tomography shows that in mid-1989 areas of subsequent tree-kill were underlain by extensive regions where the ratio of the compressional and shear elastic-wave speeds VP/VS was about 9 per cent lower than in the surrounding rocks. Theory (Mavko & Mukerji 1995), experiment (Ito, DeVilbiss & Nur 1979), and experience at other geothermal/volcanic areas (Julian et al. 1996) and at petroleum reservoirs (Harris et al. 1996) indicate that VP/VS is sensitive to pore-fluid compressibility, through its effect on VP . The observed VP/VS anomaly is probably caused directly by CO2, and seismic VP/VS tomography is thus a promising tool for monitoring gas concentration and movement in volcanoes, which may in turn be related to volcanic activity.

  10. Geyser's Eruptive Activity in Broadband Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim

    2010-05-01

    A geyser is a spring characterized by intermittent discharge of water ejected turbulently and accompanied by a vapor phase (steam). The formation of geysers is due to particular hydrogeological conditions, which exist in only a few places on Earth, so they are a fairly rare phenomenon. The reasons of geyser periodicity and specifics of the activity for every particular geyser are not completely clear yet. So almost for all known geysers it is necessary to develop the personal model. In given study we first use seismic method for detection of possible hidden feature of geyser's eruptive activity in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. Broadband seismic records of geyser generated signals were obtained in hydrothermal field. The Valley of the Geysers belongs to Kronotskiy State Natural Biosphere Reserve and the UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site "Volcanoes of Kamchatka". Neither seismological nor geophysical investigations were carried out here earlier. In September, 2009 seismic observation was organized in geyser's field by 24-bit digital output broadband seismometers (GURALP CMG-6TD flat velocity response 0.033-50 Hz). Four geysers were surveyed: the fountain type Big and Giant geysers; the cone type Pearl geyser and the short-period Gap geyser. Seismometers were set as possible close to the geyser's surface vent (usually at the distance near 3-5 m). Main parameters of the eruptions for the investigated geysers: - The Giant geyser is the most powerful among the regular active geysers in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. The height of the fountain reaches 30 meters, the mass of water erupted is about 40-60 tons. The main cycle of activity varies significantly: in 1945 the intervals between eruptions was near 3 hours, nowadays it is 5-6 hours. As a geyser of fountain type, the Giant geyser erupts from the 2*3 m2 pool of water. - The Big geyser was flooded by the lake after the natural catastrophe (giant mud-stone avalanche, formed by landslide, bed into Geiyzernaya

  11. Seismic experiment reveals rifting of craton in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Langston, Charles A.; Last, Robert J.; Birt, Christopher; Owens, Thomas J.

    A research project in Tanzania, East Africa, is being conducted to examine seismic velocities within the crust and upper mantle in an area where cratonic lithosphere is experiencing extensional tectonism. The results will be used to evaluate models of cratonic structure. Waveforms from several hundred teleseismic earthquakes and over 10,000 regional and local earthquakes recorded in 1994 and 1995 by the Tanzania Broadband Seismic Experiment are not only yielding new insights into deep continental structure, but are also helping to determine the tectonic stability of cratons by identifying the locus of rifting within northeastern Tanzania.

  12. Results from the apollo-12 passive seismic experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latham, G.

    1971-01-01

    The objective of the passive seismic experiment is to measure vibrations of the lunar surface produced by all natural and artificial sources of seismic energy and to use these data to deduce the internal structure and composition of the moon, the nature of forces which may cause deformation of the moon and moonquakes, and the numbers and masses of meteoroids striking the lunar surface. The ALSEP* seismometers can magnify lunar surface vibrations 10 million times. No instrument can operate on earth with this sensitivity, because weather and man produce too much seismic noise. To obtain answers to the above questions, seismic data must be combined with data from laboratory measurements of the physical and chemical properties of surface rocks, and many other geophyiscal and geochemical measurements. Thus far, we have had the opportunity to record data from two lunar seismic stations which were installed by the astronauts during Apollo misions  and 12. The combined recording time from the stations is presently over 12 months, but there was no overlap to permit recording of the same event at two stations. 

  13. Seismic activity noted at Medicine Lake Highlands

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, D.

    1988-12-01

    The sudden rumble of earthquakes beneath Medicine Lake Highlands this fall gave geologists an early warning that one of Northern California's volcanoes may be stirring back to life. Researchers stressed that an eruption of the volcano is not expected soon. But the flurry of underground shocks in late September, combined with new evidence of a pool of molten rock beneath the big volcano, has led them to monitor Medicine Lake with new wariness. The volcano has been dormant since 1910, when it ejected a brief flurry of ash - worrying no one. A federal team plans to take measurements of Medicine Lake, testing for changes in its shape caused by underground pressures. The work is scheduled for spring because snows have made the volcano inaccessible. But the new seismic network is an effective lookout, sensitive to very small increases in activity.

  14. Erosion influences the seismicity of active thrust faults.

    PubMed

    Steer, Philippe; Simoes, Martine; Cattin, Rodolphe; Shyu, J Bruce H

    2014-01-01

    Assessing seismic hazards remains one of the most challenging scientific issues in Earth sciences. Deep tectonic processes are classically considered as the only persistent mechanism driving the stress loading of active faults over a seismic cycle. Here we show via a mechanical model that erosion also significantly influences the stress loading of thrust faults at the timescale of a seismic cycle. Indeed, erosion rates of about ~0.1-20 mm yr(-1), as documented in Taiwan and in other active compressional orogens, can raise the Coulomb stress by ~0.1-10 bar on the nearby thrust faults over the inter-seismic phase. Mass transfers induced by surface processes in general, during continuous or short-lived and intense events, represent a prominent mechanism for inter-seismic stress loading of faults near the surface. Such stresses are probably sufficient to trigger shallow seismicity or promote the rupture of deep continental earthquakes up to the surface. PMID:25412707

  15. A Comparison of Seismicity Characteristics and Fault Structure Between Stick-Slip Experiments and Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Sammis, C. G.; Becker, T. W.; Dresen, G.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2015-08-01

    Fault zones contain structural complexity on all scales. This complexity influences fault mechanics including the dynamics of large earthquakes as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of small seismic events. Incomplete earthquake records, unknown stresses, and unresolved fault structures within the crust complicate a quantitative assessment of the parameters that control factors affecting seismicity. To better understand the relationship between fault structure and seismicity, we examined dynamic faulting under controlled conditions in the laboratory by creating saw-cut-guided natural fractures in cylindrical granite samples. The resulting rough surfaces were triaxially loaded to produce a sequence of stick-slip events. During these experiments, we monitored stress, strain, and seismic activity. After the experiments, fault structures were imaged in thin sections and using computer tomography. The laboratory fault zones showed many structural characteristics observed in upper crustal faults, including zones of localized slip embedded in a layer of fault gouge. Laboratory faults also exhibited a several millimeter wide damage zone with decreasing micro-crack density at larger distances from the fault axis. In addition to the structural similarities, we also observed many similarities between our observed distribution of acoustic emissions (AEs) and natural seismicity. The AEs followed the Gutenberg-Richter and Omori-Utsu relationships commonly used to describe natural seismicity. Moreover, we observed a connection between along-strike fault heterogeneity and variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value. As suggested by natural seismicity studies, areas of low b value marked the nucleation points of large slip events and were located at large asperities within the fault zone that were revealed by post-experimental tomography scans. Our results emphasize the importance of stick-slip experiments for the study of fault mechanics. The direct correlation of

  16. Seismotectonic of Southern Apennines from recent passive seismic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frepoli, A.; Maggi, C.; Cimini, G. B.; Marchetti, A.; Chiappini, M.

    2011-03-01

    We used data of local earthquakes collected during two recent passive seismic experiments carried out in southern Italy in order to study the seismotectonic setting of the Lucanian Apennine and the surrounding areas. Based on continuous recordings of the temporary stations we extracted over 15,600 waveforms, which were hand-picked along with those recorded by the permanent stations of the Italian national seismic network obtaining a dense, high-quality dataset of P- and S-arrival times. We examined the seismicity occurring in the period 2001-2008 by relocating 566 out of 1047 recorded events with magnitudes ML ≥ 1.5 and computing 162 fault-plane solutions. Earthquakes were relocated using a minimum one-dimensional velocity model previously obtained for the region and a Vp/ Vs ratio of 1.83. Background seismicity is concentrated within the upper crust (between 5 and 20 km of depth) and it is mostly clustered along the Lucanian Apennine chain axis. A significant feature extracted from this study relates to the two E-W trending clusters located in the Potentino and in the Abriola-Pietrapertosa sector (central Lucania region). Hypocentral depths in both clusters are slightly deeper than those observed beneath the Lucanian Apennine. We suggest that these two seismic features are representative of the transition from the inner portion of the chain to the external margin characterized by dextral strike-slip kinematics. In the easternmost part of the study area, below the Bradano foredeep and the Apulia foreland, seismicity is generally deeper and more scattered. The sparse seismicity localized in the Sibari Plain, in the offshore area along the northeastern Calabrian coast and in the Taranto Gulf is also investigated thanks to the new recordings. This seismicity shows hypocenters between 12 and 20 km of depth below the Sibari Plain and is deeper (foci between 10 and 35 km of depth) in the offshore area of the Taranto Gulf. 102 well-constrained fault-plane solutions

  17. The Pollino Seismic Sequence: Activated Graben Structures in a Seismic Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rößler, Dirk; Passarelli, Luigi; Govoni, Aladino; Bindi, Dino; Cesca, Simone; Hainzl, Sebatian; Maccaferri, Francesco; Rivalta, Eleonora; Woith, Heiko; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The Mercure Basin (MB) and the Castrovillari Fault (CF) in the Pollino range (Southern Apennines, Italy) represent one of the most prominent seismic gaps in the Italian seismic catalogue, with no M>5.5 earthquakes during the last centuries. In historical times several swarm-like seismic sequences occurred in the area including two intense swarms within the past two decades. The most energetic one started in 2010 and has been still active in 2014. The seismicity culminated in autumn 2012 with a M=5 event on 25 October. The range hosts a number of opposing normal faults forming a graben-like structure. Their rheology and their interactions are unclear. Current debates include the potential of the MB and the CF to host large earthquakes and the style of deformation. Understanding the seismicity and the behaviour of the faults is necessary to assess the tectonics and the seismic hazard. The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and INGV, Italy, have jointly monitored the ongoing seismicity using a small-aperture seismic array, integrated in a temporary seismic network. Based on this installation, we located more than 16,000 local earthquakes that occurred between November 2012 and September 2014. Here we investigate quantitatively all the phases of the seismic sequence starting from January 2010. Event locations along with moment tensor inversion constrain spatially the structures activated by the swarm and the migration pattern of the seismicity. The seismicity forms clusters concentrated within the southern part of the MB and along the Pollino Fault linking MB and CF. Most earthquakes are confined to the upper 10 km of the crust in an area of ~15x15 km2. However, sparse seismicity at depths between 15 and 20 km and moderate seismicity further north with deepening hypocenters also exist. In contrast, the CF appears aseismic; only the northern part has experienced micro-seismicity. The spatial distribution is however more complex than the major tectonic structures

  18. Seismic Images of the Gulf Stream Front off the Coast of North Carolina from the 2014 ENAM Community Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Eastern North America Margin (ENAM) Community Seismic Experiment (CSE) is scheduled to collect on- and offshore active source seismic data including more than 2500 km of multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles in the fall of 2014. The project was designed to address a wide array of questions related to the evolution and modification of the eastern North American rifted margin in conjunction with the arrival of the Earthscope transportable array on the US East Coast. The planned rifting-parallel profiles north and south of Cape Hatteras are expected to cross the front between the warm water of the Gulf Stream western boundary current and colder North Atlantic water providing the opportunity to image mesoscale features related to the front and their associated fine structure. Standard MCS data has been shown to be well-tuned to image ocean fine structure resulting from abrupt vertical changes in temperature and salinity in the ocean. Thus, the same seismic data that is collected to investigate the sub-seafloor geology can also be processed to image reflections in the water that reveal ocean processes with a horizontal resolution of ~10 m and vertical resolution of ~4 m. As an add-on to the ENAM CSE, 30 additional expendable bathythermographs and 3 conductivity temperature depth probes belonging to the University of Wyoming are planned for deployment during the collection of the MCS profiles resulting in an average hydrographic profile spacing of ~33 km. We present a first look at this new seismic oceanography data set providing 2-D images of ocean acoustic reflectivity correlated with closely spaced hydrographic measurements across the Gulf Stream front.

  19. The SEIS experiment : a Mars seismic package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibler, P.; Lognonne, P.; Giardini, D.; Banerdt, B.; Karczewski, J. F.; Mimoun, D.; Zweifel, P.; Pike, W. T.; Seis Team

    2003-04-01

    The determination of the deep internal structure of Mars, especially the state and size of the core, the structure of the mantle and shape of discontinuities will be the goal of a the SEIS experiment, which integrates a Very Broad Band 2 axis seismometer, a 3 axis short period seismometer and a serie of environmental sensors for pressure, infrasounds and temperature. We describe the scientific objective of the experiment. We then focuse on the technical description of the package of sensors, which will allow: - to measure signals in an ultra-broad band, from the tidal frequencies (0.05 mHz) up to the short period frequencies (50 Hz) - to perform environmental decorrelations of the temperature and pressure variation on Mars, allowing the sensor to operate in a thermal environment with daily variations of about 40°K - to search for infrasounds which might be associated to dust devils and atmospheric discharge. The overall mass of the SEIS experiment is 2.3 kg, including all sensors, data control processors and installation devices. Acquisition will be performed by a series of 24 bits A/D converters, while the thermal and drift control will be performed by a feedback generated by a 24 bits D/A converter. Two VBB axis will be delivered by industry at mid 2003 and functional breadboard of sphere (15 cm diameter) containing 2 VBB axis, environmental sensors and electronics will be delivered at the end of 2003. IPGP has the overall responsibility of the experiment and is responsible for the VBB sensor and environmental sensors. ETHZ is responsible for the electronics of the experiment and JPL for the Short Period sensors. The SEIS is one of the core instruments of the Netlander mission, which objective is to deploy in 2009 a network of 4 stations on Mars for one Martian year of operation. This design of "multiparameter station" can be used for other Martian missions (e.g. Mars SmartLander) and a simplified and lighter instrument could also be proposed on other planet

  20. OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

    2010-11-11

    its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

  1. Structural design of active seismic isolation floor with a charging function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakakoji, Hayato; Miura, Nanako

    2016-04-01

    This study shows an optimum structure of a seismic isolation floor against horizontal ground motions. Although a seismic isolation floor is effective with vibration reduction, the response of the floor becomes larger when excited by long-period ground motions. It is shown that caster equipment move and suffer damage in a seismic isolation structure by an experiment. Moreover, the permissible displacement of the floor is limited. Therefore, the focus is on an active seismic isolation. About active control, the system cannot operate without power supply. To solve these problems an energy regeneration is considered in our previous study. These studies only analyze simple model and did not choose the suitable structure for active control and energy regeneration. This research propose a new structure which has regenerated energy exceeds the energy required for the active control by numerical simulation.

  2. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments - laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Buddensiek, M.-L.; Oncken, O.; Kukowski, N.

    2012-10-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezo-electric transducers used here the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads). Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0-1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and being applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of very good quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and fault traces from shear zones. Since these can be regarded in sandbox models as zones of decompaction, they behave as reflectors and can be imaged. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here improves the quality with respect to S/N-ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth penetration in glass bead layers thereby amounts to 5 cm. Thus, the presented mini-seismic device is

  3. Temporary seismic networks on active volcanoes of Kamchatka (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; Abkadyrov, Ilyas; Shapiro, Nikolay; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Deev, Evgeny; Gordeev, Evgeny; Chebrov, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    We present details of four field campaigns carried out on different volcanoes of Kamchatka in 2012-2015. Each campaign was performed in three main steps: (i) installation of the temporary network of seismic stations; (ii) autonomous continuous registration of three component seismic signal; (III) taking off the network and downloading the registered data. During the first campaign started in September 2012, 11 temporary stations were installed over the Avacha group of volcanoes located 30 km north to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in addition to the seven permanent stations operated by the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey (KBGS). Unfortunately, with this temporary network we faced with two obstacles. The first problem was the small amount of local earthquakes, which were detected during operation time. The second problem was an unexpected stop of several stations only 40 days after deployment. Nevertheless, after taking off the network in August 2013, the collected data appeared to be suitable for analysis using ambient noise. The second campaign was conducted in period from August 2013 to August 2014. In framework of the campaign, 21 temporary stations were installed over Gorely volcano, located 70 km south to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. Just in time of the network deployment, Gorely Volcano became very seismically active - every day occurred more than 100 events. Therefore, we obtain very good dataset with information about thousands of local events, which could be used for any type of seismological analysis. The third campaign started in August 2014. Within this campaign, we have installed 19 temporary seismic stations over Tolbachik volcano, located on the south side of the Klyuchevskoy volcano group. In the same time on Tolbachik volcano were installed four temporary stations and several permanent stations operated by the KBGS. All stations were taking off in July 2015. As result, we have collected a large dataset, which is now under preliminary analysis

  4. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Adriano; Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction, which stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard.

  5. Free online seismic data from a sand tank experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Smolkin, D.; White, C.; Chollett, S.; Sun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical fluid flow models are used regularly to predict and analyze porous media flow but require verification against natural systems. Seismic monitoring in a controlled laboratory setting at a nominal scale of 1:1000 in the acoustic frequency range can help improve fluid flow models as well as elasto-granular models for uncompacted, saturated-unsaturated soils. A mid-scale sand tank allows for many highly repeatable, yet flexible, experimental configurations with different material compositions and pump rates while still capturing phenomena such as patchy saturation, flow fingering, or layering. The tank (~6 x 9 x 0.44 m) contains a heterogeneous sand pack (1.52-1.7 phi). In a set of eight experiments the water table is raised inside the sand body at increments of ~0.05 m. Seismic events (vertical component) are recorded by a pseudo-walkaway 64-channel accelerometer array (20 Hz-20 kHz), at 78 kS/s, in 100- scan stacks so as to optimize signal-to-noise. Three screened well sites monitor water depth (+/- 3 mm) inside the sand body. Data sets comprise SEG-Y formatted files (seismic) and are publicly downloadable from the internet (http://github.com/cageo/Lorenzo-2012), in order to allow comparisons of different seismic and fluid flow analyses. The capillary fringe does not appear to completely saturate, as expected, because the interpreted compressional-wave velocity values remain so low (< 210 m/s). Even the highest water levels there is no large seismic impedance contrast across the top of the water table to generate a clear reflector. Preliminary results indicate an immediate need for several additional experiments whose data sets will be added to the online database. Future benchmark data sets will grow with a control data set to show conditions in the sand body before water levels rise, and a surface 3D data set. In later experiments, buried sensors will help reduce seismic attenuation effects and in-situ saturation sensors will provide calibration values.

  6. Seismicity location from analysis of a 2 years passive seismological experiment around Ulaanbaatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batkhuu, Battulga; Munkhuu, Ulziibat; Sebe, Olivier; Monfret, Tony; Deschamps, Anne; Gao, Mengtan; Wu, Qingju

    2014-05-01

    We analyse broadband seismological records from a 2 years temporary array deployed over a 400x600km2 region in central Mongolia, including Ulaanbaatar region, by a Sino-Mongolian cooperation. The dataset is completed with all available regional data, mostly recorded by Mongolian National Seismic Network (MNSN) operated by Research Center for Astronomy and Geophysics (RCAG). The seismic activity of the covered area is not very high, except SW of Ulaanbaatar. To obtain as good as possible image of this seismicity, we have first to determine a regional velocity model. The development of mining activity in Mongolia, allows us to record a large set of quarry blasts. Due to the very continental position of Mongolia, micro-seismic noise level is low and the signal of these human made sources are very often recorded at distances as far as 200km. Travel time information of direct, reflected and refracted waves are used to produce crustal information (Moho depth and mean crustal P wave velocity, and velocity below the Moho, Vp/Vs ratio) over the area of observation. We show that the crust of the studied area is relatively homogeneous which allows us to improve this very simple model, searching the best crustal model with Velest software. The experiment was supported by Sino-Mongolian joint project titled "The Geophysical Investigation and Deep Structure Modeling for Seismic Hazard Assessment in the Far East", Project code: 2011DFB20120.

  7. The Millikan shaking experiments and high-frequency seismic wave propagation in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Okamoto, Taro

    2014-08-01

    In order to study high-frequency seismic wave propagation, seismic wavefields generated by resonant-shaking experiments of the Millikan Library, on the campus of California Institute Technology (Pasadena, California, USA), were analysed. Because the resonant shaking frequencies are 1.12 Hz (the east-west direction) and 1.64 Hz (the north-south direction), this active-source experiment can provide opportunities for studying high-frequency seismic wave propagation in Southern California. Because they are very narrow frequency band data, the analyses must be quite different from ordinary time-domain analyses. We show, theoretically, that the signals must be dominated by surface waves. Adopting this surface wave assumption, we proceed to make two separate analyses, one on spectral amplitude and the other on phase. We present a new method to derive group velocity from phase based on the cross correlations between the station in the Millikan Library (MIK) and stations in the regional network. Our results support that an active-source experiment by resonant shaking of a building is a feasible approach for high-frequency seismic wave studies.

  8. Seismic hazard assessment of Syria using seismicity, DEM, slope, active tectonic and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Raed; Adris, Ahmad; Singh, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we discuss the use of an integrated remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques for evaluation of seismic hazard areas in Syria. The present study is the first time effort to create seismic hazard map with the help of GIS. In the proposed approach, we have used Aster satellite data, digital elevation data (30 m resolution), earthquake data, and active tectonic maps. Many important factors for evaluation of seismic hazard were identified and corresponding thematic data layers (past earthquake epicenters, active faults, digital elevation model, and slope) were generated. A numerical rating scheme has been developed for spatial data analysis using GIS to identify ranking of parameters to be included in the evaluation of seismic hazard. The resulting earthquake potential map delineates the area into different relative susceptibility classes: high, moderate, low and very low. The potential earthquake map was validated by correlating the obtained different classes with the local probability that produced using conventional analysis of observed earthquakes. Using earthquake data of Syria and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) data is introduced to the model to develop final seismic hazard map based on Gutenberg-Richter (a and b values) parameters and using the concepts of local probability and recurrence time. The application of the proposed technique in Syrian region indicates that this method provides good estimate of seismic hazard map compared to those developed from traditional techniques (Deterministic (DSHA) and probabilistic seismic hazard (PSHA). For the first time we have used numerous parameters using remote sensing and GIS in preparation of seismic hazard map which is found to be very realistic.

  9. 3D Seismic Reflection Experiment over the Galicia Deep Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, D. S.; Jordan, B.; Reston, T. J.; Minshull, T. A.; Klaeschen, D.; Ranero, C.; Shillington, D. J.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    In June thru September, 2013, a 3D reflection and a long offset seismic experiment were conducted at the Galicia rifted margin by investigators from the US, UK, Germany, and Spain. The 3D multichannel experiment covered 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2), using the RV Marcus Langseth. Four streamers 6 km long were deployed at 12.5 m hydrophone channel spacing. The streamers were 200 m apart. Two airgun arrays, each 3300 cu in, were fired alternately every 37.5 m, to collectively yield a 400 m wide sail line consisting of 8 CMP lines at 50 m spacing. The long offset seismic experiment included 72 short period OBS's deployed below the 3D reflection survey box. Most of the instruments recorded all the shots from the airgun array shots. The 3D seismic box covered a variety of geologic features. The Peridotite Ridge (PR), is associated with the exhumation of upper mantle rocks to the seafloor during the final stage of the continental separation between the Galicia Bank and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The S reflector is present below most of the continental blocks under the deep Galicia basin. S is interpreted to be a low-angle detachment fault formed late in the rifting process, and a number of rotated fault block basins and ranges containing pre and syn-rift sediments. Initial observations from stacked 3D seismic data, and samples of 2D pre-stack time migrated (PSTM) 3D seismic data show that the PR is elevated above the present seafloor in the South and not exposed through the seafloor in the North. The relative smoothness of the PR surface for the entire 20 km N-S contrasts with the more complex, shorter wavelength, faulting of the continental crustal blocks to the east. The PR does not seem to show offsets or any apparent internal structure. The PSTM dip lines show substantial improvement for the structures in the deep sedimentary basin East of the PR. These seem to extend the S reflector somewhat farther to the West. The migrated data show a substantial network of

  10. Seismic tomography Technology for the Water Infiltration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. Descour

    2001-04-30

    NSA Engineering, Inc., conducted seismic tomography surveys in Niche No.3 in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and Alcove No.8 in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) cross drift as part of the Infiltration Experiment being conducted in Niche No.3. NSA Engineering is a direct support contractor to the Yucca Mountain Project. This report documents the work performed from August 14 through 30, 2000, prior to the beginning of the infiltration experiment. The objective of the seismic tomography survey was to investigate the flow path of water between access drifts and more specifically to (Kramer 2000): (1) Conduct a baseline seismic tomography survey prior to the infiltration experiment; (2) Produce 2-D and 3-D tomographic images of the rock volume between Alcove No.8 and Niche No.3; (3) Correlate tomography results with published structural and lithological features, and with other geophysical data such as ground penetrating radar (GPR); and (4) Results of this survey will form a baseline with which to compare subsequent changes to the rock mass. These changes may be as a result of the water infiltration tests that could be conducted in Alcove No.8 in 2001. The scope of this reported work is to use the velocity tomograms to: (a) assess the structures and lithologic features within the surveyed area and/or volume between the two access drifts; and (b) provide information on the structural state of the rock mass as inferred by the velocity signatures of the rock prior to the beginning of the infiltration experiment.

  11. Reduce seismic design conservatism through large-scale earthquake experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.T.; Stepp, J.C. )

    1992-01-01

    For structures founded on soil deposits, the interaction between the soil and the structure caused by incident seismic waves modifies the foundation input motion and the dynamic characteristics of the soil-structure system. This paper reports that as a result, soil-structure interaction (SSI) plays a critical role in the design of nuclear plant structures. Recognizing that experimental validation and quantification is required, two scaled cylindrical reinforced-concrete containment models (1/4-scale and 1/12-scale of typical full-scale reactor containments) were constructed in Lotung, an active seismic region in Taiwan. Forced vibration tests (FBT) were also conducted to characterize the dynamic behavior of the soil-structure system. Based on these data, a series of round-robin blind prediction and post-test correlation analyses using various currently-available SSI methods were performed.

  12. Characterisation of rockfalls from seismic signal: insights from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Toussaint, Renaud; de Rosny, Julien; Shapiro, Nikolai; Dewez, Thomas; Hibert, Clément; Mathon, Christian; Sedan, Olivier; Berger, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Rockfalls, debris flows and rock avalanches represent a major natural hazard for the population in mountainous, volcanic and coastal areas but their direct observation on the field is very difficult. Recent field studies showed that gravitational instabilities can be detected, localized and characterized thanks to the seismic signal they generate. Therefore, a burning challenge for risks assessment related to these events is to obtain quantiative informations on the characteristics of the rockfalls (mass, speed, extension,...) from the properties of the signal (seismic energy, frequencies,...). Using a theoretical model of viscoelastic impact of a sphere on a plane, we develop analytical scaling laws relating the energy radiated in elastic waves, the energy dissipated in viscoelasticity during the impact and the frequencies of the generated seismic signal to the mass m and the impact speed V z of the sphere and to the elastic parameters of the involved materials. The radiated elastic energy is shown to vary as m5/3V z11/5 on plates and as mV z13/5 on blocks, regardless of the elastic parameters. The energy dissipated in viscoelasticity does not depend on the support thickness and varies as m2/3V z11/5. The mean frequency of the generated signal is inversely proportional to the impact duration. Then, we conduct simple laboratory experiments that consist in dropping spherical beads of different size and materials and small gravels on thin plates of glass and PMMA and rock blocks. In the experiments, piezoelectric accelerometers are used to record the signals in a wide frequency range: 1 Hz to 56 kHz. The experiments are also monitored optically using fast cameras. The elastic energy emitted by an impact on the supports is first quantitatively estimated and compared to the potential energy of fall and to the potential energy change during the shock. We observe a quantitative agreement between experimental data and the analytical scaling laws, even when we use small

  13. 3D Modelling of Seismically Active Parts of Underground Faults via Seismic Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzeskakis, Theofanis; Konstantaras, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    During the last few years rapid steps have been taken towards drilling for oil in the western Mediterranean sea. Since most of the countries in the region benefit mainly from tourism and considering that the Mediterranean is a closed sea only replenishing its water once every ninety years careful measures are being taken to ensure safe drilling. In that concept this research work attempts to derive a three dimensional model of the seismically active parts of the underlying underground faults in areas of petroleum interest. For that purpose seismic spatio-temporal clustering has been applied to seismic data to identify potential distinct seismic regions in the area of interest. Results have been coalesced with two dimensional maps of underground faults from past surveys and seismic epicentres, having followed careful reallocation processing, have been used to provide information regarding the vertical extent of multiple underground faults in the region of interest. The end product is a three dimensional map of the possible underground location and extent of the seismically active parts of underground faults. Indexing terms: underground faults modelling, seismic data mining, 3D visualisation, active seismic source mapping, seismic hazard evaluation, dangerous phenomena modelling Acknowledgment This research work is supported by the ESPA Operational Programme, Education and Life Long Learning, Students Practical Placement Initiative. References [1] Alves, T.M., Kokinou, E. and Zodiatis, G.: 'A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: The South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins', Marine Pollution Bulletin, In Press, 2014 [2] Ciappa, A., Costabile, S.: 'Oil spill hazard assessment using a reverse trajectory method for the Egadi marine protected area (Central Mediterranean Sea)', Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 84 (1-2), pp. 44-55, 2014 [3] Ganas, A., Karastathis, V., Moshou, A., Valkaniotis, S., Mouzakiotis

  14. Erosion influence the seismicity of active thrust faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Philippe; Simoes, Martine; Cattin, Rodolphe; Shyu, J. Bruce H.

    2015-04-01

    Assessing seismic hazards remains one of the most challenging scientific issue in Earth sciences. Deep tectonic processes are classically considered as the only persistent mechanism driving the stress loading of active faults over a seismic cycle. Here we show with a mechanical model that erosion also significantly influences the stress loading of thrust faults at the timescale of a seismic cycle. Indeed, erosion rates of about ~0.1 to 20 mm/yr, as documented in Taiwan and in other active compressional orogens, can raise the Coulomb stress by ~0.1 to ~10 bar on the nearby thrust faults over the inter-seismic phase. Mass transfers induced by surface processes in general, during continuous or short-lived and intense events, represent a prominent mechanism for inter-seismic stress loading of faults near the surface. Such stresses are probably sufficient to promote the rupture of deep continental earthquakes up to the surface or to trigger shallow seismicity. We illustrate this last point by identifying seismic events in Taiwan, by the mean of a coupled statistical and mechanical approach, that were induced by intense erosional events.

  15. Erosion influence the seismicity of active thrust faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Philippe; Simoes, Martine; Cattin, Rodolphe; Shyu, J. Bruce H.

    2016-04-01

    Assessing seismic hazards remains one of the most challenging scientific issue in Earth sciences. Deep tectonic processes are classically considered as the only persistent mechanism driving the stress loading of active faults over a seismic cycle. Here we show with a mechanical model that erosion also significantly influences the stress loading of thrust faults at the timescale of a seismic cycle. Indeed, erosion rates of about ˜0.1 to 20 mm/yr, as documented in Taiwan and in other active compressional orogens, can raise the Coulomb stress by ˜0.1 to ˜10 bar on the nearby thrust faults over the inter-seismic phase. Mass transfers induced by surface processes in general, during continuous or short-lived and intense events, represent a prominent mechanism for inter-seismic stress loading of faults near the surface. Such stresses are probably sufficient to promote the rupture of deep continental earthquakes up to the surface or to trigger shallow seismicity. We illustrate this last point by identifying seismic events in Taiwan, by the mean of a coupled statistical and mechanical approach, that were induced by intense erosional events.

  16. Large heterogeneous structure beneath the Atotsugawa Fault, central Japan, revealed by seismic refraction and reflection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iidaka, Takashi; Kurashimo, Eiji; Iwasaki, Takaya; Arai, Ryuta; Kato, Aitaro; Katao, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Fumihito

    2015-08-01

    A high-strain-rate zone termed the Niigata Kobe Tectonic Zone is located in central Japan and contains an active right-lateral fault called the Atotsugawa Fault. We present the results of an explosive-source seismic experiment that focused on identifying the formation mechanisms of the fault. The experiment used seven explosive sources and 1108 seismic stations, and was undertaken during October 2007 in the area of the Atotsugawa Fault. The seismic stations were set up on a survey line with a length of ~ 170 km, oriented orthogonal to the strike of the fault. The linear array was used to identify the seismic structure of the fault zone and the deeper parts of the crust in the study area, yielding fine details of the seismic structure of the crust along the profile line, including lateral variations in P-wave velocity and the configuration of layers in the crust. A relatively low P-wave velocity reflective zone was detected beneath the fault at depths of 15-25 km. This zone also has extremely low S-wave velocities, directly underlies three active faults, and contains three low-resistivity zones that underlie these faults. These reflective and low-resistivity zones are thought to represent fluid within the crust, and the data obtained during this study are consistent with a weak zone model for the formation of the active faults in the study area. This suggests that the reflective layer represents a weak zone in the lower crust that is responsible for the concentration of deformation within the upper crust. The presence of abundant fluids beneath the Atotsugawa Fault could also reduce the strength of the lower crust, again focusing deformation related to the regional stress regime in areas that overlie these fluid-containing zones. The results suggest that the reflective layer was an important factor in the formation of the Atotsugawa Fault.

  17. Precursory seismic activity before the 1944 Tonankai (Japan) earthquake: focusing on the downward migration of seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Kiyoo

    1987-08-01

    Based on the latest JMA earthquake catalog, the author investigated seismic activity around the time of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake ( M 7.9, M w 8.1 ) and the 1946 Nankaido earthquake ( M 8.1, M w 8.1 ), which were both great thrust-type earthquakes along the Nankai Trough. For about 20 years before these earthquakes their focal regions had been quiescent (appearance of a seismic gap of the second kind) and the surrounding areas had become increasingly active, forming a doughnut pattern). Several years before these earthquakes occurred seismic activity increased at shallow depths of the area to the north. This activity gradually migrated downwards, and the Tonankai earthquake occurred when it reached its limit (a depth of approximately 70 km). The author has previously reported on several cases of increased activity in the deep seismic plane at a depth of 300-500 km prior to large shallow earthquakes along the Japan Trench (Mogi, 1973). This paper will demonstrate that a similar phenomenon occurs when the depth of the deep seismic plane is only about 70 km. For several years before the Tonankai earthquake there had been a slight increase in seismicity in the area along the trough, which is where the plate subducts. Two or three days before tne earthquake marked ground tilt also proceeded at the northeastern tip of the focal region. It is evident that the Tonankai earthquake was preceded by various long-term and short-term precursory phenomena.

  18. 3D Seismic Reflection Experiment Over the Galicia Deep Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Dale; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Morgan, Julia; Shillington, Donna; Reston, Timothy; Minshull, Timothy; Klaeschen, Dirk; Ranero, César

    2014-05-01

    In June thru September, 2013, a 3D reflection and a long offset seismic experiment were conducted at the Galicia rifted margin by investigators from the US, UK, Germany, and Spain. The 3D multichannel experiment covered 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2), using the RV Marcus Langseth. Four streamers 6 km long were deployed at 12.5 m hydrophone channel spacing. The streamers were 200 m apart. Two airgun arrays, each 3300 cu in, were fired alternately every 37.5 m, to collectively yield a 400 m wide sail line consisting of 8 CMP lines at 50 m spacing. The long offset seismic experiment included 72 short period OBS's deployed below the 3D reflection survey box. Most of the instruments recorded all the shots from the airgun array shots. The 3D seismic box covered a variety of geologic features. The Peridotite Ridge (PR), is associated with the exhumation of upper mantle rocks to the seafloor during the final stage of the continental separation between the Galicia Bank and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The S reflector is present below most of the continental blocks under the deep Galicia basin. S is interpreted to be a low-angle detachment fault formed late in the rifting process, and a number of rotated fault block basins and ranges containing pre and syn-rift sediments. Initial observations from stacked, but not yet migrated, 3D seismic data show that the PR is elevated above the present seafloor in the South and not exposed through the seafloor in the North. The relative smoothness of the PR surface for the entire 20 km N-S contrasts with the more complex, shorter wavelength, faulting of the continental crustal blocks to the east. The PR does not seem to show offsets or any apparent internal structure. However, migration will be required to see internal structure of the PR. Between the PR and the western most rifted continental crustal blocks, is a sedimentary basin about as wide as the PR and very different from the sedimentary basins bounded by the continental crustal

  19. Seismic amplification within the Seattle Basin, Washington State: Insights from SHIPS seismic tomography experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snelson, C.M.; Brocher, T.M.; Miller, K.C.; Pratt, T.L.; Trehu, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that the Seattle sedimentary basin, underlying Seattle and other urban centers in the Puget Lowland, Washington, amplifies long-period (1-5 sec) weak ground motions by factors of 10 or more. We computed east-trending P- and S-wave velocity models across the Seattle basin from Seismic Hazard Investigations of Puget Sound (SHIPS) experiments to better characterize the seismic hazard the basin poses. The 3D tomographic models, which resolve features to a depth of 10 km, for the first time define the P- and S-wave velocity structure of the eastern end of the basin. The basin, which contains sedimentary rocks of Eocene to Holocene, is broadly symmetric in east-west section and reaches a maximum thickness of 6 km along our profile beneath north Seattle. A comparison of our velocity model with coincident amplification curves for weak ground motions produced by the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake suggests that the distribution of Quaternary deposits and reduced velocity gradients in the upper part of the basement east of Seattle have significance in forecasting variations in seismic-wave amplification across the basin. Specifically, eastward increases in the amplification of 0.2- to 5-Hz energy correlate with locally thicker unconsolidated deposits and a change from Crescent Formation basement to pre-Tertiary Cascadia basement. These models define the extent of the Seattle basin, the Seattle fault, and the geometry of the basement contact, giving insight into the tectonic evolution of the Seattle basin and its influence on ground shaking.

  20. Detecting seismic activity with a covariance matrix analysis of data recorded on seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.; Landès, M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously at the Earth's surface, providing dense spatial samples of the seismic wavefield. The aim of our study is to analyse these records with statistical array-based approaches to identify coherent time-series as a function of time and frequency. Using ideas mainly brought from the random matrix theory, we analyse the spatial coherence of the seismic wavefield from the width of the covariance matrix eigenvalue distribution. We propose a robust detection method that could be used for the analysis of weak and emergent signals embedded in background noise, such as the volcanic or tectonic tremors and local microseismicity, without any prior knowledge about the studied wavefields. We apply our algorithm to the records of the seismic monitoring network of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano located at La Réunion Island and composed of 21 receivers with an aperture of ˜15 km. This array recorded many teleseismic earthquakes as well as seismovolcanic events during the year 2010. We show that the analysis of the wavefield at frequencies smaller than ˜0.1 Hz results in detection of the majority of teleseismic events from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor database. The seismic activity related to the Piton de la Fournaise volcano is well detected at frequencies above 1 Hz.

  1. Seismic activity in the Sunnyside mining district, Utah, during 1967

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Barton K.; Dunrud, C. Richard; Hernandez, Jerome

    1969-01-01

    A seismic monitoring network near Sunnyside, Utah, consisting of a triangular array of seismometer stations that encompasses most of the mine workings in the district, recorded over 50,000 local earth tremors during 1967. About 540 of the tremors were of sufficient magnitude to be accurately located. Most of these were located within 2-3 miles of mine workings and were also near known or suspected faults. The district-wide seismic activity generally consisted of two different patterns--a periodic increase in the daily number of tremors at weekly intervals, and also a less regular and longer term increase and decrease of seismic activity that occurred over a period of weeks or even months. The shorter and more regular pattern can be correlated with the mine work week and seems to result from mining. The longer term activity, however, does not correlate with known mining causes sad therefore seems to be .caused by natural stresses.

  2. Seismic studies of a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment

    SciTech Connect

    House, L.; Keppler, H.; Kaieda, H.

    1985-01-01

    During a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, 850 microearthquakes, ranging in magnitudes from -3 to 0, were located reliably using arrival times recorded at a set of 5 downhole geophone stations. A subset of these events were located using an upgraded hodogram technique. The seismicity defines a tabular zone with horizontal extent of 900 m, vertical extent of 800 m, and thickness of 150 m. This zone strikes N340/sup 0/E, and dips 75/sup 0/ to the east; its position indicates that no hydraulic connection between the two predrilled wells could be achieved by the fracturing. The distribution of locations obtained from arrival times shows good agreement with those derived from hodograms. Well constrained fault plane solutions were determined for 26 of the larger microearthquakes observed at a surface seismic net. Most solutions display one nearly vertical nodal plane that strikes close to N - S, and a T axis that trends roughly E - W, in agreement with regional indicators of the least principal stress direction. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Recent Seismic Experiments of OBS in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, A.; Li, J.; Wu, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Since 2006 some research institutions of China have carried out some important seismic experiments by using ocean bottom seismometer(OBS) in the South China Sea (SCS) and obtained many concrete progresses in modeling the crustal structure of SCS and also in understanding of its formation and evolution as well. In 2006 three wide-angle profiles were completed in the northern margin, named OBS2006-1 across the northwestern sub-basin, OBS2006-2 parallel to the sea basin boundary and OBS2006-3 across the Dongsha Rise and Chaoshan Depression respectively. In 2010 two wide- angle profiles were completed, named OBS2010-1 and OBS 2010-2 both perpendicular to the northern off-shore faulting system. During 2009-2011 four wide-angle profiles were completed in the southern margin, named OBS973-1 from southern margin to the southwestern sub-basin, OBS973-2 from Liyue Bank to the southwestern sub-basin and OBS973-3 from Xisha to the southwestern sub-basin, OBS2011-2 from Xisha to Hainan Island respectively. In 2011 two 3D seismic array of OBS were completed in the Zhongnan-Changlong sea mount chain and Huangyan-Zhenbei sea mount chain respectively. Here we present some primary but important results as follows. (1) The velocity model of OBS2006-1 indicates that the crust under the continental slope decreases from 21km to 11km, and to 7.7km in the northwestern sub-basin with Moho depth ascends from 21km to 11km. The tectonic geometry and velocity structure of the northwestern sub-basin and its margins on both sides shows symmetrical and conjugate and indicates pure shear mode of continental margin rifting mechanism. (2) The velocity model of OBS2006-3 reveals remarkable thickness with maximum 8 km of the Mesozoic sediment in Chaoshan Depression in which velocity increases downward from 4.4 km/s at top to 5.3 km/s at the bottom. The buried depth of Moho decreases from 24-25 km under Dongsha Rise to 17 km in the lower slope and an obviously velocity abnormal is detected in the upper

  4. Development of performance criteria for advanced Viking seismic experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and requirements of the seismic instrument for mapping the internal structure of the planet Mars are briefly described. The types of signals expected to exist are microseismic background generated by wind and pressure variations and thermal effects, disturbances of or in the landed vehicle, signals caused by faulting and volcanic activity, and signals due to meteoritic impacts. The advanced instrument package should include a short-period vertical component system, a long-period or wide-band 3-component system, a high frequency vertical component system, and a system for detection and rejection of lander noises. The Viking '75, Surveyor, and Apollo systems are briefly described as potential instruments to be considered for modification. Data processing and control systems are also summarized.

  5. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  6. Crustal Deformation around Zhangjiakou-Bohai Seismically Active Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, H.; Fu, G.; Kato, T.

    2011-12-01

    Zhangjiakou-Bohai belt is a seismically active belt located in Northern China around Beijing, the capital of China. Near such a belt many great earthquakes occurred in the past centuries (e.g. the 1976 Tanshan Ms7.8 earthquake, the 1998 Zhangbei Ms6.2 earthquake, etc). Chinese Government established dense permanent and regional Global Positioning System (GPS) stations in and near the area. We collected and analyzed all the GPS observation data between 1999 and 2009 around Zhangjiakou-Bohai seismic belt, and obtained velocities at 143 stations. At the same time we investigated Zhangjiakou-Bohai belt slip rate for three profiles from northwest to southeast, and constructed a regional strain field on the Zhangjiakou-Bohai seismic belt region by least-square collocation. Based on the study we found that: 1) Nowadays the Zhangjiakou-Bohai seismic belt is creeping with left-lateral slip rate of 2.0mm~2.4mm/a, with coupling depth of 35~50km; 2) In total, the slip and coupling depth of the northwestern seismic belt is less than the one of southeast side; 3) The maximum shear strain is about 3×10-8 at Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan area.

  7. Initial Results from the 2002 Gulf of California Conjugate Margin Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, S.; Lizarralde, D.; Kent, G.; Harding, A.; Fletcher, J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Umhoefer, P.; Axen, G.

    2003-04-01

    The Gulf of California, which marks the ongoing separation of Baja California from mainland Mexico, is one of the few locales where active continental breakup can be studied along unambiguous flow lines that join clear conjugate margin pairs. In Fall 2002, we conducted an onshore-offshore seismic experiment across the conjugate rifted margins of the Gulf of California in several rift segments. The joint U.S.-Mexico project, sponsored principally by the MARGINS program of the U.S. National Science Foundation, aimed to image crustal structure across conjugate margins of four major basins to determine the modes of extension and the influence of sedimentation and magmatism on breakup. Here we present an overview of the experiment, which was substantially altered at sea due to concerns for marine-mammal safety, and present some preliminary findings. Three flow-line transects were acquired, in the Alarcon Basin, the Guaymas Basin, and between Cabo and Tres Marias Islands. In addition, a fourth transect across the Baja Peninsula was acquired. Data acquired included (1) multichannel seismic reflection data using the R/V Ewing’s 20-gun array and 480-channel, 6-km-long streamer, (2) wide-angle reflection/refraction data recorded on ocean-bottom seismometers, from 206 deployments conducted by the R/V New Horizon, and (3) onshore-offshore data recorded on portable seismometers deployed up to 100 km inland on all transects. Initial results from the experiment include (1) clear evidence for asymmetric basement structure on the conjugate rifted margins and across the active mid-ocean spreading center, of the Guaymas Basin, (2) the suggestion of substantial magmatism in an early failed rift of the Alarcon Basin, and (3) active subduction beneath the margin at the Tres Marias islands. In addition, we will discuss new procedures for mitigating effects on marine mammals that may have a significant impact on future U.S.-sponsored seismic reflection activities.

  8. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  9. Active Monitoring With The Use Of Seismic Vibrators: Experimental Systems And The Results Of Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, V.; Alekseev, A.; Glinsky, B.; Khairetdinov, M.; Seleznev, V.; Emanov, A.; Soloviev, V.

    2004-12-01

    Active methods of geophysical monitoring with the use of powerful seismic vibrators play an important role in the investigation of changes in the medium's stressed-deformed state in seismic prone zones for problems of seismic hazard prediction. In the last three decades, this scientific direction has been actively developed at institutes of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences. In this period, experimental systems for the active monitoring of the medium, which include powerful vibrational sources with computer control systems, mobile specialized complexes for the precision recording of vibrational seismic signals, and data processing systems have been created. A review of various constructions of resonant vibrational seismic sources with a vibrational force of 100 tons in the frequency range from 5 to 15 Hz and the principles of creation of precision computer control systems and low-frequency three-component recording systems VIRS-M, VIRS-K, and ROSA is presented. A method for the active monitoring of the medium with the use of wideband sweep signals and narrow-band harmonic signals radiated by seismic vibrators has been developed. To determine the sensitivity of the active monitoring system, some experiments to detect the influence of the Earth's crust tidal deformations (of the order of 10-7) on seismic wave velocities have been performed. A 100-ton seismic vibrator and recording systems were located at a distance of 356 km. The radiation sessions of harmonic and sweep signals were repeated every 3 hours during 8 days. This made it possible to construct the time series of variations in the amplitudes and phases of the signals and wave arrival times. Both 12-hour and 24-hour periodicities correlated with the earth's tides were distinguished in the spectrum of variations of the recorded signals. The experiment has shown that the active monitoring system makes it possible to detect relative variations of the seismic wave velocities of the order of 10

  10. Multivariable Observations of Pre and Co-Seismic Electromagnetic Activity in Peru: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heraud, J. A.; Lira, J. A.; Montes, L.; Rosas, S.; Centa, V.; Bleier, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Mw8.0 earthquake in Pisco, Peru of August 15, 2007 was reported previously and shown to have produced extensive co-seismic luminescence away from the epicenter. Continued research will be presented in which a high coincidence exists between the location of the areas where the luminescence was video recorded and reported by qualified witnesses and the geological formation in the bay in which Jurassic and Cretaceous lithologic igneous components are present, a condition that contributes to the displacement of electric charges in the rock. Additionally, the San Lorenzo Island has become the focus of a new research effort due to the past record of pre-seismic EQLs reported and published in relation with the mega-earthquake of 1746, the previously reported co-seismic EQLs in 2007 and new evidence of pre-seismic EQLs reported one and a half days before a ML4.6 earthquake on July 29, 2012. New experiments are hitherto being deployed in San Lorenzo Island to pursue the identification of favorable conditions for the propagation of electric charges in connection with pressure on rocks due to seismic activity. Thus, continuously recording video cameras, charge potential measuring plates, recording of HF and VHF noise and the installation of a new magnetometer to detect pulse activity in the local magnetic field and twin (+/-) air conductivity sensors are being installed on the island. Additionally, a new rock experiment to analyze the displacement of charges with local rocks is under way. The expectation of a Mega earthquake in the Lima area is building up as we approach the third century without mayor seismic activity in the area so the deployment of a new network of five magnetometers for the Lima area has started.

  11. Overview of Results from the Endeavour Seismic Tomography Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Wells, A. E.; Soule, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    We report on our continuing analyses of a multi-scale seismic tomography experiment of the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. In August 2009 we deployed 68 four-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) at 64 sites throughout a 90x50 km2 area to record seismic energy from 5567 shots of the 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. The experimental geometry utilized 3 nested scales and was designed to image (1) crustal thickness variations within 25 km of the axial high (0 to 900 kyr); (2) the map view heterogeneity and anisotropy of the topmost mantle beneath the spreading axis; (3) the three-dimensional structure of the crustal magmatic system and (4) the detailed three-dimensional, shallow crustal thermal structure beneath the Endeavour vent fields. The 90-km-long Endeavour segment lies between the Cobb and Endeavour overlapping spreading centers (OSCs), which are converging and thus shortening the Endeavour segment. Previous seismic reflection studies indicate that the central Endeavour segment is on a 40-km-wide plateau of greater crustal thickness that is interpreted to have developed when the ridge overrode the mantle melt anomaly associated with the Heckle seamount chain. The central Endeavour is also underlain by an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector that is shallowest and most prominent beneath the hydrothermal fields. Geophysical studies of Endeavour thus permit investigation of the competing effects of tectonic, magmatic and hydrothermal processes on crustal structure and architecture. Ongoing analyses include tomographic inversion of first-arriving P waves that sample the upper- and mid-crustal regions, characterization of off-axis magma bodies via travel time and amplitude anomalies of crustal phases, estimation of regional-scale crustal thickness variations from analysis of PmP arrivals and imaging of mantle structure using Pn to constrain mantle flow and melt distribution [Weekly et al.; Wells et al.; Soule et al

  12. Anthropogenically-Induced Superficial Seismic Activity Modulated By Slow-Slip Events in Guerrero, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, W.; Shapiro, N.; Husker, A. L.; Kostoglodov, V.; Campillo, M.

    2014-12-01

    We use the data of the MASE seismic experiment operated during 2.5 years in Guerrero, Mexico to create a large catalog of seismic multiplets. This catalog is dominated by families of Low-Frequency Earthquakes (LFE) occurring in vicinity of the main subduction interface. In addition to more than one thousand LFE families, we detected nine repeating seismic event families that are located in the upper crust and are anthropogenically induced (AI) by mining blasts. Analysis of the recurrence of these AI events in time shows that their activity significantly increases during the strong Slow-Slip Event (SSE) in 2006. Modeled static stress perturbations induced by the SSE at the surface are ~5 kPa that is on the same order of magnitude as dynamic stress perturbations observed to trigger other low stress drop phenomena, such as tectonic tremor. We propose therefore that strong SSEs in Guerrero impose an extensional regime throughout the continental crust, modifying the stress field near the surface and increasing AI activity. This modulation of the recurrence of the crustal seismic events by the SSE-induced stress might be related to another recent observation: the SSE-induced reduction of seismic velocities linked to nonlinear elastic effects caused by opening of cracks (Rivet et al., 2011, 2014).

  13. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  14. Near-Surface Site Characterization Using a Combination of Active and Passive Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. W.; Liu, L.; Chen, Y.; White, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    Seismic surveys with an active source are commonly used to characterize the subsurface. Increasingly, passive seismic surveys utilizing ambient seismic frequencies (microtremors) are being used to support geotechnical and hazards engineering studies. In this study, we use a combination of active and passive seismic methods to characterize a watershed site at Haddam Meadows State Park, Haddam, Connecticut. At Haddam Meadows, we employed a number of seismic arrays using both active and passive approaches to estimate the depth to rock and the seismic velocity structure of the unconsolidated sediments. The active seismic surveys included seismic refraction and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) using an accelerated weight-drop seismic source. The passive seismic surveys consisted of MASW techniques using both linear and circular geophone arrays, and a survey using a 3-component seismometer. The active seismic data were processed using conventional algorithms; the passive seismic data were processed using both the spatial autocorrelation method (SPAC) and the horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (H/V) method. The interpretations of subsurface structure from the active and passive surveys are generally in good agreement and compare favorably with ground truth information provided by adjacent boreholes. Our results suggest that a combination of active and passive seismic methods can be used to rapidly characterize the subsurface at the watershed scale.

  15. US Geological Survey begins seismic ground response experiments in Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarr, A.C.; King, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This article briefly describes the experimental monitoring of minor seismic features caused by distant nuclear explosions, mining blasts and rhythmic human pushing against wooden homes. Some means of response prediction are outlined in Washington State and some effects of seismic amplification by weak clayey sediments are described. The results of several experiments are described. -A.Scarth

  16. A comparative study of seismicity statistics in laboratory stick-slip experiments and nature: Implications for fault mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Thomas; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Becker, Thorsten; Sammis, Charles; Dresen, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Fault properties can rarely be monitored under in-situ conditions at seismogenic depth. At these depths seismicity records are possibly the only high-resolution data that can provide insight into state of stress and mechanics of faulting. We analyze series of laboratory experiments on faults that developed during stick-slip on saw-cut and fractured surfaces under upper crustal stress conditions. Stick-slip experiments were performed on surfaces with varying roughness and fracture surfaces that evolved into fault zones with pronounced damage zones. We monitor and analyze acoustic emission events that exhibit many striking similarities to natural seismicity across all examined scales. These similarities include pronounced Gutenberg-Richter-type magnitude distributions, Omori-type aftershock decay, and off-fault seismicity distributions that decay as a power law with distance. In the laboratory, fault roughness and heterogeneity are critical in concentrating stresses that lead to local AE clustering, and differences in off-fault activities and lower b-values. Similar observations of earthquake clustering and b-value variations were made for natural faults such as the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas fault. In addition to seismicity statistics, we conducted a detailed analysis of moment tensors, focusing on relative contributions from isotropic and deviatoric components to laboratory seismicity. In contrast to natural seismicity, our results revealed a larger contribution from isotropic components. These contributions are a result of ongoing fracture processes within the evolving fault which are most pronounced after stick-slip events. Our study shows, that seismicity analyses in laboratory experiments can significantly advance our understanding of fault mechanics from the scale of single asperities to large fault zones.

  17. ENAM: A community seismic experiment targeting rifting processes and post-rift evolution of the Mid Atlantic US margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.; Magnani, M. B.; Shillington, D. J.; Gaherty, J. B.; Hornbach, M. J.; Dugan, B.; Long, M. D.; Lizarralde, D.; Becel, A.; Benoit, M. H.; Harder, S. H.; Wagner, L. S.; Christeson, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    The continental margins of the eastern United States formed in the Early Jurassic after the breakup of supercontinent Pangea. The relationship between the timing of this rift episode and the occurrence of offshore magmatism, which is expressed in the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly, is still unknown. The possible influence of magmatism and existing lithospheric structure on the rifting processes along margin of the eastern U.S. was one of the motivations to conduct a large-scale community seismic experiment in the Eastern North America (ENAM) GeoPRISMS focus site. In addition, there is also a clear need for better high-resolution seismic data with shallow penetration on this margin to better understand the geological setting of submarine landslides. The ENAM community seismic experiment is a project in which a team of scientists will gather both active-source and earthquake seismic data in the vicinity of Cape Hatteras on a 500 km wide section of the margin offshore North Carolina and Virginia. The timing of data acquisition in 2014 and 2015 facilitates leveraging of other geophysical data acquisition programs such as Earthscope's Transportable Array and the USGS marine seismic investigation of the continental shelf. In April of 2014, 30 broadband ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed on the shelf, slope and abyssal plain of the study site. These instruments will record earthquakes for one year, which will help future seismic imaging of the deeper lithosphere beneath the margin. In September and October of 2014, regional marine seismic reflection and refraction data will be gathered with the seismic vessel R/V Marcus Langseth, and airgun shots will also be recorded on land to provide data coverage across the shoreline. Last, in the summer of 2015, a land explosion seismic refraction study will provide constraints on the crustal structure in the adjacent coastal plain of North Carolina and Virginia. All seismic data will be distributed to the community through IRIS

  18. Seismic while drilling: Operational experiences in Viet Nam

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.; Einchcomb, C.

