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Sample records for active seismic source

  1. Monitoring seismic wave speed by an active seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.; Okubo, M.; Saiga, A.

    2012-12-01

    Decreases in elastic wave speed around cracked zones prior to faulting in rock fracture experiments have been reported (e.g., Yukutake, 1989; Yoshimitsu et al., 2009). These decreases in wave speed have been considered to be associated with crack and fault growth based on non-destructive observation using X-ray CT scan (Kawakata et al., 1999). Meanwhile, there were some reports on the decreases in seismic wave speed along paths that cross the hypocentral area in periods including some large earthquakes. Uchida et al. (2002) analyzed seismic waveform with explosive sources before and after the 1998 northern Iwate prefecture earthquake, and they showed that the decrease in seismic wave speed approximately 0.1-0.9 % by the earthquake occurrence. Justin et al. (2007) reported the reduction in seismic wave speed accompanied with the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake around the rupture area by using the four repeating earthquakes that occurred before and after the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake. However, seismograms of explosive sources or repeating earthquakes are hard to be frequently recorded, which makes the time intervals of estimated seismic wave speed be too long to distinguish preseismic changes from coseismic and post seismic changes. In order to monitor crustal structures and detecting the variation of rock properties in the crust, a kind of active seismic source systems ACROSS (Accurately Controlled Routinely Operated Signal System) has been developed(e.g., Kunitomo and Kumazawa, 2004). We used the controlled seismic source ACROSS, which installed at the Tono mine, Gifu prefecture, central Japan and has been routinely operated by Tono Geoscience center of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), automatically. Frequency modulated seismic waves are continuously radiated from approximately 10-20 Hz by eccentric rotation of the source. In order to investigate the stability of ACROSS signals, we used seismograms recorded at the 110m depth of Shobasama observing site, which is

  2. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  3. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, Michael A.; Cook, Neville G. W.; McEvilly, Thomas V.; Majer, Ernest L.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  4. Active seismic sources as a proxy for seismic surface processes: An example from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, A. D.; Lokmer, I.; Kennedy, B.; Keys, H. J. R.; Proctor, J.; Lyons, J. J.; Jolly, G. E.

    2014-10-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption pulses, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~ 7 × 105 m3) that propagated ~ 2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption timing must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the evolution of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the seismic sequence in a new cross correlation source location approach. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9 × 106 Nm producing observable seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four stations. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we obtain a best matched source position in the near vent region for the eruption period and significant down channel excitations during both the pre and post eruption periods. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~ 8 × 1011 Nm, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The new energy estimate may be more robust than those calculated from standard seismic radiation equations, which may include uncertainties about the path and site effects. The

  5. A comparison of active seismic source data to seismic excitations from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Kennedy, Ben; Keys, Harry; Lokmer, Ivan; Proctor, Jon; Lyons, John; Jolly, Gillian

    2014-05-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption jets, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~7x105 m3) that propagated ~2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption chronology must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity starting at 11:52:18 UTC that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the timing of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the eruptive sequence. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9x106 joules producing seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four 3-component stations. From these, we obtained a distribution of amplitudes across the network for each drop position which varied systematically from the eruption vent and avalanche scar to the debris avalanche toe. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross-correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we found evidence for the debris avalanche a few minutes prior to the eruption in both the broad spectrum and narrow frequency (5-10 Hz) analysis. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~8x1011 joules, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The inferred seismic energy release for the

  6. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  7. Seismic structure off the Kii Peninsula, Japan, deduced from passive- and active-source seismographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yojiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kaiho, Yuka; Obana, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Ayako; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2017-03-01

    We conduct seismic tomography to model subsurface seismicity between 2010 and 2012 and structural heterogeneity off the Kii Peninsula, southwestern Japan, and to investigate their relationships with segmentation of the Nankai and Tonankai seismogenic zones of the Nankai Trough. In order to constrain both the shallow and deep structure of the offshore seismogenic segments, we use both active- and passive-source data recorded by both ocean-bottom seismometers and land seismic stations. The relocated microearthquakes indicate a lack of seismic activity in the Tonankai seismogenic segment off Kumano, whereas there was active intraslab seismicity in the Kii Channel area of the Nankai seismogenic segment. Based on comparisons among the distribution of seismicity, age, and spreading rate of the subducting Philippine Sea plate, and the slip-deficit distribution, we conclude that seismicity in the subducting slab under the Kii Channel region nucleated from structures in the Philippine Sea slab that pre-date subduction and that fluids released by dehydration are related to decreased interplate coupling of these intraslab earthquakes. Our velocity model clearly shows the areal extent of two key structures reported in previous 2-D active-source surveys: a high-velocity zone beneath Cape Shionomisaki and a subducted seamount off Cape Muroto, both of which are roughly circular and of 15-20 km radius. The epicenters of the 1944 Tonankai and 1946 Nankai earthquakes are near the edge of the high-velocity body beneath Cape Shionomisaki, suggesting that this anomalous structure is related to the nucleation of these two earthquakes. We identify several other high- and low-velocity zones immediately above the plate boundary in the Tonankai and Nankai seismogenic segments. In comparison with the slip-deficit model, some of the low-velocity zones appear to correspond to an area of strong coupling. Our observations suggest that, unlike the Japan Trench subduction zone, in our study area

  8. Multi-level continuous active source seismic monitoring (ML-CASSM): Application to shallow hydrofracture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Daley, T. M.; Butler-Veytia, B.; Peterson, J.; Gasperikova, E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    Induced subsurface processes occur over a wide variety of time scales ranging from seconds (e.g. fracture initiation) to days (e.g. unsteady multiphase flow) and weeks (e.g. induced mineral precipitation). Active source seismic monitoring has the potential to dynamically characterize such alterations and allow estimation of spatially localized rates. However, even optimal timelapse seismic surveys have limited temporal resolution due to both the time required to acquire a survey and the cost of continuous field deployment of instruments and personnel. Traditional timelapse surveys are also limited by experimental repeatability due to a variety of factors including geometry replication and near-surface conditions. Recent research has demonstrated the value of semi-permanently deployed seismic systems with fixed sources and receivers for use in monitoring a variety of processes including near-surface stress changes (Silver et.al. 2007), subsurface movement of supercritical CO2 (Daley et.al. 2007), and preseismic velocity changes in fault regions (Niu et. al. 2008). This strategy, referred to as continuous active source seismic monitoring (CASSM), allows both precise quantification of traveltime changes on the order of 1.1 x 10-7 s and temporal sampling on the order of minutes. However, as previously deployed, CASSM often sacrifices spatial resolution for temporal resolution with previous experiments including only a single source level. We present results from the first deployment of CASSM with a large number of source levels under automated control. Our system is capable of autonomously acquiring full tomographic datasets (10 sources, 72 receivers) in 3 minutes without human intervention, thus allowing active source seismic imaging (rather than monitoring) of processes with short durations. Because no sources or receivers are moved in the acquisition process, signal repeatability is excellent and subtle waveform changes can be interpreted with increased confidence

  9. Crosswell CASSM(Continuous Active-Source Seismic Monitoring): Recent Developments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, T. M.; Niu, F.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Solbau, R.; Silver, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    Continuous active-source monitoring using borehole sources and sensors in a crosswell configuration has proven to be a useful tool for monitoring subsurface processes (Silver, et al, 2007; Daley, et al, 2007; Niu, et al, 2008). This recent work has focused on two applications: monitoring stress changes related to seismicity and monitoring changes in fluid distribution related to geologic storage of CO2. Field tests have demonstrated precision in travel time measurement of up to 1.1 x 10-7 s, and in velocity perturbation measurement of up to 1.1 x 10-5 (Niu, et al 2008). In this talk I will summarize our preceding work and discuss current developments. Current efforts address both hardware and design challenges to improving the methodology. Hardware issues include deployment of multiple piezoelectric sources in shallow and deep boreholes, source and sensor deployment on tubing inside casing, and deployment with other monitoring instrumentation. Design issues are focused on use of multiple sources and/or sensors to obtain optimal spatial resolution for monitoring processes in the interwell region. This design issue can be investigated with optimal experiment design theory. New field experiments for monitoring seismicity (at SAFOD) and CO2 injection (at a US Dept of Energy pilot) are in the design/deployment stage. Current status of these projects will be discussed. References: Silver, P.G., Daley, T.M., Niu, F., Majer, E.L., 2007, Active source monitoring of crosswell seismic travel time for stress induced changes, Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, v97, n1B, p281-293. Daley, T.M., R.D. Solbau, J.B. Ajo-Franklin, S.M. Benson, 2007, Continuous active-source monitoring of CO2 injection in a brine aquifer, Geophysics, v72, n5, pA57-A61, DOI:10.1190/1.2754716. Niu, F., Silver, P.G., Daley, T.M., Cheng, X., Majer, E.L., 2008, Preseismic velocity changes observed from active source monitoring at the Parkfield SAFOD drill site, Nature, 454, 204-208, DOI:10

  10. Preliminary Results from the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Kiser, Eric; Palomeras, Imma; Zelt, Colin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steve; Harder, Steven; Creagar, Kenneth; Vidale, John; Abers, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    iMUSH (imaging Magma Under Saint Helens) is a US NSF sponsored multi-disciplinary investigation of Mount Saint Helens (MSH), currently the most active volcano in the Cascades arc in the northwestern United States. The project consists of active and passive seismic experiments, extensive magnetotelluric sounding, and geological/geochemical studies involving scientists at 7 institutions in the U.S. and Europe. The long-term goal of the seismic project is to combine analysis of the active source data with that of data from the 70 element broadband seismograph operating from summer 2014 until 2016. Combining seismic and MT analyses with other data, we hope to image the MSH volcanic plumbing system from the surface to the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here we describe preliminary results of the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, conducted in July and August 2014. The active source experiment consisted of twenty-three 454 or 908 kg weight shots recorded by ~3500 seismographs deployed at ~6,000 locations. Of these instruments, ~900 Nodal Seismic instruments were deployed continuously for two weeks in an areal array within 10 km of the MSH summit. 2,500 PASSCAL Texan instruments were deployed twice for five days in 3 areal arrays and 2 dense orthogonal linear arrays that extended from MSH to distances > 80 km. Overall the data quality from the shots is excellent. The seismograph arrays also recorded dozens of micro-earthquakes beneath the MSH summit and along the MSH seismic zone, and numerous other local and regional earthquakes. In addition, at least one low frequency event beneath MSH was recorded during the experiment. At this point we have begun various types of analysis of the data set: We have determined an average 1D Vp structure from stacking short-term/long-term average ratios, we have determined the 2-D Vp structure from ray-trace inversions along the two orthogonal profiles (in the NW-SE and NE-SW directions), and we have made low-fold CMP stacks of the

  11. Seismic Source Mechanism of Gas-Piston Activity at Kilauea Inferred from Inversion of Broadband Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B. A.; Dawson, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Among the broad range of magmatic processes observed in the Overlook pit crater in Kilauea Caldera are recurring episodes of gas-piston activity. This activity is accompanied by repetitive seismic signals recorded by a broadband network deployed in the summit caldera. We use the seismic data to model the source mechanism of representative gas-piston events in a sequence that occurred on 20-25 August 2011 during a gentle inflation of the Kilauea summit. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range of 1 - 10,000 s. Most of the seismic wave field produced by gas-pistoning originates in a source region ~1 km below the eastern perimeter of Halema'uma'u pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks featuring an east-striking crack (dike) dipping 80° to the north, intersecting a north-striking crack (inclined sheet) dipping 65° to the east. Each gas-piston event is characterized by a rapid inflation lasting a few minutes trailed by a slower deflation ramp extending up to 15 minutes, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes accompanying the growth and collapse of a layer of foam at the top of the magma column. Assuming a simple lumped parameter representation of the shallow magmatic system, the observed pressure and volume variations can be modeled with the following attributes: foam thickness (10 - 50 m), foam cell diameter (0.04 - 0.10 m), and gas-injection velocity (0.01 - 0.06 m s-1). Based on the change in the period of very-long-period oscillations accompanying the onset of the gas-piston signal and tilt evidence, the height of

  12. Field Report on the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Schmandt, B.; Palomeras, I.; Harder, S. H.; Creager, K. C.; Vidale, J. E.; Malone, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    In the second half of July we completed the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, one component of the Imaging Magma Under Saint Helens project. A team of ~75 volunteers deployed 3500 seismographs to ~5920 locations on and around Mount St. Helens over the course of 3 weeks. This instrument deployment was accompanied by 23 shots distributed around the volcano. Instrumentation consisted of ~2550 Reftek 125A (Texan) seismographs with 4.5 Hz geophones, and 920 Nodal Seismic recorders with 10 Hz geophones. The shots were also recorded by the permanent stations of the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network and 70 iMUSH broadband seismographs. Fifteen of the shots, 424 kg each, formed two rings around Mount Saint Helens at 15 km and 30 km radius from the summit. Eight of the shots, 828 kg each, were fired at distances of 50 to 80 km from MSH on NW-SE and NE-SW azimuths. The deployment geometry consisted of two lines oriented NW/SE and NE/SW, and three arrays. The offset of the lines ranged from 150 km to 190 km with an average spacing of 200 m. The first array was centered on the volcano with a radius of 30 km, and required both driving and hiking to deploy. Arrays two and three were set out with, and centered on, the NW/SE line. These arrays had a distance range from MSH of 30-75 km and an azimuth range of about 100 degrees. In addition to this large-scale deployment, we set out 7 beamforming arrays approximately collocated with iMUSH broadband seismographs, and above clusters of seismicity in the region. The aperture of these arrays was about 1 km with an instrument spacing of 100 m. The final deployment ended only days before the AGU abstract deadline, so we have not yet examined all of the data. However, the preliminary indications are that signal to noise is excellent: The shots, several of which registered on PNSN as ML>2.1, carried across the entire array, and were recorded as far away as Seattle and Corvallis on permanent stations. The array also recorded a

  13. Assessing Acoustic Sound Levels Associated with Active Source Seismic Surveys in Shallow Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Thode, A.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    The potential effect of active source seismic research on marine mammal populations is a topic of increasing concern, and controversy surrounding such operations has begun to impact the planning and permitting of academic surveys [e.g., Malakoff, 2002 Science]. Although no causal relationship between marine mammal strandings and seismic exploration has been proven, any circumstantial evidence must be thoroughly investigated. A 2002 stranding of two beaked whales in the Gulf of California within 50 km of a R/V Ewing seismic survey has been a subject of concern for both marine seismologists and environmentalists. In order to better understand possible received levels for whales in the vicinity of these operations, modeling is combined with ground-truth calibration measurements. A wide-angle parabolic equation model, which is capable of including shear within the sediment and basement layers, is used to generate predictive models of low-frequency transmission loss within the Gulf of California. This work incorporates range-dependent bathymetry, sediment thickness, sound velocity structure and sub-bottom properties. Oceanic sounds speed profiles are derived from the U.S. Navy's seasonal GDEM model and sediment thicknesses are taken from NOAA's worldwide database. The spectral content of the Ewing's 20-airgun seismic array is constrained by field calibration in the spring of 2003 [Tolstoy et al., 2004 GRL], indicating peak energies at frequencies below a few hundred Hz, with energy spectral density showing an approximate power-law decrease at higher frequencies (being ~40 dB below peak at 1 kHz). Transmission loss is estimated along a series of radials extending from multiple positions along the ship's track, with the directivity of the array accounted for by phase-shifting point sources that are scaled by the cube root of the individual airgun volumes. This allows the time-space history of low-frequency received levels to be reconstructed within the Gulf of California

  14. Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie M. Kell, Graham Kent, Neal W. Driscoll, Robert E. Karlin, Robert L. Baskin, John N. Louie, Kenneth D. Smith, Sathish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract NS14A-08.

  15. Continuous active-source seismic monitoring of CO2 injection in abrine aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, Thomas M.; Solbau, Ray D.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Benson, Sally M.

    2006-12-10

    Continuous crosswell seismic monitoring of a small-scale CO2injection was accomplished with the development of a noveltubing-deployed piezoelectric borehole source. This piezotube source wasdeployed on the CO2 injection tubing, near the top of the saline aquiferreservoir at 1657-m depth, and allowed acquisition of crosswellrecordings at 15-minute intervals during the multiday injection. Thechange in traveltime recorded at various depths in a nearby observationwell allowed hour-by-hour monitoring of the growing CO2 plume via theinduced seismic velocity change. Traveltime changes of 0.2 to 1.0 ms ( upto 8 percent ) were observed, with no change seen at control sensorsplaced above the reservoir. The traveltime measurements indicate that theCO2 plume reached the top of the reservoir sand before reaching theobservation well, where regular fluid sampling was occuring during theinjection, thus providing information about the in situ buoyancy ofCO2.

  16. Controllable seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrell, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2015-09-29

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  17. Controllable seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrel, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2014-08-19

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  18. Active-source seismic imaging below Lake Malawi (Nyasa) from the SEGMeNT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillington, D. J.; Scholz, C. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Accardo, N. J.; McCartney, T.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Kamihanda, G.; Trinhammer, P.; Wood, D. A.; Khalfan, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Nyblade, A.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Mruma, A. H.; Salima, J.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the controls on the initiation and development of magmatism and segmentation in young rift systems. The northern Lake Malawi (Nyasa) rift in the East African Rift System is an early stage rift exhibiting pronounced tectonic segmentation, which is defined in the upper crust by ~100-km-long border faults. Very little volcanism is associated with rifting; the only surface expression of magmatism occurs in an accommodation zone between segments to the north of the lake in the Rungwe Volcanic Province. The SEGMeNT (Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania) project is a multidisciplinary, multinational study that is acquiring a suite of geophysical, geological and geochemical data to characterize deformation and magmatism in the crust and mantle lithosphere along 2-3 segments of this rift. As a part of the SEGMeNT project, we acquired seismic reflection and refraction data in Lake Malawi (Nyasa) in March-April 2015. Over 2000 km of seismic reflection data were acquired with a 500 to 2580 cu in air gun array from GEUS/Aarhus and a 500- to 1500-m-long seismic streamer from Syracuse University over a grid of lines across and along the northern and central basins. Air gun shots from MCS profiles and 1000 km of additional shooting with large shot intervals were also recorded on 27 short-period and 6 broadband lake bottom seismometers from Scripps Oceanographic Institute as a part of the Ocean Bottom Seismic Instrument Pool (OBSIP) as well as the 55-station onshore seismic array. The OBS were deployed along one long strike line and two dip lines. We will present preliminary data and results from seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in the lake and their implications for crustal deformation within and between rift segments. Seismic reflection data image structures up to ~5-6 km below the lake bottom, including syntectonic sediments, intrabasinal faults and other complex horsts. Some intrabasinal faults in both the northern and

  19. Crustal Structure in the Imperial Valley Region of California From Active-Source Seismic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, G. S.; Mooney, W. D.

    2008-12-01

    shallow as 12 km beneath the Imperial Valley. Modeling of gravity data requires that this layer deepen and/or pinch out beneath the bordering mesas and mountain ranges. This pinch-out is imaged in the 1992 data beneath the Chocolate Mountains. Based on its high velocity and the presence of intrusive basaltic rocks in the sedimentary section in the Imperial Valley, the subbasement is thought to be a mafic intrusive complex similar to oceanic middle crust. (4) Crustal thickness and upper-mantle velocity are 21-22 km and 7.6-7.7 km/s, respectively, beneath the Imperial Valley but increase to 27 km and 8.0 km/s, respectively, beneath the Chocolate Mountains. Our results from the Salton Trough may be contrasted with active-source seismic results from the northern Gulf of California (Guaymas basin; Lizarralde et al., 2007). These results show the crust to thin to 10-14 km within the Gulf. Below 3-4 km of sediment, the crust has a velocity of 6.8 km/s, interpreted to be new igneous (gabbroic) crust. Thus, the rifting process appears to have produced negligible metasedimentary basement and a crustal thickness as little as half that beneath the Salton Trough.

  20. Piezotube borehole seismic source

    DOEpatents

    Daley, Tom M; Solbau, Ray D; Majer, Ernest L

    2014-05-06

    A piezoelectric borehole source capable of permanent or semipermanent insertion into a well for uninterrupted well operations is described. The source itself comprises a series of piezoelectric rings mounted to an insulative mandrel internally sized to fit over a section of well tubing, the rings encased in a protective housing and electrically connected to a power source. Providing an AC voltage to the rings will cause expansion and contraction sufficient to create a sonic pulse. The piezoelectric borehole source fits into a standard well, and allows for uninterrupted pass-through of production tubing, and other tubing and electrical cables. Testing using the source may be done at any time, even concurrent with well operations, during standard production.

  1. Structure of the deep oceanic lithosphere in the Northwestern Pacific ocean basin derived from active-source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, A.; Kodaira, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Fujie, G.; Arai, R.; Miura, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many seismological studies have detected the sharp seismic discontinuities in the upper mantle, some of which are interpreted the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). However there are few data at the old Pacific plate, in particular at ocean basin, which is critical information for understanding nature of the oceanic LAB. In 2014 we conducted an active-source refraction/reflection survey along a 1130-km-long line in southeast of the Shatsky Rise. Five ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) were deployed and recovered by R/V Kairei of JAMSTEC. We used an airgun array with a total volume of 7,800 cubic inches with firing at intervals of 200 m. Multi-channel seismic reflection (MCS) data were also collected with a 444-channel, 6,000-m-long streamer cable. In OBS records the apparent velocity of the refraction waves from the uppermost mantle was high (< 8.6 km/sec), and considered to be caused by preferred orientation of olivine (e.g., Kodaira et al., 2014). Another remarkable feature is wide-angle reflection waves from the deep lithosphere at large (150-500 km) offsets. We applied the traveltime mapping method (Fujie et al., 2006), forward analysis (Zelt and Smith, 1992) and the amplitude modeling (Larsen and Grieger, 1998) to the OBS data. The results show that deep mantle reflectors exist at the depths from 35 to 60 km, and one possible explanation is that these reflectors correspond to patched low velocity zones around the base of the lithosphere. On MCS sections the clear and sharp Moho was imaged only at the southwestern end of the profile, but Moho was ambiguous or even not imaged in the most part of the profile. Since our seismic line covers the oceanic lithosphere with different ages that correspond to different stages of the Shatsky activity, the Moho appearance may reflect the variation of the Shatsky activity.

  2. The application of active-source seismic imaging techniques to transtensional problems the Walker Lane and Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, Anna Marie

    The plate margin in the western United States is an active tectonic region that contains the integrated deformation between the North American and Pacific plates. Nearly focused plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates within the northern Gulf of California gives way north of the Salton Trough to more diffuse deformation. In particular a large fraction of the slip along the southernmost San Andreas fault ultimately bleeds eastward, including about 20% of the total plate motion budget that finds its way through the transtensional Walker Lane Deformation Belt just east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Fault-bounded ranges combined with intervening low-lying basins characterize this region; the down-dropped features are often filled with water, which present opportunities for seismic imaging at unprecedented scales. Here I present active-source seismic imaging from the Salton Sea and Walker Lane Deformation Belt, including both marine applications in lakes and shallow seas, and more conventional land-based techniques along the Carson range front. The complex fault network beneath the Salton Trough in eastern California is the on-land continuation of the Gulf of California rift system, where North American-Pacific plate motion is accommodated by a series of long transform faults, separated by small pull-apart, transtensional basins; the right-lateral San Andreas fault bounds this system to the north where it carries, on average, about 50% of total plate motion. The Salton Sea resides within the most youthful and northerly "spreading center" in this several thousand-kilometer-long rift system. The Sea provides an ideal environment for the use of high-data-density marine seismic techniques. Two active-source seismic campaigns in 2010 and 2011 show progression of the development of the Salton pull-apart sub-basin and the northerly propagation of the Imperial-San Andreas system through time at varying resolutions. High fidelity seismic imagery

  3. Mafic intrusions east of Svalbard imaged by active-source seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Alexander; Mjelde, Rolf; Faleide, Jan Inge; Flueh, Ernst R.; Dannowski, Anke; Keers, Henk

    2012-01-01

    A seismic refraction and reflection tomography experiment was performed across the igneous province east of Svalbard which is a part of the Cretaceous High Arctic Large Igneous Province. Seismic travel times from 12 ocean bottom seismometers/hydrophones deployed along a 170 km line are inverted to produce smooth 2D images of the crustal P-wave velocity and geometry of the acoustic basement and Moho. The inversion of travel times was complemented by forward elastic wave propagation modeling. Integration with onshore geology as well as multichannel seismic, magnetic and gravity data have provide additional constraints used in the geological interpretation. The seismic P-wave velocity increases rapidly with depth, starting with 3 km/s at the sea floor and reaching 5.5 km/s at the bottom of the upper sedimentary layer. The thickness of this layer increases eastward from 2 km to 3.5 km. On average the P-wave velocity in the crystalline crust increases with depth from 5.5 km/s to 6.8 km/s. The crustal thickness is typical for continental shelf regions (30-34 km). Finger-shaped high-velocity anomalies, one reaching 12% and two of 4-6% velocity perturbation, are obtained. These velocity anomalies are concomitant with Lower Cretaceous basaltic lava flows and sills in the shallow sediments and elongated gravity and magnetic highs, traced towards the northern Barents Sea passive continental margin. We interpret the obtained velocity anomalies as signatures of dikes emplaced in the basement during breakup and subsequent spreading in the Arctic Amerasia Basin.

  4. The thickness and structural characteristics of the crust across Tibetan plateau from active-sources seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiusheng; Gao, Rui; Lu, Zhanwu; Guan, Ye; Zhang, Jisheng; Li, Pengwu; Wang, Haiyan; He, Rizheng; Karplus, Marianne

    2009-02-01

    The Tibetan plateau as one of the youngest orogen on the Earth was considered as the result of continent-continent collision between the Eurasian and Indian plates. The thickness and structure of the crust beneath Tibetan plateau is essential to understand deformation behavior of the plateau. Active-source seismic profiling is most available geophysical method for imaging the structure of the continental crust. The results from more than 25 active-sources seismic profiles carried out in the past twenty years were reviewed in this article. A preliminary cross crustal pattern of the Tibetan Plateau was presented and discussed. The Moho discontinuity buries at the range of 60-80 km on average and have steep ramps located roughly beneath the sutures that are compatible with the successive stacking/accretion of the former Cenozoic blocks northeastward. The deepest Moho (near 80 km) appears closely near IYS and the crustal scale thrust system beneath southern margin of Tibetan plateau suggests strong dependence on collision and non-distributed deformation there. However, the ˜20 km order of Moho offsets hardly reappears in the inline section across northern Tibetan plateau. Without a universally accepted, convincing dynamic explanation model accommodated the all of the facts seen in controlled seismic sections, but vertical thickening and northeastern shorten of the crust is quite evident and interpretable to a certain extent as the result of continent-continent collision. Simultaneously, weak geophysical signature of the BNS suggests that convergence has been accommodated perhaps partially through pure-shear thickening accompanied by removal of lower crustal material by lateral escape. Recent years the result of Moho with ˜7 km offset and long extend in south-dip angle beneath the east Kunlun orogen and a grand thrust fault at the northern margin of Qilian orogen has attract more attention to action from the northern blocks. The broad lower-velocity area in the upper

  5. A seismic source zone model for the seismic hazard assessment of Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hók, Jozef; Kysel, Robert; Kováč, Michal; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Kristeková, Miriam; Šujan, Martin

    2016-06-01

    We present a new seismic source zone model for the seismic hazard assessment of Slovakia based on a new seismotectonic model of the territory of Slovakia and adjacent areas. The seismotectonic model has been developed using a new Slovak earthquake catalogue (SLOVEC 2011), successive division of the large-scale geological structures into tectonic regions, seismogeological domains and seismogenic structures. The main criteria for definitions of regions, domains and structures are the age of the last tectonic consolidation of geological structures, thickness of lithosphere, thickness of crust, geothermal conditions, current tectonic regime and seismic activity. The seismic source zones are presented on a 1:1,000,000 scale map.

  6. Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie Kell, Graham Kent, Neal Driscoll, Robert Karlin, Rob Baskin, John Louie, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting, San Diego, Oct. 23-26.

  7. Seismic source dynamics of gas-piston activity at Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    Since 2008, eruptive activity at the summit of Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i has been confined to the new Overlook pit crater within the Halema`uma`u Crater. Among the broad range of magmatic processes observed in the new pit are recurring episodes of gas pistoning. The gas-piston activity is accompanied by seismic signals that are recorded by a broadband network deployed in the summit caldera. We use raw data recorded with this network to model the source mechanism of representative gas-piston events in a sequence that occurred on 20-25 August 2011 during a gentle inflation of the Kı¯lauea summit. To determine the source centroid location and source mechanism, we minimize the residual error between data and synthetics calculated by the finite difference method for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium that takes topography into account. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range 1-10,000 s. Most of the seismic wavefield produced by gas-pistoning originates in a source region ˜1 km below the eastern perimeter of the Halema`uma`u pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks featuring an east striking crack (dike) dipping 80°to the north, intersecting a north striking crack (another dike) dipping 65° to the east. Each gas-piston event is marked by a similar rapid inflation lasting a few minutes, trailed by a slower deflation ramp extending up to 15 min, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes accompanying the growth and collapse of a layer of foam at the top of the lava column. Assuming a simple lumped parameter

  8. Seismic source dynamics of gas-piston activity at Kı̄lauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2008, eruptive activity at the summit of Kı̄lauea Volcano, Hawai‘i has been confined to the new Overlook pit crater within the Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Among the broad range of magmatic processes observed in the new pit are recurring episodes of gas pistoning. The gas-piston activity is accompanied by seismic signals that are recorded by a broadband network deployed in the summit caldera. We use raw data recorded with this network to model the source mechanism of representative gas-piston events in a sequence that occurred on 20–25 August 2011 during a gentle inflation of the Kı̄lauea summit. To determine the source centroid location and source mechanism, we minimize the residual error between data and synthetics calculated by the finite difference method for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium that takes topography into account. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range 1–10,000 s. Most of the seismic wavefield produced by gas-pistoning originates in a source region ∼1 km below the eastern perimeter of the Halema‘uma‘u pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks featuring an east striking crack (dike) dipping 80°to the north, intersecting a north striking crack (another dike) dipping 65° to the east. Each gas-piston event is marked by a similar rapid inflation lasting a few minutes, trailed by a slower deflation ramp extending up to 15 min, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes accompanying the growth and collapse of a layer of foam at the top of the lava column. Assuming a

  9. Active Faults and Seismic Sources of the Middle East Region: Earthquake Model of the Middle East (EMME) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulen, L.; EMME WP2 Team*

    2011-12-01

    The Earthquake Model of the Middle East (EMME) Project is a regional project of the GEM (Global Earthquake Model) project (http://www.emme-gem.org/). The EMME project covers Turkey, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Iran, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. Both EMME and SHARE projects overlap and Turkey becomes a bridge connecting the two projects. The Middle East region is tectonically and seismically very active part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. Many major earthquakes have occurred in this region over the years causing casualties in the millions. The EMME project consists of three main modules: hazard, risk, and socio-economic modules. The EMME project uses PSHA approach for earthquake hazard and the existing source models have been revised or modified by the incorporation of newly acquired data. The most distinguishing aspect of the EMME project from the previous ones is its dynamic character. This very important characteristic is accomplished by the design of a flexible and scalable database that permits continuous update, refinement, and analysis. An up-to-date earthquake catalog of the Middle East region has been prepared and declustered by the WP1 team. EMME WP2 team has prepared a digital active fault map of the Middle East region in ArcGIS format. We have constructed a database of fault parameters for active faults that are capable of generating earthquakes above a threshold magnitude of Mw≥5.5. The EMME project database includes information on the geometry and rates of movement of faults in a "Fault Section Database", which contains 36 entries for each fault section. The "Fault Section" concept has a physical significance, in that if one or more fault parameters change, a new fault section is defined along a fault zone. So far 6,991 Fault Sections have been defined and 83,402 km of faults are fully parameterized in the Middle East region. A separate "Paleo-Sites Database" includes information on the timing and amounts of fault

  10. Theoretical and practical considerations for the design of the iMUSH active-source seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Harder, S. H.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.; Vidale, J. E.; Moran, S. C.; Malone, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The multi-disciplinary imaging of Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) experiment seeks to understand the details of the magmatic system that feeds Mount St. Helens using active- and passive-source seismic, magnetotelluric, and petrologic data. The active-source seismic component of this experiment will take place in the summer of 2014 utilizing all of the 2600 PASSCAL 'Texan' Reftek instruments which will record twenty-four 1000-2000 lb shots distributed around the Mount St. Helens region. The instruments will be deployed as two consecutive refraction profiles centered on the volcano, and a series of areal arrays. The actual number of areal arrays, as well as their locations, will depend strongly on the length of the experiment (3-4 weeks), the number of instrument deployers (50-60), and the time it will take per deployment given the available road network. The current work shows how we are balancing these practical considerations against theoretical experiment designs in order to achieve the proposed scientific goals with the available resources. One of the main goals of the active-source seismic experiment is to image the magmatic system down to the Moho (35-40 km). Calculating sensitivity kernels for multiple shot/receiver offsets shows that direct P waves should be sensitive to Moho depths at offsets of 150 km, and therefore this will likely be the length of the refraction profiles. Another primary objective of the experiment is to estimate the locations and volumes of different magma accumulation zones beneath the volcano using the areal arrays. With this in mind, the optimal locations of these arrays, as well as their associated shots, are estimated using an eigenvalue analysis of the approximate Hessian for each possible experiment design. This analysis seeks to minimize the number of small eigenvalues of the approximate Hessian that would amplify the propagation of data noise into regions of interest in the model space, such as the likely locations of magma

  11. Earthquake source studies and seismic imaging in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, C.; Silwal, V.

    2015-12-01

    Alaska is one of the world's most seismically and tectonically active regions. Its enhanced seismicity, including slab seismicity down to 180 km, provides opportunities (1) to characterize pervasive crustal faulting and slab deformation through the estimation of moment tensors and (2) to image subsurface structures to help understand the tectonic evolution of Alaska. Most previous studies of earthquakes and seismic imaging in Alaska have emphasized earthquake locations and body-wave travel-time tomography. In the past decade, catalogs of seismic moment tensors have been established, while seismic surface waves, active-source data, and potential field data have been used to improve models of seismic structure. We have developed moment tensor catalogs in the regions of two of the largest sedimentary basins in Alaska: Cook Inlet forearc basin, west of Anchorage, and Nenana basin, west of Fairbanks. Our moment tensor solutions near Nenana basin suggest a transtensional tectonic setting, with the basin developing in a stepover of a left-lateral strike-slip fault system. We explore the effects of seismic wave propagation from point-source and finite-source earthquake models by performing three-dimensional wavefield simulations using seismic velocity models that include major sedimentary basins. We will use our catalog of moment tensors within an adjoint-based, iterative inversion to improve the three-dimensional tomographic model of Alaska.

  12. Crustal Structure Across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Initial Results From the PRIDE-SEISORZ Active-Source Seismic Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J. P.; Moffat, L.; Lizarralde, D.; Laletsang, K.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Modisi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa Rift System, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi. The SEISORZ active-source seismic component of PRIDE focused on the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana, with the main goal of imaging the crustal structure across the ORZ. This will allow us to estimate total crustal extension, determine the pattern and amount of thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrasts in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a fold belt. In November 2014 we conducted a crustal-scale, 450-km-long seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile consisting of 19 sources (shots in 30-m-deep boreholes) spaced ~25 km apart from each other, and 900 receivers (IRIS/PASSCAL "Texan" dataloggers and 4.5Hz geophones) with ~500 m spacing. From NW to SE, the profile crosses several tectonic domains: the Congo craton, the Damara metamorphic belt and the Ghanzi-Chobe fold belt where the axis of the ORZ is located, and continues into the Kalahari craton. The record sections display clear crustal refraction (Pg) and wide-angle Moho reflection (PmP) phases for all 17 of the good-quality shots, and a mantle refraction arrival (Pn), with the Pg-PmP-Pn triplication appearing at 175 km offset. There are distinct changes in the traveltime and amplitude of these phases along the transect, and on either side of the axis, that seem to correlate with sharp transitions across tectonic terrains. Initial modeling suggests: (1) the presence of a sedimentary half-graben structure at the rift axis beneath the Okavango delta, bounded to the SE by the Kunyere-Thamalakane fault system; (2) faster crustal Vp in the domains to the NW of the ORZ; and (3) thicker crust (45-50 km) at both ends of the profile within the Congo and Kalahari craton domains than at the ORZ and

  13. Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C.

    1991-01-01

    A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provided. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder off an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping.

  14. Alternative Energy Sources in Seismic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tün, Muammer; Pekkan, Emrah; Mutlu, Sunay; Ecevitoğlu, Berkan

    2015-04-01

    When the suitability of a settlement area is investigated, soil-amplification, liquefaction and fault-related hazards should be defined, and the associated risks should be clarified. For this reason, soil engineering parameters and subsurface geological structure of a new settlement area should be investigated. Especially, faults covered with quaternary alluvium; thicknesses, shear-wave velocities and geometry of subsurface sediments could lead to a soil amplification during an earthquake. Likewise, changes in shear-wave velocities along the basin are also very important. Geophysical methods can be used to determine the local soil properties. In this study, use of alternative seismic energy sources when implementing seismic reflection, seismic refraction and MASW methods in the residential areas of Eskisehir/Turkey, were discussed. Our home developed seismic energy source, EAPSG (Electrically-Fired-PS-Gun), capable to shoot 2x24 magnum shotgun cartridges at once to generate P and S waves; and our home developed WD-500 (500 kg Weight Drop) seismic energy source, mounted on a truck, were developed under a scientific research project of Anadolu University. We were able to reach up to penetration depths of 1200 m for EAPSG, and 800 m for WD-500 in our seismic reflection surveys. WD-500 seismic energy source was also used to perform MASW surveys, using 24-channel, 10 m apart, 4.5 Hz vertical geophone configuration. We were able to reach 100 m of penetration depth in MASW surveys.

  15. The ENAM Explosive Seismic Source Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, S. H.; Magnani, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of the pilot study conducted as part of the eastern North American margin (ENAM) community seismic experiment (CSE) to test an innovative design of land explosive seismic source for crustal-scale seismic surveys. The ENAM CSE is a community based onshore-offshore controlled- and passive-source seismic experiment spanning a 400 km-wide section of the mid-Atlantic East Coast margin around Cape Hatteras. The experiment was designed to address prominent research questions such as the role of the pre-existing lithospheric grain on the structure and evolution of the ENAM margin, the distribution of magmatism, and the along-strike segmentation of the margin. In addition to a broadband OBS deployment, the CSE will acquire multichannel marine seismic data and two major onshore-offshore controlled-source seismic profiles recording both marine sources (airguns) and land explosions. The data acquired as part of the ENAM CSE will be available to the community immediately upon completion of QC procedures required for archiving purposes. The ENAM CSE provides an opportunity to test a radically new and more economical design for land explosive seismic sources used for crustal-scale seismic surveys. Over the years we have incrementally improved the performance and reduced the cost of shooting crustal seismic shots. These improvements have come from better explosives and more efficient configuration of those explosives. These improvements are largely intuitive, using higher velocity explosives and shorter, but larger diameter explosive configurations. However, recently theoretical advances now allow us to model not only these incremental improvements, but to move to more radical shot designs, which further enhance performance and reduce costs. Because some of these designs are so radical, they need experimental verification. To better engineer the shots for the ENAM experiment we are conducting an explosives test in the region of the ENAM CSE. The results of

  16. Seismic Sources Identification and Characterization for Myanmar: Towards Updating the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Maps (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thant, M.; Kawase, H.