    1997-03-01

    The BP/Statoil alliance in Viet Nam has used seismic while drilling on four wells during the last two years. Three wells employed the Western Atlas Tomex system, and the last well, Schlumberger`s SWD system. Perceived value of seismic while drilling (SWD) lies in being able to supply real-time data linking drill bit position to a seismic picture of the well. However, once confidence in equipment and methodology is attained, SWD can influence well design and planning associated with drilling wells. More important, SWD can remove uncertainty when actually drilling wells, allowing risk assessment to be carried out more accurately and confidently.

  19. Simulation of Seismic Tunnel Detection Experiments in Heterogeneous Geological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, C. S.; Glaser, S. D.; Rector, J.

    2013-12-01

    Detecting covert tunnels and other underground openings is an important yet challenging problem for geophysicists, especially where geological heterogeneity is pronounced. A number of geophysical methods have been employed to solve this problem, each with varying degrees of success. We focus on the near-surface seismic techniques of surface wave backscattering, surface wave attenuation tomography, body wave diffraction imaging, and resonant imaging. We use the elastodynamic wave propagation code E3D to simulate tunnel detection experiments completed at this site for a range of synthetic fractal velocity models. The Black Diamond mine, located near Pittsburg California, is used for the field test of our analysis. Our results show that for the relatively low-frequency surface wave attenuation and backscattering methods, the maximum detectable tunnel depth in a homogenous medium is approximately equal to the wavelength of the probing Rayleigh wave. The higher-frequency body wave diffraction and resonant imaging techniques are able to locate tunnels at greater depths, but require more sophisticated analysis and are prone to greater attenuation losses. As is expected, for large values of heterogeneity amplitude, ɛ, the percent standard deviation from the mean velocity model, the average observed surface wave attenuation signal decreases and the maximum detectable tunnel depth decreases. However, for moderate values of heterogeneity amplitude (ɛ < 3%), the average surface wave attenuation signal increases and the maximum detectable tunnel depth increases. For the body wave diffraction and resonant imaging experiments, as ɛ increases the complexity of the observed signal increases, resulting in more difficult processing and interpretation. The additional scattering attenuation tends to degrade the signals significantly due to their reliance on lower amplitude and higher frequency waves.

  20. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  1. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  2. Seismic Activity in the Gulf of Mexico: a Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, S. I.; Canet, C.; Iglesias, A.; Valdes-Gonzales, C. M.

    2013-05-01

    The southwestern corner of Gulf of Mexico (around the northern Isthmus of Tehuantepec) is exposed to an intense deep (> 100 km) seismic activity caused by the subduction of the Cocos plate. Aside from this, the gulf has been considered as a zone of low or no-seismicity. However, a sparse shallow seismic activity is observed across the Gulf of Mexico; some of these earthquakes have been strongly felt (e.g. 23/05/2007 and 10/09/2006), and the Jaltipan, 1959 earthquake caused fatalities and severe destruction in central and southern Veracruz. In this work we analyze 5 relevant earthquakes that occurred since 2001. At the central Gulf of Mexico focal mechanisms show inverse faults oriented approximately NW-SE with dip near 45 degrees, suggesting a link to sediment loading and/or to salt tectonics. On the other hand, in the southwestern corner of the gulf we analyzed some clear examples of strike-slip faults and activity probably related to the Veracruz Fault. One anomalous earthquake, recorded in 2007 in the western margin of the gulf, shows a strike-slip mechanism indicating a transform regime probably related with the East Mexican Fault. The recent improvement of the Mexican Seismological broadband network have allowed to record small earthquakes distributed in and around the Gulf of Mexico. Although the intermediate and large earthquakes in the region are infrequent, the historic evidence indicates that the magnitudes could reach Mw~6.4. This fact could be taken in consideration to reassess the seismic hazard for oil and industrial infrastructure in the region.

  3. Bandung seismic experiment: Towards tomographic imaging by using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranata, Bayu; Yudistira, Tedy; Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil R.; Widiyantoro, Sri; Zulfakriza, Nugraha, Andri D.

    2016-05-01

    Bandung is one of the most densely populated cities in Indonesia with vital infrastructures. On the other hand, this area is surrounded by potential sources of earthquakes that make Bandung vulnerable to earthquakes. Structure of seismic velocity and sediment thickness are crucially needed in the earthquake hazard reduction program for Bandung. Based on this consideration, we deployed 64 seismic stations over the Bandung basin to record seismic ambient noise. In this study, we employed a cross-correlation method to the simultaneously recorded data to retrieve interstation Green's functions. We measured group velocity of the retrieved Green's functions by using frequency-time analysis technique. By the end of this project, the set of interstation group velocity will be inverted to image the shallow seismic velocity structure of the Bandung basin and its surrounding areas including Mt. Tangkuban Parahu and Lembang fault. As the first stage of this work, currently we focus on Green ' s function calculation as well as the interstation group velocity measurements. The general characteristics of group velocity can be evaluated from the plot of cross-correlation function as a function of its interstation distance.

  4. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the connection between petroleum-industry activities, and seismic event occurrences is essential to monitor, quantify, and mitigate seismic risk. While many studies identified anthropogenically-induced seismicity in intraplate regions where background seismicity rates are generally low, little is known about how to distinguish naturally occurring from induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. Further, it is not clear how different oil and gas operational parameters impact the frequency and magnitude of the induced seismic events. Here, we examine variations in frequency-size and spatial distributions of seismicity within the Southern Joaquin basin, an area of both active petroleum production and active fault systems. We analyze a newly available, high-quality, relocated earthquake catalog (Hauksson et al. 2012). This catalog includes many seismic events with magnitudes up to M = 4.5 within the study area. We start by analyzing the overall quality and consistence of the seismic catalog, focusing on temporal variations in seismicity rates and catalog completeness which could indicate variations in network sensitivity. This catalog provides relatively homogeneous earthquake recordings after 1981, enabling us to compare seismicity rates before and after the beginning of more pervasive petroleum-industry activities, for example, hydraulic-fracturing and waste-water disposals. We conduct a limited study of waste-water disposal wells to establish a correlation between seismicity statistics (i.e. rate changes, fractal dimension, b-value) within specific regions and anthropogenic influences. We then perform a regional study, to investigate spatial variations in seismicity statistics which are then correlated to oil field locations and well densities. In order to distinguish, predominantly natural seismicity from induced seismicity, we perform a spatial mapping of b-values and fractal dimensions of earthquake hypocenters. Seismic events in the proximity to

  5. Local seismic events in area of Poland based on data from PASSEQ 2006-2008 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Plesiewicz, Beata; Wiszniowski, Jan; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Passeq Working Group

    2014-05-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 (Passive Seismic Experiment in TESZ; Wilde-Piórko et al, 2008) was the biggest so far passive seismic experiment in the area of Central Europe (Poland, Germany, Czech Republic and Lithuania). 196 seismic stations (including 49 broadband seismometers) worked simultaneously for over two years. During experiment multiple types of data recorders and seismometers were used making analysis more complex and time consuming. Dataset was unified and repaired to start the detection of local seismic events. Two different approaches for detection were applied for stations located in Poland. One used standard STA/LTA triggers (Carl Johnson's STA/LTA algorithm) and grid search to classify and locate events. Result was manually verified. Other approach used Real Time Recurrent Network (RTRN) detection (Wiszniowski et al, 2014). Both methods gave similar results showing four previously unknown seismic events located in area of Gulf Of Gdańsk in southern Baltic Sea. The investigation of local seismicity is a good opportunity for verification of new seismic models of lithosphere in the area. In this paper we discuss both detection methods with their pros and cons (accuracy, efficiency, manual work required, scalability). We also show details of all detected and previously unknown events in discussed area. This work was partially supported by NCN grant UMO-2011/01/B/ST10/06653.

  6. Searching for Seismically Active Faults in the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, S.; Antunes, V.; Arroucau, P.

    2015-12-01

    The repeated occurrence of large magnitude earthquakes in southwest Iberia in historical and instrumental times suggests the presence of active fault segments in the region. However, due to an apparently diffuse seismicity pattern defining a broad region of distributed deformation west of Gibraltar Strait, the question of the location, dimension and geometry of such structures is still open to debate. We recently developed a new algorithm for earthquake location in 3D complex media with laterally varying interface depths, which allowed us to relocate 2363 events having occurred from 2007 to 2013, using P- and S-wave catalog arrival times obtained from the Portuguese Meteorological Institute (IPMA, Instituto Portugues do Mar e da Atmosfera), for a study area lying between 8.5˚W and 5˚W in longitude and 36˚ and 37.5˚ in latitude. The most remarkable change in the seismicity pattern after relocation is an apparent concentration of events, in the North of the Gulf of Cadiz, along a low angle northward-dipping plane rooted at the base of the crust, which could indicate the presence of a major fault. If confirmed, this would be the first structure clearly illuminated by seismicity in a region that has unleashed large magnitude earthquakes. Here, we present results from the joint analysis of focal mechanism solutions and waveform similarity between neighboring events from waveform cross-correlation in order to assess whether those earthquakes occur on the same fault plane.

  7. The North East Italy (NI) broadband seismic network run by OGS: experience in improving the long period performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, D.

    2009-04-01

    The NI broadband seismic network is designed to monitor regional seismic activity of North East Italy and surroundings as well as to provide high quality data for various research projects in regional and global broadband seismology, like moment tensor determination. The network, grown during the last 30 years within local Civil Defence agencies and neighbouring scientific institutions cooperation, currently consists of 11 digital broadband stations equipped with Streckeisen STS-2 and STS-1, Nanometrics Trillium 40 and Guralp CMG-3T seismometers with 120 and 40 seconds long period corners; most of the seismic stations are also equipped with accelerometers. Waveforms and parametric data of the NI seismic network are transmitted in real time to the Friuli-Venezia Giulia,Veneto and Provincia di Trento Civil Defence Agencies, to the Italian National Institute for Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) and to the Earth Science Department (DST) of the Trieste University in Italy, to the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in Vienna, Austria and to the Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia (ARSO) in Ljubljana, Slovenia to support emergency management and seismological studies in the whole Alps-Dinarides junction zone. The commercial Antelope software suite from BRTT has been chosen as the common basis for real time data exchange, rapid location of earthquakes and alerting. In order to guarantee high quality installations, we sustain a continuous effort that involves searches for appropriate sites, away from sources of long period noise, improvements in installation procedures and insulation techniques, maintenance of transfer function files and routine monitoring of noise conditions at individual existing station. The quality of the seismic data is checked through the noise Power Spectral Density (PSD) analysis. The insulation equipment that we designed for our network is a local adaptation of the pressure-thermal insulation

  8. First seismic shear wave velocity profile of the lunar crust as extracted from the Apollo 17 active seismic data by wavefield gradient analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, David; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Nakamura, Yosio; Khan, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We present a new seismic velocity model of the shallow lunar crust, including, for the first time, shear wave velocity information. So far, the shear wave velocity structure of the lunar near-surface was effectively unconstrained due to the complexity of lunar seismograms. Intense scattering and low attenuation in the lunar crust lead to characteristic long-duration reverberations on the seismograms. The reverberations obscure later arriving shear waves and mode conversions, rendering them impossible to identify and analyze. Additionally, only vertical component data were recorded during the Apollo active seismic experiments, which further compromises the identification of shear waves. We applied a novel processing and analysis technique to the data of the Apollo 17 lunar seismic profiling experiment (LSPE), which involved recording seismic energy generated by several explosive packages on a small areal array of four vertical component geophones. Our approach is based on the analysis of the spatial gradients of the seismic wavefield and yields key parameters such as apparent phase velocity and rotational ground motion as a function of time (depth), which cannot be obtained through conventional seismic data analysis. These new observables significantly enhance the data for interpretation of the recorded seismic wavefield and allow, for example, for the identification of S wave arrivals based on their lower apparent phase velocities and distinct higher amount of generated rotational motion relative to compressional (P-) waves. Using our methodology, we successfully identified pure-mode and mode-converted refracted shear wave arrivals in the complex LSPE data and derived a P- and S-wave velocity model of the shallow lunar crust at the Apollo 17 landing site. The extracted elastic-parameter model supports the current understanding of the lunar near-surface structure, suggesting a thin layer of low-velocity lunar regolith overlying a heavily fractured crust of basaltic

  9. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter during the recent seismic activity in Fthiotida, central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabelos, Dimitrios N.; Contadakis, Michael E.; Vergos, Georgios; Spatalas, Spyrous

    2016-01-01

    Based on the results of our previous studies concerning the tidal triggering effect on the seismicity in Greece, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance as an index of tectonic stress criticality, associated with earthquake occurrence. Then, we investigate whether the recent increase in the seismic activity at Fthiotida in Greek mainland indicates faulting maturity and the possible production a stronger earthquake. In this paper we present the results of this investigation

  10. A comparison of active seismic source data to seismic excitations from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Kennedy, Ben; Keys, Harry; Lokmer, Ivan; Proctor, Jon; Lyons, John; Jolly, Gillian

    2014-05-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption jets, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~7x105 m3) that propagated ~2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption chronology must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity starting at 11:52:18 UTC that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the timing of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the eruptive sequence. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9x106 joules producing seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four 3-component stations. From these, we obtained a distribution of amplitudes across the network for each drop position which varied systematically from the eruption vent and avalanche scar to the debris avalanche toe. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross-correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we found evidence for the debris avalanche a few minutes prior to the eruption in both the broad spectrum and narrow frequency (5-10 Hz) analysis. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~8x1011 joules, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The inferred seismic energy release for the

  11. On the scalability of seismic waveform inversion: From ultrasonic experiments to global-scale tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamei, R.; Pratt, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic waveform inversion endeavors to extract high-resolution subsurface models from full seismic records by using numerical solutions of the full forward wave equation. In the last two decades, waveform inversion has been successfully applied to both active and passive seismic experiments, and has demonstrated superb resolution power over a wide-range of applications. Waveform inversion is still computationally challenging, and is well known to be a strongly non-linear and ill-conditioned inverse problem. Passive and active waveform inversions have largely been developed independently, although both originate from the work of Lailly (1983) and Tarantola (1984). In this presentation, we review a suite of past results from both active and passive source waveform inversions, and attempt to illustrate similarities and shared challenges between them. In active seismics, waveform inversion has been applied to i) ultrasonic breast cancer data to image targets of a few tens of centimeters on a side, ii) cross-well exploration data using frequencies between hundreds and a few thousands of Hz to image targets of the order of hundreds of meters on a side, iii) surface seismic for near-surface engineering problems using frequencies of tens to a few hundreds of Hz to image targets of the order of hundreds of meters to several kilometers, and iv) hydrocarbon exploration and crustal imaging using frequencies of a few, to a few tens of Hz for targets tens of kilometers on a side. In contrast, waveform inversion from passive source data uses much lower frequencies (less than 1 Hz), and images much larger target areas to retrieve iv) crustal scale structures of the order of hundreds of kilometers using data periods of one to several tens of seconds, v) upper-mantle structure on regional scales thousands of kilometers on a side using data periods of ten to a few hundred seconds, and vi) the whole-earth inversions (of order 10,000 km on a side), using a similar frequency range. Our

  12. A strategy for implementation of experience based seismic equipment qualification in IEEE and ASME industry standards

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.M.

    1996-12-01

    In the past 20 years, extensive data on the performance of mechanical and electric equipment during actual strong motion earthquakes and seismic qualification tests has been accumulated. Recognizing that an experience based approach provides a technically sound and cost effective method for the seismic qualification of some or certain equipment, the IEEE Nuclear Power Engineering Committee and the ASME Committee on Qualification of Mechanical Equipment established a Special Working Group to investigate the incorporation of experienced based methods into the industry consensus codes and standards currently used in the seismic qualification of Seismic Category Nuclear Power Plant equipment. This paper presents the strategy (course of action) which was developed by the Special Working Group for meeting this objective of incorporation of experience based seismic qualification standards used in the design and seismic qualification of seismic category nuclear power plant equipment. This strategy was recommended to both chartering organizations, the IEEE Nuclear Power Engineering Committee and the ASME Committee on Qualification of Mechanical Equipment for their consideration and implementation. The status of the review and implementation of the Special Working Group`s recommended strategy by the sponsoring organization is also discussed.

  13. PRESS40: a project for involving students in active seismic risk mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaba, Carla; Contessi, Elisa; Rosa Girardi, Maria

    2016-04-01

    To memorialize the anniversary of the 1976 Friuli earthquake, the Istituto Statale di Istruzione Superiore "Magrini Marchetti" in Gemona del Friuli (NE Italy), with the collaboration of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS), has promoted the PRESS40 Project (Prevenzione Sismica nella Scuola a 40 anni dal terremoto del Friuli, that in English sounds like "Seismic Prevention at School 40 years later the Friuli earthquake"). The project has developed in the 2015-2016 school year, starting from the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake, and it aims to disseminate historical memory, seismic culture and awareness of seismic safety in the young generations, too often unconscious of past experiences, as recent seismic hazard perception tests have demonstrated. The basic idea of the PRESS40 Project is to involve the students in experimental activities to be active part of the seismic mitigation process. The Project is divided into two main parts, the first one in which students learn-receive knowledge from researchers, and the second one in which they teach-bring knowledge to younger students. In the first part of the project, 75 students of the "Magrini Marchetti" school acquired new geophysical data, covering the 23 municipalities from which they come from. These municipalities represent a wide area affected by the 1976 Friuli earthquake. In each locality a significant site was examined, represented by a school area. At least, 127 measurements of ambient noise have been acquired. Data processing and interpretation of all the results are still going on, under the supervision of OGS researchers.The second part of the project is planned for the early spring, when the students will present the results of geophysical survey to the younger ones of the monitored schools and to the citizens in occasion of events to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake.

  14. Deep Seismic Researches Of Seismic-Active Zones With Use Of High-Power Vibrators - Technique, Outcomes, Outlooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, V.; Seleznev, V.; Emanov, A.; Sal`Nikov, A.; Kashun, V.; Glinsky, B.; Kovalevsky, V.; Zhemchugova, I.; Danilov, I.; Liseikin, A.

    2004-12-01

    There are presented the materials of deep vibroseism researches, carried out in seismic active regions of Siberia with use of stationary (100-tos power) and moveable vibration sources (40-60tons power) and mobile digital recording equipment. There are given some examples of unique, have no world analogues, correlograms from high-power vibrators on distances to 400km and more. Using new vibroseismic technology of deep seismic researches, there were got detail deep sections of the Earth's crust and upper mantle, including time-sections of CDP-DSS up to depth of 80km. Materials of vibroseismic investigations on 2500km of seismic profiles in hard-to-reach regions of the Altay-Sayan region, the Baikal rift zone and Okhotsko-Chukotski regions are evidence of high cost efficiency, ecological safety, possibility to be realized in hard-to-reach region and finally of availability of deep seismic investigations with use of high-power vibration sources.

  15. Las Vegas Basin Seismic Response Project: Preliminary Results From Seismic Refraction Experiments, Las Vegas, NV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza, S. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Luke, B.; Buck, B. J.; Hanson, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    In May and September 2002, seismic refraction data were acquired in the Las Vegas basin. Located in the southern Basin and Range province, the cities of Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, and Henderson sit atop a fault-bounded basin with a depth of up to 5 km and basin dimensions of roughly 60 km wide (east-west) by 50 km in length (north-south). Previous isostatic gravity, seismic reflection, and aeromagnetic studies indicate that a series of sub-basins exist beneath the unconsolidated basin fill, with the deepest sub-basin occurring 5 km west of the fault block bounding the eastern edge of the basin (Frenchman Mountain). The basin is significantly deeper along its northern extremity, following the path of the fault block bounding the northern edge of the basin (Las Vegas Valley Shear Zone), and along the western edge of Frenchman Mountain. Recent, paleoseismic studies have indicated that faults in the Las Vegas region have the potential for an earthquake of M6.5 to 7.0. It is estimated that a M6.9 earthquake in the basin could produce about 11 billion dollars in damage and a significant number of deaths and/or injuries. In addition, an equivalent or larger event in the Death Valley fault zone, 150 km distance, would also be devastating to the metropolitan area of approximately 1.5 million residents. Therefore, it is essential to understand the seismic hazard posed to the Las Vegas region. This project is part of a larger collaborative effort to characterize the basin and its response to ground shaking. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas with assistance from the University of Texas at El Paso, students from UNLV and UTEP, volunteers from the community and several students from Centennial High school deployed 432 portable seismic recorders ("Texans") throughout the valley. Shot point locations were located at three quarries in the valley, one to the north, one to the east and one to the southwest. The profiles cross the Las Vegas Valley Shear zone as well as a prominent

  16. Active seismic sources as a proxy for seismic surface processes: An example from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, A. D.; Lokmer, I.; Kennedy, B.; Keys, H. J. R.; Proctor, J.; Lyons, J. J.; Jolly, G. E.

    2014-10-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption pulses, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~ 7 × 105 m3) that propagated ~ 2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption timing must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the evolution of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the seismic sequence in a new cross correlation source location approach. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9 × 106 Nm producing observable seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four stations. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we obtain a best matched source position in the near vent region for the eruption period and significant down channel excitations during both the pre and post eruption periods. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~ 8 × 1011 Nm, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The new energy estimate may be more robust than those calculated from standard seismic radiation equations, which may include uncertainties about the path and site effects. The

  17. Deep seismic exploration into the Arctic Lithosphere: Arctic-2012 Russian wide-angle seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashubin, S.

    2013-12-01

    Integrated geological and geophysical studies of the Earth's crust and upper mantle (the Russian project 'Arctic-2012') were carried out in 2012 in the Mendeleev Rise, central Arctic. The set of studies included wide-angle seismic observations along the line crossing the Mendeleev Rise in its southern part. The DSS seismic survey was aimed at the determination of the Mendeleev Rise crust type. A high-power air gun (120 liters or 7320 cu.in) and ocean stations with multi-component recording (X, Y, Z geophone components and a hydrophone) were used for the DSS. The line was studied using a dense system of observation: bottom station spacing was from 10 to 20 km, excitation point spacing (seismic traces interval) was 315 m. Observation data were obtained in 27 location points of bottom stations, the distance between the first and the last stations was 480 km, the length of the excitation line was 740 km. In DSS wave fields, in the first and later arrivals, there are refracted and reflected waves associated with boundaries in the sedimentary cover, with the top of the basement, and with boundaries in the consolidated crust, including its bottom (Moho discontinuity). The waves could be traced for offsets up to 170-240 km. The DSS line coincides with the near-vertical CMP line worked out with the use of a 4500-m-long seismic streamer and with a 50 m shot point interval that allowed essential detalization of the upper part of the section and taking it into account in the construction of a deep crust model. The deep velocity model was constructed using ray-trace modeling of compressional, shear, and converted waves with the use of the SeisWide program. Estimates were obtained for Vp/Vs velocity ratios, which played an important role in determining the type of crust. The results of the interpretation show that the Mendeleev Rise section corresponds to sections of a thin continental crust of shelf seas and a thinned continental crust of submarine ridges and rises.

  18. Fault Activity, Seismicity and GPS Deformation of the Seismic Gap along the Red River Fault Zone (RRFZ) in Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue-Ze, Wen; Shengli, Ma; Fang, Du; Feng, Long

    2016-04-01

    Along the middle segment of the NW-trending and dextral-slip Red River fault zone (RRFZ), also the Honghe fault zone, Yunnan, China, there has been little of modern seismicity since the 1970's. Some Chinese researchers believed that this fault segment is inactive in the late Quaternary. However, more and more evidence shows that the middle segment of RRFZ is geologically-active in the late Quaternary, even is a Holocene-active one with evidence of paleo-earthquakes occurring. Our study suggests that along the fault segment there has been no any major earthquake occurring for over 500 years at least, and a large-scale seismic gap, the Honghe seismic gap, have formed there. On the modern seismicity, the middle segment of RRFZ has presented as a fault portion without or with very few small earthquakes occurring since the 1980's, but surrounded by several areas with low b-values, suggesting relatively high stress having built-up there. Also, GPS deformation analysis suggests that this fault segment has tightly locked already. Such tight locking would be associated with the fault geometry: A large-scale restraining bend of about 30°over a distance of ~100 km exists along the main fault trace along RRFZ between Yuanjiang and Yuanyang. However, how such a restraining bend makes the middle segment of RRFZ have tightly locked? How much strain has built up there? Moreover, how about the long-term seismic potential of major earthquake on the middle segment of RRFZ, and on some secondary active faults of the two sides of the segment, especially on the parallel faults Chuxiong, Qujiang and Shiping. All these are issues we want to study further. Keywords: Red River Fault Zone, Seismic Gap, Fault Activity, Seismicity, GPS Deformation

  19. Water percolation induced seismicity: evidences from low scale in-situ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetta, V.; Amitrano, D.; Guglielmi, Y.; Senfaute, G.

    2003-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the correlation between the hydro-mechanical behaviour and the seismicity induced by hydraulic loading in a fractured rock mass. The experiments have been performed in a low scale fractured rock mass (1500 m3). The site is a small reservoir composed of a 17 m thick pile of Lower Cretaceous fractured limestone limited at the top and the bottom by a two-meter thick, impervious marl layer. A water-gate installed on the draining spring allows to artificially induce a 0.1 MPa hydraulic loading within the fracture network. Hydro - mechanical studies have pointed out different type of behaviour for rock joints thanks to punctual measurements of water pressure and deformations. The results of seismic monitoring show that the most permeable joints are aseismic whereas the low permeability joint revealed a mesurable seismicity related to water percolation. The fluid pressure increase induces instability phenomena at low scale like the rupture of crystallised zone, the formation of new micro-fractures or the sudden opening and the shearing of bedding joints. The seismic events display temporal clustering as observed for induced seismicity at larger scale (dam, gas reservoir). These results reveal that even for low water pressure variation (up to 0.1 MPa) hydraulical loading of a fractured rock masse can induce observable seismicity. These low scale (1-10 m) results could be of interest for understanding induced seismicity at larger scale (100-1000 m like dam, reservoir etc.).

  20. Combined analysis of passive and active seismic measurements using additional geologic data for the determination of shallow subsurface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, Tobias; Brüstle, Andrea; Spies, Thomas; Schlittenhardt, Jörg; Schmidt, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    A detailed knowledge of subsurface structure is essential for geotechnical projects and local seismic hazard analyses. Passive seismic methods like microtremor measurements are widely used in geotechnical practice, but limitations and developments are still in focus of scientific discussion. The presentation outlines microtremor measurements in the context of microzonation in the scale of districts or small communities. H/V measurements are used to identify zones with similar underground properties. Subsequently a shear wave velocity (Vs) depth profile for each zone is determined by array measurements at selected sites. To reduce possible uncertainties in dispersion curve analyses of passive array measurements and ambiguities within the inversion process, we conducted an additional active seismic experiment and included available geological information. The presented work is realized in the framework of the research project MAGS2 ("Microseismic Activity of Geothermal Systems") and deals with the determination of seismic hazard analysis at sites near deep geothermal power plants in Germany. The measurements were conducted in the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) and the Bavarian molasses, where geothermal power plants are in operation. The results of the H/V- and array-measurements in the region of Landau (URG) are presented and compared to known geological-tectonic structures. The H/V measurements show several zones with similar H/V-curves which indicate homogenous underground properties. Additionally to the passive seismic measurements an active refraction experiment was performed and evaluated using the MASW method („Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves") to strengthen the determination of shear-wave-velocity depth profile. The dispersion curves for Rayleigh-waves of the active experiment support the Rayleigh-dispersion curves from passive measurements and therefore provide a valuable supplement. Furthermore, the Rayleigh-wave ellipticity was calculated to reduce

  1. Active damping performance of the KAGRA seismic attenuation system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yoshinori; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Aso, Yoichi; Barton, Mark; Erasmo Peña Arellano, Fabián; Shoda, Ayaka; Akutsu, Tomotada; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Hirata, Naoatsu; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Okutomi, Koki; Miyamoto, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Hideki; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (formerly LCGT now KAGRA) is presently under construction in Japan. This May we assembled a prototype of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) for the beam splitter and the signal recycling mirrors of KAGRA, which we call Type-B SAS, and evaluated its performance at NAOJ (Mitaka, Toyko). We investigated its frequency response, active damping performance, vibration isolation performance and long-term stability both in and out of vacuum. From the frequency response test and the active damping performance test, we confirmed that the SAS worked as we designed and that all mechanical resonances which could disturb lock acquisition and observation are damped within 1 minute, which is required for KAGRA, by the active controls.

  2. Application of neural networks to seismic active control

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-07-01

    An exploratory study on seismic active control using an artificial neural network (ANN) is presented in which a singledegree-of-freedom (SDF) structural system is controlled by a trained neural network. A feed-forward neural network and the backpropagation training method are used in the study. In backpropagation training, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each training cycle. The training patterns for the neural net are generated randomly. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control algorithm. The control strategy proposed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to destroy the build-up of the system response. The ground motions considered in the simulations are the N21E and N69W components of the Lake Hughes No. 12 record that occurred in the San Fernando Valley in California on February 9, 1971. Significant reduction of the structural response by one order of magnitude is observed. Also, it is shown that the proposed control strategy has the ability to reduce the peak that occurs during the first few cycles of the time history. These promising results assert the potential of applying ANNs to active structural control under seismic loads.

  3. Predicting earthquakes by analyzing accelerating precursory seismic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varnes, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    During 11 sequences of earthquakes that in retrospect can be classed as foreshocks, the accelerating rate at which seismic moment is released follows, at least in part, a simple equation. This equation (1) is {Mathematical expression},where {Mathematical expression} is the cumulative sum until time, t, of the square roots of seismic moments of individual foreshocks computed from reported magnitudes;C and n are constants; and tfis a limiting time at which the rate of seismic moment accumulation becomes infinite. The possible time of a major foreshock or main shock, tf,is found by the best fit of equation (1), or its integral, to step-like plots of {Mathematical expression} versus time using successive estimates of tfin linearized regressions until the maximum coefficient of determination, r2,is obtained. Analyzed examples include sequences preceding earthquakes at Cremasta, Greece, 2/5/66; Haicheng, China 2/4/75; Oaxaca, Mexico, 11/29/78; Petatlan, Mexico, 3/14/79; and Central Chile, 3/3/85. In 29 estimates of main-shock time, made as the sequences developed, the errors in 20 were less than one-half and in 9 less than one tenth the time remaining between the time of the last data used and the main shock. Some precursory sequences, or parts of them, yield no solution. Two sequences appear to include in their first parts the aftershocks of a previous event; plots using the integral of equation (1) show that the sequences are easily separable into aftershock and foreshock segments. Synthetic seismic sequences of shocks at equal time intervals were constructed to follow equation (1), using four values of n. In each series the resulting distributions of magnitudes closely follow the linear Gutenberg-Richter relation log N=a-bM, and the product n times b for each series is the same constant. In various forms and for decades, equation (1) has been used successfully to predict failure times of stressed metals and ceramics, landslides in soil and rock slopes, and volcanic

  4. Boundary separating the seismically active reelfoot rift from the sparsely seismic Rough Creek graben, Kentucky and Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Reelfoot rift is the most active of six Iapetan rifts and grabens in central and eastern North America. In contrast, the Rough Creek graben is one of the least active, being seismically indistinguishable from the central craton of North America. Yet the rift and graben adjoin. Hazard assessment in the rift and graben would be aided by identification of a boundary between them. Changes in the strikes of single large faults, the location of a Cambrian transfer zone, and the geographic extent of alkaline igneous rocks provide three independent estimates of the location of a structural boundary between the rift and the graben. The boundary trends north-northwest through the northeastern part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex of Kentucky and Illinois, and has no obvious surface expression. The boundary involves the largest faults, which are the most likely to penetrate to hypocentral depths, and the boundary coincides with the geographic change from abundant seismicity in the rift to sparse seismicity in the graben. Because the structural boundary was defined by geologic variables that are expected to be causally associated with seismicity, it may continue to bound the Reelfoot rift seismicity in the future.

  5. Seismic passive: an experiment for the campus of the National University of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus Reyes, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The generation of seismic image, in areas where the use of active sources it is restricted (like dynamite) or just the area where the area is an active source, it is possible to do it with passive seismic, using seismic interferometry, retrieving the impulse response (Function Green) from the cross-correlation of the ambient noise. It was cross-correlated ambient seismic noise, of a recording made along a line lying on the university campus in Bogota, on that line were located the virtual-source and the traces. For processing, the surface waves were removed and subsequently, it was applied energy normalization to each of the noise panel and were correlated each noise panels with the trace at the chosen virtual-source position. When it was retrieved common-source gathers it was made a new stacking. And with this stack, seismic image was generated. The image obtained was compared with the geological surveys of the area and found that the reflectors match, showing 2 matching reflections. It was determined from this study of seismic exploration on one line, using retrieved reflection data it posible to obtain a migrated reflection imageof the subsurface.

  6. Large-N Seismic Deployment at the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Mellors, R. J.; Pitarka, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary project that consists of a series of chemical explosion experiments at the Nevada National Security Site. The goal of SPE is to understand the complicated effect of earth structures on source energy partitioning and seismic wave propagation, develop and validate physics-based monitoring, and ultimately better discriminate low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity. Deployment of a large number of seismic sensors is planned for SPE to image the full 3-D wavefield with about 500 three-component sensors and 500 vertical component sensors. This large-N seismic deployment will operate near the site of SPE-5 shot for about one month, recording the SPE-5 shot, ambient noise, and additional controlled-sources. This presentation focuses on the design of the large-N seismic deployment. We show how we optimized the sensor layout based on the geological structure and experiment goals with a limited number of sensors. In addition, we will also show some preliminary record sections from deployment. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring earthquake activity and verification of the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. We show results from our continuing effort in developing efficient waveform cross-correlation and double-difference analysis methods for the large-scale processing of regional and global seismic archives to improve existing earthquake parameter estimates, detect seismic events with magnitudes below current detection thresholds, and improve real-time monitoring procedures. We demonstrate the performance of these algorithms as applied to the 28-year long seismic archive of the Northern California Seismic Network. The tools enable the computation of periodic updates of a high-resolution earthquake catalog of currently over 500,000 earthquakes using simultaneous double-difference inversions, achieving up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. This catalog, together with associated metadata, form the underlying relational database for a real-time double-difference scheme, DDRT, which rapidly computes high-precision correlation times and hypocenter locations of new events with respect to the background archive (http://ddrt.ldeo.columbia.edu). The DDRT system facilitates near-real-time seismicity analysis, including the ability to search at an unprecedented resolution for spatio-temporal changes in seismogenic properties. In areas with continuously recording stations, we show that a detector built around a scaled cross-correlation function can lower the detection threshold by one magnitude unit compared to the STA/LTA based detector employed at the network. This leads to increased event density, which in turn pushes the resolution capability of our location algorithms. On a global scale, we are currently building

  8. Recording and investigation of the seismic signal generated by hypervelocity impact experiments and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güldemeister, N.; Moser, D.; Wünnemann, K.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.

    2013-09-01

    Meteorite impacts can cause environmental consequences, one of which is the generation of ground motions that may exceed the magnitude of the largest earthquakes [1]. Impacts generate shock waves that attenuate with distance until they even tually turn into seismic waves. Thus, meteorite impact may be considered as a source for seismic shaking similar to earthquakes. Seismic signals have been recorded in explosion experiments [2] and in hydrocode models of large impact events such as the Chicxulub crater [3]. To determine how much of the kinetic energy Ekin of the impactoris turned into seismic energy Eseis can be investigated experimentally (by recording the acoustic emission) or by numerical models. The ratio of Eseis/Ekin is the so called seismic efficiency k. The seismic efficiency depends on material properties (porosity) and is usually estimated to range between 10-2 and 10-6 [2,4]. In the framework of the "MEMIN" (multidisciplinary experimental and modeling impact crater research network) project a suite of hypervelocity impact experiments on a decimeter scale have been carried out [5]. We use acoustic emission (AE) technique and pressure gauges in high spatiotemporal Meteorite impacts can cause environmental consequences, one of which is the generation of ground motions that may exceed the magnitude of the largest earthquakes [1]. Impacts generate shock waves that attenuate with distance until they even tually turn into seismic waves. Thus, meteorite impact may be considered as a source for seismic shaking similar to earthquakes. Seismic signals have been recorded in explosion experiments [2] and in hydrocode models of large impact events such as the Chicxulub crater [3]. To determine how much of the kinetic energy Ekin of the impactoris turned into seismic energy Eseis can be investigated experimentally (by recording the acoustic emission) or by numerical models. The ratio of Eseis/Ekin is the so called seismic efficiency k. The seismic efficiency depends

  9. The role of the Montello hill in the seismicity and active deformation of Southern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pondrelli, S.; Serpelloni, E.; Danesi, S.; Lovati, S.; Massa, M.; Mastrolembo Ventura, B.; Danecek, P.; Cavaliere, A.; Salimbeni, S.

    2013-12-01

    The most remarkable geomorphological feature of the eastern Southern Alps (northern Italy) is the Montello anticline, a ~15km long SSW-NNE elongated hill, sited ~40km north of Venice, and offset of ~15 km to the south from the main pede-Alpine thrust front. It has been generated by the uplift and the deformation produced by a S-verging blind thrust, constrained by morphotectonic analyses of uplifted river terraces and sub-surface data. Despite it is presently considered as one of the main S-verging seismogenic segments of the tectonically active Southern Alps thrust front, its real seismogenic potential is still matter of debate. Although the area has been hit in 1695 by a Mw 6.5 earthquake, the Montello is currently characterized by slower seismicity activity than its confining segments and geodetic deformation rates are at the mm/yr level. In order to study the present day crustal deformation at the fault-scale and to improve the detection of background seismicity associated to the 'seismically silent' Montello thrust and to understand its interseismic behavior, we have installed a temporary multi-parametric geophysical network, which integrates space geodetic (GPS) and seismological observations during the 2010-2011 time-interval, running semi-continuous GPS experiments from 2009 to 2013. We recorded 142 local events (compared to the 43 events located by the Italian Seismic Network), located with good reliability (rms < 0.5) with Ml between 1.5 and 3.5. The available continuous and semi-continuous GPS data show that ~2 mm/yr of N-S convergence are accommodated across this sector of the Southern Alps, but the deformation signal appears more complex than what expected by a single thrust fault. GPS, although preliminary and not sampling optimally possible lateral variations of the strain-rate field, show a remarkable change of the kinematics across the external Montello thrust front. The GPS and seismological data collected during the experiment suggest that the

  10. Peru Subduction Zone Seismic Experiment (PeruSZE): Preliminary Results From a Seismic Network Between Mollendo and Lake Titicaca, Peru.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, R.; Stubailo, I.; Skinner, S.; Phillips, K.; Foote, E.; Lukac, M.; Aguilar, V.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Husker, A.; Clayton, R.; Davis, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    This work describes preliminary results from a 50 station broadband seismic network recently installed from the coast to the high Andes in Peru. UCLA's Center for Embedded Network Sensing (CENS) and Caltech's Tectonic Observatory are collaborating with the IRD (French L'Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement) and the Institute of Geophysics, in Lima Peru in a broadband seismic experiment that will study the transition from steep to shallow slab subduction. The currently installed line has stations located above the steep subduction zone at a spacing of about 6 km. In 2009 we plan to install a line of 50 stations north from this line along the crest of the Andes, crossing the transition from steep to shallow subduction. A further line from the end of that line back to the coast, completing a U shaped array, is in the planning phase. The network is wirelessly linked using multi-hop network software designed by computer scientists in CENS in which data is transmitted from station to station, and collected at Internet drops, from where it is transmitted over the Internet to CENS each night. The instrument installation in Peru is almost finished and we have been receiving data daily from 10 stations (out of total 50) since June 2008. The rest are recording on-site while the RF network is being completed. The software system provides dynamic link quality based routing, reliable data delivery, and a disruption tolerant shell interface for managing the system from UCLA without the need to travel to Peru. The near real-time data delivery also allows immediate detection of any problems at the sites. We are building a seismic data and GPS quality control toolset that would greatly minimize the station's downtime by alerting the users of any possible problems.

  11. ActiveSeismoPick3D - automatic first arrival determination for large active seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffrath, Marcel; Küperkoch, Ludger; Wehling-Benatelli, Sebastian; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We developed a tool for automatic determination of first arrivals in active seismic data based on an approach, that utilises higher order statistics (HOS) and the Akaike information criterion (AIC), commonly used in seismology, but not in active seismics. Automatic picking is highly desirable in active seismics as the number of data provided by large seismic arrays rapidly exceeds of what an analyst can evaluate in a reasonable amount of time. To bring the functionality of automatic phase picking into the context of active data, the software package ActiveSeismoPick3D was developed in Python. It uses a modified algorithm for the determination of first arrivals which searches for the HOS maximum in unfiltered data. Additionally, it offers tools for manual quality control and postprocessing, e.g. various visualisation and repicking functionalities. For flexibility, the tool also includes methods for the preparation of geometry information of large seismic arrays and improved interfaces to the Fast Marching Tomography Package (FMTOMO), which can be used for the prediction of travel times and inversion for subsurface properties. Output files are generated in the VTK format, allowing the 3D visualization of e.g. the inversion results. As a test case, a data set consisting of 9216 traces from 64 shots was gathered, recorded at 144 receivers deployed in a regular 2D array of a size of 100 x 100 m. ActiveSeismoPick3D automatically checks the determined first arrivals by a dynamic signal to noise ratio threshold. From the data a 3D model of the subsurface was generated using the export functionality of the package and FMTOMO.

  12. The BOrborema Deep Electromagnetic and Seismic (BODES) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julià, J.; Garcia, X.; Medeiros, W. E.; Farias do Nascimento, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Borborema Province of NE Brazil is a large Precambrian domain of the Brazilian shield located in the Northeasternmost corner of South America. It is bounded by the Parnaíba basin to the West and by the São Francisco craton to the South. Its structuration in the Precambrian has been related to compressional processes during the Brasiliano-Pan African orogeny (600-550 Ma). In the Mesozoic, extensional stresses eventually leading to continental breakup, left a number of aborted rift basins within the Province. After continental breakup, the evolution of the Province was marked by episodes of uplift, which might have been coeval with episodes of Cenozoic volcanism. The most prominent expression of those uplift processes is the Borborema Plateau, an elliptically shaped topographic feature in the eastern half of the Province with maximum elevations of ~1200 m. The origin of uplift in the Plateau has been the focus of a number of multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary studies in the past few years, which have imaged the deep structure of the eastern Province with unprecedented detail. The origin of uplift in the western Province, which includes a superb example of basin inversion demonstrated by the ~1000 km elevations of the Chapada do Araripe, however, has been seldom investigated. With the goal of investigating the deep structure of the western Province, a temporary network of 10 collocated seismic and magnetotelluric stations was deployed in the region. The collocated stations were arranged in an approximately NS direction, with an interspation spacing of ~70 km and spanning a total length of ~600 km. The seismic stations consisted of broadband sensors (RefTek 151B-120 "Observer") sampling at 100 Hz and were deployed in January 2015; the MT stations consisted of long-period magnetotelluric (LEMI) systems, sampling at 1 Hz and 4 Hz, and were deployed in April 2015 for a period of ~2 weeks. Preliminary results based on teleseismic P-wave receiver functions

  13. Imaging the deep seismic structure beneath a mid-ocean ridge: the MELT experiment

    PubMed

    1998-05-22

    The Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment was designed to distinguish between competing models of magma generation beneath mid-ocean ridges. Seismological observations demonstrate that basaltic melt is present beneath the East Pacific Rise spreading center in a broad region several hundred kilometers across and extending to depths greater than 100 kilometers, not just in a narrow region of high melt concentration beneath the spreading center, as predicted by some models. The structure of the ridge system is strongly asymmetric: mantle densities and seismic velocities are lower and seismic anisotropy is stronger to the west of the rise axis. PMID:9596564

  14. Evaluation of feasibility of mapping seismically active faults in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, L. D. (Principal Investigator); Vanwormer, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery is proving to be exceptionally useful in delineating structural features in Alaska which have never been recognized on the ground. Previously unmapped features such as seismically active faults and major structural lineaments are especially evident. Among the more significant results of this investigation is the discovery of an active strand of the Denali fault. The new fault has a history of scattered activity and was the scene of a magnitude 4.8 earthquake on October 1, 1972. Of greater significance is the disclosure of a large scale conjugate fracture system north of the Alaska Range. This fracture system appears to result from compressive stress radiating outward from around Mt. McKinley. One member of the system was the scene of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake in 1968. The potential value of ERTS-1 imagery to land use planning is reflected in the fact that this earthquake occurred within 10 km of the site which was proposed for the Rampart Dam, and the fault on which it occurred passes very near the proposed site for the bridge and oil pipeline crossing of the Yukon River.

  15. Impacts of seismic activity on long-term repository performance at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, J.H.; Wilson, M.L.; Borns, D.J.; Arnold, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    Several effects of seismic activity on the release of radionuclides from a potential repository at Yucca Mountain are quantified. Future seismic events are predicted using data from the seismic hazard analysis conducted for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Phenomenological models are developed, including rockfall (thermal-mechanical and seismic) in unbackfilled emplacement drifts, container damage caused by fault displacement within the repository, and flow-path chance caused by changes in strain. Using the composite-porosity flow model (relatively large-scale, regular percolation), seismic events show little effect on total-system releases; using the weeps flow model (episodic pulses of flow in locally saturated fractures), container damage and flow-path changes cause over an order of magnitude increase in releases. In separate calculations using, more realistic representations of faulting, water-table rise caused by seismically induced changes in strain are seen to be higher than previously estimated by others, but not sufficient to reach a potential repository.

  16. Seismically Articulating Kilauea Volcano's Active Conduits, Rift Zones, and Faults through HVO's Second Fifty Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, P.; Nakata, J.; Klein, F.; Koyanagi, R.; Thelen, W.

    2011-12-01

    While seismic monitoring of active Hawaiian volcanoes began 100 years ago, the build-up of the U. S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) seismographic network to its current configuration began in 1955, when Jerry Eaton established remote stations that telemetered data via landline to recorders at HVO. With network expansion through the 1960's, earthquake location and cataloging capabilities have evolved to afford a computer processed seismic catalog now spanning fifty years. Location accuracy and catalog completeness to smaller magnitudes have increased. Research and insights developed using HVO's seismic record have exploited the ability to seismically monitor volcanic activity at depth, to identify active regions within the volcanoes on the basis of computed hypocentral locations, to infer regions of magma storage by recognizing different families of volcanic earthquakes, and to forecast volcanic activity in both short and longer term from seismicity patterns. HVO's seismicity catalog was central to calculations of probabilistic seismic hazards. The ability to develop and implement additional analytical and interpretive capabilities has kept pace with improvements in both field and laboratory hardware and software. While the basic capabilities continue as part of HVO's core monitoring, additional interpretive capabilities now include adding details of volcanic and earthquake source regions, and viewing seismic data in juxtaposition with other observatory data streams. As HVO looks to its next century of volcano studies, research and development continue to shape the future. Broadband seismic recording at HVO has enabled extensive study by Chouet, Dawson, and co-workers of the relationship of very-long-period seismic sources beneath Kilauea's summit caldera to magma supply and transport. Recent upgrades have improved the ability to use these data in seismic cataloging and research. Data processing upgrades have bolstered the ability to

  17. Physical modeling of the formation and evolution of seismically active fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponomarev, A.V.; Zavyalov, A.D.; Smirnov, V.B.; Lockner, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) in rocks is studied as a model of natural seismicity. A special technique for rock loading has been used to help study the processes that control the development of AE during brittle deformation. This technique allows us to extend to hours fault growth which would normally occur very rapidly. In this way, the period of most intense interaction of acoustic events can be studied in detail. Characteristics of the acoustic regime (AR) include the Gutenberg-Richter b-value, spatial distribution of hypocenters with characteristic fractal (correlation) dimension d, Hurst exponent H, and crack concentration parameter Pc. The fractal structure of AR changes with the onset of the drop in differential stress during sample deformation. The change results from the active interaction of microcracks. This transition of the spatial distribution of AE hypocenters is accompanied by a corresponding change in the temporal correlation of events and in the distribution of event amplitudes as signified by a decrease of b-value. The characteristic structure that develops in the low-energy background AE is similar to the sequence of the strongest microfracture events. When the AR fractal structure develops, the variations of d and b are synchronous and d = 3b. This relation which occurs once the fractal structure is formed only holds for average values of d and b. Time variations of d and b are anticorrelated. The degree of temporal correlation of AR has time variations that are similar to d and b variations. The observed variations in laboratory AE experiments are compared with natural seismicity parameters. The close correspondence between laboratory-scale observations and naturally occurring seismicity suggests a possible new approach for understanding the evolution of complex seismicity patterns in nature. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Seismic activity monitoring in the Izvorul Muntelui dam region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borleanu, Felix; Otilia Placinta, Anca; Popa, Mihaela; Adelin Moldovan, Iren; Popescu, Emilia

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes occurrences near the artificial water reservoirs are caused by stress variation due to the weight of water, weakness of fractures or faults and increasing of pore pressure in crustal rocks. In the present study we aim to investigate how Izvorul Muntelui dam, located in the Eastern Carpathians influences local seismicity. For this purpose we selected from the seismic bulletins computed within National Data Center of National Institute for Earth Physics, Romania, crustal events occurred between 984 and 2015 in a range of 0.3 deg around the artificial lake. Subsequently to improve the seismic monitoring of the region we applied a cross-correlation detector on the continuous recordings of Bicaz (BIZ) seismic stations. Besides the tectonic events we detected sources within this region that periodically generate artificial evens. We couldn't emphasize the existence of a direct correlation between the water level variations and natural seismicity of the investigated area.

  19. Seismic Properties of Partially Molten Rocks: Constraints from Experiments and Observations on Natural Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faul, U.; Jackson, I.; Garapic, G.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing resolution of seismic tomography studies as well as techniques that are sensitive to sharp, localized velocity changes indicate that melt is present in diverse tectonic settings in the upper mantle. Unresolved questions are the quantification of seismic velocities and attenuation to melt fraction, and the dynamic stability of this melt. Properties of partially molten rocks are generally sensitive to melt geometry. The melt geometry can be observed in experiments, but the experimental observations have to be extrapolated to mantle grain sizes. High resolution images of experimentally observed melt geometries (Garapic et al., 2013) indicate that the broad attenuation peak observed by forced torsional oscillation experiments (Jackson et al., 2004, Faul et al., 2004) are due to melt 'squirt'. Characterization of the inferred melt geometry in rocks recovered from mid-ocean ridges and peridotite massifs suggest that the experimental observations are applicable to the upper mantle. The data from the earlier seismic property experiments will be reprocessed with improved apparatus calibration and fitting strategies to provide a 'global' fit to the melt-bearing data as a function of grain size and melt fraction. This should allow quantification of the amount of melt imaged in seismic studies and therefore enable more accurate geodynamical models for example of arcs and backarcs, for which the highest resolution tomographic images exist. It should also provide more quantitative constraints on the amount of melt required to generate receiver functions and SS-bounces that suggest the presence of melt in the asthenosphere.

  20. Martian Ambient Seismic Noise: from the first modeling to the future data of the InSight Seismic experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, P. H.; Banerdt, W. B.; Mimoun, D.; Kobayashi, N.; Panning, M. P.; Pike, W. T.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U. R.; Nishikawa, Y.; Murdoch, N.; Kawamura, T.; Kedar, S.; Spiga, A.

    2014-12-01

    The InSight NASA Discovery mission is expected to deploy a 3 axis VBB and a 3 axis SP seismometer on Mars by late september 2016. This seismic station will explore the Martian ambient noise, in addition to more classical science goals related to the detection of Marsquakes, Meteoritic Impacts and Tides. Mars, in contrast with the Earth (with both atmosphere and ocean) and the Moon (with no atmosphere nor ocean) is expected to have ambient noise only related to its atmosphere. Mars seismic data are therefore expecting to reveal the atmospheric coupling for a different atmospheric dynamics than Earth, especially in the 0.1-1 Hz bandwidth, dominated by oceanic microseisms on Earth. We rapidly present the expected performances of the SEIS experiment onboard InSight. This experiment is based on two 3 axis seismometers, one covering the tide and low seismic frequencies (up to 10 Hz) and a second one covering the high frequencies (from 0.1 Hz to 50 Hz). Both sensors are mounted on a sensors plateform, deployed by a robotic arm 1-2 meters from the lander and covered by thermal protection and a wind protection. The expected performances indicates that signal as low as 10**(-9) m/s**2/Hz**(1/2) will be detected in the 0.005-2 Hz bandwidth. We then focus on the modeling of this ambient atmospheric noise.This modeling has been done not only from constraints gathered by the atmospheric sensors of previous Mars missions (e.g. Viking and Pathfinder) but also by numerical modeling of the atmospheric perturbations, both at global scale and mesoscale. Theoretical estimation of the ambient noise has then been obtained for the pressure-correlated surface loading and the stochastic excitation of surface waves, at both long and very long period (e.g. Mars hum) and at medium or short period (e.g. regional and local generated surface waves). Results shows that most of these source of ambient noise will be detected, likely during the day for those generated locally and possibly during the

  1. Geoazur's contribution in instrumentation to monitor seismic activity of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, B.; Hello, Y.; Anglade, A.; Desprez, O.; Ogé, A.; Charvis, P.; Deschamps, A.; Galve, A.; Nolet, G.; Sukhovich, A.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic activity in the earth is mainly located near the tectonic plate boundaries, in the deep ocean (expansion centers) or near their margins (subduction zones). Travel times and waveforms of recorded seismograms can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional wave speed distribution in the earth with seismic tomography or to image specific boundaries in the deep earth. Because of the lack of permanent sea-bottom seismometers these observation are conducted over short period of time using portable ocean bottom seismometers. Geaozur has a long experience and strong skills in designing and deploying Ocean Bottom Seismometers all over the world. We have developed two types of ocean bottom instruments. The "Hippocampe" for long deployment and "Lady bug" for aftershock monitoring or for fast overlaps during wide angle experiments. Early warning systems for tsunamis and earthquakes have been developed in recent years but these need real time data transmission and direct control of the instrument. We have developed a permanent real time Broad Band instrument installed in the Mediterranean Sea and connected to the Antares Neutrinos telescope. This instrument offers all the advantages of a very heavy and costly installation, such as the ability to do real-time seismology on the seafloor. Such real-time seafloor monitoring is especially important for seismic hazard. Major earthquakes cause human and economic losses directly related to the strong motion of the ground or by induced phenomena such as tsunamis and landslides. Fiber optical cables provide a high-capacity lightweight alternative to traditional copper cables. Three-component sensors analyze permanently the noise signal and detect the events to record. Major events can force the network to transmit data with almost zero lag time. The optical link also allows us to retrieve events at a later date. However, OBSs alone can never provide the density and long term, homogeneous data coverage needed for local and global

  2. Fault mirrors of seismically active faults: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, L.; Song, S.; Suppe, J.

    2013-12-01

    Many faults are decorated with naturally polished and glossy surfaces named fault mirrors (FMs) formed during slips. The characterization of FMs is of paramount importance to investigate physico-chemical processes controlling dynamic fault mechanics during earthquakes. Here we present detailed microstructural and mineralogical observations of the FMs from borehole cores of seismically active faults. The borehole cores were recovered from 600 to 800 m depth located in the hanging wall of the Hsiaotungshi fault in Taiwan which ruptured during 1935 Mw7.1 Hsinchu-Taichung earthquake. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of FMs show that two distinct textural domains, fault gouge and coated materials (nanograins, melt patchs, and graphite), were cut by a well-defined boundary. Melt patches and graphite, determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscope (TEM), and SEM-EDS analysis, were found to be distributed heterogeneously on the slip surfaces. On the basis of the current kinematic cross section of the Hsiaotungshi fault, all the FMs were exhumed less than 5 km, where ambient temperatures are less than 150°C. It seems that the amorphous materials on the FMs were generated by seismic slips. The sintering nanograins coating the slip surfaces was also suggested to be produced at high slip rates from both natural observation and recent rock deformation experiments. In addition, graphite could be produced by seismic slips and lubricate the fault based on the rock deformation experiments. Our observation suggests that the FMs were composed of several indicators of coseismic events (melt patches, sintering nanograins, and graphite) corresponding to small thermal perturbation generated by seismic slips. Although the contribution of these coseismic indicators on frictional behavior remains largely unknown, it suggests that multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms such as flash heating, powder lubrication and graphitization may be involved during

  3. ISIS : a formation flying ionospheric seismic imaging experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimoun, D.; Lognonné, Ph; Garcia, R.; Occhipinti, G.; Abbondanza, S.