    2015-12-01

    Myanmar, lying in the Alpide earthquake belt, is quite earthquake-prone. There have been at least 16 major earthquakes (M 7.0 - 7.9) and a great earthquake (M 8.0, 1912) in the past 175 years, some of which were quite destructive, for example, 1839 Ava (Innwa) earthquake. With an objective of reducing earthquake risk in Myanmar, seismic zone maps have been constructed since 1959. The first-generation maps were mainly the intensity zoning maps using Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) Scales (Gorshkov, 1959; Maung Thein, 1985; Maung Thein, 2001). The second-generation maps were partly historical, and partly deterministic (Maung Thein et al., 2003; Maung Thein et al., 2005). In 2012, the third-generation maps, the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) maps were constructed for the whole country. Seismic hazards in these maps are represented by means of peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), and spectral acceleration (SA) in the periods of 0.2 s, 0.3 s and 1.0 s. The seismic hazards are calculated in 0.1° x 0.1° interval, assuming the firm rock site condition and all of the PSHA were carried out for 2% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years. Now, the seismic hazard maps of Myanmar,2012 are planned to update by remodeling the seismic sources. As the first step in updating the previous probabilistic seismic hazard maps developed in 2012 we re-identify the seismogenic sources for Indo-Burma Arc, Eastern Himalaya Arc and Andaman Rift Zone as the areal seismic sources. The major active faults which are seismically very hazardous for Myanmar: Sagaing fault, Kyaukkyan fault, Nan Pon fault, Kabaw fault, Myauk-U fault, Dawei fault, Gwegyo Thrust, major thrusts in north-west Myanmar, and the left-lateral strike-slip faults in the Eastern Highland are identified as the fault sources. The seismic source parameters for each source; the b-value, maximum earthquake potential, and annual rate of exceedance for the specific magnitude earthquake

  17. Development of an Innovative Downhole Seismic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, D.

    2005-05-01

    MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) previously designed, built, and tested an innovative downhole seismic source. The design criteria included a size limitation (the source needed to fit into a 2-inch diameter well casing), the source would use .22 caliber power loads as the energy source, it would have the ability to fire at least 12 times before reloading, it would be able to function under water (depth is limited by internal pressure from the .22 caliber power loads, which must be greater than pressure exerted by water column), and it would use no more than 24-volt dc current. MSE developed the design criteria from a need for a downhole seismic source suitable for high-resolution seismic tomography applications. Tomographic methods may provide detailed information at waste sites for both characterization and monitoring. Since borehole diameters are kept to a minimum (i.e., 2-inches or less) to reduce waste volumes from drill cuttings, or the borehole may be installed using a direct push technology such as a GeoprobeT or cone penetrometer, a small diameter source is desirable. Additionally, the use of .22 caliber power loads reduces the amount of supporting equipment required to operate the source as compared to other downhole seismic sources (e.g., air guns and piezoelectric sources). MSE tested and evaluated the completed seismic source to assess the effectiveness of the .22 caliber power loads as energy sources and to assess the operational ease of using the source. Results of the testing indicated that the power loads provided energy suitable for high-resolution cross-well seismic tomography applications. Operation of the source required significantly less supporting equipment than other downhole sources tested. However, the testing suggested the system could be improved if the number of mechanical components were reduced. Subsequent research suggested that the power loads could be fired using an electric current. As a result, MSE believes that the entire

  18. Downhole seismic monitoring with Virtual Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, A.; Calvert, R.

    2005-12-01

    Huge quantities of remaining oil and gas reserves are located in very challenging geological environments covered by salt, basalt or other complex overburdens. Conventional surface seismology struggles to deliver images necessary to economically explore them. Even if those reserves are found by drilling successful production critically depends on our ability to ``see" in real time where fluids are drawn from and how pressure changes throughout the reservoirs. For relatively simple overburdens surface time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring became industry choice for aerial reservoir surveillance. For complex overburdens, 4D seismic does not have enough resolution and repeatability to answer the questions of reservoir engineers. For instance, often reservoir changes are too small to be detected from surface or these changes occur in such pace that all wells will be placed before we can detect them which greatly reduces the economical impact. Two additional challenges are present in real life that further complicate active monitoring: first, near-surface condition do change between the surveys (water level movement, freezing/thawing, tide variations etc) and second, repeating exact same acquisition geometry at the surface is difficult in practice. Both of these things may lead to false 4D response unrelated to reservoir changes. Virtual Source method (VSM) has been recently proposed as a way to eliminate overburden distortions for imaging and monitoring. VSM acknowledges upfront that our data inversion techniques are unable to unravel the details of the complex overburdens to the extent necessary to remove the distortions caused by them. Therefore VSM advocates placing permanent downhole geophones below that most complex overburden while still exciting signals with a surface sources. For instance, first applications include drilling instrumented wells below complicated near-surface, basalt or salt layer. Of course, in an ideal world we would prefer to have both downhole

  19. Back-Projecting Volcano and Geyser Seismic Signals to Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic and hydrothermal systems are generally characterized by persistent, low-amplitude seismic "noise" with no clear onset or end. Outside of active eruptions and earthquakes, which tend to occur only a small fraction of the time, seismic records and spectrograms from these systems are dominated by long-duration "noise" (typically around 1-5Hz) generated by ongoing processes in the systems' subsurface. Although it has been shown that these low-amplitude signals can represent a series of overlapping low-magnitude displacements related to fluid and volatile movement at depth, because of their "noisy" properties compared to typical active or earthquake sources they are difficult to image using traditional seismic techniques (i.e. phase-picking). In this study we present results from applying a new ambient noise back-projection technique to improve seismic source imaging of diffuse signals found in volcanic and hydrothermal systems. Using this new method we show how the distribution of all seismic sources - particularly sources associated with volcanic tremor - evolves during a proposed intrusion in early June 2010 at Sierra Negra Volcano on the Galápagos Archipelago off the coast of Ecuador. We use a known velocity model for the region (Tepp et al., 2014) to correlate and back-project seismic signals from all available receiver-pairs to potential subsurface source locations assuming bending raypaths and accounting for topography. We generate 4D time-lapsed images of the source field around Sierra Negra before, during and after the proposed intrusion and compare the consistency of our observations with previously identified seismic event locations and tomography results from the same time period. Preliminary results from applying the technique to a dense grid of geophones surrounding a periodically erupting geyser at El Tatio Geyser Field in northern Chile (>2000 eruptions recorded) will also be presented.

  20. Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie Kell, Graham Kent, Neal Driscoll, Robert Karlin, Rob Baskin, John Louie, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada: Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 35, 7 pp. Preprint at http://crack.seismo.unr.edu/geothermal/Eisses-GRCpaper-sm.pdf The Pyramid Lake fault zone lies within a vitally important area of the northern Walker Lane where not only can transtension can be studied through a complex arrangement of strike-slip and normal faults but also geothermal activity can be examined in the extensional regime for productivity. This study used advanced and economical seismic methods in attempt to develop the Paiute Tribe’s geothermal reservoir and to expand upon the tectonics and earthquake hazard knowledge of the area. 500 line-kilometers of marine CHIRP data were collected on Pyramid Lake combined with 27 kilometers of vibrator seismic on-land data from the northwest side of the basin were collected in 2010 that highlighted two distinct phases of faulting. Preliminary results suggest that the geothermal fluids in the area are controlled by the late Pleistoceneto Holocene-aged faults and not through the mid-Miocene-aged conduits as originally hypothesized.

  1. Seismic Holography of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The basic goal of the project was to extend holographic seismic imaging techniques developed under a previous NASA contract, and to incorporate phase diagnostics. Phase-sensitive imaging gives us a powerful probe of local thermal and Doppler perturbations in active region subphotospheres, allowing us to map thermal structure and flows associated with "acoustic moats" and "acoustic glories". These remarkable features were discovered during our work, by applying simple acoustic power holography to active regions. Included in the original project statement was an effort to obtain the first seismic images of active regions on the Sun's far surface.

  2. Source and Propagation Characteristics of Explosive and Other Seismic Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, X; Chan, W; Wagner, R; Walter, W R; Matzel, E M

    2005-07-14

    Understanding of the source and propagation characteristics of seismic events of different types including earthquakes, explosions and mining-induced events is essential for successful discrimination of nuclear explosions. We are compiling a data set of mining related seismic events in east Eurasia. Natural earthquake data in the same region are also collected for comparison study between mining related events and earthquakes. The ground-truth data set will provide a unique and valuable resource for monitoring research. We will utilize the data set to investigate the source and propagation characteristics of seismic sources of different types including mine blasts, tremors, collapses and earthquakes. We will use various seismological techniques including spectral analysis, and waveform modeling to conduct the investigation. The research will improve our understanding of the S-wave excitation and propagation characteristics of chemical explosions and other source types.

  3. Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A. M.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Karlin, R. E.; Baskin, R. L.; Louie, J. N.; Smith, K. D.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2011-12-01

    Preliminary slip rates measured across the East Pyramid Lake fault, or the Lake Range fault, help provide new estimates of extension across the Pyramid Lake basin. Multiple stratigraphic horizons spanning 48 ka were tracked throughout the lake, with layer offsets measured across all significant faults in the basin. A chronstratigraphic framework acquired from four sediment cores allows slip rates of the Lake Range and other faults to be calculated accurately. This region of the northern Walker Lake, strategically placed between the right-lateral strike-slip faults of Honey and Eagle Lakes to the north, and the normal fault bounded basins to the southwest (e.g., Tahoe, Carson), is critical in understanding the underlying structural complexity that is not only necessary for geothermal exploration, but also earthquake hazard assessment due to the proximity of the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. In addition, our seismic CHIRP imaging with submeter resolution allows the construction of the first fault map of Pyramid Lake. The Lake Range fault can be obviously traced west of Anahoe Island extending north along the east end of the lake in numerous CHIRP lines. Initial drafts of the fault map reveal active transtension through a series of numerous, small, northwest striking, oblique-slip faults in the north end of the lake. A previously field mapped northwest striking fault near Sutcliff can be extended into the west end of Pyramid Lake. This fault map, along with the calculated slip rate of the Lake Range, and potentially multiple other faults, gives a clearer picture into understanding the geothermal potential, tectonic regime and earthquake hazards in the Pyramid Lake basin and the northern Walker Lane. These new results have also been merged with seismicity maps, along with focal mechanisms for the larger events to begin to extend our fault map in depth.

  4. Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli

    2010-07-07

    This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

  5. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  6. Development of a hydraulic borehole seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report describes a 5 year, $10 million Sandia/Industry project to develop an advanced borehole seismic source for use in oil and gas exploration and production. The development Team included Sandia, Chevron, Amoco, Conoco, Exxon, Raytheon, Pelton, and GRI. The seismic source that was developed is a vertically oriented, axial point force, swept frequency, clamped, reaction-mass vibrator design. It was based on an early Chevron prototype, but the new tool incorporates a number of improvements which make it far superior to the original prototype. The system consists of surface control electronics, a special heavy duty fiber optic wireline and draw works, a cablehead, hydraulic motor/pump module, electronics module, clamp, and axial vibrator module. The tool has a peak output of 7,000 lbs force and a useful frequency range of 5 to 800 Hz. It can operate in fluid filled wells with 5.5-inch or larger casing to depths of 20,000 ft and operating temperatures of 170 C. The tool includes fiber optic telemetry, force and phase control, provisions to add seismic receiver arrays below the source for single well imaging, and provisions for adding other vibrator modules to the tool in the future. The project yielded four important deliverables: a complete advanced borehole seismic source system with all associated field equipment; field demonstration surveys funded by industry showing the utility of the system; industrial sources for all of the hardware; and a new service company set up by their industrial partner to provide commercial surveys.

  7. Seismic tomography model reveals mantle magma sources of recent volcanic activity at El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Yeguas, Araceli; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Koulakov, Ivan; Jakovlev, Andrey; Romero-Ruiz, M. Carmen; Prudencio, Janire

    2014-12-01

    We present a 3-D model of P and S velocities beneath El Hierro Island, constructed using the traveltime data of more than 13 000 local earthquakes recorded by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN, Spain) in the period from 2011 July to 2012 September. The velocity models were performed using the LOTOS code for iterative passive source tomography. The results of inversion were thoroughly verified using different resolution and robustness tests. The results reveal that the majority of the onshore area of El Hierro is associated with a high-velocity anomaly observed down to 10-12-km depth. This anomaly is interpreted as the accumulation of solid igneous rocks erupted during the last 1 Myr and intrusive magmatic bodies. Below this high-velocity pattern, we observe a low-velocity anomaly, interpreted as a batch of magma coming from the mantle located beneath El Hierro. The boundary between the low- and high-velocity anomalies is marked by a prominent seismicity cluster, thought to represent anomalous stresses due to the interaction of the batch of magma with crust material. The areas of recent eruptions, Orchilla and La Restinga, are associated with low-velocity anomalies surrounding the main high-velocity block. These eruptions took place around the island where the crust is much weaker than the onshore area and where the melted material cannot penetrate. These results put constraints on the geological model that could explain the origin of the volcanism in oceanic islands, such as in the Canaries, which is not yet clearly understood.

  8. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the research conducted to develop efficient strategies for investigation of rock properties and fluids ahead of tunnel excavations the seismic interferometry method was applied to analyze the data acquired in boreholes instrumented with geophone strings. The results obtained confirmed that seismic interferometry provided an improved resolution of petrophysical properties to identify heterogeneities and geological structures ahead of the excavation. These features are beyond the resolution of other conventional geophysical methods but can be the cause severe problems in the excavation of tunnels. Geophone strings were used to record different types of seismic noise generated at the tunnel head during excavation with a tunnelling machine and also during the placement of the rings covering the tunnel excavation. In this study we show how tunnel construction activities have been characterized as source of seismic signal and used in our research as the seismic source signal for generating a 3D reflection seismic survey. The data was recorded in vertical water filled borehole with a borehole seismic string at a distance of 60 m from the tunnel trace. A reference pilot signal was obtained from seismograms acquired close the tunnel face excavation in order to obtain best signal-to-noise ratio to be used in the interferometry processing (Poletto et al., 2010). The seismic interferometry method (Claerbout 1968) was successfully applied to image the subsurface geological structure using the seismic wave field generated by tunneling (tunnelling machine and construction activities) recorded with geophone strings. This technique was applied simulating virtual shot records related to the number of receivers in the borehole with the seismic transmitted events, and processing the data as a reflection seismic survey. The pseudo reflective wave field was obtained by cross-correlation of the transmitted wave data. We applied the relationship between the transmission

  9. Rifting process of the Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana arc-backarc system inferred from active source seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; Yamashita, M.; No, T.; Takizawa, K.; Kaiho, Y.; Kaneda, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana (IBM) arc-backarc system has continued the crustal growth through crustal thickening by magmatic activities and crustal thinning by backarc opening. Tatsumi et al (2008) proposed petrological crustal growth model started from basaltic magmas rising from the slab, and showed the consistency with the seismic velocity model. Although crustal growth by the crustal thickening are modeled, crustal structural change by the backarc opening are not still unknown yet. The Shikoku Basin and Parece Vela Basin were formed by the backarc opening during approximately 15-30 Ma. Since 6 Ma, the Mariana Trough has opened and the stage already moved to spreading process from rifting process. In the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc, the Sumisu rift is in the initial rifting stage. Therefore, understanding of the crustal change by the backarc opening from rifting to spreading is indispensable to know the crustal growth of whole Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana island arc. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has carried out seismic studies using a multichannel reflection survey system and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) around the IBM arc since 2003 (Takahashi et al., 2007; Kodaira et al., 2007; Takahashi et al., 2008; Kodaira et al., 2008). We already obtained eight P-wave velocity models across the IBM arc and these structures record the crustal structural change during the backarc opening process from the rifting stage to the spreading stage. As the results, we identified characteristics of the crustal structural change accompanied with backarc opening as follows. (1) Beneath the initial rifting stage without normal faults, for example, in the northern tip of the Mariana Trough, crustal thickening are identified. (2) Beneath the initial rifting stage with normal faults, for example, in the Sumisu Rift, the crustal thickness is almost similar to that beneath the volcanic front. Although an existence of the crust-mantle transition layer with

  10. The Middle AsiaN Active Source (MANAS) Profile: Preliminary Results From A Deep Seismic Transect in the Tien Shan of Kyrgyzstan and China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, J. H.; Roecker, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Schelochkov, G.; He, R.

    2007-12-01

    New near-vertical deep seismic reflection data, acquired during the summer of 2007, constitute an ~350 km lithospheric transect from the northwestern Tarim Basin in China to the central Tien Shan of Kyrgyzstan. Recognized as one of the highest, youngest, and most active orogenic systems on Earth, the Tien Shan are situated internal to the Eurasian continent, removed up to 3000 km from the former plate boundary with the Indian subcontinent. Existing geologic constraints imply that up to 200 km of shortening may have occurred in Late Tertiary to Recent time. Additionally, geologic, topographic, and gravimetric data suggest that continental lithosphere of the Tarim basin may presently be subducting beneath the southern margin of the Tien Shan, in the absence of an oceanic slab. While geodetic measurements document that the Tien Shan currently record about half of the shortening between India and Eurasia, geologic data dictate that active faults are restricted to only several of the individual ranges that make up the mountain belt. Passive-source seismological studies have shown the surprising result that the orogenic crust is thickest (65-70 km) at both the southern and northern margins of the Tien Shan, and thins dramatically to ~35 km within the internal part of the orogen. Key targets of the MANAS (Middle AsiaN Active Source) Profile include (1) the top of the Tarim crust as it descends beneath the southern Tien Shan, (2) an inferred crustal-scale frontal ramp, representing where the continental plate may have broken and is now descending into the upper mantle, (3) the geometry of demonstrably active faults below the shallow depths to which they can be inferred from surface geologic constraints, (4) the topography and seismic reflection signature of the Moho, especially given the unexpected variations in crustal thickness across the orogen, and (5) the significance of both crustal and upper mantle conductivity anomalies previously identified through magnetotelluric

  11. Signatures of lightning activity in seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiszely, Márta; Bór, József; Mónus, Péter; Betz, Hans-Dieter

    2014-05-01

    A thunderstorm with intense lightning activity swept through Hungary on 28th August, 2013 between 00:00-09:00 UTC from the west towards north-east. Characteristic signal patterns could be observed in the time series recorded by seismometers in Hungary during the time the thunderstorm was close to a recording station. The signal patterns occurred coherently both in the vertical and in the horizontal seismic records. The patterns are composed of a sharp spike and a longer lasting disturbance which followed the spike after a gap of several seconds. This disturbance was of increased amplitude and lasted for up to a few tens of seconds. Detection times of spikes in the seismic records were compared to occurrence times of lightning strokes in the thunderstorm. Information on the occurrence time, polarity, type (CG or IC), peak current, and geographical location (including height estimation for IC events) of lightning strokes was provided by the LINET lightning detection network which uses magnetic loop antennas sensitive in the VLF-LF radio bands. A single lightning stroke could be unambiguously associated with each spike in the seismic records. This one-to-one correspondence suggests that the spike was caused by the electromagnetic shock wave from the lightning return stroke. The longer lasting disturbance is, on the other hand, most probably the signature of the subsequent air pressure wave which induced ground waves, too. In more than half of the examined cases, the time between the spike and the detection of a wave packet (peak amplitude) in the disturbance matched the expected propagation time of sound waves between the source location given by LINET and the seismic station. The direct sound wave associated wave packet, however, was not always the first arriving one in the seismic disturbance which suggests that coupling of sound waves and ground waves may not only occur at the seismic detector. The poster shows case studies of lightning associated seismic records

  12. Seismic source characterization for the 2014 update of the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moschetti, Morgan P.; Powers, Peter; Petersen, Mark D.; Boyd, Oliver; Chen, Rui; Field, Edward H.; Frankel, Arthur; Haller, Kathleen; Harmsen, Stephen; Mueller, Charles S.; Wheeler, Russell; Zeng, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    We present the updated seismic source characterization (SSC) for the 2014 update of the National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) for the conterminous United States. Construction of the seismic source models employs the methodology that was developed for the 1996 NSHM but includes new and updated data, data types, source models, and source parameters that reflect the current state of knowledge of earthquake occurrence and state of practice for seismic hazard analyses. We review the SSC parameterization and describe the methods used to estimate earthquake rates, magnitudes, locations, and geometries for all seismic source models, with an emphasis on new source model components. We highlight the effects that two new model components—incorporation of slip rates from combined geodetic-geologic inversions and the incorporation of adaptively smoothed seismicity models—have on probabilistic ground motions, because these sources span multiple regions of the conterminous United States and provide important additional epistemic uncertainty for the 2014 NSHM.

  13. Controlled Source 4D Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Morency, C.; Tromp, J.

    2009-12-01

    Earth's material properties may change after significant tectonic events, e.g., volcanic eruptions, earthquake ruptures, landslides, and hydrocarbon migration. While many studies focus on how to interpret observations in terms of changes in wavespeeds and attenuation, the oil industry is more interested in how we can identify and locate such temporal changes using seismic waves generated by controlled sources. 4D seismic analysis is indeed an important tool to monitor fluid movement in hydrocarbon reservoirs during production, improving fields management. Classic 4D seismic imaging involves comparing images obtained from two subsequent seismic surveys. Differences between the two images tell us where temporal changes occurred. However, when the temporal changes are small, it may be quite hard to reliably identify and characterize the differences between the two images. We propose to back-project residual seismograms between two subsequent surveys using adjoint methods, which results in images highlighting temporal changes. We use the SEG/EAGE salt dome model to illustrate our approach. In two subsequent surveys, the wavespeeds and density within a target region are changed, mimicking possible fluid migration. Due to changes in material properties induced by fluid migration, seismograms recorded in the two surveys differ. By back propagating these residuals, the adjoint images identify the location of the affected region. An important issue involves the nature of model. For instance, are we characterizing only changes in wavespeed, or do we also consider density and attenuation? How many model parameters characterize the model, e.g., is our model isotropic or anisotropic? Is acoustic wave propagation accurate enough or do we need to consider elastic or poroelastic effects? We will investigate how imaging strategies based upon acoustic, elastic and poroelastic simulations affect our imaging capabilities.

  14. Seismic Forecasting of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Douglas; Lindsey, Charles

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and improved helioseismic imaging techniques of the far-side of the Sun as part of a synoptic monitor of solar activity. In collaboration with the MIDI team at Stanford University we are routinely applying our analysis to images within 24 hours of their acquisition by SOHO. For the first time, real-time seismic maps of large active regions on the Sun's far surface are publicly available. The synoptic images show examples of active regions persisting for one or more solar rotations, as well as those initially detected forming on the solar far side. Until recently, imaging the far surface of the Sun has been essentially blind to active regions more than about 50 degrees from the antipode of disk center. In a paper recently accepted for publication, we have demonstrated how acoustic travel-time perturbations may be mapped over the entire hemisphere of the Sun facing away from the Earth, including the polar regions. In addition to offering significant improvements to ongoing space weather forecasting efforts, the procedure offers the possibility of local seismic monitoring of both the temporal and spatial variations in the acoustic properties of the Sun over the entire far surface.

  15. Juan de Fuca Plate Ridge-to-Trench Experiment: initial results from active source seismic imaging of the Juan de Fuca plate and Cascadia fore-arc (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Canales, J.; Carton, H. D.; Han, S.; Gibson, J. C.; Janiszewski, H. A.; Horning, G.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Abers, G. A.; Trehu, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Active source seismic data were acquired during the Juan de Fuca Ridge-to-Trench experiment (June-July 2012) to characterize the evolution and structure of the Juan de Fuca plate from formation at the ridge, through evolution in the plate interior, to subduction at the Cascadia trench. The survey provides plate-scale images of the sediments, crust, and shallowest mantle along two ridge-perpendicular transects, one extending from Axial seamount to the Oregon margin near Hydrate Ridge and the other from near Endeavour segment to Grays Harbor offshore Washington. In addition, a 450 km long trench-parallel line ~10 km seaward of the Cascadia deformation front was acquired to characterize variations in plate structure along the margin. Coincident long-streamer (8 km) multi-channel seismic (MCS) and wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data were collected along each transect. Using these data, our current investigations focus on the properties of the thick sediment blanket covering the Juan de Fuca plate and evidence for fluid flow at the deformation front, crustal structure within the plate interior and near the deformation front, and tracking the downgoing plate beneath the margin. Highlights include the discovery of numerous pockmarks on the seafloor providing evidence of active fluid flow up to 60 km west of the deformation front. Along the Oregon transect, a bright decollement horizon is imaged at ~1sec twtt above basement whereas at the Washington margin, protothrusts of the deformation front reach to the top of the oceanic crust. Variations in sediment properties are documented within the margin-parallel transect with changes in the stratigraphic level of decollement. While crustal thickness is quite uniform along the margin (~ 6 km), variations in crustal reflectivity and in shallowest mantle velocities are observed over ~30-50 km length scales that could be related to structural variations in the Cascadia subduction zone. Further landward, the top of the

  16. Southern Africa seismic structure and source studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming

    1998-09-01

    The upper mantle seismic velocity structure beneath southern Africa is investigated using travel time and waveform data. Waveform and travel time data used in this study come mainly from a large mine tremor in South Africa (msb{b} 5.6) recorded on stations of the southern Africa and the Tanzania Broadband Seismic Experiment. Auxiliary data along similar profiles are obtained from other moderate events within eastern and southern Africa. The waveform data from the large tremor show upper mantle triplications for both the 400 and 670-km discontinuities between 18sp° and 27sp° distance. The most notable feature of the data is a large, late P phase that propagates to at least 27sp°. This phase is striking because of its late arrival time (as much as 15 seconds after direct P at 27sp°) and high amplitude relative to the first arrival. Travel times from all available stations are used to invert for the P wave velocity structure down to 800 km depth and S wave velocity structure down to 200 km using the Wiechert-Herglotz (W-H) inversion technique. The P wave velocities from the uppermost mantle down to 300 km are as much as 3% higher than the global average and are slightly slower than the global average between 300 and 400 km depths. The velocity gradient between 300 and 400 km is 0.0015 1/s. The S wave travel time data yield fast velocities above 200-km depth. The S wave velocity structure appears inconsistent with the P wave structure model indicating varying Poisson's ratio in the upper mantle. Little evidence is found for a pronounced upper mantle low velocity zone. Both sharp and gradual-change 400-km discontinuities are favored by the waveform data. The 670-km discontinuity appears as a gradual-change zone. The source mechanism of the mb 5.6 mining tremor itself is important for seismic discrimination and insight into mining tremor sources. Source parameters for this event as well as some other large mining tremors from the South African gold mines are studied

  17. Multiscale seismic attributes: source-corrected wavelet response and application to high-resolution seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, Stephan; Le Gonidec, Yves; Gibert, Dominique

    2012-09-01

    A wavelet-based method was presented in a previous work to introduce multiscale seismic attributes for high-resolution seismic data. Because of the limited frequency bandwidth of the seismic source, we observed distortions in the seismic attributes based on the wavelet response of the subsurface discontinuities (Le Gonidec et al.). In this paper, we go further in the seismic source-correction by considering Lévy alpha-stable distributions introduced in the formalism of the continuous wavelet transform (CWT). The wavelets are Gaussian derivative functions (GDF), characterized by a derivative order. We show that a high-resolution seismic source, after a classical signature processing, can be taken into account with a GDF. We demonstrate that in the framework of the Born approximation, the CWT of a seismic trace involving such a finite frequency bandwidth can be made equivalent to the CWT of the impulse response of the subsurface and is defined for a reduced range of dilations. We apply the method for the SYSIF seismic device (Marsset et al.; Ker et al.) and show that the source-corrections allow to define seismic attributes for layer thicknesses in the range [24; 115 cm]. We present the analysis for two seismic reflectors identified on a SYSIF profile, and we show that the source-corrected multiscale analysis quantifies their complex geometries.

  18. TOMO3D: 3-D joint refraction and reflection traveltime tomography parallel code for active-source seismic data—synthetic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, A.; Korenaga, J.; Sallarès, V.; Miniussi, A.; Ranero, C. R.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new 3-D traveltime tomography code (TOMO3D) for the modelling of active-source seismic data that uses the arrival times of both refracted and reflected seismic phases to derive the velocity distribution and the geometry of reflecting boundaries in the subsurface. This code is based on its popular 2-D version TOMO2D from which it inherited the methods to solve the forward and inverse problems. The traveltime calculations are done using a hybrid ray-tracing technique combining the graph and bending methods. The LSQR algorithm is used to perform the iterative regularized inversion to improve the initial velocity and depth models. In order to cope with an increased computational demand due to the incorporation of the third dimension, the forward problem solver, which takes most of the run time (˜90 per cent in the test presented here), has been parallelized with a combination of multi-processing and message passing interface standards. This parallelization distributes the ray-tracing and traveltime calculations among available computational resources. The code's performance is illustrated with a realistic synthetic example, including a checkerboard anomaly and two reflectors, which simulates the geometry of a subduction zone. The code is designed to invert for a single reflector at a time. A data-driven layer-stripping strategy is proposed for cases involving multiple reflectors, and it is tested for the successive inversion of the two reflectors. Layers are bound by consecutive reflectors, and an initial velocity model for each inversion step incorporates the results from previous steps. This strategy poses simpler inversion problems at each step, allowing the recovery of strong velocity discontinuities that would otherwise be smoothened.

  19. On the development of a seismic source zonation model for seismic hazard assessment in western Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahran, Hani M.; Sokolov, Vladimir; Roobol, M. John; Stewart, Ian C. F.; El-Hadidy Youssef, Salah; El-Hadidy, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    A new seismic source model has been developed for the western part of the Arabian Peninsula, which has experienced considerable earthquake activity in the historical past and in recent times. The data used for the model include an up-to-date seismic catalog, results of recent studies of Cenozoic faulting in the area, aeromagnetic anomaly and gravity maps, geological maps, and miscellaneous information on volcanic activity. The model includes 18 zones ranging along the Red Sea and the Arabian Peninsula from the Gulf of Aqaba and the Dead Sea in the north to the Gulf of Aden in the south. The seismic source model developed in this study may be considered as one of the basic branches in a logic tree approach for seismic hazard assessment in Saudi Arabia and adjacent territories.

  20. Crustal rifting and magmatic underplating in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) intra-oceanic arc detected by active source seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; No, T.; Tatsumi, Y.; Kaneda, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has carried out seismic experiments using a multichannel reflection system and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Mariana (IBM) arc region since 2002 to understand growth process of continental crust. The source was an airgun array with a total capacity of 12,000 cubic inches and the OBSs as the receiver were deployed with an interval of 5 km for all seismic refraction experiments. As the results, we obtained crustal structures across the whole IBM arc with an interval of 50 km and detected the structural characteristics showing the crustal growth process. The IBM arc is one of typical oceanic island arc, which crustal growth started from subduction of an oceanic crust beneath the other oceanic crust. The arc crust has developed through repeatedly magmatic accretion from subduction slab and backarc opening. The volcanism has activated in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Quaternary (e.g., Taylor, 1992), however, these detailed locations of past volcanic arc has been remained as one of unknown issues. In addition, a role of crustal rifting for the crustal growth has also been still unknown issue yet. Our seismic structures show three rows of past volcanic arc crusts except current arc. A rear arc and a forearc side have one and two, respectively. The first one, which was already reported by Kodaira et al. (2008), distributes in northern side from 27 N of the rear arc region. The second one, which develops in the forearc region next to the recent volcanic front, distributes in whole of the Izu-Ogasawara arc having crustal variation along arc direction. Ones of them sometimes have thicker crust than that beneath current volcanic front and no clear topographic high. Last one in the forearc connects to the Ogasawara Ridge. However, thickest crust is not always located beneath these volcanic arcs. The initial rifting region like the northern end of the Mariana Trough and the Sumisu

  1. Seismic reflection imaging with conventional and unconventional sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros Ugalde, Diego Alonso

    This manuscript reports the results of research using both conventional and unconventional energy sources as well as conventional and unconventional analysis to image crustal structure using reflected seismic waves. The work presented here includes the use of explosions to investigate the Taiwanese lithosphere, the use of 'noise' from railroads to investigate the shallow subsurface of the Rio Grande rift, and the use of microearthquakes to image subsurface structure near an active fault zone within the Appalachian mountains. Chapter 1 uses recordings from the land refraction and wide-angle reflection component of the Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research (TAIGER) project. The most prominent reflection feature imaged by these surveys is an anomalously strong reflector found in northeastern Taiwan. The goal of this chapter is to analyze the TAIGER recordings and to place the reflector into a geologic framework that fits with the modern tectonic kinematics of the region. Chapter 2 uses railroad traffic as a source for reflection profiling within the Rio Grande rift. Here the railroad recordings are treated in an analogous way to Vibroseis recordings. These results suggest that railroad noise in general can be a valuable new tool in imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface in environmental and geotechnical studies. In chapters 3 and 4, earthquakes serve as the seismic imaging source. In these studies the methodology of Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) is borrowed from the oil and gas industry to develop reflection images. In chapter 3, a single earthquake is used to probe a small area beneath Waterboro, Maine. In chapter 4, the same method is applied to multiple earthquakes to take advantage of the increased redundancy that results from multiple events illuminating the same structure. The latter study demonstrates how dense arrays can be a powerful new tool for delineating, and monitoring temporal changes of deep structure in areas characterized by significant

  2. Development of a magnetostrictive borehole seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Keefe, R.G.

    1997-04-01

    A magnetostrictive borehole seismic source was developed for use in high resolution crosswell surveys in environmental applications. The source is a clamped, vertical-shear, swept frequency, reaction-mass shaker design consisting of a spring pre-loaded magnetostrictive rod with permanent magnet bias, drive coils to induce an alternating magnetic field, and an integral tungsten reaction mass. The actuator was tested extensively in the laboratory. It was then incorporated into an easily deployable clamped downhole tool capable of operating on a standard 7 conductor wireline in borehole environments to 10,000{degrees} deep and 100{degrees}C. It can be used in either PVC or steel cased wells and the wells can be dry or fluid filled. It has a usable frequency spectrum of {approx} 150 to 2000 Hz. The finished tool was successfully demonstrated in a crosswell test at a shallow environmental site at Hanford, Washington. The source transmitted signals with a S/N ratio of 10-15 dB from 150-720 Hz between wells spaced 239 feet apart in unconsolidated gravel. The source was also tested successfully in rock at an oil field test site, transmitting signals with a S/N ratio of 5-15 dB over the full sweep spectrum from 150-2000 Hz between wells spaced 282 feet apart. And it was used successfully on an 11,000{degrees} wireline at a depth of 4550{degrees}. Recommendations for follow-on work include improvements to the clamp, incorporation of a higher sample rate force feedback controller, and increases in the force output of the tool.

  3. Discrimination of Seismic Sources Using Israel Seismic Network.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    of Dynamic Theory of Propagation of Seismic Waves, 7:115-123 (in Russian). Gelchinsky, B., Landa , E. and Shtivelman, V., 1985. Algorithms of Phase... DIEGO , CA 92123 DOUGLAS BAUMGARDT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORY ENSCO INC. ATTN: TECHNICAL STAFF (PLS ROUTE) 5400 PORT ROYAL ROAD DEPT. 5791 SPRINGFIELD, VA...1212 ROOM HA372 RESTON, VA 22091 2001 WISCONSIN AVE. NW WASHINGTON, DC 20007 JONATHAN BERGER ROBERT BLANDFORD UNIVERSITY OF CA, SAN DIEGO AFTAC

  4. Characteristic scale of heterogeneity of seismically active fault and its manifestation in scaling of earthquake source spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Previously, similarity of source spectra of Kamchatka earthquakes with respect to the common corner frequency f c1 and the expressed deviations from similarity for the second f c2 and the third f c3 corner frequencies were revealed. The value of f c3 reflects the characteristic size L is of fault surface; correspondingly, L is ≈ v r T is , where v r is the rupture speed and T is ≈ 1/ f c3 is characteristic time. The estimates of f c3 are used for normalizing f c1 and f c2. In this way one obtains dimensionless rupture temporal parametres τ1 and τ2 and can further study the dependence τ2 (τ1). The growth of a rupture is considered as a process of aggregation of elementary fault spots of the size L is . The dimensionless width of the random front of aggregation is on the order of τ2. The relationship τ2 (τ1) approximately follows power law with exponent β. The estimates of β derived from earthquake populations of Kamchatka, USA and Central Asia (β = 0.35-0.6) agree with values expected from the known Eden's theory of random aggregation growth and from its generalizations.

  5. Source Characteristics and Their Implications for Seismic Hazard Assessment in the Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, B.; Wang, Z.; Woolery, E. W.

    2002-12-01

    The central United States is located in the stable plate interior, more than 1,000 km away from the active plate boundaries. Recent studies show that the seismic sources in the central United States are different from those in the plate boundaries. For example, one study showed that New Madrid seismic zone is a relaxing weak zone that was initially generated by upswelling magma or a hotspot and was perturbed by glaciation or other recent changes in the regional stress field. The seismicity in the central United States is also different from that of the plate boundaries. Historical data have recorded only minor to moderate earthquakes (M5.5 or less) in the past 200 years. Great earthquakes (M7.0 or above) have occurred only rarely and evidence for these great ones is in the geological records (paleoliquefaction). Strong and damaging earthquakes (M6.0-7.0) were missing. Also, there are significant differences among the current ground motion attenuation relationships, the result of a lack of strong-motion records for the central United States. To perform seismic hazard analysis (either probabilistic seismic hazard analysis or deterministic seismic hazard analysis), three data sets, the seismic source, earthquake magnitude distribution, and ground motion attenuation relationship, are needed. Source, magnitude distribution, and attenuation relationship are extremely variable throughout the central United States, and must be carefully considered when determining the input data sets for seismic hazard analysis. Otherwise, seismic hazard could be overestimated or underestimated.

  6. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  7. Toward seismic source imaging using seismo-ionospheric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, L.; Larmat, C. S.; Mikesell, D.; Sladen, A.; Khelfi, K.; Astafyeva, E.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide coverage offered by global navigation space systems (GNSS) such as GPS, GLONASS or Galileo allows seismological measurements of a new kind. GNSS-derived total electron content (TEC) measurements can be especially useful to image seismically active zones that are not covered by conventional instruments. For instance, it has been shown that the Japanese dense GPS network GEONET was able to record images of the ionosphere response to the initial coseismic sea-surface motion induced by the great Mw 9.0 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake less than 10 minutes after the rupture initiation (Astafyeva et al., 2013). But earthquakes of lower magnitude, down to about 6.5 would also induce measurable ionospheric perturbations, when GNSS stations are located less than 250 km away from the epicenter. In order to make use of these new data, ionospheric seismology needs to develop accurate forward models so that we can invert for quantitative seismic sources parameters. We will present our current understanding of the coupling mechanisms between the solid Earth, the ocean, the atmosphere and the ionosphere. We will also present the state-of-the-art in the modeling of coseismic ionospheric disturbances using acoustic ray theory and a new 3D modeling method based on the Spectral Element Method (SEM). This latter numerical tool will allow us to incorporate lateral variations in the solid Earth properties, the bathymetry and the atmosphere as well as realistic seismic source parameters. Furthermore, seismo-acoustic waves propagate in the atmosphere at a much slower speed (from 0.3 to ~1 km/s) than seismic waves propagate in the solid Earth. We are exploring the application of back-projection and time-reversal methods to TEC observations in order to retrieve the time and space characteristics of the acoustic emission in the seismic source area. We will first show modeling and inversion results with synthetic data. Finally, we will illustrate the imaging capability of our approach

  8. Development of Towed Marine Seismic Vibrator as an Alternative Seismic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozasa, H.; Mikada, H.; Murakami, F.; Jamali Hondori, E.; Takekawa, J.; Asakawa, E.; Sato, F.

    2015-12-01

    The principal issue with respect to marine impulsive sources to acquire seismic data is if the emission of acoustic energy inflicts harm on marine mammals or not, since the volume of the source signal being released into the marine environment could be so large compared to the sound range of the mammals. We propose a marine seismic vibrator as an alternative to the impulsive sources to mitigate a risk of the impact to the marine environment while satisfying the necessary conditions of seismic surveys. These conditions include the repeatability and the controllability of source signals both in amplitude and phase for high-quality measurements. We, therefore, designed a towed marine seismic vibrator (MSV) as a new type marine vibratory seismic source that employed the hydraulic servo system for the controllability condition in phase and in amplitude that assures the repeatability as well. After fabricating a downsized MSV that requires the power of 30 kVA at a depth of about 250 m in water, several sea trials were conducted to test the source characteristics of the downsized MSV in terms of amplitude, frequency, horizontal and vertical directivities of the generated field. The maximum sound level satisfied the designed specification in the frequencies ranging from 3 to 300 Hz almost omnidirectionally. After checking the source characteristics, we then conducted a trial seismic survey, using both the downsized MSV and an airgun of 480 cubic-inches for comparison, with a streamer cable of 2,000m long right above a cabled earthquake observatory in the Japan Sea. The result showed that the penetration of seismic signals generated by the downsized MSV was comparable to that by the airgun, although there was a slight difference in the signal-to-noise ratio. The MSV could become a versatile source that will not harm living marine mammals as an alternative to the existing impulsive seismic sources such as airgun.

  9. Correlation between Induced Seismic Events and Hydraulic Fracturing activities in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R.; Aminzadeh, F.; Tiwari, A.

    2014-12-01

    Induced seismicity observed in Oklahoma and Ohio have raised environmental concern to an alarming level and thus any plausible correlation between subsurface injection and production activities have become an significant area of study. As per US Seismic Hazard map, California lies in highly sensitive zone, which makes understanding of stimulation induced seismic events critically important. The copious number of seismic events due to presence of numerous faults in California benefits understanding seismicity of the region but makes it difficult to distinguish induced seismic events from naturally occurring seismic events. Since regional models are considered more effective in understanding the seismicity of the region, this study aims in understanding impact of hydraulic fracturing activities in various oilfields in California. The focus of the study is to identify sensitive zones in California which might have observed seismic activities induced due to hydraulic fracturing. This has been done using the criteria of spatial and temporal co-relation between fracturing activities and seismic events for oilfields with significant number of fracturing activities. The seismic and well data used for this study is acquired from public sources and have been integrated in an efficient manner using the GIS tool and iterative querying. The two step methodology implemented for this work involves segregating the induced seismic events from natural events based on the depth of the event and seismic history of the region and then spatially and temporally studying it with regards to hydraulic fracturing in vicinity of the seismic event.

  10. Seismic source study of the Racha-Dzhava (Georgia) earthquake from aftershocks and broad-band teleseismic body-wave records: An example of active nappe tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuenzalida, H.; Rivera, L.; Haessler, H.; Legrand, D.; Philip, H.; Dorbath, L.; McCormack, D.; Arefiev, S.; Langer, C.; Cisternas, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Racha-Dzhava earthquake (Ms = 7.0) that occurred on 1991 April 29 at 09:12:48.1 GMT in the southern border of the Great Caucasus is the biggest event ever recorded in the region, stronger than the Spitak earthquake (Ms = 6.9) of 1988. A field expedition to the epicentral area was organised and a temporary seismic network of 37 stations was deployed to record the aftershock activity. A very precise image of the aftershock distribution is obtained, showing an elongated cloud oriented N105??, with one branch trending N310?? in the western part. The southernmost part extends over 80 km, with the depth ranging from 0 to 15 km, and dips north. The northern branch, which is about 30 km long, shows activity that ranges in depth from 5 to 15 km. The complex thrust dips northwards. A stress-tensor inversion from P-wave first-motion polarities shows a state of triaxial compression, with the major principal axis oriented roughly N-S, the minor principal axis being vertical. Body-waveform inversion of teleseismic seismograms was performed for the main shock, which can be divided into four subevents with a total rupture-time duration of 22 s. The most important part of the seismic moment was released by a gentle northerly dipping thrust. The model is consistent with the compressive tectonics of the region and is in agreement with the aftershock distribution and the stress tensor deduced from the aftershocks. The focal mechanisms of the three largest aftershocks were also inverted from body-wave records. The April 29th (Ms = 6.1) and May 5th (Ms = 5.4) aftershocks have thrust mechanisms on roughly E-W-oriented planes, similar to the main shock. Surprisingly, the June 15th (Ms = 6.2) aftershock shows a thrust fault striking N-S. This mechanism is explained by the structural control of the rupture along the east-dipping geometry of the Dzirula Massif close to the Borzhomi-Kazbeg strike-slip fault. In fact, the orientation and shape of the stress tensor produce a thrust on a N

  11. Evidence for Holocene palaeoseismicity along the Basel-Reinach active normal fault (Switzerland): a seismic source for the 1356 earthquake in the Upper Rhine graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, Matthieu; Meghraoui, Mustapha; Delouis, Bertrand; Giardini, Domenico

    2005-02-01

    We conducted a palaeoseismic study with geomorphologic mapping, geophysical prospecting and trenching along an 8-km-long NNE-SSW trending fault scarp south of Basel. The city as well as 40 castles within a 20-km radius were destroyed or heavily damaged by the earthquake of 1356 October 18 (Io = IX-X), the largest historical seismic event in central Europe. Active river incisions as well as late Quaternary alluvial terraces are uplifted along the linear Basel-Reinach (BR) fault scarp. The active normal fault is comprised of at least two main branches reaching the surface as evident by resistivity profiles, reflection seismic data and direct observations in six trenches. In trenches, the normal fault rupture affects three colluvial wedge deposits up to the base of the modern soil. Radiocarbon as well as thermoluminescence (TL) age determinations from other trenches helped to reconstruct the Holocene event chronology. We identified three seismic events with an average coseismic movement of 0.5-0.8 m and a total vertical displacement of 1.8 m in the last 7800 yr and five events in the last 13 200 yr. The most recent event occurred in the interval AD 500-1450 (2σ) and may correspond to the 1356 earthquake. Furthermore, the morphology suggests both a southern and northern fault extensions that may reach 20 km across the Jura mountains and across the Rhine valley. Taking this fault length and a 10-km-thick seismogenic layer suggests a Mw 6.5 or greater event as a possible scenario for the seismic hazard assessment of the Basel region.

  12. Evidence for Holocene paleoseismicity along the Basel-Reinach Active Normal Fault (Switzerland): A Seismic Source for the 1356 Earthquake in the Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Meghraoui, M.; Delouis, B.; Giardini, D.

    2003-04-01

    We conducted a paleoseismic study with geomorphologic mapping, geophysical prospecting and trenching along an 8-km-long NNE-SSW trending fault scarp south of Basel. The city as well as 40 castles within a 20-km radius were destroyed or heavily damaged by the earthquake of 18th October 1356 (Io = IX-X MKS), the largest historical seismic event in central Europe. Active river incisions as well as late Quaternary alluvial terraces are uplifted along the linear Basel-Reinach fault scarp. The active normal fault shows at least two main branches reaching the surface as attested by resistivity profiles, reflection seismic data, and direct observations in six trenches. In trenches, the normal fault rupture affects three colluvial wedge deposits up to the base of the present day soil. Radiocarbon as well as thermoluminescence age determinations from other trenches helped reconstruct the Holocene events chronology. We identified three seismic events with an average coseismic movement of 0.5 - 0.8 m and a total vertical displacement of 1.8 m in the last 7800 years and five events in the last 13200 years. The most recent event occurred in the interval 610 - 1475 A.D. (2sigma) and may likely correspond to the 1356 earthquake. Furthermore, the morphology suggests both a southern and northern fault extensions that may reach 20 km across the Jura Mountains and across the Rhine Valley. Taking this fault length and a 10 km-thick seismogenic layer suggests a M 6.5 or greater event as a possible scenario for the seismic hazard assessment of the Basel region.

  13. Seismic and Biological Sources of Ambient Ocean Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Simon Eric

    Sound is the most efficient radiation in the ocean. Sounds of seismic and biological origin contain information regarding the underlying processes that created them. A single hydrophone records summary time-frequency information from the volume within acoustic range. Beamforming using a hydrophone array additionally produces azimuthal estimates of sound sources. A two-dimensional array and acoustic focusing produce an unambiguous two-dimensional `image' of sources. This dissertation describes the application of these techniques in three cases. The first utilizes hydrophone arrays to investigate T-phases (water-borne seismic waves) in the Philippine Sea. Ninety T-phases were recorded over a 12-day period, implying a greater number of seismic events occur than are detected by terrestrial seismic monitoring in the region. Observation of an azimuthally migrating T-phase suggests that reverberation of such sounds from bathymetric features can occur over megameter scales. In the second case, single hydrophone recordings from coral reefs in the Line Islands archipelago reveal that local ambient reef sound is spectrally similar to sounds produced by small, hard-shelled benthic invertebrates in captivity. Time-lapse photography of the reef reveals an increase in benthic invertebrate activity at sundown, consistent with an increase in sound level. The dominant acoustic phenomenon on these reefs may thus originate from the interaction between a large number of small invertebrates and the substrate. Such sounds could be used to take census of hard-shelled benthic invertebrates that are otherwise extremely difficult to survey. A two-dimensional `map' of sound production over a coral reef in the Hawaiian Islands was obtained using two-dimensional hydrophone array in the third case. Heterogeneously distributed bio-acoustic sources were generally co-located with rocky reef areas. Acoustically dominant snapping shrimp were largely restricted to one location within the area surveyed

  14. IRIS Controlled Source Seismic Experiments: Continental Structure, Instrumentation, and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2004-12-01

    The controlled-source seismology program of IRIS/PASSCAL has made major contributions to the study of continental structure and evolution. It has also undergone major developments in seismic instrumentation. The first PASSCAL experiments (1984/85) targeted the Basin and Range Province and the Ouachita orogenic belt. The Basin and Range study provided remarkably clear images of this thin, highly-extended crust, while the Ouachita experiment tested competing hypotheses for the deep structure of this Paleozoic orogen. However, both of these projects were limited by a lack of seismic instruments. The situation improved in the late 1980's with the benefit of a mixed array of 600 seismic recorders from the USGS, Stanford, and the Geological Survey of Canada. The resolution achieved with these instruments was revolutionary. Results include the imaging of such remarkable features as crustal-scale duplexes in the Brooks Range compressional orogen of northern Alaska, and of crustal "core complexes" in the extended crust of southwest Arizona. The 3-channel PASSCAL Jr. instrument was developed, leading to experiments in which ˜1000 instruments were deployed, including three-component recording. This complex mix of instruments served the community well for several years, but required large, complex instrument centers and lots of technical support. With input from PASSCAL and the international community, a newly designed, compact instrument (the Texan) was finalized in the spring of 1998, and the first 200 instruments was delivered to the Univ. of Texas-El Paso in late 1998. The present instrument pool of Texans exceeds 1,400 and these have been used on such projects as the high-resolution imaging of the Los Angeles and San Fernando basins (LARSE I and II experiments), where active thrust faults have been imaged. Controlled-source seismic experiments are now very numerous. During calendar year 2004 alone, portable Texan instruments have traveled from Venezuela to Denmark

  15. The suppression of coherent noise from another airgun source in marine multi-channel seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ho-Han; Liu, Char-Shine; Chang, Jih-Hsin; Tsai, You-Tsung; Chiu, Shye-Donq

    2016-12-01

    During seismic investigations, multiple and unexpected sources may cause serious interference on seismic records, and coherent noise generated by another unwanted active source could result in extremely poor data quality. Because airgun arrays have been widely used as the sound source in marine seismic surveys, the noise generated by another airgun array usually has similar characteristics to the primary signals in both frequency bands and wave forms, so the suppression of this type of coherent noise is very difficult. In practice, seismic crews try to avoid conducting multiple surveys simultaneously in a same area, so the source interference problem normally does not occur, and suppression of coherent noise from another active source has rarely been discussed and proposed before. This paper presents a dataset in which part of the records are contaminated by shot noise from another seismic vessel, and proposes a hybrid approach to suppress the coherent noise from that unwanted seismic source. Noise subtraction and primary signal preservation within different data properties are considered to begin the noise suppression. Based on different noise characteristics from various source directions and wave propagation paths, coherence noise can be separated from primary signals in frequency-wave number (F-K), frequency-time (F-T) and intercept time-slowness (tau-p) domains, respectively. This hybrid coherent noise suppression approach involves applying three different filters, F-K, F-T and tau-p, to the contaminated dataset. Our results show that most of the coherent noise generated by another seismic source could be suppressed, and seismic images could be substantially improved.

  16. Characterising Active Fault Earthquake Sources Beneath the Coastal Environments of Christchurch and Wellington Cities, New Zealand, Using Seismic Reflection Profiles and Fault Displacement Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P.; Nodder, S.; Gorman, A. R.; Woelz, S.; Orpin, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal cities of Christchurch and Wellington, New Zealand, lie in different tectonic settings within the obliquely convergent Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone. Both cities have experienced damaging earthquakes in the last three years, which highlight the importance of locating and characterising hidden active faults close to urban areas. The devastating and geologically complex Canterbury earthquake sequence of 2010-2012 developed on the periphery of the plate boundary, and reactivated several previously unidentified strike-slip and reverse faults. Major aftershocks initially beneath land, generally migrated eastward over time, and finally advanced offshore into Pegasus Bay. A study of active submarine faulting beneath the bay highlights the role of inherited crustal structure and inversion tectonics. Marine seismic reflection data reveals that faults have very low slip rate and negligible post-glacial (<15 ka) deformation, which is consistent with inferred long recurrence intervals between large magnitude (Mw>6) earthquakes. Wellington City is surrounded by numerous high-slip rate strike-slip faults overlying the Hikurangi subduction zone. A dense network of secondary basement structures previously recognised throughout the region, mainly from tectonic geomorphology, have, until recently, been considered mostly inactive and excluded from seismic hazard models. We used high-resolution geophysical, bathymetric and sediment-core data to determine the structure, earthquake history and earthquake potential of a newly discovered active reverse fault beneath the inner reaches of Wellington Harbour. The fault has a slip rate of ~0.6 ± 0.3 mm/y, and a vertical displacement history indicating at least two large magnitude (Mw 6.3-7.1), surface-rupturing earthquakes in the last 10 ka. We infer that the fault extends southwards onshore beneath the city and potentially into Cook Strait, and represents a significant previously unrecognised seismic hazard.

  17. Stress-Release Seismic Source for Seismic Velocity Measurement in Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, P. L.; Clark, C.; Richardson, J.; Martin, L.; Zahl, E.; Etter, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate seismic event locations are needed to delineate roles of mine geometry, stress and geologic structures in developing rockburst conditions. Accurate absolute locations are challenging in mine environments with rapid changes in seismic velocity due to sharp contrasts between individual layers and large time-dependent velocity gradients attending excavations. Periodic use of controlled seismic sources can help constrain the velocity in this continually evolving propagation medium comprising the miners' workplace. With a view to constructing realistic velocity models in environments in which use of explosives is problematic, a seismic source was developed subject to the following design constraints: (i) suitable for use in highly disturbed zones surrounding mine openings, (ii) able to produce usable signals over km-scale distances in the frequency range of typical coal mine seismic events (~10-100 Hz), (iii) repeatable, (iv) portable, (v) non-disruptive to mining operations, and (vi) safe for use in potentially explosive gaseous environments. Designs of the compressed load column seismic source (CLCSS), which generates a stress, or load, drop normal to the surface of mine openings, and the fiber-optic based source-initiation timer are presented. Tests were conducted in a coal mine at a depth of 500 m (1700 ft) and signals were recorded on the surface with a 72-ch (14 Hz) exploration seismograph for load drops of 150-470 kN (16-48 tons). Signal-to-noise ratios of unfiltered signals ranged from ~200 immediately above the source (500 m (1700 ft)) to ~8 at the farthest extent of the array (slant distance of ~800 m (2600 ft)), suggesting the potential for use over longer range. Results are compared with signals produced by weight drop and sledge hammer sources, indicating the superior waveform quality for first-arrival measurements with the CLCSS seismic source.

  18. Patterns of seismic activity preceding large earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Bruce E.; Carlson, J. M.; Langer, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    A mechanical model of seismic faults is employed to investigate the seismic activities that occur prior to major events. The block-and-spring model dynamically generates a statistical distribution of smaller slipping events that precede large events, and the results satisfy the Gutenberg-Richter law. The scaling behavior during a loading cycle suggests small but systematic variations in space and time with maximum activity acceleration near the future epicenter. Activity patterns inferred from data on seismicity in California demonstrate a regional aspect; increased activity in certain areas are found to precede major earthquake events. One example is given regarding the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 which is located near a fault section associated with increased activity levels.

  19. 3D Modelling of Seismically Active Parts of Underground Faults via Seismic Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzeskakis, Theofanis; Konstantaras, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    During the last few years rapid steps have been taken towards drilling for oil in the western Mediterranean sea. Since most of the countries in the region benefit mainly from tourism and considering that the Mediterranean is a closed sea only replenishing its water once every ninety years careful measures are being taken to ensure safe drilling. In that concept this research work attempts to derive a three dimensional model of the seismically active parts of the underlying underground faults in areas of petroleum interest. For that purpose seismic spatio-temporal clustering has been applied to seismic data to identify potential distinct seismic regions in the area of interest. Results have been coalesced with two dimensional maps of underground faults from past surveys and seismic epicentres, having followed careful reallocation processing, have been used to provide information regarding the vertical extent of multiple underground faults in the region of interest. The end product is a three dimensional map of the possible underground location and extent of the seismically active parts of underground faults. Indexing terms: underground faults modelling, seismic data mining, 3D visualisation, active seismic source mapping, seismic hazard evaluation, dangerous phenomena modelling Acknowledgment This research work is supported by the ESPA Operational Programme, Education and Life Long Learning, Students Practical Placement Initiative. References [1] Alves, T.M., Kokinou, E. and Zodiatis, G.: 'A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: The South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins', Marine Pollution Bulletin, In Press, 2014 [2] Ciappa, A., Costabile, S.: 'Oil spill hazard assessment using a reverse trajectory method for the Egadi marine protected area (Central Mediterranean Sea)', Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 84 (1-2), pp. 44-55, 2014 [3] Ganas, A., Karastathis, V., Moshou, A., Valkaniotis, S., Mouzakiotis

  20. Source-independent full waveform inversion of seismic data

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2006-02-14

    A set of seismic trace data is collected in an input data set that is first Fourier transformed in its entirety into the frequency domain. A normalized wavefield is obtained for each trace of the input data set in the frequency domain. Normalization is done with respect to the frequency response of a reference trace selected from the set of seismic trace data. The normalized wavefield is source independent, complex, and dimensionless. The normalized wavefield is shown to be uniquely defined as the normalized impulse response, provided that a certain condition is met for the source. This property allows construction of the inversion algorithm disclosed herein, without any source or source coupling information. The algorithm minimizes the error between data normalized wavefield and the model normalized wavefield. The methodology is applicable to any 3-D seismic problem, and damping may be easily included in the process.

  1. Interaction of seismic sources in the Apennine belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viti, Marcello; Mantovani, Enzo; Cenni, Nicola; Vannucchi, Andrea

    By analyzing the historical seismicity of the Apennines since AD 1000, we have identified four major seismic sequences occurred from 1349 to 1353, 1456 to 1461, 1688 to 1706 and 1915 to 1920. Each of these crises is characterized by several strong earthquakes and by the fact that seismic activity progressively migrated from the Southern to northern Apennines. In order to provide a plausible explanation for this phenomenology, we have elaborated a detailed seismotectonic model of the Apennines, compatible with the implications of plate tectonics in the central Mediterranean region. In our model, the seismic motion of a tectonic block, induced by tectonic forces, stresses the surrounding blocks eventually causing further earthquake activity. The temporal delay between the triggering shock and subsequent strong earthquakes depends on the rheological properties of the crust-mantle system, that control post-seismic strain and stress perturbations. We argue that the spatio-temporal distribution of major earthquakes which have occurred in the Apennine belt during the most intense seismic crises since AD 1300 is consistent with the short-term implications of the ongoing tectonic setting in the central Mediterranean area and with the expected effects of post-seismic relaxation, quantified by numerical experiments based on the stress diffusion model. The results obtained point out an agreement between earthquake occurrence and the arrival of the predicted maximum amplitude of post-seismic strain and strain rate perturbation in the relevant seismic zones. Moreover, in most cases the strain regime induced by post-seismic perturbation may be compatible with the geometry and kinematics of fault systems recognized in the zones considered. These results might delineate an important tool for recognizing the zones most prone to next strong earthquakes in the study area.

  2. Seismic activation of tectonic stresses by mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcak, Henryk; Mutke, Grzegorz

    2013-10-01

    Hard coal mining in the area of the Bytom Syncline (Upper Silesia Coal Basin, Poland) has been associated with the occurrence of high-energy seismic events (up to 109 J; local magnitude up to 4.0), which have been recorded by the local mining seismological network and regional seismological network. It has been noticed that the strongest seismic events occur when the mine longwall alignments coincide with the syncline axis. Data recorded by the improved local seismic network in the Bobrek Mine allow the estimation of the depths of the events’ hypocentres during excavation of longwall panel 3 as it approached the syncline axis. The recorded data were also used to estimate the location of the rupture surface and stress distribution in the seismic focus region. It was concluded that tectonic stresses, particularly horizontal stress components, are essential in the distribution of seismic tremors resulting from reverse faulting. The stresses induced by mining activity are only triggering tectonic deformations. The hypocentres of the strongest seismic events during mining of longwall panel 3/503 were located 300-800 m deeper than the level of coal seam 503.

  3. One-Station Seismology Without Traditional Seismic Sources (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, V. C.

    2010-12-01

    Information about the interior of planetary bodies other than the Earth is difficult to obtain. While seismology has been extremely successful on the Earth, there has been a reluctance to use precious payload weight to send a single seismometer aboard a lander. Much of this reluctance focuses on the idea that a single seismometer could not provide useful information about the subsurface. However, this notion relies on old concepts of seismology in which large earthquakes recorded at many stations are a prerequisite for obtaining useful data, whereas a number of new techniques (e.g. cross correlation, deconvolution and spectral analysis applied to noise) have shown that non-traditional sources of seismic waves can potentially be very useful. Furthermore, some of these techniques can be applied to data from a single station. Here, we therefore challenge the old notion of the prerequisites for seismology by demonstrating how a single seismometer that is well-coupled to the ground can potentially deliver useful information about the shallow subsurface and crustal structure (including the presence or absence of liquids there), and even possibly average global structure. The success of these measurements depends on a number of factors, including the type of seismic sources that are available, the temporal variability of these sources, the length of time that the station reports data, and certain properties of the subsurface. After making some order-of-magnitude estimates regarding these parameters, we make a quantitative assessment of what would need to be achieved technologically in order for the measurements to succeed. While this assessment is planet-dependent, our first order conclusions are that shallow reflectors could potentially be imaged with current technology, that crustal reverberations could be analyzed if there exists relatively strong surface activity (e.g. volcanism, large rivers, ice tectonics or active sources), but that deeper structure may be

  4. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  5. Underwater seismic source. [for petroleum exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for generating a substantially oscillation-free seismic signal for use in underwater petroleum exploration, including a bag with walls that are flexible but substantially inelastic, and a pressured gas supply for rapidly expanding the bag to its fully expanded condition is described. The inelasticity of the bag permits the application of high pressure gas to rapidly expand it to full size, without requiring a venting mechanism to decrease the pressure as the bag approaches a predetermined size to avoid breaking of the bag.

  6. Apollo 14 active seismic experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, J. S.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Explosion seismic refraction data indicate that the lunar near-surface rocks at the Apollo 14 site consist of a regolith 8.5 meters thick and characterized by a compressional wave velocity of 104 meters per second. The regolith is underlain by a layer with a compressional wave velocity of 299 meters per second. The thickness of this layer, which we interpret to be the Fra Mauro Formation, is between 16 and 76 meters. The layer immediately beneath this has a velocity greater than 370 meters per second. We found no evidence of permafrost.

  7. Regional Observation of Seismic Activity in Baekdu Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geunyoung; Che, Il-Young; Shin, Jin-Soo; Chi, Heon-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Seismic unrest in Baekdu Mountain area between North Korea and Northeast China region has called attention to geological research community in Northeast Asia due to her historical and cultural importance. Seismic bulletin shows level of seismic activity in the area is higher than that of Jilin Province of Northeast China. Local volcanic observation shows a symptom of magmatic unrest in period between 2002 and 2006. Regional seismic data have been used to analyze seismic activity of the area. The seismic activity could be differentiated from other seismic phenomena in the region by the analysis.

  8. Crustal Seismic Anisotropy Produced by Rock Fabric Terranes in the Taiwan Central Range Deformational Orogen: Integrative Study Combining Rock Physics, Structural Geology, and Passive/Active-Source Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D. A.; Ross, Z.; Christensen, N. I.; Wu, F. T.; Byrne, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    The island of Taiwan is currently under construction due to the collision of the northwestern corner of the Philippine Sea plate and the embedded Luzon island arc with the larger continental Eurasian plate. This collision is responsible for the current growth of the Central Range that dominates the eastern half of the island. An international collaboration involving several USA and Taiwan universities and academic institutions was formed to study how the orogen evolves through time and to understand the role of a colliding island arc in mountain building. The project, Taiwan Integrated Geodynamics Research (TAIGER), was funded by NSF-Continental Dynamics and Taiwan National Science Council. The Central Range grows at one of the most rapid rates of uplift in the world, exposing metamorphic rocks that were once at least 10 km deep. The range offers unique opportunities for studies of crustal seismic anisotropy for two major reasons: (1) its geological makeup is conducive for producing crustal seismic anisotropy; that is, the rocks are highly foliated; and (2) a seismological data volume of significant breadth offers extensive coverage of sources and recording stations throughout the region. We carried out a crustal shear wave splitting study by data mining 3300 local earthquakes collected in the TAIGER 2009 sea-land experiment. We used an automated P and S wave arrival time picking method (Ross and Ben-Zion, 2014) applied to over 100,000 event-station pairs. These data were analyzed for shear-wave splitting using the MFAST automated package (Savage et al., 2010), producing 3300 quality shear wave split measurements. The splitting results were then station-averaged. The results show NNE to NE orientation trends that are consistent with regional cleavage strikes. Average crustal shear wave split time is 0.244 sec. These measurements are consistent with rock physics measurements of Central Range slate and metamorphic acoustic velocities. The splits exhibit orientations

  9. Geologic characterization of seismic sources: Moving into the 1990s

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, David P.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss leading-edge directions in paleoseismology and seismic geology, particularly as they relate to characterizing seismic sources. The paper builds on earlier articles that discuss some of these trends (Schwartz and Coppersmith, 1986; Schwartz, 1987). There are several areas that appear to be especially important. These are: fault segmentation, which provides a physical framework for evaluating both the size and potential location of future earthquakes on a fault zone; earthquake recurrence models, which provide information on the frequency of different size earthquakes on a fault; and long-term earthquake potential, an area in which significant advances have been made through development of earthquake hazard models that use probabilistic methodology to incorporate the uncertainties in seismic source characterization and the evolving understanding of the earthquake process.

  10. Calibration of R/V Marcus G. Langseth Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, J.; Tolstoy, M.; Webb, S.; Doermann, L.; Bohenstihl, D.; Nooner, S.; Crone, T.; Holmes, R. C.

    2008-12-01

    NSF-owned Research Vessel Marcus G. Langseth is operated by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, providing the tools for full-scale marine seismic surveys to the academic community. Since inauguration of science operations, Langseth has successfully supported 2D and 3D seismic operations, including offshore- onshore and OBS refraction profiling A significant component of Langseths equipage is the seismic source, comprising four identical linear subarrays which can be combined in a number of configurations according to the needs of each scientific mission. To ensure a full understanding of the acoustic levels of these sources and in order to mitigate their possible impact upon marine life through accurate determination of safety radii, an extensive program of acoustic calibration was carried out in 2007 and 2008, during Langseths shakedown exercises. A total of 14000+ airgun array discharges were recorded in three separate locations with water depths varying from 1750 to 45 meters and at source-receiver offsets between near-zero and 17 km. The quantity of data recorded allows significant quantitative analysis of the sound levels produced by the Langseth seismic sources. A variety of acoustic metrics will be presented and compared, including peak levels and energy-based measures such as RMS, Energy Flux Density and its equivalent, Sound Exposure Level. It is clearly seen that water depth exerts a fundamental control on received sound levels, but also that these effects can be predicted with reasonable accuracy.

  11. Magnetic activity of seismic solar analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Beck, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    We present our latest results on the solar-stellar connection by studying 18 solar analogs that we identified among the Kepler seismic sample tep{salabert16a}. We measured their magnetic activity properties using observations collected by the Kepler satellite and the ground-based, high-resolution HERMES spectrograph. The photospheric (S{_ph}) and chromospheric (S) magnetic activity proxies of these seismic solar analogs are compared in relation to solar activity. We show that the activity of the Sun is actually comparable to the activity of the seismic solar analogs. Furthermore, we report on the discovery of temporal variability in the acoustic frequencies of the young (1 Gyr-old) solar analog KIC 10644253 with a modulation of about 1.5 years, which agrees with the derived photospheric activity tep{salabert16b}. It could actually be the signature of the short-period modulation, or quasi-biennal oscillation, of its magnetic activity as observed in the Sun and the 1-Gyr-old solar analog HD 30495. In addition, the lithium abundance and the chromospheric activity estimated from HERMES confirms that KIC 10644253 is a young and more active star than the Sun.

  12. Source Characterization and Seismic Hazard Considerations for Hydraulic Fracture Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, K.; Viegas, G. F.; Baig, A. M.; Urbancic, T.

    2015-12-01

    Large microseismic events (M>0) have been shown to be generated during hydraulic fracture treatments relatively frequently. These events are a concern both from public safety and engineering viewpoints. Recent microseismic monitoring projects in the Horn River Basin have utilized both downhole and surface sensors to record events associated with hydraulic fracturing. The resulting hybrid monitoring system has produced a large dataset with two distinct groups of events: large events recorded by the surface network (0activity. Both datasets show very low seismic efficiency, implying slip weakening and possibly the presence of fluids in the source region. Reservoir events have shear-tensile source mechanisms ranging between tensile opening and tensile closing, and fracture orientations dominated by the rock fabric which are not always optimally oriented to the regional stress field. The observed source characteristics are expected for events driven by increased pore pressure and reduced friction due to lubrication. On average, deep events show higher stress drop, apparent stress, and rupture velocity than reservoir events. This reflects higher confining stresses with depth, and possibly the release of stored energy in the existing zone of weakness. Deep events are dominated by shear failures, but source characteristics are smaller than for naturally occurring tectonic earthquakes of similar magnitude. Most importantly from a seismic hazard perspective, large earthquakes associated with hydrofracing have lower stress drops than tectonic earthquakes, and thus produce smaller peak ground acceleration and less damage on

  13. Properties of the 15 February 2011 Flare Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, S.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    The first near-side X-class flare of Solar Cycle 24 occurred in February 2011 (SOL2011-02-05T01:55) and produced a very strong seismic response in the photosphere. One sunquake was reported by Kosovichev ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 734, L15, 2011), followed by the discovery of a second sunquake by Zharkov, Green, Matthews et al. ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 741, L35, 2011). The flare had a two-ribbon structure and was associated with a flux-rope eruption and a halo coronal mass ejection (CME) as reported in the CACTus catalogue. Following the discovery of the second sunquake and the spatial association of both sources with the locations of the feet of the erupting flux rope (Zharkov, Green, Matthews et al., Astrophys. J. Lett. 741, L35, 2011), we present here a more detailed analysis of the observed photospheric changes in and around the seismic sources. These sunquakes are quite unusual, taking place early in the impulsive stage of the flare, with the seismic sources showing little hard X-ray (HXR) emission, and strongest X-ray emission sources located in the flare ribbons. We present a directional time-distance diagram computed for the second source, which clearly shows a ridge corresponding to the travelling acoustic-wave packet and find that the sunquake at the second source happened about 45 seconds to one minute earlier than the first source. Using acoustic holography we report different frequency responses of the two sources. We find strong downflows at both seismic locations and a supersonic horizontal motion at the second site of acoustic-wave excitation.

  14. Multiband array detection and location of seismic sources recorded by dense seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, Natalia; Satriano, Claudio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-06-01

    We present a new methodology for detection and space-time location of seismic sources based on multiscale, frequency-selective coherence of the wave field recorded by dense large-scale seismic networks and local antennas. The method is designed to enhance coherence of the signal statistical features across the array of sensors and consists of three steps: signal processing, space-time imaging, and detection and location. The first step provides, for each station, a simplified representation of seismic signal by extracting multiscale non-stationary statistical characteristics, through multiband higher-order statistics or envelopes. This signal processing scheme is designed to account for a priori unknown transients, potentially associated with a variety of sources (e.g. earthquakes, tremors), and to prepare data for a better performance in posterior steps. Following space-time imaging is carried through 3-D spatial mapping and summation of station-pair time-delay estimate functions. This step produces time-series of 3-D spatial images representing the likelihood that each pixel makes part of a source. Detection and location is performed in the final step by extracting the local maxima from the 3-D spatial images. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in detecting and locating seismic sources associated with low signal-to-noise ratio on an example of the aftershock earthquake records from local stations of International Maule Aftershock Deployment in Central Chile. The performance and potential of the method to detect, locate and characterize the energy release associated with possibly mixed seismic radiation from earthquakes and low-frequency tectonic tremors is further tested on continuous data from southwestern Japan.

  15. An integrated analysis of controlled- and passive source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpfhuber, Eva-Maria

    This dissertation consists of two parts, which include a study using passive source seismic data, and one using the dataset from a large-scale refraction/wide-angle reflection seismic experiment as the basis for an integrated analysis. The goal of the dissertation is the integration of the two different datasets and a combined interpretation of the results of the "Continental Dynamics of the Rocky Mountains" (CD-ROM) 1999 seismic experiment. I have determined the crustal structure using four different receiver function methods using data collected from the northern transect of the CD-ROM passive seismic experiment. The resulting migrated image and crustal thickness determinations confirm and define prior crustal thickness measurements based on the CD-ROM and Deep Probe datasets. The new results show a very strong lower crustal layer (LCL) with variable thickness beneath the Wyoming Province. In addition, I was able to show that it terminates at 42° latitude and provide a seismic tie between the CD-ROM and Deep Probe seismic experiments so they represent a continuous N-S transect extending from New Mexico into Alberta, Canada. This new tie is particularly important because it occurs close to a major tectonic boundary, the Cheyenne belt, between an Archean craton and a Proterozoic terrane. The controlled-source seismic dataset was analyzed with the aid of forward modeling and inversion to establish a two-dimensional velocity and interface model of the area. I have developed a picking strategy, which helps identify the seismic phases, and improves quality and quantity of the picks. In addition, I was able to pick and identify S-wave phases, which furthermore allowed me to establish an independent S-wave model, and hence the Poisson's and Vp/Vs ratios. The final velocity and interface model was compared to prior results, and the results were jointly interpreted with the receiver function results. Thanks to the integration of the controlled-source and receiver function

  16. Array analysis methods for detection, classification and location of seismic sources: a first evaluation for aftershock analysis using dense temporary post-seismic array network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, N.; Satriano, C.; Vilotte, J.; Bernard, P.

    2012-12-01

    Detection, separation, classification and location of distributed non stationary seismic sources in broadband noisy environment is an important problem in seismology, in particular for monitoring the high-level post-seismic activity following large subduction earthquakes, like the off-shore Maule (Mw 8.8, 2010) earthquake in Central Chile. Multiple seismic arrays, and local antenna, distributed over a region allow exploiting frequency selective coherence of the signals that arrive at widely-separated array stations, leading to improved detection, convolution blind source separation, and location of distributed non stationary sources. We present here first results on the investigation of time-frequency adaptive array analysis techniques for detection and location of broadband distributed seismic events recorded by the dense temporary seismic network (International Maule Aftershock Deployment, IMAD) installed for monitoring the high-level seismic activity following the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake (Mw 8.8). This seismic network is characterized by a large aperture, with variable inter-station distances, corroborated with a high level of distributed near and far field seismic source activity and noise. For this study, we first extract from the post-seismic network a number of seismic arrays distributed over the region covered by this network. A first aspect is devoted to passive distributed seismic sources detection, classification and separation. We investigate a number of narrow and wide band signal analysis methods both in time and time-frequency domains for energy arrival detection and tracking, including time adaptive higher order statistics, e.g. like kurtosis, and multiband band-pass filtering, together with adaptive time-frequency transformation and extraction techniques. We demonstrate that these techniques provide superior resolution and robustness than classical STA/LTA techniques in particular in the case of distributed sources with potential signal

  17. Assessing submarine gas hydrate at active seeps on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand, using controlled source electromagnetic data with constraints from seismic, geochemistry, and heatflow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalenberg, K.; Haeckel, M.; Pecher, I. A.; Toulmin, S. J.; Hamdan, L. J.; Netzeband, G.; Wood, W.; Poort, J.; Jegen, M. D.; Coffin, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    Electrical resistivity is one of the key properties useful for evaluating submarine gas hydrate deposits. Gas hydrates are electrically insulating in contrast to the conductive pore fluid. Where they form in sufficient quantities the bulk resistivity of the sub-seafloor is elevated. CSEM data were collected in 2007 as part of the German - International “New Vents” project on R/V Sonne, cruise SO191, at three target areas on the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand. The margin is characterized by widespread bottom simulating reflectors (BSR), seep structures, and active methane and fluid venting indicating the potential for gas hydrate formation. Opouawe Bank is one of the ridge and basin systems on the accretionary wedge and is located off the Wairarapa coast at water depths of 1000-1100 m. The first observed seep sites (North Tower, South Tower, Pukeko, Takahe, and Tui) were identified from individual gas flares in hydro-acoustic data and video observations during voyages on R/V Tangaroa. Seismic reflection data collected during SO191 subsequently identified more than 25 new seep structures. Two intersecting CSEM profiles have been surveyed across North Tower, South Tower, and Takahe. 1-D inversion of the data reveals anomalously high resistivities at North Tower and South Tower, moderately elevated resistivities at Takahe, and normal background resistivities away from the seeps. The high resistivities are attributed to gas hydrate layers at intermediate depths beneath the seeps. At South Tower the hydrate concentration could be possibly as much as 25% of the total sediment volume within a 50m thick layer. This conforms with geochemical pore water analyses which show a trend of increased methane flux towards South Tower. At Takahe, gas pockets and patchy gas hydrate, as well as sediment heterogeneities and carbonates, or temperature driven upward fluid flow indicated by the observed higher heat flow at this site may explain the resistivity pattern

  18. Seismic activity of Erebus volcano, antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada

    1987-11-01

    Mount Erebus is presently the only Antarctic volcano with sustained eruptive activity in the past few years. It is located on Ross Island and a convecting anorthoclase phonolite lava lake has occupied the summit crater of Mount Erebus from January 1973 to September 1984. A program to monitor the seismic activity of Mount Erebus named IMESS was started in December 1980 as an international cooperative program among Japan, the United States and New Zealand. A new volcanic episode began on 13 September, 1984 and continued until December. Our main observations from the seismic activity from 1982 1985 are as follows: (1) The average numbers of earthquakes which occurred around Mount Erebus in 1982, 1983 and January August 1984 were 64, 134 and 146 events per day, respectively. Several earthquake swarms occurred each year. (2) The averag number of earthquakes in 1985 is 23 events per day, with only one earthquake swarm. (3) A remarkable decrease of the background seismicity is recognized before and after the September 1984 activity. (4) Only a few earthquakes were located in the area surrounding Erebus mountain after the September 1984 activity. A magma reservoir is estimated to be located in the southwest area beneath the Erebus summit, based on the hypocenter distributions of earthquakes.