    Today, available techniques for the lithosphere tomography are limited by the number of seismic stations that we can deploy : it is sometimes difficult to access to some remote regions, but foremost the number of stations that are deployable over the oceans is strongly reduced. If we can dispose of some sites on islands (which are all characterized by a strong background noise), and on the measurements on coastal areas borders, it is therefore difficult to inverse the fine structure of the oceanic lithosphere. A promising idea is to use a long known idea, that earthquakes have a measurable impact on the ionosphere. As a matter of fact, the decrease of the atmosphere density with respect to altitude implies an amplification of the Rayleigh waves in the atmosphere, up to a maximum at about 250 km. This effect has been quantified for the Denali earthquake (Ducic et al, 2003) though its impact on the TEC content on the ionosphere. We therefore propose to detect this effect from space, thanks to a spaceborne multistatic SAR. Our concept includes 3 satellites in formation (along the same orbit) in a MEO orbit (about 19000 km). The master satellite payload is a slightly modified SAR, which operates around two main frequencies, in order to allow the computation of the delay induced by ionospheric fluctuations. The two other satellites have a passive payload which is time-synchronized with the master SAR: the use of their crossing rays will allow a 3D reconstruction of the ionosphere. A preliminary design of the space segment proposes an implementation on a MEO-orbit compatible bus, with high peak power capabilities. In order to allow the compatibility of the payload concept with the on-board available power, we have assumed that the satellite will enter in its alert mode on ground request. When an earthquake occurs, we dispose of a ten minutes delay to "wake-up" the satellite. When not in alert mode, its nominal imaging frequency will be reduced to allow the detection of

  4. Conceptual Design and Architecture of Mars Exploration Rover (MER) for Seismic Experiments Over Martian Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akshay; Singh, Amit

    2012-07-01

    Keywords: MER, Mars, Rover, Seismometer Mars has been a subject of human interest for exploration missions for quite some time now. Both rover as well as orbiter missions have been employed to suit mission objectives. Rovers have been preferentially deployed for close range reconnaissance and detailed experimentation with highest accuracy. However, it is essential to strike a balance between the chosen science objectives and the rover operations as a whole. The objective of this proposed mechanism is to design a vehicle (MER) to carry out seismic studies over Martian surface. The conceptual design consists of three units i.e. Mother Rover as a Surrogate (Carrier) and Baby Rovers (two) as seeders for several MEMS-based accelerometer / seismometer units (Nodes). Mother Rover can carry these Baby Rovers, having individual power supply with solar cells and with individual data transmission capabilities, to suitable sites such as Chasma associated with Valles Marineris, Craters or Sand Dunes. Mother rover deploys these rovers in two opposite direction and these rovers follow a triangulation pattern to study shock waves generated through firing tungsten carbide shells into the ground. Till the time of active experiments Mother Rover would act as a guiding unit to control spatial spread of detection instruments. After active shock experimentation, the babies can still act as passive seismometer units to study and record passive shocks from thermal quakes, impact cratering & landslides. Further other experiments / payloads (XPS / GAP / APXS) can also be carried by Mother Rover. Secondary power system consisting of batteries can also be utilized for carrying out further experiments over shallow valley surfaces. The whole arrangement is conceptually expected to increase the accuracy of measurements (through concurrent readings) and prolong life cycle of overall experimentation. The proposed rover can be customised according to the associated scientific objectives and further

  5. Detecting Seismic Activity with a Covariance Matrix Analysis of Data Recorded on Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.

    2014-12-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously all around the word, with very broadband and high-sensitivity sensors. The aim of our study is to apply statistical array-based approaches to processing of these records. We use the methods mainly brought from the random matrix theory in order to give a statistical description of seismic wavefields recorded at the Earth's surface. We estimate the array covariance matrix and explore the distribution of its eigenvalues that contains information about the coherency of the sources that generated the studied wavefields. With this approach, we can make distinctions between the signals generated by isolated deterministic sources and the "random" ambient noise. We design an algorithm that uses the distribution of the array covariance matrix eigenvalues to detect signals corresponding to coherent seismic events. We investigate the detection capacity of our methods at different scales and in different frequency ranges by applying it to the records of two networks: (1) the seismic monitoring network operating on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano at La Réunion island composed of 21 receivers and with an aperture of ~15 km, and (2) the transportable component of the USArray composed of ~400 receivers with ~70 km inter-station spacing.

  6. The performance of the stations of the Romanian seismic network in monitoring the local seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeleanu, Luminita Angela; Neagoe, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    The seismic survey of the territory of Romania is mainly performed by the national seismic network operated by the National Institute for Earth Physics of Bucharest. After successive developments and upgrades, the network consists at present of 123 permanent stations equipped with high quality digital instruments (Kinemetrics K2, Quantera Q330, Quantera Q330HR, PS6-24 and Basalt digitizers) - 102 real time and 20 off-line stations - which cover the whole territory of the country. All permanent stations are supplied with 3 component accelerometers (episenzor type), while the real time stations are in addition provided with broadband (CMG3ESP, CMG40T, KS2000, KS54000, KS2000, CMG3T, STS2) or short period (SH-1, S13, Mark l4c, Ranger, GS21, L22_VEL) velocity sensors. Several communication systems are currently used for the real time data transmission: an analog line in UHF band, a line through GPRS (General Packet Radio Service), a dedicated line through satellite, and a dedicated line provided by the Romanian Special Telecommunication Service. During the period January 1, 2006 - June 30, 2013, 5936 shallow depth seismic events - earthquakes and quarry blasts - with local magnitude ML ≥ 1.2 were localized on the Romanian territory, or in its immediate vicinity, using the records of the national seismic network; 1467 subcrustal earthquakes (depth ≥ 60 km) with magnitude ML ≥ 1.9 were also localized in the Vrancea region, at the bend of the Eastern Carpathians. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the individual contribution of the real time seismic stations to the monitoring of the local seismicity. The performance of each station is estimated by taking into consideration the fraction of events that are localised using the station records, compared to the total number of events of the catalogue, occurred during the time of station operation. Taking into account the nonuniform space distribution of earthquakes, the location of the site and the recovery

  7. Lesser Antilles Subduction Zone Investigation by a Cluster of Large Seismic Experiments in the Forearc Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, T.

    2007-12-01

    subduction mega-thrust fault plane, and which is here the main target has been localized along 3 transects to the Arc thanks to a preliminary survey in 2001, the French SISMANTILLES cuise. We will present the first results obtained during these experiments dedicated specifically to image at depth the seismic structure and activity of this region. To image faults at depth and the detailed upper-crustal structure, 3700 km of multi-beam bathymetry and multi-channel reflection seismic profiles have been collected along a grid comprising 7 strike-lines of up to 300 km long and spaced by 15 km and 12 transects of up to 150 km long and spaced by 25 km (SISMANTILLES 2). All these airgun shots dedicated to deep penetration have been recorded by the 84 OBSs and 20 OBHs deployed by the F/S Merian and N/O Atalante on the nodes of this grid of profiles. It will permit to get Vp constraints on the deep forearc region and mantle wedge by wide-angle refraction studies, as well as constraints on the updip and downdip limits of the seismogenic part of the mega-thrust fault plane. Two of these transects have been extended across the whole arc during the TRAIL survey, with up to 50 OBSs deployed along both 240 km long profiles. All these OBSs remained several months beyond the shot experiments for local earthquakes Vp and Vp/Vs tomography. They have been recovered and partly redeployed by N/O Antea during the OBSANTILLES survey. A significant number of those instruments had broadband seismometers, a notable originality in the case of the OBSs to detect low-frequency transient signals.

  8. Seismic images of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt, Arctic Alaska, from an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levander, A.; Fuis, G.S.; Wissinger, E.S.; Lutter, W.J.; Oldow, J.S.; Moore, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    We describe results of an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment across the Brooks Range and flanking geologic provinces in Arctic Alaska. The seismic acquisition was unusual in that reflection and refraction data were collected simultaneously with a 700 channel seismograph system deployed numerous times along a 315 km profile. Shot records show continuous Moho reflections from 0-180 km offset, as well as numerous upper- and mid-crustal wide-angle events. Single and low-fold near-vertical incidence common midpoint (CMP) reflection images show complex upper- and middle-crustal structure across the range from the unmetamorphosed Endicott Mountains allochthon (EMA) in the north, to the metamorphic belts in the south. Lower-crustal and Moho reflections are visible across the entire reflection profile. Travel-time inversion of PmP arrivals shows that the Moho, at 33 km depth beneath the North Slope foothills, deepens abruptly beneath the EMA to a maximum of 46 km, and then shallows southward to 35 km at the southern edge of the range. Two zones of upper- and middle-crustal reflections underlie the northern Brooks Range above ~ 12-15 km depth. The upper zone, interpreted as the base of the EMA, lies at a maximum depth of 6 km and extends over 50 km from the range front to the north central Brooks Range where the base of the EMA outcrops above the metasedimentary rocks exposed in the Doonerak window. We interpret the base of the lower zone, at ~ 12 km depth, to be from carbonate rocks above the master detachment upon which the Brooks Range formed. The seismic data suggest that the master detachment is connected to the faults in the EMA by several ramps. In the highly metamorphosed terranes south of the Doonerak window, the CMP section shows numerous south-dipping events which we interpret as a crustal scale duplex involving the Doonerak window rocks. The basal detachment reflections can be traced approximately 100 km, and dip southward from about 10-12 km

  9. Planning the improvement of seismic monitoring in a volcanic supersite: experience on Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; Scarfi, Luciano; Scaltrito, Antonio; Aiesi, Giampiero; Di Prima, Sergio; Ferrari, Ferruccio; Rapisarda, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and one of the most intriguing natural laboratories for the understanding of eruptive processes and lava uprising in basalt-type volcanic environments; indeed, it is considered, by the scientific international community, together with the Vesuvius and the Hawaiian Islands, as a volcanic supersite. Its activity is continuously monitored by the Osservatorio Etneo of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), by means of an array of integrated multidisciplinary techniques. In particular, Etna seismicity is recorded by a dense local seismic network (ESN- Etna Seismic Network), which, nowadays, consists of about 40 real-time seismic stations, many of which equipped with broadband velocity and accelerometer sensors. The data are analyzed routinely in detail by the Osservatorio Etneo staff, producing daily and periodic reports and bulletins of the earthquakes located in the whole Sicily and southern Calabria region. In the last decades, seismological observations provided important information on both the dynamics and internal structure of the volcano, in addition to their interaction with the regional tectonic structures. In the last year, in the framework of the VULCAMED project, an INGV workgroup has taken on the task of developing the existing seismic network through the installation of new measurement stations. By considering the spatial distribution of earthquakes in the area, the presence of structures known as seismically active and through extensive geological-geophysical surveys, ten potential new sites were identified. In the following months, some of these sites will complement the existing network. The choice of optimal sites must clearly be made through a careful analysis of environmental noise, of the possible logistics, technical and broadcast problems, but must also take into account the geometry of the existing seismic network. For this purpose, we applied the Seismic Network

  10. Deep seismic refraction experiment in northeast Brazil: New constraints for Borborema province evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Marcus Vinicius A. G. de; Berrocal, Jesus; Soares, José E. P.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.

    2015-03-01

    The Borborema Province of northeastern Brazil is a major Proterozoic crustal province that, until now, has never been explored using deep crustal seismic methods. Here are reported the first results obtained from a high-quality seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile that has defined the internal seismic velocity structure and thickness of the crust in this region. Almost 400 recording stations were deployed in the Deep Seismic Refraction (DSR) experiment through an NW-SE ca. 900 km linear array and 19 shots were exploded at every 50 km along the line. Data from the 10 southeastern most shots of the seismic profile were processed in this work. The main features and geological structures crossed by the studied portion of the profile belong to the so-called Central Sub-province of the Borborema tectonic province. The crustal model obtained is compatible with a typical structure of extended crust. The model was essentially divided into three layers: upper crust, lower crust, and a half-space represented by the shallower portion of the mantle. The Moho is an irregular interface with depth ranging between 31.7 and 34.5 km, and beneath the Central Sub-province it varies from 31.5 to 33 km depth, where its limits are related to major crustal discontinuities. The distribution of velocities within the crust is heterogeneous, varying vertically from 5.7 to 6.3 km/s in the upper crust and from 6.45 to 6.9 km/s in the lower crust. From the average crustal velocity distribution it is evident that the Central Sub-province has seismic characteristics different from neighboring domains. The crust is relatively thin and crustal thickness variations in the profile are subtle due to stretching that occurred in the Cretaceous, during the fragmentation of Pangaea, opening of the South Atlantic Ocean and separation of South America from Africa.

  11. Ionospheric plasma deterioration in the area of enhanced seismic activity as compared to antipodal sites far from seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, Tamara; Arikan, Feza; Poustovalova, Ljubov; Stanislawska, Iwona

    2016-07-01

    The early magnetogram records from two nearly antipodal sites at Greenwich and Melbourne corresponding to the activity level at the invariant magnetic latitude of 50 deg give a long series of geomagnetic aa indices since 1868. The aa index derived from magnetic perturbation values at only two observatories (as distinct from the planetary ap index) experiences larger extreme values if either input site is well situated to the overhead ionospheric and/or field aligned current systems producing the magnetic storm effects. Analysis of the earthquakes catalogues since 1914 has shown the area of the peak global earthquake occurrence in the Pacific Ocean southwards from the magnetic equator, and, in particular, at Australia. In the present study the ionospheric critical frequency, foF2, is analyzed from the ionosonde measurements at the nearby observatories, Canberra and Slough (Chilton), and Moscow (control site) since 1944 to 2015. The daily-hourly-annual percentage occurrence of positive ionospheric W index (pW+) and negative index (pW-) is determined. It is found that the ionospheric plasma depletion pW- of the instant foF2 as compared to the monthly median is well correlated to the aa index at all three sites but the positive storm signatures show drastic difference at Canberra (no correlation of pW+ with aa index) as compared to two other sites where the high correlation is found of the ionospheric plasma density enhancement with the geomagnetic activity. A possible suppression of the enhanced ionospheric variability over the region of intense seismicity is discussed in the paper. This study is supported by TUBITAK EEEAG 115E915.

  12. Advancing Explosion Source Theory through Experimentation: Results from Seismic Experiments Since the Moratorium on Nuclear Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, J. L.; Stump, B. W.

    2011-12-01

    On 23 September 1992, the United States conducted the nuclear explosion DIVIDER at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It would become the last US nuclear test when a moratorium ended testing the following month. Many of the theoretical explosion seismic models used today were developed from observations of hundreds of nuclear tests at NTS and around the world. Since the moratorium, researchers have turned to chemical explosions as a possible surrogate for continued nuclear explosion research. This talk reviews experiments since the moratorium that have used chemical explosions to advance explosion source models. The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment examined single-point, fully contained chemical-nuclear equivalence by detonating over a kiloton of chemical explosive at NTS in close proximity to previous nuclear explosion tests. When compared with data from these nearby nuclear explosions, the regional and near-source seismic data were found to be essentially identical after accounting for different yield scaling factors for chemical and nuclear explosions. The relationship between contained chemical explosions and large production mining shots was studied at the Black Thunder coal mine in Wyoming in 1995. The research led to an improved source model for delay-fired mining explosions and a better understanding of mining explosion detection by the International Monitoring System (IMS). The effect of depth was examined in a 1997 Kazakhstan Depth of Burial experiment. Researchers used local and regional seismic observations to conclude that the dominant mechanism for enhanced regional shear waves was local Rg scattering. Travel-time calibration for the IMS was the focus of the 1999 Dead Sea Experiment where a 10-ton shot was recorded as far away as 5000 km. The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments provided a comparison of fully- and partially-contained chemical shots with mining explosions, thus quantifying the reduction in seismic amplitudes associated with partial

  13. Melt-Triggered Seismic Response in Hydraulically-Active Polar Ice: Observations and Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.

    seismogenic basal response in the lakes regions. This was demonstrated on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Seismogenesis may instead be more clearly reflected by surficial strain gradients established by variability in basal traction, suggesting these feedbacks are secondary rather than primary. The response is therefore not clearly indicated from day-to-day timing of GPS-observations. Third, the absence of an observed local response does not necessarily indicate the absence of a local physical response. This was also illustrated in Greenland. Here, deep local icequakes are likely muted by noise, waveform-attenuating ice, and viscous basal rheology. Magnitude thresholds suggest that M w ≤ 2 for consistent recording of local, basal sources. In contrast, remote, low frequency seismic events were clearly observed, and attributed to activity within ice catchments along the western edge of the ice sheet or Jacobshavn glacier. Finally, we assert that early-indicators of melt-triggered glacial response include components of spatially localized, brittle deformation that is most suitable to seismic observation. Critically-stable regions along mass-balance equilibrium lines constitute potential sites for newly forming surface-to-bed hydraulic connections in a warming climate, and likewise, a potential target for future seismic experiments.

  14. The structure and subsidence of Rockall Trough from two-ship seismic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Joppen, M.; White, R.S. )

    1990-11-10

    Coincident multichannel seismic reflection and refraction profiles acquired northwest of Britain during a two-ship seismic experiment in the southern Rockall Trough provide evidence for a thin (6 km) syn-rift crust below Rockall Trough. The variation of seismic velocity with depth is consistent with either oceanic crust similar to that found in other parts of the North Atlantic or with thinned continental crust heavily intruded by syn-rift igneous rocks. The syn-rift crust beneath Rockall Trough is now buried by nearly 5 km of sediments that are intruded by Tertiary volcanics varying in extent from isolated sills to a large sill complex extending 100 km laterally. The basement imaged on seismic profiles exhibits a band of subhorizontal reflectors that extend laterally over distances of up to 40 km which they interpret as sediments intercalated with submarine lava flow generated during the opening of the Trough. Estimates of stretching from crustal thinning and from subsidence indicate that Rockall Trough has undergone extensive rifting ({beta} > 6). Upwelling asthenosphere beneath the thinned lithosphere generated at least 1-3 km thickness of melt as it decompressed. The molten rock rose upward from the mantle until it was in part extruded as lava flows and in part intruded into the crust.

  15. Ghana's experience in the establishment of a national digital seismic network observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahulu, Sylvanus; Danuor, Sylvester Kojo

    2015-07-01

    The Government of Ghana has established a National Digital Seismic Network Observatory in Ghana with the aim of monitoring events such as earthquakes, blasts from mining and quarrying, nuclear tests, etc. The Digital Observatory was commissioned on 19 December 2012, and was dedicated to Geosciences in Ghana. Previously Ghana did not have any operational, digital seismic network acquisition system with the capability of monitoring and analysing data for planning and research purposes. The Ghana Geological Survey has been monitoring seismic events with an analogue system which was not efficient and does not deliver real-time data. Hence, the importance of setting up the National Digital Seismic Network System which would enable the Geological Survey to constantly monitor, manage and coordinate both natural and man-made seismic activities in the country and around the globe, to some extent on real-time basis. The Network System is made up of six remote digital stations that transmit data via satellite to the central observatory. Sensors used are 3× Trillium Compact and 3× Trillium 120PA with Trident digitizers. The department has also acquired strong motion equipment: Titan accelerometers with Taurus digitizers from Nanometrics. Three of each of these instruments have been installed at the Akosombo and Kpong hydrodams, and also at the Weija water supply dam. These instruments are used to monitor dams. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) values established from the analysed data from the accelerometers will be used to retrofit or carry out maintenance work of the dam structures to avoid collapse. Apart from these, the observatory also assesses and analyses seismic waveforms relevant to its needs from the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) system operated by the US Geological Survey. The Ghana Geological Survey, through its Seismic Network Observatory makes data available to its stakeholder institutions for earthquake disaster mitigation; reports on all aspects of

  16. Issues Related to Seismic Activity Induced by the Injection of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Sminchak, Joel; Gupta, Neeraj; Byrer, Charles; Bergman, Perry

    2001-05-31

    Case studies, theory, regulation, and special considerations regarding the disposal of carbon dioxide (CO2) into deep saline aquifers were investigated to assess the potential for induced seismic activity. Formations capable of accepting large volumes of CO2 make deep well injection of CO2 an attractive option. While seismic implications must be considered for injection facilities, induced seismic activity may be prevented through proper siting, installation, operation, and monitoring. Instances of induced seismic activity have been documented at hazardous waste disposal wells, oil fields, and other sites. Induced seismic activity usually occurs along previously faulted rocks and may be investigated by analyzing the stress conditions at depth. Seismic events are unlikely to occur due to injection in porous rocks unless very high injection pressures cause hydraulic fracturing. Injection wells in the United States are regulated through the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program. UIC guidance requires an injection facility to perform extensive characterization, testing, and monitoring. Special considerations related to the properties of CO2 may have seismic ramifications to a deep well injection facility. Supercritical CO2 liquid is less dense than water and may cause density-driven stress conditions at depth or interact with formation water and rocks, causing a reduction in permeability and pressure buildup leading to seismic activity. Structural compatibility, historical seismic activity, cases of seismic activity triggered by deep well injection, and formation capacity were considered in evaluating the regional seismic suitability in the United States. Regions in the central, midwestern, and southeastern United States appear best suited for deep well injection. In Ohio, substantial deep well injection at a waste disposal facility has not caused seismic events in a seismically active area. Current

  17. Seismic Activity at Vailulu'u, Samoa's Youngest Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konter, J.; Staudigel, H.; Hart, S.

    2002-12-01

    Submarine volcanic systems, as a product of the Earth's mantle, play an essential role in the Earth's heat budget and in the interaction between the solid Earth and the hydrosphere and biosphere. Their eruptive and intrusive activity exerts an important control on these hydrothermal systems. In March 2000, we deployed an array of five ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) on the summit region (625-995 m water depth) of Vailulu'u Volcano (14°12.9'S;169°03.5'W); this volcano represents the active end of the Samoan hotspot chain and is one of only a few well-studied intra-plate submarine volcanoes. We monitored seismic activity for up to 12 months at low sample rate (25 Hz), and for shorter times at a higher sample rate (125 Hz). We have begun to catalogue and locate a variety of acoustic events from this network. Ambient ocean noise was filtered out by a 4th-order Butterworth bandpass filter (2.3 - 10 Hz). We distinguish small local earthquakes from teleseismic activity, mostly identified by T- (acoustic) waves, by comparison with a nearby GSN station (AFI). Most of the detected events are T-phases from teleseismic earthquakes, characterized by their emergent coda and high frequency content (up to 30 Hz); the latter distinguishes them from low frequency emergent signals associated with the volcano (e.g. tremor). A second type of event is characterized by impulsive arrivals, with coda lasting a few seconds. The differences in arrival times between stations on the volcano are too small for these events to be T-waves; they are very likely to be local events, since the GSN station in Western Samoa (AFI) shows no arrivals close in time to these events. Preliminary locations show that these small events occur approximately once per day and are located within the volcano (the 95% confidence ellipse is similar to the size of the volcano, due to the small size of the OBH network). Several events are located relatively close to each other (within a km radius) just NW of the crater.

  18. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter during the recent seismic activity of Fthiotida, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael; Aarabelos, Dimitrios; Vergos, Georgios; Spatalas, Spyridon

    2014-05-01

    Applying the Hi(stogram)Cum(ulation) method, which was introduced recently by Cadicheanu, van Ruymbecke and Zhu (2007), we analyze the series of the earthquakes occurred in the last 50 years in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ) . The result of the analysis for all the areas indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations and the same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identifiation of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance, p, as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence and we check on posterior if the variation of the confidence level index, p, indicate the fault matureness in the case of the recent seismic activity at Fthiotida, Greece. In this paper we present the results of this test. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M andZhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the seismic area of Mygdonia basin, North Greece, in Terrestrial and Stellar Environment, eds.D. Arabelos, M

  19. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - II: Deception Island images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Posadas, Antonio M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we present regional maps of the inverse intrinsic quality factor (Qi-1), the inverse scattering quality factor (Qs-1) and total inverse quality factor (Qt-1) for the volcanic environment of Deception Island (Antarctica). Our attenuation study is based on diffusion approximation, which permits us to obtain the attenuation coefficients for every single couple source-receiver separately. The data set used in this research is derived from an active seismic experiment using more than 5200 offshore shots (air guns) recorded at 32 onshore seismic stations and four ocean bottom seismometers. To arrive at a regional distribution of these values, we used a new mapping technique based on a Gaussian space probability function. This approach led us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' of values of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation. The 2-D tomographic images confirm the existence of a high attenuation body below an inner bay of Deception Island. This structure, previously observed in 2-D and 3-D velocity tomography of the region, is associated with a massive magma reservoir. Magnetotelluric studies reach a similar interpretation of this strong anomaly. Additionally, we observed areas with lower attenuation effects that bear correlation with consolidated structures described in other studies and associated with the crystalline basement of the area. Our calculations of the transport mean-free path and absorption length for intrinsic attenuation gave respective values of ≈ 950 m and 5 km, which are lower than the values obtained in tectonic regions or volcanic areas such as Tenerife Island. However, as observed in other volcanic regions, our results indicate that scattering effects dominate strongly over the intrinsic attenuation.

  20. Trace Gases - A Warning Signs of Impending Major Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baijnath, J.; Freund, F.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Seismological models can predict future earthquakes only with wide uncertainty windows, typically on the order of decades to centuries. To improve short-term earthquake forecasts, it is essential to understand the non-seismic processes that take place in Earth's crust during the build-up of tectonic stresses. Days prior to the January 2001 M 7.6 Gujurat earthquake in India, there was a significant increase in the regional CO concentration, reaching 240 ppbv over a 100 squared kilometers, as derived from data of the MOPITT sensor onboard the NASA Terra satellite. A possible explanation for these observations is that when stresses in Earth's crust are building, positive hole charge carriers are activated, which are highly mobile and spread from deep below the earth to the surface. Positive holes act as highly oxidizing oxygen radicals, oxidizing water to hydrogen peroxide. It is hypothesized that, as positive hole charge carriers arrive from below and traverse the soil, they are expected to oxidize soil organics, converting aliphatics to ketones, formaldehyde, CO and CO2. This is tested by using a closed chamber with a slab of gabbro rock. Ultrasound generated by a pair of 50 W, 40 kHz piezoelectric transducers, applied to one end of the gabbro slab was used to activate the positive holes. This created a high concentration of positive holes at the end of the rock that the electrical conductivity through the rock increased more than 1000-fold, while the increase in conductivity through the other end of the gabbro slab was on the order of 100-fold. On the other end of the slab, rock dust and various soils were placed. A stainless steel mesh was also placed over the soil and dust to allow a current to flow through the granular material. When the far end of the slab was subjected to the ultrasound, currents as large as 250 nA were recorded flowing through the length of the gabbro slab and through the dust/soil pile. Dry dust/soil and dust samples impregnated with

  1. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  2. Improving the Detectability of the Catalan Seismic Network for Local Seismic Activity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, Jose Antonio; Frontera, Tànit; Batlló, Josep; Goula, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The seismic survey of the territory of Catalonia is mainly performed by the regional seismic network operated by the Cartographic and Geologic Institute of Catalonia (ICGC). After successive deployments and upgrades, the current network consists of 16 permanent stations equipped with 3 component broadband seismometers (STS2, STS2.5, CMG3ESP and CMG3T), 24 bits digitizers (Nanometrics Trident) and VSAT telemetry. Data are continuously sent in real-time via Hispasat 1D satellite to the ICGC datacenter in Barcelona. Additionally, data from other 10 stations of neighboring areas (Spain, France and Andorra) are continuously received since 2011 via Internet or VSAT, contributing both to detect and to locate events affecting the region. More than 300 local events with Ml ≥ 0.7 have been yearly detected and located in the region. Nevertheless, small magnitude earthquakes, especially those located in the south and south-west of Catalonia may still go undetected by the automatic detection system (DAS), based on Earthworm (USGS). Thus, in order to improve the detection and characterization of these missed events, one or two new stations should be installed. Before making the decision about where to install these new stations, the performance of each existing station is evaluated taking into account the fraction of detected events using the station records, compared to the total number of events in the catalogue, occurred during the station operation time from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2014. These evaluations allow us to build an Event Detection Probability Map (EDPM), a required tool to simulate EDPMs resulting from different network topology scenarios depending on where these new stations are sited, and becoming essential for the decision-making process to increase and optimize the event detection probability of the seismic network.

  3. Crosswell CASSM(Continuous Active-Source Seismic Monitoring): Recent Developments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, T. M.; Niu, F.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Solbau, R.; Silver, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    Continuous active-source monitoring using borehole sources and sensors in a crosswell configuration has proven to be a useful tool for monitoring subsurface processes (Silver, et al, 2007; Daley, et al, 2007; Niu, et al, 2008). This recent work has focused on two applications: monitoring stress changes related to seismicity and monitoring changes in fluid distribution related to geologic storage of CO2. Field tests have demonstrated precision in travel time measurement of up to 1.1 x 10-7 s, and in velocity perturbation measurement of up to 1.1 x 10-5 (Niu, et al 2008). In this talk I will summarize our preceding work and discuss current developments. Current efforts address both hardware and design challenges to improving the methodology. Hardware issues include deployment of multiple piezoelectric sources in shallow and deep boreholes, source and sensor deployment on tubing inside casing, and deployment with other monitoring instrumentation. Design issues are focused on use of multiple sources and/or sensors to obtain optimal spatial resolution for monitoring processes in the interwell region. This design issue can be investigated with optimal experiment design theory. New field experiments for monitoring seismicity (at SAFOD) and CO2 injection (at a US Dept of Energy pilot) are in the design/deployment stage. Current status of these projects will be discussed. References: Silver, P.G., Daley, T.M., Niu, F., Majer, E.L., 2007, Active source monitoring of crosswell seismic travel time for stress induced changes, Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, v97, n1B, p281-293. Daley, T.M., R.D. Solbau, J.B. Ajo-Franklin, S.M. Benson, 2007, Continuous active-source monitoring of CO2 injection in a brine aquifer, Geophysics, v72, n5, pA57-A61, DOI:10.1190/1.2754716. Niu, F., Silver, P.G., Daley, T.M., Cheng, X., Majer, E.L., 2008, Preseismic velocity changes observed from active source monitoring at the Parkfield SAFOD drill site, Nature, 454, 204-208, DOI:10

  4. Long Term Seismic Observation in Mariana by OBSs : Activity of Deep Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Ohki, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Fukao, Y.; Sugioka, H.; Suyehiro, K.

    2003-12-01

    In order to obtain the deep arc structural image of Mariana, a large-scale seismic observation by using 58 long-term ocean bottom seismometers (LTOBS) has been started since June 2003 for about one year. It is a part of the MARGINS program (US-JAPAN COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: MULTI-SCALE SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE MARIANA SUBDUCTION FACTORY), and the aim of this observation is the crustal and mantle structure modeling by using passive and active seismic sources. The 50 and 8 LTOBSs are owned by LDEO and ERI, respectively, and they were deployed during the cruise of R/V Kaiyo (Jamstec), KY03-06. Prior to this experiment, we made a pilot long-term seismic array observation in the same area by using 10 LTOBSs, deployed in Oct. 2001 by R/V Yokosuka (Jamstec) and recovered in Feb. 2003 by R/V Kaiyo. This LTOBS has been developed by ERI, which has the PMD sensor (WB2023LP) and a titanium sphere housing (D=50cm) and was already used in several long-term observations (ex. trans-PHS array observation presented at the AGU fall meeting, 2000, S51B-02). Two of 10 LTOBSs could not be recovered due to malfunction of the releasing system, and one recovered had a trouble in the sensor control unit. But, seven others have obtained more than 11 months long data continuously. As passive source studies of these observations use characteristic deep earthquakes in this area, the activity of them will be introduced in this presentation, from the data obtained just above them. At the first step, difference of hypocenters of known events, listed on the PDE catalog, is examined. There are 59 events of epicenters within a circular area centered at 19° N, 145° E with radius of 1000km from the catalog during the observation. P and S arrivals are picked by using the WIN system, and the iasp91 model (only {VP} with {{VP}/{V_S}=1.732}) is used for the hypocenter determination. Station corrections are applied only for the sediment layer, estimated from several arrival time data of P and P-S converted

  5. Multi-level continuous active source seismic monitoring (ML-CASSM): Application to shallow hydrofracture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Daley, T. M.; Butler-Veytia, B.; Peterson, J.; Gasperikova, E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    Induced subsurface processes occur over a wide variety of time scales ranging from seconds (e.g. fracture initiation) to days (e.g. unsteady multiphase flow) and weeks (e.g. induced mineral precipitation). Active source seismic monitoring has the potential to dynamically characterize such alterations and allow estimation of spatially localized rates. However, even optimal timelapse seismic surveys have limited temporal resolution due to both the time required to acquire a survey and the cost of continuous field deployment of instruments and personnel. Traditional timelapse surveys are also limited by experimental repeatability due to a variety of factors including geometry replication and near-surface conditions. Recent research has demonstrated the value of semi-permanently deployed seismic systems with fixed sources and receivers for use in monitoring a variety of processes including near-surface stress changes (Silver et.al. 2007), subsurface movement of supercritical CO2 (Daley et.al. 2007), and preseismic velocity changes in fault regions (Niu et. al. 2008). This strategy, referred to as continuous active source seismic monitoring (CASSM), allows both precise quantification of traveltime changes on the order of 1.1 x 10-7 s and temporal sampling on the order of minutes. However, as previously deployed, CASSM often sacrifices spatial resolution for temporal resolution with previous experiments including only a single source level. We present results from the first deployment of CASSM with a large number of source levels under automated control. Our system is capable of autonomously acquiring full tomographic datasets (10 sources, 72 receivers) in 3 minutes without human intervention, thus allowing active source seismic imaging (rather than monitoring) of processes with short durations. Because no sources or receivers are moved in the acquisition process, signal repeatability is excellent and subtle waveform changes can be interpreted with increased confidence

  6. Seismic exploration of Fuji volcano with active sources in 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, J.; Kagiyama, T.; Tanaka, S.; Miyamachi, H.; Tsutsui, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Katayama, H.; Matsuo, N.; Oshima, H.; Nishimura, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Watanabe, T.; Yamazaki, F.

    2004-12-01

    Fuji volcano (altitude 3,776 m) is the largest basaltic stratovolcano in Japan. In late August and early September 2003, seismic exploration was conducted around Fuji volcano by the detonation of 500 kg charges of dynamite to investigate the seismic structure of that area. Seismographs with an eigenfrequency of 2 Hz were used for observation, positioned along a WSW-ENE line passing through the summit of the mountain. A total of 469 observation points were installed at intervals of 250-500 m. The data were stored in memory on-site using data loggers. The sampling interval was 4 ms. Charges were detonated at 5 points, one at each end of the observation line and 3 along its length. The first arrival times at each observation point for each detonation were recorded as data. The P-wave velocity structure directly below the observation line was determined by forward calculation using the ray tracing method [Zelt and Smith, 1992]. The P-wave velocity structure below the volcano, assuming a layered structure, was found to be as follows. (1) The first layer extends for about 40 km around the summit and to a depth of 1-2 km. The P-wave velocity is 2.5 km/s on the upper surface of the layer and 3.5 km/s on the lower interface. (2) The second layer has P-wave velocities of 4.0 km/s on the top interface and 5.5 km/s at the lower interface. The layer is 25 km thick to the west of the summit and 1-2 km thick to the east, and forms a dome shape with a peak altitude of 2000 m directly below the summit. (3) The third layer is 5-12 km thick and has P-wave velocities of 5.7 km/s at the top interface and 6.5 km/s at the lower interface. This layer reaches shallower levels to the east of the summit, corresponding to the area where the second layer is thinner. Mt. Fuji is located slightly back from where the Philippine Sea Plate subducts below the Eurasian plate in association with collision with the Izu Peninsula. Matsuda (1971) suggested that Mt. Fuji lies on the same uplifted body as

  7. Insights into induced earthquakes and aftershock activity with in-situ measurements of seismic velocity variations in an active underground mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, F.; Olivier, G.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Shapiro, N.; Lynch, R.

    2015-12-01

    The behaviour of the crust shortly after large earthquakes has been the subject of numerous studies, but many co- and post-seismic processes remain poorly understood. Damage and healing of the bulk rock mass, post-seismic deformation and the mechanisms of earthquake triggering are still not well understood. These processes are important to properly model and understand the behaviour of faults and earthquake cycles.In this presentation, we will show how in-situ measurements of seismic velocity variations have given new insights into these co- and post-seismic processes. An experiment was performed where a blast was detonated in a tunnel in an underground mine, while seismic velocity variations were accurately (0.005 %) measured with ambient seismic noise correlations. Additionally, aftershock activity was examined and the influence of the removal of a piece of solid rock was estimated with elastic static stress modelling. The majority of the aftershocks were delayed with respect to the passing of the dynamic waves from the blast, while the locations of the aftershocks appeared clustered and not homogeneously spread around the blast location. A significant velocity drop is visible during the time of the blast, which is interpreted as co-seismic damage and plastic deformation. These non-elastic effects are healed by the confining stresses over a period of 5 days until the seismic velocity converges to a new baseline level. The instantaneous weakening and gradual healing observed from the velocity variations are qualitatively similar to results reported in laboratory studies. The change in the baseline level of the seismic velocity before and after the blast indicate a change in the static stress that is comparable to the results of elastic static stress modelling. The differences between the elastic model predictions and the seismic velocity variations could be due to zones of fractured rock, indicated by the spatial clustering of the aftershocks, that are not

  8. Passive, broad-band seismic measurements for geothermal exploration : The GAPSS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccorotti, Gilberto; Piccinini, Davide; Zupo, Maria; Mazzarini, Francesco; Cauchie, Lena; Chiarabba, Claudio; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    Passive seismological imaging techniques based on either transient (earthquakes) or sustained (background noise) signals can provide detailed descriptions of subsurface attributes as seismic velocity, attenuation, and anisotropy. However, the correspondence between these parameters and the physical properties of crustal fluids is still ambiguous. Moreover, the resolving capabilities and condition of applicability of emerging techniques such as the Ambient Noise Tomography are still to be investigated thoroughly. Following these arguments, a specific project (GAPSS-Geothermal Area Passive Seismic Sources) was planned, in order to test passive exploration methods on a well-known geothermal area, namely the Larderello-Travale Geothermal Field (LTGF). This geothermal area is located in the western part of Tuscany (Italy), and it is the most ancient geothermal power field of the world. Heat flow in this area can reach local peaks of 1000 mW/m3. The deep explorations in this area showed a deeper reservoir (3000 to 4000 m depth) located within the metamorphic rocks in the contact aureole of the Pliocene-Quaternary granites; it is characterized by a wide negative gravimetric anomaly, interpreted as partially molten granite at temperatures of 800°C. From seismic surveys the K-marker K (pressurized horizons) was found at depths between 3 and 7 km. The structural grain of the geothermal field is characterized by N-W trending and N-E dipping normal faults whose activity lasts since the Pliocene. GAPSS lasted from early May, 2012, through October, 2013. It consisted of up to 20 temporary seismic stations, complemented by two permanent stations from the National Seismic Network of Italy. The resulting array has an aperture of about 50 Km, with station spacings between 2 and 50 km. Stations are equipped with either broadband (40s and 120s) or intermediate-period (5s), 3-components seismometers. LTGF is seismically active. During the first 10 months of measurements, we located

  9. Onshore-offshore seismic networks: an inescapable approach to reveal the crustal structure and the seismic activity of large subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvis, P.; Galve, A.; Laigle, M.; Hirn, A.; Hello, Y. M.; Oge, A.; Yates, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ninety percent of the seismic energy released worldwide and ninety percent of the largest earthquakes and tsunamis occur in subduction zones. Several recent catastrophic subduction earthquakes surprised us on many aspects, either because we had been unable to anticipate their extremely large magnitude (2011 Tohoku Earthquake, Mw 9.0), or because we had considered the subduction as partly aseismic (2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake, Mw 9.1). One of the reasons for our present ignorance of the behavior of large subduction earthquakes is the lack of marine data to image and monitor the structure and evolution of megathrust faults offshore. Over the last 15 years, our group has conducted several passive and active seismic experiments* in the forearc regions of the Ecuador-Colombia, Lesser Antilles and Hellenic subduction zones. The objectives of these experiments were to image the subduction interplate fault at depth and accurately locate the current earthquake activity of the megathrusts using arrays of combined ocean-bottom and land-based seismometers. In the case of very large events and in the absence of geodetic data in the offshore part of the faults, the precise knowledge of current seismicity is mandatory to estimate the seismogenic behavior and potential of the fault interface. 2D dense active seismic lines, shot jointly with multichannel acquisitions, provide invaluable images of the deep structure of the Lesser Antilles arc and forearc, which allow locating the updip and downdip limits of the expected seismogenic zone. Assuming that the Moho is the downdip limit of the seismogenic zone, the 26 km-thick crust of the arc makes the seismogenic zone 3 times wider than it is in ';standard' oceanic arcs (like Marianas). 3D active and passive experiments in the Lesser Antilles and Ecuador forearcs provide an unprecedented way to image the structure in 3D down to the lower plate. The tomography documents the spatial variability of the interplate fault structure and of

  10. New inferences from spectral seismic energy measurement of a link between regional seismicity and volcanic activity at Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, R.; Falsaperla, S.; Marrero, J. M.; Messina, A.

    2009-04-01

    The existence of a relationship between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity has been the subject of several studies in the last years. Generally, activity in basaltic volcanoes such as Villarica (Chile) and Tungurahua (Ecuador) shows very little changes after the occurrence of regional earthquakes. In a few cases volcanic activity has changed before the occurrence of regional earthquakes, such as observed at Teide, Tenerife, in 2004 and 2005 (Tárraga et al., 2006). In this paper we explore the possible link between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity at Mt. Etna in 2006 and 2007. On 24 November, 2006 at 4:37:40 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 4.7 stroke the eastern coast of Sicily. The epicenter was localized 50 km SE of the south coast of the island, and at about 160 km from the summit craters of Mt. Etna. The SSEM (Spectral Seismic Energy Measurement) of the seismic signal at stations at 1 km and 6 km from the craters highlights that four hours before this earthquake the energy associated with volcanic tremor increased, reached a maximum, and finally became steady when the earthquake occurred. Conversely, neither before nor after the earthquake, the SSEM of stations located between 80 km and 120 km from the epicentre and outside the volcano edifice showed changes. On 5 September, 2007 at 21:24:13 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 3.2 and 7.9 km depth stroke the Lipari Island, at the north of Sicily. About 38 hours before the earthquake occurrence, there was an episode of lava fountain lasting 20 hours at Etna volcano. The SSEM of the seismic signal recorded during the lava fountain at a station located at 6 km from the craters highlights changes heralding this earthquake ten hours before its occurrence using the FFM method (e.g., Voight, 1988; Ortiz et al., 2003). A change in volcanic activity - with the onset of ash emission and Strombolian explosions - was observed a couple of hours before the occurrence of the regional

  11. Geomorphological features of active tectonics and ongoing seismicity of northeastern Kumaun Himalaya, Uttarakhand, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Vivekanand; Pant, Charu C.; Darmwal, Gopal Singh

    2015-08-01

    The northeastern part of Kumaun Lesser Himalaya, Uttarakhand, India, lying between the rupture zones of 1905, Kangra and 1934, Bihar-Nepal earthquakes and known as `central seismic gap' is a segment of an active fault known to produce significant earthquakes and has not slipped in an unusually long time when compared to other segments. The studied section forms a part of this seismic gap and is seismically an active segment of the Himalayan arc, as compared to the remaining part of the Kumaun Lesser Himalaya and it is evident by active geomorphological features and seismicity data. The geomorphological features of various river valley transects suggest that the region had a history of tectonic rejuvenation which is testified by the deposition of various levels of terraces and their relative uplift, shifting and ponding of river channels, uplifted potholes, triangular facets on fault planes, fault scarps, etc. Further, the seismic data of five-station digital telemetered seismic network along with two stand alone systems show the distribution of earthquakes in or along the analyzed fault transects. It is observed that the microseismic earthquakes (magnitude 1.0-3.0) frequently occur in the region and hypocenters of these earthquakes are confined to shallow depths (10-20 km), with low stress drop values (1.0-10 bar) and higher peak ground velocity (PGV). The cluster of events is observed in the region, sandwiched between the Berinag Thrust (BT) in south and Main Central Thrust (MCT) in north. The occurrences of shallow focus earthquakes and the surface deformational features in the different river valley transect indicates that the region is undergoing neotectonic rejuvenation. In absence of chronology of the deposits it is difficult to relate it with extant seismicity, but from the geomorphic and seismic observations it may be concluded that the region is still tectonically active. The information would be very important in identifying the areas of hazard prone and

  12. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  13. Assessing Acoustic Sound Levels Associated with Active Source Seismic Surveys in Shallow Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Thode, A.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    The potential effect of active source seismic research on marine mammal populations is a topic of increasing concern, and controversy surrounding such operations has begun to impact the planning and permitting of academic surveys [e.g., Malakoff, 2002 Science]. Although no causal relationship between marine mammal strandings and seismic exploration has been proven, any circumstantial evidence must be thoroughly investigated. A 2002 stranding of two beaked whales in the Gulf of California within 50 km of a R/V Ewing seismic survey has been a subject of concern for both marine seismologists and environmentalists. In order to better understand possible received levels for whales in the vicinity of these operations, modeling is combined with ground-truth calibration measurements. A wide-angle parabolic equation model, which is capable of including shear within the sediment and basement layers, is used to generate predictive models of low-frequency transmission loss within the Gulf of California. This work incorporates range-dependent bathymetry, sediment thickness, sound velocity structure and sub-bottom properties. Oceanic sounds speed profiles are derived from the U.S. Navy's seasonal GDEM model and sediment thicknesses are taken from NOAA's worldwide database. The spectral content of the Ewing's 20-airgun seismic array is constrained by field calibration in the spring of 2003 [Tolstoy et al., 2004 GRL], indicating peak energies at frequencies below a few hundred Hz, with energy spectral density showing an approximate power-law decrease at higher frequencies (being ~40 dB below peak at 1 kHz). Transmission loss is estimated along a series of radials extending from multiple positions along the ship's track, with the directivity of the array accounted for by phase-shifting point sources that are scaled by the cube root of the individual airgun volumes. This allows the time-space history of low-frequency received levels to be reconstructed within the Gulf of California

  14. Seismic Activity in Northern Izu-Bonin arc by Ocean Bottom Seismograph Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Kamiya, S.; Kodaira, S.; Suetsugu, D.; Takahashi, N.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2006-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin Island arc is an oceanic island arc, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Suyehiro et al. (1996) found a thick andesitic middle crust with velocity of 6 km/s in northern Izu arc. Recent active seismic experiments in the Izu-Bonin arc show significant variations of the thickness of the middle crust along the volcanic front (Kodaira et al, 2005). The thickness of the middle crust shows an inverse correlation with the average P-wave crustal velocity and the SiO2 composition of the Quaternary volcanoes along the arc. Crustal evolution in the oceanic island arc is a process including magma evolution in the mantle wedge. To understand the nature of the crustal evolution in the oceanic island arc, we have to clarify structures in the mantle wedge along the arc in addition to the oceanic island arc crust. We conducted seismicity observations by a temporal ocean bottom seismograph (OBS) network in northern Izu-Bonin arc between Tori-shima and Hachijo-jima (30° to 34°N) to investigate structures of the oceanic island arc crust and the mantle wedge in northern Izu-Bonin arc by seismic tomography. The OBS network consists of 40 pop-up type OBSs with a three-component short-period seismometer. The OBSs were deployed in April 2006 and retrieved in July after about 80-day observations. The OBS data were processed with seismic data recorded at island stations on Hachijo-jima and Aoga-shima. These island stations are operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention. From the preliminary results of the hypocenters, many earthquakes were located along the subducting Pacific plate. Along the volcanic front, shallow earthquake clusters were observed around Tori-shima and Sumisu-Jima islands. Another shallow earthquake cluster was observed near a seamount of echelon chains in the back-arc region of the Izu-Bonin arc. Earthquakes in the fore-arc region show strong attenuation at OBSs in the back-arc region

  15. Active and long-lived permanent forearc deformation driven by the subduction seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron Melo, Felipe Alejandro

    I have used geological, geophysical and engineering methods to explore mechanisms of upper plate, brittle deformation at active forearc regions. My dissertation particularly addresses the permanent deformation style experienced by the forearc following great subduction ruptures, such as the 2010 M w8.8 Maule, Chile and 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquakes. These events triggered large, shallow seismicity on upper plate normal faults above the rupture reaching Mw7.0. First I present new structural data from the Chilean Coastal Cordillera over the rupture zone of the Maule earthquake. The study area contains the Pichilemu normal fault, which produced the large crustal aftershocks of the megathrust event. Normal faults are the major neotectonic structural elements but reverse faults also exist. Crustal seismicity and GPS surface displacements show that the forearc experiences pulses of rapid coseismic extension, parallel to the heave of the megathrust, and slow interseismic, convergence-parallel shortening. These cycles, over geologic time, build the forearc structural grain, reactivating structures properly-oriented respect to the deformation field of each stage of the interplate cycle. Great subduction events may play a fundamental role in constructing the crustal architecture of extensional forearc regions. Static mechanical models of coseismic and interseismic upper plate deformation are used to explore for distinct features that could result from brittle fracturing over the two stages of the interplate cycle. I show that the semi-elliptical outline of the first-order normal faults along the Coastal Cordillera may define the location of a characteristic, long-lived megathrust segment. Finally, using data from the Global CMT catalog I analyzed the seismic behavior through time of forearc regions that have experienced great subduction ruptures >Mw7.7 worldwide. Between 61% and 83% of the cases where upper plate earthquakes exhibited periods of increased seismicity

  16. A preliminary census of engineering activities located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Marco; Briffa, Emanuela; Cannata, Andrea; Cannavò, Flavio; Gambino, Salvatore; Maiolino, Vincenza; Maugeri, Roberto; Palano, Mimmo; Privitera, Eugenio; Scaltrito, Antonio; Spampinato, Salvatore; Ursino, Andrea; Velardita, Rosanna

    2015-04-01

    The seismic events caused by human engineering activities are commonly termed as "triggered" and "induced". This class of earthquakes, though characterized by low-to-moderate magnitude, have significant social and economical implications since they occur close to the engineering activity responsible for triggering/inducing them and can be felt by the inhabitants living nearby, and may even produce damage. One of the first well-documented examples of induced seismicity was observed in 1932 in Algeria, when a shallow magnitude 3.0 earthquake occurred close to the Oued Fodda Dam. By the continuous global improvement of seismic monitoring networks, numerous other examples of human-induced earthquakes have been identified. Induced earthquakes occur at shallow depths and are related to a number of human activities, such as fluid injection under high pressure (e.g. waste-water disposal in deep wells, hydrofracturing activities in enhanced geothermal systems and oil recovery, shale-gas fracking, natural and CO2 gas storage), hydrocarbon exploitation, groundwater extraction, deep underground mining, large water impoundments and underground nuclear tests. In Italy, induced/triggered seismicity is suspected to have contributed to the disaster of the Vajont dam in 1963. Despite this suspected case and the presence in the Italian territory of a large amount of engineering activities "capable" of inducing seismicity, no extensive researches on this topic have been conducted to date. Hence, in order to improve knowledge and correctly assess the potential hazard at a specific location in the future, here we started a preliminary study on the entire range of engineering activities currently located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity. To this end, we performed: • a preliminary census of all engineering activities located in the study area by collecting all the useful information coming from available on-line catalogues; • a detailed compilation

  17. Broadband seismic experiment at Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia: very-long-period pulses embedded in multiphase earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, D.; Voight, B.; Langston, C.; Ratdomopurbo, A.; Ebeling, C.

    2000-07-01

    Multiphase (MP) and low frequency (LF) earthquakes with spectral peak amplitudes at 3-4 and 1 Hz, respectively, are two common types of shallow volcanic earthquakes previously recognized at Merapi Volcano. Their mechanisms are poorly understood but MPs have been temporally associated with lava dome growth. We conducted a seismic experiment in January-February 1998, using four broadband seismographs to investigate the nature of seismic activity associated with dome growth. During our experiment, Merapi experienced mild dome growth with low-level seismic activity. We compare our data to that recorded on a local short-period (SP) network, with the following preliminary results. MP and LF events as recorded and classified on the short-period network instruments were recognized on the broadband network. Frequency spectrograms revealed similar patterns in the near summit region at widely separated broadband stations. Higher frequency spectra than previously recognized were identified for both MP and LF events, and were strongly attenuated as a function of radial distance from the source. Thus the spectral characteristics of these events as recorded on far-field stations are not fully indicative of the source processes. In particular, many events classified as LF-type appear to have much high frequency energy near the source. This aspect of these so-called LF earthquakes, and their association with very-long-period (VLP) pulses, suggests that many events identified in the far-field as LF events are in actuality a variety of the MP event and involve similar source processes. Broadband records indicated that simple large-amplitude VLP pulses were embedded in MP and LF wavetrains. From event to event these pulses were similar in their waveforms and had periods of 4 s. VLP events embedded in LF and MP earthquakes were located using particle motions. The epicenters were clustered in a central region of the dome complex, and preliminary source depths were within about 100 m of

  18. Magmatic underplating and crustal growth in the Emeishan Large Igneous Province, SW China, revealed by a passive seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Yigang; Xu, Tao; Si, Shaokun; Liang, Xiaofeng; Tian, Xiaobo; Deng, Yangfan; Chen, Lin; Wang, Peng; Xu, Yihe; Lan, Haiqiang; Xiao, Fuhui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Badal, José; Teng, Jiwen

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt to characterize the subsurface structure that is related to fossil mantle plume activity, a comprehensive geophysical investigation was conducted in the Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP). The nature and geometry of the crust were examined within the scheme of the domal structure of ELIP, which comprises the Inner, Intermediate and Outer zones, which are defined on the basis of the biostratigraphy of pre-volcanic sediments. The bulk crustal properties within the Inner Zone are characterized by high density, high P-wave velocity, high Vp/Vs ratios and large crustal thickness. A visible continuous seismic converter is present in the upper part of the crust in the whole Intermediate Zone and the eastern part of the Inner Zone, but it is absent in the Inner Zone, where another seismic converter is observed in the lower part of the crust. The geometric configuration of these converters is attributable to the addition of mantle-derived melts to the pre-existing crust and subsequent interaction between them. The crustal geometry, which is delineated by the migrated image of receiver functions from the passive seismic experiment, and the crustal properties collectively suggest that a mafic layer of 15-20 km thickness and 150-180 km width exists at the base of the crust in the Inner Zone. Such a mafic layer reflects a vertical crustal growth through magmatic underplating at the base of the crust and intraplating within the upper crust. The salient spatial correlation between the deep crustal structure and the dome strongly supports a genetic link between crustal thickening and plume activity, if the pre-volcanic domal uplift is generated by the Permian Emeishan mantle plume. This arrangement is further supported by the consistency of the extent of crustal uplift estimated by isostatic equilibrium modeling and sedimentary data. This study therefore characterizes and provides evidence for a plume-modified crust in a large igneous province.

  19. P-wave velocity structure of the southern Ryukyu margin east of Taiwan: Results from the ACTS wide-angle seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Berthet, T.; Lallemand, S.; Schnurle, P.; Lee, C.-S.; Liu, C.-S.; McIntosh, K.; Theunissen, T.

    2012-11-01

    An active seismic experiment has been conducted across the southern Ryukyu margin east of Taiwan over the whole trench-arc-backarc system in May 2009. Twenty-four ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) were deployed from the Ryukyu trench to the southern Okinawa trough over the Ryukyu arc and forearc. Wide angle seismic data were recorded by the OBS array while coincident reflection seismic data were acquired using a 6 km long streamer and a 6600 cubic inch seismic airgun array. Results from tomographic inversion of 21091 travel time picks along this line allowed us to image crustal structures of the Ryukyu margin down to a depth of 25 km. The transect has been designed to provide a better seismic velocity structure of the subduction zone in a highly deformed area that has produced an M8 earthquake in 1920. The line crosses a seismic cluster of earthquakes which source mechanisms are still poorly understood. The subducting oceanic crust of the Huatung Basin is about 5-6 km thick. The underlying mantle exhibits low seismic velocities around 7.8 km/s suggesting some hydrothermal alterations or alteration of the upper mantle through faults generated by the flexure of the subducting plate as it enters the subduction. Low velocities, up to 4.5 km/s, associated with the accretionary wedge are well imaged from the trench back to the Nanao forearc. A major result concerns the abrupt termination of the buttress at the rear of the accretionary wedge. Despite the low resolution of the tomographic inversion near the subduction interface, several lines of evidence supporting the presence of a low velocity zone beneath the toe of the forearc buttress could be established. The Moho beneath the Ryukyu non-volcanic arc is located at a depth around 25 km depth.