  19. Deterministic Methods of Seismic Source Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    time dis- tribution of sources, a noise time series is therefore composed of a random time sequence of "bursts" or pulses, with each pulse having a mode...and RA4 - - A3, we can see that, At - RB2 iR24 =- as B23 (2.4.38) RB32 - ItS1 , RB34 = - RU RB 42 3 B4 1 , RB 44 𔃺 RB43 We can obviously compute LaB

  20. Seismic reflection imaging of underground cavities using open-source software

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R J

    2011-12-20

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) includes provisions for an on-site inspection (OSI), which allows the use of specific techniques to detect underground anomalies including cavities and rubble zones. One permitted technique is active seismic surveys such as seismic refraction or reflection. The purpose of this report is to conduct some simple modeling to evaluate the potential use of seismic reflection in detecting cavities and to test the use of open-source software in modeling possible scenarios. It should be noted that OSI inspections are conducted under specific constraints regarding duration and logistics. These constraints are likely to significantly impact active seismic surveying, as a seismic survey typically requires considerable equipment, effort, and expertise. For the purposes of this study, which is a first-order feasibility study, these issues will not be considered. This report provides a brief description of the seismic reflection method along with some commonly used software packages. This is followed by an outline of a simple processing stream based on a synthetic model, along with results from a set of models representing underground cavities. A set of scripts used to generate the models are presented in an appendix. We do not consider detection of underground facilities in this work and the geologic setting used in these tests is an extremely simple one.

  1. The Use of Seismic Coda to Characterize the Source Mechanisms of Induced Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, D. T.; Leidig, M.; Yoo, S.; Mayeda, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years the injection of wastewater from petroleum production activities into disposal wells has been implicated in some unusual local seismicity. The potential seismic hazard associated with waste fluid disposal wells is so far poorly understood. Improving our understanding of the mechanics and physics of induced earthquakes is an important goal that will help mitigate seismic risk before disposal operations begin. To address this issue we adapted a set of data analysis techniques from seismic nuclear test-ban monitoring to the local scale (i.e., on the order of several spatial kilometers). In this paper we summarize the results of applying some of the methods to data from a temporary deployment of broadband stations surrounding a saltwater disposal well (SWD) near the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) airport. The sequence of small events (less than M 3.3) starting in late October 2008 provides a good test bed for the application of in-depth analysis to data recorded on a very sparse seismic network. In particular, we studied the amplitude behavior of the DFW data using the scattered seismic wave field, or so-called "coda", which has unique properties that makes its use ideal for sparse station monitoring at local distances. Because local scattered waves sample the subsurface via multiple reflections and 3-D scattering, amplitude measurements made from coda envelopes reach a steady decay that is purely a function of the average medium properties that encompass the volume surrounding the source and seismic station, irrespective of source size. As such, the scattered waves behave very predictably within a region and can be used for estimates of magnitude and other source-related characteristics (e.g., earthquake stress drop, radiated seismic energy, seismic moment) that are significantly more stable than traditional approaches that utilize the direct waves such as P and S. Because the coda averages over the 3-D crustal heterogeneity as well as the source radiation

  2. Seismic source characterisation of a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, Ingrid; Brückl, Ewald; Radinger, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The Tunnel Seismic While Drilling (TSWD) method aims at predicting continuously the geological situation ahead of the tunnel without disturbing the construction work. Thereby the Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) itself is used as seismic source. The cutting process generates seismic waves radiating into the rock mass and vibrations propagating to the main bearing of the cutter head. These vibrations are monitored and used as pilot signal. For the processing and interpretation it was hypothesized so far that the TBM acts like a single force. To prove this assumption the radiation pattern of several TBM's under construction were investigated. Therefore 3-components geophones were installed at the surface, which were situated directly above the tunnel axes and also with lateral offset. Additional, borehole geophones were placed in the wall of one tube of a two-tube tunnel. The geophones collected the forward and backward radiated wave field, as the TBM, operating in the other tube, passed their positions. The obtained seismic data contains continuous records over a range of 600 m of the TBM position. The offsets vary from 25 m to 400 m and the frequency ranges from 20-250 Hertz. The polarisation of the p-wave and the s-wave and their amplitude ratio were determined and compared with modelled seismograms with different source mechanism. The results show that the description of the source mechanism by a single force can be used as a first order approximation. More complex radiation pattern including tensile forces and several source locations like the transmission of reaction forces over the gripper to the tunnel wall are further tested and addressed.

  3. Study of the Seismic Source in the Jalisco Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Q. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Ochoa, J.; Cruz, L. H.

    2013-05-01

    The direct measure of the earthquake fault dimension and the orientation, as well as the direction of slip represent a complicated task nevertheless a better approach is using the seismic waves spectrum and the direction of P-first motions observed at each station. With these methods we can estimate the seismic source parameters like the stress drop, the corner frequency which is linked to the rupture duration time, the fault radius (For the particular case of a circular fault), the rupture area, the seismic moment , the moment magnitude and the focal mechanisms. The study area where were estimated the source parameters comprises the complex tectonic configuration of Jalisco block, that is delimited by the mesoamerican trench at the west, the Colima grabben to the south, and the Tepic-Zacoalco to the north The data was recorded by the MARS network (Mapping the Riviera Subduction Zone) and the RESAJ network. MARS had 50 stations and settled in the Jalisco block; for a period of time, of January 1, 2006 until June, 2007, the magnitude range of these was between 3 to 6.5 MB. RESJAL has 10 stations and is within the state of Jalisco, began to record since October 2011 and continues to record. Before of apply the method we firs remove the trend, the mean and the instrument response and we corrected for attenuation; then manually chosen the S wave, the multitaper method was used to obtain the spectrum of this wave and so estimate the corner frequency and the spectra level. We substitute the obtained in the equations of the Brune model to calculate the source parameters. To calculate focal mechanisms HASH software was used which determines the most likely mechanism. The main propose of this study is estimate earthquake seismic source parameters with the objective of that helps to understand the physics of earthquake rupture mechanism in the area.

  4. Seismic source inversion using Green's reciprocity and a 3-D structural model for the Japanese Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutė, S.; Fichtner, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a feasibility study for seismic source inversions using a 3-D velocity model for the Japanese Islands. The approach involves numerically calculating 3-D Green's tensors, which is made efficient by exploiting Green's reciprocity. The rationale for 3-D seismic source inversion has several aspects. For structurally complex regions, such as the Japan area, it is necessary to account for 3-D Earth heterogeneities to prevent unknown structure polluting source solutions. In addition, earthquake source characterisation can serve as a means to delineate existing faults. Source parameters obtained for more realistic Earth models can then facilitate improvements in seismic tomography and early warning systems, which are particularly important for seismically active areas, such as Japan. We have created a database of numerically computed 3-D Green's reciprocals for a 40°× 40°× 600 km size area around the Japanese Archipelago for >150 broadband stations. For this we used a regional 3-D velocity model, recently obtained from full waveform inversion. The model includes attenuation and radial anisotropy and explains seismic waveform data for periods between 10 - 80 s generally well. The aim is to perform source inversions using the database of 3-D Green's tensors. As preliminary steps, we present initial concepts to address issues that are at the basis of our approach. We first investigate to which extent Green's reciprocity works in a discrete domain. Considering substantial amounts of computed Green's tensors we address storage requirements and file formatting. We discuss the importance of the initial source model, as an intelligent choice can substantially reduce the search volume. Possibilities to perform a Bayesian inversion and ways to move to finite source inversion are also explored.

  5. Seismic source theory in stratified anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Menahem, A.; Sena, A.G.

    1990-09-10

    First, the authors obtain an explicit representation of the spectral elastodynamic Green`s tensor in general homogeneous anisotropic media as a sum of three integrals over the corresponding three slowness surfaces. The multidimensional stationary phase principle is then applied to derive an asymptotic approximation at the far field. In the case of azimuthally isotropic media, they offer an alternative representation of the Green`s tensor and its ensuing displacements fields in the form of an exact Hankel transform over the horizontal wave number variable. The total field is specified here in terms of two potentials: an SH potential and a mixed quasi-transverse/quasi-longitudinal potential, both of which assume the role of two scalar Green`s functions. The availability of the Green`s tensor in analytical form enables one to obtain readily numerical solutions for a wide selection of media and sources. It is shown that the radiation field of an explosion has the following new features: (1) Quasi-transverse waves are created with four and eight lobe patterns; (2) quasi-longitudinal waves are generated for the collatitudinal displacement with four lobe patterns; (3) the energy ratio SV/P may reach the value of 20 for more than 50% of the azimuths in crustal structures such as tuff and shales; and (4) radiation patterns for vertical shear waves are created which are indistinguishable from corresponding waves produced by earthquake faults. The formalism allows the authors to establish a Haskell-type matrix algorithm for a multilayered azimuthally isotropic half-space, which enables them to calculate body waves and surface waves in real-earth crustal models.

  6. Comparisons between vs30 and spectral response for 30 sites in Newcastle, Australia from collocated seismic cone penetrometer, active- and passive-source vs data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volti, Theodora; Burbidge, David; Collins, Clive; Asten, Michael; Odum, Jackson K.; Stephenson, William J.; Pascal, Chris; Holzschuh, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Although the time‐averaged shear‐wave velocity down to 30 m depth (VS30) can be a proxy for estimating earthquake ground‐motion amplification, significant controversy exists about its limitations when used as a single parameter for the prediction of amplification. To examine this question in absence of relevant strong‐motion records, we use a range of different methods to measure the shear‐wave velocity profiles and the resulting theoretical site amplification factors (AFs) for 30 sites in the Newcastle area, Australia, in a series of blind comparison studies. The multimethod approach used here combines past seismic cone penetrometer and spectral analysis of surface‐wave data, with newly acquired horizontal‐to‐vertical spectral ratio, passive‐source surface‐wave spatial autocorrelation (SPAC), refraction microtremor (ReMi), and multichannel analysis of surface‐wave data. The various measurement techniques predicted a range of different AFs. The SPAC and ReMi techniques have the smallest overall deviation from the median AF for the majority of sites. We show that VS30 can be related to spectral response above a period T of 0.5 s but not necessarily with the maximum amplification according to the modeling done based on the measured shear‐wave velocity profiles. Both VS30 and AF values are influenced by the velocity ratio between bedrock and overlying sediments and the presence of surficial thin low‐velocity layers (<2  m thick and <150  m/s), but the velocity ratio is what mostly affects the AF. At 0.20.5  s do the amplification curves consistently show higher values for soft site classes and lower for hard classes.

  7. Focal Mechanisms and Seismic Source Parameters in the Jalisco Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Q. J.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Jalisco Block is a very complex tectonic region delimited by the Middle America Trench at the west, the Colima grabben to the south, and the Tepic-Zacoalco grabben to the northeast. In this region great interplate and intraplate earthquakes have taken place historically. The main propose of this study is to estimate earthquake seismic source parameters with the objective of that helps to understand the physics of earthquake rupture mechanism and the tectonics in the region. We use data recorded by the MARS network (Mapping the Riviera Subduction Zone) a temporary seismic network with 50 stations installed in the states of Jalisco, Colima and Michoacán between January, 2006 and June 2007. We located more of 1000 events from February to November 2006 with magnitude between 2.0 to 4.5, using Hypo71 and a local P wave velocity model. To calculate focal mechanisms we read P-wave first motion polarity and MECFOC software was used which to determinate composite and individual mechanism. Before of apply the method for source parameters we first remove the trend, the mean and the instrument response and we corrected for attenuation; then manually chosen the S wave, the multitaper method was used to obtain the spectrum of this wave and so estimate the corner frequency and the spectra level. We substitute the obtained values in the equations of the Brune model to calculate the source parameters (the stress drop, the fault radius, the rupture area and the seismic moment).

  8. Ionospheric Response Due to Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Signatures of the seismic activity in the ionospheric F2 region have been studied by analyzing the measurement of electron and ion temperatures during the occurrence of earthquake. The ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data recorded by the RPA payload aboard the Indian SROSS-C2 satellite during the period from January 1995 to December 2000 were used for the altitude range 430-630 km over Indian region. The normal day's electron and ion temperatures have been compared to the temperatures recorded during the seismic activity. The details of seismic events were obtained from USGS earthquake data information website. It has been found that the average electron temperature is enhanced during the occurrence of earthquakes by 1.2 to 1.5 times and this enhancement was for ion temperature ranging from 1.1to 1.3 times over the normal day's average temperatures. The above careful quantitative analysis of ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data shows the consistent enhancement in the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures. It is expected that the seismogenic vertical electrical field propagates up to the ionospheric heights and induces Joule heating that may cause the enhancement in ionospheric temperatures.

  9. Shear wave identification near by shallow seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Rudajev, Vladimír.; Živor, Roman

    2010-05-01

    Interference of P- and S-waves occurs during the first period of P-wave when the shallow seismic measurement is realized near the seismic source (the distance is less or equal to one P-wave wavelength). Polarization analysis method (particle motion) is suitable for the determination of S-wave arrival time in these conditions. Three component geophones are usually used in this case for the registration of seismic waves generated by a hammer blow. With regard to P- and S-waves polarization it is advantageous to orientate the three component orthogonal system of geophones so that separate components make an angle of 35.26° to horizontal plane (Galperin geophone configuration). Azimuth angle between separate components is 120° in this case. This configuration insures the equivalent gravity force moments affect all the three components in the same way. It is in the contrast to the standard arrangement of the three component geophone with two horizontal and one vertical component. The inclined arrangement results in equal frequency responses for all the three components. Phase and amplitude characteristics between the components should therefore be the same. This facilitates the S-wave arrival detection. An example of application of this method to the determination of seismic wave propagation velocity anisotropy is presented.

  10. Non double couple seismic sources and its stress environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutikov, A.; Yunga, S.

    2003-04-01

    Non double couple sources are considered in framework of the hypothesis that the process of seismic rupture can be viewed as a result of complicated fault geometry and its segmentation. The study focuses on the comparison of the deformation modes of the NDC sources with the states of stresses in its vicinity. The states of stresses are revealed using as a first approximation summation of seismic moment tensors. A measure of NDC part of moment tensor or deformation mode is described by angle parameter which correspond to characteristic equation of considered tensors. This parameter is of special interest as it cosine exhibit uniform distribution for sum of simulated random moment tensors series. Analytical approach is found to reveal reliability of NDC measure taking into consideration the values of seismic moment tensor errors. A tectonophysical interpretation of the numerical experiments is proposed to highlight the role played by stress factor in the local kinematics of structural discontinuities during the seismic rupture process. This technique, together with the construction of diagrams of principal axes, enables us to rapidly examine the stress-field pattern and further discuss the deformation modes of faulting and fracturing, which may take place at a small scale in earthquake focus and at regional scale in geological unit. An examination of angular measure of NDC part versus parameter of deformation mode in number of geodynamic regimes confirm the self-similarity assumption. But for the whole data set, in contradiction with this result, scaling relations do not verify self-similarity. This feature implies that second order factors, as the hydrothermal or magmatic pore fluids in rock, influence source characteristics and bring new complications in scaling relations. This work was partly supported by RFBR, grant 01-05-65340.

  11. Effects of Large and Small-Source Seismic Surveys on Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, M.; Richardson, W. J.; Koski, W. R.; Smultea, M. A.; Haley, B.; Fitzgerald, M. W.; Rawson, M.

    2006-05-01

    L-DEO implements a marine mammal and sea turtle monitoring and mitigation program during its seismic surveys. The program consists of visual observations, mitigation, and/or passive acoustic monitoring (PAM). Mitigation includes ramp ups, powerdowns, and shutdowns of the seismic source if marine mammals or turtles are detected in or about to enter designated safety radii. Visual observations for marine mammals and turtles have taken place during all 11 L-DEO surveys since 2003, and PAM was done during five of those. Large sources were used during six cruises (10 to 20 airguns; 3050 to 8760 in3; PAM during four cruises). For two interpretable large-source surveys, densities of marine mammals were lower during seismic than non- seismic periods. During a shallow-water survey off Yucatán, delphinid densities during non-seismic periods were 19x higher than during seismic; however, this number is based on only 3 sightings during seismic and 11 sightings during non-seismic. During a Caribbean survey, densities were 1.4x higher during non-seismic. The mean closest point of approach (CPA) for delphinids for both cruises was significantly farther during seismic (1043 m) than during non-seismic (151 m) periods (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.001). Large whales were only seen during the Caribbean survey; mean CPA during seismic was 1722 m compared to 1539 m during non-seismic, but sample sizes were small. Acoustic detection rates with and without seismic were variable for three large-source surveys with PAM, with rates during seismic ranging from 1/3 to 6x those without seismic (n = 0 for fourth survey). The mean CPA for turtles was closer during non-seismic (139 m) than seismic (228 m) periods (P < 0.01). Small-source surveys used up to 6 airguns or 3 GI guns (75 to 1350 in3). During a Northwest Atlantic survey, delphinid densities during seismic and non-seismic were similar. However, in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, delphinid densities during non-seismic were 2x those during

  12. Forward and Inverse Modeling of the seismic and electromagnetic disturbances associated with localized seismic sources in volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Mahardika, H.; Jardani, A.

    2011-12-01

    We consider a seismic source characterized by a moment tensor in a water-saturated porous material with piece-wise constant seismic velocities corresponding to different geological units. We have developed a finite element code to compute the seismograms, the electrograms and the magnetograms associated with the source, the conversion of the mechanical energy to electromagnetic energy at the position of heterogeneities and the co-seismic signals traveling at the same speed than the seismic waves. In our model, the electromagnetic energy is generated through the electrokinetic coupling in porous materials. This coupling is related to the relative displacement between the pore water and the mineral grains coated by the electrical double layer. We show that in the case of a noisy environment, the electromagnetic information is complementary to the seismic information to recover the position of the source and to invert the moment tensor, which in turn provides information on the stress state of the volcano.

  13. Frequency power analyses of seismic sources on firn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Christopher; Diez, Anja; Coen, Hofstede; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Mayer, Christoph; Lambrecht, Astrid; Miller, Heinz; Eisen, Olaf

    2013-04-01

    A great obstacle for seismic surveys on firn-covered ice masses is the ability of firn to strongly attenuate seismic energy and divert downward ray paths away from the vertical because of the velocity gradient. The standard way to overcome these limitations is the drilling of shotholes about 10-30 m deep. However, drilling of shotholes is a time and energy consuming task. Another possibility is to use vibroseismic sources at the surface and increase the signal-to-noise ratio by repeated stacking. However, compared to explosive charges, vibroseismic signals are bandlimited per se. As a third variant, we investigate the usage of ordered patterns of surface charges consisting of detonation cord. Previous applications of detonation cord only explored their general comparison to bulk explosives when deployed in a linear fashion, i.e. a single line. Our approach extends these results to other geometries, like fan- or comb-shaped patterns. These have two advantages: first, over the pattern area a locally plane wave is generated, limiting the spherical and velocity-gradient induced spreading of energy during propagation; second, the ratio between seismic wave speed of the firn and the detonation cord of typically about 1:5 causes the wave to propagate in an angle downward. When using large offsets like a snow streamer, it is possible to direct the refected energy towards the streamer, depending on offset range and reflector depth. We compare the different source types for several surveys conducted in Antarctica in terms of frequency spectra. Our results show that ordered patterns of detonation cord serve as suitable seismic surface charges, avoiding the need to drill shotholes. Moreover, an example of a short profile with patterned surface charges is presented. The technique can be of advantage for surveys in remote areas, which can only be accessed by aircrafts.

  14. Seismicity at White Island volcano, New Zealand: a revised classification and inferences about source mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherburn, Steven; Scott, Bradley J.; Nishi, Yuji; Sugihara, Mituhiko

    1998-08-01

    The classification of earthquakes at White Island volcano, New Zealand, has been revised to address problems in existing classification schemes, to better reflect new data and to try to focus more on source processes. Seismicity generated by the direct involvement of magmatic or hydrothermal fluids are referred to as volcanic, and that generated by fault movement in response to stresses caused by those fluids, regional stresses, thermal effects and so on are referred to as volcano-tectonic. Spasmodic bursts form a separate category, as we have insufficient information to classify them as volcanic or volcano-tectonic. Volcanic seismicity is divided into short-duration, long-period volcanic earthquakes, long-duration volcanic earthquakes, and harmonic- and non-harmonic volcanic tremor, while volcano-tectonic seismicity is divided into shallow and deep volcano-tectonic earthquakes. Harmonic volcanic tremor is related to sub-surface intrusive processes, while non-harmonic volcanic tremor originates close to active craters at shallow depth, and usually occurs during eruptive activity. Short-duration, long-period volcanic earthquakes come from a single source close to the active craters, but originate deeper than non-harmonic volcanic tremor, and are not related to eruptive activity. Long-duration volcanic earthquakes often accompany larger discrete eruptions. The waveform of these events consists of an initial low-frequency part from a deep source, and a later cigar-shaped part of mixed frequencies from a shallow crater source.

  15. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  16. The seismicity of Ethiopia; active plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohr, P.

    1981-01-01

    Ethiopia, descended from the semimythical Kingdom of Punt, lies at the strategic intersection of Schmidt's jigsaw puzzle where the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the African Rift System meet. Because of geologically recent uplift combined with rapid downcutting erosion by rivers, notably the Blue Nile (Abbay), Ethiopia is the most mountainous country in Africa. It is also the most volcanically active, while its historical seismicity matches that of the midocean ridges. And, in a sense, Ethiopia is host to an evoloving ocean ridge system. 

  17. Electroacoustic pulse source for high-resolution seismic explorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannelli, G. B.; D'Ottavi, E.; Santoboni, S.

    1987-07-01

    We suggest an electroacoustic pulse source with frequency characteristics, directivity pattern, and energy suitable for high-resolution prospecting on land and underwater. The seismic wave is produced by a high-energy discharge, set in the focus of a parabolic aluminum reflector filled with insulating liquids. The acoustic pulse is transmitted to the soil via a neoprene diaphragm that couples the transducer to the earth. The discharge is primed by a low-energy preliminary spark, via a third electrode between the principal electrodes, which produces the liquid ionization. An important feature of the electroacoustic source is the variation of frequency spectrum of the impulse, by changing electrical parameters such as capacitance and inductance. The directivity pattern can be changed by inching the electrodes up or down with reference to the focus. First field measurements showed better penetration capacity of the seismic wave of the paraboloid in comparison with a traditional mechanical source. This electroacoustic source can be utilized on land, and even more successfully in underwater acoustic prospecting, by providing suitable electric insulation. In this latter application the frequency range is higher than that used for land prospecting.

  18. Design and application of an electromagnetic vibrator seismic source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Vibrational seismic sources frequently provide a higher-frequency seismic wavelet (and therefore better resolution) than other sources, and can provide a superior signal-to-noise ratio in many settings. However, they are often prohibitively expensive for lower-budget shallow surveys. In order to address this problem, I designed and built a simple but effective vibrator source for about one thousand dollars. The "EMvibe" is an inexpensive electromagnetic vibrator that can be built with easy-to-machine parts and off-the-shelf electronics. It can repeatably produce pulse and frequency-sweep signals in the range of 5 to 650 Hz, and provides sufficient energy for recording at offsets up to 20 m. Analysis of frequency spectra show that the EMvibe provides a broader frequency range than the sledgehammer at offsets up to ??? 10 m in data collected at a site with soft sediments in the upper several meters. The EMvibe offers a high-resolution alternative to the sledgehammer for shallow surveys. It is well-suited to teaching applications, and to surveys requiring a precisely-repeatable source signature.

  19. Seismic Source Characterization of Small-Scale Contained Explosions Utilizing Near-Source Empirical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPhail, M. D.; Stump, B. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Source Phenomenology Experiment (SPE) was a series of nine chemical explosions within a mine in Arizona. Its purpose was to collect seismic waveforms from these explosions for the purposes of resolving the equivalent elastic seismic source model. Ground motion data from the SPE are analyzed in this study to assess the uniqueness of the source representation of these contained explosions as well as the ability to resolve the trade-off between yield and depth when the geology or physical parameters of the source region may have a range of possible values. In this study, the p-wave velocities (Vp) are well constrained but the accompanying s-wave velocities (Vs) are less constrained. In order to assess the effects of source depth of burial (DOB) and Vs model on the seismic moment tensors, Green's functions (Gf) were computed for different DOB as well as different Vs models holding the Vpmodel constant. The Gf for the 16, near-source stations were calculated focusing on observations in the 150-680 m range. The compensated linear vector dipole and explosion components of the new Gf are compared to quantify the possible effects of DOB and Vs on the source representation. Gf with variable DOB and Vs are convolved with the Mueller-Murphy isotropic source function to produce synthetic seismograms at a range of azimuths in order to assess tradeoffs. Noise is added to the synthetics to investigate their impact on the full recovery of the seismic moment tensor. Inversions, with real and synthetic data, are conducted where covariance matrices and condition numbers are formulated to evaluate the effects of station distance and azimuthal coverage on seismic moment tensor recovery. These procedures guide additional analysis of the observational data to quantify the practical resolution of physical phenomenology accompanying these contained explosion sources.

  20. The Beni-Ilmane (Algeria) seismic sequence of May 2010: Seismic sources and stress tensor calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beldjoudi, H.; Delouis, B.; Djellit, H.; Yelles-Chaouche, A.; Gharbi, S.; Abacha, I.

    2016-02-01

    A moderate earthquake with a moment magnitude of Mw 5.5 struck the Sub-Bibanique region of eastern Algeria on 14 May 2010, killing three people, injuring hundreds of others, and causing moderate damages in the epicentral area, mainly in the villages of Beni-Ilmane and Samma. The focal mechanism of the seismic source for the first shock, obtained by near-field waveform modelling, exhibits left-lateral strike-slip faulting with the first nodal plane oriented at N345°, and right-lateral strike-slip faulting with the second nodal plane oriented at N254°. A second earthquake that struck the region on 16 May 2010, with a moment magnitude of Mw 5.1, was located 9 km SW of the first earthquake. The focal mechanism obtained by waveform modelling showed reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented NE-SW (N25° and N250°). A third earthquake that struck the region on 23 May 2010, with a moment magnitude of Mw 5.2, was located 7 km S of the first shock. The obtained focal mechanism showed a left-lateral strike-slip plane oriented at N12° and a right-lateral strike-slip plane oriented at N257°. Field investigations combined with geological and seismotectonic analyses indicate that the three earthquake shocks were generated by activity on three distinct faults. The second and third shocks were generated on faults oriented WSW-ENE and NNE-SSW, respectively. The regional stress tensor calculated in the region gives an orientation of N340° for the maximum compressive stress direction (σ1) which is close to the horizontal, with a stress shape factor indicating either a compressional or a strike-slip regime.

  1. Seismic source zoning and maximum credible earthquake prognosis of the Greater Kashmir Territory, NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hamid; Nath, Sankar Kumar

    2016-09-01

    We present the seismic source zoning of the tectonically active Greater Kashmir territory of the Northwestern Himalaya and seismicity analysis (Gutenberg-Richter parameters) and maximum credible earthquake (m max) estimation of each zone. The earthquake catalogue used in the analysis is an extensive one compiled from various sources which spans from 1907 to 2012. Five seismogenic zones were delineated, viz. Hazara-Kashmir Syntaxis, Karakorum Seismic Zone, Kohistan Seismic Zone, Nanga Parbat Syntaxis, and SE-Kashmir Seismic Zone. Then, the seismicity analysis and maximum credible earthquake estimation were carried out for each zone. The low b value (<1.0) indicates a higher stress regime in all the zones except Nanga Parbat Syntaxis Seismic Zone and SE-Kashmir Seismic Zone. The m max was estimated following three different methodologies, the fault parameter approach, convergence rates using geodetic measurements, and the probabilistic approach using the earthquake catalogue and is estimated to be M w 7.7, M w 8.5, and M w 8.1, respectively. The maximum credible earthquake (m max) estimated for each zone shows that Hazara Kashmir Syntaxis Seismic Zone has the highest m max of M w 8.1 (±0.36), which is espoused by the historical 1555 Kashmir earthquake of M w 7.6 as well as the recent 8 October 2005 Kashmir earthquake of M w 7.6. The variation in the estimated m max by the above discussed methodologies is obvious, as the definition and interpretation of the m max change with the method. Interestingly, historical archives (˜900 years) do not speak of a great earthquake in this region, which is attributed to the complex and unique tectonic and geologic setup of the Kashmir Himalaya. The convergence is this part of the Himalaya is distributed not only along the main boundary faults but also along the various active out-of-sequence faults as compared to the Central Himalaya, where it is mainly adjusted along the main boundary fault.

  2. Seismo-volcano source localization with triaxial broad-band seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inza, L. A.; Mars, J. I.; Métaxian, J. P.; O'Brien, G. S.; Macedo, O.

    2011-10-01

    Seismo-volcano source localization is essential to improve our understanding of eruptive dynamics and of magmatic systems. The lack of clear seismic wave phases prohibits the use of classical location methods. Seismic antennas composed of one-component (1C) seismometers provide a good estimate of the backazimuth of the wavefield. The depth estimation, on the other hand, is difficult or impossible to determine. As in classical seismology, the use of three-component (3C) seismometers is now common in volcano studies. To determine the source location parameters (backazimuth and depth), we extend the 1C seismic antenna approach to 3Cs. This paper discusses a high-resolution location method using a 3C array survey (3C-MUSIC algorithm) with data from two seismic antennas installed on an andesitic volcano in Peru (Ubinas volcano). One of the main scientific questions related to the eruptive process of Ubinas volcano is the relationship between the magmatic explosions and long-period (LP) swarms. After introducing the 3C array theory, we evaluate the robustness of the location method on a full wavefield 3-D synthetic data set generated using a digital elevation model of Ubinas volcano and an homogeneous velocity model. Results show that the backazimuth determined using the 3C array has a smaller error than a 1C array. Only the 3C method allows the recovery of the source depths. Finally, we applied the 3C approach to two seismic events recorded in 2009. Crossing the estimated backazimuth and incidence angles, we find sources located 1000 ± 660 m and 3000 ± 730 m below the bottom of the active crater for the explosion and the LP event, respectively. Therefore, extending 1C arrays to 3C arrays in volcano monitoring allows a more accurate determination of the source epicentre and now an estimate for the depth.

  3. Source parameters derived from seismic spectrum in the Jalisco block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Q. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    The direct measure of the earthquake fault dimension represent a complicated task nevertheless a better approach is using the seismic waves spectrum. With this method we can estimate the dimensions of the fault, the stress drop and the seismic moment. The study area comprises the complex tectonic configuration of Jalisco block and the subduction of the Rivera plate beneath the North American plate; this causes that occur in Jalisco some of the most harmful earthquakes and other related natural disasters. Accordingly it is important to monitor and perform studies that helps to understand the physics of earthquake rupture mechanism in the area. The main proposue of this study is estimate earthquake seismic source parameters. The data was recorded by the MARS network (Mapping the Riviera Subduction Zone) and the RESAJ network. MARS had 51 stations and settled in the Jalisco block; that is delimited by the mesoamerican trench at the west, the Colima grabben to the south, and the Tepic-Zacoalco to the north; for a period of time, of January 1, 2006 until December 31, 2007 Of this network was taken 104 events, the magnitude range of these was between 3 to 6.5 MB. RESJAL has 10 stations and is within the state of Jalisco, began to record since October 2011 and continues to record. We firs remove the trend, the mean and the instrument response, then manually chosen the S wave, then the multitaper method was used to obtain the spectrum of this wave and so estimate the corner frequency and the spectra level. We substitude the obtained in the equations of the Brune model to calculate the source parameters. Doing this we obtained the following results; the source radius was between .1 to 2 km, the stress drop was between .1 to 2 MPa.

  4. Modeling seismic hazard in the Lower Rhine Graben using a fault-based source model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneste, Kris; Vleminckx, Bart; Verbeeck, Koen; Camelbeeck, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    The Lower Rhine Graben (LRG) is an active tectonic structure in intraplate NW Europe. It is characterized by NW-SE oriented normal faults, and moderate but rather continuous seismic activity. Probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PHSA) in this region have hitherto been based on area source models, in which the LRG is modeled as a single or a small number of seismotectonic zones, where the occurrence of earthquakes is assumed to be uniform. Hazard engines usually model earthquakes in area sources as point sources or finite ruptures in a horizontal plane at a fixed depth. The past few years, efforts have increasingly been directed to using fault sources in PSHA, in order to obtain more realistic patterns of ground motion. This requires an inventory of all fault sources, and definition of their physical properties (at least length, width, strike, dip, rake, slip rate, and maximum magnitude). The LRG is one of the few regions in intraplate NW Europe where seismic activity can be linked to active faults. In the frame of the EC project SHARE ("Seismic Hazard Harmonization in Europe", http://www.share-eu.org/), we have compiled the first parameterized fault model for the LRG that can be used in PSHA studies. We construct the magnitude-frequency distribution (MFD) of each fault from two contributions: 1) up to the largest observed magnitude (M=5.7), we use the MFD determined from the historical and instrumental earthquake catalog, weighted in proportion to the total moment rate, and 2) the frequency of the maximum earthquake predicted by the fault model. We consider the ground-motion prediction equations (GMPE) that were selected in the SHARE project for active shallow crust. This selection includes GMPE's with different distance metrics, the main difference being whether depth of rupture is taken into account or not. Seismic hazard is computed with OpenQuake (http://openquake.org/), an open-source hazard and risk engine that is developed in the frame of the Global

  5. Source character of microseismicity in the San Francisco Bay block, California, and implications for seismic hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, J.A.; Zoback, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    We examine relocated seismicity within a 30-km-wide crustal block containing San Francisco Bay and bounded by two major right-lateral strike-slip fault systems, the Hayward and San Andreas faults, to determine seismicity distribution, source character, and possible relationship to proposed faults. Well-located low-level seismicity (Md ??? 3.0) has occurred persistently within this block throughout the recording interval (1969 to 1995), with the highest levels of activity occurring along or directly adjacent to (within ???5 km) the bounding faults and falling off toward the long axis of the bay. The total seismic moment release within the interior of the Bay block since 1969 is equivalent to one ML 3.8 earthquake, one to two orders of magnitude lower than activity along and within 5 km of the bounding faults. Focal depths of reliably located events within the Bay block are generally less than 13 km with most seismicity in the depth range of 7 to 12 km, similar to focal depths along both the adjacent portions of the San Andreas and Hayward faults. Focal mechanisms for Md 2 to 3 events within the Bay block mimic focal mechanisms along the adjacent San Andreas fault zone and in the East Bay, suggesting that Bay block is responding to a similar regional stress field. Two potential seismic source zones have been suggested within the Bay block. Our hypocentral depths and focal mechanisms suggest that a proposed subhorizontal detachment fault 15 to 18 km beneath the Bay is not seismically active. Several large-scale linear NW-trending aeromagnetic anomalies within the Bay block were previously suggested to represent large through-going subvertical fault zones. The two largest earthquakes (both Md 3.0) in the Bay block since 1969 occur near two of these large-scale linear aeromagnetic anomalies; both have subvertical nodal planes with right-lateral slip subparallel to the magnetic anomalies, suggesting that structures related to the anomalies may be capable of brittle

  6. Seismic gaps and source zones of recent large earthquakes in coastal Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, J.W.; Spence, W.

    1979-01-01

    The earthquakes of central coastal Peru occur principally in two distinct zones of shallow earthquake activity that are inland of and parallel to the axis of the Peru Trench. The interface-thrust (IT) zone includes the great thrust-fault earthquakes of 17 October 1966 and 3 October 1974. The coastal-plate interior (CPI) zone includes the great earthquake of 31 May 1970, and is located about 50 km inland of and 30 km deeper than the interface thrust zone. The occurrence of a large earthquake in one zone may not relieve elastic strain in the adjoining zone, thus complicating the application of the seismic gap concept to central coastal Peru. However, recognition of two seismic zones may facilitate detection of seismicity precursory to a large earthquake in a given zone; removal of probable CPI-zone earthquakes from plots of seismicity prior to the 1974 main shock dramatically emphasizes the high seismic activity near the rupture zone of that earthquake in the five years preceding the main shock. Other conclusions on the seismicity of coastal Peru that affect the application of the seismic gap concept to this region are: (1) Aftershocks of the great earthquakes of 1966, 1970, and 1974 occurred in spatially separated clusters. Some clusters may represent distinct small source regions triggered by the main shock rather than delimiting the total extent of main-shock rupture. The uncertainty in the interpretation of aftershock clusters results in corresponding uncertainties in estimates of stress drop and estimates of the dimensions of the seismic gap that has been filled by a major earthquake. (2) Aftershocks of the great thrust-fault earthquakes of 1966 and 1974 generally did not extend seaward as far as the Peru Trench. (3) None of the three great earthquakes produced significant teleseismic activity in the following month in the source regions of the other two earthquakes. The earthquake hypocenters that form the basis of this study were relocated using station

  7. Source Mechanism, Stress Triggering, and Hazard Analysis of Induced Seismicity in Oil/Gas Fields in Oman and Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Toksoz, M. N.; Ding, M.; Al-Enezi, A.; Al-Jeri, F.; Meng, C.

    2015-12-01

    Induced seismicity has drawn new attentions in both academia and industry in recent years as the increasing seismic activity in the regions of oil/gas fields due to fluid injection/extraction and hydraulic fracturing. Source mechanism and triggering stress of these induced earthquakes are of great importance for understanding their causes and the physics of the seismic processes in reservoirs. Previous research on the analysis of induced seismic events in conventional oil/gas fields assumed a double couple (DC) source mechanism. The induced seismic data in this study are from both Oman and Kuwait. For the Oman data, the induced seismicity is monitored by both surface network (0seismic data (0source mechanisms and triggering stress. We determine the full moment tensor of the induced seismicity data, based on a full-waveform inversion method (Song and Toksöz, 2011). With the full moment tensor inversion results, Coulomb stress is calculated to investigate the triggering features of the induced seismicity data. Our results show a detailed evolution of 3D triggering stress in oil/gas fields from year 1999 to 2007 for Oman, and from year 2006 to 2015 for Kuwait. In addition, the local hazard corresponding to the induced seismicity in these oil/gas fields is assessed and compared to ground motion prediction due to large (M>5.0) regional tectonic earthquakes.

  8. A//r//m//s AND SEISMIC SOURCE STUDIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, T.C.; ,

    1984-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes some recent developments in studies of seismic source parameter estimation, emphasizing the essential similarities between mining-induced seismogenic-failure and naturally occurring, tectonically driven earthquakes. The root-mean-square acceleration, a//r//m//s, shows much promise as an observational measure of high-frequency ground motion; it is very stable observationally, is insensitive to radiation pattern, and can be related linearly to the dynamic stress differences arising in the faulting process. To interpret a//r//m//s correctly, however, requires knowledge of f//m//a//x, the high-frequency band-limitation of the radiated field of earthquakes. As a practical matter, f//m//a//x can be due to any number of causes, but an essential ambiguity is whether or not f//m//a//x can arise from source properties alone. The interaction of the aftershocks of the Oroville, California, earthquake illustrates how a//r//m//s stress drops may be connected to detailed seismicity patterns.

  9. Control system for inclined impact-type surface seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, G.M.

    1987-07-28

    A system is described for controlling the azimuths and inclinations of the respective shooting paths of separate vehicle-transported surface seismic sources. Each source has an impact mass, means for propelling the mass along the shooting path to strike an earth contacting base plate, and means for adjusting each shooting path by rotation thereof about two mutually perpendicular gimbal axes oriented in predetermined relation to the heading of the associated vehicle. The system consists of: (a) means for determining each such vehicle heading; (b) means dependent upon each vehicle heading for calculating the angular positions of each shooting path with respect to the gimbal axes which align the shooting path with desired values of azimuth and inclination; and (c) means responsive to the calculation means for actuating each shooting path adjustment means to effect such alignment.