  20. Seismic mapping of shallow fault zones in the San Gabriel Mountains from the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Lutter, W.J.; Ehlig, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    During the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE), a reflection/refraction survey was conducted along a profile (line 1) extending from Seal Beach, California, northeastward to the Mojave Desert and crossing the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley basins and San Gabriel Mountains. In most shot gathers from the southern and central San Gabriel Mountains, clear secondary arrivals are seen that merge, or appear to merge, with first arrivals at three locations, including the location of the Vincent thrust fault, an exposed late Mesozoic/early Cenozoic megathrust. These secondary arrivals are interpretable as reflections in the shallow crust (<5 km depth) from a concave-upward interface that projects to the surface in the north near the Vincent thrust fault, is offset in its central part at the San Gabriel fault (an old branch of the San Andreas fault), and terminates in the south at 1 to 2 km depth at the southern mountain front. The velocity structure above and below this interface strongly suggests it is the Vincent thrust fault: intermediate velocities (6.2 km/s), consistent with mylonites overlying the Vincent thrust fault, are observed above it; lower velocities (5.8 km/s), consistent with the Pelona Schist underlying the Vincent thrust fault, are observed below it. Problems arise, however, in attempting to match this reflector to the exposed Vincent thrust fault, which is seen in outcrops east of line 1. The Vincent thrust fault is shallower than the reflector in most places. An unmapped structure (steep fault, monocline, or thrust fault) is required between line 1 and the outcrops that either drops the Vincent thrust fault down to the depths of the reflector or repeats the Vincent thrust fault beneath line 1 in the footwall of another thrust fault. An alternative interpretation of the reflector is a deep greenstone horizon within the Pelona Schist, although this alternative is not favored by the velocity structure. Copyright 2001 by the American

  1. Data report for the 1985 seismic-refraction experiment at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, V.D.

    1985-12-31

    In February 1985, the US Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-refraction survey in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, southwestern Nevada to better define the P(compressional)-wave velocity structure of the upper crust in this area. This experiment is a continuation of seismic investigations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by the USGS on behalf of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project (NNWSI) to assess the feasibility of a proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain. The 1985 seismic-refraction survey consisted of three separate deployments: two East-West profiles, Line A and Line B, and a North-South profile (Plate 1). Thirty-one shots were recorded by 120 portable seismographs, where recorder station spacing averaged .3 km, and the shotpoints averaged 5 to 8 km apart. Additionally, off set shots were fired at shotpoints located about 7 to 15 km from the endpoints of the deployment lines. This report includes record sections from the twenty-nine shotpoints (Plates 2 to 17), a list of seismograph locations (Appendix A), a list of shotpoint locations and shot times, DKDAT data files and Tape Grade Code (Appendix B), and a list of first-arrival traveltime picks (Appendix C). Detailed interpretation of these data will be published in a subsequent report.

  2. High resolution seismic imaging of an active normal fault in the Agri Valley, Southern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Improta, L.; Bruno, P.; di Fiore, V.; Mariani, S.

    2004-12-01

    The Agri Valley is an intermontane basin located in the Southern Apennine seismic belt (Italy) whose formation in tied to large NW-trending trastensional and extensional faults active since Early Pleistocene. Recent faulting activity in the area is documented by faulted paleosoils and suggested by a M7 earthquake that struck the basin in 1857. On the contrary, present-day background seismicity in the area is extremely low. Despite intense geomorphic investigations, the identification of the source responsible for this historical event and of further large seismogenic faults in the area is still a matter of debate. A new NW trending normal faulting system has been recently recognized based on subtle geomorphic expressions on the ridge bounding the basin westward. Recent faulting activity along this structure is locally documented by a trench. Aimed at yielding new information about the shallow structure of the fault, we conducted a high resolution seismic experiment in a small lacustrine basin, located 4 km south of the trench, in which the presence of the fault is inferred by a linear surface warping but trench excavation is impractical. Both multi-fold wide-angle data and multichannel near vertical reflection data have been collected along a 220-m-long profile in order to obtain an accurate model of the basin combining seismic velocity and reflectivity images. About 3600 first arrival traveltimes picked on 36 wide-angle record sections have been inverted by a non-linear tomographic technique that is specially designed to image complex structures. The tomographic inversion provides a high-resolution velocity model of the basin down to 60 m depth. The model is strongly heterogeneous and displays sharp lateral velocity variations. Seismic reflection processing has been applied to both data sets. Data have been edited for trace quality and first (refracted and direct) arrivals have been muted. A following FK dip filtering on the shot gathers reduced the energy

  3. Stable and unstable phases of elevated seismic activity at the persistently restless Telica Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Mel; Roman, Diana C.; Geirsson, Halldor; LaFemina, Peter; McNutt, Stephen R.; Muñoz, Angelica; Tenorio, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, is a persistently restless volcano with daily seismicity rates that can vary by orders of magnitude without apparent connection to eruptive activity. Low-frequency (LF) events are dominant and peaks in seismicity rate show little correlation with eruptive episodes, presenting a challenge for seismic monitoring and eruption forecasting. A short period seismic station (TELN) has been operated on Telica's summit since 1993, and in 2010 the installation of a six-station broadband seismic and eleven-station continuous GPS network (the TESAND network) was completed to document in detail the seismic characteristics of a persistently restless volcano. Between our study period of November 2009 and May 2013, over 400,000 events were detected at the TESAND summit station (TBTN), with daily event rates ranging from 5 to 1400. We present spectral analyses and classifications of ~ 200,000 events recorded by the TESAND network between April 2010 and March 2013, and earthquake locations for a sub-set of events between July 2010 and February 2012. In 2011 Telica erupted in a series of phreatic vulcanian explosions. Six months before the 2011 eruption, we observe a sudden decrease in LF events concurrent with a swarm of high-frequency (HF) events, followed by a decline in overall event rates, which reached a minimum at the eruption onset. We observe repeated periods of high and low seismicity rates and suggest these changes in seismicity represent repeated transitions between open-system and closed-system degassing. We suggest that these short- and long-term transitions between open to closed-system degassing form part of a long-term pattern of stable vs. unstable phases at Telica. Stable phases are characterised by steady high-rate seismicity and represent stable open-system degassing, whereas unstable phases are characterised by highly variable seismicity rates and represent repeated transitions from open to closed-system degassing, where the system is

  4. Seismic imaging of the geodynamic activity at the western Eger rift in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullick, N.; Buske, S.; Hrubcova, P.; Ruzek, B.; Shapiro, S.; Wigger, P.; Fischer, T.

    2015-04-01

    The western Eger rift at the Czech-German border in central Europe is an important geodynamically active area within the European Cenzoic rift system (ECRS) in the forelands of the Alps. Along with two other active areas of the ECRS, the French Massif Central and the east and west Eifel volcanic fields, it is characterized by numerous CO2-rich fluid emission points and frequent micro-seismicity. Existence of a plume(s) is indicated in the upper mantle which may be responsible for these observations. Here we reprocess a pre-existing deep seismic reflection profile '9HR' and interpret the subsurface structures as mapped by seismic reflectivity with previous findings, mainly from seismological and geochemical studies, to investigate the geodynamic activity in the subsurface. We find prominent hints of pathways which may allow magmatic fluids originating in the upper mantle to rise through the crust and cause the observed fluid emanations and earthquake activity.

  5. A Gravity data along LARSE (Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment) Line II, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooley, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a detailed gravity study along part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE) transect across the San Fernando Basin and Transverse Ranges to help characterize the structure underlying this area. 249 gravity measurements were collected along the transect and to augment regional coverage near the profile. An isostatic gravity low of 50-60 mGal reflects the San Fernando-East Ventura basin. Another prominent isostatic gravity with an amplitude of 30 mGal marks the Antelope Valley basin. Gravity highs occur over the Santa Monica Mountains and the Transverse Ranges. The highest isostatic gravity values coincide with outcrops of Pelona schist.

  6. Passive seismic experiment - A summary of current status. [Apollo-initiated lunar surface station data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The data set obtained from the four-station Apollo seismic network including signals from approximately 11,800 events, is surveyed. Some refinement of the lunar model will result, but its gross features remain the same. Attention is given to the question of a small, molten lunar core, the answer to which remains dependent on analysis of signals from a far side impact. Seventy three sources of repeating, deep moonquakes have been identified, thirty nine of which have been accurately located. Concentrated at depths from 800 to 1000 km, the periodicities of these events have led to the hypothesis that they are generated by tidal stresses. Lunar seismic data has also indicated that the meteoroid population is ten times lower than originally determined from earth based observations. Lunar seismic activity is much lower and mountainous masses show no sign of sinking, in contrast to earth, as a result of the lunar crust being four times thicker. While much work remains to be done, significant correlation between terrestrial and lunar observations can be seen.

  7. Results from the latest SN-4 multi-parametric benthic observatory experiment (MARsite EU project) in the Gulf of Izmit, Turkey: oceanographic, chemical and seismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embriaco, Davide; Marinaro, Giuditta; Frugoni, Francesco; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Monna, Stephen; Etiope, Giuseppe; Gasperini, Luca; Çağatay, Namık; Favali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    An autonomous and long-term multiparametric benthic observatory (SN-4) was designed to study gas seepage and seismic energy release along the submerged segment of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF). Episodic gas seepage occurs at the seafloor in the Gulf of Izmit (Sea of Marmara, NW Turkey) along this submerged segment of the NAF, which ruptured during the 1999 Mw7.4 Izmit earthquake. The SN-4 observatory already operated in the Gulf of Izmit at the western end of the 1999 Izmit earthquake rupture for about one-year at 166 m water depth during the 2009-2010 experiment (EGU2014-13412-1, EGU General Assembly 2014). SN-4 was re-deployed in the same site for a new long term mission (September 2013 - April 2014) in the framework of MARsite (New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite, http://marsite.eu/ ) EC project, which aims at evaluating seismic risk and managing of long-term monitoring activities in the Marmara Sea. A main scientific objective of the SN-4 experiment is to investigate the possible correlations between seafloor methane seepage and release of seismic energy. We used the same site of the 2009-2010 campaign to verify both the occurrence of previously observed phenomena and the reliability of results obtained in the previous experiment (Embriaco et al., 2014, doi:10.1093/gji/ggt436). In particular, we are interested in the detection of gas release at the seafloor, in the role played by oceanographic phenomena in this detection, and in the association of gas and seismic energy release. The scientific payload included, among other instruments, a three-component broad-band seismometer, and gas and oceanographic sensors. We present a technical description of the observatory, including the data acquisition and control system, results from the preliminary analysis of this new multidisciplinary data set, and a comparison with the previous experiment.

  8. Apollo experience report: Safety activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, C. N.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the flight safety experiences gained during the Apollo Program and safety, from the viewpoint of program management, engineering, mission planning, and ground test operations was discussed. Emphasis is placed on the methods used to identify the risks involved in flight and in certain ground test operations. In addition, there are discussions on the management and engineering activities used to eliminate or reduce these risks.

  9. Seismic Activity: Public Alert and Warning: Legal Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocchetti, D.

    2007-12-01

    As science and technology evolve in ways that increase our ability to inform the public of potentially destructive seismic activity, there are significant legal issues for consideration. Even though countries and even states within the United States have differing legal tenets that could either change or at least re-shape the outcome of specific legal questions that this session will be pondering, there are fundamental legal principals that will permeate. It is often said that the law lags behind society and in particular its technological developments. No doubt in the area of warning the public of impending destructive forces of nature or society, the law will need to do some catching up. The law is probably adequately developed for at least some preliminary discussion of the key issues. No matter the legal scheme, if there is a failure or perceived failure in the system to warn people of a pending emergencies, albeit an earthquake, tsunami, or other predictable event, those who are harmed or believe they are harmed will seek relief under the law. Every day there are situations wherein the failure to warn or to adequately warn is key, such as with faulty or defective consumer products, escaped prisoners, and police high-speed vehicle chases. With alert and warning systems for disaster, however, we have a unique set of facts. Generally, the systems and their failures occur during emergencies or at least during situations under apparently exigent circumstances when the disaster's predictability is widely recognized as less than 100 percent. The law, in particular United States tort law, has been particularly lenient when people and organizations are operating during compressed timeframes and their actions are generally considered necessary to address circumstances relative to public safety. The legal system has been forgiving when the actor that failed or appeared to fail was government. The courts have liberally applied the principal of sovereign immunity to

  10. Effect of the surface roughness on the seismic signal generated by a single rock impact: insight from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, Vincent; Mangeney, Anne; de Rosny, Julien; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The seismic signal generated by rockfalls, landslides or avalanches is a unique tool to detect, characterize and monitor gravitational flow activity, with strong implication in terms of natural hazard monitoring. Indeed, as natural flows travel down the slope, they apply stresses on the ground, generating seismic waves in a wide frequency band. Our ultimate objective is to relate the granular flow properties to the generated signals that result from the different physical processes involved. We investigate here the more simple process: the impact of a single bead on a rough surface. Farin et al. [2015] have already shown theoretically and experimentally the existence of a link between the properties of an impacting bead (mass and velocity) on smooth surfaces, and the emitted signal (radiated elastic energy and mean frequency). This demonstrates that the single impactor properties can be deduced from the form of the emitted signal. We extend this work here by investigating the impact of single beads and gravels on rough and erodible surfaces. Experimentally, we drop glass and steel beads of diameters from 2 mm to 10 mm on a PMMA plate. The roughness of this last is obtained by gluing 3mm-diameter glass beads on one of its face. Free beads have been also added to get erodible beds. We track the dropped impactor motion, times between impacts and the generated acoustic waves using two fast cameras and 8 accelerometers. Cameras are used in addition to estimate the impactor rotation. We investigate the energy balance during the impact process, especially how the energy restitution varies as a function of the energy lost through acoustic waves. From these experiments, we clearly observe that even if more dissipative processes are involved (friction, grain reorganization, etc.), the single bead scaling laws obtained on smooth surfaces remain valid. A main result of this work is to quantify the fluctuations of the characteristic quantities such as the bounce angle, the

  11. Near-Surface Seismic Reflection and GPR Imaging of the Active Emigrant Peak Fault, Fish Lake Valley, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, R. A.; Christie, M. W.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Stockli, D. F.

    2007-12-01

    Multifaceted near-surface geophysical studies of active faulting in the Eastern California Shear Zone are being conducted at the University of Kansas. During the summer of 2006 shallow seismic reflection and GPR data sets were acquired across the active Emigrant Peak fault on the east side of Fish Lake Valley, Nevada. This fault is a normal fault that aids in the transfer of regional right-lateral deformation associated with the Death Valley/Fish Lake Valley fault zone. Locally a 20 m high scarp marks the trace of the main fault across a large, active alluvial fan. The GPR experiment produced a pseudo-3D image approximately 500m by 115m in size with a bin size of 1m by 5m. Depth penetration was dependent on antenna frequency, but reached approximately 25m in the dry alluvial fan sediments. Two 2-D seismic lines were acquired with a depth penetration of approximately 200m using a 30.06 caliber rifle source. The main line was over 400m in length and the cross line over 150m in length. CMP bins were 0.25m in size. Both data types were processed to migrated images and imported into an industry-standard reflection interpretation package. Analysis of the GPR volume allowed the interpretation of numerous normal faults parallel to the main Emigrant fault both near the main scarp and as 'off-fault' deformation. Some are down-to-the-basin 'growth faults' and some are antithetic in nature. Faults were only mapped if they were continuous across many x-lines. The migrated seismic images contain numerous reflections, grouped in packages of short reflectors of different amplitudes and dip orientations. The GPR fault planes were transferred onto the seismic data and correlated with obvious breaks in dip and amplitude between the reflection packages. After basic interpretation of the faults the stratigraphic changes across the fault planes were analyzed on the seismic data to estimate offsets at different depths for each fault. Currently, we are working to estimate a quantitative

  12. Analysis of the seismic activity associated with the 2010 eruption of Merapi Volcano, Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi-Santoso, Agus; Lesage, Philippe; Dwiyono, Sapari; Sumarti, Sri; Subandriyo; Surono; Jousset, Philippe; Metaxian, Jean-Philippe

    2013-07-01

    The 2010 eruption of Merapi is the first large explosive eruption of the volcano that has been instrumentally observed. The main characteristics of the seismic activity during the pre-eruptive period and the crisis are presented and interpreted in this paper. The first seismic precursors were a series of four shallow swarms during the period between 12 and 4 months before the eruption. These swarms are interpreted as the result of perturbations of the hydrothermal system by increasing heat flow. Shorter-term and more continuous precursory seismic activity started about 6 weeks before the initial explosion on 26 October 2010. During this period, the rate of seismicity increased almost constantly yielding a cumulative seismic energy release for volcano-tectonic (VT) and multiphase events (MP) of 7.5 × 1010 J. This value is 3 times the maximum energy release preceding previous effusive eruptions of Merapi. The high level reached and the accelerated behavior of both the deformation of the summit and the seismic activity are distinct features of the 2010 eruption. The hypocenters of VT events in 2010 occur in two clusters at of 2.5 to 5 km and less than 1.5 km depths below the summit. An aseismic zone was detected at 1.5-2.5 km depth, consistent with studies of previous eruptions, and indicating that this is a robust feature of Merapi's subsurface structure. Our analysis suggests that the aseismic zone is a poorly consolidated layer of altered material within the volcano. Deep VT events occurred mainly before 17 October 2010; subsequent to that time shallow activity strongly increased. The deep seismic activity is interpreted as associated with the enlargement of a narrow conduit by an unusually large volume of rapidly ascending magma. The shallow seismicity is interpreted as recording the final magma ascent and the rupture of a summit-dome plug, which triggered the eruption on 26 October 2010. Hindsight forecasting of the occurrence time of the eruption is performed

  13. Recent Seismic and Geodetic Activity at Multiple Volcanoes in the Ecuadorean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, S.; Ruiz, M. C.; McCausland, W. A.; Prejean, S. G.; Mothes, P. A.; Bell, A. F.; Hidalgo, S.; Barrington, C.; Yepez, M.; Aguaiza, S.; Plain, M.

    2015-12-01

    The state of volcanic activity often fluctuates between periods of repose and unrest. The transition time between a period of repose and unrest, or vice versa for an open system, can occur within a matter of hours or days. Because of this short time scale, real-time seismic and geodetic (e.g. tiltmeter, GPS) monitoring networks are crucial for characterizing the state of activity of a volcano. In the Ecuadorean Andes, 5 volcanoes demonstrate long-term (Tungurahua, Reventador, and Guagua Pichincha) or recently reactivated (Cotopaxi, Chiles-Cerro Negro) seismic and geodetic activity. The Instituto Geofisico regularly characterizes volcano seismicity into long period, very long period, volcano-tectonic, and tremor events. Significant recent changes at these volcanoes include: rigorous reactivation of glacier-capped Cotopaxi, drumbeat seismicity absent a dome extrusion at Tungurahua, and regularly reoccurring (~7 day recurrence interval), shallow seismic swarms at Guagua Pichincha. These volcanoes locate along both the Western and Eastern Cordillera of the Ecuadorean Andes and, where data are available, manifest important variations in chemical composition, daily gas flux, and surficial deformation. We summarize the long-term geophysical parameters measured at each volcano and place recent changes in each parameter in a larger magmatic and hydrothermal context. All of the studied volcanoes present significant societal hazards to local and regional communities.

  14. Time-lapse imaging of fault properties at seismogenic depth using repeating earthquakes, active sources and seismic ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xin

    2009-12-01

    The time-varying stress field of fault systems at seismogenic depths plays the mort important role in controlling the sequencing and nucleation of seismic events. Using seismic observations from repeating earthquakes, controlled active sources and seismic ambient noise, five studies at four different fault systems across North America, Central Japan, North and mid-West China are presented to describe our efforts to measure such time dependent structural properties. Repeating and similar earthquakes are hunted and analyzed to study the post-seismic fault relaxation at the aftershock zone of the 1984 M 6.8 western Nagano and the 1976 M 7.8 Tangshan earthquakes. The lack of observed repeating earthquakes at western Nagano is attributed to the absence of a well developed weak fault zone, suggesting that the fault damage zone has been almost completely healed. In contrast, the high percentage of similar and repeating events found at Tangshan suggest the existence of mature fault zones characterized by stable creep under steady tectonic loading. At the Parkfield region of the San Andreas Fault, repeating earthquake clusters and chemical explosions are used to construct a scatterer migration image based on the observation of systematic temporal variations in the seismic waveforms across the occurrence time of the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake. Coseismic fluid charge or discharge in fractures caused by the Parkfield earthquake is used to explain the observed seismic scattering properties change at depth. In the same region, a controlled source cross-well experiment conducted at SAFOD pilot and main holes documents two large excursions in the travel time required for a shear wave to travel through the rock along a fixed pathway shortly before two rupture events, suggesting that they may be related to pre-rupture stress induced changes in crack properties. At central China, a tomographic inversion based on the theory of seismic ambient noise and coda wave interferometry

  15. Variations of terrestrial geomagnetic activity correlated to M6+ global seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    From the surface of the Sun, as a result of a solar flare, are expelled a coronal mass (CME or Coronal Mass Ejection) that can be observed from the Earth through a coronagraph in white light. This ejected material can be compared to an electrically charged cloud (plasma) mainly composed of electrons, protons and other small quantities of heavier elements such as helium, oxygen and iron that run radially from the Sun along the lines of the solar magnetic field and pushing into interplanetary space. Sometimes the CME able to reach the Earth causing major disruptions of its magnetosphere: mashed in the region illuminated by the Sun and expanding in the region not illuminated. This interaction creates extensive disruption of the Earth's geomagnetic field that can be detected by a radio receiver tuned to the ELF band (Extreme Low Frequency 0-30 Hz). The Radio Emissions Project (scientific research project founded in February 2009 by Gabriele Cataldi and Daniele Cataldi), analyzing the change in the Earth's geomagnetic field through an induction magnetometer tuned between 0.001 and 5 Hz (bandwidth in which possible to observe the geomagnetic pulsations) was able to detect the existence of a close relationship between this geomagnetic perturbations and the global seismic activity M6+. During the arrival of the CME on Earth, in the Earth's geomagnetic field are generated sudden and intensive emissions that have a bandwidth including between 0 and 15 Hz, an average duration of 2-8 hours, that preceding of 0-12 hours M6+ earthquakes. Between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012, all M6+ earthquakes recorded on a global scale were preceded by this type of signals which, due to their characteristics, have been called "Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors" (S.G.P.). The main feature of Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors is represented by the close relationship that they have with the solar activity. In fact, because the S.G.P. are geomagnetic emissions, their temporal modulation depends

  16. Seismic Surveys Negatively Affect Humpback Whale Singing Activity off Northern Angola

    PubMed Central

    Cerchio, Salvatore; Strindberg, Samantha; Collins, Tim; Bennett, Chanda; Rosenbaum, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring was used to document the presence of singing humpback whales off the coast of Northern Angola, and opportunistically test for the effect of seismic survey activity in the vicinity on the number of singing whales. Two Marine Autonomous Recording Units (MARUs) were deployed between March and December 2008 in the offshore environment. Song was first heard in mid June and continued through the remaining duration of the study. Seismic survey activity was heard regularly during two separate periods, consistently throughout July and intermittently in mid-October/November. Numbers of singers were counted during the first ten minutes of every hour for the period from 24 May to 1 December, and Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs) were used to assess the effect of survey day (seasonality), hour (diel variation), moon phase and received levels of seismic survey pulses (measured from a single pulse during each ten-minute sampled period) on singer number. Application of GAMMs indicated significant seasonal variation, which was the most pronounced effect when assessing the full dataset across the entire season (p<0.001); however seasonality almost entirely dropped out of top-ranked models when applied to a reduced dataset during the July period of seismic survey activity. Diel variation was significant in both the full and reduced datasets (from p<0.01 to p<0.05) and often included in the top-ranked models. The number of singers significantly decreased with increasing received level of seismic survey pulses (from p<0.01 to p<0.05); this explanatory variable was included among the top ranked models for one MARU in the full dataset and both MARUs in the reduced dataset. This suggests that the breeding display of humpback whales is disrupted by seismic survey activity, and thus merits further attention and study, and potentially conservation action in the case of sensitive breeding populations. PMID:24618836

  17. Seismic surveys negatively affect humpback whale singing activity off northern Angola.

    PubMed

    Cerchio, Salvatore; Strindberg, Samantha; Collins, Tim; Bennett, Chanda; Rosenbaum, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring was used to document the presence of singing humpback whales off the coast of Northern Angola, and opportunistically test for the effect of seismic survey activity in the vicinity on the number of singing whales. Two Marine Autonomous Recording Units (MARUs) were deployed between March and December 2008 in the offshore environment. Song was first heard in mid June and continued through the remaining duration of the study. Seismic survey activity was heard regularly during two separate periods, consistently throughout July and intermittently in mid-October/November. Numbers of singers were counted during the first ten minutes of every hour for the period from 24 May to 1 December, and Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs) were used to assess the effect of survey day (seasonality), hour (diel variation), moon phase and received levels of seismic survey pulses (measured from a single pulse during each ten-minute sampled period) on singer number. Application of GAMMs indicated significant seasonal variation, which was the most pronounced effect when assessing the full dataset across the entire season (p<0.001); however seasonality almost entirely dropped out of top-ranked models when applied to a reduced dataset during the July period of seismic survey activity. Diel variation was significant in both the full and reduced datasets (from p<0.01 to p<0.05) and often included in the top-ranked models. The number of singers significantly decreased with increasing received level of seismic survey pulses (from p<0.01 to p<0.05); this explanatory variable was included among the top ranked models for one MARU in the full dataset and both MARUs in the reduced dataset. This suggests that the breeding display of humpback whales is disrupted by seismic survey activity, and thus merits further attention and study, and potentially conservation action in the case of sensitive breeding populations. PMID:24618836

  18. Noise-based body-wave seismic tomography in an active underground mine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, G.; Brenguier, F.; Campillo, M.; Lynch, R.; Roux, P.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade, ambient noise tomography has become increasingly popular to image the earth's upper crust. The seismic noise recorded in the earth's crust is dominated by surface waves emanating from the interaction of the ocean with the solid earth. These surface waves are low frequency in nature ( < 1 Hz) and not usable for imaging smaller structures associated with mining or oil and gas applications. The seismic noise recorded at higher frequencies are typically from anthropogenic sources, which are short lived, spatially unstable and not well suited for constructing seismic Green's functions between sensors with conventional cross-correlation methods. To examine the use of ambient noise tomography for smaller scale applications, continuous data were recorded for 5 months in an active underground mine in Sweden located more than 1km below surface with 18 high frequency seismic sensors. A wide variety of broadband (10 - 3000 Hz) seismic noise sources are present in an active underground mine ranging from drilling, scraping, trucks, ore crushers and ventilation fans. Some of these sources generate favorable seismic noise, while others are peaked in frequency and not usable. In this presentation, I will show that the noise generated by mining activity can be useful if periods of seismic noise are carefully selected. Although noise sources are not temporally stable and not evenly distributed around the sensor array, good estimates of the seismic Green's functions between sensors can be retrieved for a broad frequency range (20 - 400 Hz) when a selective stacking scheme is used. For frequencies below 100 Hz, the reconstructed Green's functions show clear body-wave arrivals for almost all of the 153 sensor pairs. The arrival times of these body-waves are picked and used to image the local velocity structure. The resulting 3-dimensional image shows a high velocity structure that overlaps with a known ore-body. The material properties of the ore-body differ from

  19. Tomographic image of a seismically active volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Pitt, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP/VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California, using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (5.1 × 109 to 5.9 × 1010m3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ∼2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α = 1.6 × 10−3 to 7.9 × 10−3 (crack-like pores) and mean gas volume fraction ϕ = 8.1 × 10−4 to 3.4 × 10−3. The pore density parameter κ = 3ϕ/(4πα) = na3=0.11, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to be 4.6 × 109 to 1.9 × 1011 kg. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 500 tons day−1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ∼25–1040 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  20. Tomographic image of a seismically active volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip; Chouet, Bernard; Pitt, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP/VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California, using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (5.1 × 109 to 5.9 × 1010m3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ˜2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α = 1.6 × 10-3 to 7.9 × 10-3 (crack-like pores) and mean gas volume fraction ϕ = 8.1 × 10-4 to 3.4 × 10-3. The pore density parameter κ = 3ϕ/(4πα) = na3=0.11, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to be 4.6 × 109 to 1.9 × 1011 kg. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 500 tons day-1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ˜25-1040 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  1. Tomographic Image of a Seismically Active Volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P. B.; Chouet, B. A.; Pitt, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP /VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (˜50 km3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ˜2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is primarily due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate-spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α ˜8 x 10-4 (crack-like pores) and gas volume fraction φ ˜4 x 10-4. The pore density parameter κ = 3φ / (4πα) = na3 = 0.12, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to range up to ˜1.6 x 1010 kg if the pores exclusively contain CO2, although he presence of an aqueous phase may lower this estimate by up to one order of magnitude. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 5 x 105 kg day-1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ˜8 to ˜90 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  2. Multichannel seismic-reflection profiling on the R/V Maurice Ewing during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE), California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Clayton, Robert W.; Klitgord, Kim D.; Bohannon, Robert G.; Sliter, Ray; McRaney, John K.; Gardner, James V.; Keene, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the acquisition of deep-crustal multichannel seismic-reflection data in the Inner California Borderland aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing, conducted in October 1994 as part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE). LARSE is a cooperative study of the crustal structure of southern California involving earth scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, Caltech, the University of Southern California, the University of California Los Angeles, and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). During LARSE, the R/V Ewing's 20- element air gun array, totaling 137.7 liters (8470 cu. in.), was used as the primary seismic source for wide-angle recording along three main onshore-offshore lines centered on the Los Angeles basin and the epicenters of the 1933 Long Beach and 1994 Northridge earthquakes. The LARSE onshore-offshore lines were each 200-250 km long, with the offshore portions being between 90 and 150 km long. The nearly 24,000 air gun signals generated by the Ewing were recorded by an array of 170 PASSCAL REFTEK recorders deployed at 2 km intervals along all three of the onshore lines and 9 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed along two of the lines. Separate passes over the OBS-deployment lines were performed with a long air gun repetition rate (60 and 90 seconds) to minimize acoustic-wave interference from previous shots in the OBS data. The Ewing's 4.2-km, 160-channel, digital streamer was also used to record approximately 1250 km of 40-fold multichannel seismic-reflection data. To enhance the fold of the wide-angle data recorded onshore, mitigating against cultural and wind noise in the Los Angeles basin, the entire ship track was repeated at least once resulting in fewer than about 660 km of unique trackline coverage in the Inner Borderland. Portions of the seismic-reflection lines were repeated up to 6 times. A variety of other geophysical data were also continuously recorded, including 3.5 kHz bathymetry, multi

  3. Multiple Seismic Array Observations for Tracing Deep Tremor Activity in Western Shikoku, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Shiomi, K.; Obara, K.

    2011-12-01

    Deep non-volcanic tremors become very active during episodic slow-slip events in western Japan and Cascadia. The episodic tremor and slow-slip events in western Shikoku, Japan, occur at a typical interval of 6 months. Recently, it has been reported that tremor migration activity is complex and shows different migrating directions depending on time scales (Ghosh et al., 2010). Such characteristics of tremor are important to understand the mechanism of tremor and the relationship between tremor and SSEs. However it is difficult to determine the location of tremors with high accuracy because tremors show faint signals and make the identification of P/S-wave arrivals difficult. Seismic array analysis is useful to evaluate tremor activity, especially to estimate the arrival direction of seismic energy (e.g. Ueno et al., 2010, Ghosh et al., 2010), as it can distinguish multiple tremor sources occurring simultaneously. Here, we have conducted seismic array observation and analyzed seismic data during tremor activity by applying the MUSIC method to trace tremor location and its migration in western Shikoku. We have installed five seismic arrays in western Shikoku since January 2011. One of the arrays contains 30 stations with 3-component seismometers with a natural frequency of 2 Hz (Type-L array). The array aperture size is 2 km and the mean interval between stations is approximately 200 m. Each of the other arrays (Type-S array) contains 9 seismic stations with the same type of seismometers of the Type-L array, and is deployed surrounding the Type-L array. The small array aperture size is 800 m and its mean station interval is approximately 150 m. All array stations have recorded continuous waveform data at a sampling of 200Hz. In May 2011, an episodic tremor and a short-term slip event occurred for the first time during the observation period. We could retrieve the array seismic data during the whole tremor episode. The analysis of data from the type-L array confirms

  4. Seismic hydraulic fracture migration originated by successive deep magma pulses: The 2011-2013 seismic series associated to the volcanic activity of El Hierro Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Moreno, A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; De Angelis, S.; García-Yeguas, A.; Prudencio, J.; Morales, J.; Tuvè, T.; García, L.

    2015-11-01

    In this manuscript we present a new interpretation of the seismic series that accompanied eruptive activity off the coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands, during 2011-2013. We estimated temporal variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value throughout the period of analysis, and performed high-precision relocations of the preeruptive and syneruptive seismicity using a realistic 3-D velocity model. Our results suggest that eruptive activity and the accompanying seismicity were caused by repeated injections of magma from the mantle into the lower crust. These magma pulses occurred within a small and well-defined volume resulting in the emplacement of fresh magma along the crust-mantle boundary underneath El Hierro. We analyzed the distribution of earthquake hypocenters in time and space in order to assess seismic diffusivity in the lower crust. Our results suggest that very high earthquake rates underneath El Hierro represent the response of a stable lower crust to stress perturbations with pulsatory character, linked to the injection of magma from the mantle. Magma input from depth caused large stress perturbations to propagate into the lower crust generating energetic seismic swarms. The absence of any preferential alignment in the spatial pattern of seismicity reinforces our hypothesis that stress perturbation and related seismicity, had diffusive character. We conclude that the temporal and spatial evolution of seismicity was neither tracking the path of magma migration nor it defines the boundaries of magma storage volumes such as a midcrustal sill. Our conceptual model considers pulsatory magma injection from the upper mantle and its propagation along the Moho. We suggest, within this framework, that the spatial and temporal distributions of earthquake hypocenters reflect hydraulic fracturing processes associated with stress propagation due to magma movement.

  5. Evaluating the Relationship Between Seismicity and Subsurface Well Activity in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, L. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between seismicity and subsurface well activity is crucial to evaluating the seismic hazard of transient, non-tectonic seismicity. Several studies have demonstrated correlations between increased frequency of earthquake occurrence and the injection/production of fluids (e.g. oil, water) in nearby subsurface wells in intracontinental settings (e.g. Arkansas, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas). Here, we evaluate all earthquake magnitudes for the past 20-30 years across the diverse seismotectonic settings of Utah. We explore earthquakes within 5 km and subsequent to completion dates of oil and gas wells. We compare seismicity rates prior to well establishment with rates after well establishment in an attempt to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic earthquakes in areas of naturally high background seismicity. In a few central Utah locations, we find that the frequency of shallow (0-10 km) earthquakes increased subsequent to completion of gas wells within 5 km, and at depths broadly similar to bottom hole depths. However, these regions typically correspond to mining regions of the Wasatch Plateau, complicating our ability to distinguish between earthquakes related to either well activity or mining. We calculate earthquake density and well density and compare their ratio (earthquakes per area/wells per area) with several published metrics of seismotectonic setting. Areas with a higher earthquake-well ratio are located in relatively high strain regions (determined from GPS) associated with the Intermountain Seismic Belt, but cannot be attributed to any specific Quaternary-active fault. Additionally, higher ratio areas do not appear to coincide with anomalously high heat flow values, where rocks are typically thermally weakened. Incorporation of timing and volume data for well injection/production would allow for more robust temporal statistical analysis and hazard analysis.

  6. Seismic Response Control Of Structures Using Semi-Active and Passive Variable Stiffness Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Mohamed M. A.

    Controllable devices such as Magneto-Rheological Fluid Dampers, Electro-Rheological Dampers, and controllable friction devices have been studied extensively with limited implementation in real structures. Such devices have shown great potential in reducing seismic demands, either as smart base isolation systems, or as smart devices for multistory structures. Although variable stiffness devices can be used for seismic control of structures, the vast majority of research effort has been given to the control of damping. The primary focus of this dissertation is to evaluate the seismic control of structures using semi-active and passive variable stiffness characteristics. Smart base isolation systems employing variable stiffness devices have been studied, and two semi-active control strategies are proposed. The control algorithms were designed to reduce the superstructure and base accelerations of seismically isolated structures subject to near-fault and far-field ground motions. Computational simulations of the proposed control algorithms on the benchmark structure have shown that excessive base displacements associated with the near-fault ground motions may be better mitigated with the use of variable stiffness devices. However, the device properties must be controllable to produce a wide range of stiffness changes for an effective control of the base displacements. The potential of controllable stiffness devices in limiting the base displacement due to near-fault excitation without compromising the performance of conventionally isolated structures, is illustrated. The application of passive variable stiffness devices for seismic response mitigation of multistory structures is also investigated. A stiffening bracing system (SBS) is proposed to replace the conventional bracing systems of braced frames. An optimization process for the SBS parameters has been developed. The main objective of the design process is to maintain a uniform inter-story drift angle over the

  7. Fault Activity Investigations in the Lower Tagus Valley (Portugal) With Seismic and Geoelectric Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. G.; Gonçalves, R.; Torres, L. M.; Cabral, J.; Mendes-Victor, L. A.

    2004-05-01

    The Lower Tagus River Valley is located in Central Portugal, and includes a large portion of the densely populated area of Lisbon. It is sited in the Lower Tagus Cenozoic Basin, a tectonic depression where up to 2,000 m of Cenozoic sediments are preserved, which was developed in the Neogene as a compressive foredeep basin related to tectonic inversion of former Mesozoic extensional structures. It is only a few hundred kilometers distant from the Eurasia-Africa plate boundary, and is characterized by a moderate seismicity presenting a diffuse pattern, with historical earthquakes having caused serious damage, loss of lives and economical problems. It has therefore been the target of several seismic hazard studies in which extensive geological and geophysical research was carried out on several geological structures. This work focuses on the application of seismic and geoelectric methods to investigate an important NW-SE trending normal fault detected on deep oil-industry seismic reflection profiles in the Tagus Cenozoic Basin. In these seismic sections this fault clearly offsets horizons that are ascribed to the Upper Miocene. However, due to the poor near surface resolution of the seismic data and the fact that the fault is hidden under the recent alluvial cover of the Tagus River, it was not clear whether it displaced the upper sediments of Holocene age. In order to constrain the fault geometry and kinematics and to evaluate its recent tectonic activity, a few high-resolution seismic reflection profiles were acquired and refraction interpretation of the reflection data was performed. Some vertical electrical soundings were also carried out. A complex fault system was detected, apparently with normal and reverse faulting. The collected data strongly supports the possibility that one of the detected faults affects the uppermost Neogene sediments and very probably the Holocene alluvial sediments of the Tagus River. The evidence of recent activity on this fault, its

  8. The Source Physics Experiments and Advances in Seismic Explosion Monitoring Predictive Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Ford, S. R.; Antoun, T.; Pitarka, A.; Xu, H.; Vorobiev, O.; Rodgers, A.; Pyle, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Despite many years of study, a number of seismic explosion phenomena remain incompletely understood. These include the generation of S-waves, the variation of absolute amplitudes with emplacement media differences, and the occasional generation of reversed Rayleigh waves. Advances in numerical methods and increased computational power have improved the physics contained in the modeling software and it is possible to couple non-linear source-region effects to far-field propagation codes to predict seismic observables, thereby allowing end-to-end modeling. However, despite the many sensor records from prior nuclear tests, the data available to develop and validate the simulation codes remain limited in important ways. This is particularly the case for the range of both scaled depths of burial and of source media, especially where full near-field to far-field records are available along with key quantitative parameter data such as depth, material properties and yield. For example, two of the most widely used seismic source models, both derived from the best empirical data, Mueller and Murphy (1971) and Denny and Johnson (1989), predict very different amplitudes for greatly overburied explosions. To provide new data to advance predictive explosion modeling capabilities, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is carrying out a series of seven chemical explosions over a range of depths and sizes in the Source Physics Experiments (SPE). These shots are taking place in the Climax Stock granite at the Nevada National Security Site, the location where reversed Rayleigh waves from a nuclear test were first observed in the 1962 HARDHAT event (e.g. Brune and Pomeroy, 1963). Three of the SPE shots have successfully occurred so far, and were well-recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation including seismic, acoustic, EM, and remote sensing. In parallel, detailed site characterization has been conducted using geologic mapping and sampling, borehole geophysics

  9. Passive Seismic Experiment "13 BB Star" in the Margin of the East European Craton, Northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, M.; Grad, M.; Wilde-Piórko, M.; Suchcicki, J.; Arant, T.

    2014-12-01

    Passive experiment "13 BB star" is dedicated to study deep structure of the Earth's interior in the marginal zone of the East European Craton in northern Poland. The seismic network consists of 13 broadband stations on the area of c. 120 km in diameter. The network is located in the area well recognized from the point of view velocities of sedimentary cover and crustal structure. Good records obtained since summer 2013, and expected during next 1.5 years long recording campaign, should yield images of detailed structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), „410", "?520", and „660" km discontinuities, as well as mantle-core boundary and inner core. The LAB is investigated recently very effectively, mostly using seismic methods because their deep penetration and relatively good resolution. The nature of LAB is still debated, particularly under "cold" Precambrian shields and platforms. We show examples of local and teleseismic records, array transfer function of "13 BB star" network and preliminary noise analysis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC- 2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  10. High-resolution shallow-seismic experiments in sand. Part 2: Velocities in shallow unconsolidated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, R.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.

    1998-07-01

    The authors conducted a shallow high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction experiment on a sandy beach. The depth of investigation was about 2 m. They interpret the data using the Hertz-Mindlin contact theory combined with Gassmann`s equation. These were used to obtain the vertical velocity profile. Then the profile was computed from seismic data using the turning-rays approximation. The normal moveout (NMO) velocity at the depth of 2 m matches the velocity profile. As a result, they developed a method to invert measured velocity from first arrivals, i.e., velocity versus distance into velocity versus depth using only one adjustable parameter. This parameter contains all the information about the internal structure and elasticity of the sand. The lowest velocity observed was about 40 m/s. It is noteworthy that the theoretical lower bound for velocity in dry sand with air is as low as 13 m/s. The authors find that modeling sand as a quartz sphere pack does not quantitatively agree with the measured data. However, the theoretical functional form proves to be useful for the inversion.

  11. Seismic activity of Tokyo area and Philippine Sea plate under Japanese Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Nanjo, K.; Kasahara, K.; Panayotopoulos, Y.; Tsuruoka, H.; Kurashimo, E.; Obara, K.; Hirata, N.; Kimura, H.; Honda, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Japanese government has estimated the probability of earthquake occurrence with magnitude 7-class during the next 30 years as 70 %. This estimation is based on five earthquakes that occurred in this area in the late 120 years. However, it has been revealed that this region is lying on more complicated tectonic condition due to the two subducted plates and the various types of earthquakes which have been caused by. Therefore, it is necessary to classify these earthquakes into inter-plate earthquakes and intra-plate ones. Then, we have been constructing a seismic observation network since 5 years ago. Tokyo Metropolitan area is a densely populated region of about 40 million people. It is the center of Japan both in politics and in economy. So that human activities have been conducting quite busily, this region is unsuitable for seismic observation. Then, we have decided to make an ultra high dense seismic observation network. We named it the Metropolitan Seismometer Observation Network; MeSO-net. MeSO-net consists of 296 seismic stations. Minimum interval is about 2km and average interval is about 5km.We picked the P- and S-wave arrival times manually. We applied double-difference tomography method to the dataset and estimated the velocity structure. We depicted the plate boundaries from the newly developed velocity model. And, we referred to the locations of the repeating earthquakes, the distributions of normal hypocenters and the focal mechanisms. Our plate model became relatively flat and a little shallower than previous one.Seismicity of Metropolitan area after the M9 event was compared to the one before M9 event. The seismic activity is about 4 times as high as before the M9 event occurred. We examined spatial distribution of the activated seismicity with respect to the newly developed plate configuration. The activated events are located on upper boundaries and they have almost thrust type mechanisms. Recently, a slow slip event has occurred on October in

  12. Common features and peculiarities of the seismic activity at Phlegraean Fields, Long Valley, and Vesuvius

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marzocchi, W.; Vilardo, G.; Hill, D.P.; Ricciardi, G.P.; Ricco, C.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed and compared the seismic activity that has occurred in the last two to three decades in three distinct volcanic areas: Phlegraean Fields, Italy; Vesuvius, Italy; and Long Valley, California. Our main goal is to identify and discuss common features and peculiarities in the temporal evolution of earthquake sequences that may reflect similarities and differences in the generating processes between these volcanic systems. In particular, we tried to characterize the time series of the number of events and of the seismic energy release in terms of stochastic, deterministic, and chaotic components. The time sequences from each area consist of thousands of earthquakes that allow a detailed quantitative analysis and comparison. The results obtained showed no evidence for either deterministic or chaotic components in the earthquake sequences in Long Valley caldera, which appears to be dominated by stochastic behavior. In contrast, earthquake sequences at Phlegrean Fields and Mount Vesuvius show a deterministic signal mainly consisting of a 24-hour periodicity. Our analysis suggests that the modulation in seismicity is in some way related to thermal diurnal processes, rather than luni-solar tidal effects. Independently from the process that generates these periodicities on the seismicity., it is suggested that the lack (or presence) of diurnal cycles is seismic swarms of volcanic areas could be closely linked to the presence (or lack) of magma motion.

  13. Seismic evidence for active underplating below the megathrust earthquake zone in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hisanori; Takeda, Tetsuya; Obara, Kazushige; Kasahara, Keiji

    2010-07-01

    Determining the structure of subduction zones is important for understanding mechanisms for the generation of interplate phenomena such as megathrust earthquakes. The peeling off of the uppermost part of a subducting slab and accretion to the bottom of an overlying plate (underplating) at deep regions has been inferred from exhumed metamorphic rocks and deep seismic imaging, but direct seismic evidence of this process is lacking. By comparing seismic reflection profiles with microearthquake distributions in central Japan, we show that repeating microearthquakes occur along the bottom interface of the layer peeling off from the subducting Philippine Sea plate. This region coincides with the location of slow-slip events that may serve as signals for monitoring active underplating. PMID:20616277

  14. Seismic and satellite observations of calving activity at major glacier fronts in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danesi, Stefania; Salimbeni, Simone; Urbini, Stefano; Pondrelli, Silvia; Margheriti, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between oceans and large outlet glaciers in polar regions contributes to the budget of the global water cycle. We have observed the dynamic of sizeable outlet glaciers in Greenland by the analysis of seismic data collected by the regional seismic network Greenland Ice Sheet Monitoring Network (GLISN) trying also to find out correspondence in the glacier tongue evolution derived by the observation of satellite images. By studying the long-period seismic signals at stations located at the mouth of large fjords (e.g. ILULI, NUUG, KULLO), we identify major calving events through the detection of the ground flexure in response to seiche waves generated by iceberg detachments. 
For the time spanning the period between 2010-2014, we fill out calving-event catalogues which can be useful for the estimation of spatial and temporal variations in volume of ice loss at major active fronts in Greenland.

  15. Two-dimensional seismic attenuation images of Stromboli Island using active data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, J.; Del Pezzo, E.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Giampiccolo, E.; Patané, D.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation 2-D images of Stromboli Volcano. We used 21,953 waveforms from air gun shots fired by an oceanographic vessel and recorded at 33 inland and 10 ocean bottom seismometer seismic stations. Coda wave envelopes of the filtered seismic traces were fitted to the energy transport equation in the diffusion approximation, obtaining a couple of separate Qi and Qs in six frequency bands. Using numerically estimated sensitivity kernels for coda waves, separate images of each quality factor were produced. Results appear stable and robust. They show that scattering attenuation prevails over intrinsic attenuation. The scattering pattern shows a strong concordance with the tectonic lineaments in the area, while an area of high total attenuation coincides with the zone where most of the volcanic activity occurs. Our results provide evidence that the most important attenuation effects in volcanic areas are associated with the presence of geological heterogeneities.

  16. A Predictive Model of Daily Seismic Activity Induced by Mining, Developed with Data Mining Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the development and evaluation of a predictive classification model of daily seismic energy emissions induced by longwall mining in sector XVI of the Piast coal mine in Poland. The model uses data on tremor energy, basic characteristics of the longwall face and mined output in this sector over the period from July 1987 to March 2011. The predicted binary variable is the occurrence of a daily sum of tremor seismic energies in a longwall that is greater than or equal to the threshold value of 105 J. Three data mining analytical methods were applied: logistic regression,neural networks, and stochastic gradient boosted trees. The boosted trees model was chosen as the best for the purposes of the prediction. The validation sample results showed its good predictive capability, taking the complex nature of the phenomenon into account. This may indicate the applied model's suitability for a sequential, short-term prediction of mining induced seismic activity.

  17. Seismic sequence near Zakynthos Island, Greece, April 2006: Identification of the activated fault plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpetsidaki, A.; Sokos, E.; Tselentis, G.-A.; Zahradnik, J.

    2010-01-01

    The April 2006 earthquake sequence near Zakynthos (Western Greece) is analysed to identify the fault plane(-s). The sequence (33 events) was relocated to assess physical insight into the hypocenter uncertainty. Moment tensor solution of three major events was performed, simultaneously with the determination of the centroid position. Joint analysis of the hypocenter position, centroid position and nodal planes indicated sub-horizontal fault planes. Moment tensor solutions of 15 smaller events were performed under assumption that the source positions are those of the hypocenters (without seeking centroids). Their focal mechanisms are highly similar and agree with the analysis of the three major events. The preferable seismotectonic interpretation is that the whole sequence activated a single sub-horizontal fault zone at a depth of about 13 km, corresponding to the interplate subduction boundary. Considering that the Ionian Sea is a high-seismicity area, the identification of the seismic fault is significant for the seismic hazard investigation of the region.

  18. Strike-slip fault Kinematics and mechanics at the seismic cycle time-scale : Results from new analogue model experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniven, Yannick; Dominguez, Stéphane; Soliva, Roger; Cattin, Rodolphe; Peyret, Michel; Chéry, Jean; Romano, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The average seismic cycle duration extends from hundred to a few thousands years but geodetic measurements, including trilateration, GPS, Insar and seismological data extend over less than one century. This short time observation scale renders difficult, then, to constrain the role of key parameters such as fault friction and geometry, crust rheology, stress and strain rate that control the kinematics and mechanics of active faults. To solve this time scale issue, we have developed a new experimental set-up that reproduces scaled micro-earthquakes and several hundreds of seismic cycles along a strike-slip fault. The model is constituted by two polyurethane foam plates laterally in contact, lying on a basal silicone layer, which simulate the mechanical behaviour of an elastoplastic upper crust over a ductile lower crust, respectively. To simulate the boundary conditions of a strike-slip fault, a computerized motoreductor system moves the two compartments on an opposite sens and at a constant very low velocity (a few µm/s). The model spatial and temporal scaling, deduces from analog material physical and mechanical parameters, implies that 1 cm in the model represents 2-3 km in the nature and 1 s is equivalent to 5-15 years. Surface-horizontal strain field is quantified by sub-pixel correlation of digital camera pictures recorded every 16 µm of displacement. For each experience about 2000 horizontal-velocity field measurements are recorded. The analysis of model-interseismic and coseismic surface displacements and their comparison to seismogenic natural faults demonstrate that our analog model reproduces correctly both near and far-field surface strains. To compare the experiences, we have developed several algorithms that allow studying the main spatial and temporal evolution of the physical parameters and surface deformation processes that characterise the seismic cycle (magnitudes, stress, strain, friction coefficients, interseismic locking depth, recurrence

  19. Statistical Analysis of the Correlation between Microwave Emission Anomalies and Seismic Activity Based on AMSR-E Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    qin, kai; Wu, Lixin; De Santis, Angelo; Zhang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Pre-seismic thermal IR anomalies and ionosphere disturbances have been widely reported by using the Earth observation system (EOS). To investigate the possible physical mechanisms, a series of detecting experiments on rock loaded to fracturing were conducted. Some experiments studies have demonstrated that microwave radiation energy will increase under the loaded rock in specific frequency and the feature of radiation property can reflect the deformation process of rock fracture. This experimental result indicates the possibility that microwaves are emitted before earthquakes. Such microwaves signals are recently found to be detectable before some earthquake cases from the brightness temperature data obtained by the microwave-radiometer Advanced Microwave-Scanning Radiometer for the EOS (AMSR-E) aboard the satellite Aqua. This suggested that AMSR-E with vertical- and horizontal-polarization capability for six frequency bands (6.925, 10.65, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz) would be feasible to detect an earthquake which is associated with rock crash or plate slip. However, the statistical analysis of the correlation between satellite-observed microwave emission anomalies and seismic activity are firstly required. Here, we focus on the Kamchatka peninsula to carry out a statistical study, considering its high seismicity activity and the dense orbits covering of AMSR-E in high latitudes. 8-years (2003-2010) AMSR-E microwave brightness temperature data were used to reveal the spatio-temporal association between microwave emission anomalies and 17 earthquake events (M>5). Firstly, obvious spatial difference of microwave brightness temperatures between the seismic zone at the eastern side and the non-seismic zone the western side within the Kamchatka peninsula are found. Secondly, using both vertical- and horizontal-polarization to extract the temporal association, it is found that abnormal changes of microwave brightness temperatures appear generally 2 months before the

  20. Seismic activity triggered by water wells in the Paraná Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AssumpçãO, Marcelo; Yamabe, Tereza H.; Barbosa, José Roberto; Hamza, Valiya; Lopes, Afonso E. V.; Balancin, Lucas; Bianchi, Marcelo B.

    2010-07-01

    Triggered seismicity is commonly associated with deep water reservoirs or injection wells where water is injected at high pressure into the reservoir rock. However, earth tremors related solely to the opening of groundwater wells are extremely rare. Here we present a clear case of seismicity induced by pore-pressure changes following the drilling of water wells that exploit a confined aquifer in the intracratonic Paraná Basin of southeastern Brazil. Since 2004, shallow seismic activity, with magnitudes up to 2.9 and intensities V MM, has been observed near deep wells (120-200 m) that were drilled in early 2003 near the town of Bebedouro. The wells were drilled for irrigation purposes, cross a sandstone layer about 60-80 m thick and extract water from a confined aquifer in fractured zones between basalt flow layers. Seismic activity, mainly event swarms, has occurred yearly since 2004, mostly during the rainy season when the wells are not pumped. During the dry season when the wells are pumped almost continuously, the activity is very low. A seismographic network, installed in March 2005, has located more than 2000 microearthquakes. The events are less than 1 km deep (mostly within the 0.5 km thick basalt layer) and cover an area roughly 1.5 km × 5 km across. The seismicity generally starts in a small area and expands to larger distances with an equivalent hydraulic diffusivity ranging from 0.06 to 0.6 m2/s. Geophysical and geothermal logging of several wells in the area showed that water from the shallow sandstone aquifer enters the well at the top and usually forms waterfalls. The waterfalls flow down the sides of the wells and feed the confined, fractured aquifer in the basalt layer at the bottom. Two seismic areas are observed: the main area surrounds several wells that are pumped continuously during the dry season, and a second area near another well (about 10 km from the first area) that is not used for irrigation and not pumped regularly. The main area

  1. Characterising Seismicity at Alutu, an Actively Deforming Volcano in the Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, M.; Nowacki, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Wookey, J. M.; Biggs, J.; Bastow, I. D.; Ayele, A.; Bedada, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) provides a unique example of the tectonic and volcanic processes occuring during the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading. Situated 100 km south of Addis Ababa along the eastern rift margin, Alutu is a silicic stratovolcano that geodetic measurements (InSAR and GPS) have shown is actively deforming. Though the volcano has received relatively little scientific attention it is also a site of economic significance as a geothermal power plant resides within the caldera. As part of ARGOS (Alutu Research Geophysical ObservationS), a multi-disciplinary project aiming to investigate the magmatic and hydrothermal processes occuring at Alutu, a seismic network of 12 broadband seismometers was deployed in January 2012. Other components of ARGOS include InSAR, GPS, geologic mapping and magnetotellurics. From the seismic dataset, P- and S-wave arrivals across the array were manually picked and used to locate events using a non-linear earthquake location algorithm (NonLinLoc) and a predefined 1D velocity model. Perturbations were later applied to this velocity model to investigate the sensitivity of the locations and evaluate the true uncertainties of the solutions. Over 1000 events were successfully located during 2012, where picks were possible at 4 or more stations. Seismicity clusters at both shallow depths (z<2 km) beneath the caldera and at deeper depths of 5-15 km. There is a significant increase in seismicity during the rainy months, suggesting the shallow events may be related to the hydrothermal system. We interpret the deeper events as being magmatic in origin. Events are also located along the eastern border faults that bound the outer edges of the MER and highlights that seismicity arises concurrently via tectonic processes. An adapted version of Richter's original local magnitude scale (ML) to account for attenuation within the MER (Keir et al., 2006) was then used to compute magnitudes for the best located events

  2. Temporal variation of mass-wasting activity in Mount St. Helens crater, Washington, U. S. A. indicated by seismic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, H.H. )

    1991-11-01

    In the crater of Mount St. Helens, formed during the eruption of 18 May 1980, thousands of rockfalls may occur in a single day, and some rock and dirty-snow avalanches have traveled more than 1 km from their source. Because most seismic activity in the crater is produced by mass wasting, the former can be used to monitor the latter. The number and amplitude of seismic events per unit time provide a generalized measure of mass-wasting activity. In this study 1-min averages of seismic amplitudes were used as an index of rockfall activity during summer and early fall. Plots of this index show the diurnal cycle of rockfall activity and establish that the peak in activity occurs in mid to late afternoon. A correlation coefficient of 0.61 was found between daily maximum temperature and average seismic amplitude, although this value increases to 0.72 if a composite temperature variable that includes the maximum temperature of 1 to 3 preceding days as well as the present day is used. Correlation with precipitation is much weaker.