  10. Seismic noise frequency dependent P and S wave sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, E.; Schimmel, M.; Gualtieri, L.; Farra, V.; Ardhuin, F.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic noise in the period band 3-10 sec is generated in the oceans by the interaction of ocean waves. Noise signal is dominated by Rayleigh waves but body waves can be extracted using a beamforming approach. We select the TAPAS array deployed in South Spain between June 2008 and September 2009 and we use the vertical and horizontal components to extract noise P and S waves, respectively. Data are filtered in narrow frequency bands and we select beam azimuths and slownesses that correspond to the largest continuous sources per day. Our procedure automatically discard earthquakes which are localized during short time durations. Using this approach, we detect many more noise P-waves than S-waves. Source locations are determined by back-projecting the detected slowness/azimuth. P and S waves are generated in nearby areas and both source locations are frequency dependent. Long period sources are dominantly in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean whereas shorter period sources are rather in the North Atlantic Ocean. We further show that the detected S-waves are dominantly Sv-waves. We model the observed body waves using an ocean wave model that takes into account all possible wave interactions including coastal reflection. We use the wave model to separate direct and multiply reflected phases for P and S waves respectively. We show that in the South Atlantic the complex source pattern can be explained by the existence of both coastal and pelagic sources whereas in the North Atlantic most body wave sources are pelagic. For each detected source, we determine the equivalent source magnitude which is compared to the model.

  11. The Feasibility of Monitoring Continuous Wave Sources with Seismic Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Claassen, J.P.; Elbring, G.; Ladd, M.

    1999-03-15

    This paper identifies and explores the technical requirements and issues associated with remotely monitoring continuous wave (CW) sources with seismic arrays. Potential approaches to this monitoring problem will be suggested and partially evaluated to expose the monitoring challenges which arise when realistic local geologies and cultural noise sources are considered. The selective directionality and the adaptive noise cancellation properties of arrays are required to observe weak signals while suppressing a colored background punctuated with an unknown distribution of point and sometimes distributive sources. The array is also required to characterize the emitters and propagation environment so as to properly focus on the CW sources of interest while suppressing the remaining emitters. The proper application of arrays requires an appreciation of the complexity of propagation in a non-homogeneous earth. The heterogeneity often limits the available spatial coherence and therefore the size of the army. This adversely impacts the array gain and the array's ability to carefully resolve various emitters. Arrays must also contend with multipath induced by the source and the heterogeneous earth. If the array is to focus on an emitter and realize an enhancement in the signal to noise ratio, methods must be sought to coherently add the desired signal components while suppressing interference which may be correlated with the desired signal. The impact of these and other issues on army design and processing are described and discussed.

  12. The Pollino Seismic Sequence: Activated Graben Structures in a Seismic Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rößler, Dirk; Passarelli, Luigi; Govoni, Aladino; Bindi, Dino; Cesca, Simone; Hainzl, Sebatian; Maccaferri, Francesco; Rivalta, Eleonora; Woith, Heiko; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The Mercure Basin (MB) and the Castrovillari Fault (CF) in the Pollino range (Southern Apennines, Italy) represent one of the most prominent seismic gaps in the Italian seismic catalogue, with no M>5.5 earthquakes during the last centuries. In historical times several swarm-like seismic sequences occurred in the area including two intense swarms within the past two decades. The most energetic one started in 2010 and has been still active in 2014. The seismicity culminated in autumn 2012 with a M=5 event on 25 October. The range hosts a number of opposing normal faults forming a graben-like structure. Their rheology and their interactions are unclear. Current debates include the potential of the MB and the CF to host large earthquakes and the style of deformation. Understanding the seismicity and the behaviour of the faults is necessary to assess the tectonics and the seismic hazard. The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and INGV, Italy, have jointly monitored the ongoing seismicity using a small-aperture seismic array, integrated in a temporary seismic network. Based on this installation, we located more than 16,000 local earthquakes that occurred between November 2012 and September 2014. Here we investigate quantitatively all the phases of the seismic sequence starting from January 2010. Event locations along with moment tensor inversion constrain spatially the structures activated by the swarm and the migration pattern of the seismicity. The seismicity forms clusters concentrated within the southern part of the MB and along the Pollino Fault linking MB and CF. Most earthquakes are confined to the upper 10 km of the crust in an area of ~15x15 km2. However, sparse seismicity at depths between 15 and 20 km and moderate seismicity further north with deepening hypocenters also exist. In contrast, the CF appears aseismic; only the northern part has experienced micro-seismicity. The spatial distribution is however more complex than the major tectonic structures

  13. Fast Grid Search Algorithm for Seismic Source Location

    SciTech Connect

    ALDRIDGE,DAVID F.

    2000-07-01

    The spatial and temporal origin of a seismic energy source are estimated with a first grid search technique. This approach has greater likelihood of finding the global rninirnum of the arrival time misiit function compared with conventional linearized iterative methods. Assumption of a homogeneous and isotropic seismic velocity model allows for extremely rapid computation of predicted arrival times, but probably limits application of the method to certain geologic environments and/or recording geometries. Contour plots of the arrival time misfit function in the vicinity of the global minimum are extremely useful for (i) quantizing the uncertainty of an estimated hypocenter solution and (ii) analyzing the resolving power of a given recording configuration. In particular, simultaneous inversion of both P-wave and S-wave arrival times appears to yield a superior solution in the sense of being more precisely localized in space and time. Future research with this algorithm may involve (i) investigating the utility of nonuniform residual weighting schemes, (ii) incorporating linear and/or layered velocity models into the calculation of predicted arrival times, and (iii) applying it toward rational design of microseismic monitoring networks.

  14. Surface-Source Downhole Seismic Analysis in R

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Eric M.

    2007-01-01

    This report discusses a method for interpreting a layered slowness or velocity model from surface-source downhole seismic data originally presented by Boore (2003). I have implemented this method in the statistical computing language R (R Development Core Team, 2007), so that it is freely and easily available to researchers and practitioners that may find it useful. I originally applied an early version of these routines to seismic cone penetration test data (SCPT) to analyze the horizontal variability of shear-wave velocity within the sediments in the San Francisco Bay area (Thompson et al., 2006). A more recent version of these codes was used to analyze the influence of interface-selection and model assumptions on velocity/slowness estimates and the resulting differences in site amplification (Boore and Thompson, 2007). The R environment has many benefits for scientific and statistical computation; I have chosen R to disseminate these routines because it is versatile enough to program specialized routines, is highly interactive which aids in the analysis of data, and is freely and conveniently available to install on a wide variety of computer platforms. These scripts are useful for the interpretation of layered velocity models from surface-source downhole seismic data such as deep boreholes and SCPT data. The inputs are the travel-time data and the offset of the source at the surface. The travel-time arrivals for the P- and S-waves must already be picked from the original data. An option in the inversion is to include estimates of the standard deviation of the travel-time picks for a weighted inversion of the velocity profile. The standard deviation of each travel-time pick is defined relative to the standard deviation of the best pick in a profile and is based on the accuracy with which the travel-time measurement could be determined from the seismogram. The analysis of the travel-time data consists of two parts: the identification of layer-interfaces, and the

  15. Seismicity pattern: an indicator of source region of volcanism at convergent plate margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špičák, Aleš; Hanuš, Václav; Vaněk, Jiří

    2004-04-01

    The results of detailed investigation into the geometry of distribution of earthquakes around and below the volcanoes Korovin, Cleveland, Makushin, Yake-Dake, Oshima, Lewotobi, Fuego, Sangay, Nisyros and Montagne Pelée at convergent plate margins are presented. The ISC hypocentral determinations for the period 1964-1999, based on data of global seismic network and relocated by Engdahl, van der Hilst and Buland, have been used. The aim of this study has been to contribute to the solution of the problem of location of source regions of primary magma for calc-alkaline volcanoes spatially and genetically related to the process of subduction. Several specific features of seismicity pattern were revealed in this context. (i) A clear occurrence of the intermediate-depth aseismic gap (IDAG) in the Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) below all investigated active volcanoes. We interpret this part of the subducted slab, which does not contain any teleseismically recorded earthquake with magnitude greater than 4.0, as a partially melted domain of oceanic lithosphere and as a possible source of primary magma for calc-alkaline volcanoes. (ii) A set of earthquakes in the shape of a seismically active column (SAC) seems to exists in the continental wedge below volcanoes Korovin, Makushin and Sangay. The seismically active columns probably reach from the Earth surface down to the aseismic gap in the Wadati-Benioff zone. This points to the possibility that the upper mantle overlying the subducted slab does not contain large melted domains, displays an intense fracturing and is not likely to represent the site of magma generation. (iii) In the continental wedge below the volcanoes Cleveland, Fuego, Nisyros, Yake-Dake, Oshima and Lewotobi, shallow seismicity occurs down to the depth of 50 km. The domain without any earthquakes between the shallow seismically active column and the aseismic gap in the Wadati-Benioff zone in the depth range of 50-100 km does not exclude the melting of the mantle

  16. Seismicity of Barentsburg area at the Spitsbergen Archipelago: overlapping the tectonic and technogenic sources ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremenetskaya, E.; Asming, V.; Vinogradov, A.

    2003-04-01

    .0 were also detected 28012001 by the remote IMS stations, including ARCES in Norway at distance of 1000 km from WSI. There was found two main "local source sites" coinciding in space with the Southern and Northern mine fields of the "Arctikugol'" coal mines. The size of sites are 1x1 km and 0.5x1.5 km correspondingly, and they accumulated 523 weak seismic events, induced by rock bursts in the mines or by stress release in wall rocks. Time series in both sites are similar (the correlation ratio was evaluated for 10-days sets as 0.72). Only 12 very weak events in the sites and no one outside were detected when the mines were idle. During the period of active mining operations totally 18 events were detected outside of the "source sites". The obtain data allow to suggest, that mining activity is the main factor triggering both the seismic emission within mining fields and the local earthquakes in surrounding area, but more detail and continuous observations are needed to clarify an effect of technogenic seismicity on a geodynamic regime in nearby interplate faults.

  17. Dual-Frequency Coherence of Seismic Tremor and Source Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. M.; Schwartz, S. Y.; Clarke, D. L.

    2009-12-01

    Last fall Dorman and Schwartz reported discovery of a statistical signature (Dual-frequency coherence-DFC) which distinguishes nonvolcanic tremor from the usual microseismic noise. This was first observed in OBS data from the CRSEIZE experiment of 1999-2000 (DeShon and others, 2006), and later on land data from the Nicoya Peninsula. The tremor observed on OBSs was correlated with fluid flow through the seafloor (Brown and others, 2005). The observation of this signature on both land and OBS data indicates that it is a property of the source, rather than the path or the instrument or its environment. Possible causes include the fluid flow noise proposed by Julian (1994) and a repetitive stick-slip motion. Recent work has shown that nonvolcanic tremor accompanying slow slip in three different subduction zones, including northern Costa Rica, consists of swarms of low-frequency earthquakes that occur as stick-slip motion on the plate interface (Brown et al., 2008). Thus, both fluid flow and shear failure sources may be responsible for tremor generation. New work reveals that a Rössler attractor of the type studied by Julian produces a DFC similar to that of the tremor. Since the frequency of the oscillator is controlled by the physical properties of the source (fluid viscosity, channel dimension, flow velocity) this establishes a link between the seismically observable offset frequencies and one potential source mechanism.

  18. Induced Seismicity from different sources in Italy: how to interpret it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastori, M.; De Gori, P.; Piccinini, D.; Bagh, S.; Improta, L.; Chiarabba, C.

    2015-12-01

    Typically the term "induced seismicity" is used to refer minor earthquakes and tremors caused by human activities that alter the stresses and strains on the Earth's crust. In the last years, the interest in the induced seismicity related to fluids (oil and gas, and geothermal resources) extraction or injection is increased, because it is believed to be responsible to enucleate earthquakes. Possible sources of induced seismicity are not only represented by the oil and gas production but also, i.e., by changes in the water level of artificial lakes. The aim of this work is to show results from two different sources, wastewater injection and changes in the water level of an artificial reservoir (Pertusillo lake), that can produce induced earthquakes observed in the Val d'Agri basin (Italy) and to compare them with variation in crustal elastic parameters. Val d'Agri basin in the Apennines extensional belt hosts the largest oilfield in onshore Europe and is bordered by NW-SE ­trending fault systems. Most of the recorded seismicity seems to be related to these structures. We correlated the seismicity rate, injection curves and changes in water levels with temporal variations of Vp/Vs and anisotropic parameters of the crustal reservoirs and in the nearby area. We analysed about 983 high-quality recordings occurred from 2002 to 2014 in Val d'Agri basin from temporary and permanent network held by INGV and ENI corporate. 3D high-precision locations and manual-revised P- and S-picking are used to estimate anisotropic parameters (delay time and fast direction polarization) and Vp/Vs ratio. Seismicity is mainly located in two areas: in the SW of the Pertusillo Lake, and near the Eni Oil field (SW and NE of the Val d'Agri basin respectively). Our correlations well recognize the seismicity diffusion process, caused by both water injection and water level changes; these findings could help to model the active and pre-existing faults failure behaviour.

  19. Wave-equation migration velocity inversion using passive seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, B.; Shragge, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic monitoring at injection sites (e.g., CO2 sequestration, waste water disposal, hydraulic fracturing) has become an increasingly important tool for hazard identification and avoidance. The information obtained from this data is often limited to seismic event properties (e.g., location, approximate time, moment tensor), the accuracy of which greatly depends on the estimated elastic velocity models. However, creating accurate velocity models from passive array data remains a challenging problem. Common techniques rely on picking arrivals or matching waveforms requiring high signal-to-noise data that is often not available for the magnitude earthquakes observed over injection sites. We present a new method for obtaining elastic velocity information from earthquakes though full-wavefield wave-equation imaging and adjoint-state tomography. The technique exploits the fact that the P- and S-wave arrivals originate at the same time and location in the subsurface. We generate image volumes by back-propagating P- and S-wave data through initial Earth models and then applying a correlation-based extended-imaging condition. Energy focusing away from zero lag in the extended image volume is used as a (penalized) residual in an adjoint-state tomography scheme to update the P- and S-wave velocity models. We use an acousto-elastic approximation to greatly reduce the computational cost. Because the method requires neither an initial source location or origin time estimate nor picking of arrivals, it is suitable for low signal-to-noise datasets, such as microseismic data. Synthetic results show that with a realistic distribution of microseismic sources, P- and S-velocity perturbations can be recovered. Although demonstrated at an oil and gas reservoir scale, the technique can be applied to problems of all scales from geologic core samples to global seismology.

  20. Assessing the Uncertainties on Seismic Source Parameters: Towards Realistic Estimates of Moment Tensor Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoni, F.; Scognamiglio, L.; Tinti, E.; Casarotti, E.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic moment tensor is one of the most important source parameters defining the earthquake dimension and style of the activated fault. Moment tensor catalogues are ordinarily used by geoscientists, however, few attempts have been done to assess possible impacts of moment magnitude uncertainties upon their own analysis. The 2012 May 20 Emilia mainshock is a representative event since it is defined in literature with a moment magnitude value (Mw) spanning between 5.63 and 6.12. An uncertainty of ~0.5 units in magnitude leads to a controversial knowledge of the real size of the event. The possible uncertainty associated to this estimate could be critical for the inference of other seismological parameters, suggesting caution for seismic hazard assessment, coulomb stress transfer determination and other analyses where self-consistency is important. In this work, we focus on the variability of the moment tensor solution, highlighting the effect of four different velocity models, different types and ranges of filtering, and two different methodologies. Using a larger dataset, to better quantify the source parameter uncertainty, we also analyze the variability of the moment tensor solutions depending on the number, the epicentral distance and the azimuth of used stations. We endorse that the estimate of seismic moment from moment tensor solutions, as well as the estimate of the other kinematic source parameters, cannot be considered an absolute value and requires to come out with the related uncertainties and in a reproducible framework characterized by disclosed assumptions and explicit processing workflows.

  1. Seismic activity monitoring in the Izvorul Muntelui dam region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borleanu, Felix; Otilia Placinta, Anca; Popa, Mihaela; Adelin Moldovan, Iren; Popescu, Emilia

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes occurrences near the artificial water reservoirs are caused by stress variation due to the weight of water, weakness of fractures or faults and increasing of pore pressure in crustal rocks. In the present study we aim to investigate how Izvorul Muntelui dam, located in the Eastern Carpathians influences local seismicity. For this purpose we selected from the seismic bulletins computed within National Data Center of National Institute for Earth Physics, Romania, crustal events occurred between 984 and 2015 in a range of 0.3 deg around the artificial lake. Subsequently to improve the seismic monitoring of the region we applied a cross-correlation detector on the continuous recordings of Bicaz (BIZ) seismic stations. Besides the tectonic events we detected sources within this region that periodically generate artificial evens. We couldn't emphasize the existence of a direct correlation between the water level variations and natural seismicity of the investigated area.

  2. Seismic Hazard characterization study using an earthquake source with Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) method in the Northern of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahya, A.; Palupi, M. I. R.; Suharsono

    2016-11-01

    Sumatra region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Indonesia because it is lie on an active tectonic zone. In 2004 there is earthquake with a moment magnitude of 9.2 located on the coast with the distance 160 km in the west of Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam and triggering a tsunami. These events take a lot of casualties and material losses, especially in the Province of Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam and North Sumatra. To minimize the impact of the earthquake disaster, a fundamental assessment of the earthquake hazard in the region is needed. Stages of research include the study of literature, collection and processing of seismic data, seismic source characterization and analysis of earthquake hazard by probabilistic methods (PSHA) used earthquake catalog from 1907 through 2014. The earthquake hazard represented by the value of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) and Spectral Acceleration (SA) in the period of 0.2 and 1 second on bedrock that is presented in the form of a map with a return period of 2475 years and the earthquake hazard curves for the city of Medan and Banda Aceh.

  3. Seismic sources in El Salvador. A geological and geodetic contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Henar, J.; Martínez-Díaz, J. J.; Benito, B.; Alvarez-Gomez, J. A.; Canora, C.; Capote, R.; Staller, A.; Tectónica Activa, Paleosismicidad y. Riesgos Asociados UCM-910368

    2013-05-01

    El Salvador Fault Zone is a deformation band of 150 km long and 20 km wide within the Salvadorian volcanic arc. This shear band distributes the deformation between main strike-slip faults trending N90°-100°E and around 30 km long, and secondary normal faults trending between N120°E and N170°E. The ESFZ continues westward and is relieved by the Jalpatagua Fault. Eastward ESFZ becomes less clear disappearing at Golfo de Fonseca. The ESFZ deforms and offsets quaternary deposits with a right lateral movement in its main segments. Five segments have been proposed for the whole fault zone, from the Jalpatagua Fault to the Golfo de Fonseca. Paleoseismic studies in the Berlin and San Vicente Segments reveal an important amount of quaternary deformation. In fact, the San Vicente Segment was the source of the February 13, 2001 destructive earthquake. In this work we propose 18 capable seismic sources within El Salvador. The slip rate of each source has been obtained through out the combination of GPS data and paleoseismic data when it has been possible. We also have calculated maximum theoretical intensities produced by the maximum earthquakes related with each fault. We have taken into account several scenarios considering different possible surface rupture lengths up to 50 km and Mw 7.6 in some of the strike slip faults within ESFZ.

  4. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Adriano; Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction, which stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard.

  5. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  6. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  7. SEISMIC SOURCE SCALING AND DISCRIMINATION IN DIVERSE TECTONIC ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, R E; Mayeda, K; Walter, W R; Viegas, G M; Murphy, K

    2008-07-08

    The objectives of this study are to improve low-magnitude (concentrating on M2.5-5) regional seismic discrimination by performing a thorough investigation of earthquake source scaling using diverse, high-quality datasets from varied tectonic regions. Local-to-regional high-frequency discrimination requires an estimate of how earthquakes scale with size. Walter and Taylor (2002) developed the MDAC (Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Corrections) method to empirically account for these effects through regional calibration. The accuracy of these corrections has a direct impact on our ability to identify clandestine explosions in the broad regional areas characterized by low seismicity. Unfortunately our knowledge at small magnitudes (i.e., m{sub b} < {approx} 4.0) is poorly resolved, and source scaling remains a subject of on-going debate in the earthquake seismology community. Recently there have been a number of empirical studies suggesting scaling of micro-earthquakes is non-self-similar, yet there are an equal number of compelling studies that would suggest otherwise. It is not clear whether different studies obtain different results because they analyze different earthquakes, or because they use different methods. Even in regions that are well studied, such as test sites or areas of high seismicity, we still rely on empirical scaling relations derived from studies taken from half-way around the world at inter-plate regions. We investigate earthquake sources and scaling from different tectonic settings, comparing direct and coda wave analysis methods that both make use of empirical Green's function (EGF) earthquakes to remove path effects. Analysis of locally recorded, direct waves from events is intuitively the simplest way of obtaining accurate source parameters, as these waves have been least affected by travel through the earth. But finding well recorded earthquakes with 'perfect' EGF events for direct wave analysis is difficult, limits the number of earthquakes

  8. R/V EWING seismic source array calibrations: 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, J.; Webb, S.; Tolstoy, M.; Rawson, M.; Holmes, C.; Bohnenstiehl, D.; Chapp, E.

    2003-12-01

    In the Northern Gulf of Mexico, May, 2003, an NSF-funded effort was carried out to obtain calibrated measurements of the various airgun arrays deployed by R/V EWING during its seismic surveys. The motivations for this were several: to ground-truth the modeling upon which safety radii for marine mammal mitigation are established; to obtain broadband digitized signals which will accurately define the full spectral content of airgun signatures; to investigate the effects of seafloor interactions and their contribution to the acoustic noise levels from seismic sources. For this purpose, a digital, remotely telemetering spar buoy was designed and assembled; affording interactive control over the choice of two hydrophone channels, four fixed gain settings and four digitizing rates [6,250 - 50,000 Hz.] Three deployments were planned: a deep-water site, suitable for comparison of actual signals with modeled results; a shallow-water [25 - 50m] site where the effects of bottom interaction would be strongest; and a continental-slope site, which represents the favored habitat of many cetacean species. Methodology was developed which enabled the sequential discharge of four subarrays of 6, 10, 12 and 20 airguns. A separate run was made with two "GI" airguns, the favored high resolution survey source. An Incidental Harassment Authorization and a Biological Opinion, including an Incidental Take Statement were issued for the project by National Marine Fisheries, and a suite of marine mammal observation and mitigation procedures was followed. The deep and shallow water sites were occupied, and some 440 airgun signals were recorded. The slope site work was cancelled due to weather too poor for accurate marine mammal observation, but calibration was subsequently carried out with an exploration industry source vessel in a similar environment. Preliminary results indicate that the mitigation modeling is accurate, though somewhat conservative; that the radiated energy from airgun arrays

  9. Seismic hazard assessment of Syria using seismicity, DEM, slope, active tectonic and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Raed; Adris, Ahmad; Singh, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we discuss the use of an integrated remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques for evaluation of seismic hazard areas in Syria. The present study is the first time effort to create seismic hazard map with the help of GIS. In the proposed approach, we have used Aster satellite data, digital elevation data (30 m resolution), earthquake data, and active tectonic maps. Many important factors for evaluation of seismic hazard were identified and corresponding thematic data layers (past earthquake epicenters, active faults, digital elevation model, and slope) were generated. A numerical rating scheme has been developed for spatial data analysis using GIS to identify ranking of parameters to be included in the evaluation of seismic hazard. The resulting earthquake potential map delineates the area into different relative susceptibility classes: high, moderate, low and very low. The potential earthquake map was validated by correlating the obtained different classes with the local probability that produced using conventional analysis of observed earthquakes. Using earthquake data of Syria and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) data is introduced to the model to develop final seismic hazard map based on Gutenberg-Richter (a and b values) parameters and using the concepts of local probability and recurrence time. The application of the proposed technique in Syrian region indicates that this method provides good estimate of seismic hazard map compared to those developed from traditional techniques (Deterministic (DSHA) and probabilistic seismic hazard (PSHA). For the first time we have used numerous parameters using remote sensing and GIS in preparation of seismic hazard map which is found to be very realistic.

  10. Performance Analysis of Tandem-L Mission for Modeling Volcanic and Seismic Deformation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Homa; Goel, Kanika; Parizzi, Alessandro; Sudhaus, Henriette; Adam, Nico; Eineder, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Although a great number of publications have focused on the application of InSAR in deformation source modeling as well as the development of different algorithms in this regard, little investigation has been dedicated to the sensitivity analysis of the InSAR in deformation source modeling. Our purpose is to address this issue by analyzing the reliability of InSAR in modeling the deformation sources due to landslides, seismic and volcanic activities, with special focus on the L band SAR measurements. The sensitivity analysis is considered for three commonly used geophysical models in case of subsidence, seismic and volcanic activities; namely, the Gaussian subsidence bowl, Okada and Mogi point source, respectively. In each of the cases, the InSAR sensitivity is analytically formulated and its performance is investigated using simulated SAR data. The investigations are carried out using stochastic error propagation approaches to infer the precision of the models' parameters as well as their mutual covariance. The limiting factors in SAR interferometry are categorized in two groups and investigated separately in sensitivity analysis; with the first dealing with the geometrical limits imposed by the side looking geometry of the SAR measurements and the second focusing on the InSAR stochastic characteristics in the L band.

  11. Sources of high frequency seismic noise: insights from a dense network of ~250 stations in northern Alsace (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jerome; Blachet, Antoine; Lehujeur, Maximilien

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring local or regional seismic activity requires stations having a low level of background seismic noise at frequencies higher than few tenths of Hertz. Network operators are well aware that the seismic quality of a site depends on several aspects, among them its geological setting and the proximity of roads, railways, industries or trees. Often, the impact of each noise source is only qualitatively known which precludes estimating the quality of potential future sites before they are tested or installed. Here, we want to take advantage of a very dense temporary network deployed in Northern Alsace (France) to assess the effect of various kinds of potential sources on the level of seismic noise observed in the frequency range 0.2-50 Hz. In September 2014, more than 250 seismic stations (FairfieldNodal@ Zland nodes with 10Hz vertical geophone) have been installed every 1.5 km over a ~25km diameter disc centred on the deep geothermal sites of Soultz-sous-Forêts and Rittershoffen. This region exhibits variable degrees of human imprints from quite remote areas to sectors with high traffic roads and big villages. It also encompasses both the deep sedimentary basin of the Rhine graben and the piedmont of the Vosges massif with exposed bedrock. For each site we processed the continuous data to estimate probability density functions of the power spectral densities. At frequencies higher than 1 Hz most sites show a clear temporal modulation of seismic noise related to human activity with the well-known variations between day and night and between weekdays and weekends. Moreover we observe a clear evolution of the spatial distribution of seismic noise levels with frequency. Basically, between 0.5 and 4 Hz the geological setting modulates the level of seismic noise. At higher frequencies, the amplitude of seismic noise appears mostly related to the distance to nearby roads. Based on road maps and traffic estimation, a forward approach is performed to model the induced

  12. A GIS-based time-dependent seismic source modeling of Northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Mahdi; Alesheikh, Ali Asghar; Zolfaghari, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    The first step in any seismic hazard study is the definition of seismogenic sources and the estimation of magnitude-frequency relationships for each source. There is as yet no standard methodology for source modeling and many researchers have worked on this topic. This study is an effort to define linear and area seismic sources for Northern Iran. The linear or fault sources are developed based on tectonic features and characteristic earthquakes while the area sources are developed based on spatial distribution of small to moderate earthquakes. Time-dependent recurrence relationships are developed for fault sources using renewal approach while time-independent frequency-magnitude relationships are proposed for area sources based on Poisson process. GIS functionalities are used in this study to introduce and incorporate spatial-temporal and geostatistical indices in delineating area seismic sources. The proposed methodology is used to model seismic sources for an area of about 500 by 400 square kilometers around Tehran. Previous researches and reports are studied to compile an earthquake/fault catalog that is as complete as possible. All events are transformed to uniform magnitude scale; duplicate events and dependent shocks are removed. Completeness and time distribution of the compiled catalog is taken into account. The proposed area and linear seismic sources in conjunction with defined recurrence relationships can be used to develop time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of Northern Iran.

  13. SEISMIC SOURCE SCALING AND DISCRIMINATION IN DIVERSE TECTONIC ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, R E; Mayeda, K; Walter, W R; Viegas, G M; Murphy, K

    2007-07-10

    The objectives of this study are to improve low-magnitude regional seismic discrimination by performing a thorough investigation of earthquake source scaling using diverse, high-quality datasets from varied tectonic regions. Local-to-regional high-frequency discrimination requires an estimate of how earthquakes scale with size. Walter and Taylor (2002) developed the MDAC (Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Corrections) method to empirically account for these effects through regional calibration. The accuracy of these corrections has a direct impact on our ability to identify clandestine explosions in the broad regional areas characterized by low seismicity. Unfortunately our knowledge of source scaling at small magnitudes (i.e., m{sub b} < {approx}4.0) is poorly resolved. It is not clear whether different studies obtain contradictory results because they analyze different earthquakes, or because they use different methods. Even in regions that are well studied, such as test sites or areas of high seismicity, we still rely on empirical scaling relations derived from studies taken from half-way around the world at inter-plate regions. We investigate earthquake sources and scaling from different tectonic settings, comparing direct and coda wave analysis methods. We begin by developing and improving the two different methods, and then in future years we will apply them both to each set of earthquakes. Analysis of locally recorded, direct waves from events is intuitively the simplest way of obtaining accurate source parameters, as these waves have been least affected by travel through the earth. But there are only a limited number of earthquakes that are recorded locally, by sufficient stations to give good azimuthal coverage, and have very closely located smaller earthquakes that can be used as an empirical Green's function (EGF) to remove path effects. In contrast, coda waves average radiation from all directions so single-station records should be adequate, and

  14. Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia P. Tuttle

    2012-01-31

    Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan

  15. Apollo 14 and 16 Active Seismic Experiments, and Apollo 17 Lunar Seismic Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Seismic refraction experiments were conducted on the moon by Apollo astronauts during missions 14, 16, and 17. Seismic velocities of 104, 108, 92, 114 and 100 m/sec were inferred for the lunar regolith at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 landing sites, respectively. These data indicate that fragmentation and comminution caused by meteoroid impacts has produced a layer of remarkably uniform seismic properties moonwide. Brecciation and high porosity are the probable causes of the very low velocities observed in the lunar regolith. Apollo 17 seismic data revealed that the seismic velocity increases very rapidly with depth to 4.7 km/sec at a depth of 1.4 km. Such a large velocity change is suggestive of compositional and textural changes and is compatible with a model of fractured basaltic flows overlying anorthositic breccias. 'Thermal' moonquakes were also detected at the Apollo 17 site, becoming increasingly frequent after sunrise and reaching a maximum at sunset. The source of these quakes could possibly be landsliding.

  16. Sms1: Seismic Wave Velocities Variations With Tectonic Stress From Controlled Source Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastin, Sebastien; Crampin, Stuart; Shear-Wave Analysis Group

    We present clear observations of seismic velocity variations following comparatively distant seismic activity and a consequently change in tectonic stress. The Stress- Monitoring Site SMSITES at Húsavík in Northern Iceland, described in paper SMS2 at this meeting, was used to monitor short-term variations in absolute seismic velocity. The survey took place between the 10th and 23rd of August 2001. The signal from the controlled source, a DOV (Downhole Orbital Vibrator), was transmitted repeatedly between two boreholes at 315m-offset along a single sub- horizontal direct ray path ray path at ~500m depth. The azimuthal direction between the wells is almost parallel to the strike of the Húsavík-Flatey Transform Fault (HFF) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and is about 200m from the surface break. Source and receivers are in a 200m-thick layer of sandstone sandwiched between fractured layers. The DOV source was swept every 12s and the three-component recordings summed every 100 sweeps. This routine was repeated 24hours a day for 13days. Statistical analysis of the source signal stability indicates the source is coherent at 20µs and that velocity variations can be resolved at close to 1 part in 10-5. Variations in relative velocities of 2% to 5%, are observed peak to peak for Vp, Vsh, and Vsv. The behaviour of P-wave and S-wave velocities is strikingly different and correlates with a swarm of ~110 seismic activity on the 11th of August marks the start of a damped oscillation in S-waves velocities and a sudden 4% decrease of Vp. Following the swarm, Vp increases linearly, whereas Vs follows a typical "S"-shaped relaxation-curve increase to higher (presumably equilibrium) values. This is believed to be the first time that such well

  17. Source location of the 19 February 2008 Oregon bolide using seismic networks and infrasound arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kristoffer T.; Hedlin, Michael A. H.; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Vergoz, Julien; Le Pichon, Alexis; Drob, Douglas P.

    2010-12-01

    On 19 February 2008 a bolide traveled across the sky along a southern trajectory ending in a terminal burst above Oregon. The event was well recorded by the USArray, other seismic networks, four infrasound arrays, and several video cameras. We compare the results of locating the burst using these different sensor networks. Specifically, we reverse time migrate acoustic-to-seismic coupled signals recorded by the USArray out to 800 km range to image the source in 2-D space and time. We also apply a grid search over source altitude and time, minimizing the misfit between observed and predicted arrival times using 3-D ray tracing with a high-resolution atmospheric velocity model. Our seismic and video results suggest a point source rather than a line source associated with a hypersonic trajectory. We compare the seismic source locations to those obtained by using different combinations of observed infrasound array signal back azimuths and arrival times. We find that all locations are consistent. However, the seismic location is more accurate than the infrasound locations due to the larger number of seismic sensors, a more favorable seismic source-receiver geometry, and shorter ranges to the seismometers. For the infrasound array locations, correcting for the wind improved the accuracy, but implementing arrival times while increasing the precision reduced the accuracy presumably due to limitations of the source location method and/or atmospheric velocity model. We show that despite known complexities associated with acoustic-to-seismic coupling, aboveground infrasound sources can be located with dense seismic networks with remarkably high accuracy and precision.

  18. Seismic activity of the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Moment magnitude M with objective confidence-level uncertainties are estimated for felt San Francisco Bay region earthquakes using Bakun and Wentworth's (1997) analysis strategy for seismic intensity observations. The frequency-magnitude distribution is well described for M ???5.5 events since 1850 by a Gutenberg-Richter relation with a b-value of 0.90. The seismic moment rate ??M0/yr since 1836 is 2.68 X 1018 N-m/yr (95% confidence range = 1.29 X 1018 N-m/yr to 4.07 X 1018 N-m/yr); the seismic moment rate since 1850 is nearly the same. ??M0/yr in the 56 years before 1906 is about 10 times that in the 70 years after 1906. In contrast, ??M0/yr since 1977 is about equal that in the 56 years before 1906. 80% (1?? = 14%) of the plate-motion moment accumulation rate is available for release in earthquakes. The historical ??M0/yr and the portion of the plate-motion moment accumulation rate available for release in earthquakes are used in a seismic cycle model to estimate the rate of seismic activity in the twenty-first century. High and low rates of future seismic activity are both permissible given the range of possible seismic-cycle recurrence times T and the uncertainties in the historical ??M0 and in the percentage of plate motion available for release in earthquakes. If the historical seismic moment rate is not greater than the estimated 2.68 X 1018 N-m/yr and the percentage of the plate-motion moment accumulation available for release in earthquakes is not less than the estimated 80%, then for all T, the rate of seismic moment release from now until the next 1906-sized shock will be comparable to the rate from 1836 to 1905 when M 6 1/2 shocks occurred every 15 to 20 years.

  19. Geological indicators of a suspected seismic source from Peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yogendra; John, Biju; P, Ganapathy G.; S, Divyalakshmi K.

    2014-05-01

    An increase in seismicity in Peninsular India during the last few decades has initiated various studies for identifying seismogenic structures and their behaviour. Even though few earthquakes occurred at well defined structures many of them occurred at unexpected locations where no previous seismicity reported. However, studies subsequent to the 1993 Latur earthquake as well as the studies at different parts of peninsular India, have led to the identification of pre-existing faults that have activated in the past. Studies elsewhere in the cratonic hinderland also show that the damaging earthquakes occur on pre-existing faults with a recurrence period of tens of thousands of year Studies subsequent to 1989 Wadakkancheri earthquake (M=4.3) identified Desamangalam fault which are capable of generating earthquakes. However, it is noted that a number of later events are occurring much south of the Desamangalam fault. We identified a set of NW-SE trending lineaments which are influencing the drainage pattern of the area. A network of paleochannels is also observed in the remote sensing analysis and field studies in this area. Regionally these lineaments meeting one of the major lineaments in central Kerala called Periyar lineament, in the south. Charnockite rocks constitutes the major rock type of the region. These rocks at places developed strong foliation similar to the lineament direction. Detailed field studies identified oblique movement (reverse and strike slip component) along NW-SE trending faults which are dipping south-west. The studies also find NNE-SSW trending vertical faults showing strike-slip movement. The damage zones of each of these faults bears different mineral precipitations and gouge injections of episodic nature. The presence of loose gouge may indicate the faulting is a much later development in the brittle regime. The sense of movement of the observed faults may indicate that the various river/drainage abandonment observed in the area are due to

  20. Missile impacts as sources of seismic energy on the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latham, G.V.; McDonald, W.G.; Moore, H.J.

    1970-01-01

    Seismic signals recorded from impacts of missiles at the White Sands Missile Range are radically different from the signal recorded from the Apollo 12 lunar module impact. This implies that lunar structure to depths of at least 10 to 20 kilometers is quite different from the typical structure of the earth's crust. Results obtained from this study can be used to predict seismic wave amplitudes from future man-made lunar impacts. Seismic energy and crater dimensions from impacts are compared with measurements from chemical explosions.

  1. Method for enhancing low frequency output of impulsive type seismic energy sources and its application to a seismic energy source for use while drilling

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P; Stokes, Robert H; Glowka, David A

    2014-12-02

    A method for operating an impulsive type seismic energy source in a firing sequence having at least two actuations for each seismic impulse to be generated by the source. The actuations have a time delay between them related to a selected energy frequency peak of the source output. One example of the method is used for generating seismic signals in a wellbore and includes discharging electric current through a spark gap disposed in the wellbore in at least one firing sequence. The sequence includes at least two actuations of the spark gap separated by an amount of time selected to cause acoustic energy resulting from the actuations to have peak amplitude at a selected frequency.

  2. Mapping the sources of the seismic wave field at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, using data recorded on multiple seismic Antennas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almendros, J.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.; Huber, Caleb G.

    2002-01-01

    Seismic antennas constitute a powerful tool for the analysis of complex wave fields. Well-designed antennas can identify and separate components of a complex wave field based on their distinct propagation properties. The combination of several antennas provides the basis for a more complete understanding of volcanic wave fields, including an estimate of the location of each individual wave-field component identified simultaneously by at least two antennas. We used frequency-slowness analyses of data from three antennas to identify and locate the different components contributing to the wave fields recorded at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in February 1997. The wave-field components identified are (1) a sustained background volcanic tremor in the form of body waves generated in a shallow hydrothermal system located below the northeastern edge of the Halemaumau pit crater; (2) surface waves generated along the path between this hydrothermal source and the antennas; (3) back-scattered surface wave energy from a shallow reflector located near the southeastern rim of Kilauea caldera; (4) evidence for diffracted wave components originating at the southeastern edge of Halemaumau; and (5) body waves reflecting the activation of a deeper tremor source between 02 hr 00 min and 16 hr 00 min Hawaii Standard Time on 11 February.

  3. Broadband Sound Pressure Field Characteristics of Marine Seismic Sources Used by R/V Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Boebel, O.; El Naggar, S.; Jokat, W.; Kuhn, G.; Niessen, F.; Schenke, H.; Werner, B.; Diebold, J.