  3. DHOFAR Seismic Experiment: First results to understand the breakup processes in a passive margin context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, C.; Leroy, S.; D'Acremont, E.; Pointu, A.; Ebinger, C.; Brisbourne, A.; Denton, P.; Al-Lazki, A.; Al-Azri, H.; Bin Monshir Bahlaf, S.; Brunet, C.; Famin, V.; Labrousse, L.

    2004-12-01

    The process of strain localisation preceding the onset of seafloor spreading is still poorly understood, though extensively studied. The reason is the differences in lithospheric properties, proximity to hot spot(s) and melt generation and extraction that lead to a variety of structural styles with major differences. The eastern Gulf of Aden represents a natural laboratory to study passive continental margins for many reasons: post-rift sedimentary strata are relatively thin, both onshore and nearshore structures are well-exposed, and conjugate margins can be precisely reconstructed. A first cruise (ENCENS-SHEBA), in 2000, has established the structural and geophysical framework using bathymetric swath mapping and underway geophysics. Later on, the Dhofar seismic experiment consisted in the deployment of a network of 11 broadband seismic stations from March 2003 to March 2004 on the northern margin, in the Dhofar area, southern Oman. This experiment was dedicated to the detailed study of the crust and upper mantle beneath the northern passive margin. CMG40TD 3-components seismometers from SEIS-UK network were used. We have recorded hundreds of teleseismic events with a good azimuthal coverage. Three main studies are then attempted. First, a teleseismic image of the first 200 km depth will be established using the P- and PKP-phases. This will allow a 3D representation of crustal and upper mantle velocity structures. We present here the preliminary results from the study of the traveltime residuals. The image resolution shall be enhanced by combining gravity data. Second, a receiver function analysis will locally determine the depth of the main interfaces (eg, Moho boundary). Finally, events recorded within the 1000-6000 km distance range will improve the regional S-wave velocity structure in this area and will help to locate the main regional wide structures related to this extended area.

  4. Asymmetric active seismicity along the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, John R.; Voss, Peter H.; Lavier, Luc L.

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading ridges are frequently characterised by spreading segments that are largely magma starved. Spreading along such segments does not occur by crustal creation/accretion processes such as intrusions, diking and volcanism, but rather by mechanical extension of the lithosphere, exposing the mantle to seafloor where it interacts with seawater to form serpentinite. Such exhumation is thought to occur along detachment faults that form concave down surfaces and produce an extensional geometry that is highly asymmetric. A consequence of all models that have been developed to simulate this type of extension is that stress and strain is focused primarily on the footwall block of the spreading system. This would predict that at any given time, only one side of the system should show active seismicity. In 2001, the Gakkel Ridge was extensively sampled by dredging during the AMORE cruise. These samples showed that the ridge is divided into distinct segments that today are either magmatically robust (only basalts recovered) or magmatically starved (dominantly serpentinised peridotite and gabbros recovered). We extracted earthquake data along the Gakkel Ridge from the global catalogs to investigate if these distinct segments exhibit any differences in active seismicity. We show that the western volcanic zone shows symmetric active seismicity, with earthquakes occurring on both sides of the ridge axis along a relatively restricted region. In contrast, the sparsely magmatic zone shows active seismicity dominantly along along the southern half of the ridge, with comparatively little seismicity to the north. These results are consistent with the proposed models for the formation of amagmatic spreading centers.

  5. Study of Seismic Activity Using Geophysical and Radio Physical Equipment for Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvavadze, N.; Tsereteli, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most dangerous and destructive natural hazards are earthquakes, which is confirmed by recent earthquakes such as Nepal 2015, Japan and Turkey 2011. Because of this, study of seismic activity is important. Studying any process, it is necessary to use different methods of observation, which allows us to increase accuracy of obtained data. Seismic activity is a complex problem and its study needs different types of observation methods. Two main problems of seismic activity study are: reliable instrumental observations and earthquake short-term predictions. In case of seismic risks it is necessary to have reliable accelerometer data. One of the most promising field in earthquake short-term prediction is very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic wave propagation in ionosphere observation. To study Seismic activity of Caucasus region, was created observation complex using Accelerometer, Velocimeter and VLF electromagnetic waves received from communication stations (located in different area of the world) reflected from low ionosphere. System is created and operates at Tbilisi State University Ionosphere Observatory, near Tbilisi in Tabakhmela 42.41'70 N, 44.80'92 E, Georgia. Data obtained is sent to a local server located at M. Nodia Institute of Geophysics, TSU, for storage and processing. Diagram for complex is presented. Also data analysis methods were created and preliminary processing was done. In this paper we present some of the results: Earthquake data from ionosphere observations as well as local earthquakes recorded with accelerometer and velocimeter. Complex is first in 6 that will be placed around Georgia this year. We plan on widening network every year.

  6. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: program objectives; program features; flight experiment features; current activities; MACE development model lab testing; MACE test article deployed on STS middeck; and development model testing.

  7. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David W.

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: program objectives; program features; flight experiment features; current activities; MACE development model lab testing; MACE test article deployed on STS middeck; and development model testing.

  8. Elevated Seismic Activity Beneath the Slumbering Morne aux Diables Volcano, Northern Dominica and the Monitoring Role of the Seismic Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, R. B.; Robertson, R. E.; Abraham, W.; Cole, P.; de Roche, T.; Edwards, S.; Higgins, M.; Johnson, M.; Joseph, E. P.; Latchman, J.; Lynch, L.; Nath, N.; Ramsingh, C.; Stewart, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Since June 2009, periods of elevated seismic activity have been experienced around the flanks of Morne Aux Diables Volcano in northern Dominica. This long-dormant volcano is a complex of 7 andesitic lava domes with a central depression where a cold soufrière is evident. Prior to this activity, seismicity was very quiet except for a short period in 2000 and an intense short-lived swarm in April 2003. The most recent earthquake activity has been regularly felt by residents in villages on all flanks of the complex. In Dec 09/Jan10, scientists from the Seismic Research Centre (SRC), based in Trinidad & Tobago, in collaboration with staff of the Office of Disaster Management (ODM) and Dominica Public Seismic Network (DPSN) improved the monitoring capacity around this volcano from 1 to 7 seismic stations. Earthquakes are determined to be volcano-tectonic in nature and located at shallow depths (<4 km) beneath the central depression. Additionally, in Jan/Feb 10 geothermal sampling was undertaken and 2 permanent GPS sites were deployed. Public information leaflets prepared by SRC scientists using a "Question & Answer" format have been distributed to concerned citizens whilst many public meetings were carried out by ODM staff. Field investigations indicate that the previous Late Pleistocene activity of Morne Aux Diables switched from Pelèan dome growth and gravitational collapse to more explosive pumice-falls and associated ignimbrites, both styles forming extensive pyroclastic fans around the central complex. The town of Portsmouth is located on one of these fans ~5 km southwest of the central depression. Sporadic, short bursts of seismic activity continue at the time of writing.

  9. Investigation of the relationships between seismic activities and radon level in western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tarakçı, M; Harmanşah, C; Saç, M M; İçhedef, M

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of radon activity is determined from pre-earthquake data. Analysis using Normal, Gamma, Weibull and Rayleigh distributions indicates that the variation of radon levels in seismically active regions is best described by a normal distribution. It was observed that radon levels would change in compressive fault lines prior to earthquake. Besides that it tended to increase before the earthquake and then decrease towards the time of earthquake occurrences. PMID:24215813

  10. Testing the recent Santorini seismic activity for possible tidal triggering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael E.; Arabelos, Dimitrios N.; Vergos, George

    2013-04-01

    Applying the Hi(stogram)Cum(ulation) method, which was introduced recently by Cadicheanu, van Ruymbecke and Zhu (2007), we analyze the series of the earthquakes occurred in the last 50 years in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ). The result of the analysis for all the areas indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations and the same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identification of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence and we check if the recent increase in the seismic activity at the Santorini island complex indicate that the faults Kameni and Columbo (to which the seismicity is clustered) (Chouliaras et al. 2013) are mature for a stronger earthquake. In this paper we present the results of this test. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M andZhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the seismic area of Mygdonia basin, North Greece, in

  11. Analysis of Seismic Activity of the last 15 Years Nearby Puerto Rico and Caribbean Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Torres-Ortíz, D. M.; Fernández-Heredia, A. I.; Martínez-Cruzado, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    An earthquake catalog of the seismicity occurred during the last 15 years in the Caribbean region, nearby the vicinity of Puerto Rico Island (PRI) was compiled in order to capture the big picture of the regional seismic activity ratio and in particular at the epicentral regions of several historical and instrumentally recorded (during 2008-20015) large to moderate magnitude earthquakes occurred nearby PRI in onshore and offshore, which include the M6.4 earthquake of 01/13/2014, the largest earthquake recorded instrumentally nearby PRI. From the point of view of joint temporal-spatial distribution of epicenters, episodic temporal-spatial seismic activity is clearly seen as temporal-spatial concentrations during certain time intervals in different regions. These localized concentrations of epicenters that occur during certain time intervals in well localized/concentrated regions may suggest "seismic gaps" that shows no regular time interval, neither spatial pattern. In the epicentral region of the M6.4 01/13/2014 earthquake and the historical Mona Passage M7.5 earthquake of 10/11/1918, episodic concentrations in time and space of small magnitude earthquakes epicenters is evident, however do not show temporal pattern. Preliminary results of statistical analysis of an ongoing research in terms of the parameter b (Gutenberg-Richter relationship), and the Omori's law with the aim to relate the tectonic framework of the region (or sub-regions) such as structural heterogeneity stress are here presented/discussed.

  12. Seismic Spatial Autocorrelation as a Technique to Track Changes in the Permafrost Active Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present preliminary results from an effort to continuously track freezing and thawing of the permafrost active layer using a small-aperture seismic array. The 7-element array of three-component posthole seismometers is installed on permafrost at Poker Flat Research Range, near Fairbanks, Alaska. The array is configured in two three-station circles with 75 and 25 meter radii that share a common center station. This configuration is designed to resolve omnidirectional, high-frequency seismic microtremor (i.e. ambient noise). Microtremor is continuously monitored and the data are processed using the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. The resulting SPAC coefficients are then inverted for shear-wave velocity structure versus depth. Thawed active-layer soils have a much slower seismic velocity than frozen soils, allowing us to track the depth and intensity of thawing. Persistent monitoring on a permanent array would allow for a way to investigate year-to-year changes without costly site visits. Results from the seismic array will compared to, and correlated with, other measurement techniques, such as physical probing and remote sensing methods. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Seismicity characteristics of a potentially active Quaternary volcano: The Tatun Volcano Group, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos I.; Lin, Cheng-Horng; Liang, Wen-Tzong

    2007-02-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is located at the northern tip of Taiwan, near the capital Taipei and close to two nuclear power plants. Because of lack of any activity in historical times it has been classified as an extinct volcano, even though more recent studies suggest that TVG might have been active during the last 20 ka. In May 2003 a seismic monitoring project at the TVG area was initiated by deploying eight three-component seismic stations some of them equipped with both short-period and broadband sensors. During the 18 months observation period local seismicity mainly consisted of high frequency earthquakes either occurring as isolated events, or as a continuous sequence in the form of spasmodic bursts. Mixed and low frequency events were also present during the same period, even though they occurred only rarely. Arrival times from events with clear P-/S-wave phases were inverted in order to obtain a minimum 1D velocity model with station corrections. Probabilistic nonlinear earthquake locations were calculated for all these events using the newly derived velocity model. Most high frequency seismicity appeared to be concentrated near the areas of hydrothermal activity, forming tight clusters at depths shallower than 4 km. Relative locations, calculated using the double-difference method and utilising catalogue and cross-correlation differential traveltimes, showed insignificant differences when compared to the nonlinear probabilistic locations. In general, seismicity in the TVG area seems to be primarily driven by circulation of hydrothermal fluids as indicated by the occurrence of spasmodic bursts, mixed/low frequency events and a b-value (1.17 ± 0.1) higher than in any other part of Taiwan. These observations, that are similar to those reported in other dormant Quaternary volcanoes, indicate that a magma chamber may still exist beneath TVG and that a future eruption or period of unrest should not be considered unlikely.

  14. Seismic activity in the Sunnyside mining district, Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah, during 1968

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunrud, C. Richard; Maberry, John O.; Hernandez, Jerome H.

    1970-01-01

    More than 20,000 local earth tremors were recorded by the seismic monitoring network in the Sunnyside mining district during 1968. This is about 40 percent of the number of tremors recorded by the network in 1967. In 1968 a total of 281 tremors were of sufficient magnitude to be located accurately--about 50 percent of the number of tremors in 1967 that were located accurately. As in previous years, nearly all the earth tremors originated near, or within a few thousand feet of, the mine workings. This distribution indicates that mine-induced stress changes caused most of the seismic activity. However, over periods of weeks and months there were significant changes in the distribution of seismic activity caused by tremors that were not directly related to mining but probably were caused by adjustment of natural stresses 6r by a complex combination of both natural and mine-induced stress changes. In 1968 the distribution of tremor hypocenters varied considerably with time, relative to active mining areas and to faults present in the mine workings. During the first 6 months, most tremors originated along or near faults that trend close to or through the active mine workings. However, in the last 6 months, the tremor hypocenters tended to concentrate in the rock mass closer to, or around, the active mining areas. This shift in concentration of seismic activity with time has been noted throughout the district many times since recording began in 1963, and is apparently caused by spontaneous releases of stored strain energy resulting from mine-induced stress changes. These spontaneous releases of strain energy, together with rock creep, apparently are the mechanism of adjustment within the rock mass toward equilibrium conditions, which are continually disrupted by mining. Although potentially hazardous bumps were rare in the Sunnyside mining district during 1968, smaller bumps and rock falls were more common in a given active mining area whenever hypocenters of larger

  15. Characterization of blocks impacts from seismic signal: insights from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, M.; Mangeney, A.; Toussaint, R.; de Rosny, J.; Sainte-Marie, J.; Shapiro, N.

    2014-12-01

    Rockfalls, debris flows and rock avalanches represent a major natural hazard for the population in mountainous, volcanic and coastal areas but their direct observation on the field is very difficult. Recent field studies showed that gravitational instabilities can be detected, localized and characterized thanks to the seismic signal they generate. Therefore, a burning challenge for risks assessment related to these events is to obtain quantiative informations on the characteristics of the rockfalls (mass, speed, extension,...) from the properties of the signal (seismic energy, frequencies,...). Using a theoretical model of viscoelastic impact of a sphere on a plane, we develop analytical scaling laws relating the energy radiated in elastic waves, the energy dissipated in viscoelasticity during the impact and the frequencies of the generated acoustic signal to the mass m and the impact speed Vz of the sphere and to the elastic parameters of the involved materials. The elastic energy is shown to vary as m5/3Vz11/5 on plates and as mVz13/5 on blocks, regardless of the elastic parameters. The energy dissipated in viscoelasticity does not depend on the support thickness and varies as m2/3Vz11/5. The mean frequency of the generated signal is inversely proportional to the impact duration. Then, we conduct simple laboratory experiments that consist in dropping spherical beads of different size and materials and small gravels on thin plates of glass and Plexiglass and rock blocks. The elastic energy emitted by an impact on the supports is first quantitatively estimated and compared to the potential energy of fall and to the potential energy change during the shock. We observe a quantitative agreement between experimental data and the analytical scaling laws, even when we use small gravels instead of spherical beads as impactors. These experiments allows to valid the theoretical model and to establish the energy budget of an impact. In the experiments, piezoelectric

  16. The RAMESSES experiment-II. Evidence for accumulated melt beneath a slow spreading ridge from wide-angle refraction and multichannel reflection seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, D. A.; Peirce, C.; Sinha, M. C.

    1998-12-01

    The RAMESSES study (Reykjanes Axial Melt Experiment: Structural Synthesis from Electromagnetics and Seismics) targeted an apparently magmatically active axial volcanic ridge (AVR), centred on 57°45'N at the Reykjanes Ridge, with the aim of investigating the processes of crustal accretion at a slow spreading mid-ocean ridge. As part of this multicomponent experiment, airgun and explosive wide-angle seismic data were recorded by 10 digital ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) along profiles oriented both across- and along-axis. Coincident normal-incidence seismic, bathymetry and underway gravity and magnetic data were also collected. Forward modelling of the seismic and gravity data has revealed layer thicknesses, velocities and densities similar to those observed elsewhere within the oceanic crust near mid-ocean ridges. At 57°45'N, the Reykjanes Ridge has a crustal thickness of approximately 7.5 km on-axis. However, the crust is modelled to decrease in thickness slightly off-axis (i.e. with age), which implies that full crustal thickness is achieved on-axis and that it is subsequently thinned, most likely, by off-axis extension. Modelling also indicates that the AVR is underlain by a thin (~100 m), narrow (~4 km) melt lens some 2.5 km beneath the seafloor, which overlies a broader zone of partial melt approximately 8 km in width. Thus the results of this study provide the first clear evidence for a crustal magma chamber beneath any slow spreading ridge. The size and depth of this magma chamber (the melt lens and underlying zone of partial melt) are similar to those observed beneath fast and intermediate spreading ridges, which implies that the processes of crustal accretion are similar at all spreading rates. Hence the lack of previous observations of magma chambers beneath slow spreading ridges is probably temporally related to the periods of magmatic activity being considerably shorter and more widely spaced in time than at fast and intermediate spreading ridges.

  17. Seismic results from DOE`s non-proliferation experiment: A comparison of chemical and nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, M.; Goldstein, P.; Mayeda, K.; Walter, W.

    1995-01-01

    The basic results from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) NonProliferation Experiment (NPE) for seismic signal generation are that the source function for a chemical explosion is equivalent to that of a nuclear explosion of about twice the yield and that the seismic moment measurements are consistent between freefield, local, and regional measurements. In addition, evidence was found that Pn in the Basin and Range province of the western United States is a turning ray and is simply proportional to the source function while the transfer functions for Pg and Lg are low-pass in nature.

  18. Lower crustal deformation beneath the central Transverse Ranges, southern California: Results from the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godfrey, N.J.; Fuis, G.S.; Langenheim, V.; Okaya, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    We present a P wave velocity model derived from active source seismic data collected during the 1994 Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment. Our model extends previously published upper crustal velocity models to mantle depths. Our model was developed by both ray tracing through a layered model and calculating travel times through a gridded model. It includes an 8-km-thick crustal root centered beneath the surface trace of the San Andreas fault, north of the highest topography in the San Gabriel Mountains. A simple mass balance calculation suggests that ???36 km of north-south shortening across the San Andreas fault in the central Transverse Ranges could have formed this root. If north-south compression began when the "Big Bend" in the San Andreas fault formed at ???5 Ma, 36 km of shortening implies a north-south contraction rate of ???7.1 mm/yr across the central Transverse Ranges. If, instead, north-south compression began when the Transverse Ranges formed at 3.4-3.9 Ma, 36 km of shortening implies a contraction rate of 9.2-10.6 mm/yr. North of the San Andreas fault, the Mojave Desert crust has a low-velocity (6.3 km/s) mid and lower crust and a 28-km-deep Moho. South of the San Andreas fault, beneath the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley basins, there is a fast (6.6-6.8 km/s), thick (10-12 km) lower crust with a 27-km-deep Moho. Farther south still, the lower crust of the Continental Borderland is fast (6.6-6.8 km/s) and thin (5 km) with a shallow (22 km deep) Moho.

  19. Elevated shear strength of sediments on active margins: Evidence for seismic strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Derek E.; DeVore, Joshua R.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes are a primary trigger of submarine landslides, yet some of the most seismically active areas on Earth show a surprisingly low frequency of submarine landslides. Here we show that within the uppermost 100 m below seafloor (mbsf) in previously unfailed sediment, active margins have elevated shear strength by a factor of 2-3 relative to the same interval on passive margins. The elevated shear strength is seen in a global survey of undrained shear strength with depth as well as a normalized analysis that accounts for lithology and stress state. The enhanced shear strength is highest within the uppermost 10 mbsf. These results indicate that large areas of modern day slopes on active margins have enhanced slope stability, which may explain the relative paucity of landslides. These findings lend support to the seismic strengthening hypothesis that the repeated exposure to earthquake energy gradually increases shear strength by shear-induced compaction.

  20. Passive seismic experiment and receiver functions analysis to determine crustal structure at the contact of the northern Dinarides and southwestern Pannonian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šumanovac, Franjo; Hegedűs, Endre; Orešković, Jasna; Kolar, Saša; Kovács, Attila C.; Dudjak, Darko; Kovács, István J.

    2016-06-01

    Passive seismic experiment was carried out at the SW contact of the Dinarides and Pannonian basin to determine the crustal structure and velocity discontinuities. The aim of the experiment was to define the relationship between the Adriatic microplate and the Pannonian segment as a part of the European plate. Most of the temporary seismic stations were deployed in Croatia along the Alp07 profile-a part of the active-source ALP 2002 project. About 300-km-long profile stretches from Istra peninsula to the Drava river, in a WSW-ESE direction. Teleseismic events recorded on 13 temporary seismic stations along the profile were analysed by P-receiver function method. Two types of characteristic receiver functions (RF) have been identified, belonging to Dinaridic and Pannonian crusts as defined on the Alp07 profile, while in transitional zone there are both types. Three major crustal discontinuities can be identified for the Dinaridic type: sedimentary basement, intracrustal discontinuity and Mohorovičić discontinuity, whereas the Pannonian type revealed only two discontinuities. The intracrustal discontinuity was not observed in the Pannonian type, thus pointing to a single-layered crust in the Pannonian basin. Two interpretation methods were applied: forward modelling of the receiver functions and H-κ stacking method, and the results were compared with the active-source seismic data at deep refraction profile Alp07. The receiver function modelling has given reliable results of the Moho depths that are in accordance with the seismic refraction results at the end of the Alp07 profile, that is in the area of Pannonian crust characterized by simple crustal structure and low seismic velocities (Vp between 5.9 and 6.2 km s-1). In the Dinarides and its peripheral parts, receiver function modelling regularly gives greater Moho depths, up to +15 per cent, due to more complex crustal structure. The depths of the Moho calculated by the H-κ stacking method vary within wide

  1. Passive seismic experiment and receiver functions analysis to determine crustal structure at the contact of the northern Dinarides and southwestern Pannonian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šumanovac, Franjo; Hegedűs, Endre; Orešković, Jasna; Kolar, Saša; Kovács, Attila C.; Dudjak, Darko; Kovács, István J.

    2016-03-01

    Passive seismic experiment was carried out at the SW contact of the Dinarides and Pannonian basin to determine the crustal structure and velocity discontinuities. The aim of the experiment was to define the relationship between the Adriatic microplate and the Pannonian segment as a part of the European plate. Most of the temporary seismic stations were deployed in Croatia along the Alp07 profile - a part of the active-source ALP 2002 project. About 300 km long profile stretches from Istra peninsula to the Drava river, in a WSW-ESE direction. Teleseismic events recorded on 13 temporary seismic stations along the profile were analysed by P-receiver function method. Two types of characteristic receiver functions (RF) have been identified, belonging to Dinaridic and Pannonian crusts as defined on the Alp07 profile, while in transitional zone there are both types. Three major crustal discontinuities can be identified for the Dinaridic type: sedimentary basement, intracrustal discontinuity and Mohorovičić discontinuity, whereas the Pannonian type revealed only two discontinuities. The intracrustal discontinuity was not observed in the Pannonian type, thus pointing to a single-layered crust in the Pannonian basin. Two interpretation methods were applied: forward modelling of the receiver functions and H-κ stacking method, and the results were compared with the active-source seismic data at deep refraction profile Alp07. The receiver function modelling has given reliable results of the Moho depths that are in accordance with the seismic refraction results at the end of the Alp07 profile, i.e. in the area of Pannonian crust characterised by simple crustal structure and low seismic velocities (Vp between 5.9 and 6.2 km s-1). In the Dinarides and its peripheral parts, receiver function modelling regularly gives greater Moho depths, up to +15%, due to more complex crustal structure. The depths of the Moho calculated by the H-κ stacking method vary within wide limits (±13

  2. Transition from slab to slabless: Results from the 1993 Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaudoin, B.C.; Godfrey, N.J.; Klemperer, S.L.; Lendl, C.; Trehu, A.M.; Henstock, T.J.; Levander, A.; Holl, J.E.; Meltzer, A.S.; Luetgert, J.H.; Mooney, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    Three seismic refraction-reflection profiles, part of the Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment, allow us to compare and contrast crust and upper mantle of the North American margin before and after it is modified by passage of the Mendocino triple junction. Upper crustal velocity models reveal an asymmetric Great Valley basin overlying Sierran or ophiolitic rocks at the latitude of Fort Bragg, California, and overlying Sierran or Klamath rocks near Redding, California. In addition, the upper crustal velocity structure indicates that Franciscan rocks underlie the Klamath terrane east of Eureka, California. The Franciscan complex is, on average, laterally homogeneous and is thickest in the triple junction region. North of the triple junction, the Gorda slab can be traced 150 km inboard from the Cascadia subduction zone. South of the triple junction, strong precritical reflections indicate partial melt and/or metamorphic fluids at the base of the crust or in the upper mantle. Breaks in these reflections are correlated with the Maacama and Bartlett Springs faults, suggesting that these faults extend at least to the mantle. We interpret our data to indicate tectonic thickening of the Franciscan complex in response to passage of the Mendocino triple junction and an associated thinning of these rocks south of the triple junction due to assimilation into melt triggered by upwelling asthenosphere. The region of thickened Franciscan complex overlies a zone of increased scattering, intrinsic attenuation, or both, resulting from mechanical mixing of lithologies and/or partial melt beneath the onshore projection of the Mendocino fracture zone. Our data reveal that we have crossed the southern edge of the Gorda slab and that this edge and/or the overlying North American crust may have fragmented because of the change in stress presented by the edge.

  3. Seismicity and eruptive activity at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala: February 1975 -January 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuan, A.T.E.; McNutt, S.R.; Harlow, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    We examine seismic and eruptive activity at Fuego Volcano (14??29???N, 90?? 53???W), a 3800-m-high stratovolcano located in the active volcanic arc of Guatemala. Eruptions at Fuego are typically short-lived vulcanian eruptions producing ash falls and ash flows of high-alumina basalt. From February 1975 to December 1976, five weak ash eruptions occurred, accompanied by small earthquake swarms. Between 0 and 140 (average ??? 10) A-type or high-frequency seismic events per day with M > 0.5 were recorded during this period. Estimated thermal energies for each eruption are greater by a factor of 106 than cumulative seismic energies, a larger ratio than that reported for other volcanoes. Over 4000 A-type events were recorded January 3-7, 1977 (cumulative seismic energy ??? 109 joules), yet no eruption occurred. Five 2-hour-long pulses of intense seismicity separated by 6-hour intervals of quiescence accounted for the majority of events. Maximum likelihood estimates of b-values range from 0.7 ?? 0.2 to 2.1 ?? 0.4 with systematically lower values corresponding to the five intense pulses. The low values suggest higher stress conditions. During the 1977 swarm, a tiltmeter located 6 km southeast of Fuego recorded a 14 ?? 3 microradian tilt event (down to SW). This value is too large to represent a simple change in the elastic strain field due to the earthquake swarm. We speculate that the earthquake swarm and tilt are indicative of subsurface magma movement. ?? 1984.

  4. The Effect of Recent Volcanic Activity on the Seismic Structure of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, M. E.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Pratt, M. J.; Shore, P.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Rambolamanana, G.; Andriampenomanana Ny Ony, F. S. T.; Tsiriandrimanana, R.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic structure of Madagascar is determined using ambient-noise and two-plane-wave earthquake surface waves analyses. A deep low-velocity anomaly is seen in regions of recent volcanic activity in the central and northern regions of the island. The primary data used are from the 2011-2013 MACOMO (Madagascar, the Comoros, and Mozambique) broadband seismic array from the PASSCAL program of IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology), funded by the NSF. Additional data came from the RHUM-RUM project (led by G. Barruol and K. Sigloch), the Madagascar Seismic Profile (led by F. Tilmann), and the GSN. For the ambient-noise study, Rayleigh wave green's functions for all interstation paths are extracted from the broadband seismic data recorded from August 2011 until October 2013. Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion curves are extracted in the 8 - 50 s period range, identifying shallow crustal structure. For deeper structure, the two-plane-wave method is used on teleseismic earthquake data to obtain surface wave phase velocities in the 20 - 182 s period range. In the inversion, a finite-frequency kernel is used for each period, and a 1-D shear velocity structure is determined at each location. A three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle is obtained from assembling the 1-D models. Preliminary results show a good correlation between the Rayleigh wave velocities and the geology of Madagascar, which includes areas of ancient Archaean craton. The slowest seismic velocities are associated with known volcanic regions in both the central and northern regions, which have experienced volcanic activity within the past million years.

  5. Regional Seismic Signals from Chemical Explosions, Nuclear Explosions and Earthquakes: Results from the Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Gok, R; Mayeda, K; Sicherman, A; Bonner, J; Leidig, M

    2005-09-02

    Routine industrial mining explosions play two important roles in seismic nuclear monitoring research: (1) they are a source of background events that need to be discriminated from potential nuclear explosions; (2) as some of the only explosions occurring in the current de facto global moratoria on nuclear testing, their signals should be exploited to improve the calibration of seismic m monitoring systems. A common issue monitoring arising in both of these roles is our limited physical understanding of the causes behind observed differences and similarities in the seismic signals produced by routine industrial mining blasts and small underground nuclear tests. In 2003 a consortium (Weston, SMU, LLNL, LANL and UTEP) carried out a Source Phenomenology Experiment (SPE), a series of dedicated explosions designed to improve this physical understanding, particularly as it relates to seismic methods of discriminating between signals from three different source types: earthquakes, industrial blasts, and nuclear tests. Here we very briefly review prior field experimental work that examined the seismic relationships between these source types.

  6. Locadiff with ambient seismic noise : theoretical background and application to monitoring volcanoes and active faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, Eric; Obermann, Anne; Planes, Thomas; Rossetto, Vincent; Margerin, Ludovic; Sens-Schoenfelder, Christoph; Campillo, Michel

    2015-04-01

    This contribution will cover recent theoretical, numerical, and field data processing developments aiming at modeling how coda waves are perturbed (in phase and amplitude) by mechanical changes in the crust. Using continuous ambient seismic noise, we cross-correlate data every day and compare the coda of the correlograms. We can relative velocity changes and waveform decorrelation along the year, that are related to mechanical changes in the shallow crust, associated to the seismic or volcanic activity, but also to environmental effects such as hydrology. Bibliography : Anne Obermann, Thomas Planes, Eric Larose and Michel Campillo, Imaging pre- and co-eruptive structural changes of a volcano with ambient seismic noise, J. Geophys. Res. 118 6285-6294 (2013). A. Obermann, B. Froment, M. Campillo, E. Larose, T. Planès, B. Valette, J. H. Chen, and Q. Y. Liu, Seismic noise correlations to image structural and mechanical changes associated with the Mw7.9 2008-Wenchuan earthquake, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 119, 1-14,(2014). Thomas Planès, Eric Larose, Ludovic Margerin, Vincent Rossetto, Christoph Sens-Schoenfelder, Decorrelation and phase-shift of coda waves induced by local changes : Multiple scattering approach and numerical validation, Waves in Random and Complex Media 24, 99-125, (2014)

  7. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  8. The effect of deformation history on the interpretation of seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle: experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Skemer, P. A.; Morales, L. F. G.; Kaminski, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    The main source of seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle is the deformation-induced crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of olivine. The interpretation of seismic anisotropy relies on models and experiments that predict certain relationships between olivine CPO and the deformation kinematics. Under some conditions, such as the interiors of oceanic plates, these relationships may be quite simple. However, near plate boundaries flow patterns are complex and the interpretation of seismic anisotropy is not straight-forward. In this contribution we describe the effect of deformation history on the re-orientation of olivine CPO as a function of strain. High pressure and temperature deformation experiments were performed on the Åheim dunite, which exhibits a pre-existing texture. Experiments were conducted in three different configurations with the pre-existing foliation at 0°, 45°, and 90° to the axis of compression, simulating three unique deformation histories. Deformation microstructures and texture are analyzed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The experiments show that up to strains of ~0.7 the three configurations evolve differently from one another, and from models initiated with random textures. Moreover, none of the models achieved the expected textural steady-state. The experiments results are then compared to numerical simulations using a Viscoplastic Self Consistent (VPSC) approach, and D-Rex. The input for the models is the Åheim dunite CPO in the three configurations used in the experiments. It is shown that, generally, texture symmetry evolves similarly in the models and the experiments although there are notable differences in texture strength. To achieve better agreement between experiments and models, new model parameterizations are proposed. Finally, we use the new parameterization of D-Rex to simulate a range of plausible deformation histories and associated seismic anisotropy in a variety of flow settings.

  9. Broadband seismic measurements of degassing activity associated with lava effusion at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip; Asch, Guenter

    2008-01-01

    From November 1999 through July 2000, a broadband seismic experiment was carried out at Popocatépetl Volcano to record seismic activity over a wide period range (0.04–100 s). We present an overview of the seismicity recorded during this experiment and discuss results of analyses of long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) seismic signals recorded at stations nearest to the crater over a four-month interval December 1999–March 2000. Three families of LP signals (Types-I, II, and III) are identified based on distinctive waveform features observed periods shorter than 1 s, periods longer than 15 s, and within the period range 0.5–2.5 s. Type-I LP events have impulsive first arrivals and exhibit a characteristic harmonic wave train with dominant periods in the 1.4–1.9 s range during the first 10 s of signal. These events are also associated with a remarkable VLP wavelet with period near 30 s. Type-II LP events represent pairs of events occurring in rapid succession and whose signatures are superimposed. These are typically marked by slowly emergent first arrivals and by a characteristic VLP wave train with dominant period near 30 s, made of two successive wavelets whose shapes are quasi-identical to those of the VLP wavelets associated with Type-I events. Type-III LP events represent the most energetic signals observed during our experiment. These have an emergent first arrival and display a harmonic signature with dominant period near 1.1 s. They are dominated by periods in the 0.25–0.35 s band and contain no significant energy at periods longer than 15 s. Hypocentral locations of the three types of LP events obtained from phase picks point to shallow seismic sources clustered at depths shallower than 2 km below the crater floor. Observed variations in volcanic eruptive activity correlate with defined LP families. Most of the observed seismicity consists of Type-I events that occur in association with 1–3-min-long degassing bursts (

  10. Towards 4-D Noise-based Seismic Probing of Volcanoes: Perspectives from a Large-N Nodal Experiment on Piton de la Fournaise Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, F.; Ackerley, N. J.; Nakata, N.; Boué, P.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Shapiro, N.

    2015-12-01

    Noise-based seismology is proving to be a complementary approach to active source or earthquake-based methods for imaging and monitoring the Earth's interior and in particular volcanoes and active faults. Until recently, noise-based imaging and monitoring relied only on the inversion of surface waves reconstructed from correlations of mostly microseismic seismic noise. Compared to body-wave tomography, surface wave tomography succeeds in retrieving lateral sub-surface velocity contrasts but is less efficient in resolving velocity perturbations at depth. Moreover reflected body-waves can carry direct information about sharp interfaces at depth. Extracting body-waves from noise correlations is challenging and the use of Large-N seismic arrays proves to be of great benefit for extracting noisy body-waves from noise-correlations by stacking over a large number of receiver pairs and by applying array processing. The purpose of VolcArray Large-N seismic experiment on Piton de la Fournaise Volcano is to extract body-waves travelling directly through the active magma reservoir located at ~2.5 km depth below the summit crater using noise correlations between arrays of seismic nodes. By beamforming noise on individual arrays, we found an unusual strong directional source of body-wave noise. This is thus a favorable context for retrieving the body-wave component of the Green's function between arrays. However, standard correlation techniques between nodes do not allow deciphering between the reconstructed Green's function and artifacts from the correlation of the strong directional source of body-waves. By applying double beamforming to the noise correlations between arrays, we are able to isolate ballistic body-waves travelling across the magma storage zone at depth. The stability of these reconstructed waves over time is encouraging in the perspectives of high resolution monitoring of the volcano feeding system.

  11. Seismic activity, inferred crustal stresses and seismotectonics in the Rana region, Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Erik C.; Bungum, Hilmar; Lindholm, Conrad D.

    2000-10-01

    The seismotectonic significance of the Rana region is known both from the fact that this was the location of the largest known earthquake in Fennoscandia in recent times, the MS 5.8-6.2 earthquake of August 31, 1819, and from its relatively high, constant seismic activity also in the 20th century. In order to study this region in more detail, a local seismic network has been in operation there since July 1997, as part of the NEONOR (Neotectonics in Norway) project. The network was primarily designed to detect possible activity on the Båsmoen fault which runs ˜50 km subparallel to the Rana fjord, and which shows signs of likely post glacial activity. The results have revealed a quite complex spatio-temporal distribution of seismic activity, and has also shown no activity on the Båsmoen fault itself. During the first 18 months of operation (July 1997-January 1999), the network has detected 373 locatable seismic events, of which 267 were local earthquakes. Most of these earthquakes occurred in five groups in the western parts of the network. All five groups had similar NNW-ESW trends in epicenter locations, and all have shallow foci (2-12 km), similar to what has also been found earlier for other concentrated earthquake zones in Northern Norway, and the magnitude range is between ML 0.1 and 2.8. Earthquake focal mechanism solutions within the network reveal a predominance for normal faulting with the tensional stress axis perpendicular do the coastline (implying an unusual coast-parallel orientation of the principal horizontal compressive stress). The earthquakes occur in a region of maximum post-glacial uplift gradients, which supports deglaciation flexure as a viable explanation for these earthquakes. A certain influence from more local factors, however, tied in general to crustal in homogeneities, cannot be ruled out.

  12. Fault activation after vigorous eruption: the December 8, 2015 seismic swarm at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparone, Salvatore; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Maiolino, Vincenza; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Ursino, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    From December 2, 2015, volcanic activity suddenly occurred on Mt. Etna with very violent fire fountaining at central crater, known also as "Voragine". This activity continued with other intense episodes at the same crater during the three following days and involving also, in turn, all the other three summit craters. This sudden eruption produced a rapid deflation of the volcano and was followed, from December 8, by a seismic swarm, with almost eighty earthquakes during this day, located on the uppermost segment of the Pernicana-Provenzana fault system (PFS). This seismicity was characterized by shallow foci (from few hundred meters until 1.5 km below the sea level) and mainshock with 3.6 magnitude. In order to investigate and measure the dynamics controlling and accompanying the PFS activation, a dataset composed of C-Band Sentinel-1A data has been used for SAR Interferometry (InSAR) analysis. Some interferograms have been generated from ascending and descending orbits in order to analyze both short- and long-term deformation. The availability of GPS data allowed comparing and integrating them with InSAR for ground truth and modeling aims. The surface kinematics and modeling obtained by DInSAR and GPS data and integration have been compared to the distribution of the seismicity and related focal mechanisms in order to define the fault geometry and motion. Moreover, essential constraints have been achieved about the PFS dynamic and its relationship with the intense volcanic activity occurred.

  13. Radar imaging of winter seismic survey activity in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Rykhus, Russ; Lu, Zhiming; Arp, C.D.; Selkowitz, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    During the spring of 2006, Radarsat-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery was acquired on a continual basis for the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (TLSA), in the northeast portion of the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPR-A) in order to monitor lake ice melting processes. During data processing, it was discovered that the Radarsat-1 imagery detected features associated with winter seismic survey activity. Focused analysis of the image time series revealed various aspects of the exploration process such as the grid profile associated with the seismic line surveys as well as trails and campsites associated with the mobile survey crews. Due to the high temporal resolution of the dataset it was possible to track the progress of activities over a one month period. Spaceborne SAR imagery can provide information on the location of winter seismic activity and could be used as a monitoring tool for land and resource managers as increased petroleum-based activity occurs in the TLSA and NPR-A. ?? 2008 Cambridge University Press.

  14. Studies of the Correlation Between Ionospheric Anomalies and Seismic Activities in the Indian Subcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Sasmal, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2010-10-20

    The VLF (Very Low Frequency) signals are long thought to give away important information about the Lithosphere-Ionosphere coupling. It is recently established that the ionosphere may be perturbed due to seismic activities. The effects of this perturbation can be detected through the VLF wave amplitude. There are several methods to find this correlations and these methods can be used for the prediction of these seismic events. In this paper, first we present a brief history of the use of VLF propagation method for the study of seismo-ionospheric correlations. Then we present different methods proposed by us to find out the seismo-ionospheric correlations. At the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata we have been monitoring the VTX station at Vijayanarayanam from 2002. In the initial stage, we received 17 kHz signal and latter we received 18.2 kHz signal. In this paper, first we present the results for the 17 kHz signal during Sumatra earthquake in 2004 obtained from the terminator time analysis method. Then we present much detailed and statistical analysis using some new methods and present the results for 18.2 kHz signal. In order to establish the correlation between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes, we need to understand what are the reference signals throughout the year. We present the result of the sunrise and sunset terminators for the 18.2 kHz signal as a function of the day of the year for a period of four years, viz, 2005 to 2008 when the solar activity was very low. In this case, the signal would primarily be affected by the Sun due to normal sunrise and sunset effects. Any deviation from this standardized calibration curve would point to influences by terrestrial (such as earthquakes) and extra-terrestrial (such as solar activities and other high energy phenomena). We present examples of deviations which occur in a period of sixteen months and show that the correlations with seismic events is significant and typically the highest deviation

  15. Review of auditory subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments.

    PubMed

    Fudin, R; Benjamin, C

    1991-12-01

    Subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments using auditory stimuli have yielded only a modicum of support for the contention that such activation produces predictable behavioral changes. Problems in many auditory subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments indicate that those predictions have not been tested adequately. The auditory mode of presentation, however, has several methodological advantages over the visual one, the method used in the vast majority of subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments. Consequently, it should be considered in subsequent research in this area. PMID:1805167

  16. A Large-N Mixed Sensor Active + Passive Seismic Array near Sweetwater, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklage, M.; Hollis, D.; Gridley, J. M.; Woodward, R.; Spriggs, N.

    2014-12-01

    A collaborative high-density seismic survey using broadband and short period seismic sensors was conducted March 7 - April 30, 2014 near Sweetwater, TX. The objective of the survey was to use a combination of controlled source shot slices and passive seismic recordings recorded by multiple types of sensors with different bandwidths and sensitivities to image the subsurface. The broadband component of the survey consisted of 25 continuously recording seismic stations comprised of 20 Trillium Compact Posthole sensors from Nanometrics and 5 Polar Trillium 120PHQs from the IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center (PIC). The broadband stations also utilized 25 Centaur digitizers from Nanometrics as well as 25 polar quick deploy enclosures from the PIC. The broadband array was designed to maximize horizontal traveling seismic energy for surface wave analysis over the primary target area with sufficient offset for imaging objectives at depth. The short period component of the survey consisted of 2639 receiver locations using Zland nodes from NodalSeismic. The nodes are further divided into 3 sub-arrays: 1) outlier array 2) active source array 3) backbone array. The outlier array consisted of 25 continuously recording nodes distributed around the edge of the survey at a distance of ~5 km from the survey boundary, and provided valuable constraints to passive data analysis techniques at the edge of the survey boundary. The active source patch consisted of densely spaced nodes that were designed to record signals from a Vibroseis source truck for active source reflection processing and imaging. The backbone array consisted of 292 nodes that covered the entirety of the survey area to maximize the value of the passive data analysis. By utilizing continuous recording and smartly designed arrays for measuring local and regional earthquakes we can incorporate velocity information derived from passive data analysis into the active source processing workflow to produce a superior subsurface

  17. Fault mirrors in seismically active fault zones: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Li-Wei; Song, Sheng-Rong; Suppe, John; Yeh, En-Chao

    2016-03-01

    Fault mirrors (FMs) are naturally polished and glossy fault slip surfaces that can record seismic deformation at shallow depths. They are important for investigating the processes controlling dynamic fault slip. We characterize FMs in borehole samples from the hanging wall damage zone of the active Hsiaotungshi reverse fault, Taiwan. Here we report the first documented occurrence of the combination of silica gel and melt patches coating FMs, with the silica gel resembling those observed on experimentally formed FMs that were cataclastically generated. In addition, the melt patches, which are unambiguous indicators of coseismic slip, suggest that the natural FMs were produced at seismic rates, presumably resulting from flash heating at asperities on the slip surfaces. Since flash heating is efficient at small slip, we propose that these natural FMs represent fossils of small earthquakes, formed in either coseismic faulting and folding or aftershock deformation in the active Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt.

  18. Evidence for activity of the Calabrian arc system and implications for historical seismicity in Eastern Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallais, F.; Gutscher, M.-A.; Graindorge, D.; Polonia, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Wadati-Benioff zone under Calabria and the Tyrrhenian Sea is located in the centre of the Mediterranean Sea, a region characterized by complex tectonics. The presence of deep earthquakes under the Tyrrhenian Sea to a depth of 500 km, depicting an Ionian slab dipping about 70° towards the NW (Selvaggi and Chiarabba, 95), related with an active volcanic arc (the Aeolian Islands). The Calabrian peninsula is among the most seismically active regions in the Mediterranean area. Several historical seismic events, such as 1169 and 1693 earthquakes, reached MCS intensities of XI and are associated with destructive tsunami (Piatanesi and Tinti, 1998). The source of these two strongest earthquakes has still not been identified with certainty. The 1693 earthquake struck Eastern Sicily (60000 people killed) and generated a 5-10 m high tsunami (Piatanesi and Tinti, 1998). The 1169 earthquake had similar intensities and a comparable isoseismal pattern, suggesting an equivalent source. Because of the tsunami generated in 1693 and because the isoseismals are open to the sea, the source region appears to be offshore. The subduction fault plane would then be a good candidate for the 1693 event. However, a lack of instrumentally recorded thrust earthquakes, characteristic of active subduction zone, suggests that if subduction is active, the fault plane may be locked since the instrumental period. Reported recent GPS motions suggest that the subduction of the Ionian lithosphere beneath the Tyrrhenian basin plays an minor role in controlling the active deformation of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary, but may be locally still active in particular in the Calabrian arc (D'Agostino et al., 08). Moreover the offshore accretionary wedge is known to include compressional anticlines and ongoing hydrological activity (mud volcanoes). We present preliminary results from reprocessed 96-channels seismic reflection profiles acquired during the French "Archimede" cruise (1997) crossing the

  19. The Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) for OSI - Experiences from IFE14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Sick, Benjamin; Häge, Martin; Blake, Thomas; Labak, Peter; Joswig, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    An on-site inspection (OSI) is the third of four elements of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The sole purpose of an OSI is to confirm whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of the treaty and to gather any facts which might assist in identifying any possible violator. It thus constitutes the final verification measure under the CTBT if all other available measures are not able to confirm the nature of a suspicious event. The Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) carried out the Integrated Field Exercise 2014 (IFE14) in the Dead Sea Area of Jordan from 3 November to 9. December 2014. It was a fictitious OSI whose aim was to test the inspection capabilities in an integrated manner. The technologies allowed during an OSI are listed in the Treaty. The aim of the Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) is to detect and localize aftershocks of low magnitudes of the triggering event or collapses of underground cavities. The locations of these events are expected in the vicinity of a possible previous explosion and help to narrow down the search area within an inspection area (IA) of an OSI. The success of SAMS depends on the main elements, hardware, software, deployment strategy, the search logic and not least the effective use of personnel. All elements of SAMS were tested and improved during the Built-Up Exercises (BUE) which took place in Austria and Hungary. IFE14 provided more realistic climatic and hazardous terrain conditions with limited resources. Significant variations in topography of the IA of IFE14 in the mountainous Dead Sea Area of Jordan led to considerable challenges which were not expected from experiences encountered during BUE. The SAMS uses mini arrays with an aperture of about 100 meters and with a total of 4 elements. The station network deployed during IFE14 and results of the data analysis will be presented. Possible aftershocks of

  20. Siting of USArray Seismic Stations in North Carolina and southern Virginia: Experience of NC-1 Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Howard, J.; Horne, T.

    2012-12-01

    The USArray component of the EarthScope, a transportable array of 400 seismometers installed in a grid about 70 km apart, is in the next two years entering its final stage with station deployment along the Atlantic coast of the United States. Here, we present the experience of the student-faculty team from North Carolina Central University (NCCU) in finding and documenting the suitable sites for the twenty five USArray stations in North Carolina and southern Virginia. The ideal sites are easily accessible yet far from traffic and other sources of noise, with good cell phone coverage, sun exposure and out of flood-prone areas. Although the initial selection of potential locations was done using geospatial mapping and analysis software provided by EarthScope, finding and finalizing the sites involved driving more then 1,000 miles each week for over two months inspecting possible site locations. Aside from driving, the majority of time was spent talking about the EarthScope project and hosting of USArray stations to mostly reluctant landowners. In addition to facing various challenges in finding appropriate sites due to land use issues, such as suburban sprawl of central North Carolina, or topography factors, such as low lying flood prone coastal areas, by far the major challenge was finding the landowners willing to host the seismic station for the necessary three years. In addition to involving students from an HBCU in seismology related project and increasing the visibility of NCCU geophysics program in the University and local community through publicity releases in local media and on university web site, the project had an important outreach component. As North Carolina is located along the seismically quiet, passive Atlantic margin, most residents are not familiar with earthquakes and seismology and the siting experience provided students an opportunity to practice explaining the earthquake research to the general public. The dialog also highlighted science

  1. Active-source seismic imaging below Lake Malawi (Nyasa) from the SEGMeNT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillington, D. J.; Scholz, C. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Accardo, N. J.; McCartney, T.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Kamihanda, G.; Trinhammer, P.; Wood, D. A.; Khalfan, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Nyblade, A.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Mruma, A. H.; Salima, J.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the controls on the initiation and development of magmatism and segmentation in young rift systems. The northern Lake Malawi (Nyasa) rift in the East African Rift System is an early stage rift exhibiting pronounced tectonic segmentation, which is defined in the upper crust by ~100-km-long border faults. Very little volcanism is associated with rifting; the only surface expression of magmatism occurs in an accommodation zone between segments to the north of the lake in the Rungwe Volcanic Province. The SEGMeNT (Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania) project is a multidisciplinary, multinational study that is acquiring a suite of geophysical, geological and geochemical data to characterize deformation and magmatism in the crust and mantle lithosphere along 2-3 segments of this rift. As a part of the SEGMeNT project, we acquired seismic reflection and refraction data in Lake Malawi (Nyasa) in March-April 2015. Over 2000 km of seismic reflection data were acquired with a 500 to 2580 cu in air gun array from GEUS/Aarhus and a 500- to 1500-m-long seismic streamer from Syracuse University over a grid of lines across and along the northern and central basins. Air gun shots from MCS profiles and 1000 km of additional shooting with large shot intervals were also recorded on 27 short-period and 6 broadband lake bottom seismometers from Scripps Oceanographic Institute as a part of the Ocean Bottom Seismic Instrument Pool (OBSIP) as well as the 55-station onshore seismic array. The OBS were deployed along one long strike line and two dip lines. We will present preliminary data and results from seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in the lake and their implications for crustal deformation within and between rift segments. Seismic reflection data image structures up to ~5-6 km below the lake bottom, including syntectonic sediments, intrabasinal faults and other complex horsts. Some intrabasinal faults in both the northern and

  2. High-resolution seismic monitoring of rockslide activity in the Illgraben, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, Arnaud; Hovius, Niels; Dietze, Michael; McArdell, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Rockfalls and rockslides are important geomorphic processes in landscape dynamics. They contribute to the evolution of slopes and supply rock materials to channels, enabling fluvial incision. Hillslope processes are also a natural hazard that we need to quantify and, if possible, predict. For these reasons, it is necessary to determine the triggering conditions and mechanisms involved in rockfalls. Rainfall is a well-known contributor since water, through soil moisture or pore pressure, may lead to the inception and propagation of cracks and can induce slope failure. Water can also affect slope stability through effects of climatic conditions such as the fluctuations of temperature around the freezing point. During the winter of 2012, we have recorded with a seismic array of 8 instruments substantial rockslide activity that affected a gully in the Illgraben catchment in the Swiss Alps. Three stations were positioned directly around the gully with a nearest distance of 400 m. The period of intense activity did not start during a rainstorm as it is common in summer but during a period of oscillation of temperatures around the freezing point. The activity did not occur in a single event but lasted about a week with a decay in time of the event frequency. Many individual events had two distinct seismic signals, with first, a short duration phase of about 10 s at frequencies below 5 Hz that we interpret as a slope failure signature, followed by a second long duration signal of > 60 s at frequencies above 10 Hz that we attribute to the propagation of rock debris down the slope. Thanks to the array of seismic sensors, we can study the fine details of this rockslide sequence by locating the different events, determining their distribution in time, and systematic quantification of seismic metrics (energy, duration, intensity...). These observations are compared to independent meteorological constrains and laser scan data to obtain an estimate of the volume mobilized by the

  3. Active and passive electrical and seismic time-lapse monitoring of earthen embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, Justin Bradley

    In this dissertation, I present research involving the application of active and passive geophysical data collection, data assimilation, and inverse modeling for the purpose of earthen embankment infrastructure assessment. Throughout the dissertation, I identify several data characteristics, and several challenges intrinsic to characterization and imaging of earthen embankments and anomalous seepage phenomena, from both a static and time-lapse geophysical monitoring perspective. I begin with the presentation of a field study conducted on a seeping earthen dam, involving static and independent inversions of active tomography data sets, and self-potential modeling of fluid flow within a confined aquifer. Additionally, I present results of active and passive time-lapse geophysical monitoring conducted during two meso-scale laboratory experiments involving the failure and self-healing of embankment filter materials via induced vertical cracking. Identified data signatures and trends, as well as 4D inversion results, are discussed as an underlying motivation for conducting subsequent research. Next, I present a new 4D acoustic emissions source localization algorithm that is applied to passive seismic monitoring data collected during a full-scale embankment failure test. Acoustic emissions localization results are then used to help spatially constrain 4D inversion of collocated self-potential monitoring data. I then turn to time-lapse joint inversion of active tomographic data sets applied to the characterization and monitoring of earthen embankments. Here, I develop a new technique for applying spatiotemporally varying structural joint inversion constraints. The new technique, referred to as Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC), is first demonstrated on a synthetic 2D joint model space, and is then applied to real geophysical monitoring data sets collected during a full-scale earthen embankment piping-failure test. Finally, I discuss some non-technical issues related to

  4. Comparison of Active and Passive Seismic Methods for Calculating Shear-wave Velocity Profiles: An Example from Hartford County, Connecticut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, S.; Lane, J. W.; Liu, L.; Thomas, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic hazard classifications have been developed for Hartford County, Connecticut based primarily on mapping of surficial materials and depositional environment using criteria specified by the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). A study using near-surface seismic techniques to measure shear-wave velocities in Connecticut was initiated in support of broader seismic hazard mapping efforts undertaken by New England State Geologists. Thirty field sites in Hartford County representative of the range of mapped seismic hazard classes were chosen based on the availability of boring logs and adequate open space for the geophysical surveys. Because it can be difficult to acquire multi-channel seismic data in urban areas due to unwanted noise and open space restrictions, we also investigated the use of passive single-station seismometer measurements as a compact supplement and potential alternative to long-offset multi-channel measurements. Here we compare the results of active-source multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and passive horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) seismic methods to determine shear-wave velocity profiles and seismic hazard classification based on Vs30 in glacial sediments throughout Hartford County, Connecticut. HVSR-derived seismic resonances were used as a constraint during inversion of the MASW dispersion curve to reduce model misfit and improve model comparison to site lithology.

  5. A New Generation of Large Seismic Refraction Experiments in Central Europe (1997-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterch, A.; Grad, M.; Spicak, A.; Brueckl, E.; Hegedus, E.; Keller, G. R.; Thybo, H.

    2003-12-01

    Beginning in 1997, Central Europe has been covered by an unprecedented network of seismic refraction experiments. These experiments (POLONAISE'97, CELEBRATION 2000, ALP 2002, SUDETES 2003) have only been possible due a massive international cooperative effort. The total length of all profiles is about 19,000 km, and over 300 explosive sources were employed. The result is a network of seismic refraction profiles that extends along the Trans-European Suture Zone region of Poland and the Bohemian massif, Pannonian basin, trough the Carpathians and Alps to the Adriatic Sea and the Dinarides. As reflected in structures within these areas, Central Europe has experienced a complex tectonic history that includes the Caledonian, Variscan, and Alpine orogenies. The related TESZ region is a broad zone of deformation that extends across Europe from British Isles to the Black Sea region that formed as Europe was assembled from a complex collage of terranes during the late Palaeozoic. For example, the Bohemian massif is mostly located in the Czech Republic and is a large, complex terrane whose origin can be traced to northern Gondwana (Africa). These terranes were accreted along the margin of Baltica that was formed during the break-up of Rodinia. The tectonic evolution of this region shares many attributes with the Appalachian/Ouachita origin and is certainly of global important to studies in terrane tectonics and continental evolution. In southern Poland, several structural blocks are located adjacent to Baltica and were probably transported laterally along it similar to the Cenozoic movement of terranes along the western margin of North America. The younger Carpathian arc and Pannonian back-arc basin were also targeted by these experiments. Thickness of the crust in the area of investigations changes from 22-25 km in the Pannonian basin to about 55 km in the Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland. Together, these experiments are providing an unprecedented 3-D image of the

  6. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, "weight-drop" source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  7. Ion density variation during seismic activity as measured by SROSS-C2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Ananna; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Kumar, Sarvesh

    ABSTRACT Ion density (O+ and H+) as a precursory parameter to seismic activity has been analysed from year 1995-1998, using RPA payload aboard SROSS-C2 satellite at an average altitude range of ~ 500 km over the Indian region. The details of seismic events during this period are downloaded from United State Geological Survey (USGS) website. Total of six events from the period of 1995-1998 are analyzed which are free from other perturbing phenomena like solar flares and thunderstorms/ lighting. It has been observed that there is considerable enhancement in average values of heavier ion - O+ density and decrease in lighter ion - H+ ion density during seismic affected time over the normal days. The increase in O+ ion density varies from 1.4 to 8.1 times and decrease in H+ ion density varies from 1.4 to 19.9 times compared to normal day's ion densities respectively. VLF emissions generated due to anomalous electric field during seimogenic activity could plausible candidature of change in ion concentration values during these events.

  8. Peculiarities of ULF electromagnetic disturbances before strong earthquakes in seismic active zone of Kamchatka peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytenko, Y. A.; Ismagilov, V. S.; Schekotov, A.; Molchanov, O.; Chebrov, V.; Raspopov, O. M.

    2006-12-01

    Regular observations of ULF electromagnetic disturbances and acoustic emissions at st. Karymshino in seismic active zone of Kamchatka peninsula were carried out during 2001-2003 years. Five seismic active periods with strong earthquakes (M>5) were displayed during this period. These EQs occurred at the Pacific at 20-60 km depth at 100-140 km distances to the East from the st. Karymshino. Analysis of normalized dynamic power spectra of data of high-sensitive (0.2 pT/sqrt(Hz)) three-component induction magnetometer achieved a significant disorder of daily variation and increasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities (from 0.2 to ~1 pT) in the whole investigated frequency range (0.2-5 Hz). The anomaly intensity increasing was observed during the 12-18 hours before main seismic shocks. Maximum of the increasing occurred during 4-6 hours before the EQs. An increasing of acoustic emissions (F=30 Hz) was observed during the same period. A sharp decreasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities was observed 2-4 hours before the EQs. We suppose that physical processes in a hearth of forthcoming EQ lead to an irreversible avalanche-like formation of cracks and stimulation of the acoustic and ULF electromagnetic disturbances.

  9. Active deformation and seismicity in the Southern Alps (Italy): The Montello hill as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danesi, Stefania; Pondrelli, Silvia; Salimbeni, Simone; Cavaliere, Adriano; Serpelloni, Enrico; Danecek, Peter; Lovati, Sara; Massa, Marco

    2015-06-01

    The Montello anticline is a morphotectonic feature of the east pede-mountain of the South Alpine Chain in northern Italy, which lies ca. 40 km northwest of Venice, Italy. The purpose of this study is to characterize the present-day crustal deformation and seismotectonics of the Montello area through multi-parametric geophysical observations. We used new data obtained from the installation of a temporary network of 12 seismic stations and 6 GPS sites. The GPS observations indicate that there is ~ 1 mm/yr shortening across the Montello thrust. Sites located north of the Montello thrust front deviate from the ~ NNW-ward Adria-Eurasia convergence direction, as they are constrained by a relative rotation pole in northwestern Italy that has a NNE-ward motion trend. Over 18 months, seismographic recordings allowed us to locate 142 local seismic events with Ml 0.5-3.5 with good reliability (rms < 0.5). After cross-correlation analysis, we classified 42 of these events into six clusters, with cross-correlation thresholds > 0.80. The source focal solutions indicate that: (i) there is thrusting seismic activity on the basal, sub-horizontal, portion of the Montello structure; and (ii) strike-slip source kinematics prevail on the western edge of the Montello hill. Our observations on the source mechanisms and the measured crustal deformation confirm that the Montello thrust is tectonically active.

  10. Stress-strain sensor for monitoring seismic precursors and fault activities in the sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qiujiao; Sun, Wei; Zeng, Zuoxun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a sensor to monitor stress-strain signals in a granular medium is used to detect seismic precursory information. Compared with the widely used sensors of borehole stress in the rock, the sensor has more convenient operation, higher output sensitivity, compactness and farther propagation effect. The stress and strain changes before Pu'er Ms6.4 earthquake in China are recorded by Beijing and Xinmin stations, and its corresponding fault activities are analyzed. Study indicates anomalous amplitude of strain signal reaches 10 times higher than that of ordinary background, and compressive oscillation and extensional oscillation occurred constantly before the earthquake. The method and results presented in the paper provide a new way for investigating seismic precursors for shallow-source earthquakes.

  11. Seismic aftershock monitoring for on-site inspection purposes. Experience from Integrated Field Exercise 2008.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labak, P.; Arndt, R.; Villagran, M.

    2009-04-01

    One of the sub-goals of the Integrated Field Experiment in 2008 (IFE08) in Kazakhstan was testing the prototype elements of the Seismic aftershock monitoring system (SAMS) for on-site inspection purposes. The task of the SAMS is to collect the facts, which should help to clarify nature of the triggering event. Therefore the SAMS has to be capable to detect and identify events as small as magnitude -2 in the inspection area size up to 1000 km2. Equipment for 30 mini-arrays and 10 3-component stations represented the field equipment of the SAMS. Each mini-array consisted of a central 3-component seismometer and 3 vertical seismometers at the distance about 100 m from the central seismometer. The mini-arrays covered approximately 80% of surrogate inspection area (IA) on the territory of former Semipalatinsk test site. Most of the stations were installed during the first four days of field operations by the seismic sub-team, which consisted of 10 seismologists. SAMS data center comprised 2 IBM Blade centers and 8 working places for data archiving, detection list production and event analysis. A prototype of SAMS software was tested. Average daily amount of collected raw data was 15-30 GB and increased according to the amount of stations entering operation. Routine manual data screening and data analyses were performed by 2-6 subteam members. Automatic screening was used for selected time intervals. Screening was performed using the Sonoview program in frequency domain and using the Geotool and Hypolines programs for screening in time domain. The screening results were merged into the master event list. The master event list served as a basis of detailed analysis of unclear events and events identified to be potentially in the IA. Detailed analysis of events to be potentially in the IA was performed by the Hypoline and Geotool programs. In addition, the Hyposimplex and Hypocenter programs were also used for localization of events. The results of analysis were integrated

  12. Seismic properties of fluid bearing formations in magmatic geothermal systems: can we directly detect geothermal activity with seismic methods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, Melchior; Scott, Samuel; Quintal, Beatriz; Caspari, Eva; Maurer, Hansruedi; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Seismic methods are amongst the most common techniques to explore the earth's subsurface. Seismic properties such as velocities, impedance contrasts and attenuation enable the characterization of the rocks in a geothermal system. The most important goal of geothermal exploration, however, is to describe the enthalpy state of the pore fluids, which act as the main transport medium for the geothermal heat, and to detect permeable structures such as fracture networks, which control the movement of these pore fluids in the subsurface. Since the quantities measured with seismic methods are only indirectly related with the fluid state and the rock permeability, the interpretation of seismic datasets is difficult and usually delivers ambiguous results. To help overcome this problem, we use a numerical modeling tool that quantifies the seismic properties of fractured rock formations that are typically found in magmatic geothermal systems. We incorporate the physics of the pore fluids, ranging from the liquid to the boiling and ultimately vapor state. Furthermore, we consider the hydromechanics of permeable structures at different scales from small cooling joints to large caldera faults as are known to be present in volcanic systems. Our modeling techniques simulate oscillatory compressibility and shear tests and yield the P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation factors of fluid saturated fractured rock volumes. To apply this modeling technique to realistic scenarios, numerous input parameters need to be indentified. The properties of the rock matrix and individual fractures were derived from extensive literature research including a large number of laboratory-based studies. The geometries of fracture networks were provided by structural geologists from their published studies of outcrops. Finally, the physical properties of the pore fluid, ranging from those at ambient pressures and temperatures up to the supercritical conditions, were taken from the fluid physics

  13. Active and passive seismic studies of geothermal resources in New Mexico and investigations of earthquake hazards to geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, P.; Daggett, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    Seismic data were collected in southwestern New Mexico to investigate the sources of the geothermal anomalies and to investigate the potential earthquake hazards of geothermal development. No major crustal structure anomalies have been located related to known geothermal resources, and no areas of continual seismicity have been identified, which is interpreted to indicate a lack of active, or recently active crustal intrusions in southwestern New Mexico. Without a magnetic heat source, the geothermal potential of the known anomalies is probably limited to intermediate and low temperature applications (<180/sup 0/C). The lack of continual seismicity indicates low seismic hazard in the area directly related to geothermal development, although the historic and geologically recent tectonic activity should be taken into consideration during any development in the area. A model of forced groundwater convection is presented to explain the geothermal anomalies in southwestern New Mexico, which is consistent with all available geological and geophysical data from the area.

  14. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, E. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; Emer, D. F.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Wright, A. A.; Drellack, S.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Mercadante, J.; Floyd, M.; McGowin, C.; Cothrun, C.; Bonal, N.

    2013-12-01

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined. For Phase II of the experiment, characterization of the location is required to develop the geologic/geophysical models for the execution of the experiment. Criteria for the location are alluvium thickness of approximately 170 m and a water table below 170 m; minimal fracturing would be ideal. A P-wave mini-vibroseis survey was conducted at a potential site in alluvium to map out the subsurface geology. The seismic reflection profile consisted of 168 geophone stations, spaced 5 m apart. The mini-vibe was a 7,000-lb peak-force source, starting 57.5 m off the north end of the profile and ending 57.5 m past the southern-most geophone. The length of the profile was 835 m. The source points were placed every 5 m, equally spaced between geophones to reduce clipping. The vibroseis sweep was from 20 Hz down to 180 Hz over 8 seconds, and four sweeps were stacked at each shot location. The shot gathers show high signal-to-noise ratios with clear first arrivals across the entire spread and the suggestion of some shallow reflectors. The data were

  15. Assessing low-activity faults for the seismic safety of dams

    SciTech Connect

    Page, W.D.; Savage, W.U.; McLaren, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    Dams have been a familiar construct in the northern Sierra Nevada range in California (north of the San Joaquin River) since the forty-niners and farmers diverted water to their gold mines and farms in the mid 19th century. Today, more than 370 dams dot the region from the Central Valley to the eastern escarpment. Fifty-five more dam streams on the eastern slope. The dams are of all types: 240 earth fill; 56 concrete gravity; 45 rock and earth fills; 35 rock fill; 14 concrete arch; 9 hydraulic fill; and 29 various other types. We use the northern Sierra Nevada to illustrate the assessment of low-activity faults for the seismic safety of dams. The approach, techniques, and methods of evaluation are applicable to other regions characterized by low seismicity and low-activity faults having long recurrence intervals. Even though several moderate earthquakes had shaken the Sierra Nevada since 1849 (for example, the 1875 magnitude 5.8 Honey Lake and the 1909 magnitudes 5 and 5.5 Downieville earthquakes), seismic analyses for dams in the area generally were not performed prior to the middle of this century. Following the 1971 magnitude 6.7 San Fernando earthquake, when the hydraulic-fill Lower Van Norman Dam in southern California narrowly escaped catastrophic failure, the California Division of Safety of Dams and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission required seismic safety to be addressed with increasing rigor. In 1975, the magnitude 5.7 Oroville earthquake on the Cleveland Hill fault near Oroville Dam in the Sierra Nevada foothills, showed convincingly that earthquakes and surface faulting could occur within the range. Following this event, faults along the ancient Foothills fault system have been extensively investigated at dam sites.

  16. Transient Creep Events and the Transition from Aseismic to Seismic Faulting Observed in Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A.; Brantut, N.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Dry triaxial compression experiments performed on Carrara marble and Volterra Gypsum at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100MPa revealed an important dependence of the strain rate on the confining stress. At constant shear stress, transient exponential increases in axial strain, similar to transient creep events observed on the field, were observed for small decreases of the confining pressure (1-10MPa), which could eventually lead to ductile failure nucleation. In such case, rupture propagation was silent and slow (several hundreds of seconds), although accompanied by stress drops of the order of several tens of MPas and millimetric slips. However, as the slip velocity increased during failure propagation, continuous acoustic waveform recordings enabled us to illustrate the transition from aseismic to seismic faulting. These experiments provide a clear experimental case of silent, slow localized failure in rocks as a result of an interplay between intragranular plasticity and microcracking. In the case of ductile failure as in the marble, dislocation and twin accumulation is such that cracks propagation steps are small and/or slow, and thus the radiated energy release rate remains small at early stages of rupture and increases with rupture speed. This last observation clearly highlights the dependence of radiated acoustic (and microseismic?) energy during crack propagation not only on the rupture propagation speed and the slip velocity but most importantly on the rock's lithology and rheology. This could have important implications as carbonates are prevalent within sedimentary basins. At even at shallower depths and prevalent within fault gouges, clay minerals are also expected to behave in a similar way.

  17. FAME: Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Agocs, Tibor; Challita, Zalpha; Jasko, Attila; Kroes, Gabby; Banyai, Evelin; Miller, Chris; Taylor, William; Schnetler, Hermine; Venema, Lars

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the development of a demonstrator freeform active mirror for future astronomical instruments both on Earth and in space. It consists of a system overview and progress in various areas of technology in the building blocks of the mirror: an extreme freeform thin face sheet, an active array, design tools and the metrology and control of the system. The demonstrator aims to investigate the applicability of the technique in high end astronomical systems, also for space and cryogenically.

  18. Key aspects governing induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijze, Loes; Wassing, Brecht; Fokker, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In the past decades numerous examples of earthquakes induced by human-induced changes in subsurface fluid pressures have been reported. This poses a major threat to the future development of some of these operations and calls for an understanding and quantification of the seismicity generated. From geomechanical considerations and insights from laboratory experiments the factors controlling induced seismicity may be grouped into 4 categories; the magnitude of the stress disturbance, the pre-existing stress conditions, the reservoir/fault rock properties and the local geometry. We investigated whether the (relative) contributions of these factors and their influence on magnitudes generated could be recognized by looking at the entire dataset of reported cases of induced seismicity as a whole, and what this might imply for future developments. An extensive database has been built out of over a 160 known cases of induced seismicity worldwide, incorporating the relevant geological, seismological and fluid-related parameters. The cases studied include hydrocarbon depletion and secondary recovery, waste water injection, (enhanced) geothermal systems and hydraulic fracturing with observed magnitudes ranging from less than -1.5 to 7. The parameters taken into account were based on the theoretical background of the mechanisms of induced seismicity and include the injection/depletion-related parameters, (spatial) characteristics of seismicity, lithological properties and the local stress situation. Correlations between the seismic response and the geological/geomechanical characteristics of the various sites were investigated. The injected/depleted volumes and the scale of the activities are major controlling factors on the maximum magnitudes generated. Spatial signatures of seismicity such as the depth and lateral spread of the seismicity were observed to be distinct for different activities, which is useful when considering future operations. Where available the local

  19. Seismic body wave separation in volcano-tectonic activity inferred by the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Paolo; De Lauro, Enza; De Martino, Salvatore; Falanga, Mariarosaria; Petrosino, Simona

    2015-04-01

    One of the main challenge in volcano-seismological literature is to locate and characterize the source of volcano/tectonic seismic activity. This passes through the identification at least of the onset of the main phases, i.e. the body waves. Many efforts have been made to solve the problem of a clear separation of P and S phases both from a theoretical point of view and developing numerical algorithms suitable for specific cases (see, e.g., Küperkoch et al., 2012). Recently, a robust automatic procedure has been implemented for extracting the prominent seismic waveforms from continuously recorded signals and thus allowing for picking the main phases. The intuitive notion of maximum non-gaussianity is achieved adopting techniques which involve higher-order statistics in frequency domain., i.e, the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis (CICA). This technique is successful in the case of the blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. In seismological framework, indeed, seismic signals are thought as the convolution of a source function with path, site and the instrument response. In addition, time-delayed versions of the same source exist, due to multipath propagation typically caused by reverberations from some obstacle. In this work, we focus on the Volcano Tectonic (VT) activity at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy) during the 2006 ground uplift (Ciaramella et al., 2011). The activity was characterized approximately by 300 low-magnitude VT earthquakes (Md < 2; for the definition of duration magnitude, see Petrosino et al. 2008). Most of them were concentrated in distinct seismic sequences with hypocenters mainly clustered beneath the Solfatara-Accademia area, at depths ranging between 1 and 4 km b.s.l.. The obtained results show the clear separation of P and S phases: the technique not only allows the identification of the S-P time delay giving the timing of both phases but also provides the independent waveforms of the P and S phases. This is an enormous

  20. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - I: model and the case of Tenerife Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Ibáñez, Jesús M.

    2013-12-01

    The complex volcanic system of Tenerife Island is known to have a highly heterogeneous character, as recently confirmed by velocity tomography. We present new information derived from intrinsic quality factor inverse maps (Qi-1), scattering quality factor inverse maps (Qs-1) and total quality factor inverse maps (Qt-1) obtained for the same region. The data set used in this work is the result of the analysis of an active seismic experiment carried out, using offshore shots (air guns) recorded at over 85 onshore seismic stations. The estimates of the attenuation parameters are based on the assumption that the seismogram energy envelopes are determined by seismic energy diffusion processes occurring inside the island. Diffusion model parameters, proportional to Qi-1 and to Qs-1, are estimated from the inversion of the energy envelopes for any source-receiver couple. They are then weighted with a new graphical approach based on a Gaussian space probability function, which allowed us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' representing the space distribution of the attenuation parameters. The 2-D images obtained reveal the existence of a zone in the centre of the island characterized by the lowest attenuation effects. This effect is interpreted as highly rigid and cooled rocks. This low-attenuation region is bordered by zones of high attenuation, associated with the recent historical volcanic activity. We calculate the transport mean free path obtaining a value of around 4 km for the frequency range 6-12 Hz. This result is two orders of magnitude smaller than values calculated for the crust of the Earth. An absorption length between 10 and 14 km is associated with the average intrinsic attenuation parameter. These values, while small in the context of tectonic regions, are greater than those obtained in volcanic regions such as Vesuvius or Merapi. Such differences may be explained by the magnitude of the region of study, over three times larger than the aforementioned study

  1. Environmental Pollution, Student's Book (Experiences/Experiments/Activities).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Elbert C.

    Described in this student's manual are numerous experiments to acquaint the learner with community environmental problems. Experiments are relatively simple and useful in the junior high school grades. Activities are provided which emphasize some of the materials involved in pollution problems, such as carbon dioxide, sulfur compounds, and others,…

  2. Environmental Pollution, Teacher's Manual (Experiences/Experiments/Activities).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Elbert C.

    Described in this teacher's guide are numerous experiments teachers may use to guide students in learning about community environmental problems. Experiments are relatively simple and useful in the junior high school grades. Activities allow the student to become acquainted with the methods for the detection and removal of undesirable materials…

  3. Comparison of seismic and hydrodynamic yield determinations for the Soviet joint verification experiment of 1988

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynn R.; Ekström, Göran

    1989-01-01

    Seismic magnitudes determined from surface and body waves for the Soviet underground nuclear explosion of September 14, 1988, are used to calculate the yield of that event from previously derived calibration curves. The yield obtained by combining the two seismic estimates is 113 kilotons, which is very close to those obtained by hydrodynamic measurements made on-site. This comparison substantiates previous conclusions about the sizes of past Soviet weapons tests and compliance with the Threshold Test Ban Treaty. The factor of uncertainty in the combined seismic yield is 1.28 at the 68% and 1.62 at the 95% confidence levels, demonstrating that accuracies considerably better than a factor of 2 can be obtained by combining seismic determinations of yield. PMID:16594040

  4. Experiments on the Brazil-nut effect due to seismic shakings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, A.; Tancredi, G.; Lluch, N.

    2014-07-01

    Size segregation processes have been identified as relevant when studying the behaviour of rocks and boulders on the surface and in the interior of a rubble-pile asteroid. The size segregation as a consequence of repeated shakings is also known as the Brazil-nut effect (BNE). These processes might be really important when studying rubble-pile -type asteroids, which may have suffered seisms as a consequence of repeated collisions; such as in the case of asteroid Itokawa. Size segregation processes can be studied using laboratory experiments as well as computational models, the first case being the one initially considered in this work. Previous studies of the BNE were performed using a sinusoidal vertical or horizontal vibration of the containers. Since we are interested in the effects of repeated seismic shakes, we have used in our experiments a sequence of repeated knocks of the container. We built a resin and polycarbonate box, which is filled with marbles of different sizes. Vacuum up to 0.5 % of ambient pressure is established inside the box. The box is subjected to repeated free-falls from heights up to 1m, with impact velocities on the ground up to 4m/s. We have chosen these low velocities since they are comparable to the escape velocities of km-size asteroids; and they are on the order of the displacement velocities of surface material as a consequence of a small impact (far from the impact point; Tancredi et al. 2012). We study the dependence of size segregation processes with the size rate among the spheres and the impact speed of the box. We observe that, when effectively occurs, size segregation mostly depends on the size rate of the particles and very little on the impact speed, even though this slight dependence has been recorded in our experiments. The laboratory experiments have been also numerically simulated using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) package known as ESyS-particle. The results of the numerical simulations are compared to the

  5. Earth's magnetic field anomalies that precede the M6+ global seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    In this work has been analyzed the Earth's magnetic field variations and the M6+ global seismic activity to verify if M6+ earthquakes are preceded by a change of the Earth's magnetic field. The data of Earth's magnetic field used to conduct the study of correlation are provided by the induction magnetometer of Radio Emissions Project's station (Lat: 41°41'4.27"N, Long: 12°38'33,60"E, Albano Laziale, Rome, Italy), equipped with a ELF receiver prototype (with a vertically aligned coil antenna) capable to detect the variations of the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field on Z magnetic component. The M6+ global seismic activity data are provided in real-time by USGS, INGV and CSEM. The sample of data used to conduct the study refers to the period between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012. The Earth's magnetic field variations data set has been marked with the times (time markers) of M6+ earthquakes occurred on a global scale and has been verified the existence of disturbances of the Earth's geomagnetic field in the time interval that preceded the M6+ global seismic activity. The correlation study showed that all M6+ earthquakes recorded on 2012 were preceded by an increase of the Earth's magnetic field, detected in the Z magnetic component. The authors measured the time lag elapsed between the maximum increment of the Earth's magnetic field recorded before an earthquake M6+ and the date and time at which this occurred, and has been verified that the minimum time lag recorded between the Earth's magnetic field increase and the earthquake M6+ has been 1 minute (9 October 2012, Balleny Islands, M6,4); while, the maximum time lag recorded has been 3600 minutes (26 June 2012, China, M6,3). The average time lag has been 629.47 minutes. In addition, the average time lag is deflected in relation to the magnitude increase. Key words: Seismic Geomagnetic Precursor (SGP), Interplanetary Seismic Precursor (ISP), Earth's magnetic field variations, earthquakes, prevision.

  6. Active Seismic Monitoring Using High-Power Moveable 40-TONS Vibration Sources in Altay-Sayn Region of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, V. M.; Seleznev, V. S.; Emanov, A. F.; Kashun, V. N.; Elagin, S. A.; Romanenko, I.; Shenmayer, A. E.; Serezhnikov, N.

    2013-05-01

    determined variations in velocities of longitudinal and transverse waves. Both from 100-tons and 40-tons vibration sources there are distinctly determined annual and semiannual variations, and also variations of 120 and 90 days. There is determined correlations of revealed variations of P- and S-wave velocities with drowning of the upper part of the Earth`s crust because of season changes of water volumes in the biggest Novosibirsk water reservoir. There were carried out experiments on aperture widening of operating vibroseismic observations in seismic active zones of the South of Altay. All these results prove possibility of using moveable collapsible 40-tons vibration sources for active monitoring of seismic dangerous zones, nuclear power plants, nuclear waste storage etc.

  7. Geomorphology, active duplexing, and earthquakes within the Central Himalayan seismic gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, K. D.; Sandiford, M.; Rajendran, C. C.; Rajendran, K.

    2013-12-01

    The ~500 km long 'Central Himalayan seismic gap' of northwest India, is the largest section of the Himalaya that has not experienced a very large earthquake (Mw > 7.0) in the past 200-500 years. The slip deficit associated with this seismic quiescence has led many to suggest that the region is overdue for a great earthquake (Mw >8), an event which could be potentially devastating given the region's high population (>10 million). Despite the recognition that the region is under considerable seismic risk, the geometry of active fault structures that could potentially fail during large earthquakes remains poorly defined. This has arisen, to a certain extent, because moderate earthquakes, such as the Mw 6.3 1999 event near the city of Chamoli and the Mw 7.0 1991 earthquake near Uttarkashi (responsible for ~1000 deaths), have not produced obvious surface ruptures and do not appear to coincide with surficially mapped faults. We present new geomorphic and river longitudinal profile data that define a prominent ~400 km long distinctive geomorphic transition at the base of the high Himalaya in the seismic gap, defined as a sharp dividing line north of which there are significant increases in normalized river steepness (ksn), hillslope angles, and local relief. We interpret the morphologic changes across the geomorphic boundary to be produced due to a northward increase in rock uplift rate, given that the boundary cross-cuts mapped structures and lithologic contacts, yet coincides exactly with: 1) the axial trace of the geophysically-imaged ramp-flat transition in the Main Himalayan Thrust, 2) significant northward increases in instrumentally-recorded seismicity, and 3) an order of magnitude change in published Ar-Ar bedrock cooling ages. The available datasets suggest that such an increase in rock uplift rate is best explained by a ~400 km long by ~50 km wide active duplex along the Main Himalayan Thrust ramp, with the leading edge of the duplex giving rise to the

  8. Recent high-resolution seismic reflection studies of active faults in the Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    In the past four years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in key gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland, western Washington State. Although extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area, these marine profiles lack coverage on land and in shallow or restricted waterways. The recent high-resolution seismic surveys have targeted key structures beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate, and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. The surveys can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test key elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. Results from these surveys have: 1) documented several meters of vertical displacement on at least two separate faults in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the Catfish Lake scarp and the underlying kink band in the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a first look at the structures beneath the north portion of the western Tacoma fault zone, north of previous marine profiles; 4) documented that deformation along the Seattle fault extends well east of Lake Sammamish; 5) imaged the Seattle fault beneath the Vasa Park trench; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in and south of the Seattle fault zone south of Bellevue. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic investigations of past earthquakes on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  9. Temporal Variations of Magnetic Field Associated with Seismic Activity at Cerro Machin Volcano, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, J. M.; Serna, J. P.; Guzman, J.

    2011-12-01

    A study of magnetic variations was carried out at Cerro Machin Volcano, Colombia for the period 2009 -2010, with two permanent magnetometers located at South and North of the central dome, separated about 2.5 km each other. After corrections, we found that there is no clear correlation between volcanic seismicity and temporal changes of magnetic field for each magnetometer station, if they are analyzed individually. On the contrary, when we calculated the residual Magnetic field (RMF), for each magnetometer, and then we made the subtraction between them, and plot it vs time, we found a clear correlation of changes in local magnetic field with the occurrence of volcanic seismicity (ML >1.6). We found a change in the RMF between 1584 nT and 1608 nT, each time that a volcano-tectonic earthquake occurred. The máximum lapse time between the previous change in RMF and the further occurrence of the earthquake is 24 days, with an average of 11 days. This pattern occurred more than 9 times during the studied period. Based on the results, we believed that the simple methodology proposed here, is a good tool for monitoring changes in seismicity associated with activity at Cerro Machín volcano. We suggest that the temporal changes of RMF at Cerro Machín Volcano, are associated with piezo-magnetic effects, due to changes in strain-stress inside the volcano, produced by the interaction between local faulting and magma movement.

  10. Geological and tectonic implications obtained from first seismic activity investigation around Lembang fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afnimar; Yulianto, Eko; Rasmid

    2015-12-01

    The Lembang fault located at northern part of populated Bandung basin is the most conspicuous fault that potentially capable in generating earthquakes. The first seismic investigation around Lembang fault has been done by deploying a seismic network from May 2010 till December 2011 to estimate the seismic activities around that fault. Nine events were recorded and distributed around the fault. Seven events were likely to be generated by the Lembang fault and two events were not. The events related to the Lembang fault strongly suggest that this fault has left-lateral kinematic. It shows vector movement of Australian plate toward NNE might have been responsible for the Lembang fault kinematic following its initial vertical gravitational movement. The 1-D velocity model obtained from inversion indicates the stratigraphy configuration around the fault composed at least three layers of low Vp/Vs at the top, high Vp/Vs at the middle layer and moderate Vp/Vs at the bottom. In comparison with general geology of the area, top, mid and bottom layers may consecutively represent Quaternary volcanic layer, pre-Quaternary water-filled sedimentary layer and pre-Quaternary basement. Two eastern events related to minor faults and were caused by a gravitational collapse.

  11. Protrusive intrusion, dehydration and polymorphism in minerals as possible reason of seismic activity, relation between ophiolite belts and seismic zonation of the territory of Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, A. V.; Petrosyan, H. M.

    2010-05-01

    In the basis of multiple geological and geophysical data, also on the results of investigations seismic and density properties of rocks at high termobaric conditions, we proposed the petrophisical section and model of evolution of Earth crust of the territory of Armenia. On the proposed model the following interrelated problems are debated: forming of ophiolite belts and volcanic centers, genesis of hydrocarbons by organic and inorganic ways, and also reasons of originating of seismic centers. The reasons of originating of seismic centers in different depths of Earth crust, are miscellaneous. According to the model of Earth crust evolution the ophiolite belts are formed due to permanent protrusive intrusion of serpentinized masses from the foot of the crust (35-50km) into upper horizons. It is natural to assume, that the permanent intrusion of serpentinizd masses through deep faults has drastically occurred accompanying with seismic shakings. This process encourages the development of deep faults. The protrusive intrusion of serpentinized masse accompanied with partial dehydration of serpentinites and serpentinized ultrabasites and new mineral formation. The processes was accompanied also with drastic change of seismic waves and volumes up to 30%. Experiments at high termobaric conditions show, that some minerals undergone polymorphous transformations, accompanied with phase change and drastic change of rocks volume. Particularly plastic calcite, included in the composition of metamorphic rocks to run into the cracks expends and diversifies them. The process described cause some general effects similar to those of the process of dilatancy. Therefore, the protrusive intrusion of serpentinized masses into upper horizons, it dehydrations and polymorphous transformations in different minerals, may be cause of geo-dynamic processes at different depths of Earth crust. It may be assumed, that those processes permanently occur nowadays as well. Comparing the maps of

  12. Characterising volcanic activity of Piton de la Fournaise volcano by the spatial distribution of seismic velocity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens-Schoenfelder, C.; Pomponi, E.

    2013-12-01

    We apply Passive Image Interferometry to investigate the seismic noise recorded from October 2009 until December 2011 by 21 stations of the IPGP/OVPF seismic network installed on Piton de la Fournaise volcano within the UnderVolc project. The analyzed period contains three eruptions in 2009 and January 2010, two eruptions plus one dyke intrusion in late 2010, and a seismic crises in 2011. Seismic noise of vertical and horizontal components is cross-correlated to measure velocity changes as apparent stretching of the coda. For some station pairs the apparent velocity changes exceed 1% and a decorrelation of waveforms is observed at the time of volcanic activity. This distorts monitoring results if changes are measured with respect to a global reference. To overcome this we present a method to estimate changes using multiple references that stabilizes the quality of estimated velocity changes. We observe abrupt changes that occur coincident with volcanic events as well as long term transient signals. Using a simple assumption about the spatial sensitivity of our measurements we can map the spatial distribution of velocity changes for selected periods. Comparing these signals with volcanic activity and GPS derived surface deformation we can identify patterns of the velocity changes that appear characteristic for the type of volcanic activity. We can differentiate intrusive processes associated with inflation and increased seismic activity, periods of relaxation without seismicity and eruptions solely based on the velocity signal. This information can help to assess the processes acting in the volcano.

  13. Near-surface Fun with Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, M.

    2015-12-01

    What is happening in the near-surface often has a direct effect on human activity. Seismic exploration has routinely targeted geology at depths of kilometers to tens of kilometers. However, these techniques can be applied to answer questions about shallower targets. Several recent experiments demonstrate seismic applicability to near-surface problems. One example is passive seismic monitoring using ambient noise to identify shallow changes and potential hazards in a producing hydrocarbon field. Another example is the use of seismic reflection data from within the water column to determine layering caused by temperature and salinity differences in depth. A third example is identifying historical elevation changes along coast lines using seismic reflection data. These examples show that exploration seismic methods can be effectively used for a variety of near-surface applications.

  14. Experiment system of LAMOST active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangqun; Su, Ding; Li, Guoping; Yao, Zhengqiu; Zhang, Zhengcao; Li, Yeping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, You; Xu, Xinqi; Wang, Hai

    2004-10-01

    Active optics is the most difficult part in LAMOST project. Especially for the segmented reflecting Schmidt plate Ma, in which both segmented mirror active optics and thin mirror (or deformable mirror) active optics are applied. To test and optimize the thin mirror active optics of Ma, and to approach the reality of operating environment of the telescope, an outdoor experiment system has been established. This experiment system is also a `small LAMOST" with one sub-mirror of the primary mirror Mb and one sub-mirror of the Schmidt plate Ma, and with full scale in spacing (40 meters) between Ma and Mb. many parts of LAMOST were tested in the experiment system except segmented mirror active optics. Especially for force actuators, thin mirror support system, friction driving of the alt-azimuth mounting and its control system, wave front test along such a long optical path. This paper presents the experiment system, research and developments, and some experiment results.

  15. High-resolution shallow-seismic experiments in sand. Part 1: Water table, fluid flow, and saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, R.; Nur, A.

    1998-07-01

    A high-resolution, very shallow seismic reflection and refraction experiment was conducted to investigate the seismic response of groundwater level changes in beach sand in situ. A fixed 10-m-long receiver array was used for repeated seismic profiling. Direct measurements of water level in a monitoring well and moisture content in the sand were taken as well. The water table in the well changed by about 1 m in slightly delayed response to the nearby ocean tides. In contrast, inversion of the seismic data yielded a totally different picture. The reflection from the water table at high tide appeared at a later time than the reflection at low tide. This unexpected discrepancy can be reconciled using Gassmann`s equation: a low-velocity layer must exist between the near-surface dry sand and the deeper and much faster fully saturated sand. This low-velocity layer coincides with the newly saturated zone and is caused by a combination of the sand`s high density (close to that of fully saturated sand), and its high compressibility (close to that of dry sand). This low-velocity zone causes a velocity pull-down for the high-frequency reflections, and causes a high-tide reflection to appear later in time than low-tide reflection. The calculated velocities in the dry layer show changes with time that correlate with sand dryness, as predicted by the temporal changes of the sand`s density due to changing water/air ratio. The results show that near-surface velocities in sand are sensitive to partial saturation in the transition zone between dry and saturated sand. The authors were able to extract the saturation of the first layer and the depth to the water table from the seismic velocities.

  16. Seismic Interferometry and the Spatial Auto-Correlation Method on the Regional Coda of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S.; Prieto, G. A.

    2008-12-01

    A seismic recording of the non-proliferation experiment (NPE), made by a petroleum-exploration company in Railroad Valley (Nevada), contains the first break of the regional P phases followed by a three minute long coda. The transverse orientation and sign-bit recording of the array, renders distinguishing phase arrival times difficult. This motivates the use of seismic interferometry. The geometry does not permit recovering the Green's function from the first break arrival times using the stationary phase theorem, however the coda contains sufficiently equipartitioned energy. We study the result of seismic interferometry in the frequency-domain. This procedure is analogous to the spatial auto-correlation (SPAC) method, devised for studying microtremors by Aki in 1957. Cross-correlating two receiver stations retrieves, under favorable circumstances, an approximation of the Green's function between these two stations. To first order, this Green's function consists of a direct event traveling between the receivers. In the frequency domain, the lowest mode in the Green's function is a weighted and scaled zero-order Bessel function of the first kind, J0. We fit the frequency-domain of the recovered Green's functions to damped J0 functions. to recover phase velocity and estimates of the attenuation coefficients. Only energy between 1-4 Hz can be fitted unambiguously with J0 functions, because higher frequencies contain too much spurious energy. This result shows the equivalence of the SPAC method and seismic interferometry for the lowest mode in the Green's function. This study also shows how the coda of a regional event, seemingly unfavorably positioned, can contains energy useful for seismic interferometry.

  17. Broadband seismic monitoring of active volcanoes using deterministic and stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Nakano, M.; Maeda, T.; Yepes, H.; Palacios, P.; Ruiz, M. C.; Arrais, S.; Vaca, M.; Molina, I.; Yamashina, T.

    2009-12-01

    We systematically used two approaches to analyze broadband seismic signals observed at active volcanoes: one is waveform inversion of very-long-period (VLP) signals in the frequency domain assuming possible source mechanisms; the other is a source location method of long-period (LP) and tremor using their amplitudes. The deterministic approach of the waveform inversion is useful to constrain the source mechanism and location, but is basically only applicable to VLP signals with periods longer than a few seconds. The source location method uses seismic amplitudes corrected for site amplifications and assumes isotropic radiation of S waves. This assumption of isotropic radiation is apparently inconsistent with the hypothesis of crack geometry at the LP source. Using the source location method, we estimated the best-fit source location of a VLP/LP event at Cotopaxi using a frequency band of 7-12 Hz and Q = 60. This location was close to the best-fit source location determined by waveform inversion of the VLP/LP event using a VLP band of 5-12.5 s. The waveform inversion indicated that a crack mechanism better explained the VLP signals than an isotropic mechanism. These results indicated that isotropic radiation is not inherent to the source and only appears at high frequencies. We also obtained a best-fit location of an explosion event at Tungurahua when using a frequency band of 5-10 Hz and Q = 60. This frequency band and Q value also yielded reasonable locations for the sources of tremor signals associated with lahars and pyroclastic flows at Tungurahua. The isotropic radiation assumption may be valid in a high frequency range in which the path effect caused by the scattering of seismic waves results in an isotropic radiation pattern of S waves. The source location method may be categorized as a stochastic approach based on the nature of scattering waves. We further applied the waveform inversion to VLP signals observed at only two stations during a volcanic crisis

  18. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  19. An overview on geophysical structures in the Eastern Alps revealed by recent seismic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, M.; Brueckl, E. P.; Grad, M.

    2009-12-01

    CELEBRATION 2000 and ALP 2002 were two large seismic wide-angle experiments which targeted the lithospheric structure of Central Europe. This presentation highlights crustal features of the Eastern Alps and their transition into adjacent tectonic provinces (Bohemian Massif, Carpathians, Pannonian Basin, Southern Alps and Dinarides) which were unknown prior to these experiments. The Eastern Alps result from the collision of the European platform with the Adriatic plate which got initiated in the Eocene. From the late Oligocene on, escape tectonics towards the unconstrained eastern margin contributed to the evolution of the Eastern Alps. Both processes left their imprints on the surface geology which differs significantly from the Western Alps. Considering the layout of the experiments, an innovative 3D processing scheme was implemented and supplemented by traditional 2D interpretation techniques. The 3D approach provides robust models with large spatial coverage, while the evaluation of 2D profiles allows resolving details at locations of particular interest. The P-wave velocity distribution of crust shows a clear separation into a low-velocity European plate and a high-velocity Adriatic plate. Crustal velocities below the Pannonian Basin are moderate to low. Velocity structures in the uppermost crust correlate well with surface geology and tectonic divisions. One of the most important results is a new map of the Moho discontinuity. Its depth varies between 52 and 24 km, and from its structure we deduce the new crustal fragment Pannonia. Pannonia has shallow crust and is underthrusted by both the European Moho in the North and the Adriatic Moho in the South-West. Although solely vertical component receivers were used, strong S-waves can be observed on some seismograms. Their evaluation confirms the separation into three crustal fragments and provides constraints on Poisson’s ratio. A subhorizontal mantle reflector in a depth range from approximately 55 km is found

  20. The Influence of Seismic Amplification and Distanced Surcharge on the Active Thrust on Earth-Reinforced Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Biondi, Giovani; Grassi, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele

    2008-07-08

    The paper describes a closed form pseudo-static solution for the estimation of the active earth-pressure coefficient for an earth-reinforced wall assuming a non-uniform profile of the seismic coefficients along the wall height and a distanced uniformly-distributed surcharge on the backfill surface. The static and seismic hydraulic conditions of the backfill are also accounted for. A parametric analysis is carried out and the obtained results are discussed.

  1. Analysis of the seismicity activity of the volcano Ceboruco, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ayala, N. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Gomez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a stratovolcano is located in the state of Nayarit,Mexico (104 ° 30'31 .25 "W, 21 ° 7'28 .35" N, 2280msnm). This is an volcano active, as part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Nelson (1986) reports that it has had activity during the last 1000 years has averaged eruptions every 125 years or so, having last erupted in 1870, currently has fumarolic activity. In the past 20 years there has been an increase in the population and socio-economic activities around the volcano (Suárez Plascencia, 2013); which reason the Ceboruco study has become a necessity in several ways. Recent investigations of seismicity (Rodríguez Uribe et al., 2013) have classified the earthquakes in four families Ceboruco considering the waveform and spectral features. We present analysis included 57 days of seismicity from March to October 2012, in the period we located 97 events with arrivals of P and S waves clear, registered in at least three seasons, three components of the temporal network Ceboruco volcano.

  2. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  3. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  4. Present activity and seismogenic potential of a low-angle normal fault system (Città di Castello, Italy): Constraints from surface geology, seismic reflection data and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, Francesco; Boncio, Paolo; Lavecchia, Giusy; Pace, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    We present new constraints on an active low-angle normal fault system in the Città di Castello-Sansepolcro basin (CSB) of the northern Apennines of Italy. New field data from the geological survey of the Carta Geologica d' Italia (CARG project) define the surface geometry of the normal fault system and lead to an interpretation of the CROP 03 deep-crust seismic reflection profile (Castiglion Fiorentino-Urbania segment), with particular attention paid to the geometry of the Plio-Quaternary extensional structures. Surface and sub-surface geological data are integrated with instrumental and historical seismicity in order to define the seismotectonics of the area. Low-angle east-dipping reflectors are the seismic expression of the well-known Altotiberina Fault (AF), a regional extensional detachment on which both east- and west-dipping high-angle faults, bounding the CSB, sole out. The AF breakaway zone is located ˜ 10 km west of the CSB. Within the extensional allochthon, synthetic east-dipping planes prevail. Displacement along the AF is ˜ 4.5 km, which agrees with the cumulative offset due to its synthetic splays. The evolution of the CSB has mainly been controlled by the east-dipping fault system, at least since Early Pleistocene time; this system is still active and responsible for the seismicity of the area. A low level of seismic activity was recorded instrumentally within the CSB, but several damaging earthquakes have occurred in historical times. The instrumental seismicity and the intensity data points of the largest historical earthquakes (5 events with maximum MCS intensity of IX to IX-X) allow us to propose two main seismogenic structures: the Monte Santa Maria Tiberina (Mmax = 5.9) and Città di Castello (Mmax up to 6.5) normal faults. Both are synthetic splays of the AF detachment, dipping to the NE at moderate (45-50°) to low (25-30°) angles and cutting the upper crust up to the surface. This study suggests that low-angle normal faults (at least

  5. Assessment and surveillance of active seismic regions through time series satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, M. A.; Savastru, R. S.; Savastru, D. M.

    2013-08-01

    Satellite time-series data, coupled with ground based observations where available, can enable scientists to survey pre-earthquake signals in the areas of strong tectonic activity. Cumulative stress energy in seismic active regions under operating tectonic force manifests various earthquakes' precursors. Space-time anomalies of Earth's emitted radiation (radon in underground water and soil, thermal infrared in spectral range measured from satellite months to weeks before the occurrence of earthquakes etc.), and electromagnetic anomalies are considered as pre-seismic signals. This energy transformation may result in enhanced transient thermal infrared (TIR) emission, which can be detected through satellites equipped with thermal sensors like AVHRR (NOAA), MODIS (Terra/Aqua). This paper presents observations made using time series NOAA-AVHRR and MODIS satellite data-derived land surface temperature (LST) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) values in case of 27th 2004 earthquake recorded in seismic Vrancea region, Romania, using anomalous TIR signals as reflected in LST rise and high OLR values which followed similar growth pattern spatially and temporally. In all analyzed cases, starting with almost one week prior to a moderate or strong earthquake a transient thermal infrared rise in LST of several Celsius degrees (°C) and the increased OLR values higher than the normal have been recorded around epicentral areas, function of the magnitude and focal depth, which disappeared after the main shock. As Vrancea area has a significant regional tectonic activity in Romania and Europe, the joint analysis of geospatial and in-situ geophysical information is revealing new insights in the field of hazard assessment.

  6. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Studies of Active Faults: a Case Study from Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2007-12-01

    In the past five years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland region of Washington State. The extensive forests have made recognition of active faults difficult, but new Light Distance and Ranging (LIDAR) detailed topographic data have made a major breakthrough in mapping active faults. Extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area. These marine profiles, however, lack coverage beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. Recent land surveys and profiles in restricted waterways can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. We have also been venturing into more congested areas to seismically image faults in key urban locations. Results from recent surveys have: 1) documented new faults that had long been suspected in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the LIDAR scarps and observed structures across the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a window into structures beneath the north and eastern portions of the western Tacoma fault zone; 4) documented deformation along the Seattle fault near a paleoseismic trench; 5) mapped the eastern part the Seattle fault zone beyond its previously mapped limits; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in the Seattle fault zone in the cities of Bellevue and Seattle. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic data collected on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  7. Geology of the area of induced seismic activity at Monticello Reservoir, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Secor, D.T. Jr.; Smith, W.A.; Snoke, A.W.; Peck, L.S.; Pitcher, D.M.; Prowell, D.C.; Simpson, D.H.

    1982-08-10

    This study provides geological background information necessary for an evaluation of the earthquake hazard in an area of induced seismic activity at Monticello Reservoir, South Carolina. This region contains a thick stratified sequence of Proterozoic Z and Cambrian metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. In the early to middle Paleozoic, this sequence was recrystallized and deformed under metamorphic conditions that ranged from greenschist to amphibolite facies and experienced at least two episodes of folding. The region has been intruded by late kinematic to postkinematic granitoid plutons of Silurian and Carboniferous ages and by numerous northwest trending diabase diks of Late Traissic and Early Jurassic age. The region south of Monticello Reservoir in the Carolina slate belt experienced two episodes of faulting in the late Paleozoic and/or early to middle Mesozoic. The older group of faults trends approximately east, has only small displacements, and is characterized by extensive silicifiction of the fault zones. The younger group of faults trends approximately north has experienced dip slip displacements up to 1700 m and is characterized by carbonate mineralization in the fault zones. Both sets of faults are cut by an undeformed diabase dike of Late Triassic or Early Jurassic age. The induced seismic activity around Monticello Reservoir is occurring in a heterogeneous quartz monzonite pluton of Carboniferous age. The pluton contains large enclaves of country rock and is cut by numerous, diversely oriented small faults and joint. These local inhomogeneities in the pluton together with an irregular stress field are interpreted to control the diffuse seismic activity around the reservoir. In view of the apparent absence of lengthy faults it is unlikely that a large-magnitude earthquake will occur in response to the stress and pore pressure changes related to the impoundment of Monticello Reservoir.

  8. Movement of the Earth pole and the seismic activity in 2001-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Aleksey; Zabbarova, Regina; Lapaeva, Valentina; Nefedyev, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between the parameters which characterize the movement of the Earth pole and seismic activity are considered. The correlation of the considered parameters is studied. The discussions about the relationship of poles movement and irregularity in speed of Earth rotation with seismic activity were actively performed in 60- 70th years of last century. Mainly, the influence of seismicity on pole movement was considered in this works. In particular, the question about excitation of a pole by earthquakes chandler's fluctuations was studied. An interest in the similar researches continues till now. The chandler's movements investigations and their relation with rotation of the Earth and seismicity were proceeded. The correlation between appearance of earthquakes and abnormal evasion of time and latitude for the observatories located near an epicenter was also discussed. What changes in position of the Earth pole do occur as a result of the strongest earthquakes? To answer on this question it is necessary to study variations of "an average pole", where the basic periodic components in movement of a pole having amplitude 0.1"-0.3" are accepted. To perform the analysis of the pole co-ordinates (X and Y) the International service of the Earth rotation for 1995-2012 have been considered. Linear Orlov-Saharov transformation has been applied to an exception of the periodic movement. On the basis of this positions changes of an average pole (aperiodicity displacement and long periodical variations of an axis of rotation in a Earth body) have been calculated with an interval of 0.1 years. Was found the changes of position of an average pole of the Earth was preceded the most considerable seismic events of the beginning of 21 century. As a whole, the increase of seismic activity has begun after 2002 only. For example, there were 2 strong earthquakes with magnitude 7 and more (Salvador, India) in 2001 , 2 earthquakes (Tajikistan, Taiwan) occurred in 2002, and 5

  9. The 2013 earthquake swarm in Helike, Greece: seismic activity at the root of old normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanidis, V.; Deschamps, A.; Papadimitriou, P.; Matrullo, E.; Karakonstantis, A.; Bozionelos, G.; Kaviris, G.; Serpetsidaki, A.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Voulgaris, N.; Bernard, P.; Sokos, E.; Makropoulos, K.

    2015-09-01

    The Corinth Rift in Central Greece has been studied extensively during the past decades, as it is one of the most seismically active regions in Europe. It is characterized by normal faulting and extension rates between 6 and 15 mm yr-1 in an approximately N10E° direction. On 2013 May 21, an earthquake swarm was initiated with a series of small events 4 km southeast of Aigion city. In the next days, the seismic activity became more intense, with outbursts of several stronger events of magnitude between 3.3 and 3.7. The seismicity migrated towards the east during June, followed by a sudden activation of the western part of the swarm on July 15th. More than 1500 events have been detected and manually analysed during the period between 2013 May 21 and August 31, using over 15 local stations in epicentral distances up to 30 km and a local velocity model determined by an error minimization method. Waveform similarity-based analysis was performed, revealing several distinct multiplets within the earthquake swarm. High-resolution relocation was applied using the double-difference algorithm HypoDD, incorporating both catalogue and cross-correlation differential traveltime data, which managed to separate the initial seismic cloud into several smaller, densely concentrated spatial clusters of strongly correlated events. Focal mechanism solutions for over 170 events were determined using P-wave first motion polarities, while regional waveform modelling was applied for the calculation of moment tensors for the 18 largest events of the sequence. Selected events belonging to common spatial groups were considered for the calculation of composite mechanisms to characterize different parts of the swarm. The solutions are mainly in agreement with the regional NNE-SSW extension, representing typical normal faulting on 30-50° north-dipping planes, while a few exhibit slip in an NNE-SSW direction, on a roughly subhorizontal plane. Moment magnitudes were calculated by spectral analysis

  10. Active Tectonics of off-Hokuriku, Central Japan, by two ships seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Naoko; Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Abe, Susumu; Shiraishi, Kazuya

    2015-04-01

    Along the southern to eastern margin of the Sea of Japan, active faults are densely distributed. These submarine active faults produced tsunami disasters, such as 1983 Nihonkai-chubu earthquake (M7.7) and 1993 Hokkaido Nansei-oki earthquake (M7.8). To estimate tsunami hazards, we performed deep seismic reflection profiling to obtain the information of tsunami source faults, off-Hokuriku area in the central part of Honshu, Japan. The survey is carried out as a part of research project named "the integrated research project on seismic and tsunami hazards around the Sea of Japan" funded by MEXT. To obtain long offset data in busy marine activity area, we used two vessels; a gun-ship with 3020 cu. inch air-gun and a cable-ship with a 2-km-long, streamer cable with 156 channels and 480 cu. inch air-gun. Common-midpoint reflection data were acquired using two ships at 4 km offset. The survey area consists of stretched continental crust associated with rifting and opening of the Sea of Japan in early Miocene and is marked by densely distributed syn-rift normal faults. Fault reactivation of normal faults as reverse faults is common. Two phases of fault reactivation are identified from the seismic sections after termination of opening of the Sea of Japan. One is the late Miocene NS trending shortening deformation. This is produced by NS-trending convergence of the Shikoku basin (15 Ma), which belongs to the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) to SW Japan at Nankai trough (Kimura et al., 2005). After the initiation of the subduction of PHS at Nankai trough, the strong shortening deformation is terminated and the fold-and-thrust belt was unconformably covered by sub-horizontal Pliocene sediments. Some horizons of unconformities represent multiple events of shortening driven from the subduction interface. Some normal faults reactivated as active strike-slip and reverse faults in Quaternary. Well observed example is the 2007 Noto peninsula earthquake (M6.8). The 2007 Noto peninsula

  11. Fault rupture as a series of nano-seismic events during high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, X.; Reches, Z.; Chen, X.; Chang, J. C.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The rupture process of experimental faults is investigated here by monitoring nano-seismic events (NSE) during slip in a rotary shear apparatus. Our experimental faults are made of two rock blocks with one to four miniature 3D accelerometers that are glued to the stationary block at distance of ~ 2 cm from the fault surface. Accelerations in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 200 kHz are recorded in slip-parallel (x), slip-transverse (y), and slip-vertical (z) directions. We conducted a series of 45 experiments on diorite and dolomite samples in two loading styles: classical velocity controlled loading, and power-density loading, in which the power-density (shear stress times slip velocity) is selected, and stick-slip events develop spontaneously according to the experimental fault response. The 3D accelerometer data were recorded at 106 samples/s, with acceleration resolution of 10 mV/g in recoding range of +/- 5 V. The experiments were conducted at slip-velocity of 0.001-0.8 m/s and slip distance up to 1.38 m. The accelerometer observations revealed tens to hundreds of NSEs per slip in both loading styles; peak acceleration ranged from 1g to over 500g. A typical stick-slip with tens of NSEs in Fig. 1, shows: (1) An initial NSE at ~59.72 s (green) that coincides with a small stress drop (~10%, red); (2) Simultaneous macroscopic slip initiation (blue); (3) A swarm of NSEs occur as the fault slips, each NSE lasts 1-2 milliseconds; and (4) Details of the initial NSE are shown in Fig. 2. Based on waveform cross-correlation between frequency band from 20 kHz to 70kHz, we identify several groups of NSE clusters, and apply empirical Green's function method to analyze event source spectra based on Brune-type source model. These NSEs are indicators of rupture propagation during the experimental fault slip.

  12. Moonquakes and lunar tectonism results from the Apollo passive seismic experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G.; Ewing, M.; Dorman, J.; Lammlein, D.; Press, F.; Toksoz, N.; Sutton, G.; Duennebier, F.; Nakamura, Y.

    1972-01-01

    The natural seismicity of the moon appears to be very low relative to that of the earth. However, moonquakes do occur. They are detected by the stations of the Apollo seismic network at an average rate of 1800/yr at Station 14 and at lower rates at Stations 12 and 15. All of the moonquakes are small, and in the few cases for which the foci have been located, they occur at great depth (about 800 km). The frequency of occurrence of moonquakes is strongly correlated with lunar tides. The dynamic processes that generate quakes are clearly much less vigorous within the moon than they are within the earth.