    2006-05-01

    Single airguns and airgun arrays of different size and volume are used as sound sources for scientific marine seismic reflection and refraction surveys conducted by R/V Polarstern in the Arctic and Antarctic Ocean. To ensure that these research activities do not affect marine wildlife and particularly marine mammals in the Antarctic Treaty Area south of 60°S knowledge of the sound pressure field of the seismic sources is essential. Therefore, a broadband marine seismic source characterization study was conducted at the Heggernes Acoustic Range in the Herdlefjord, Norway in October 2003. The objectives were (1) to determine the spatial distribution of the sound pressure levels emitted by Polarstern's seismic sources, (2) to compute the source levels assuming a spherical amplitude decay, (3) to determine mitigation radii, within which at least some species of marine mammals might possibly experience behavioral or physiological disturbance due to the received sound pressure levels. The thresholds currently in use to determine mitigation radii are 160 dBRMS re 1 μPa for potential behavioral disturbance and 180 dBRMS re 1 μPa for potential physiological and hearing effects like temporary threshold shifts. To determine the spatial distribution of the sound pressure levels each airgun (array) was shot along a line of 2- 3 km length running between 2 hydrophone chains with receivers in 35, 100, 198 and 267 m depth. A GI-Gun (2.4 l), a G-Gun (8.5 l) and a Bolt PAR CT800 (32.8 l) were deployed as single sources, and 3 GI-Guns (7.4 l), 3 G-Guns (25.6 l) and 8 VLF-Guns (24 l) as arrays. The measurements are complemented by a modeling approach for an 8 G-Gun (68.2 l) and 8 G-Gun+1 Bolt PAR CT800 array (100.1 l). The data analysis includes a determination of peak-peak, zero-peak and RMS-amplitudes, sound exposure levels and amplitude spectra as function of source-receiver distance. The amplitude vs distance graphs, analyzed for the 4 hydrophone depths, show the typical

  4. Sound source localization technique using a seismic streamer and its extension for whale localization during seismic surveys.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Shima H; Wilcock, William S D; Tolstoy, Maya; Crone, Timothy J; Carbotte, Suzanne M

    2015-12-01

    Marine seismic surveys are under increasing scrutiny because of concern that they may disturb or otherwise harm marine mammals and impede their communications. Most of the energy from seismic surveys is low frequency, so concerns are particularly focused on baleen whales. Extensive mitigation efforts accompany seismic surveys, including visual and acoustic monitoring, but the possibility remains that not all animals in an area can be observed and located. One potential way to improve mitigation efforts is to utilize the seismic hydrophone streamer to detect and locate calling baleen whales. This study describes a method to localize low frequency sound sources with data recoded by a streamer. Beamforming is used to estimate the angle of arriving energy relative to sub-arrays of the streamer which constrains the horizontal propagation velocity to each sub-array for a given trial location. A grid search method is then used to minimize the time residual for relative arrival times along the streamer estimated by cross correlation. Results from both simulation and experiment are shown and data from the marine mammal observers and the passive acoustic monitoring conducted simultaneously with the seismic survey are used to verify the analysis.

  5. Detecting seismic activity with a covariance matrix analysis of data recorded on seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.; Landès, M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously at the Earth's surface, providing dense spatial samples of the seismic wavefield. The aim of our study is to analyse these records with statistical array-based approaches to identify coherent time-series as a function of time and frequency. Using ideas mainly brought from the random matrix theory, we analyse the spatial coherence of the seismic wavefield from the width of the covariance matrix eigenvalue distribution. We propose a robust detection method that could be used for the analysis of weak and emergent signals embedded in background noise, such as the volcanic or tectonic tremors and local microseismicity, without any prior knowledge about the studied wavefields. We apply our algorithm to the records of the seismic monitoring network of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano located at La Réunion Island and composed of 21 receivers with an aperture of ˜15 km. This array recorded many teleseismic earthquakes as well as seismovolcanic events during the year 2010. We show that the analysis of the wavefield at frequencies smaller than ˜0.1 Hz results in detection of the majority of teleseismic events from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor database. The seismic activity related to the Piton de la Fournaise volcano is well detected at frequencies above 1 Hz.

  6. Equivalence of the virtual-source method and wave-field deconvolution in seismic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Snieder, Roel; Sheiman, Jon; Calvert, Rodney

    2006-06-01

    Seismic interferometry and the virtual-source method are related approaches for extracting the Green's function that accounts for wave propagation between receivers by making suitable combinations of the waves recorded at these two receivers. These waves can either be excited by active, controlled, sources, or by natural incoherent sources. We compare this technique with the deconvolution of the wave field recorded at different receivers. We show that the deconvolved wave field is a solution of the same wave equation as that for the physical system, but that the deconvolved wave forms may satisfy different boundary conditions than those of the original system. We apply this deconvolution approach to the wave motion recorded at various levels in a building after an earthquake, and show how to extract the building response for different boundary conditions. Extracting the response of the system with different boundary conditions can be used to enhance, or suppress, the normal-mode response. In seismic exploration this principle can be used for the suppression of surface-related multiples.

  7. Automatic classification of endogenous seismic sources within a landslide body using random forest algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Floriane; Hibert, Clément; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Stumpf, André; Doubre, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Different studies have shown the presence of microseismic activity in soft-rock landslides. The seismic signals exhibit significantly different features in the time and frequency domains which allow their classification and interpretation. Most of the classes could be associated with different mechanisms of deformation occurring within and at the surface (e.g. rockfall, slide-quake, fissure opening, fluid circulation). However, some signals remain not fully understood and some classes contain few examples that prevent any interpretation. To move toward a more complete interpretation of the links between the dynamics of soft-rock landslides and the physical processes controlling their behaviour, a complete catalog of the endogeneous seismicity is needed. We propose a multi-class detection method based on the random forests algorithm to automatically classify the source of seismic signals. Random forests is a supervised machine learning technique that is based on the computation of a large number of decision trees. The multiple decision trees are constructed from training sets including each of the target classes. In the case of seismic signals, these attributes may encompass spectral features but also waveform characteristics, multi-stations observations and other relevant information. The Random Forest classifier is used because it provides state-of-the-art performance when compared with other machine learning techniques (e.g. SVM, Neural Networks) and requires no fine tuning. Furthermore it is relatively fast, robust, easy to parallelize, and inherently suitable for multi-class problems. In this work, we present the first results of the classification method applied to the seismicity recorded at the Super-Sauze landslide between 2013 and 2015. We selected a dozen of seismic signal features that characterize precisely its spectral content (e.g. central frequency, spectrum width, energy in several frequency bands, spectrogram shape, spectrum local and global maxima

  8. Near real-time estimation of the seismic source parameters in a compressed domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ismael A. Vera

    Seismic events can be characterized by its origin time, location and moment tensor. Fast estimations of these source parameters are important in areas of geophysics like earthquake seismology, and the monitoring of seismic activity produced by volcanoes, mining operations and hydraulic injections in geothermal and oil and gas reservoirs. Most available monitoring systems estimate the source parameters in a sequential procedure: first determining origin time and location (e.g., epicentre, hypocentre or centroid of the stress glut density), and then using this information to initialize the evaluation of the moment tensor. A more efficient estimation of the source parameters requires a concurrent evaluation of the three variables. The main objective of the present thesis is to address the simultaneous estimation of origin time, location and moment tensor of seismic events. The proposed method displays the benefits of being: 1) automatic, 2) continuous and, depending on the scale of application, 3) of providing results in real-time or near real-time. The inversion algorithm is based on theoretical results from sparse representation theory and compressive sensing. The feasibility of implementation is determined through the analysis of synthetic and real data examples. The numerical experiments focus on the microseismic monitoring of hydraulic fractures in oil and gas wells, however, an example using real earthquake data is also presented for validation. The thesis is complemented with a resolvability analysis of the moment tensor. The analysis targets common monitoring geometries employed in hydraulic fracturing in oil wells. Additionally, it is presented an application of sparse representation theory for the denoising of one-component and three-component microseismicity records, and an algorithm for improved automatic time-picking using non-linear inversion constraints.

  9. Noise-based body-wave seismic tomography in an active underground mine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, G.; Brenguier, F.; Campillo, M.; Lynch, R.; Roux, P.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade, ambient noise tomography has become increasingly popular to image the earth's upper crust. The seismic noise recorded in the earth's crust is dominated by surface waves emanating from the interaction of the ocean with the solid earth. These surface waves are low frequency in nature ( < 1 Hz) and not usable for imaging smaller structures associated with mining or oil and gas applications. The seismic noise recorded at higher frequencies are typically from anthropogenic sources, which are short lived, spatially unstable and not well suited for constructing seismic Green's functions between sensors with conventional cross-correlation methods. To examine the use of ambient noise tomography for smaller scale applications, continuous data were recorded for 5 months in an active underground mine in Sweden located more than 1km below surface with 18 high frequency seismic sensors. A wide variety of broadband (10 - 3000 Hz) seismic noise sources are present in an active underground mine ranging from drilling, scraping, trucks, ore crushers and ventilation fans. Some of these sources generate favorable seismic noise, while others are peaked in frequency and not usable. In this presentation, I will show that the noise generated by mining activity can be useful if periods of seismic noise are carefully selected. Although noise sources are not temporally stable and not evenly distributed around the sensor array, good estimates of the seismic Green's functions between sensors can be retrieved for a broad frequency range (20 - 400 Hz) when a selective stacking scheme is used. For frequencies below 100 Hz, the reconstructed Green's functions show clear body-wave arrivals for almost all of the 153 sensor pairs. The arrival times of these body-waves are picked and used to image the local velocity structure. The resulting 3-dimensional image shows a high velocity structure that overlaps with a known ore-body. The material properties of the ore-body differ from

  10. Seismic structure and seismicity at the southern Mariana Trough with hydrothermal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Mizuno, M.; Takada, H.; Yamada, T.; Isse, T.; Shinohara, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Southern Mariana Trough back-arc spreading system shows asymmetry spreading, and has high relief at spreading axes, which infers abundant melt supply. Furthermore, five hydrothermal vents that extrude different water contents, exist within 5 km near the spreading axis. To investigate upper mantle structure, crustal structure and hypocenter distribution provide important constraint on following four main points to understand the back-arc spreading system; 1) imaging melt delivery to the spreading axis and off axis seamount including volcanic arc, 2) production and character of the crust, 3) relationship between melt supply and crustal formation, and 4) pathway and heat source for hydrothermal circulation with related to its formation. We conducted a seismic reflection/refraction survey and seismicity observation at the hydrothermal area in the Southern Mariana Trough from August to November in 2010. We used 9 ocean bottom seismometers, an air gun (GI gun) and a single channel streamer cable. We took 7 parallel lines and 7 perpendicular lines to the spreading center. Line length was 15 km each, and line interval was 2.5 km. From the survey and observation, we obtained very low seismicity at the hydrothermal area in the 3 month's observation. The reflection survey shows that some reflectors exist under the hydrothermal area. In this presentation, we will also show seismic velocity structures from the refraction survey.

  11. The Seismicity activity toward east of Bogotá D. C., Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicangana, G.; Vargas, C. A.; Gomez-Capera, A.; Pedraza, P.; Mora-Paez, H.; Salcedo, E.; Caneva, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the eastern flank of Eastern Cordillera very close to Bogotá D.C metropolitan area at least in last 450 years five magnitude 5.0 or higher earthquakes has occur. These were confirmed by both historical and instrumental seismicity information. Among these earthquakes, the first one in Colombian historical times was occur at March 16th, 1644 and was sense toward south of Santa Fé de Bogotá. Then on October 18th, 1743 occurred with a current probabilistic magnitude greater than 6.5 an earthquake that transcended in this region due to the economic slump and loss of lives that it caused. Recently the Quetame Earthquake with M = 5.9 occur on May 24th, 2008, that destroyed the Quetame town. This last earthquake was registered locally by Colombian Seismological Network (RSNC). In this study we realized an analysis over this seismicity activity both by historical chronicles with macroseismic estimation data, the seismicity record obtained mainly by the Colombian National Seismological Network (RSNC) data for the 1993-2012 lapse, for searching the seismogenics sources that produced this seismicity activity. So, with these results we show the tectonic panorama of this region indicating of this manner the faults that possibility can be potentially seismic actives. For this we have considered mainly geomorphologic features associated to the faults activity additionally corroborated with GPS velocities data of GEORED project of Colombian Geological Survey.

  12. Monitoring of low-energy seismic activity in Elbrus volcanic area with the use of underground seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, V.; Sobisevitch, A.

    2012-04-01

    Results of experiment with underground seismic array for studying low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area are presented. Linear seismic array of 2.5 km aperture is created in the tunnel of Baksan neutrino observatory. Horizontal tunnel of 4.3 km length is drilled in the mount Andyrchi at a distance of 20 km from Elbrus volcano. Array includes 6 three-component seismic sensors with 24-byte recorders installed with 500 m interval one from another along the tunnel. Underground seismic array is the new instrument of geophysical observatory organized for studies of geophysical processes in the Elbrus volcanic area. The observatory equipped with modern geophysical instruments including broadband tri-axial seismometers, quartz tilt-meters, magnetic variometers, geo-acoustic sensors, hi-precision distributed thermal sensors and gravimeters. The initial analysis of seismic signals recorded by seismic array allows us to detect low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area beginning from the distance of 3-5 km (the faults in a vicinity of mount Andyrchi) up to 15-25 km (area of Elbrus volcano). The regional micro-earthquakes with magnitude 1-2 at the distances 50-100 km was also recorded. 2.5 km aperture of the underground linear seismic array make it possible to determine with high accuracy hypocenters of local seismic events associated with geodynamic of volcanic magmatic structures and to realize seismo-emission tomography of the active zones of Elbrus volcano.

  13. Seismic activity in the Sunnyside mining district, Utah, during 1967

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Barton K.; Dunrud, C. Richard; Hernandez, Jerome

    1969-01-01

    A seismic monitoring network near Sunnyside, Utah, consisting of a triangular array of seismometer stations that encompasses most of the mine workings in the district, recorded over 50,000 local earth tremors during 1967. About 540 of the tremors were of sufficient magnitude to be accurately located. Most of these were located within 2-3 miles of mine workings and were also near known or suspected faults. The district-wide seismic activity generally consisted of two different patterns--a periodic increase in the daily number of tremors at weekly intervals, and also a less regular and longer term increase and decrease of seismic activity that occurred over a period of weeks or even months. The shorter and more regular pattern can be correlated with the mine work week and seems to result from mining. The longer term activity, however, does not correlate with known mining causes sad therefore seems to be .caused by natural stresses.

  14. Seismic activity related to the degassing of the Gorely volcano (Kamchatka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenkov, S. S.; Shapiro, N.; Koulakov, I.; Abkadyirov, I.; Frank, W.; Jakovlev, A.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed continuous seismic records from a temporary network of 21 broadband seismograph that we installed in Gorely volcano (Kamchatka, Russia) between August 2013 and August 2014. During the studied period, the activity of Gorely was characterized by a sustained gas emission. We developed a source scanning algorithm based on summation of seismogram envelopes to automatically detect seismic events characterized by emerging signals without clear arrivals of P or S waves. With the help of this method, we detected and located numerous events originated from the vicinity of the main crater and caused by the volcano degassing. We then studied variations in spatio-temporal distribution of this seismic emission to characterize the evolution of the volcanic activity.

  15. A comparison of small, affordable seismic sources at the Ketzin CO2 storage site, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopher, Daniel; Juhlin, Christopher; Huang, Fei; Ivandic, Monika; Lueth, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Seismic methods have proven to be effective for monitoring the movement and location of injected CO2 within deep saline aquifers. However, a disadvantage of seismic monitoring is the high costs associated with many repeat seismic surveys as part of a long term monitoring strategy of a CO2 storage site. As the cost for the use of the seismic source is often a significant part of the overall survey cost, affordable, smaller sources would increase the potential feasibility of a long term seismic monitoring strategy. A comparison of three land seismic sources is performed at the Ketzin CO2 storage site, Germany. Two of these sources (Vibsist 500 and Bobcat drop hammer) can be considered to be smaller and more affordable sources than those conventionally used in the seismic monitor surveys at Ketzin. In this study these smaller sources are compared to a larger more conventional Vibsist 3000 source. The subsurface target for the three sources in this comparison is the CO2 storage reservoir for the Ketzin site, located within the Triassic Stuttgart formation, which lies at a depth of approximately 600m/500ms. Two of the sources are Swept Impact (SIST) type courses (Vibsist 500 and 3000) which use hydraulic concrete breaking hammers. The third source uses a concrete breaking drop hammer tool mounted on a Bobcat loader. Data were collected along a 984m long profile with 24m receiver spacing and 12m shot spacing in 2011, 2012 and 2013 using the three different sources. A quantitative and qualitative comparison of the raw data from the three sources was performed in order to assess their relative performance. Frequency content, signal to noise ratio and penetration depth curves were calculated for the raw data. Data from the three sources was also processed using a conventional workflow to produce stacked sections which were compared. Based on the results from this study the Bobcat drop hammer source appears to perform better than the Vibsist 500 source. However both of the

  16. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP): Active Rift Processes in the Brawley Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lazaro-Mancilla, O.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), funded by NSF and USGS, acquired seismic data in and across the Salton Trough in southern California and northern Mexico in March 2011. The project addresses both rifting processes at the northern end of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. Seven lines of onshore refraction and low-fold reflection data were acquired in the Coachella, Imperial, and Mexicali Valleys, two lines and a grid of airgun and OBS data were acquired in the Salton Sea, and onshore-offshore data were recorded. Almost 2800 land seismometers and 50 OBS's were used in almost 5000 deployments at almost 4300 sites, in spacing as dense as 100 m. These instruments received seismic signals from 126 explosive shots up to 1400 kg and over 2300 airgun shots. In the central Salton Trough, North American lithosphere appears to have been rifted completely apart. Based primarily on a 1979 seismic refraction project, the 20-22 km thick crust is apparently composed entirely of new crust added by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. Active rifting of this new crust is manifested by shallow (<10km depth) seismicity in the oblique Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ), small Salton Buttes volcanoes aligned perpendicular to the transform faults, very high heat flow (~140 mW/m2), and geothermal energy production. This presentation is focused on an onshore-offshore line of densely sampled refraction and low-fold reflection data that crosses the Brawley Seismic Zone and Salton Buttes in the direction of plate motion. At the time of abstract submission, data analysis was very preliminary, consisting of first-arrival tomography of the onshore half of the line for upper crustal seismic velocity. Crystalline basement (>5 km/s), comprised of late-Pliocene to Quaternary sediment metamorphosed by the high heat flow, occurs at ~2 km depth beneath the Salton Buttes and geothermal field and ~4 km

  17. Underground structure characterization using motor vehicles as passive seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, H. A.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Rector, J.; Vaidya, S.

    2009-12-01

    The ability to detect and characterize underground voids will be critical to the success of On-Site Inspections (OSI) as mandated by the nuclear Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). OSIs may be conducted in order to successfully locate the Ground Zero of underground tests as well as infrastructure related to testing. Recently, our team has shown the potential of a new technique to detect underground objects using the amplitude of seismic surface waves generated by motor vehicles. In an experiment conducted in June, 2009 we were able to detect an abandoned railroad tunnel by recognizing a clear pattern in the surface waves scattered by the tunnel, using a signal generated by driving a car on a dirt road across the tunnel. Synthetic experiments conducted using physically realistic wave-equation models further suggest that the technique can be readily applied to detecting underground features: it may be possible to image structures of importance to OSI simply by laying out an array of geophones (or using an array already in place for passive listening for event aftershocks) and driving vehicles around the site. We present evidence from a set of field experiments and from synthetic modeling and inversion studies to illustrate adaptations of the technique for OSI. Signature of an abandoned underground railroad tunnel at Donner Summit, CA. To produce this image, a line of geophones was placed along a dirt road perpendicular to the tunnel (black box) and a single car was driven along the road. A normalized mean power-spectrum is displayed on a log scale as a function of meters from the center of the tunnel. The top of the tunnel was 18m below ground surface. The tunnel anomaly is made up of a shadow (light) directly above the tunnel and amplitude build-up (dark) on either side of the tunnel. The size of the anomaly (6 orders of magnitude) suggests that the method can be extended to find deep structures at greater distances from the source and receivers.

  18. Second and Third Quarters Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Rohay, Alan C.

    1999-10-08

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site.

  19. Utilization of near-source video and ground motion in the assessment of seismic source functions from mining explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Stump, B.W.

    1994-09-01

    Identification of seismic events detected under a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty requires a clear physical understanding of the different types of seismic sources including mining explosions, rock bursts, mine collapse and small, shallow earthquakes. Constraint of the operative physical processes in the source region and linkage to the generation of seismic waveforms with particular emphasis on regional seismograms is needed. In order to properly address the multi-dimensional aspect of data sets designed to constrain these sources, we are investigating a number of modern visualization tools that have only recently become available with new, high-speed graphical computers that can utilize relatively large data sets. The results of this study will provide a basis for identifying important processes in the source region that contribute to regional seismograms.

  20. A Rolling Line Source for a Seismic Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    first used for bottom sounding and echolocation in the early 20th century by the French scientist Paul Langevin, a friend of the famous chemist Madam ...Marie Curie . Now acoustic sonars are well developed, and are an integral part of every warship, worldwide. Seismic interface waves, such as

  1. Joint analysis of infrasound and seismic signals by cross wavelet transform: detection of Mt. Etna explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.; Patanè, D.

    2013-06-01

    The prompt detection of explosive volcanic activity is crucial since this kind of activity can release copious amounts of volcanic ash and gases into the atmosphere, causing severe dangers to aviation. In this work, we show how the joint analysis of seismic and infrasonic data by wavelet transform coherence (WTC) can be useful to detect explosive activity, significantly enhancing its recognition that is normally done by video cameras and thermal sensors. Indeed, the efficiency of these sensors can be reduced (or inhibited) in the case of poor visibility due to clouds or gas plumes. In particular, we calculated the root mean square (RMS) of seismic and infrasonic signals recorded at Mt. Etna during 2011. This interval was characterised by several episodes of lava fountains, accompanied by lava effusion, and minor strombolian activities. WTC analysis showed significantly high values of coherence between seismic and infrasonic RMS during explosive activity, with infrasonic and seismic series in phase with each other, hence proving to be sensitive to both weak and strong explosive activity. The WTC capability of automatically detecting explosive activity was compared with the potential of detection methods based on fixed thresholds of seismic and infrasonic RMS. Finally, we also calculated the cross correlation function between seismic and infrasonic signals, which showed that the wave types causing such seismo-acoustic relationship are mainly incident seismic and infrasonic waves, likely with a common source.

  2. Seismic source and structure estimation in the western Mediterranean using a sparse broadband network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thio, Hong Kie; Song, Xi; Saikia, Chandan K.; Helmberger, Donald V.; Woods, Bradley B.

    1999-01-01

    We present a study of regional earthquakes in the western Mediterranean geared toward the development of methodologies and path calibrations for source characterization using regional broadband stations. The results of this study are useful for the monitoring and discrimination of seismic events under a comprehensive test ban treaty, as well as the routine analysis of seismicity and seismic hazard using a sparse array of stations. The area consists of several contrasting geological provinces with distinct seismic properties, which complicates the modeling of seismic wave propagation. We started by analyzing surface wave group velocities throughout the region and developed a preliminary model for each of the major geological provinces. We found variations of crustal thickness ranging from 45 km under the Atlas and Betic mountains and 37 km under the Saharan shield, to 20 km for the oceanic crust of the western Mediterranean Sea, which is consistent with earlier works. Throughout most of the region, the upper mantle velocities are low which is typical for tectonically active regions. The most complex areas in terms of wave propagation are the Betic Cordillera in southern Spain and its north African counterparts, the Rif and Tell Atlas mountains, as well as the Alboran Sea, between Spain and Morocco. The complexity of the wave propagation in these regions is probably due to the sharp velocity contrasts between the oceanic and continental regions as well as the the existence of deep sedimentary basins that have a very strong influence on the surface wave dispersion. We used this preliminary regionalized velocity model to correct the surface wave source spectra for propagation effects which we then inverted for source mechanism. We found that this method, which is in use in many parts of the world, works very well, provided that data from several stations are available. In order to study the events in the region using very few broadband stations or even a single station

  3. An Earthquake Source Ontology for Seismic Hazard Analysis and Ground Motion Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechar, J. D.; Jordan, T. H.; Gil, Y.; Ratnakar, V.

    2005-12-01

    Representation of the earthquake source is an important element in seismic hazard analysis and earthquake simulations. Source models span a range of conceptual complexity - from simple time-independent point sources to extended fault slip distributions. Further computational complexity arises because the seismological community has established so many source description formats and variations thereof; what this means is that conceptually equivalent source models are often expressed in different ways. Despite the resultant practical difficulties, there exists a rich semantic vocabulary for working with earthquake sources. For these reasons, we feel it is appropriate to create a semantic model of earthquake sources using an ontology, a computer science tool from the field of knowledge representation. Unlike the domain of most ontology work to date, earthquake sources can be described by a very precise mathematical framework. Another uniqueness associated with developing such an ontology is that earthquake sources are often used as computational objects. A seismologist generally wants more than to simply construct a source and have it be well-formed and properly described; additionally, the source will be used for performing calculations. Representation and manipulation of complex mathematical objects presents a challenge to the ontology development community. In order to enable simulations involving many different types of source models, we have completed preliminary development of a seismic point source ontology. The use of an ontology to represent knowledge provides machine interpretability and the ability to validate logical consistency and completeness. Our ontology, encoded using the OWL Web Ontology Language - a standard from the World Wide Web Consortium, contains the conceptual definitions and relationships necessary for source translation services. For example, specification of strike, dip, rake, and seismic moment will automatically translate into a double

  4. Broadband seismic monitoring of active volcanoes using deterministic and stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Nakano, M.; Maeda, T.; Yepes, H.; Palacios, P.; Ruiz, M. C.; Arrais, S.; Vaca, M.; Molina, I.; Yamashina, T.

    2009-12-01

    We systematically used two approaches to analyze broadband seismic signals observed at active volcanoes: one is waveform inversion of very-long-period (VLP) signals in the frequency domain assuming possible source mechanisms; the other is a source location method of long-period (LP) and tremor using their amplitudes. The deterministic approach of the waveform inversion is useful to constrain the source mechanism and location, but is basically only applicable to VLP signals with periods longer than a few seconds. The source location method uses seismic amplitudes corrected for site amplifications and assumes isotropic radiation of S waves. This assumption of isotropic radiation is apparently inconsistent with the hypothesis of crack geometry at the LP source. Using the source location method, we estimated the best-fit source location of a VLP/LP event at Cotopaxi using a frequency band of 7-12 Hz and Q = 60. This location was close to the best-fit source location determined by waveform inversion of the VLP/LP event using a VLP band of 5-12.5 s. The waveform inversion indicated that a crack mechanism better explained the VLP signals than an isotropic mechanism. These results indicated that isotropic radiation is not inherent to the source and only appears at high frequencies. We also obtained a best-fit location of an explosion event at Tungurahua when using a frequency band of 5-10 Hz and Q = 60. This frequency band and Q value also yielded reasonable locations for the sources of tremor signals associated with lahars and pyroclastic flows at Tungurahua. The isotropic radiation assumption may be valid in a high frequency range in which the path effect caused by the scattering of seismic waves results in an isotropic radiation pattern of S waves. The source location method may be categorized as a stochastic approach based on the nature of scattering waves. We further applied the waveform inversion to VLP signals observed at only two stations during a volcanic crisis

  5. Discrimination and Assessment of Induced Seismicity in Active Tectonic Zones: A Case Study from Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, C. E.; Lindsey, N.; Foxall, W.; Robertson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes induced by human activity have become a matter of heightened public concern during recent years. Of particular concern is seismicity associated with wastewater injection, which has included events having magnitudes greater than 5. The causes of the induced events are primarily changes in pore-pressure, fluid volume and perhaps temperature due to injection. Recent research in the US has focused on mid-continental regions having low rates of naturally-occurring seismicity, where induced events can be identified by relatively straightforward spatial and temporal correlation of seismicity with high-volume injection activities. Recent examples include events correlated with injection of wastewater in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas and Ohio, and long-term brine injection in the Paradox Valley in Colorado. Even in some of the cases where there appears at first sight to be a clear spatial correlation between seismicity and injection, it has been difficult to establish causality definitively. Here, we discuss methods to identify induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. We concentrate our study on Southern California, where large numbers of wastewater injection wells are located in oil-producing basins that experience moderate to high rates of naturally-occurring seismicity. Using the catalog of high-precision CISN relocations produced by Hauksson et al. (BSSA, 2012), we aim to discriminate induced from natural events based on spatio-temporal patterns of seismicity occurrence characteristics and their relationships to injection activities, known active faults and other faults favorably oriented for slip under the tectonic stress field. Since the vast majority of induced earthquakes are very small, it is crucial to include all events above the detection threshold of the CISN in each area studied. In addition to exploring the correlation of seismicity to injection activities in time and space, we analyze variations in frequency-magnitude distributions, which can

  6. Refinement of Regional Distance Seismic Moment Tensor and Uncertainty Analysis for Source-Type Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-02

    constrained. One event, a 1996 Lop Nor shaft explosion displaces large Love waves and reversed Rayleigh waves at one station indicative of a large F-factor...distribution of naturally occurring earthquakes. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Seismic moment tensor, regional seismic waveforms, Rayleigh waves, Love Waves 16...pattern along the equator of the focal sphere, which produces Rayleigh waves with uniform source phase, and which does not generate Love waves. The pure

  7. Seismic precursors of vulcanian explosions at Ubinas volcano (Peru) : Statistical analysis and source locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métaxian, J.-P.; Macedo, O.; Lengline, O.; Monteiller, V.; Taipe, E.

    2009-04-01

    Ubinas stratovolcano (5672 m), located 60 km east from Arequipa city is historically the most active volcano in Peru. The present eruption began on March 25th 2006. A lava plug has been observed at the bottom of the pit crater situated in the south part of the caldeira. The eruptive activity involves very brought closer exhalations rising a few hundred meters above the crater rim to larger plumes produced by explosions that may reach up to 3 kilometers. The seismic activity is characterized by high rates of long-period (LP) event production accompanying eruptive activity and very long period (VLP) events observed at the same time as vulcanian explosions. The LP and VLP events have a spectral content respectively dominated by frequencies between 2-5 Hz and 0.3-0.9 Hz. The vulcanian explosive activity is characterized by the occurrence of LP swarm preceding most of the VLPs by about 2 hours. In some occasions, the LP swarm merges into tremor about half an hour before the explosion. LPs belonging to the same swarm have similar waveform suggesting a unique source area, which could be the conduit and/or the lava plug surface. The monitoring system includes 4 seismic stations, among which one is equipped with a broadband sensor and 2 tiltmeters. In this work we analyzed a catalogue of data including more than 40000 LP events and 130 VLP events recorded between May 2006 and December 2008. The evolution of the average number of LP events preceding explosions was computed. The variation of the LP rate is clearly diverging from the background rate ~ 0.1 days before explosions. In particular, the most energetic explosions are correlated with the biggest increases of seismicity. However this general behavior is not observed for every single explosion. A direct test is now under study in order to check if the earthquake rate can be used as an alert tool for future explosions. To locate the source of LP events belonging to the swarms, we used a method based on the measurement of

  8. Beyond seismic interferometry: imaging the earth's interior with virtual sources and receivers inside the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wapenaar, C. P. A.; Van der Neut, J.; Thorbecke, J.; Broggini, F.; Slob, E. C.; Snieder, R.

    2015-12-01

    Imagine one could place seismic sources and receivers at any desired position inside the earth. Since the receivers would record the full wave field (direct waves, up- and downward reflections, multiples, etc.), this would give a wealth of information about the local structures, material properties and processes in the earth's interior. Although in reality one cannot place sources and receivers anywhere inside the earth, it appears to be possible to create virtual sources and receivers at any desired position, which accurately mimics the desired situation. The underlying method involves some major steps beyond standard seismic interferometry. With seismic interferometry, virtual sources can be created at the positions of physical receivers, assuming these receivers are illuminated isotropically. Our proposed method does not need physical receivers at the positions of the virtual sources; moreover, it does not require isotropic illumination. To create virtual sources and receivers anywhere inside the earth, it suffices to record the reflection response with physical sources and receivers at the earth's surface. We do not need detailed information about the medium parameters; it suffices to have an estimate of the direct waves between the virtual-source positions and the acquisition surface. With these prerequisites, our method can create virtual sources and receivers, anywhere inside the earth, which record the full wave field. The up- and downward reflections, multiples, etc. in the virtual responses are extracted directly from the reflection response at the surface. The retrieved virtual responses form an ideal starting point for accurate seismic imaging, characterization and monitoring.

  9. A Large-N Mixed Sensor Active + Passive Seismic Array near Sweetwater, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklage, M.; Hollis, D.; Gridley, J. M.; Woodward, R.; Spriggs, N.

    2014-12-01

    A collaborative high-density seismic survey using broadband and short period seismic sensors was conducted March 7 - April 30, 2014 near Sweetwater, TX. The objective of the survey was to use a combination of controlled source shot slices and passive seismic recordings recorded by multiple types of sensors with different bandwidths and sensitivities to image the subsurface. The broadband component of the survey consisted of 25 continuously recording seismic stations comprised of 20 Trillium Compact Posthole sensors from Nanometrics and 5 Polar Trillium 120PHQs from the IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center (PIC). The broadband stations also utilized 25 Centaur digitizers from Nanometrics as well as 25 polar quick deploy enclosures from the PIC. The broadband array was designed to maximize horizontal traveling seismic energy for surface wave analysis over the primary target area with sufficient offset for imaging objectives at depth. The short period component of the survey consisted of 2639 receiver locations using Zland nodes from NodalSeismic. The nodes are further divided into 3 sub-arrays: 1) outlier array 2) active source array 3) backbone array. The outlier array consisted of 25 continuously recording nodes distributed around the edge of the survey at a distance of ~5 km from the survey boundary, and provided valuable constraints to passive data analysis techniques at the edge of the survey boundary. The active source patch consisted of densely spaced nodes that were designed to record signals from a Vibroseis source truck for active source reflection processing and imaging. The backbone array consisted of 292 nodes that covered the entirety of the survey area to maximize the value of the passive data analysis. By utilizing continuous recording and smartly designed arrays for measuring local and regional earthquakes we can incorporate velocity information derived from passive data analysis into the active source processing workflow to produce a superior subsurface

  10. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  11. Investigations of Eurasian Seismic Sources and Upper Mantle Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-25

    is interpreted as the spinel -+ garnet lherzolite (or peridotite ) transition. Seismic corridors sampling primarily oceanic, back-arc, and tectonically...occurring as the odd xenolith in kimberlites and other igneous intrusions, or exposed in mountain peridotites and ophiolite sequences-and carry with them...tantalizingly close yet frustratingly remote. Although it rises to within a few kilometers of the surface beneath oceans, xenoliths, peridotites exposed in

  12. Time reversal seismic source imaging using peak average power ratio (PAPR) parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franczyk, Anna; Leśniak, Andrzej; Gwiżdż, Damian

    2017-03-01

    The time reversal method has become a standard technique for the location of seismic sources. It has been used both for acoustic and elastic numerical modelling and for 2D and 3D propagation models. Although there are many studies concerning its application to point sources, little so far has been done to generalise the time reversal method to the study of sequences of seismic events. The need to describe such processes better motivates the analysis presented in this paper. The synthetic time reversal imaging experiments presented in this work were conducted for sources with the same origin time as well as for the sources with a slight delay in origin time. For efficient visualisation of the seismic wave propagation and interference, a new coefficient—peak average power ratio—was introduced. The paper also presents a comparison of visualisation based on the proposed coefficient against a commonly used visualisation based on a maximum value.

  13. The excitation of long period seismic waves by a source spanning a structural discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, J. H.

    Simple theoretical results are obtained for the excitation of seismic waves by an indigenous seismic source in the case that the source volume is intersected by a structural discontinuity. In the long wavelength approximation the seismic radiation is identical to that of a point source placed on one side of the discontinuity or of a different point source placed on the other side. The moment tensors of these two equivalent sources are related by a specific linear transformation and may differ appreciably both in magnitude and geometry. Either of these sources could be obtained by linear inversion of seismic data but the physical interpretation is more complicated than in the usual case. A source which involved no volume change would, for example, yield an isotropic component if, during inversion, it were assumed to lie on the wrong side of the discontinuity. The problem of determining the true moment tensor of the source is indeterminate unless further assumptions are made about the stress glut distribution; one way to resolve this indeterminancy is to assume proportionality between the integrated stress glut on each side of the discontinuity.

  14. Discontinuum Modelling Approach for Stress Analysis at a Seismic Source: Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainoki, Atsushi; Mitri, Hani S.; Yao, Mike; Chinnasane, Damodara

    2016-12-01

    Rockbursts in underground mines can cause devastating damage to mine workings; hence, it is important to be able to assess the potential for their occurrence. The present study focuses on a large seismic event that took place at an underground base metal mine in Canada. The event took place in a dyke near the 100/900 orebodies on 3880 Level (1180 m below surface) of the Copper Cliff Mine in Sudbury, Canada. A 3D continuum stress analysis of the orebodies, i.e., 100 and 900, using an orebody-wide model encompassing the major geological structures and in situ stress heterogeneity in the mine shows low potential for rockburst at the seismic source location—a result which contradicts the fact that a large seismic event actually took place. A postulation is thus made that there had been highly stressed regions caused by geological disturbances at the source location before mining activities took place. In order to verify the postulation, a further study is undertaken with the discrete element modelling technique, whereby a cube-shaped model containing a fracture network is subjected to a stress state similar to that at the source location. A model parametrical study is conducted with respect to the distribution of the fracture (joint) network and its mechanical properties. The results reveal that when joints are densely distributed at the source location, the stress state becomes significantly burst prone. It is observed that the length, density, stiffness, and orientation of joints have a large influence on the stress state along the joints, while the friction angle, cohesion, and tensile strength do not influence the stress state. A cube-shaped model is constructed with joint sets actually mapped at the mine and a stress analysis is performed. The results demonstrate the generation of highly stressed regions due to the interaction of the joints with the applied in situ stress fields, thus leading to burst-prone conditions. The present study numerically confirms that

  15. Seismicity in Eastern North America: What Is the Source of Intraplate Strain and Stress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Holt, W. E.; Stein, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive mechanism to explain seismicity in stable intraplate regions remains enigmatic. Within eastern and central North America, for example, a number of moderate to large-sized earthquakes have occurred, with the New Madrid sequence of 1811 and 1812 being the most noteworthy. The much more recent M 5.8 Virginia earthquake is a fresh reminder that there is a source for strain accumulation within eastern North America. Although there is agreement that these intraplate earthquakes owe their activity to the reactivation of ancient faults created during previous tectonic events, there is no comprehensive model to explain how these faults get reactivated. Several hypotheses exist, including lithospheric sources, such as ridge push, coupling with mantle flow, or even strain release associated with glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Here we explore whether tectonic effects, which consist of forces associated with topography and lithosphere structure (gravity potential energy differences - GPE), coupled with the effects of large scale mantle flow, are compatible as a source of stress for seismicity within eastern US. We compare the p-axes of all compiled earthquake mechanisms in this region to the SHmax directions of deviatoric stresses, modeled using a global finite element method. The method we employ couples gravitational potential energy derived stresses with stresses from a global density-driven mantle convection model that incorporates both radial and lateral viscosity variations. Additionally, we also investigate how lateral strength variations within the lithosphere of continental North America and adjacent regions affect these forces, and consequently the occurrence of earthquakes in this region.

  16. Sensing network for electromagnetic fields generated by seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Bambakidis, Gust; Ternovskiy, Igor V.