  13. U. S. Geological Survey begins seismic ground response experiments in Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarr, A.C.; King, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    The men were Denver-based U.S Geological Survey (USGS) geophysicists working on the Urban Hazards Field Investigations project. On the previous day they had recorded two events on their seismographs-a distant nuclear explosion in Nevada and a blast at amine near Centralia, Washington. On another day, they used seismic refraction equipment to locate the depth of bedrock and seismic velocity to it at several locations in West Seattle and in the Seward Park-Brighton district of southeast Seattle. 

  14. Combined Active and Passive Seismic Methods To Characterize Strongmotion Sites in Washington and Oregon, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pileggi, D.; Cakir, R.; Lunedei, E.; Albarello, D.; Walsh, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of the shear-wave velocity profile at strongmotion station sites is important for calibrating accelerograms in terms of local site effects. Surface-wave seismic prospecting methods (both in active and passive configurations) provide an effective tool for an inexpensive and deep penetrating seismic characterization of subsoil. We used a combination of active (Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves, MASW) and passive (Extended Spectral AutoCorrelation, ESAC) array techniques along with the single-station ambient vibration measurements (Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios - HVSR) to characterize strong-motion sites in Washington and Oregon. The MASW analysis was used to better constrain the shallowest part of the Vs profile, while effective dispersion curve provided by ESAC and HVSR data allow us to extend the survey downwards (up to hundred meters of depth). The combined use of these data in the frame of global-search inversion algorithms (Genetic Algorithms) allows us to manage the extreme non-linearity of the inverse problem and mitigate problems associated with the non-uniqueness of the solution. A strict synergy between geologic surveys, boreholes (when the latter was available) and seismic surveys allows a further reduction of relevant uncertainties. Preliminary results show that; i) this combined methodology is a practical, inexpensive, and fast way to characterize multiple strong motion sites; ii) local geology and/or borehole information was combined to better constrain the inversion and to reduce the uncertainty in velocity profiles; and, iii) this combined methodology gives additional information of shear-wave velocities at greater depths.

  15. Time Variation of Seismic Anisotropy, Stress and Cracks on Active Volcanoes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    We summarize measurements of seismic anisotropy and its relation to other geophysical measurements of stress and cracks on eleven active volcanoes; Unzen (Unz), Sakurajima (Sak), Aso, Asama (Asm) and Kirishima (Kir) in Japan; Okmok (Okm) in Alaska, Ruapehu (Rua) and Tongariro (Ton) in New Zealand, Soufriere Hills (Sou) in Montserrat, Kilauea (Kil) in Hawaii and Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) in La Reunion. We used the MFAST shear wave splitting computer code, an objective code that is fully automatic except for the S arrival pick. Fast polarization directions (phi) should be parallel to cracks and hence the maximum horizontal stress direction. Time delays (dt) increase with path length and percent anisotropy, usually related to crack density. Where possible we used S waves from deep earthquakes to ensure that the movement of the earthquakes was not correlated with the volcanic activity. At some volcanoes we used families of repeating events with similar waveforms and at most volcanoes we also computed splitting at earthquakes local to the volcano. We compared the phi and dt variation in time to eruption occurrences and to other available parameters including seismicity rate, b-values, focal mechanisms, isotropic velocity changes from noise cross-correlation, Vp/Vs ratios, Geodetic measurements such as GPS and tilt, and gas flux. All volcanoes had some stations with excellent shear wave arrivals that yielded measureable splitting. Individual measurements showed scatter in most areas, but at most of the volcanoes, moving averages of phi or dt (or both) yielded time variations that correlated with other measurements related to volcanic activity or to stress changes or changes in crack-filling material such as gas flux. The multiplet studies did not yield slowly varying splitting but instead showed distinct jumps in splitting parameters at various times, which appears to be caused in part by cycle skipping. Time resolution of changes depends on the seismicity available

  16. Thermal anomalies in fumaroles at Vulcano island (Italy) and their relationship with seismic activity and stress-induced permeability changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonia, Paolo; Cusano, Paola; Diliberto, Iole Serena; Cangemi, Marianna

    2016-04-01

    Fumarole thermal monitoring is a useful tool in the evaluation of volcanic activity, since temperatures strongly relate to the upward flux of magmatic volatiles. Once depurated from meteorological noise, their variations can reflect permeability changes due to crustal stress dynamics eventually associated to seismic activity. In this work, we discuss a fumarole temperature record acquired in the period September 2009 - May 2012 at Vulcano island (Italy), during which changes of volcanic state, local seismic activity and teleseisms occurred. Apart from positive thermal anomalies driven by increments in volcanic activity, we observed 3 episodes at least of concurrence between tectonic earthquakes and fumarole temperature increments, with particular reference to the local August 16th, 2010 Lipari earthquake, the March 11th, 2011 Sendai-Honshu (Japan) earthquake and a seismic swarm occurred along the Tindari-Letojanni fault in July-August 2011. We interpreted the seismic-related anomalies as "crustal fluid transients", i.e. signals of volcanogenic vapour flow variations induced by stress-induced permeability changes. From this perspective fumarolic activity can be considered as a tracer of geodynamic instability but, since seismic and volcanic phenomena are in mutual cause-effect relationships, a multidisciplinary observation system is mandatory for correctly addressing thermal data interpretation.

  17. Assessment of Stress-Strain State of Seismically Active Region of Armenia According to the Results of Hydrogeodynamic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munkhsaikhan, A.; Avetyan, R.; Pashayan, R.

    2015-12-01

    Results of hydrogeodynamic monitoring, data of the chemical analysis of water were compared with seismic regime of the region aiming to study and evaluate stress-strain state of earth crust of Central Armenia during 2010-2014. Methodolgy of processing water level data came down to allocating tectonic-seismic stress taking into account the following factors: atmosphere pressure, precipitations, size of snow cover and tidal variations. The overall picture of the stress-strain state of the territory yearly was defined by calculated value of deformations around each hydrogeodynamic borehole taking into account the number of seismic events which occurred during that period. Maps of the isolines of equal values of deformations were drawn which reflect space-time regularity of the modern geodynamics of Armenia. The resluts of the correlation between parametres of hydrogeochemical effects and charaectreristics of earthquakes have shown that statistically significant connection between effect parametres (effect time, extremum time) and characteristics of seismic events (energetic class, epicentral distance ) was determined for the changes of parameters of the chemical composition of underground water. Histogram of changes of values of geochemical components of waters of mineral springs in space was drawn for the period of monitoring observations. The analysis of data allowed allocating more informative parameters of chemical composition of mineral water: gas component-carbon dioxide (CO2). Magnesium -Mg2+, chloride -Cl- where allocated from the macrocomponenet composition. According to the catalogue of seismic data there was drawn diagram of the frequency of earthquakes, reflecting the distribution of the earthquake number according to magnitude M (according to rule LgN=a-bM) in logarithmic scale. Coefficient of seismic activity was calculated - a, by which variations seismic activity of the region is evaluated. Thus, modern tectonic movements of earth crust of Armenia are

  18. Geomorphic evidence of active faults growth in the Norcia seismic area (central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materazzi, Marco; Aringoli, Domenico; Farabollini, Piero; Giacopetti, Marco; Pambianchi, Gilberto; Tondi, Emanuele; Troiani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Fault-growth by segment linkage is one of the fundamental processes controlling the evolution, in both time and the space, of fault systems. In fact, step-like trajectories shown by length-displacement diagrams for individual fault arrays suggest that the development of evolved structures result by the linkage of single fault segments. The type of interaction between faults and the rate at which faults reactivate not only control the long term tectonic evolution of an area, but also influence the seismic hazard, as earthquake recurrence intervals tend to decrease as fault slip rate increase. The use of Geomorphological investigations represents an important tool to constrain the latest history of active faults. In this case, attention has to be given to recognize morphostructural, historical, environmental features at the surface, since they record the long-term seismic behavior due to the fault growth processes (Tondi and Cello, 2003). The aim of this work is to investigate the long term morphotectonic evolution of a well know seismic area in the central Apennines: the Norcia intramontane basin (Aringoli et al., 2005). The activity of the Norcia seismic area is characterized by moderate events and by strong earthquakes with maximum intensities of X-XI degrees MCS and equivalent magnitudes around 6.5±7.0 (CPTI, 2004). Based on the morphostructural features as well as on the historical seismicity of the area, we may divide the Norcia seismic area into three minor basins roughly NW-SE oriented: the Preci sub-basin in the north; the S. Scolastica and the Castel S. Maria sub-basins in the south. The wider basin (S. Scolastica) is separated from the other two by ridges transversally oriented with respect the basins themselves; they are the geomorphological response to the tectonic deformation which characterizes the whole area. Other geomorphological evidences of tectonic activity are represented by deformation of old summit erosional surfaces, hydrographic network

  19. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  20. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David W.

    1991-07-01

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: science program objectives and rationale; science requirements; capturing the essential physics; science development approach; development model hardware; development model test plan; and flight hardware and operations.

  1. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: science program objectives and rationale; science requirements; capturing the essential physics; science development approach; development model hardware; development model test plan; and flight hardware and operations.

  2. Structure of the active rift zone and margins of the northern Imperial Valley from Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livers, A.; Han, L.; Delph, J. R.; White-Gaynor, A. L.; Petit, R.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    First-arrival refraction data were used to create a seismic velocity model of the upper crust across the actively rifting northern Imperial Valley and its margins. The densely sampled seismic refraction data were acquired by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) , which is investigating rift processes in the northern-most rift segment of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. A 95-km long seismic line was acquired across the northern Imperial Valley, through the Salton Sea geothermal field, parallel to the five Salton Butte volcanoes and perpendicular to the Brawley Seismic Zone and major strike-slip faults. Nineteen explosive shots were recorded with 100 m seismometer spacing across the valley and with 300-500 m spacing into the adjacent ranges. First-arrival travel times were picked from shot gathers along this line and a seismic velocity model was produced using tomographic inversion. Sedimentary basement and seismic basement in the valley are interpreted to be sediment metamorphosed by the very high heat flow. The velocity model shows that this basement to the west of the Brawley Seismic Zone is at ~4-km depth. The basement shallows to ~2-km depth in the active geothermal field and Salton Buttes volcanic field which locally coincide with the Brawley Seismic Zone. At the eastern edge of the geothermal field, the basement drops off again to ~3.5-km depth. The eastern edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the along-strike extension of the Sand Hills Fault, an inactive strike-slip fault. The seismic velocities to the east of the fault correspond to metamorphic rock of the Chocolate Mountains, different from the metamorphosed basement in the valley. The western edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the active Superstition Hills Fault. To the west of the valley, >4-km deep valley basement extends to the active Superstition Hills Fault. Basement then shallows

  3. Variation in harbour porpoise activity in response to seismic survey noise.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Brookes, Kate L; Graham, Isla M; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    Animals exposed to anthropogenic disturbance make trade-offs between perceived risk and the cost of leaving disturbed areas. Impact assessments tend to focus on overt behavioural responses leading to displacement, but trade-offs may also impact individual energy budgets through reduced foraging performance. Previous studies found no evidence for broad-scale displacement of harbour porpoises exposed to impulse noise from a 10 day two-dimensional seismic survey. Here, we used an array of passive acoustic loggers coupled with calibrated noise measurements to test whether the seismic survey influenced the activity patterns of porpoises remaining in the area. We showed that the probability of recording a buzz declined by 15% in the ensonified area and was positively related to distance from the source vessel. We also estimated received levels at the hydrophones and characterized the noise response curve. Our results demonstrate how environmental impact assessments can be developed to assess more subtle effects of noise disturbance on activity patterns and foraging efficiency. PMID:24850891

  4. Variation in harbour porpoise activity in response to seismic survey noise

    PubMed Central

    Pirotta, Enrico; Brookes, Kate L.; Graham, Isla M.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Animals exposed to anthropogenic disturbance make trade-offs between perceived risk and the cost of leaving disturbed areas. Impact assessments tend to focus on overt behavioural responses leading to displacement, but trade-offs may also impact individual energy budgets through reduced foraging performance. Previous studies found no evidence for broad-scale displacement of harbour porpoises exposed to impulse noise from a 10 day two-dimensional seismic survey. Here, we used an array of passive acoustic loggers coupled with calibrated noise measurements to test whether the seismic survey influenced the activity patterns of porpoises remaining in the area. We showed that the probability of recording a buzz declined by 15% in the ensonified area and was positively related to distance from the source vessel. We also estimated received levels at the hydrophones and characterized the noise response curve. Our results demonstrate how environmental impact assessments can be developed to assess more subtle effects of noise disturbance on activity patterns and foraging efficiency. PMID:24850891

  5. Seismic protection of frame structures via semi-active control: modeling and implementation issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattulli, Vincenzo; Lepidi, Marco; Potenza, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Theoretical and practical issues concerning the multi-faceted task of mitigating the latero-torsional seismic response of a prototypal frame structure with asymmetric mass distribution are approached. Chevron braces with embedded magnetorheological dampers acting on the interstory drift are used to ensure additional energy dissipation. The semi-active control strategy employed to govern the modification of the damper characteristics via feedback is based on the selection of optimal forces according to a H2/LQG criterion, with respect to which the actual forces are regulated by a clipped-optimal logic. A dynamic observer is used to estimate the state through a non-collocated placement of the acceleration sensors. Several aspects to be addressed throughout the complex process including the design, modelization, and implementation phases of semi-active protection systems are discussed. Finally, experimental results obtained to mitigate the motion induced by ground excitation in a large-scale laboratory prototype, simulating the seismic response of a two-story building, are summarized.

  6. Possibilities for Observations of Electromagnetic Perturbations Related to Seismic Activity with Swarm Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, A.; Mandea, M.; Balasis, G.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that intense seismic activity might generate upward electromagnetic (EM) perturbations that can be detected by ground-based and low altitude spaceborne measurements. For instance, DEMETER satellite (2004-2010) very low frequency (VLF) wave observations pointed out a statistically significant decrease of the measured ionospheric wave intensity a few hours before large shallow earthquakes (EQs). This result would confirm the existence of a lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling before the occurrence of an impending significant EQ. Swarm offers a great opportunity to study EM perturbations possibly related to seismic activity because it is a multi-satellite low Earth orbit (LEO) mission with a unique space-time configuration able to measure both electric and magnetic fields at various altitudes in the topside ionosphere. Here, we are analyzing, using various signal processing techniques, Swarm measurements shortly before and after large shallow EQs (magnitude above 7 and depth < 40 km) that occurred in the first year of the mission and report on the initial results of our analysis.

  7. Amplitude analysis of active source seismic data from the grounding zone of Whillans Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, Huw; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Alley, Richard; Christianson, Knut

    2015-04-01

    Amplitude analysis of active source seismic data is often used to estimate acoustic properties and thereby infer the lithology of the substrate beneath glaciers and ice streams. The substrate beneath the ice streams of West Antarctica is of particular interest as here subglacial sediment deformation results in the rapid flow of the overriding ice. At the grounding zone, where the grounded ice sheet transitions to the floating ice shelf, this substrate is thought to stiffen due to tidal compaction resulting in a zone of higher basal shear stress which is manifest in the buckling of the internal layering in the overriding ice. Here we investigate these processes by estimating subglacial properties using active source seismic data acquired across the grounding zone of Whillans Ice Stream. Perhaps uniquely, we are able to test our methodology due to the survey crossing from an ice overlying sediment interface into a known ice overlying water interface. Our analysis indicates that lithological variations within the grounding zone are below the resolution of our methodology with the exception of a body of water trapped by a hydropotential reversal upstream of the grounding zone.

  8. Estimating activity-related energy expenditure under sedentary conditions using a tri-axial seismic accelerometer.

    PubMed

    van Hees, Vincent T; van Lummel, Rob C; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2009-06-01

    Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) is difficult to quantify, especially under sedentary conditions. Here, a model was developed using the detected type of physical activity (PA) and movement intensity (MI), based on a tri-axial seismic accelerometer (DynaPort MiniMod; McRoberts B.V., The Hague, the Netherlands), with energy expenditure for PA as a reference. The relation between AEE (J/min/kg), MI, and the type of PA was determined for standardized PAs as performed in a laboratory including: lying, sitting, standing, and walking. AEE (J/min/kg) was calculated from total energy expenditure (TEE) and sleeping metabolic rate (SMR) as assessed with indirect calorimetry ((TEEx0.9)-SMR). Subsequently, the model was validated over 23-h intervals in a respiration chamber. Subjects were 15 healthy women (age: 22+/-2 years; BMI: 24.0+/-4.0 kg/m2). Predicted AEE in the chamber was significantly related to measured AEE both within (r2=0.81+/-0.06, P<0.00001) and between (r2=0.70, P<0.001) subjects. The explained variation in AEE by the model was higher than the explained variation by MI alone. This shows that a tri-axial seismic accelerometer is a valid tool for estimating AEE under sedentary conditions. PMID:19282829

  9. Mapping of active faults based on the analysis of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles in offshore Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucic, Ljiljana; Glavatovic, Branislav

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection data analysis is considered as important tool for mapping of active tectonic faults, since seismic exploration methods on varied scales can image subsurface structures of different depth ranges. Mapping of active faults for the offshore area of Montenegro is performed in Petrel software, using reflection database consist of 2D profiles in length of about 3.500 kilometers and 311 square kilometers of 3D seismics, acquired from 1979 to 2003. Montenegro offshore area is influenced by recent tectonic activity with numerous faults, folded faults and over trusts. Based on reflection profiles analysis, the trust fault system offshore Montenegro is reveled, parallel to the coast and extending up to 15 kilometers from the offshore line. Then, the system of normal top carbonate fault planes is mapped and characterized on the southern Adriatic, with NE trending. The tectonic interpretation of the seismic reflection profiles in Montenegro point toward the existence of principally reverse tectonic forms in the carbonate sediments, covered by young Quaternary sandy sediments of thickness 1-3 kilometers. Also, reflective seismic data indicate the active uplifting of evaporite dome on about 10 kilometers of coastline.

  10. Localization of short-range acoustic and seismic wideband sources: Algorithms and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafsudd, J. Z.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R.; Yao, K.; Taciroglu, E.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the determination of the location (source localization) of a disturbance source which emits acoustic and/or seismic signals. We devise an enhanced approximate maximum-likelihood (AML) algorithm to process data collected at acoustic sensors (microphones) belonging to an array of, non-collocated but otherwise identical, sensors. The approximate maximum-likelihood algorithm exploits the time-delay-of-arrival of acoustic signals at different sensors, and yields the source location. For processing the seismic signals, we investigate two distinct algorithms, both of which process data collected at a single measurement station comprising a triaxial accelerometer, to determine direction-of-arrival. The direction-of-arrivals determined at each sensor station are then combined using a weighted least-squares approach for source localization. The first of the direction-of-arrival estimation algorithms is based on the spectral decomposition of the covariance matrix, while the second is based on surface wave analysis. Both of the seismic source localization algorithms have their roots in seismology; and covariance matrix analysis had been successfully employed in applications where the source and the sensors (array) are typically separated by planetary distances (i.e., hundreds to thousands of kilometers). Here, we focus on very-short distances (e.g., less than one hundred meters) instead, with an outlook to applications in multi-modal surveillance, including target detection, tracking, and zone intrusion. We demonstrate the utility of the aforementioned algorithms through a series of open-field tests wherein we successfully localize wideband acoustic and/or seismic sources. We also investigate a basic strategy for fusion of results yielded by acoustic and seismic arrays.

  11. FM&TI (Forward Modeling & Tomographic Inversion) approach in passive and active seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, Ivan

    2010-05-01

    Seismic tomography is like a photography taken by a camera with deformed and blurred lenses. Amplitudes and shapes of seismic patterns derived at tomographic images are often strongly biased with respect to real structures in the Earth. In particular, tomography usually provides continuous velocity distributions, while the major velocity changes in the Earth often occur on first order interfaces. While working with noisy data, one has to apply strong damping which makes impossible retrieving realistic amplitudes of anomalies. Uneven ray sampling may cause variable damping effect: within one model, one may obtain over- and underdamped solutions in different parts of the study area. Lack of some ray orientations may cause smearing of seismic patterns. Due to these and other reasons, quantitative values reported in most tomographic studies, although supported by pseudo-formal criteria (e.g. trade-off curves), do not often represent the reality. We propose an approach which is used to construct a realistic structure of the Earth based on a combination of forward modeling and tomographic inversion. Based on available a-priori information we construct a synthetic model with realistic patterns. Then we compute synthetic times and invert them using the same tomographic code with the same parameters as in the case of observed data processing. The reconstruction result is compared with the tomographic image of observed data inversion. For the parts where discrepancy is observed, we correct the synthetic model and repeat the forward modeling and inversion again. After several trials we obtain similar results of synthetic and observed data inversion. In this case we claim that the derived synthetic model adequately represents the real structure of the Earth. In the talk, several examples of applying this approach at various scales for different data schemes are presented: (1) few real and synthetic examples of active source refraction travel time data; (2) local earthquake

  12. Seismicity and active tectonic processes in the ultra-slow spreading Lena Trough, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läderach, C.; Schlindwein, V.; Schenke, H.-W.; Jokat, W.

    2011-03-01

    With its remote location in the ice-covered Fram Strait, Lena Trough is a poorly known segment of the global mid-ocean ridge system. It is a prominent member of the ultra-slow spreading mid-ocean ridges but its spreading mechanisms are not well understood. We relocalized teleseismically recorded earthquakes from the past five decades to identify tectonic processes in Lena Trough and the adjacent Spitsbergen Fracture Zone (FZ). During two cruises with RV Polarstern in 2008 and 2009 we deployed seismic arrays on ice floes to record the local seismicity of Lena Trough. We could identify and localize microseismic events which we assume to be present in the entire rift valley. In contrast, our relocalization of teleseismically recorded earthquakes shows an asymmetric epicentre distribution along Lena Trough with earthquakes occurring predominately along the western valley flanks of Lena Trough. In 2009 February/March, several high-magnitude earthquakes peaking in an Mb 6.6 event occurred in an outside-corner setting of the Spitsbergen FZ. This is the strongest earthquake which has ever been recorded in Fram Strait and its location at the outside-corner high of the ultra-slow spreading ridge is exceptional. Comparing the seismicity with the magnetic anomalies and high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, we divide Lena Trough in a symmetrically spreading northern part and an asymmetrically spreading southern part south of the South Lena FZ. We propose that a complex interaction between the former De Geer Megashear zone, which separated Greenland from Svalbard starting at Late Mesozoic/Early Cenozoic times, and the developing rift in the southern Lena Trough resulted an increasing eastward dislocation towards the Spitsbergen FZ between older spreading axes and the recent active spreading axis which we believe to be located west of the bathymetric rift valley flanks in a wide extensional plain.

  13. Geodynamics of the Dead Sea Fault: Do active faulting and past earthquakes determine the seismic gaps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2014-05-01

    The ~1000-km-long North-South trending Dead Sea transform fault (DSF) presents structural discontinuities and includes segments that experienced large earthquakes (Mw>7) in historical times. The Wadi Araba and Jordan Valley, the Lebanese restraining bend, the Missyaf and Ghab fault segments in Syria and the Ziyaret Fault segment in Turkey display geometrical complexities made of step overs, restraining and releasing bends that may constitute major obstacles to earthquake rupture propagation. Using active tectonics, GPS measurements and paleoseismology we investigate the kinematics and long-term/short term slip rates along the DSF. Tectonic geomorphology with paleoseismic trenching and archeoseismic investigations indicate repeated faulting events and left-lateral slip rate ranging from 4 mm/yr in the southern fault section to 6 mm/yr in the northern fault section. Except for the northernmost DSF section, these estimates of fault slip rate are consistent with GPS measurements that show 4 to 5 mm/yr deformation rate across the plate boundary. However, recent GPS results showing ~2.5 mm/yr velocity rate of the northern DSF appears to be quite different than the ~6 mm/yr paleoseismic slip rate. The kinematic modeling that combines GPS and seismotectonic results implies a complex geodynamic pattern where the DSF transforms the Cyprus arc subduction zone into transpressive tectonics on the East Anatolian fault. The timing of past earthquake ruptures shows the occurrence of seismic sequences and a southward migration of large earthquakes, with the existence of major seismic gaps along strike. In this paper, we discuss the role of the DSF in the regional geodynamics and its implication on the identification of seismic gaps.

  14. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicitymore » in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.« less

  15. Metabolic Activity - Skylab Experiment M171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's Metabolic Activity experiment (M171), a medical evaluation facility designed to measure astronauts' metabolic changes while on long-term space missions. The experiment obtained information on astronauts' physiological capabilities and limitations and provided data useful in the design of future spacecraft and work programs. Physiological responses to physical activity was deduced by analyzing inhaled and exhaled air, pulse rate, blood pressure, and other selected variables of the crew while they performed controlled amounts of physical work with a bicycle ergometer. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  16. An integrated approach to the seismic activity and structure of the central Lesser Antilles subduction megathrust seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Alfred; Laigle, Mireille; Charvis, Philippe; Flueh, Ernst; Gallart, Josep; Kissling, Edi; Lebrun, Jean-Frederic; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Sachpazi, Maria

    2010-05-01

    main target has been localized along 3 transects to the Arc, thanks to a preliminary survey in 2001, the French SISMANTILLES cruise. We will present the first results obtained during these experiments dedicated specifically to image at depth the seismic structure and activity of this region. To image faults at depth and the detailed upper-crustal structure, 3700 km of multi-beam bathymetry and multi-channel reflection seismic profiles have been collected along a grid comprising 7 strike-lines of up to 300 km long and spaced by 15 km and 12 transects of up to 150 km long and spaced by 25 km (SISMANTILLES II). All these airgun shots dedicated to deep penetration have been recorded by the 80 OBSs and 20 OBHs deployed by the F/S Merian and N/O Atalante on the nodes of this grid of profiles. It will permit to get Vp constraints on the deep forearc region and mantle wedge by wide-angle refraction studies, as well as constraints on the updip and downdip limits of the seismogenic part of the mega-thrust fault plane. Two of these transects have been extended across the whole arc during the TRAIL survey, with up to 50 OBSs deployed along both 240 km long profiles. All these OBSs remained several months after the shot experiments to gather data for accurate location of local earthquakes and possibly Vp and Vp/Vs tomography. They have been recovered and partly redeployed by N/O Antea during the OBSANTILLES survey. A significant number of those instruments had broadband seismometers, a notable originality in the case of the OBSs to probe the conditions for detecting low-frequency transient signals which have been found recently in the case of the Cascadia and Central Japan subductions and associated to their seismogenic character.

  17. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  18. Time-frequency-wavenumber Decomposition To Investigate Seismic Wavefield: Application To The Annot Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schissele, E.; Cansi, Y.; Gaffet, S.

    Many observations and studies as well as numerical simulations have been done in order to completely understand the whole seismogram recorded during an earthquake. At regional distances, the seismic wavefield is strongly influenced by crustal hetero- geneities. The primary wavefield constituted by Pn, Pg, Sn, Sg, Rg, Lg.... phases is diffracted and refracted by these heterogeneities and hence forms the coda of the seis- mogram. But the different mechanisms of propagation in a heterogeneous medium are not fully understood. The identification of the different phases contributing to the coda seems to be essential to progress in the comprehension of the seismic wavefield propagation. Seismic arrays are then well-adapted tools since they provide the spatio-temporal evo- lution of the wavefield. In 1998, 4 small-scales arrays were deployed for 2 months around the Annot region, located in the southern French Alps. Each array was constituted by 9 short-period seismometers, recording frequencies greater than 0.2 Hz. Its aperture was 250 meters, with a minimal distance between 2 adjacent sensors of 20 meters. That allows us to study the seismic wavefield for very low wavelength without any problem of spatial aliasing. It will be interesting to characterize in terms of wavefield deformation the signature of the different kinds of heterogeneities (fault system, topographic relief, impedance contrast...) surrounding this area. We expect the primary wavefield to be diffracted or refracted by all these heterogeneities. A time-frequency-wavenumber technique which allows us to characterize the whole coherent part of the energy which prop- agates through the seismic array has been derived. Such a characterization involves, for each coherent wavelet, an estimate of: (i) an arrival time and a frequency content and (ii) an azimuth and an apparent velocity. This way, the principal phases will be described. What will be more interesting, is the extraction of the deterministic part of the

  19. Seismic structure and activity of the north-central Lesser Antilles subduction zone from an integrated approach: Similarities with the Tohoku forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laigle, M.; Hirn, A.; Sapin, M.; Bécel, A.; Charvis, P.; Flueh, E.; Diaz, J.; Lebrun, J.-F.; Gesret, A.; Raffaele, R.; Galvé, A.; Evain, M.; Ruiz, M.; Kopp, H.; Bayrakci, G.; Weinzierl, W.; Hello, Y.; Lépine, J.-C.; Viodé, J.-P.; Sachpazi, M.; Gallart, J.; Kissling, E.; Nicolich, R.

    2013-09-01

    The 300-km-long north-central segment of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, including Martinique and Guadeloupe islands has been the target of a specific approach to the seismic structure and activity by a cluster of active and passive offshore-onshore seismic experiments. The top of the subducting plate can be followed under the wide accretionary wedge by multichannel reflection seismics. This reveals the hidden updip limit of the contact of the upper plate crustal backstop onto the slab. Two OBS refraction seismic profiles from the volcanic arc throughout the forearc domain constrain a 26-km-large crustal thickness all along. In the common assumption that the upper plate Moho contact on the slab is a proxy of its downdip limit these new observations imply a three times larger width of the potential interplate seismogenic zone under the marine domain of the Caribbean plate with respect to a regular intra-oceanic subduction zone. Towards larger depth under the mantle corner, the top of the slab imaged from the conversions of teleseismic body-waves and the locations of earthquakes appears with kinks which increase the dip to 10-20° under the forearc domain, and then to 60° from 70 km depth. At 145 km depth under the volcanic arc just north of Martinique, the 2007 M 7.4 earthquake, largest for half a century in the region, allows to document a deep slab deformation consistent with segmentation into slab panels. In relation with this occurrence, an increased seismic activity over the whole depth range provides a new focussed image thanks to the OBS and land deployments. A double-planed dipping slab seismicity is thus now resolved, as originally discovered in Tohoku (NE Japan) and since in other subduction zones. Two other types of seismic activity uniquely observed in Tohoku, are now resolved here: "supraslab" earthquakes with normal-faulting focal mechanisms reliably located in the mantle corner and "deep flat-thrust" earthquakes at 45 km depth on the interplate

  20. Testing Models of Magmatic and Hydrothermal Segmentation: A Three-Dimensional Seismic Tomography Experiment at the Endeavour Ridge (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Weekly, R. T.; Wells, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    Competing models for what controls the segmentation and intensity of ridge crest processes are at odds on the scale of mantle and crustal magmatic segmentation, the distribution of hydrothermal venting with respect to a volcanic segment and the properties of the thermal boundary layer that transports energy between the magmatic and hydrothermal systems. The presence of an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector beneath the central portion of the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, as well as systematic along axis changes in seafloor depth, ridge crest morphology and hydrothermal venting provide an ideal target for testing conflicting hypotheses. In late summer 2009, we conducted an active source seismic experiment on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. A total of 5,567 airgun shots from the 36-gun, 6,600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth were recorded by 68 short-period ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed at 64 sites. The experimental geometry utilized 3 nested scales and was designed to image (1) crustal thickness variations within 25 km of the axial high (0 to 900 kyr); (2) the map view heterogeneity and anisotropy of the topmost mantle beneath the spreading axis; (3) the three-dimensional structure of the crustal magmatic system and (4) the detailed three-dimensional, shallow crustal thermal structure beneath the Endeavour vent fields. At the segment scale, six 100-km-long ridge-parallel shot lines were obtained at distances of 16, 23 and 30 km to both sides of the ridge axis with OBSs on all but the outer lines. At the along-axis scale of the AMC reflector, shot lines are spaced 1 km apart and OBSs 8 km apart within a 60 x 20 km2 region. At the vent field scale, shots were obtained on a 500 x 500 m2 grid and OBSs spaced 5 km apart within a 20 x 10 km2 region. All the shooting lines were collected with a 9 m source depth to obtain impulsive arrivals at shorter ranges but the outer lines were also shot with a 15 m source depth

  1. Crust structure across the Rif Cordillera from 'RIFSIS' seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Alba; Gallart, Josep; Díaz, Jordi; Carbonell, Ramon; Harnafi, Mimoun; Levander, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The Rif Cordillera, located in North Morocco forms, together with the Betic Range, the Gibraltar Arc around the Alboran Sea. This asymmetric curved mountain belt originated during a Miocene continent-continent collision as a result of the westward motion of the Alboran domain between northwest Africa and Iberia. The complexity of the area favored the proposition of diverse tectonic models, such as roll-back, accompanied and followed by lithospheric convective down-welling, and delamination. In this study, we present models of crustal structure derived from a seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection experiment which took place in October 2011 within the Spanish project RIFSIS complemented by the US-PICASSO one. Two profiles oriented N-S and E-W respectively were carried out across the Rif domains. Five shots of 1 Tn each were detonated along the lines and at the crossing point, recorded by about 900 stations from US-Iris pool deployed at an average spacing of 750 m. The N-S line was extended northwards by a 70 km long segment in Spain, in the Betic Range. Southwards, this profile connects with the one recorded in 2010 across the Atlas Mountains, within the SIMA project. The interpreted crustal structure differentiates two sedimentary layers on top of the basement, inferred from the observed first arrivals at short offsets, followed by upper, mid and lower crustal levels constrained by reflected phases visible in the record sections. The bottom of the crust is well defined from PmP phases, although the absence of Pn arrivals prevents to constrain upper mantle velocities. Average velocity values for the different layers in the models are respectively: 3.5 and 4.2 km/s for the sediments, 5.9, 6.3 and 6.6 km/s within the crust, and 8 km/s below Moho. These velocity depth models obtained at the Rif Cordillera hold major variations in crustal thickness, especially along the E-W profile, that shows a rapid change of 15-20 km in Moho depths within 30 km horizontal

  2. Rocky Mountain evolution: Tying Continental Dynamics of the Rocky Mountains and Deep Probe seismic experiments with receiver functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rumpfhuber, E.-M.; Keller, Gordon R.; Sandvol, E.; Velasco, A.A.; Wilson, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the crustal structure using three different receiver function methods using data collected from the northern transect of the Continental Dynamics of the Rocky Mountains (CD-ROM) experiment. The resulting migrated image and crustal thickness determinations confirm and refine prior crustal thickness measurements based on the CD-ROM and Deep Probe experiment data sets. The new results show a very distinct and thick lower crustal layer beneath the Archean Wyoming province. In addition, we are able to show its termination at 42??N latitude, which provides a seismic tie between the CD-ROM and Deep Probe seismic experiments and thus completes a continuous north-south transect extending from New Mexico into Alberta, Canada. This new tie is particularly important because it occurs close to a major tectonic boundary, the Cheyenne belt, between an Archean craton and a Proterozoic terrane. We used two different stacking techniques, based on a similar concept but using two different ways to estimate uncertainties. Furthermore, we used receiver function migration and common conversion point (CCP) stacking techniques. The combined interpretation of all our results shows (1) crustal thinning in southern Wyoming, (2) strong northward crustal thickening beginning in central Wyoming, (3) the presence of an unusually thick and high-velocity lower crust beneath the Wyoming province, and (4) the abrupt termination of this lower crustal layer north of the Cheyenne belt at 42??N latitude. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Shallow Seismic Reflection Study of Recently Active Fault Scarps, Mina Deflection, Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, R. A.; Christie, M.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Stockli, D. F.

    2006-12-01

    During the spring and summer of 2006 University of Kansas geophysics students and faculty acquired shallow, high resolution seismic reflection data over actively deforming alluvial fans developing across the Emmigrant Peak (in Fish Lake Valley) and Queen Valley Faults in western Nevada. These normal faults represent a portion of the transition from the right-lateral deformation associated with the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone to the normal and left-lateral faulting of the Mina Deflection. Data were gathered over areas of recent high resolution geological mapping and limited trenching by KU students. An extensive GPR data grid was also acquired. The GPR results are reported in Christie, et al., 2006. The seismic data gathered in the spring included both walkaway tests and a short CMP test line. These data indicated that a very near-surface P-wave to S-wave conversion was taking place and that very high quality S-wave reflections were probably dominating shot records to over one second in time. CMP lines acquired during the summer utilized a 144 channel networked Geode system, single 28 hz geophones, and a 30.06 downhole rifle source. Receiver spacing was 0.5 m, source spacing 1.0m and CMP bin spacings were 0.25m for all lines. Surveying was performed using an RTK system which was also used to develop a concurrent high resolution DEM. A dip line of over 400m and a strike line over 100m in length were shot across the active fan scarp in Fish Lake Valley. Data processing is still underway. However, preliminary interpretation of common-offset gathers and brute stacks indicates very complex faulting and detailed stratigraphic information to depths of over 125m. Depth of information was actually limited by the 1024ms recording time. Several west-dipping normal faults downstep towards the basin. East-dipping antithetic normal faulting is extensive. Several distinctive stratigraphic packages are bound by the faults and apparent unconformitites. A CMP dip line

  4. Coherence between geodetic and seismic deformation in a context of slow tectonic activity (SW Alps, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpersdorf, A.; Sue, C.; Baize, S.; Cotte, N.; Bascou, P.; Beauval, C.; Collard, P.; Daniel, G.; Dyer, H.; Grasso, J.-R.; Hautecoeur, O.; Helmstetter, A.; Hok, S.; Langlais, M.; Menard, G.; Mousavi, Z.; Ponton, F.; Rizza, M.; Rolland, L.; Souami, D.; Thirard, L.; Vaudey, P.; Voisin, C.; Martinod, J.

    2015-04-01

    A dense, local network of 30 geodetic markers covering a 50 × 60 km2 area in the southwestern European Alps (Briançon region) has been temporarily surveyed in 1996, 2006 and 2011 by GPS. The aim is to measure the current deformation in this seismically active area. The study zone is characterized by a majority of extensional and dextral focal mechanisms, along north-south to N160 oriented faults. The combined analysis of the three measurement campaigns over 15 years and up to 16 years of permanent GPS data from the French RENAG network now enables to assess horizontal velocities below 1 mm/year within the local network. The long observation interval and the redundancy of the dense campaign network measurement help to constrain a significant local deformation pattern in the Briançon region, yielding an average E-W extension of 16 ± 11 nanostrain/year. We compare the geodetic deformation field to the seismic deformation rate cumulated over 37 years, and obtain good coherencies both in amplitude and direction. Moreover, the horizontal deformation localized in the Briançon region represents a major part of the Adriatic-European relative plate motion. However, the average uplift of the network in an extensional setting needs the presence of buoyancy forces in addition to plate tectonics.

  5. Dating previously balanced rocks in seismically active parts of California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.W.; Brune, J.N.; Liu, T.; Zreda, M.; Yount, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Precariously balanced boulders that could be knocked down by strong earthquake ground motion are found in some seismically active areas of southern California and Nevada. In this study we used two independent surface-exposure dating techniques - rock-varnish microlamination and cosmogenic 36Cl dating methodologies - to estimate minimum- and maximum-limiting ages, respectively, of the precarious boulders and by inference the elapsed time since the sites were shaken down. The results of the exposure dating indicate that all of the precarious rocks are >10.5 ka and that some may be significantly older. At Victorville and Jacumba, California, these results show that the precarious rocks have not been knocked down for at least 10.5 k.y., a conclusion in apparent conflict with some commonly used probabilistic seismic hazard maps. At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the ages of the precarious rocks are >10.5 to >27.0 ka, providing an independent measure of the minimum time elapsed since faulting occurred on the Solitario Canyon fault.

  6. Tectonic history and thrust-fold deformation style of seismically active structures near Coalinga

    SciTech Connect

    Namson, J.S. ); Davis, T.L.; Lagoe, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the Coalinga region can be divided into tectostratigraphic facies whose boundaries delineate two major tectonic events - one in the mid-Cenozoic (38-17 Ma) and one in the late Cenozoic (less than 3 Ma). The succession of these tectostratigraphic facies, and an integration of geology, subsurface well data, a seismic-reflection profile, and earthquake seismicity on a retrodeformable cross section, yield a model for the tectonic evolution of the Coalinga region. This model suggests that the structural style of both deformational events is characteristic of fold and thrust belts. The model also indicates that the causative fault of the May 2 earthquake is a ramped thrust. The results of this study, in combination with regional geologic relations, suggest that the Coalinga region is part of an active fold and thrust belt which borders the west and south sides of the San Joaquin Valley. The potential for future earthquakes due to movement of other blind thrust faults within this belt should be evaluated.

  7. Seismic activity and water level fluctuations in the artificial lakes of Aliakmonas river (NW Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Panagiota; Chouliaras, Gerasimos; Drakatos, George

    2015-04-01

    The Public Power Corporation (PPC) of Greece has established four dammed reservoirs, downstream of each other on Aliakmonas River in North Western Greece (namely the artificial lakes of Ilarionas, Polyphyto, Sfikia and Asomata). In addition to the monitoring of the reservoir water levels the PPC has also installed a dense seismological network in the wider area. In this investigation the correlation between the local seismic activity and the water level fluctuations at the Ilarionas and Polyphyto reservoirs is studied. On October 25th, 1984, during the Asomata reservoir initial filling, a Ms=5.4 earthquake occurred in the region which was characterized by weak seismicity, until the strong earthquake of Ms=6.5 that occurred on May 13th, 1995, at a distance of 18 km from the southern edge of the Polyphyto reservoir. More recently, on July 2nd and 3rd, 2013, two moderate earthquakes (Ml=4.7 and Ml=4.6) occurred, almost a year after the filling of the Ilarionas reservoir in 2012. In addition to these events, fourteen earthquakes with magnitudes equal or greater to Ml=4 have also been detected in the wider area of the Aliakmonas reservoir.

  8. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  9. Crustal thickness and velocity structure across the Moroccan Atlas from long offset wide-angle reflection seismic data: The SIMA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Teixell, A.; Palomeras, I.; Martí, D.; Kchikach, A.; Harnafi, M.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; Arboleya, M. L.; Alcalde, J.; Fernández, M.; Charroud, M.; Amrhar, M.

    2014-05-01

    crustal structure and topography of the Moho boundary beneath the Atlas Mountains of Morocco has been constrained by a controlled source, wide-angle seismic reflection transect: the SIMA experiment. This paper presents the first results of this project, consisting of an almost 700 km long, high-resolution seismic profile acquired from the Sahara craton across the High and the Middle Atlas and the Rif Mountains. The interpretation of this seismic data set is based on forward modeling by raytracing, and has resulted in a detailed crustal structure and velocity model for the Atlas Mountains. Results indicate that the High Atlas features a moderate crustal thickness, with the Moho located at a minimum depth of 35 km to the S and at around 31 km to the N, in the Middle Atlas. Upper crustal shortening is resolved at depth through a crustal root where the Saharan crust underthrusts the northern Moroccan crust. This feature defines a lower crust imbrication that, locally, places the Moho boundary at ˜40-41 km depth in the northern part of the High Atlas. The P-wave velocity model is characterized by relatively low velocities, mostly in the lower crust and upper mantle, when compared to other active orogens and continental regions. These low deep crustal velocities together with other geophysical observables such as conductivity estimates derived from MT measurements, moderate Bouguer gravity anomaly, high heat flow, and surface exposures of recent alkaline volcanism lead to a model where partial melts are currently emplaced at deep crustal levels and in the upper mantle. The resulting model supports the existence of a mantle upwelling as mechanism that would contribute significantly to sustain the High Atlas topography. However, the detailed Moho geometry deduced in this work should lead to a revision of the exact geometry and position of this mantle feature and will require new modeling efforts.

  10. On dependence of seismic activity on 11 year variations in solar activity and/or cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhantayev, Zhumabek; Khachikyan, Galina; Breusov, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    It is found in the last decades that seismic activity of the Earth has a tendency to increase with decreasing solar activity (increasing cosmic rays). A good example of this effect may be the growing number of catastrophic earthquakes in the recent rather long solar minimum. Such results support idea on existence a solar-lithosphere relationship which, no doubts, is a part of total pattern of solar-terrestrial relationships. The physical mechanism of solar-terrestrial relationships is not developed yet. It is believed at present that one of the main contenders for such mechanism may be the global electric circuit (GEC) - vertical current loops, piercing and electrodynamically coupling all geospheres. It is also believed, that the upper boundary of the GEC is located at the magnetopause, where magnetic field of the solar wind reconnects with the geomagnetic field, that results in penetrating solar wind energy into the earth's environment. The effectiveness of the GEC operation depends on intensity of cosmic rays (CR), which ionize the air in the middle atmosphere and provide its conductivity. In connection with the foregoing, it can be expected: i) quantitatively, an increasing seismic activity from solar maximum to solar minimum may be in the same range as increasing CR flux; and ii) in those regions of the globe, where the crust is shipped by the magnetic field lines with number L= ~ 2.0, which are populated by anomalous cosmic rays (ACR), the relationship of seismic activity with variations in solar activity will be manifested most clearly, since there is a pronounced dependence of ACR on solar activity variations. Checking an assumption (i) with data of the global seismological catalog of the NEIC, USGS for 1973-2010, it was found that yearly number of earthquake with magnitude M≥4.5 varies into the 11 year solar cycle in a quantitative range of about 7-8% increasing to solar minimum, that qualitatively and quantitatively as well is in agreement with the

  11. Theory and experiment of an inertia-type vertical isolation system for seismic protection of equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lyan-Ywan; Chen, Pei-Rong; Pong, Kuan-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Although it has been proven that seismic isolation is an effective technology for seismic protection of structures and equipment, most existing isolation systems are for mitigating horizontal ground motions, and in practice there are very few vertical isolation systems. Part of the reason is due to the conflict with regard to the demand for isolation stiffness. In other words, a vertical isolation system must have sufficient vertical rigidity to sustain the weight of the isolated object, while it must also have sufficient flexibility in order to elongate the vibration period under seismic excitation. In order to overcome this difficulty, a novel system is proposed in this study, called an inertia-type vertical isolation system (IVIS). The primary difference between the IVIS and a traditional system is that the former has an additional leverage mechanism with a counterweight. The counterweight will provide a static uplifting force and an extra dynamic inertia force, such that the effective vertical stiffness of the IVIS becomes higher in its static state and lower in the dynamic one. The theory underlying the IVIS is developed and verified experimentally by a seismic simulation test in this work. The results show that the IVIS leads to a less static settlement and at the same time a lower effective isolation frequency. The test results also demonstrate that the isolator displacement demand of the IVIS is only about 30-40 percent that of the traditional one in all kinds of earthquakes. With regard to the reduction of acceleration response, the IVIS is particularly effective for near-fault earthquakes or near-resonant excitations, but is less effective for far-field earthquakes with more high-frequency contents, as compared with the traditional system.

  12. Active source monitoring of crosswell seismic travel time forstress induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, P.G.; Daley, T.M.; Niu, F.; Majer, E.L.

    2006-11-11

    We have conducted a series of cross-well experiments tocontinuously measure in situ temporal variations in seismic velocity attwo test sites: building 64 (B64) and Richmond Field Station (RFS) of theLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. A piezoelectricsource was used to generate highly repeatable signals, and a string of 24hydrophones was used to record the signals. The B64 experiment wasconducted utilizing two boreholes 17 m deep and 3 m apart for 160 h. AtRFS, we collected a 36-day continuous record in a cross-borehole facilityusing two 70-m-deep holes separated by 30 m. With signal enhancementtechniques we were able to achieve a precision of 6.0 nsec and 10 nsec indelay-time estimation from stacking of 1-hr records during the ?7- and?35-day observation periods at the B64 and RFS sites, which correspond to3 and 0.5 ppm of their travel times, respectively. Delay time measured atB64 has a variation of ?2 lsec in the 160-hr period and shows a strongand positive correlation with the barometric pressure change at the site.At RFS, after removal of a linear trend, we find a delay-time variationof 2.5 lsec, which exhibits a significant negative correlation withbarometric pressure. We attribute the observed correlations to stresssensitivity of seismic velocity known from laboratory studies. Thepositive and negative sign observed in the correlation is likely relatedto the expected near- and far-field effects of this stress dependence ina poroelastic medium. The stress sensitivity is estimated to be 10 6/Paand 10 7/Pa at the B64 and RFS site, respectively.

  13. Spatial heterogeneities of deviatoric stress and pore-pressure in Kyushu, Japan, and their implication for seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Chikura, Hiromi; Ohkura, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Abe, Yuki; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Shin; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the spatial variation in stress fields and pore fluid pressures on Kyushu Island, southwestern Japan. High seismic activity is found not only along active faults in Kyushu Island (southwestern Japan) but also in the central area of the island where there are active volcanoes. We consider the focal mechanisms of the shallow earthquakes on Kyushu Island to determine the relative deviatoric stress field and pore fluid factor. Generally, the stress field corresponds to a strike slip regime in this area. A decline in the maximum principal compressional stress is found in the western part of the high seismicity area, in the middle of Kyushu Island; this may be caused by a thickening of the seismogenic zone, as estimated from D90 analysis. At thin seismogenic layer, strike slip faulting dominates and strain rate from GPS study is high. In the active fault zone, seismic activity along the fault is high, and the pore pressure within the zone is higher than the values observed elsewhere, suggesting a mechanism explained by the fault valve model of Sibson [1992]. The pore pressure in the high seismic area with scattered hypocenter distribution in the middle part is lower than that in the active fault zones.

  14. Olivine Slip-system Activity at High Pressure: Implications for Upper-Mantle Rheology and Seismic Anisotropy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raterron, P.; Castelnau, O.; Geenen, T.; Merkel, S.

    2013-12-01

    The past decade abounded in technical developments allowing the investigation of materials rheology at high pressure (P > 3 GPa) [1]. This had a significant impact on our understanding of olivine rheology in the Earth asthenosphere, where P is in the range 3 - 13 GPa. A dislocation slip-system transition induced by pressure has been documented in dry Fe-bearing olivine [2]; it induces changes in olivine aggregate lattice preferred orientation (LPO) [3,4], which may explain the seismic velocity anisotropy attenuation observed at depths > 200 km in the upper mantle [5]. Deformation experiments carried out on olivine single crystals at high pressure allowed quantifying the effect of P on individual slip system activities [6]. Integration of these data, together with data on lattice friction arising from computational models (e.g., [7]), into analytical or mean-field numerical models for aggregate plasticity gave insight on the viscosity and LPO of olivine aggregates deformed at geological conditions in the dislocation creep regime [8,9]. We will review these recent findings and their implications for upper mantle rheology and seismic anisotropy. [1] Raterron & Merkel, 2009, J. Sync. Rad., 16, 748 ; [2] Raterron et al., 2009, PEPI, 172, 74 ; [3] Jung et al., 2009, Nature Geoscience, 2, 73 ; [4] Ohuchi et al., 2011, EPSL, 304, 55 ; [5] Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731 ; [6] Raterron et al., 2012, PEPI, 200-201, 105 ; [7] Durinck et al., 2007, EJM, 19, 631 ; [8] Castelnau et al., 2010, C.R. Physique, 11, 304 ; [9] Raterron et al., 2011, PEPI, 188, 26

  15. Evolution of earthquake rupture potential along active faults, inferred from seismicity rates and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormann, Thessa; Wiemer, Stefan; Enescu, Bogdan; Woessner, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    One of the major unresolved questions in seismology is the evolution in time and space of the earthquake rupture potential and thus time-dependent hazard along active faults. What happens after a major event: is the potential for further large events reduced as predicted from elastic rebound, or increased as proposed by current-state short-term clustering models? How does the rupture potential distribute in space, i.e. does it reveal imprints of stress transfer? Based on the rich earthquake record from the Pacific Plate along the Japanese coastline we investigate what information on spatial distributions and temporal changes of a normalized rupture potential (NRP) for different magnitudes can be derived from time-varying, local statistical characteristics of well and frequently observed small-to-moderate seismicity. Seismicity records show strong spatio-temporal variability in both activity rates and size distribution. We analyze 18 years of seismicity, including the massive 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake and its aftermath. We show that the size distribution of earthquakes has significantly changed before (increased fraction of larger magnitudes) and after that mainshock (increased fraction of smaller magnitudes), strongest in areas of highest coseismic slip. Remarkably, a rapid recovery of this effect is observed within only few years. We combine this significant temporal variability in earthquake size distributions with local activity rates and infer the evolution of NRP distributions. We study complex spatial patterns and how they evolve, and more detailed temporal characteristics in a simplified spatial selection, i.e. inside and outside the high slip zone of the M9 earthquake. We resolve an immediate and strong NRP increase for large events prior to the Tohoku event in the subsequent high slip patch and a very rapid decrease inside this high-stress-release area, coupled with a lasting increase of NRP in the immediate surroundings. Even in the center of the Tohoku

  16. a Borehole Seismic System for Active and Passive Seimsic Studies to 3 KM at Ptrc's Aquistore Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Nixon, C.; Kofman, R.; White, D. J.; Worth, K.

    2015-12-01

    We have constructed a downhole seismic recording system for application to depths of nearly 3 km and temperatures up to 135 °C at Aquistore, an independent research and monitoring project in which liquid CO2 is being stored in a brine and sandstone water formation. The key component to this system is a set of commercially available slim-hole 3-C sondes carrying 15 Hz geophones deployable in open and cased boreholes with diameters as small as 57 mm. The system is currently hosted on a 4-conductor wireline with digital information streamed to the surface recording unit. We have further incorporated these sondes into a mobile passive monitoring unit that includes a number of redundancies such as a multiple Tbyte network accessible RAID hard-drive system (NAS) and a self-designed uninterruptible power supply. The system can be remotely controlled via the internet. The system is currently deployed covering a range of depths from 2850 m to 2910 m. Ambient temperatures at this depth are approximately 110 °C with onboard tool temperatures running at 115 °C. Data is continuously streamed to the NAS for archiving, approximately 11 GBytes of data is recorded per day at the sampling period of 0.5 ms. The lack of noise at this depth allows short data snippets to be flagged with a simple amplitude threshold criteria. The greatly reduced data volume of the snippets allows for ready access via the internet to the system for ongoing quality control. Spurious events, mostly small amplitude tube waves originating at or near the surface, are readily discounted. Active seismic measurements are carried out simultaneously but these require that an appropriately accurate independent GPS based time synchronization be used. Various experiences with event detection, orientation of sondes using both explosives and seismic vibrator, potential overheating of the surface electronics, and issues related to loss of shore power provide for a detailed case study. Aquistore, managed by the

  17. The Seismic Broad Band Western Mediterranean (wm) Network and the Obs Fomar Pool: Current state and Obs activities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Davila, Jose Martin; Buforn, Elisa; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Harnafi, Mimoun; Mattesini, Mauricio; Caldeira, Bento; Hanka, Winfried; El Moudnib, Lahcen; Strollo, Angelo; Roca, Antoni; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Dahm, Torsten; Cabieces, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The Western Mediterranean (WM) seismic network started in 1996 as an initiative of the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), with the collaboration of the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) of Potsdam. A first broad band seismic station (SFUC) was installed close to Cádiz (South Spain). Since then, additional stations have been installed in the Ibero-Moghrebian region. In 2005, the "WM" code was assigned by the FDSN and new partners were jointed: Evora University (UEVO, Portugal), the Scientifique Institute of Rabat (ISRABAT, Morocco), and GFZ. Now days, the WM network is composed by 15 BB stations, all of them with Streckaisen STS-2 or STS-2.5 sensors, Quanterra or Earthdata digitizers and SeiscomP. Most them have co-installed a permanent geodetic GPS stations, and some them also have an accelerometer. There are 10 stations deployed in Spanish territory (5 in the Iberian peninsula, 1 in Balearic islands and 4 in North Africa Spanish places) with VSAT or Internet communications, 2 in Portugal (one of them without real time), and 3 in Morocco (2 VSAT and 1 ADSL). Additionally, 2 more stations (one in South Spain and one in Morocco) will be installed along this year. Additionally ROA has deployed a permanent real time VBB (CMG-3T: 360s) station at the Alboran Island. Due to the fact that part of the seismic activity is located at marine areas, and also because of the poor geographic azimuthal coverage at some zones provided by the land stations (specially in the SW of the San Vicente Cape area), ROA and UCM have acquired six broad band "LOBSTERN" OBS, manufactured by KUM (Kiel, Germany), conforming the OBS FOMAR pool. Three of them with CMG-40T sensor and the other with Trillium 120. These OBS were deployed along the Gibraltar strait since January to November 2014 to study the microseismicity in the Gibraltar strait area. In September 2015 FOMAR network has been deployed in SW of the San Vicente Cape for 8 months as a part of

  18. Earthquakes in Action: Incorporating Multimedia, Internet Resources, Large-scale Seismic Data, and 3-D Visualizations into Innovative Activities and Research Projects for Today's High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Konter, B.; Jacobs, A.; Lawrence, K.; Kilb, D.