    2014-06-01

    The sensors network is becoming prolific and play now increasingly more important role in acquiring and processing information. Cyber-Physical Systems are focusing on investigation of integrated systems that includes sensing, networking, and computations. The physics of the seismic measurement and electromagnetic field measurement requires special consideration how to design electromagnetic field measurement networks for both research and detection earthquakes and explosions along with the seismic measurement networks. In addition, the electromagnetic sensor network itself could be designed and deployed, as a research tool with great deal of flexibility, the placement of the measuring nodes must be design based on systematic analysis of the seismic-electromagnetic interaction. In this article, we review the observations of the co-seismic electromagnetic field generated by earthquakes and man-made sources such as vibrations and explosions. The theoretical investigation allows the distribution of sensor nodes to be optimized and could be used to support existing geological networks. The placement of sensor nodes have to be determined based on physics of electromagnetic field distribution above the ground level. The results of theoretical investigations of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena are considered in Section I. First, we compare the relative contribution of various types of mechano-electromagnetic mechanisms and then analyze in detail the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by piezomagnetic and electrokinetic effects.

  17. Investigation of Apparent Seismic Velocity Changes Caused by Microseism Noise Source Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, M. F.; Bean, C. J.; Lokmer, I.; Craig, D.

    2013-12-01

    Currently there is strong interest in monitoring temporal changes in seismic wave velocity in various geological settings. These settings can range from volcano monitoring to reservoir monitoring amongst others. Green's functions are often used to observe temporal variations in seismic wave velocity as their arrival times contain information about velocity changes. Green's functions are typically retrieved by cross correlating ambient noise recorded at given pair of stations. Theoretically the recorded wavefields used for the cross correlation should be diffuse. For applications in seismic imagery, the background noise sources should be uniformly distributed in space or the wavefield must be highly scattered but neither condition typically occur in nature. However temporal and spatial variations of non-uniformly distributed noise sources may lead to apparent changes in Green's functions which are related to the source not the path. This could lead to a misinterpretation of temporal changes in wave velocity. We track the spatial and temporal distribution of the noise sources using seismic arrays, located in Ireland. It is a good location in which to study these effects, as it is tectonically very quiet and is relatively close to large microseism noise sources in the North Atlantic, allowing a quantification of noise source heterogeneity. The temporal variations in seismic wave velocity are calculated and compared to the temporal and spatial distribution of the microseism noise sources. The initial results show how the direct arrival waveform and the arrival time of the Green's functions correlate with spatial and temporal variability of the microseism noise sources. Under these conditions we also explore the minimum noise trace length required for the Green's functions to converge. We quantify the degree to which apparent velocity variations using direct arrivals are caused by changes in the sources and assess the use of coda wave arrivals in mitigating source

  18. UTILIZING RESULTS FROM INSAR TO DEVELOP SEISMIC LOCATION BENCHMARKS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEISMIC SOURCE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    M. BEGNAUD; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    Obtaining accurate seismic event locations is one of the most important goals for monitoring detonations of underground nuclear teats. This is a particular challenge at small magnitudes where the number of recording stations may be less than 20. Although many different procedures are being developed to improve seismic location, most procedures suffer from inadequate testing against accurate information about a seismic event. Events with well-defined attributes, such as latitude, longitude, depth and origin time, are commonly referred to as ground truth (GT). Ground truth comes in many forms and with many different levels of accuracy. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can provide independent and accurate information (ground truth) regarding ground surface deformation and/or rupture. Relating surface deformation to seismic events is trivial when events are large and create a significant surface rupture, such as for the M{sub w} = 7.5 event that occurred in the remote northern region of the Tibetan plateau in 1997. The event, which was a vertical strike slip even appeared anomalous in nature due to the lack of large aftershocks and had an associated surface rupture of over 180 km that was identified and modeled using InSAR. The east-west orientation of the fault rupture provides excellent ground truth for latitude, but is of limited use for longitude. However, a secondary rupture occurred 50 km south of the main shock rupture trace that can provide ground truth with accuracy within 5 km. The smaller, 5-km-long secondary rupture presents a challenge for relating the deformation to a seismic event. The rupture is believed to have a thrust mechanism; the dip of the fimdt allows for some separation between the secondary rupture trace and its associated event epicenter, although not as much as is currently observed from catalog locations. Few events within the time period of the InSAR analysis are candidates for the secondary rupture. Of these, we have

  19. Earthquakes in the Orozco transform zone: seismicity, source mechanisms, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, Anne M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, a network of ocean bottom seismometers and hydrophones was deployed in order to determine the seismic characteristics of the Orozco transform fault in the central eastern Pacific. We present hypocentral locations and source mechanisms for 70 earthquakes recorded by this network. All epicenters are within the transform region of the Orozco Fracture Zone and clearly delineate the active plate boundary. About half of the epicenters define a narrow line of activity parallel to the spreading direction and situated along a deep topographic trough that forms the northern boundary of the transform zone (region 1). Most focal depths for these events are very shallow, within 4 km of the seafloor; several well-determined focal depths, however, are as great as 7 km. No shallowing of seismic activity is observed as the rise-transform intersection is approached; to the contrary, the deepest events are within 10 km of the intersection. First motion polarities for most of the earthquakes in region 1 are compatible with right-lateral strike slip faulting along a nearly vertical plane, striking parallel to the spreading direction. Another zone of activity is observed in the central part of the transform (region 2). The apparent horizontal and vertical distribution of activity in this region is more scattered than in the first, and the first motion radiation patterns of these events do not appear to be compatible with any known fault mechanism. Pronounced lateral variations in crustal velocity structure are indicated for the transform region from refraction data and measurements of wave propagation directions. The effect of this lateral heterogeneity on hypocenters and fault plane solutions is evaluated by tracing rays through a three-dimensional velocity grid. While findings for events in region 1 are not significantly affected, in region 2, epicentral mislocations of up to 10 km and azimuthal deflections of up to 45° may result from

  20. A new impulsive seismic shear wave source for near-surface (0-30 m) seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of elastic moduli and fluid content in shallow (0-30 m) natural soils below artificial flood containment structures can be particularly useful in levee monitoring as well as seismic hazard studies. Shear wave moduli may be estimated from horizontally polarized, shear wave experiments. However, long profiles (>10 km) with dense receiver and shot spacings (<1m) cannot be collected efficiently using currently available shear wave sources. We develop a new, inexpensive, shear wave source for collecting fast, shot gathers over large acquisition sites. In particular, gas-charged, organic-rich sediments comprising most lower-delta sedimentary facies, greatly attenuate compressional body-waves. On the other hand, SH waves are relatively insensitive to pore-fluid moduli and can improve resolution. We develop a recoil device (Jolly, 1956) into a single-user, light-weight (<20 kg), impulsive, ground-surface-coupled SH wave generator, which is capable of working at rates of several hundred shotpoints per day. Older impulsive methods rely on hammer blows to ground-planted stationary targets. Our source is coupled to the ground with steel spikes and the powder charge can be detonated mechanically or electronically. Electrical fuses show repeatability in start times of < 50 microseconds. The barrel and shell-holder exceed required thicknesses to ensure complete safety during use. The breach confines a black-powder, 12-gauge shotgun shell, loaded with inert, environmentally safe ballast. In urban settings, produced heat and sound are confined by a detached, exterior cover. A moderate 2.5 g black-powder charge generates seismic amplitudes equivalent to three 4-kg sledge-hammer blows. We test this device to elucidate near subsurface sediment properties at former levee breach sites in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Our radio-telemetric seismic acquisition system uses an in-house landstreamer, consisting of 14-Hz horizontal component geophones, coupled to steel plates

  1. Multiple Seismic Array Observations for Tracing Deep Tremor Activity in Western Shikoku, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Shiomi, K.; Obara, K.

    2011-12-01

    Deep non-volcanic tremors become very active during episodic slow-slip events in western Japan and Cascadia. The episodic tremor and slow-slip events in western Shikoku, Japan, occur at a typical interval of 6 months. Recently, it has been reported that tremor migration activity is complex and shows different migrating directions depending on time scales (Ghosh et al., 2010). Such characteristics of tremor are important to understand the mechanism of tremor and the relationship between tremor and SSEs. However it is difficult to determine the location of tremors with high accuracy because tremors show faint signals and make the identification of P/S-wave arrivals difficult. Seismic array analysis is useful to evaluate tremor activity, especially to estimate the arrival direction of seismic energy (e.g. Ueno et al., 2010, Ghosh et al., 2010), as it can distinguish multiple tremor sources occurring simultaneously. Here, we have conducted seismic array observation and analyzed seismic data during tremor activity by applying the MUSIC method to trace tremor location and its migration in western Shikoku. We have installed five seismic arrays in western Shikoku since January 2011. One of the arrays contains 30 stations with 3-component seismometers with a natural frequency of 2 Hz (Type-L array). The array aperture size is 2 km and the mean interval between stations is approximately 200 m. Each of the other arrays (Type-S array) contains 9 seismic stations with the same type of seismometers of the Type-L array, and is deployed surrounding the Type-L array. The small array aperture size is 800 m and its mean station interval is approximately 150 m. All array stations have recorded continuous waveform data at a sampling of 200Hz. In May 2011, an episodic tremor and a short-term slip event occurred for the first time during the observation period. We could retrieve the array seismic data during the whole tremor episode. The analysis of data from the type-L array confirms

  2. Current (1985-1988) seismic activity in Belgium: Comparison with historical and instrumental seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camelbeeck, T.

    1990-12-01

    Reliable information concerning the historical and instrumental seismicity in Belgium is discussed in comparison with the more recent data of microseismicity. The Brabant Massif and the north of France are characterized by an important historical seismicity. Since the Middle Ages, four earthquakes caused considerable concern in that region. The actual seismic activity is not well known due to the lack of seismological stations. It is thus impossible to base the tectonic pattern on seismological data. The seismic activity in Hainaut was analyzed with the data of the seismic sequence near Dour in 1987 and the reexamination of the bigger earthquakes having occurred since 1965. The seismogenic layer is limited to the 8 first km of the crust. The occurrence under the form of swarms or sequences is an evidence of strong fracturation. The fault-plane solution of the Dour earthquake in 1987 indicates an almost north-south extension at this place of the Mons Basin. The focal mechanisms of 5 earthquakes in the center region shows a north-west south-east oriented maximal horizontal compressive stress. This information is in agreement with the dextral strike-slip of the 'shear zone of north-Artois' made conspicuous by geology. Important information about the seismotectonics in the eastern part of Belgium is given by the study of the actual microseismicity with a dense network of seismological stations. The fault-plane solution of the Malmedy (12 May 1985, M (sub L) = 2.5) earthquake indicates a south-west north-east extension along a fault of rhenish orientation. This is a favorable argument to the hypothesis of the prolongation across the Ardennes of the quaternary faults of the lower Rhine embayment. The analysis of the Bilzen (16 Jul. 1985, M(sub L) = 3.0), Gulpen (17 Oct. 1988, M(sub L) = 3.5), and Sprimont (27 Dec. 1988, M(sub L) = 3.6) earthquakes supplies new information on the complex tectonics of the Liege region.

  3. Temporal variation of mass-wasting activity in Mount St. Helens crater, Washington, U. S. A. indicated by seismic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, H.H. )

    1991-11-01

    In the crater of Mount St. Helens, formed during the eruption of 18 May 1980, thousands of rockfalls may occur in a single day, and some rock and dirty-snow avalanches have traveled more than 1 km from their source. Because most seismic activity in the crater is produced by mass wasting, the former can be used to monitor the latter. The number and amplitude of seismic events per unit time provide a generalized measure of mass-wasting activity. In this study 1-min averages of seismic amplitudes were used as an index of rockfall activity during summer and early fall. Plots of this index show the diurnal cycle of rockfall activity and establish that the peak in activity occurs in mid to late afternoon. A correlation coefficient of 0.61 was found between daily maximum temperature and average seismic amplitude, although this value increases to 0.72 if a composite temperature variable that includes the maximum temperature of 1 to 3 preceding days as well as the present day is used. Correlation with precipitation is much weaker.

  4. Large-N Seismic Deployment at the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Mellors, R. J.; Pitarka, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary project that consists of a series of chemical explosion experiments at the Nevada National Security Site. The goal of SPE is to understand the complicated effect of earth structures on source energy partitioning and seismic wave propagation, develop and validate physics-based monitoring, and ultimately better discriminate low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity. Deployment of a large number of seismic sensors is planned for SPE to image the full 3-D wavefield with about 500 three-component sensors and 500 vertical component sensors. This large-N seismic deployment will operate near the site of SPE-5 shot for about one month, recording the SPE-5 shot, ambient noise, and additional controlled-sources. This presentation focuses on the design of the large-N seismic deployment. We show how we optimized the sensor layout based on the geological structure and experiment goals with a limited number of sensors. In addition, we will also show some preliminary record sections from deployment. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Passive monitoring for near surface void detection using traffic as a seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Kuzma, H. A.; Rector, J.; Nazari, S.

    2009-12-01

    In this poster we present preliminary results based on our several field experiments in which we study seismic detection of voids using a passive array of surface geophones. The source of seismic excitation is vehicle traffic on nearby roads, which we model as a continuous line source of seismic energy. Our passive seismic technique is based on cross-correlation of surface wave fields and studying the resulting power spectra, looking for "shadows" caused by the scattering effect of a void. High frequency noise masks this effect in the time domain, so it is difficult to see on conventional traces. Our technique does not rely on phase distortions caused by small voids because they are generally too tiny to measure. Unlike traditional impulsive seismic sources which generate highly coherent broadband signals, perfect for resolving phase but too weak for resolving amplitude, vehicle traffic affords a high power signal a frequency range which is optimal for finding shallow structures. Our technique results in clear detections of an abandoned railroad tunnel and a septic tank. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop a technology for the simultaneous imaging of shallow underground structures and traffic monitoring near these structures.

  6. Open Source Seismic Software in NOAA's Next Generation Tsunami Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, S. B.; Baker, B. I.; Hagerty, M. T.; Leifer, J. M.; Lisowski, S.; Thies, D. A.; Donnelly, B. K.; Griffith, F. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Tsunami Information technology Modernization (TIM) is a project spearheaded by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to update the United States' Tsunami Warning System software currently employed at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (Eva Beach, Hawaii) and the National Tsunami Warning Center (Palmer, Alaska). This entirely open source software project will integrate various seismic processing utilities with the National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office's core software, AWIPS2. For the real-time and near real-time seismic processing aspect of this project, NOAA has elected to integrate the open source portions of GFZ's SeisComP 3 (SC3) processing system into AWIPS2. To provide for better tsunami threat assessments we are developing open source tools for magnitude estimations (e.g., moment magnitude, energy magnitude, surface wave magnitude), detection of slow earthquakes with the Theta discriminant, moment tensor inversions (e.g. W-phase and teleseismic body waves), finite fault inversions, and array processing. With our reliance on common data formats such as QuakeML and seismic community standard messaging systems, all new facilities introduced into AWIPS2 and SC3 will be available as stand-alone tools or could be easily integrated into other real time seismic monitoring systems such as Earthworm, Antelope, etc. Additionally, we have developed a template based design paradigm so that the developer or scientist can efficiently create upgrades, replacements, and/or new metrics to the seismic data processing with only a cursory knowledge of the underlying SC3.

  7. Lithospheric Models of the Middle East to Improve Seismic Source Parameter Determination/Event Location Accuracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    structure of Saudi Arabia through data collection from broadband stations. Figure 2. (Left) Map of Arabian Plate showing major tectonic ...State Award Nos. DE-AC52-07NA27344/24.2.3.2 and DOS_SIAA-11-AVC/NMA-1 ABSTRACT The Middle East is a tectonically complex and seismically...active region. The ability to accurately locate earthquakes and other seismic events in this region is complicated by tectonics , the uneven

  8. Inverting seismic noise cross-correlations for noise source distribution: A step towards reducing source-induced bias in seismic noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermert, Laura; Afanasiev, Michael; Sager, Korbinian; Gokhberg, Alexey; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We report on the ongoing development of a new inversion method for the space- and time-dependent power spectral density distribution of ambient seismic noise sources. The method, once complete, will mainly serve two purposes: First, it will allow us to construct more realistic forward models for noise cross-correlation waveforms, thereby opening new possibilities for waveform imaging by ambient noise tomography. Second, it may provide new insights about the properties of ambient noise sources, complementing studies based on beamforming or numerical modeling of noise based on oceanographic observations. To invert for noise sources, we consider surface wave signal energy measurements on the 'causal' (station A to B) and on the 'acausal' (station B to A) correlation branch, and the ratio between them. These and similar measurements have proven useful for locating noise sources using cross-correlations in several past studies. The inversion procedure is the following: We construct correlation forward models based on Green's functions from a spectral element wave propagation code. To construct these models efficiently, we use source-receiver reciprocity and assume spatial uncorrelation of noise sources. In such a setting, correlations can be calculated from a pre-computed set of Green's functions between the seismic receivers and sources located at the Earth's surface. We then calculate spatial sensitivity kernels for the noise source distribution with respect to the correlation signal energy measurements. These in turn allow us to construct a misfit gradient and optimize the source distribution model to fit our observed cross-correlation signal energies or energy ratios. We will present the workflow for calculation of the forward model and sensitivity kernels, as well as results for both forward modeling and kernels for an example data set of long-period noise or 'hum' at a global scale. We will also provide an outlook on the noise source inversion considering the

  9. Structure and seismic activity of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, M.; Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Laigle, M.; Ruiz Fernandez, M.; Kopp, H.; Hirn, A.; Flueh, E. R.; Thales Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Several active and passive seismic experiments conducted in 2007 in the framework of the European program "Thales Was Right" and of the French ANR program "Subsismanti" provided a unique set of geophysical data highlighting the deep structure of the central part of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, offshore Dominica and Martinique, and its seismic activity during a period of 8 months. The region is characterized by a relatively low rate of seismicity that is often attributed to the slow (2 cm/yr) subduction of the old, 90 My, Atlantic lithosphere beneath the Caribbean Plate. Based on tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic data, the forearc can clearly be divided into an inner forearc, characterised by a high vertical velocity gradient in the igneous crust, and an outer forearc with lower crustal velocity gradient. The thick, high velocity, inner forearc is possibly the extension at depth of the Mesozoic Caribbean crust outcropping in La Désirade Island. The outer forearc, up to 70 km wide in the northern part of the study area, is getting narrower to the south and disappears offshore Martinique. Based on its seismic velocity structure with velocities higher than 6 km/s the backstop consists, at least partly, of magmatic rocks. The outer forearc is also highly deformed and faulted within the subducting trend of the Tiburon Ridge. With respect to the inner forearc velocity structure the outer forearc basement could either correspond to an accreted oceanic terrane or made of highly fractured rocks. The inner forearc is a dense, poorly deformable crustal block, tilted southward as a whole. It acts as a rigid buttress increasing the strain within both the overriding and subducting plates. This appears clearly in the current local seismicity affecting the subducting and the overriding plates that is located beneath the inner forearc. We detected earthquakes beneath the Caribbean forearc and in the Atlantic oceanic plate as well. The main seismic activity is

  10. Seismic and source characteristics of large chemical explosions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adushkin, V.V.; Kostuchenko, V.N.; Pernik, L.M.; Sultanov, D.D.; Zcikanovsky, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    From the very beginning of its arrangement in 1947, the Institute for Dynamics of the Geospheres RAS (former Special Sector of the Institute for physics of the Earth, RAS) was providing scientific observations of effects of nuclear explosions, as well as large-scale detonations of HE, on environment. This report presents principal results of instrumental observations obtained from various large-scale chemical explosions conducted in the Former-Soviet Union in the period of time from 1957 to 1989. Considering principal aim of the work, tamped and equivalent chemical explosions have been selected with total weights from several hundreds to several thousands ton. In particular, the selected explosions were aimed to study scaling law from excavation explosions, seismic effect of tamped explosions, and for dam construction for hydropower stations and soil melioration. Instrumental data on surface explosions of total weight in the same range aimed to test military technics and special objects are not included.

  11. Evidence for bathymetric control on the distribution of body wave microseism sources from temporary seismic arrays in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Garrett G.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2014-06-01

    Microseisms are the background seismic vibrations mostly driven by the interaction of ocean waves with the solid Earth. Locating the sources of microseisms improves our understanding of the range of conditions under which they are generated and has potential applications to seismic tomography and climate research. In this study, we detect persistent source locations of P-wave microseisms at periods of 5-10 s (0.1-0.2 Hz) using broad-band array noise correlation techniques and frequency-slowness analysis. Data include vertical component records from four temporary seismic arrays in equatorial and southern Africa with a total of 163 broad-band stations and deployed over a span of 13 yr (1994-2007). While none of the arrays were deployed contemporaneously, we find that the recorded microseismic P waves originate from common, distant oceanic bathymetric features with amplitudes that vary seasonally in proportion with extratropical cyclone activity. Our results show that the majority of the persistent microseismic P-wave source locations are within the 30-60º latitude belts of the Northern and Southern hemispheres while a substantially reduced number are found at lower latitudes. Variations in source location with frequency are also observed and indicate tomographic studies including microseismic body wave sources will benefit from analysing multiple frequency bands. We show that the distribution of these source regions in the North Atlantic as well as in the Southern Ocean correlate with variations in bathymetry and ocean wave heights and corroborate current theory on double-frequency microseism generation. The stability of the source locations over the 13-yr time span of our investigation suggests that the long-term body wave microseism source distribution is governed by variations in the bathymetry and ocean wave heights while the interaction of ocean waves has a less apparent influence.

  12. Investigation into 3D earth structure and sources using full seismic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covellone, Brian M.

    Seismograms are the result of the complex interactions between a seismic source, a propagation medium and the seismograph's response. Through the use of 3-dimensional modeling and full seismic waveform data, we quantify and minimize errors associated with the source and propagation medium within our data sets. We compile a new and unique earthquake catalog for the Middle East that is openly available to the public. We quantify the benefits of using a 3-dimensional model relative to a 1-dimensional model to minimizing error in earthquake moment tensors and identify where in the waveform 3-dimensional models outperform 1-dimensional models. Two new and unique 3-dimensional seismic wave speed models are computed for the Ontong Java plateau and eastern North American margin.Both models are significant improvements to the resolution of wave speed structures in the crust and upper mantle and provide new information for the evaluation of tectonic features.

  13. Localization of short-range acoustic and seismic wideband sources: Algorithms and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafsudd, J. Z.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R.; Yao, K.; Taciroglu, E.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the determination of the location (source localization) of a disturbance source which emits acoustic and/or seismic signals. We devise an enhanced approximate maximum-likelihood (AML) algorithm to process data collected at acoustic sensors (microphones) belonging to an array of, non-collocated but otherwise identical, sensors. The approximate maximum-likelihood algorithm exploits the time-delay-of-arrival of acoustic signals at different sensors, and yields the source location. For processing the seismic signals, we investigate two distinct algorithms, both of which process data collected at a single measurement station comprising a triaxial accelerometer, to determine direction-of-arrival. The direction-of-arrivals determined at each sensor station are then combined using a weighted least-squares approach for source localization. The first of the direction-of-arrival estimation algorithms is based on the spectral decomposition of the covariance matrix, while the second is based on surface wave analysis. Both of the seismic source localization algorithms have their roots in seismology; and covariance matrix analysis had been successfully employed in applications where the source and the sensors (array) are typically separated by planetary distances (i.e., hundreds to thousands of kilometers). Here, we focus on very-short distances (e.g., less than one hundred meters) instead, with an outlook to applications in multi-modal surveillance, including target detection, tracking, and zone intrusion. We demonstrate the utility of the aforementioned algorithms through a series of open-field tests wherein we successfully localize wideband acoustic and/or seismic sources. We also investigate a basic strategy for fusion of results yielded by acoustic and seismic arrays.

  14. Seismic source characterization by ionospheric sounding from Gound Positioning System data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, L.; Lognonné, P.; Kherani, A. E.; Crespon, F.; Murakami, M.

    2007-12-01

    Imaging the terrestrial ionosphere is becoming possible since the installation of dense GPS networks, with a temporal and spatial resolution allowing the detection of ionospheric seismic waves. Since the 1960s, ionospheric seismic waves are detectable almost punctually after large shallow earthquakes, with current minimum magnitude of 6.5. Most recently, the use of dense networks gave the way to a global visualization of the horizontal propagation of co-seismic ionospheric disturbances. Such a use of a Global Positioning System array, and the sounding capability of the method above the ocean, prove the potential of this method as a complement to more traditional techniques used in seismology. From now on, after imaging seismic waves in the ionosphere, the challenge is the characterization of the seismic source, whose rupture involves coupling mechanisms between the moving solid earth and its surrounding atmosphere. The study presented here is based on the Total Electronic Content variations mapped close to the source and shortly after the Tokachi-Oki earthquake (M=8.3) that occurred on September, 25, 2003, in Japan. The first fundamental source parameters derived from 1 Hz sampled data will be reminded here. The rupture process is then pre-modelled in reference to the co-seismic displacements estimated by other techniques. Therefore, a modelling of the horizontal propagation of acoustic waves generated by three aligned separated sources is developed. The preliminary results of the subsequent GPS data inversion tests will be presented. Finally, for physical modelling of the vertical propagation, we used ray tracing in the atmosphere, in order to study the effects of the near-field pulse spreading in acoustic domain as well as the redistribution of the charged particles under geomagnetic dependency.

  15. Characterising Seismicity at Alutu, an Actively Deforming Volcano in the Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, M.; Nowacki, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Wookey, J. M.; Biggs, J.; Bastow, I. D.; Ayele, A.; Bedada, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) provides a unique example of the tectonic and volcanic processes occuring during the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading. Situated 100 km south of Addis Ababa along the eastern rift margin, Alutu is a silicic stratovolcano that geodetic measurements (InSAR and GPS) have shown is actively deforming. Though the volcano has received relatively little scientific attention it is also a site of economic significance as a geothermal power plant resides within the caldera. As part of ARGOS (Alutu Research Geophysical ObservationS), a multi-disciplinary project aiming to investigate the magmatic and hydrothermal processes occuring at Alutu, a seismic network of 12 broadband seismometers was deployed in January 2012. Other components of ARGOS include InSAR, GPS, geologic mapping and magnetotellurics. From the seismic dataset, P- and S-wave arrivals across the array were manually picked and used to locate events using a non-linear earthquake location algorithm (NonLinLoc) and a predefined 1D velocity model. Perturbations were later applied to this velocity model to investigate the sensitivity of the locations and evaluate the true uncertainties of the solutions. Over 1000 events were successfully located during 2012, where picks were possible at 4 or more stations. Seismicity clusters at both shallow depths (z<2 km) beneath the caldera and at deeper depths of 5-15 km. There is a significant increase in seismicity during the rainy months, suggesting the shallow events may be related to the hydrothermal system. We interpret the deeper events as being magmatic in origin. Events are also located along the eastern border faults that bound the outer edges of the MER and highlights that seismicity arises concurrently via tectonic processes. An adapted version of Richter's original local magnitude scale (ML) to account for attenuation within the MER (Keir et al., 2006) was then used to compute magnitudes for the best located events

  16. Seismicity at Old Faithful Geyser: an isolated source of geothermal noise and possible analogue of volcanic seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, Susan Werner

    1984-09-01

    Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., is a relatively isolated source of seismic noise and exhibits seismic behavior similar to that observed at many volcanoes, including "bubblequakes" that resemble B-type "earthquakes", harmonic tremor before and during eruptions, and periods of seismic quiet prior to eruptions. Although Old Faithful differs from volcanoes in that the conduit is continuously open, that rock-fracturing is not a process responsible for seismicity, and that the erupting fluid is inviscid H 2O rather than viscous magma, there are also remarkable similarities in the problems of heat and mass recharge to the system, in the eruption dynamics, and in the seismicity. Water rises irregularly into the immediate reservoir of Old Faithful as recharge occurs, a fact that suggests that there are two enlarged storage regions: one between 18 and 22 m (the base of the immediate reservoir) and one between about 10 and 12 m depth. Transport of heat from hot water or steam entering at the base of the recharging water column into cooler overlying water occurs by migration of steam bubbles upward and their collapse in the cooler water, and by episodes of convective overturn. An eruption occurs when the temperature of the near-surface water exceeds the boiling point if the entire water column is sufficiently close to the boiling curve that the propagation of pressure-release waves (rarefactions) down the column can bring the liquid water onto the boiling curve. The process of conversion of the liquid water in the conduit at the onset of an eruption into a two-phase liquid-vapor mixture takes on the order of 30 s. The seismicity is directly related to the sequence of filling and heating during the recharge cycle, and to the fluid mechanics of the eruption. Short (0.2-0.3 s), monochromatic, high-frequency events (20-60 Hz) resembling unsustained harmonic tremor and, in some instances, B-type volcanic earthquakes, occur when exploding or imploding

  17. Ice motion and seismic activity on a steep temporate glacier tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalban Canassy, Pierre; Faillettaz, Jerome; Funk, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Ice motion and seismic activity on a steep temporate glacier (Triftgletscher, Bernese Alps, Switzerland) Pierre Dalban Canassy*, Jerome Faillettaz* and Martin Funk* * Laboratory of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology (VAW), ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland (dalban@vaw.baug.ethz.ch) In the last 15 years Triftgletscher (Bernese Alps, Switzerland) has substantially retreated (several hundreds of meters) from the riegel and a proglacial lake containing 6.106 m3 water has been formed in the glacier forefield. Because of the glacier retreat, especially the thinning of the lower flat tongue, the stability of the steep section behind it is affected. The consequence is that the likelihood of large ice avalanches starting from the steep section will increase. The recent intensive glacier thinning in the lower tongue area of 6-10 m.a-1 has even worsened the situation because the runout path of the ice avalanches has become steeper. Ice avalanches with several millions of m3 triggering impulse waves by plunguing into the lake can be the consequence. The aim of our study is to improve the understanding of the mechanisms leading to such instabilities and to develop a predictive method based on both seismic and photogrammetric surveys. The seismic recording is performed with help of 3 geophones installed on the rock on both sides of the serac fall allowing a continuous record. We are able to highlight seismic events by applying an automatic detection procedure, to locate their sources and also to evaluate the released energy of each detected icequake. The most part of these events are due to crack openings and falls of ice chunks, but we could also isolate specific events corresponding to stick-slip motions. The latter seem to play a significant role in the destabilization of the ice mass and represent valuable precursors to break-off episodes. The 2D picture analysis is achieved by analysing photographs taken every day at the same time by an automatic camera installed in

  18. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  19. Characterization of Source and Wave Propagation Effects of Volcano-seismic Events and Tremor Using the Amplitude Source Location Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Londono, J. M.; López, C. M.; Ruiz, M. C.; Mothes, P. A.; Maeda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We propose application of the amplitude source location (ASL) method to characterize source and wave propagation effects of volcano-seismic events and tremor observed at different volcanoes. We used this method to estimate the source location and source amplitude from high-frequency (5-10 Hz) seismic amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation. We estimated the cumulative source amplitude (Is) as the offset value of the time-integrated envelope of the vertical seismogram corrected for geometrical spreading and medium attenuation in the 5-10 Hz band. We studied these parameters of tremor signals associated with eruptions and explosion events at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador; long-period (LP) events at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador; and LP events at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia. We identified two types of eruption tremor at Tungurahua; noise-like inharmonic waveforms and harmonic oscillatory signals. We found that Is increased linearly with increasing source amplitude for explosion events and LP events, and that Is increased exponentially with increasing source amplitude for inharmonic eruption tremor signals. The source characteristics of harmonic eruption tremor signals differed from those of inharmonic tremor signals. The Is values we estimated for inharmonic eruption tremor were consistent with previous estimates of volumes of tephra fallout. The linear relationship between the source amplitude and Is for LP events can be explained by the wave propagation effects in the diffusion model for multiple scattering assuming a diffusion coefficient of 105 m2/s and an intrinsic Q factor of around 50. The resultant mean free path is approximately 100 m. Our results suggest that Cotopaxi and Nevado del Ruiz volcanoes have similar highly scattering and attenuating structures. Our approach provides a systematic way to compare the size of volcano-seismic signals observed at different volcanoes. The scaling relations among source parameters that we identified

  20. Seismic detection of an active subglacial magmatic complex in Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, Amanda C.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Grace Barcheck, C.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Aster, Richard C.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Huerta, Audrey D.; Nyblade, Andrew; Young, Duncan A.; Wilson, Terry J.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous volcanoes exist in Marie Byrd Land, a highland region of West Antarctica. High heat flow through the crust in this region may influence the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Volcanic activity progressed from north to south in the Executive Committee mountain range between the Miocene and Holocene epochs, but there has been no evidence for recent magmatic activity. Here we use a recently deployed seismic network to show that in 2010 and 2011, two swarms of seismic activity occurred at 25-40km depth beneath subglacial topographic and magnetic highs, located 55km south of the youngest subaerial volcano in the Executive Committee Range. We interpret the swarm events as deep long-period earthquakes based on their unusual frequency content. Such earthquakes occur beneath active volcanoes, are caused by deep magmatic activity and, in some cases, precede eruptions. We also use radar profiles to identify a prominent ash layer in the ice overlying the seismic swarm. Located at 1,400m depth, the ash layer is about 8,000years old and was probably sourced from the nearby Mount Waesche volcano. Together, these observations provide strong evidence for ongoing magmatic activity and demonstrate that volcanism continues to migrate southwards along the Executive Committee Range. Eruptions at this site are unlikely to penetrate the 1.2 to 2-km-thick overlying ice, but would generate large volumes of melt water that could significantly affect ice stream flow.

  1. Seismic image of a CO2 reservoir beneath a seismically active volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Pitt, A.M.; Foulger, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a seismically active volcano 200 000 to 50 000 years old, situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Since 1989 it has shown evidence of unrest in the form of earthquake swarms (Hill et al. 1990), volcanic 'long-period' earthquakes (Pitt and Hill 1994), increased output of magmatic 3He (Sorey et al. 1993) and the emission of about 500 tonnes day-1 of CO2 (Farrar et al. 1995; Hill 1996; M. Sorey, personal communication, 1997) which has killed trees and poses a threat to human safety. Local-earthquake tomography shows that in mid-1989 areas of subsequent tree-kill were underlain by extensive regions where the ratio of the compressional and shear elastic-wave speeds Vp/VS was about 9% lower than in the surrounding rocks. Theory (Mavko and Mukerji 1995), experiment (Ito, DeVilbiss and Nur 1979) and experience at other geothermal/volcanic areas (Julian et al. 1996) and at petroleum reservoirs (Harris et al. 1996) indicate that Vp/VS is sensitive to pore-fluid compressibility, through its effect on Vp. The observed Vp/VS anomaly is probably caused directly by CO2, and seismic Vp/VS tomography is thus a promising tool for monitoring gas concentration and movement in volcanoes, which may in turn be related to volcanic activity.

  2. Seismicity at Old Faithful Geyser: an isolated source of geothermal noise and possible analogue of volcanic seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., is a relatively isolated source of seismic noise and exhibits seismic behavior similar to that observed at many volcanoes, including "bubblequakes" that resemble B-type "earthquakes", harmonic tremor before and during eruptions, and periods of seismic quiet prior to eruptions. Although Old Faithful differs from volcanoes in that the conduit is continuously open, that rock-fracturing is not a process responsible for seismicity, and that the erupting fluid is inviscid H2O rather than viscous magma, there are also remarkable similarities in the problems of heat and mass recharge to the system, in the eruption dynamics, and in the seismicity. Water rises irregularly into the immediate reservoir of Old Faithful as recharge occurs, a fact that suggests that there are two enlarged storage regions: one between 18 and 22 m (the base of the immediate reservoir) and one between about 10 and 12 m depth. Transport of heat from hot water or steam entering at the base of the recharging water column into cooler overlying water occurs by migration of steam bubbles upward and their collapse in the cooler water, and by episodes of convective overturn. An eruption occurs when the temperature of the near-surface water exceeds the boiling point if the entire water column is sufficiently close to the boiling curve that the propagation of pressure-release waves (rarefactions) down the column can bring the liquid water onto the boiling curve. The process of conversion of the liquid water in the conduit at the onset of an eruption into a two-phase liquid-vapor mixture takes on the order of 30 s. The seismicity is directly related to the sequence of filling and heating during the recharge cycle, and to the fluid mechanics of the eruption. Short (0.2-0.3 s), monochromatic, high-frequency events (20-60 Hz) resembling unsustained harmonic tremor and, in some instances, B-type volcanic earthquakes, occur when exploding or imploding

  3. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the connection between petroleum-industry activities, and seismic event occurrences is essential to monitor, quantify, and mitigate seismic risk. While many studies identified anthropogenically-induced seismicity in intraplate regions where background seismicity rates are generally low, little is known about how to distinguish naturally occurring from induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. Further, it is not clear how different oil and gas operational parameters impact the frequency and magnitude of the induced seismic events. Here, we examine variations in frequency-size and spatial distributions of seismicity within the Southern Joaquin basin, an area of both active petroleum production and active fault systems. We analyze a newly available, high-quality, relocated earthquake catalog (Hauksson et al. 2012). This catalog includes many seismic events with magnitudes up to M = 4.5 within the study area. We start by analyzing the overall quality and consistence of the seismic catalog, focusing on temporal variations in seismicity rates and catalog completeness which could indicate variations in network sensitivity. This catalog provides relatively homogeneous earthquake recordings after 1981, enabling us to compare seismicity rates before and after the beginning of more pervasive petroleum-industry activities, for example, hydraulic-fracturing and waste-water disposals. We conduct a limited study of waste-water disposal wells to establish a correlation between seismicity statistics (i.e. rate changes, fractal dimension, b-value) within specific regions and anthropogenic influences. We then perform a regional study, to investigate spatial variations in seismicity statistics which are then correlated to oil field locations and well densities. In order to distinguish, predominantly natural seismicity from induced seismicity, we perform a spatial mapping of b-values and fractal dimensions of earthquake hypocenters. Seismic events in the proximity to

  4. Active Tectonics and Seismic Potential of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Wesson, Robert L.; Ekström, Göran

    This multidisciplinary monograph provides the first modern integrative summary focused on the most spectacular active tectonic systems in North America. Encompassing seismology, tectonics, geology, and geodesy, it includes papers that summarize the state of knowledge, including background material for those unfamiliar with the region; address global hypotheses using data from Alaska; and test important global hypotheses using data from this region. It is organized around four major themes: • subduction and great earthquakes at the Aleutian Arc, • the transition from strike slip to accretion and subduction of the Yakutat microplate, • the Denali fault and related structures and their role in accommodating permanent deformation of the overriding plate, and • regional integration and large-scale models and the use of data from Alaska to address important global questions and hypotheses. The book's publication near the beginning of the National Science Foundation's EarthScope project makes it especially timely because Alaska is perhaps the least understood area within the EarthScope footprint, and interest in the region can be expected to rise with time as more EarthScope data become available.

  5. Newly identified active faults in the Pollino seismic gap, southern Italy, and their seismotectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, Francesco; Cirillo, Daniele; de Nardis, Rita; Cardinali, Mauro; Lavecchia, Giusy; Orecchio, Barbara; Presti, Debora; Totaro, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The following is a geological study of a Quaternary and active normal fault-system, which crops out in the Pollino area, a seismogenic sector of the Southern Apennines, Italy. From 2010 to 2014, this area was affected by long lasting seismic activity characterized by three major events which occurred in May 2012 (Mw 4.3), in October 2012 (Mw 5.2) and in June 2014 (Mw 4.0). The integration of structural-geological data with morpho-structural and remote sensing analyses, led to define the geometry, the kinematics, the cross-cutting relationships and the slip rates of the inferred active fault segments within and near the epicentral area. We reconstructed an asymmetric extensional pattern characterized by low-angle, E and NNE-dipping faults, and by antithetic, high-angle, SW- to WSW-dipping faults. The geometry of the faults at depth was constrained using high-resolution hypocenter distributions. The overall system fits well with the deformation field obtained from focal mechanisms and geodetic data. Comparing the fault pattern with the time-space evolution of the Pollino seismic activity, we identified the seismogenic sources in two, near-parallel, WSW-dipping faults, whose seismogenic potential were assessed. The peculiar perpendicular-to-fault-strike evolution of the seismic activity, is discussed in the frame of the reconstructed seismotectonic model.