    2006-12-01

    The most effective means of communicating science to today's "high-tech" students is through the use of visually attractive and animated lessons, hands-on activities, and interactive Internet-based exercises. To address these needs, we have developed Earthquakes in Action, a summer high school enrichment course offered through the California State Summer School for Mathematics and Science (COSMOS) Program at the University of California, San Diego. The summer course consists of classroom lectures, lab experiments, and a final research project designed to foster geophysical innovations, technological inquiries, and effective scientific communication (http://topex.ucsd.edu/cosmos/earthquakes). Course content includes lessons on plate tectonics, seismic wave behavior, seismometer construction, fault characteristics, California seismicity, global seismic hazards, earthquake stress triggering, tsunami generation, and geodetic measurements of the Earth's crust. Students are introduced to these topics through lectures-made-fun using a range of multimedia, including computer animations, videos, and interactive 3-D visualizations. These lessons are further enforced through both hands-on lab experiments and computer-based exercises. Lab experiments included building hand-held seismometers, simulating the frictional behavior of faults using bricks and sandpaper, simulating tsunami generation in a mini-wave pool, and using the Internet to collect global earthquake data on a daily basis and map earthquake locations using a large classroom map. Students also use Internet resources like Google Earth and UNAVCO/EarthScope's Jules Verne Voyager Jr. interactive mapping tool to study Earth Science on a global scale. All computer-based exercises and experiments developed for Earthquakes in Action have been distributed to teachers participating in the 2006 Earthquake Education Workshop, hosted by the Visualization Center at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (http

  19. SinoProbe-02:Deep Seismic Reflection Profile (480km) experiment in North China:Acquisition and the Preliminary Processing result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, H.; Gao, R.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Kuang, Z.; Liu, J.; Zhang, J.; Guan, Y.; Keller, G.; Liu, M.; Cox, C. M.; Holloway, S.; Chang, J. C.; Kaip, G. M.; Zhang, S.

    2010-12-01

    An active-source deep seismic reflection experiment was recorded across the Central Asian and Trans-North China orogens (see Figure) last winter as part of the SinoProbe-02 program. This profile extended southeastward from Erenhot and ended in the Huailai basin near Beijing. The shot depth was 25m; the shot size was 30-50kg; and the nominal shot interval was 250 km. Additional 200-kg charges were set off every 1 km and 1 ton shots were placed at intervals of 50 km. A Sercel 408 XL recording system and 2000 strings of SM-24 geophones were deployed at a spacing of 50m. Recording was at a 2ms sample interval for a total of 30s.The typical processing stream included crooked-line binning, refraction statics, true amplitude recovery, deconvolution, detailed velocity analyses, residual statics corrections and NMO stack (see Table). To the south, a transparent granite body is indicated in the middle crust with a series of north dipping reflections structures in the lower crust. The complex structures near Sonid Youqi suggest a transparent crust due to the Solonker suture zone. Map showing deep seismic reflection profile (solid black line) across North China. Processing Parameters

  20. Fault structure, stress, or pressure control of the seismicity in shale? Insights from a controlled experiment of fluid-induced fault reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Barros, Louis; Daniel, Guillaume; Guglielmi, Yves; Rivet, Diane; Caron, Hervé; Payre, Xavier; Bergery, Guillaume; Henry, Pierre; Castilla, Raymi; Dick, Pierre; Barbieri, Ernesto; Gourlay, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    Clay formations are present in reservoirs and earthquake faults, but questions remain on their mechanical behavior, as they can vary from ductile (aseismic) to brittle (seismic). An experiment, at a scale of 10 m, aims to reactivate a natural fault by fluid pressure in shale materials. The injection area was surrounded by a dense monitoring network comprising pressure, deformation, and seismicity sensors, in a well-characterized geological setting. Thirty-two microseismic events were recorded during several injection phases in five different locations within the fault zone. Their computed magnitude ranged between -4.3 and -3.7. Their spatiotemporal distribution, compared with the measured displacement at the injection points, shows that most of the deformation induced by the injection is aseismic. Whether the seismicity is controlled by the fault architecture, mineralogy of fracture filling, fluid, and/or stress state is then discussed. The fault damage zone architecture and mineralogy are of crucial importance, as seismic slip mainly localizes on the sealed-with-calcite fractures which predominate in the fault damage zone. As no seismicity is observed in the close vicinity of the injection areas, the presence of fluid seems to prevent seismic slips. The fault core acts as an impermeable hydraulic barrier that favors fluid confinement and pressurization. Therefore, the seismic behavior seems to be strongly sensitive to the structural heterogeneity (including permeability) of the fault zone, which leads to a heterogeneous stress response to the pressurized volume.

  1. Delineating Crustal Deformation by Onshore/Offshore Seismic Experiments in the Backstop Region of the Mediterranean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoulia, J. E.; Makris, J.

    2009-12-01

    Preapulian zone was observed under all five seismic lines and seems to dominate at least at the western part of the Backstop. Since the metamorphic limestone of the Ionian zone was not observed west of the three major thrusts, we have concluded that all the northern part of the backstop region is part of Preapulia. Tectonically, the main elements are thrusts that are still active and are marked by high seismicity and dextral strike slip faults. The main one, called the “Andravida fault” was followed deep into the Ionian Sea, building a large transtensional basin in the Kyparissiakos gulf. The Andravida fault system is of the same orientation as the Cephalonia fault, accommodating the expansion of the Aegean Microplate to the west. It is also marked by significant seismicity. Several normal faults were also mapped, usually associated with the thrust systems. Since most of the faults can be followed to the sea bottom, deforming also the most recent sediments, and are associated with high seismicity, we concluded that the recent tectonisation is very active and prone to seismic hazard.

  2. Seismic investigations of the Nansen Ridge during the FRAM I experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffersen, Y.; Husebye, E. S.; Bungum, H.; Gregersen, S.

    1982-02-01

    As part of the FRAM I ice station experiment in the Arctic Ocean during the period March 11-May 15, 1979, a sonobuoy array was kept in operation for about 6 weeks. During the last two days of the experiment the array drifted over the crestal mountains of the western flank of the Nansen Ridge. Here microearthquakes were recorded at a rate of 1-2 events per hour, with epicentral distances from 15 to 25 km. Two parallel epicenter lineations are found, a main one that coincides with the median valley and another less active one that follows the northwestern rift-valley wall. This activity may be related to the uplift of a fault block from the median valley onto the rift valley wall. A crustal model for the crestal mountain area was obtained from two unreversed refraction profiles, giving preliminary compressional velocities of 4.6 km/s at the sea floor, a 6.1 km/s refractor at 1.5 km depth, and a 7.9 km/s refractor at 6 km depth, while in the median valley a 7.2 km/s refractor is found at a depth of 3 km.

  3. Explosive Activity at Tungurahua Volcano: Analysis of Seismic and Infrasonic Data from 2006 - 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, A. L.; Ruiz, M. C.; Lyons, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Tungurahua is an active, steep-sided andesitic stratovolcano, located in central Ecuador. Historic eruptions are characterized by strong explosions, lava and pyroclastic flows, lahars and tephra fallout. After 75 years of quiescence, a renewed phase of explosive activity began in October 1999. Since, Tungurahua has experienced a series of eruptive cycles, with almost continuous activity separated by only short periods (months) of repose. We apply several statistical techniques to a continuous catalog of over 4500 volcanic explosions, recorded between July 2006 and May 2011. Reduced amplitudes and energies are calculated for each event using four collocated broadband seismic and infrasound sensors. An initial time series analysis isolates 8 phases of activity: Jul-Aug 2006, Feb-Apr 2007, Jul 2007-Feb 2008, Mar 2008-Jun 2009, Jan-Mar 2010, May-Jul 2010, Nov-Dec 2010 and Apr-May 2011. Small temporal changes in the volcanic eruption mechanism across successive episodes are identified by a lack of dependency in event rate auto-correlation and a continuous fluctuation in the proxy b-value of moving-window, frequency-amplitude distributions. We highlight the May-July 2010 episode because it is statistically distinct from the other periods of explosive activity. Peak explosion event rate during this time is approximately six times that of any other episode across the observation period (max ~ 242 events; 31 May 2010), while cumulative daily seismo-acoustic explosion energies are at least an order of magnitude greater. The coefficient of variation (Cv = σ/μ, where; σ is the standard deviation; and μ is the mean repose time of explosions) is used to show a strong clustering of events with time (episodes 1-5 & 7-8 = Cv ~ 2-5) and not representative of a Poisson controlled process. A Cv ~ 13.7 in May-July 2010 (episode 6) further highlights the anomalous nature of activity during this period. The volcano acoustic-seismic ratio (VASR, or η), the ratio of elastic energy

  4. Correlation Between Radon Outgassing and Seismic Activity Along the Hayward Fault Near Berkeley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtmann-Rice, D.; Cuff, K.

    2003-12-01

    Results from previous studies indicate that radon concentration values are significantly higher over selected sections of the Hayward fault than adjacent areas. This phenomenon is believed to be attributed to the presence of abundant fractures in rock associated with the fault, which act as pathways for radon as it migrates from depth towards the earth?s surface. In an attempt to determine whether or not a relationship exists between seismicity along the fault, the production of microfractures, and emanation of radon, a radon outgassing monitoring study was conducted along an active section of the Hayward fault in Berkeley, California. The study was carried out by using an alphaMETER 611, which is a device capable of accurately measuring radon concentrations every 15 minutes. The alphaMETER was placed at the bottom of a sealed one meter deep well, in close proximity to a section of the Hayward fault located along the northwestern face of the Berkeley Hills. Once per week for several months data collected by the alphaMETER was downloaded into a laptop computer. Data from the alphaMETER was then compared with seismic data recorded by local seismometers to see if any correlation existed. A general correlation between variation in radon concentration and the occurrence of small earthquakes was found. Significant peaks in radon concentration were observed within an approximately one week period before the occurrence of small earthquakes. Concentration values then decreased dramatically just prior to and during periods when the earthquakes occurred. Such correlation is very similar to that recently observed in association with a magnitude five earthquake along the Anatolian Fault, reported by geoscientists working in Turkey using similar instrumentation (Inan, 2003, personal communication). The most plausible explanation for the observed correlation is as follows: 1) prior to a given earthquake, stress build up within a particular fault region leads to the formation of

  5. Semi-active seismic response control of base-isolated building with MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soda, Satsuya; Kusumoto, Haruhide; Chatani, Ryosuke; Iwata, Norio; Fujitani, Hideo; Shiozaki, Yoichi; Hiwatashi, Takeshi

    2003-07-01

    This study deals with a shake table test on a three-story base-isolated steel frame. The frame rests on four roller bearings for isolation and is equipped with four laminated rubbers as shear spring. An MR damper is used in the test to perform semi-active seismic response control. The basic control algorithm applied in the study is to simulate the load-deflection of an origin-restoring friction damper (ORFD) which is a sort of friction damper that looses its resistance when it moves toward the origin, making sure for the base-isolated system to minimize residual displacement even after an extremely strong ground motion. Also attempted is a hybrid type control that superposes viscous damping on the ORFD when the damper moves from the peak displacement toward the origin.

  6. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  7. Exhumed analogues of seismically active carbonate-bearing thrusts: fault architecture and deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Viti, C.; Barchi, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2012 a M = 5.9 earthquake followed by a long aftershock sequence struck the Northern Italy. The sequence occurred at 4-10 km depth within the active front of Northern Apennines Prism and the major events nucleate within, or propagate through, a thick sequence of carbonates. In an inner sector of the Northern Apennines, ancient carbonate-bearing thrusts exposed at the surface, represent exhumed analogues of structures generating seismicity in the active front. Here we document fault architecture and deformation mechanisms of three regional carbonate bearing thrusts with displacement of several kilometers and exhumation in the range of 1-4 km. Fault zone structure and deformation mechanisms are controlled by the lithology of the faulted rocks. In layered limestones and marly-limestones the fault zone is up to 200 m thick and is characterized by intense pressure solution. In massive limestones the deformation generally occurs along thin and sharp slip planes that are in contact with fault portions affected by either cataclasis or pressure solution. SEM and TEM observations show that pressure solution surfaces, made of smectite lamellae, with time tend to form an interconnected network affected by frictional sliding. Sharp slipping planes along massive limestones show localization along Y shear planes that separate an extremely comminuted cataclasites from an almost undeformed protolith. The comparison of the three shear zones depicts a fault zone structure extremely heterogeneous as the result of protolith lithology, geometrical complexities and the presence of inherited structures. We observe the competition between brittle (cataclasis, distributed frictional sliding along phyllosilicates and extremely localized slip within carbonates) and pressure solution processes, that suggest a multi-mode of slip behaviour. Extreme localization along carbonate-bearing Y shear planes is our favorite fault zone feature representing past seismic ruptures along the studied

  8. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at

  9. On causes of the low seismic activity in the Earth's polar latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Boris; Sasorova, Elena; Domanski, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    The irregularity of distribution of seismic activity in the world was observed at the beginning of the era of instrumental seismology (B. Gutenberg, C. Richter, K. Kasahara). At the same time, the global nature of the symmetry of this effect has been established only in this millennium, with the participation of authors (Levin B.W., Sasorova E.V., 2010). Analysis of the global earthquake catalogs showed that almost all seismic events over the last century occurred within a limited latitudinal band contained between the 65 N and 65 S. The seismic activity in the polar regions of the planet was manifested very weakly. The reasons for such features were found by following the analysis of the characteristics associated with the theory of the figure of the Earth. In the works of the French mathematician A. Veronne (1912) was the first to introduce the concept of "critical" latitudes (φ1 = ±35°15' 22″) wherein the radius of the ellipsoid of revolution is equal to the radius of the sphere of the same volume. Variation of the radius vector of the ellipsoid at this latitude is equal to zero. There is the boundary between the compressed areas of the polar zones and equatorial region, where the rocks of the Earth are dominated by tensile forces. Analysis of the specific characteristics of the gravity force distribution on the surface of the ellipsoid has shown that there is a distribution of the same character with a singular point at latitude φ2 = ±61° 52' 12″. In case of variations in the angular velocity of the planet's rotation the variation of gravity force at the latitude φ2 is negligible, compared with variations of gravity force on the equator and pole, which exceed the previous value by 3-4 orders. Attempted analysis of the model of the ellipsoid of revolution in the theory of axisymmetric elastic shells has allowed to establish that in the elastic shell of the planet must occur meridional and ring forces. The theory shows that when the flatness (or polar

  10. Periods of the Earth's seismicity activation and their relationship to variations in the Earth's rotation velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasorova, Elena; Levin, Boris

    2015-04-01

    It is known that Earth's seismic activity (SA) demonstrates distinct roughness (nonuniformity) in time. Periods of intensification of the SA followed by periods of its decaying. For strong earthquakes these periods are continued several decades. It was also noted that there is a pronounced periodic amplification and attenuation of the SA with a period of about 30 years, which is manifested mainly in two latitudinal belts 50°N-30°N and 0°-30°S [Levin, Sasorova, 2014, 2015]. This work deals with the hypothesis that it is the properties of rotating non-uniform rate of the planet may be the cause of the periodicity of manifestations SA. The objective of this work is the searching of the spatial-temporal interconnection between the Earth rotation irregularity and the observed cyclic increasing and decreasing of the Earth's SA. This requires preparation a long series of observations of seismic events with representative data sets (EQ selected from 1895 up to date with a magnitude M> = 7.5, based on the catalog NEIC). Two sources of data on the angular velocity of the Earth's rotation of (length of day, LOD) were adapted: the world-known database IERS (Annual Report, International Earth Rotation Service) and the data, which were presented in the work (McCarthy, D.D., and Babcock A.K., 1986). The first one contains daily observations from 1962 to 2013, the second one was identified semi-annual observations from 1720 to 1984. It was prepared concatenated data set (CLOD) for the period from 1720 to 2013. Characteristic periods in the time series CLOD: 62, 32, and 23 years have been isolated by the use of spectral analysis. Next, it were used a band-pass filters for the four frequency bands from 124 to 45 years, from 37 do 25 years, from 25 to 19 years, and in the range of less than 19 years. In the frequency bands 37-25 years and 25-19 years marked clear periodic oscillations close to a sine wave. The amplitude of the oscillations with the 1720 to 1790 gradually

  11. Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2008 (SMAPVEX08) was conducted to address specific issues identified by the SMAP satellite mission (launch 2013). SMAP is currently addressing issues related to the development and selection of retrieval algorithms as well as refining the mission de...

  12. Active tectonic data calling for the re-evaluation of the seismic hazard along the Vienna Basin Transform Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, K.; Hinsch, R.; Peresson, H.; Wagreich, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Vienna Basin Transform Fault is a slow moving active fault passing through the most populated and most productive region of Austria with 2.4 million inhabitants producing c. 45% of the Austrian GDP. Active faulting in this highly vulnerable environment is accompanied by historically moderate seismicity (Imax ~ 8-9) in a narrow NE-striking zone paralleling the fault. Novel tectonic data such as maps of active faults and computed seismic slip deficits indicate that previous hazard analyses for the surrounding of Vienna may both underestimate the probability of severe earthquakes and the maximum credible earthquake. Slip rates of the fault in the Vienna Basin are derived from an actively subsiding pull-apart structure filled with up to 140 m Quaternary sediments. 1.5 to 2 km sinistral displacement, which accumulated during basin formation in the last 400 (?) ky corresponds to a slip rate of 1.6 - 2.5 mm/y. This is in good agreement with GPS data showing 2 mm slip per year and precise leveling proving surface subsidence up to 1 mm/y. The data, however, strongly contrast from slip rates computed from cumulative seismic moments of earthquakes. Seismic energy release only accounts for c. 0.2 mm/yr slip proving a seismic slip deficit for the historical time window of about 750 y. In addition, seismic slip calculations for arbitrarily selected fault sectors reveal large differences between the fastest (0.5 mm/yr) and slowest (0.02 mm/yr) seismically moving sector. We relate these to the locking of fault segments. Both results indicate that the seismic cycle exceeds the length of available seismological observation and larger earthquakes than those recorded need to be expected along the fault. Additional data to call for hazard re-evaluation come from the integration of subcrop data, Quaternary thickness, earthquake data, geophysical data (Gegenleitner et al., this vol.) and geomorphology, which results in a detailed map of active faults. The map depicts a major NE

  13. DigiSeis—A software component for digitizing seismic signals using the PC sound card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Khan, Khalid; Akhter, Gulraiz; Ahmad, Zulfiqar

    2012-06-01

    An innovative software-based approach to develop an inexpensive experimental seismic recorder is presented. This approach requires no hardware as the built-in PC sound card is used for digitization of seismic signals. DigiSeis, an ActiveX component is developed to capture the digitized seismic signals from the sound card and deliver them to applications for processing and display. A seismic recorder application software SeisWave is developed over this component, which provides real-time monitoring and display of seismic events picked by a pair of external geophones. This recorder can be used as an educational aid for conducting seismic experiments. It can also be connected with suitable seismic sensors to record earthquakes. The software application and the ActiveX component are available for download. This component can be used to develop seismic recording applications according to user specific requirements.

  14. Installation of a digital, wireless, strong-motion network for monitoring seismic activity in a western Colorado coal mining region

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Swanson; Collin Stewart; Wendell Koontz

    2007-01-15

    A seismic monitoring network has recently been installed in the North Fork Valley coal mining region of western Colorado as part of a NIOSH mine safety technology transfer project with two longwall coal mine operators. Data recorded with this network will be used to characterize mining related and natural seismic activity in the vicinity of the mines and examine potential hazards due to ground shaking near critical structures such as impoundment dams, reservoirs, and steep slopes. Ten triaxial strong-motion accelerometers have been installed on the surface to form the core of a network that covers approximately 250 square kilometers (100 sq. miles) of rugged canyon-mesa terrain. Spread-spectrum radio networks are used to telemeter continuous streams of seismic waveform data to a central location where they are converted to IP data streams and ported to the Internet for processing, archiving, and analysis. 4 refs.

  15. Multi-Parameter Observation and Detection of Pre-Earthquake Signals in Seismically Active Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S.; Parrot, M.; Liu, J. Y.; Hattori, K.; Kafatos, M.; Taylor, P.

    2012-01-01

    The recent large earthquakes (M9.0 Tohoku, 03/2011; M7.0 Haiti, 01/2010; M6.7 L Aquila, 04/2008; and M7.9 Wenchuan 05/2008) have renewed interest in pre-anomalous seismic signals associated with them. Recent workshops (DEMETER 2006, 2011 and VESTO 2009 ) have shown that there were precursory atmospheric /ionospheric signals observed in space prior to these events. Our initial results indicate that no single pre-earthquake observation (seismic, magnetic field, electric field, thermal infrared [TIR], or GPS/TEC) can provide a consistent and successful global scale early warning. This is most likely due to complexity and chaotic nature of earthquakes and the limitation in existing ground (temporal/spatial) and global satellite observations. In this study we analyze preseismic temporal and spatial variations (gas/radon counting rate, atmospheric temperature and humidity change, long-wave radiation transitions and ionospheric electron density/plasma variations) which we propose occur before the onset of major earthquakes:. We propose an Integrated Space -- Terrestrial Framework (ISTF), as a different approach for revealing pre-earthquake phenomena in seismically active areas. ISTF is a sensor web of a coordinated observation infrastructure employing multiple sensors that are distributed on one or more platforms; data from satellite sensors (Terra, Aqua, POES, DEMETER and others) and ground observations, e.g., Global Positioning System, Total Electron Content (GPS/TEC). As a theoretical guide we use the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) model to explain the generation of multiple earthquake precursors. Using our methodology, we evaluated retrospectively the signals preceding the most devastated earthquakes during 2005-2011. We observed a correlation between both atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies preceding most of these earthquakes. The second phase of our validation include systematic retrospective analysis for more than 100 major earthquakes (M>5

  16. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    PubMed

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest. PMID:24860717

  17. Results of high resolution seismic imaging experiments for defining permeable pathways in fractured gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Daley, T.

    1997-10-01

    As part of its Department of Energy (DOE) Industry cooperative program in oil and gas, Berkeley Lab has an ongoing effort in cooperation with Industry partners to develop equipment, field techniques, and interpretational methods to further the practice of characterizing fractured heterogeneous reservoirs. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the combined use of state-of-the-art technology in fluid flow modeling and geophysical imaging into an interdisciplinary approach for predicting the behavior of heterogeneous fractured gas reservoirs. The efforts in this program have mainly focused on using seismic methods linked with geologic and reservoir engineering analysis for the detection and characterization of fracture systems in tight gas formations, i.e., where and how to detect the fractures, what are the characteristics of the fractures, and how the fractures interact with the natural stresses, lithology, and their effect on reservoir performance. The project has also integrated advanced reservoir engineering methods for analyzing flow in fractured systems such that reservoir management strategies can be optimized. The work at Berkeley Lab focuses on integrating high resolution seismic imaging, (VSP, crosswell, and single well imaging), geologic information and well test data to invert for flow paths in fractured systems.

  18. Local-scale cross-correlation of seismic noise from the Calico fault experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Gerstoft, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Most studies of seismic noise cross-correlation (NCC) have focused on regional/continental scale imaging using empirical surface-wave Green's functions extracted from primary (0.05-0.08 Hz) and secondary (0.1-0.16 Hz) microseisms. In this work, we present the NCC results at higher frequencies (>0.5 Hz) from 6 months seismic noise recorded by a local array (~4 km aperture) deployed along the Calico fault in the Mojave Desert, California. Both fast and slow propagating waves are observed from the NCC record-sections. We compare the NCCs from sensor pairs that share a common sensor with the records of a borehole shot located very close to this common sensor. The result shows a good match of the slow surface-wave arrivals, indicating that the NCC method is able to recover unbiased surface-wave Green's functions at local scales. The strong body-wave NCC component is caused by the P waves generated offshore California. Along a SW-NE profile across the fault, we observe apparent P-wave arrivals and their reflections, which can be explained by a low-velocity-zone (LVZ) along the Calico fault. We calculate the LVZ width to be ~ 2.3 km, and the P-wave velocity reduction within the LVZ to be ~35 %. These estimates are consistent with other evidence for a relatively wide LVZ along the Calico fault.

  19. The CAFE experiment: A joint seismic and MT investigation of the Cascadia subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGary, R. Shane

    In this thesis we present results from inversion of data using dense arrays of ˙ collocated seismic and magnetotelluric stations located in the Cascadia subduction zone region of central Washington. In the migrated seismic section, we clearly image the top of the slab and oceanic Moho, as well as a velocity increase corresponding to the eclogitization of the hydrated upper crust. A deeper velocity increase is interpreted as the eclogitization of metastable gabbros, assisted by fluids released from the dehydration of upper mantle chlorite. A low velocity feature interpreted as a fluid/melt phase is present above this transition. The serpentinized wedge and continental Moho are also imaged. The magnetotelluric image further constrains the fluid/melt features, showing a rising conductive feature that forms a column up to a conductor indicative of a magma chamber feeding Mt. Rainier. This feature also explains the disruption of the continental Moho found in the migrated image. Exploration of the assumption of smoothness implicit in the standard MT inversion provides tools that enable us to generate a more accurate MT model. This final MT model clearly demonstrates the link between slab derived fluids/melting and the Mt. Rainier magma chamber. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  20. Termination of the Batholiths marine seismic experiment: the scientific method loses to hearsay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollister, L. S.

    2007-12-01

    The marine seismic component of the NSF-Continental Dynamics funded project Batholiths was terminated by Canadian authorities due to environmental concerns. Socioeconomic benefits of the project were not taken into account, nor were findings by the National Research Council on effects of ocean noise on marine mammal populations. The marine seismic component of Batholiths was to have been done using sound from airguns towed behind the R/V Langseth in order to seismically image the geologic structures below the Coast Mountains of British Columbia. The project was nearly identical in timing, location, and scope to the ACCRETE project, which was successfully permitted and done in the early fall of 1994, with no detected or known damage to the environment. However, what changed in the last 13 years was a dramatic increase of concern by eNGOs (environmental non- government organizations) that airguns produced sound that might be harmful to marine species, marine mammals in particular. The marine noise concerns were amplified by eNGO agendas and campaigns to prevent oil exploration along continental margins and to shut down naval exercises involving sonar to detect submarines. Compared to these agendas, Batholiths was an easy target because the PIs (Principal Investigators) did not have the manpower or financial or legal resources (in contrast to the Navy and oil companies) to push back against an organized campaign set on stopping Batholiths. The main concern used to mobilize public opinion against Batholiths was that, if we were permitted, then oil exploration in the nearby region would be permitted; and, if oil were found, drilling would proceed: the slippery slope argument. Thus, by stopping Batholiths with the speculation that airgun noise, as used in a marine seismic study, might damage marine life, the eNGOs believe they have stopped oil exploration in British Columbia coastal waters. It is widely recognized that everything was done right to get the permits for

  1. Active and passive seismic methods for characterization and monitoring of unstable rock masses: field surveys, laboratory tests and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombero, Chiara; Baillet, Laurent; Comina, Cesare; Jongmans, Denis; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate characterization and monitoring of potentially unstable rock masses may provide a better knowledge of the active processes and help to forecast the evolution to failure. Among the available geophysical methods, active seismic surveys are often suitable to infer the internal structure and the fracturing conditions of the unstable body. For monitoring purposes, although remote-sensing techniques and in-situ geotechnical measurements are successfully tested on landslides, they may not be suitable to early forecast sudden rapid rockslides. Passive seismic monitoring can help for this purpose. Detection, classification and localization of microseismic events within the prone-to-fall rock mass can provide information about the incipient failure of internal rock bridges. Acceleration to failure can be detected from an increasing microseismic event rate. The latter can be compared with meteorological data to understand the external factors controlling stability. On the other hand, seismic noise recorded on prone-to-fall rock slopes shows that the temporal variations in spectral content and correlation of ambient vibrations can be related to both reversible and irreversible changes within the rock mass. We present the results of the active and passive seismic data acquired at the potentially unstable granitic cliff of Madonna del Sasso (NW Italy). Down-hole tests, surface refraction and cross-hole tomography were carried out for the characterization of the fracturing state of the site. Field surveys were implemented with laboratory determination of physico-mechanical properties on rock samples and measurements of the ultrasonic pulse velocity. This multi-scale approach led to a lithological interpretation of the seismic velocity field obtained at the site and to a systematic correlation of the measured velocities with physical properties (density and porosity) and macroscopic features of the granitic cliff (fracturing, weathering and anisotropy). Continuous

  2. Zonation of North Alex Mud Volcano Highlighted by 3-D Active and Passive Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, J.; Lefeldt, M. R.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Brueckmann, W.

    2010-12-01

    The West Nile Delta forms part of the source of the large turbiditic Nile Deep Sea Fan. Since the late Miocene sediments have formed an up to 10 km thick pile, which includes about 1 - 3 km of Messinian evaporates. The sediment load of the overburden implies strong overpressures and salt-related tectonic deformation. Both are favourable for fluid migration towards the seafloor guided by the fractured margin. The western deltaic system, Rosetta branch, has formed an 80 km wide continental shelf. Here at 700 m water depth the mud volcano North Alex (NA) developed his circular bathymetric feature, which proved to be an active gas and mud-expelling structure. A 3-D high-resolution multichannel seismic survey (IFM-GEOMAR P-Cable system) was completed across the mud volcano. 3-D time migration provided a 3-D data cube with a 6.25 m grid. Vertical seismic sections did reveal a large set of faults located within the main mud volcano as well as surrounding the structure. Internal faults are mainly related to episodic mud expulsion processes and continuous gas and fluid production. Deep cutting external faults surround the structure in a half circle shape. Horizontal amplitude maps (time slices) of indicate recent activity of these faults even up to the seafloor. High gas saturation of the sediments is indicated by inverted reflection events. In the centre the gas front cuts into the seafloor reflection while it dips down with increasing radius. Only with the small grid resolution inward dipping reflections become visible, which form an upward opened concave reflector plane underlying the top gas front. The interpretation assumes an oval lens shaped body (conduit) saturated with gas at the top of the mud volcano. It provides the upper termination of the mud chimney. This separation is further supported by passive seismic observations. Distant earthquakes can stimulate long-period harmonic oscillations in mud volcanoes. Such oscillations are detectable with three

  3. Investigating possible influence of solar activity on some reported seismic-induced ionospheric precursors via VLF wave propagation in Earth-ionosphere waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    The diurnal propagation characteristic of VLF radio signal have been widely used to study pre-seismic ionospheric anomalies, some of which are often reported to be associated with the event. On the other hand, Solar particle events and geomagnetic activity also drive changes in the magnetosphere, which modify ionospheric parameters through the Earth's magnetic field. There are also effects originating from planetary and tidal waves, thermospheric tides and stratospheric warming. Distinguishing or separating seismically induced ionospheric fluctuations from those of other origin remain vital and challenging. In this work, we investigated the influence of solar and geomagnetic origin on some reported 'seismic ionospheric precursors' before a few major earthquakes. We also investigated anomalies in VLF day-length signal during period of low solar and geomagnetic activity (in relation to seismic activity), to understand the occurrence of VLF anomaly that are unrelated to seismicity and solar activity.

  4. Ground penetrating radar and active seismic investigation of stratigraphically verified pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gase, A.; Bradford, J. H.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and active seismic surveys in July and August, 2015 parallel to outcrops of the pyroclastic density current deposits of the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington. The primary objective of this study is to compare geophysical properties that influence electromagnetic and elastic wave velocities with stratigraphic parameters in the un-saturated zone. The deposits of interest are composed of pumice, volcanic ash, and lava blocks comprising a wide range of intrinsic porosities and grain sizes from sand to boulders. Single-offset GPR surveys for reflection data were performed with a Sensors and Software pulseEKKO Pro 100 GPR using 50 MHz, 100 MHz, and 200 MHz antennae. GPR data processing includes time-zero correction, dewow filter, migration, elevation correction. Multi-offset acquisition with 100 MHz antennae and offsets ranging from 1 m to 16 m are used for reflection tomography to create 2 D electromagnetic wave velocity models. Seismic surveys are performed with 72 geophones spaced at two meters using a sledge hammer source with shot points at each receiver point. We couple p- wave refraction tomography with Rayleigh wave inversion to compute Vp/Vs ratios. The two geophysical datasets are then compared with stratigraphic information to illustrate the influence of lithological parameters (e.g. stratification, grain-size distribution, porosity, and sorting) on geophysical properties of unsaturated pyroclastic deposits. Future work will include joint petrophysical inversion of the multiple datasets to estimate porosity and water content in the unsaturated zone.

  5. A robust satellite technique for monitoring seismically active areas: The case of Bhuj Gujarat earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzano, N.; Aliano, C.; Filizzola, C.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

    2007-02-01

    A robust satellite data analysis technique (RAT) has been recently proposed as a suitable tool for satellite TIR surveys in seismically active regions and already successfully tested in different cases of earthquakes (both high and medium-low magnitudes). In this paper, the efficiency and the potentialities of the RAT technique have been tested even when it is applied to a wide area with extremely variable topography, land coverage and climatic characteristics (the whole Indian subcontinent). Bhuj-Gujarat's earthquake (occurred on 26th January 2001, MS ˜ 7.9) has been considered as a test case in the validation phase, while a relatively unperturbed period (no earthquakes with MS ≥ 5, in the same region and in the same period) has been analyzed for confutation purposes. To this aim, 6 years of Meteosat-5 TIR observations have been processed for the characterization of the TIR signal behaviour at each specific observation time and location. The anomalous TIR values, detected by RAT, have been evaluated in terms of time-space persistence in order to establish the existence of actually significant anomalous transients. The results indicate that the studied area was affected by significant positive thermal anomalies which were identified, at different intensity levels, not far from the Gujarat coast (since 15th January, but with a clearer evidence on 22nd January) and near the epicentral area (mainly on 21st January). On 25th January (1 day before Gujarat's earthquake) significant TIR anomalies appear on the Northern Indian subcontinent, showing a remarkable coincidence with the principal tectonic lineaments of the region (thrust Himalayan boundary). On the other hand, the results of the confutation analysis indicate that no meaningful TIR anomalies appear in the absence of seismic events with MS ≥ 5.

  6. Active and passive seismic imaging of a hydraulic fracture in diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Wills, P.B.; De Martini, D.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a comprehensive set of experiments including remote- and treatment-well microseismic monitoring, interwell shear-wave shadowing, and surface tiltmeter arrays, that was used to monitor the growth of a hydraulic fracture in the Belridge diatomite. To obtain accurate measurements, and extensive subsurface network of geophones was cemented spanning the diatomite formation in three closely spaced observation wells around the well to be fracture treated. Data analysis indicates that the minifracture and main hydraulic fracture stimulations resulted in a nearly vertical fracture zone (striking N26{degrees}E) vertically segregated into two separate elements, the uppermost of which grew 60 ft above the perforated interval. The interwell seismic effects are consistent with a side process zone of reduced shear velocity, which remote-well microseismic data independently suggest may be as wide as 40 ft. The experiments indicate complicated processes occurring during hydraulic fracturing that have significant implications for stimulation, waterflooding, in fill drilling, and EOR. These processes are neither well understood nor included in current hydraulic fracture models.

  7. Monitoring and Characterizing the Geysering and Seismic Activity at the Lusi Mud Eruption Site, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Karyono; Obermann, Anne; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Abdurrokhim, Abdurrokhim; Masturyono, Masturyono; Hadi, Soffian

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi eruption began on May 29, 2006 in the northeast of Java Island, Indonesia, and to date is still active. Lusi is a newborn sedimentary-hosted hydrothermal system characterized by continuous expulsion of liquefied mud and breccias and geysering activity. Lusi is located upon the Watukosek fault system, a left lateral wrench system connecting the volcanic arc and the bakarc basin. This fault system is still periodically reactivated as shown by field data. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we conducted several types of monitoring. Based on camera observations, we characterized the Lusi erupting activity by four main behaviors occurring cyclically: (1) Regular activity, which consists in the constant emission of water and mud breccias (i.e. viscous mud containing clay, silt, sand and clasts) associated with the constant expulsion of gas (mainly aqueous vapor with minor amounts of CO2 and CH4) (2) Geysering phase with intense bubbling, consisting in reduced vapor emission and more powerful bursting events that do not seem to have a regular pattern. (3) Geysering phase with intense vapor and degassing discharge and a typically dense plume that propagates up to 100 m height. (4) Quiescent phase marking the end of the geysering activity (and the observed cycle) with no gas emissions or bursts observed. To investigate the possible seismic activity beneath Lusi and the mechanisms controlling the Lusi pulsating behaviour, we deployed a network of 5 seismic stations and a HD camera around the Lusi crater. We characterize the observed types of seismic activity as tremor and volcano-tectonic events. Lusi tremor events occur in 5-10 Hz frequency band, while volcano tectonic events are abundant in the high frequencies range from 5 Hz until 25 Hz. We coupled the seismic monitoring with the images collected with the HD camera to study the correlation between the seismic tremor and the different phases of the geysering activity. Key words: Lusi

  8. The comparative analysis of the Earth seismic activity and the variation of the Earth rotation angular velocity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasorova, Elena; Levin, Boris

    2013-04-01

    It was shown [Levin, Sasorova 2012], that a cyclic increase and decrease of the seismic activity in different time intervals was observed in spatial-temporal distributions of the earthquakes (EQ) (1900-2012) with magnitude M≥7 in northwest part of the Pacific region. The spatial-temporal analysis revealed the periodic changing of the seismic activity and the depth distributions of the strong events in different time intervals. The Earth rotation angular velocity varies with time. Increasing of the angular velocity of a celestial body rotation leads to growth of oblateness of planet, and vice versa, the oblateness is decreasing with reducing of velocity of rotation. So, well-known effect of instability leads to small pulsations of the Earth surface. The Earth crust in polar areas is compressing with increasing of angular velocity of rotating planet, and it is extensible in the equator zone. The decreasing of rotation velocity leads to opposite result. The objectives of this work is the comparative spatial-temporal analysis of the seismicity regime variation (events with M>=7.0) on the whole Earth and in the Pacific region from 1900 up to date and the Earth rotation instability. The two subsets of the worldwide NEIC (USGS) catalog were used (USGS/NEIC from 1973 up to 2012 and Significant Worldwide Earthquakes (2150 B.C. - 1994 A.D.)). The preliminary standardization of magnitudes and removal of aftershocks was fulfilled for the first mentioned above subset of events. In both cases the entire range of observations was subdivided into several 5-year intervals. The temporal EQ distributions were calculated separately for six latitudinal intervals (belts): 45°-30°N, 30°-15°N, 15°-0°N, 0°-15°S, 15°-30°S, 30°-45°S. The high latitudes do not take in consideration because of very low seismic activity in these latitudes. Separately were analyzed: the EQs with M>=8 for time interval 1900-2012, and the EQs with M>=6 for time interval 1700-1900. The data base (http

  9. Calibration formulae and values for velocity seismometers used in the 1998 Santa Clara Valley, California seismic experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindh, Allan G.; Eaton, Jerry P.; O'Neill Allen, Mary; Healy, John H.; Stewart, Samuel W.; Damerell, Lu

    1999-01-01

    Eaton (1975), Bakun and Dratler (1976), Eaton (1977), Healy and O’Neil (1977), Asten (1977), Stewart and O'Neill (1980), Liu and Peselnick (1986), Eaton (1991), Rodgers et al. (1995), and many others (see Asten (1977) for a list of earlier references) have presented formulae for calculating the damped generator constant (or motor constant), and the damping constant (or fractional damping ratio) for magnetically damped velocity seismometers. Unfortunately the notation varies between authors, and not all the formulae allow for some of the significant variables -- differences in input impedance of the recording system in particular. This has become particularly relevant because the USGS seismic networks in California have traditionally set up their velocity sensors for the 10K Ohm impedance of the standard USGS analog telemetry systems (Eaton, 1977), but modern digital recording systems are usually set up with high input impedances, often of a megaohm or greater. Thus the nominal calibration values valid for USGS velocity sensors in their “normal” configuration are incorrect when they are recorded on other systems. In this short note we have collected the relevant formulae needed, and computed the seismometer responses for the various velocity sensors used in the recent Santa Clara Valley Seismic Experiment (SCVSE, see Lindh et al., 1999).

  10. Structure and evolution of the seismically active Ostler Fault Zone (New Zealand) based on interpretations of multiple high resolution seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Fiona M.; Ghisetti, Francesca; Kaiser, Anna E.; Green, Alan G.; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Gorman, Andrew R.

    2010-12-01

    To improve our understanding of active faulting away from the main plate boundary on New Zealand's South Island, we have acquired high resolution seismic data across the Ostler Fault Zone Twelve 1.2 km long lines perpendicular to fault strike and a 1.6 km long crossline were collected in a region of the MacKenzie Basin where surface mapping delineates significant complexity in the form of two non-overlapping reverse fault strands separated by a transfer zone characterised by multiple smaller strands and increased folding. Interpretation of the resultant images includes a 45-55° west-dipping principal fault and two 25-30° west-dipping subsidiary faults, one in the hanging wall and one in the footwall of the principal fault. The geologically mapped complexities are shown to be caused by shallow variations in the structure of the principal fault, which breaks the surface in the north and south but not within the transfer zone, where it forms a triangle zone with associated backthrusting and minor faulting. These complexities only extend to ~ 300 m depth. Structures below this level are markedly simpler and much more 2D in nature, with the principal fault strand extending over a much longer distance than the individual strands observed at the surface. Since longer faults are susceptible to larger earthquakes than shorter ones, seismic hazard at the study site may be higher than previously thought. Multiple surface fault strands that give way to a single more major stand at relatively shallow depths may be a common feature of segmented fault systems. The deepest layered reflections at our site are consistent with the presence of a Late Cretaceous (?)-Tertiary basin underlying the present-day MacKenzie Basin. Structural restoration of the seismic images back to the base of Quaternary fluvioglacial terraces and back to the top of a Late Pliocene-Pleistocene fluviolacustrine unit indicate that compression was initiated prior to the Late Pliocene and that it has continued

  11. Mass movements in fjords caused by seismic activity? A case study from Balsfjord, northern Norway.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, M.; Vorren, T. O.

    2003-04-01

    Fjords can provide excellent opportunities for investigating sedimentary processes related to slope failures. Balsfjord is a 46 km long and maximum 5 km wide fjord in northern Norway, about 10 km south of Tromsø. An end moraine divides the fjord into an Inner and Outer Basin. High-resolution seismic data (3.5 kHz penetration echo sounder), as well as two piston cores, one from each basin, were analysed. The objective of this study was to find submarine deposits that could be used to study the regionality and chronology of postglacial mass-movement activity in northern Norway. Various types of gravity flows were identified, i.e. slumps, debris flows and turbidites. Maximum thickness of one debris flow is c. 15 m. Two marked turbidites have a lateral extent of about 10 km. The origins of some slumps and debris flows include slope failure of the end moraine crossing the fjord, as well as in front of a river mouth. The origin of the turbidites will be studied using grain-size distribution. Three mass-movement events in both basins are correlated using radiocarbon dates. Since these events can be identified in both basins, they are suggested to indicate regional avalanche activity. The three events were bracketed between 9400 radiocarbon years BP and 9100 radiocarbon years BP. This time span fits into the period of most rapid postglacial isostatic uplift in areas adjacent to Balsfjord (Corner and Haugane, 1993). A close correlation between a steep uplift gradient and earthquake frequency/magnitude is suggested by several authors (e.g. Bøe et al., 2001). Thus, seismic activity can be regarded as a potential trigger mechanism for mass-movement activity in Balsfjord. References: Bøe, R., Hovland, M., Instanes, A., Rise, L. and Vasshus, S., 2000. Submarine slide scars and mass movements in Karmsundet and Skudenesfjorden, southwestern Norway: morphology and evolution. Marine Geology, 167(1-2): 147-165. Corner, G.D. and Haugane, E., 1993. Marine-lacustrine stratigraphy of

  12. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  13. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  14. New constraints on the magmatic system beneath Newberry Volcano from the analysis of active and passive source seismic data, and ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, B.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic systems beneath arc-volcanoes are often poorly resolved by seismic imaging due to the small spatial scale and large magnitude of crustal heterogeneity in combination with field experiments that sparsely sample the wavefield. Here we report on our continued analysis of seismic data from a line of densely-spaced (~300 m), three-component seismometers installed on Newberry Volcano in central Oregon for ~3 weeks; the array recorded an explosive shot, ~20 teleseismic events, and ambient noise. By jointly inverting both active and passive-source travel time data, the resulting tomographic image reveals a more detailed view of the presumed rhyolitic magma chamber at ~3-5 km depth, previously imaged by Achauer et al. (1988) and Beachly et al. (2012). The magma chamber is elongated perpendicular to the trend of extensional faulting and encircled by hypocenters of small (M < 2) earthquakes located by PNSN. We also model teleseismic waveforms using a 2-D synthetic seismogram code to recreate anomalous amplitudes observed in the P-wave coda for sites within the caldera. Autocorrelation of ambient noise data also reveals large amplitude waveforms for a small but spatially grouped set of stations, also located within the caldera. On the basis of these noise observations and 2-D synthetic models, which both require slow seismic speeds at depth, we conclude that our tomographic model underestimates low-velocity anomalies associated with the inferred crustal magma chamber; this is due in large part to wavefront healing, which reduces observed travel time anomalies, and regularization constraints, which minimize model perturbations. Only by using various methods that interrogate different aspects of the seismic data are we able to more realistically constrain the complicated, heterogeneous volcanic system. In particular, modeling of waveform characteristics provides a better measure of the spatial scale and magnitude of crustal velocities near magmatic systems.

  15. Seismoelectric experiments in a natural laboratory: investigating the permeability/frequency dependence of co-seismic effects at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, K. E.; West, M. T.; Barrash, W.; Hinz, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    The propagation of seismic waves through porous media generates electric fields, known as seismoelectric effects, as a consequence of electrokinetic coupling associated with movement of pore fluid relative to the solid matrix. Seismoelectric conversions generated at interfaces are of interest for their predicted sensitivity to contrasts in permeability, and pore fluid type (among other properties) although they can be very challenging to measure. Stronger, co-seismic electric fields that travel within P-waves and Stoneley waves are easier to measure and may prove useful as tools for borehole logging or investigation of lateral variations in near surface sediments. In August, 2009, we carried out seismoelectric field experiments on the surface and in boreholes penetrating an unconfined, coarse-grained sand, gravel and cobble aquifer at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site. The aquifer is composed of a sequence of 4 cobble-dominated units overlain by a sand channel and underlain, at a depth of approximately 20 m, by a layer of clay. The water table was located at a depth of approximately 2 m. The main objective of our experiments was to determine whether theoretical seismic/seismoelectric transfer functions, linking various physical properties to the amplitudes of co-seismic effects associated with P-waves, would be consistent with in-situ measurements made in a well-characterized natural environment. Identifying the roles of porosity and permeability was of particular interest given that theoretical models suggest (somewhat counter-intuitively) that the co-seismic effect is dependent on the former but not the latter at frequencies below Biot’s critical frequency - estimated to lie in the range of a few hundred to a few thousand Hz at this site. Borehole experiments utilized sledgehammer and weight drop seismic sources positioned on surface, 2 - 3 m away from the borehole collar. A downhole electrode array and downhole geophone were used (separately) to measure

  16. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  17. Simulation of complete seismic surveys for evaluation of experiment design and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Oezdenvar, T.; McMechan, G.A.; Chaney, P.

    1996-03-01

    Synthesis of complete seismic survey data sets allows analysis and optimization of all stages in an acquisition/processing sequence. The characteristics of available survey designs, parameter choices, and processing algorithms may be evaluated prior to field acquisition to produce a composite system in which all stages have compatible performance; this maximizes the cost effectiveness for a given level of accuracy, or for targets with specific characteristics. Data sets synthesized for three salt structures provide representative comparisons of time and depth migration, post-stack and prestack processing, and illustrate effects of varying recording aperture and shot spacing, iterative focusing analysis, and the interaction of migration algorithms with recording aperture. A final example demonstrates successful simulation of both 2-D acquisition and processing of a real data line over a salt pod in the Gulf of Mexico.

  18. The Tectonic Evolution of SE Canada: Seismic Evidence from the QM-III Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, I. D.; Boyce, A.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Levin, V. L.; Menke, W. H.; Ellwood, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the geological record can be interpreted in the context of processes operating today at plate boundaries. This works well to explain processes and products during the Phanerozoic era; during Precambrian times when the oldest rocks were forming, however, conditions on the younger, hotter, more ductile Earth were likely very different, making analogies with modern day tectonics less certain. Gathering evidence preserved deep within the plates in the shields is thus essential to improve our understanding of the early Earth. Shields are usually underlain by thick, seismically fast roots that are absent beneath younger portions of Earth's surface. The thermochemically distinct nature of cratonic roots is often associated with Archean processes such as the extraction of komatiitic magmas. However, the cratonic core of North America does not fit easily into this Archean formation paradigm: part of the Canadian shield extends beneath the Archean Superior craton, but much of it persists beneath younger Proterozoic crust as well. We present here a relative arrival-time tomographic study of mantle seismic structure using data from a new seismograph network operating in SE Canada. Our stations extend from the Archean Superior craton around the southern tip of Hudson Bay, through Proterozoic Grenville terranes, and into Paleozoic coastal Maine and Nova Scotia. Tomographic images display three broad zones of mantle wavespeed: slow in the Appalachian terranes; fast in the Grenville Province; very fast within the Superior craton. Archean lithosphere has been modified by the Great Meteor hotspot, but we find no evidence for major plate-scale underthrusting during the Grenville orogeny. The abrupt wavespeed transition from Archean to Proterozoic mantle is thus consistent with the emerging consensus that keels form in two stages: a chemically depleted layer in Archean times followed by the thermal development of a less-depleted lithosphere during Proterozoic times.

  19. An active footwall shortcut thrust revealed by seismic reflection profiling: a case study of the Futaba fault, northern Honshu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Kato, Naoko; Higashinaka, Motonori; Kurashimo, Eiji; Iwasaki, Takaya; Abe, Susumu

    2013-04-01

    The Futaba fault is located along the Pacific cast of southern part of Northern Honshu and continues at least 100 km. Based on tectonic morphological research, its central part show the active tectonic features. Due to the effect of M9 Tohoku Oki earthquake 2011, the evaluation of Coulomb stress changes on the fault surface is concerned for the assess of seismic hazards. To investigate the deep geometry of seismogenic source fault and basic crustal structure, we performed deep seismic reflection profiling along the 58-km-long seismic line across the Futaba fault. The seismic data were obtained using four vibroseis trucks and 1164 channel recorders. The seismic section portrays the half graben filled by 1000-m-thick lower Miocene fluvial sediments, suggesting that the Futaba fault reactivated as a west dipping normal fault during the early Miocene associated with opening of the Sea of Japan. On the hanging wall of the Miocene normal fault, Mesozoic metamorphic rocks are cropping out forming a narrow range parallel to the fault. On the footwall of this range, footwall shortcut thrust is clearly identified by the deformation of Plio-Pleistocene sediments on the seismic section. The deeper extension of the Futaba fault can be traced down to 4.5 seconds (TWT) and sub-horizontal reflectors are developed around 6-7 seconds (TWT). The dip angle of the Futaba fault in the seismogenic zone is about 45 degrees. The footwall shortcut thrust was formed at the shallow high-angle part of the Futaba fault as a low-angle (30 degrees) reverse fault. The formation of half graben is limited along the northern part of this fault system. The footwall shortcut thrust was developed along a 40-km-long segment only accompanied with the Miocene half graben. The southern segment of the surface trace of the Futaba fault suggests a straight geometry may represent a change in dip angle.

  20. Active Targets for Experiments with Rare Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the active-target technique in the ANASEN detector, which was developed by researchers from Louisiana State University and Florida State University. ANASEN was used in a number of stable and rare iosotope experiments in α- and proton scattering, as well as (α , p) and (d , p) reactions at FSU's in-flight radioactive beam facility RESOLUT. ANASEN also was used to perform the first experiment, proton scattering off a 37K beam at the ReA3 facility. Another active-target detector with a very different approach is found in the Active Target Time-Projection Chamber, which was developed by a collaboration between researchers from MSU, the University of Notre Dame, Western Michigan University, LLNL, LBNL, and St. Mary's University (Canada). First experiments with an AT-TPC prototype have been reported. The talk will summarize the results from the first experiments with these systems, describe further development and future research projects. Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the

  1. Seismic sequences in the Sombrero Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, J.; Huerfano, V. A.; ten Brink, U.; von Hillebrandt, C.

    2007-05-01

    The northeastern Caribbean, in the vicinity of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, has a long and well-documented history of devastating earthquakes and tsunamis, including major events in 1670, 1787, 1867, 1916, 1918, and 1943. Recently, seismicity has been concentrated to the north and west of the British Virgin Islands, in the region referred to as the Sombrero Seismic Zone by the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN). In the combined seismicity catalog maintained by the PRSN, several hundred small to moderate magnitude events can be found in this region prior to 2006. However, beginning in 2006 and continuing to the present, the rate of seismicity in the Sombrero suddenly increased, and a new locus of activity developed to the east of the previous location. Accurate estimates of seismic hazard, and the tsunamigenic potential of seismic events, depend on an accurate and comprehensive understanding of how strain is being accommodated in this corner region. Are faults locked and accumulating strain for release in a major event? Or is strain being released via slip over a diffuse system of faults? A careful analysis of seismicity patterns in the Sombrero region has the potential to both identify faults and modes of failure, provided the aggregation scheme is tuned to properly identify related events. To this end, we experimented with a scheme to identify seismic sequences based on physical and temporal proximity, under the assumptions that (a) events occur on related fault systems as stress is refocused by immediately previous events and (b) such 'stress waves' die out with time, so that two events that occur on the same system within a relatively short time window can be said to have a similar 'trigger' in ways that two nearby events that occurred years apart cannot. Patterns that emerge from the identification, temporal sequence, and refined locations of such sequences of events carry information about stress accommodation that is obscured by large clouds of

  2. An in-situ stimulation experiment in crystalline rock - assessment of induced seismicity levels during stimulation and related hazard for nearby infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischig, Valentin; Broccardo, Marco; Amann, Florian; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Esposito, Simona; Krietsch, Hannes; Doetsch, Joseph; Madonna, Claudio; Wiemer, Stefan; Loew, Simon; Giardini, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    A decameter in-situ stimulation experiment is currently being performed at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland by the Swiss Competence Center for Energy Research - Supply of Electricity (SCCER-SoE). The underground research laboratory lies in crystalline rock at a depth of 480 m, and exhibits well-documented geology that is presenting some analogies with the crystalline basement targeted for the exploitation of deep geothermal energy resources in Switzerland. The goal is to perform a series of stimulation experiments spanning from hydraulic fracturing to controlled fault-slip experiments in an experimental volume approximately 30 m in diameter. The experiments will contribute to a better understanding of hydro-mechanical phenomena and induced seismicity associated with high-pressure fluid injections. Comprehensive monitoring during stimulation will include observation of injection rate and pressure, pressure propagation in the reservoir, permeability enhancement, 3D dislocation along the faults, rock mass deformation near the fault zone, as well as micro-seismicity. The experimental volume is surrounded by other in-situ experiments (at 50 to 500 m distance) and by infrastructure of the local hydropower company (at ~100 m to several kilometres distance). Although it is generally agreed among stakeholders related to the experiments that levels of induced seismicity may be low given the small total injection volumes of less than 1 m3, detailed analysis of the potential impact of the stimulation on other experiments and surrounding infrastructure is essential to ensure operational safety. In this contribution, we present a procedure how induced seismic hazard can be estimated for an experimental situation that is untypical for injection-induced seismicity in terms of injection volumes, injection depths and proximity to affected objects. Both, deterministic and probabilistic methods are employed to estimate that maximum possible and the maximum expected induced

  3. Paper 58714 - Exploring activated faults hydromechanical processes from semi-controled field injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Nussbaum, C.

    2015-12-01

    The appreciation of the sensitivity of fractures and fault zones to fluid-induced-deformations in the subsurface is a key question in predicting the reservoir/caprock system integrity around fluid manipulations with applications to reservoir leakage and induced seismicity. It is also a question of interest in understanding earthquakes source, and recently the hydraulic behavior of clay faults under a potential reactivation around nuclear underground depository sites. Fault and fractures dynamics studies face two key problems (1) the up-scaling of laboratory determined properties and constitutive laws to the reservoir scale which is not straightforward when considering faults and fractures heterogeneities, (2) the difficulties to control both the induced seismicity and the stimulated zone geometry when a fault is reactivated. Using instruments dedicated to measuring coupled pore pressures and deformations downhole, we conducted field academic experiments to characterize fractures and fault zones hydromechanical properties as a function of their multi-scale architecture, and to monitor their dynamic behavior during the earthquake nucleation process. We show experiments on reservoir or cover rocks analogues in underground research laboratories where experimental conditions can be optimized. Key result of these experiments is to highlight how important the aseismic fault activation is compared to the induced seismicity. We show that about 80% of the fault kinematic moment is aseismic and discuss the complex associated fault friction coefficient variations. We identify that the slip stability and the slip velocity are mainly controlled by the rate of the permeability/porosity increase, and discuss the conditions for slip nucleation leading to seismic instability.