  6. Comparison of seismic sources for imaging geologic structures on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, W.E.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1997-02-01

    In this study, five non-invasive swept sources, three non-invasive impulsive sources and one invasive impulsive source were compared. Previous shallow seismic source tests (Miller and others, 1986, 1992, 1994) have established that site characteristics should be considered in determining the optimal source. These studies evaluated a number of invasive sources along with a few non-invasive impulsive sources. Several sources (particularly the high frequency vibrators) that were included in the ORR test were not available or not practical during previous tests, cited above. This study differs from previous source comparisons in that it (1) includes many swept sources, (2) is designed for a greater target depth, (3) was conducted in a very different geologic environment, and (4) generated a larger and more diverse data set (including high fold CMP sections and walkaway vertical seismic profiles) for each source. The test site is centered around test injection well HF-2, between the southern end of Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG 5) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  7. 75 FR 13498 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Dumbarton Bridge Seismic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Specified Activities; Dumbarton Bridge Seismic Retrofit Project, California AGENCY: National Marine... Dumbarton Bridge Seismic Retrofit Project. DATES: Effective August 15, 2010, through August 14, 2011... Seismic Retrofit Project. NMFS issued a notice in the Federal Register ] on December 4, 2009 (74 FR...

  8. Source characteristics of the seismic sequences in the Eastern Carpathians foredeep region (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Emilia; Radulian, Mircea

    2001-08-01

    The source parameters and scaling properties for two seismic areas (Vrâncioaia and Râmnicu Sărat) of the Carpathians Mountains foredeep, adjacent to the Vrancea seismic region, are analyzed by standard time and frequency domain methods and empirical Green's function deconvolution. The study area is characterized by distinct shallow seismicity clusters with small and moderate-size earthquakes ( M<5). The digital short-period and broad-band waveforms recorded by the Romanian seismic network are considered. The analysis of the retrieved source parameters possibly outlines a heterogeneous faulting process. A significant difference in the stress drop value is emphasized between Vrâncioaia and Râmnicu Sărat earthquakes, which is assumed to be ascribed to differences in the local seismotectonics and reology. Our paper shows the efficiency of the empirical Green's function deconvolution in eliminating the instrument, path and site effects for the earthquake sequences in the Râmnicu Sărat region. The apparent source time function is generally well constrained, as demonstrated by our tests using in parallel both, appropriate Green's functions of different sizes, and instruments with different frequency bandwidth.

  9. Penetration characteristics of electromagnetic emissions from an underground seismic source into the atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, O. A.; Hayakawa, M.; Rafalsky, V. A.

    1995-02-01

    Theoretical calculations are made on electromagnetic fields in the frequency range 10(exp -2) to 10(exp 2) Hz on the ground surface and above the ionosphere induced by stochastic microcurrent activity inside the future seismic sources on the assumption of cylindrical symmetry of the effective current and three types of polarization. The inhomogeneity of the ground and atmosphere conductivity and anisotropy of the ionosphere are taken into consideration. The intensity of ULF magnetic and electric precursors observed on the ground, and their spatial distribution can be explained by using the results of the present computations. It is found that only the fields from a magnetic type source can penetrate into the magnetosphere and generate propagating Alfven waves. The expected values of magnetospheric electric and magnetic field are 1-10 microV/m/square root of Hz and 1-10 pT/square root of Hz respectively, and the horizontal scale of their distribution is about 100-200 km. Finally, these theoretical predictions are compared with the corresponding results of satellite observations.

  10. Active faulting in low- to moderate-seismicity regions: the SAFE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebrier, M.; Safe Consortium

    2003-04-01

    SAFE (Slow Active Faults in Europe) is an EC-FP5 funded multidisciplinary effort which proposes an integrated European approach in identifying and characterizing active faults as input for evaluating seismic hazard in low- to moderate-seismicity regions. Seismically active western European regions are generally characterized by low hazard but high risk, due to the concentration of human and material properties with high vulnerability. Detecting, and then analysing, tectonic deformations that may lead to destructive earthquakes in such areas has to take into account three major limitations: - the typical climate of western Europe (heavy vegetation cover and/or erosion) ; - the subdued geomorphic signature of slowly deforming faults ; - the heavy modification of landscape by human activity. The main objective of SAFE, i.e., improving the assessment of seismic hazard through understanding of the mechanics and recurrence of active faults in slowly deforming regions, is achieved through four major steps : (1) extending geologic and geomorphic investigations of fault activity beyond the Holocene to take into account various time-windows; (2) developing an expert system that combines diverse lines of geologic, seismologic, geomorphic, and geophysical evidence to diagnose the existence and seismogenic potential of slow active faults; (3) delineating and characterising high seismic risk areas of western Europe, either from historical or geological/geomorphic evidence; (4) demonstrating and discussing the impact of the project results on risk assessment through a seismic scenario in the Basel-Mulhouse pilot area. To take properly into account known differences in source behavior, these goals are pursued both in extensional (Lower and Upper Rhine Graben, Catalan Coast) and compressional tectonic settings (southern Upper Rhine Graben, Po Plain, and Provence). Two arid compressional regions (SE Spain and Moroccan High Atlas) have also been selected to address the limitations

  11. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter during the recent seismic activity in Fthiotida, central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabelos, Dimitrios N.; Contadakis, Michael E.; Vergos, Georgios; Spatalas, Spyrous

    2016-01-01

    Based on the results of our previous studies concerning the tidal triggering effect on the seismicity in Greece, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance as an index of tectonic stress criticality, associated with earthquake occurrence. Then, we investigate whether the recent increase in the seismic activity at Fthiotida in Greek mainland indicates faulting maturity and the possible production a stronger earthquake. In this paper we present the results of this investigation

  12. Identifying seismic noise sources and their amplitude from P wave microseisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Jennifer; Harmon, Nicholas; Srokosz, Meric

    2016-04-01

    Understanding sources of seismic noise is important for a range of applications including seismic imagery, time-lapse, and climate studies. For locating sources from seismic data, body waves offer an advantage over surface waves because they can reveal the distance to the source as well as direction. Studies have found that body waves do originate from regions predicted by models (Obrebski et al., 2013), where wave interaction intensity and site effect combine to produce the source (Ardhuin & Herbers, 2013). Here, we undertake a quantitative comparison between observed body wave microseisms and modelled sources- in terms of location, amplitude, and spectral shape- with the aim of understanding how well sources are observed and potentially what they reveal about the underlying ocean wavefield. We used seismic stations from the Southern California Seismic Network, and computed beamformer output as a function of time, frequency, slowness and azimuth. During winter months (October - mid March) the dominant arrivals at frequencies 0.18-0.22 Hz were P waves that originated from the North Pacific, whilst arrivals from the North Atlantic dominated at slightly lower frequencies of 0.16-0.18 Hz. Based on this, we chose to focus on P waves during winter, and back-projected the beamformer energy onto a global grid using P wave travel timetables (following Gerstoft et al., 2008). We modelled the seismic sources using Wavewatch III and site effect coefficients calculated following Ardhuin and Herbers (2013). We output the beamformer and the modelled sources on a 2° global grid averaged over 6 hour periods from September 2012 to September 2014, at seismic frequencies of 0.06 to 0.3 Hz. We then integrated the spectra over the full frequency range. Here we focus on results from the first winter in the North Pacific. Preliminary results indicate that the logarithm of the modelled source and the logarithm of the beamformer output are well described by a two-term exponential model

  13. Calibration of Seismic Sources during a Test Cruise with the new RV SONNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, M.; Schnabel, M.; Damm, V.

    2015-12-01

    During autumn 2014, several test cruises of the brand new German research vessel SONNE were carried out before the first official scientific cruise started in December. In September 2014, BGR conducted a seismic test cruise in the British North Sea. RV SONNE is a multipurpose research vessel and was also designed for the mobile BGR 3D seismic equipment, which was tested successfully during the cruise. We spend two days for calibration of the following seismic sources of BGR: G-gun array (50 l @ 150 bar) G-gun array (50 l @ 207 bar) single GI-gun (3.4 l @ 150 bar) For this experiment two hydrophones (TC4042 from Reson Teledyne) sampling up to 48 kHz were fixed below a drifting buoy at 20 m and 60 m water depth - the sea bottom was at 80 m depth. The vessel with the seismic sources sailed several up to 7 km long profiles around the buoy in order to cover many different azimuths and distances. We aimed to measure sound pressure level (SPL) and sound exposure level (SEL) under the conditions of the shallow North Sea. Total reflections and refracted waves dominate the recorded wave field, enhance the noise level and partly screen the direct wave in contrast to 'true' deep water calibration based solely on the direct wave. Presented are SPL and RMS power results in time domain, the decay with distance along profiles, and the somehow complicated 2D sound radiation pattern modulated by topography. The shading effect of the vessel's hull is significant. In frequency domain we consider 1/3 octave levels and estimate the amount of energy in frequency ranges not used for reflection seismic processing. Results are presented in comparison of the three different sources listed above. We compare the measured SPL decay with distance during this experiment with deep water modeling of seismic sources (Gundalf software) and with published results from calibrations with other marine seismic sources under different conditions: E.g. Breitzke et al. (2008, 2010) with RV Polarstern

  14. Seismic body wave separation in volcano-tectonic activity inferred by the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Paolo; De Lauro, Enza; De Martino, Salvatore; Falanga, Mariarosaria; Petrosino, Simona

    2015-04-01

    One of the main challenge in volcano-seismological literature is to locate and characterize the source of volcano/tectonic seismic activity. This passes through the identification at least of the onset of the main phases, i.e. the body waves. Many efforts have been made to solve the problem of a clear separation of P and S phases both from a theoretical point of view and developing numerical algorithms suitable for specific cases (see, e.g., Küperkoch et al., 2012). Recently, a robust automatic procedure has been implemented for extracting the prominent seismic waveforms from continuously recorded signals and thus allowing for picking the main phases. The intuitive notion of maximum non-gaussianity is achieved adopting techniques which involve higher-order statistics in frequency domain., i.e, the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis (CICA). This technique is successful in the case of the blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. In seismological framework, indeed, seismic signals are thought as the convolution of a source function with path, site and the instrument response. In addition, time-delayed versions of the same source exist, due to multipath propagation typically caused by reverberations from some obstacle. In this work, we focus on the Volcano Tectonic (VT) activity at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy) during the 2006 ground uplift (Ciaramella et al., 2011). The activity was characterized approximately by 300 low-magnitude VT earthquakes (Md < 2; for the definition of duration magnitude, see Petrosino et al. 2008). Most of them were concentrated in distinct seismic sequences with hypocenters mainly clustered beneath the Solfatara-Accademia area, at depths ranging between 1 and 4 km b.s.l.. The obtained results show the clear separation of P and S phases: the technique not only allows the identification of the S-P time delay giving the timing of both phases but also provides the independent waveforms of the P and S phases. This is an enormous

  15. Seismic characterization of fracture compliance in the field using P- and S-wave sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foord, Greg; Verdon, James P.; Kendall, J.-Michael

    2015-12-01

    Near-surface seismic field experiments using both P- and S-wave sources were carried out to image fractured limestones at two sites in southwest England. We measured P- and S-wave seismic velocities at multiple azimuths to aligned fracture sets, allowing us to determine the seismic anisotropy generated by these fractures. The effect of aligned fractures on seismic anisotropy is commonly modelled in terms of the additional compliance introduced by the fractures. Therefore, an understanding of fracture compliance is crucial both in terms of interpreting observations of anisotropy in the field and in forward modelling the effects of fractures on seismic wave propagation. Of particular concern is (1) the scaling of fracture compliance with fracture length scale, and (2) the controls on the ratio of normal to tangential compliance of the fractures (Ω = ZN/ZT). Our experimental design allows us to image both, and we find that Ω = 0.37 ± 0.06 and Ω = 0.75 ± 0.10 for our two study sites, while the absolute values of the tangential compliance range from 0.66 × 10-11 to 5.0 × 10-11 Pa-1 m.

  16. SOME APPLICATIONS OF SEISMIC SOURCE MECHANISM STUDIES TO ASSESSING UNDERGROUND HAZARD.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; ,

    1984-01-01

    Various measures of the seismic source mechanism of mine tremors, such as magnitude, moment, stress drop, apparent stress, and seismic efficiency, can be related directly to several aspects of the problem of determining the underground hazard arising from strong ground motion of large seismic events. First, the relation between the sum of seismic moments of tremors and the volume of stope closure caused by mining during a given period can be used in conjunction with magnitude-frequency statistics and an empirical relation between moment and magnitude to estimate the maximum possible sized tremor for a given mining situation. Second, it is shown that the 'energy release rate,' a commonly-used parameter for predicting underground seismic hazard, may be misleading in that the importance of overburden stress, or depth, is overstated. Third, results involving the relation between peak velocity and magnitude, magnitude-frequency statistics, and the maximum possible magnitude are applied to the problem of estimating the frequency at which design limits of certain underground support equipment are likely to be exceeded.

  17. The use of a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) as a seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, Ingrid; Chwatal, Werner; Radinger, Alexander; Brückl, Ewald

    2014-05-01

    The Tunnel Seismic While Drilling (TSWD) method uses the Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) as the seismic source. The method has been developed to predict the geological situation from reflections ahead of the tunnel face without disturbing the tunneling. The vibrations of the TBM are continuously monitored near the drilling head (pilot signal) as well as the direct and reflected seismic wave field at borehole geophones (geophone signal) situated in the tunnel wall behind the TBM. During the processing these signals are correlated and result in excellent seismic traces comparable to conventional seismic methods. The interpretation of the reflections leads to a nearly daily prognosis about 100 m ahead of the TBM. This system was successfully implemented at three different construction sites in Austria and is currently operating at one further. The cutters on front of the TBM head are pressed against the tunnel face and split the rock during rotating which is called the chipping process. This cutting process generates seismic waves radiated into the rock mass and results also in vibrations of the TBM itself. On the one hand it is important to know the source mechanism of the TBM and the radiation pattern of the seismic waves in all directions. Until now this is not well understood. To investigate this 3C-geophones were installed at the surface above the tunnel axis at different construction sites. The obtained seismograms show the forward and backward radiated seismic wave field of the TBM, for the present without consideration of the influence of the free surface. We compare this data with modelled seismograms in which we use different possible source mechanism, like single force or force due to tensile cracks. First results are shown in the scope of this work. On the other hand it is essential to know how good the recorded pilot signal represents the entire chipping process. Due to technically reasons the pilot signal has been registered so far on the non-rotating part

  18. Seismic source-region elastic calculations on KDYNA

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.B.

    1994-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of source-region simulations on the KDYNA hydrodynamics code. The source was a pressure-step function in a 40-m-radius cavity 500 m below a free surface. The problem of a driven cavity in an elastic material was chosen as a test and calibration problem for two reasons. First, the driven cavity is a model for an underground explosion. Secondly, the availability of analytical methods for waves in elastic solids means that alternate calculational paths exist for calculating the distant signals from the cavity. Data from an array of sensor points roughly 1 km from the source were saved and passed to Howard Patton and Keith K. Nakanish for input to a NMTS (Normal Mode Time Series) code. The data consisted of the time histories (0 to 2 s) of the radial and axial velocities and the radial, axial, and shear components of the stress at each sensor point. The NMTS code will use the input to predict the signals in the far field (e.g., 300 km) from the explosion source. This elastic KDYNA calculation provides a complete and satisfactory simulation for input to the NMTS code and for comparison with other calculational methods.

  19. Searching for Seismically Active Faults in the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, S.; Antunes, V.; Arroucau, P.

    2015-12-01

    The repeated occurrence of large magnitude earthquakes in southwest Iberia in historical and instrumental times suggests the presence of active fault segments in the region. However, due to an apparently diffuse seismicity pattern defining a broad region of distributed deformation west of Gibraltar Strait, the question of the location, dimension and geometry of such structures is still open to debate. We recently developed a new algorithm for earthquake location in 3D complex media with laterally varying interface depths, which allowed us to relocate 2363 events having occurred from 2007 to 2013, using P- and S-wave catalog arrival times obtained from the Portuguese Meteorological Institute (IPMA, Instituto Portugues do Mar e da Atmosfera), for a study area lying between 8.5˚W and 5˚W in longitude and 36˚ and 37.5˚ in latitude. The most remarkable change in the seismicity pattern after relocation is an apparent concentration of events, in the North of the Gulf of Cadiz, along a low angle northward-dipping plane rooted at the base of the crust, which could indicate the presence of a major fault. If confirmed, this would be the first structure clearly illuminated by seismicity in a region that has unleashed large magnitude earthquakes. Here, we present results from the joint analysis of focal mechanism solutions and waveform similarity between neighboring events from waveform cross-correlation in order to assess whether those earthquakes occur on the same fault plane.

  20. Determination of earthquake source parameters from waveform data for studies of global and regional seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziewonski, A. M.; Chou, T.-A.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    1981-04-01

    It is possible to use the waveform data not only to derive the source mechanism of an earthquake but also to establish the hypocentral coordinates of the `best point source' (the centroid of the stress glut density) at a given frequency. Thus two classical problems of seismology are combined into a single procedure. Given an estimate of the origin time, epicentral coordinates and depth, an initial moment tensor is derived using one of the variations of the method described in detail by Gilbert and Dziewonski (1975). This set of parameters represents the starting values for an iterative procedure in which perturbations to the elements of the moment tensor are found simultaneously with changes in the hypocentral parameters. In general, the method is stable, and convergence rapid. Although the approach is a general one, we present it here in the context of the analysis of long-period body wave data recorded by the instruments of the SRO and ASRO digital network. It appears that the upper magnitude limit of earthquakes that can be processed using this particular approach is between 7.5 and 8.0; the lower limit is, at this time, approximately 5.5, but it could be extended by broadening the passband of the analysis to include energy with periods shorter that 45 s. As there are hundreds of earthquakes each year with magnitudes exceeding 5.5, the seismic source mechanism can now be studied in detail not only for major events but also, for example, for aftershock series. We have investigated the foreshock and several aftershocks of the Sumba earthquake of August 19, 1977; the results show temporal variation of the stress regime in the fault area of the main shock. An area some 150 km to the northwest of the epicenter of the main event became seismically active 49 days later. The sense of the strike-slip mechanism of these events is consistent with the relaxation of the compressive stress in the plate north of the Java trench. Another geophysically interesting result of our

  1. Seismic Reflection Image of Lithospheric Structure Beneath Shidara, Using Explosive Sources from the 2001 Deep Seismic Profiling in Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Ito, T.; Miller, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Hirata, N.; Ohishi, M.; Kaip, G.; Kato, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Kwiatkowski, A.; Kurashimo, E.; Kawamura, T.

    2001-12-01

    Central Honshu lies above an active subduction zone where the Philippine Sea plate is being subducted beneath the Eurasian plate. A better understanding of the lithospheric structure of this region is important for assessing the risk of large mega-thrust earthquakes and also for understanding processes of continental growth. In order to define the deep geometry of major structures within the crust as well as the down-going slab, a deep seismic reflection profile was collected in the central part of Honshu, Japan. This experiment was performed as a piggy-back on a larger scale seismic experiment conducted by the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center and Joint Japanese University teams in late August, 2001. In the Shidara area, a 27-km seismic line was deployed perpendicular to the trench axis and major geologic boundaries. In the central part of the seismic line, 10-Hz vertical geophones, connected by a digital telemetry cables, were deployed over 15 km at a 50 m spacing. In addition, 100 TEXAN (Reftek 125) recorders with 4.5 Hz geophones were deployed at ca. 120 m-intervals for 12 km. A total of six shots with a maximum offset of 210 km, were clearly recorded by this dense receiver array. Near-vertical incidence data were obtained with recordings of a 500 kg shot at the northern end of this receiver array and a 100 kg shot at the southern end. The shots were recorded for 60 to 64 s at a 4 ms sampling rate. Records from these shots exhibit strong, layered reflections from 6 to 9.5 s, which we interpret as being derived from the lower crust. North-dipping reflections at 10.5 to 11.5 s can be interpreted as reflections from the down-going slab. Some north-dipping events from the middle and upper crust probably correspond to the deeper extension of the Median Tectonic Line and Butsuzo Tectonic Line, both of which extend for more than 1000 km along western Honshu and Kyushu Islands.

  2. Volcano deformation source parameters estimated from InSAR: Sensitivities to uncertainties in seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterlark, Timothy; Donovan, Theodore; Feigl, Kurt L.; Haney, Matthew; Thurber, Clifford H.; Tung, Sui

    2016-04-01

    The eruption cycle of a volcano is controlled in part by the upward migration of magma. The characteristics of the magma flux produce a deformation signature at the Earth's surface. Inverse analyses use geodetic data to estimate strategic controlling parameters that describe the position and pressurization of a magma chamber at depth. The specific distribution of material properties controls how observed surface deformation translates to source parameter estimates. Seismic tomography models describe the spatial distributions of material properties that are necessary for accurate models of volcano deformation. This study investigates how uncertainties in seismic tomography models propagate into variations in the estimates of volcano deformation source parameters inverted from geodetic data. We conduct finite element model-based nonlinear inverse analyses of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data for Okmok volcano, Alaska, as an example. We then analyze the estimated parameters and their uncertainties to characterize the magma chamber. Analyses are performed separately for models simulating a pressurized chamber embedded in a homogeneous domain as well as for a domain having a heterogeneous distribution of material properties according to seismic tomography. The estimated depth of the source is sensitive to the distribution of material properties. The estimated depths for the homogeneous and heterogeneous domains are 2666 ± 42 and 3527 ± 56 m below mean sea level, respectively (99% confidence). A Monte Carlo analysis indicates that uncertainties of the seismic tomography cannot account for this discrepancy at the 99% confidence level. Accounting for the spatial distribution of elastic properties according to seismic tomography significantly improves the fit of the deformation model predictions and significantly influences estimates for parameters that describe the location of a pressurized magma chamber.

  3. Reconciling Earthquake Source Parameters from InSAR and Long-period Seismic Waveform Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakibay Senobari, N.; Funning, G.; Ferreira, A. M. G.; Weston, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons between earthquake source parameters as determined by InSAR and the global centroid moment tensor (GCMT) catalogue show discrepancies between locations derived using these independent methods (Ferreira et al., 2011; Weston et al., 2011, 2012). Earthquake centroid location determination using InSAR data (named the 'InSAR Centroid Moment Tensor', or 'ICMT' location) is more robust, since it is independent of Earth velocity structure errors that impact on longperiod surface wave inversions used in the GCMT method. Ferreira et al (2011) showed that these discrepancies cannot be resolved at present by applying more detailed 3D Earth velocity structures from mantle tomography models. Earthquake location determination is dependent on the assumed velocity structure, not only in the GCMT method, but also in all of the seismic based earthquake source parameter inversions. Velocity structures are typically produced by seismic tomography, which itself depends on seismic phase travel times. These travel times are a function of source location and origin time, plus the path between the source and receivers. Errors in source location can therefore be compounded as errors in the velocity structure. In a preliminary study we analyze longperiod seismic data for four shallow continental earthquakes studied with InSAR - Zarand Mw 6.5 (Iran, 2005), Eureka Valley Mw 6.1 (California, 1993), Aiquile Mw 6.5 (Bolivia, 1998) and Wells Mw 6.0 (Nevada, 2008). We use the spectral element wave propagation package, SPECFEM3D GLOBE, and Earth model S40RTS (Ritsema et al., 2010) to calculate Green's functions and synthetic seismograms for these events using their ICMT source locations. Using a cross-correlation method we were able to estimate phase shifts for each source-receiver pair between synthetic and observed long period waveforms. We believe these phase shifts may correspond to unmodeled heterogeneity in the S40RTS model, and if systematically documented could provide additional

  4. Non-invasive shallow seismic source comparison for hazardous waste site investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, W.E.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1994-12-31

    Many commonly used shallow seismic sources are unacceptable for hazardous waste site investigations because they risk exhumation of contaminants in the soil, they add contaminants (e.g. lead) which are not allowed by regulations, or they add new migration paths for contaminants. Furthermore, recently developed high frequency vibrators for shallow investigations could be more effective at some sites than non-invasive impulsive sources because of their ability to tailor the source spectrum and reduce interference. The authors show preliminary results of a comparison test of eight non-invasive impulsive and swept sources in preparation for seismic reflection profiling on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. Well log data are used to determine geologic contacts and to generate synthetic seismograms for the site. Common midpoint (CMP) seismic data for each source were collected at 95 geophone groups from 125 shot points along a 400m test line. Hydrophone data were obtained at 1.5m spacing between 61m and 133m depth in a hole near the center of the CMP line. As of March, 1994, brute stacks have been completed for three of the eight sources. Depth penetration is demonstrated in brute stacks and shot gathers, which show a 200ms reflector for all of the sources tested along portions of the line. Source effectiveness will also be evaluated by comparing images of several shallower reflectors (40--150ms) which are apparent in many of the records. Imaging of these reflectors appears to depend upon the ability of the source to generate sufficient high frequency energy (>100 Hz).

  5. Active Faults, Modern Seismicity And Block Structure Of Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatinsky, Y.; Rundquist, D.

    2004-12-01

    The analysis of on active faults and seismicity shows that the only a northern part of Eurasia should be regarded as an indivisible lithosphere unit. We defined it as the North Eurasian plate (Gatinsky, Rundquist, 2004) unlike the Eurasian plate s.l., which can be used only for paleotectonic reconstructions. The North Eurasian plate is bordered by zones of seismic activity traced along the Gakkel ridge, the Chersky and Stanovoi ranges, the Baikal rift, Altai--Sayany region, northern Tien Shan, Pamir, Hindu Kush and Kopet Dagh, Great Caucasus, northern Anatolia, Rhodopes, Carpathians, eastern and central Alps. Relationships between this plate and Europe west of the Rhine grabens remain ambiguous. The satellite measurements for them seem to be similar (Nocquet, Calais, 2003), but structural and seismic evidences allow suggesting their incipient division. Wide zones between this plate and neighboring ones can be distinguished outside north Eurasia. These zones consist of numerous blocks of various sizes. Block boundaries are mainly characterized by the high seismicity and development of active wrench faults, thrusts or modern rifts. Some of such zones were named earlier as "diffuse plate boundaries" (Stein et al., 2002; Bird et al, 2003). We suggest to name them as "transit zones" because they are situated between large lithosphere plates and as if transfer the stress field of one of them to other. Blocks within the transit zones reveal local divergences in GPS vectors of their displacements in the ITRF system and especially with respect to fixed Eurasia. At the same time data of satellite measurements emphasize the unity of the North Eurasian plate, which moves eastward in absolute coordinates with some clockwise rotation. The stress distribution in inner parts of the continent is being affected by the interaction with different plates and blocks. It can be more effectively illustrated by a «triangle» of the maximal seismic activity of Eurasia in the central Asia

  6. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for underwater acoustic problems using seismic sources.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott D; Odom, Robert I; Collis, Jon M

    2013-03-01

    Several problems of current interest involve elastic bottom range-dependent ocean environments with buried or earthquake-type sources, specifically oceanic T-wave propagation studies and interface wave related analyses. Additionally, observed deep shadow-zone arrivals are not predicted by ray theoretic methods, and attempts to model them with fluid-bottom parabolic equation solutions suggest that it may be necessary to account for elastic bottom interactions. In order to study energy conversion between elastic and acoustic waves, current elastic parabolic equation solutions must be modified to allow for seismic starting fields for underwater acoustic propagation environments. Two types of elastic self-starter are presented. An explosive-type source is implemented using a compressional self-starter and the resulting acoustic field is consistent with benchmark solutions. A shear wave self-starter is implemented and shown to generate transmission loss levels consistent with the explosive source. Source fields can be combined to generate starting fields for source types such as explosions, earthquakes, or pile driving. Examples demonstrate the use of source fields for shallow sources or deep ocean-bottom earthquake sources, where down slope conversion, a known T-wave generation mechanism, is modeled. Self-starters are interpreted in the context of the seismic moment tensor.

  7. Industry-Grade Seismic Processing System for Controlled- (and Passive-) Source Research in Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubak, G.; Morozov, I.

    2004-05-01

    Open-source seismic processing provides flexibility, functionality and value that are not found in commercial packages. A seismic processing system called SIA, initially developed at the University of Wyoming and continued at the University of Saskatchewan, represents one of the most extensive efforts to integrate the flexibility of academic seismic data analysis with polish and performance of a commercial processor. At present, SIA offers capabilities for nearly complete reflection processing, combined with built-in support for multicomponent, variable-format seismic data, extensive database capabilities, input/output in several data formats accepted in exploration and earthquake seismology (e.g., SEG-Y, SEG-2, Seismic UNIX, PASSCAL-SEGY, GSE3.0, SAC), original inversion codes (e.g., 2-D and 3-D reflection and receiver function migration, genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks), software and documentation maintenance, and interfaces to popular packages such as Datascope, GMT, rayinvr, reflectivity, and Seismic UNIX. Recently, we included in the system a modern graphical user interface (GUI) based on the open-source, platform-independent QT technology by TrollTech. The interface organizes project data while hiding the system structure from the user and generally resembles that of ProMAX (by Landmark Graphics). Nearly 200 tools are arranged into packages (e.g., reflection, travel-time, earthquake data processing, or graphics), and processing flows are constructed by dragging these tools and dropping them in the flows. Multiple processing flows may be opened simultaneously allowing the user to edit and execute concurrent jobs. Context-sensitive help can be accessed through the interface, in addition to the full HTML documentation automatically generated by the system. Context-dependent color highlighting is used to improve readability of the parameters. Processing jobs are submitted through the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) which allows multiple processes

  8. Regional Seismic Identification Research:Processing, Transportability and Source Models

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W; Mayeda, K; Rodgers, A; Taylor, S; Dodge, D; Matzel, E; Ganzberger, M

    2004-07-09

    Our identification research for the past several years has focused on the problem of correctly discriminating small-magnitude explosions from a background of earthquakes, mining tremors, and other events. Small magnitudes lead to an emphasis on regional waveforms. It has been shown that at each test site where earthquake and explosions are in close proximity and recorded at the same station, clear differences in the regional body waves such as the relative high frequency amplitudes of P and S waves can be used to discriminate between event types. However path and source effects can also induce such differences, therefore these must be quantified and accounted for. We have been using a specific technique called Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Correction (MDAC), with some success to account for some of these effects.

  9. Source estimation with surface-related multiples—fast ambiguity-resolved seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Ning; Aravkin, Aleksandr; van Leeuwen, Tristan; Lin, Tim; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of obtaining a reliable seismic image without prior knowledge of the source wavelet, especially from data that contain strong surface-related multiples. Conventional reverse-time migration requires prior knowledge of the source wavelet, which is either technically or computationally challenging to accurately determine; inaccurate estimates of the source wavelet can result in seriously degraded reverse-time migrated images, and therefore wrong geological interpretations. To solve this problem, we present a `wavelet-free' imaging procedure that simultaneously inverts for the source wavelet and the seismic image, by tightly integrating source estimation into a fast least-squares imaging framework, namely compressive imaging, given a reasonably accurate background velocity model. However, this joint inversion problem is difficult to solve as it is plagued with local minima and the ambiguity with respect to amplitude scalings because of the multiplicative, and therefore nonlinear, appearance of the source wavelet in the otherwise linear formalism. We have found a way to solve this nonlinear joint-inversion problem using a technique called variable projection, and a way to overcome the scaling ambiguity by including surface-related multiples in our imaging procedure following recent developments in surface-related multiple prediction by sparse inversion. As a result, we obtain without prior knowledge of the source wavelet high-resolution seismic images, comparable in quality to images obtained assuming the true source wavelet is known. By leveraging the computationally efficient compressive-imaging methodology, these results are obtained at affordable computational costs compared with conventional processing work flows that include surface-related multiple removal and reverse-time migration.

  10. Shear source multiazimuth near- and far-offset vertical seismic profiles, Asal Rift, Republic of Djibouti

    SciTech Connect

    Hirn, A.; Magnier, S.A. )

    1992-12-10

    A three-component borehole seismic data set obtained in the Asal rift zone shows that azimuthal anisotropy may be present with the fast propagation direction aligned with the present-day rift axis. This is seen on the near- and far-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data from the two source points lying parallel to the rift axis. The third orthogonal source point gives propagation times characteristic of near-horizontal paths along the detected slow direction. The reflected VSP wave field contains both P and S energy. The main P and S reflections correlate well and correspond to thin clay and siltstone layers interspersed within the lava flow series. Some evidence exists for a change with depth of the amount or direction of the anisotropy found in the uppermost 400 m.

  11. Investigating active faulting in the south-central Chilean forearc by local seismicity and moment tensor inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbrock, A.; Bohm, M.; Echtler, H.; Melnick, D.; Bruhn, C.; Bataille, K.

    2004-12-01

    The seismological ISSA experiment is giving a detailed insight into the seismicity distribution of southern Chile, where major earthquakes (M>8) have repeatedly ruptured the surface, involving vertical offsets of several meters. During a nearly 5-month observation period in 1999 and 2000 a temporary seismic network recorded approximately 350 local earthquakes. Two localized areas, North and South of the Arauco peninsula, showed a very high seismic activity in and above the interplate seismic zone of the Nazca-South America convergent margin. We used a double-difference relocation technique to obtain detailed images of the seismicity distribution in these areas. We also determined fault plane solutions to interpret the observed alignment of earthquakes hypocenters. Due to the low signal to noise ratio reliable first motion reading were difficult to achieve, which only very few clear readings. To overcome this problem we used moment tensor inversions to estimate reliable source mechanisms. However, for small magnitude earthquakes (<5) the biggest obstacle is the alignment of synthetic and observed waveforms. Inverting only for the amplitude spectrum, and therefore dropping the information in the phase spectrum can mostly circumvent the alignment problem. The two clusters investigated show high waveform correlation coefficients for most of the earthquakes indicating that possibly changes in fluid pressure can be responsible for triggering the events. After relocation most of the hypocenters in each of the two clusters align on a eastward dipping fault. Source mechanisms obtained indicate thrust faulting, where one of the possible fault planes aligns with the steep eastward dipping fault based on the seismicity distribution. These faults are reaching down to the top of the seismogenic zone and may serve as pathways for ascending fluids released in the subduction process. Active crustal-scale faulting below and active uplift of the coast account for active tectonic

  12. Source study of three moderate size recent earthquakes in the Guerrero seismic gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Q.; Ottemöller, L.; Raeesi, M.

    2015-07-01

    We study three recent earthquakes of different types in the Guerrero seismic gap zone with M ≥ 6.5: the 15 July 1996 Guerrero near-coast interplate earthquake ( M w = 6.6), the 18 April 2002 Guerrero near-trench interplate earthquake ( M w = 6.7), and the 11 December 2011 Guerrero normal-faulting inslab earthquake ( M w = 6.5). We compute the slip distributions, estimate source parameters, and model strong ground motions with the finite-fault stochastic method. We use different methods to estimate source parameters in order to observe differences in stress drop and radiated seismic energy among these events. The similarity in seismic magnitude gives us the opportunity to compare our results for the three different types of earthquake and interpret them in terms of the tectonic environments and seismic hazard. We analyze the peak ground accelerations and their relation with the stress drop. We simulated ground motions with the stochastic method. The model parameters are validated against recordings and a stress drop of 3, 15, and 70 MPa is estimated for the near-trench interplate, near-coast interplate, and normal-faulting inslab events, respectively. The near-trench interplate event has the lowest radiated seismic energy and the lowest rupture velocity. This is reflected in the energy to moment ratio of 2.17 × 10-6, 4.52 × 10-6, and 3.96 × 10-6 for the near-trench interplate, near-coast interplate, and normal-faulting inslab events, respectively. We define asperities using two different criteria: (1) based on average displacement and (2) maximum displacement. The asperity area for the near-coast and near-trench interplate events represents about 23 and 24-25 % of the total rupture area, which in the case of the normal-faulting inslab event, it is only 19 and 23 % based on average and maximum displacement, respectively.

  13. Active damping performance of the KAGRA seismic attenuation system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yoshinori; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Aso, Yoichi; Barton, Mark; Erasmo Peña Arellano, Fabián; Shoda, Ayaka; Akutsu, Tomotada; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Hirata, Naoatsu; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Okutomi, Koki; Miyamoto, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Hideki; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (formerly LCGT now KAGRA) is presently under construction in Japan. This May we assembled a prototype of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) for the beam splitter and the signal recycling mirrors of KAGRA, which we call Type-B SAS, and evaluated its performance at NAOJ (Mitaka, Toyko). We investigated its frequency response, active damping performance, vibration isolation performance and long-term stability both in and out of vacuum. From the frequency response test and the active damping performance test, we confirmed that the SAS worked as we designed and that all mechanical resonances which could disturb lock acquisition and observation are damped within 1 minute, which is required for KAGRA, by the active controls.

  14. Broadband source spectrum, seismic energy, and stress drop of the 1989 Macquarie Ridge earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, H. )

    1990-06-01

    The author computes the broadband source spectrum at periods from 1 to 50 seconds using teleseismic P body waves of the May 23, 1989 Macquarie Ridge earthquake (M{sub W} = 8.1) recorded by the GDSN, GEOSCOPE, and IDA networks. The average source spectrum is obtained by windowing, tapering, and Fourier-transforming P waves, removing from the spectra the effects of attenuation, geometrical spreading, and radiation pattern, and averaging logarithmically over the stations. The source spectrum for the strike-slip Macquarie Ridge earthquake is higher than an average source spectrum of seven recent large earthquakes (scaled to be comparable to a M{sub W} = 8.1 earthquake) by a factor of 2 to 3 at periods of 1 to 20 seconds. These other earthquakes were underthrusting events in subduction zones. Using Haskell's formulation assuming a point source with no directivity, she estimates the seismically radiated energy from the source spectrum by integrating the square of the source spectrum in velocity and scaling the result. The seismic energy thus estimated for the Macquarie Ridge earthquake is 3 to 8 {times} 10{sup 23} ergs. An Orowan stress drop can be obtained from the seismic energy and moment. The Orowan stress drop for the Macquarie Ridge earthquake is about 20 to 50 bars, much higher than similarly determined stress drops of other recent large earthquakes. There is a correlation between the Orowan stress drops and time since the last earthquake of comparable or larger magnitude for seven recent large earthquakes. This correlation suggests that a healing process operates that may control the mechanical strength of the fault and is important on time scales of tens to hundreds of years.

  15. Fully probabilistic seismic source inversion - Part 2: Modelling errors and station covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähler, Simon C.; Sigloch, Karin

    2016-11-01

    Seismic source inversion, a central task in seismology, is concerned with the estimation of earthquake source parameters and their uncertainties. Estimating uncertainties is particularly challenging because source inversion is a non-linear problem. In a companion paper, Stähler and Sigloch (2014) developed a method of fully Bayesian inference for source parameters, based on measurements of waveform cross-correlation between broadband, teleseismic body-wave observations and their modelled counterparts. This approach yields not only depth and moment tensor estimates but also source time functions. A prerequisite for Bayesian inference is the proper characterisation of the noise afflicting the measurements, a problem we address here. We show that, for realistic broadband body-wave seismograms, the systematic error due to an incomplete physical model affects waveform misfits more strongly than random, ambient background noise. In this situation, the waveform cross-correlation coefficient CC, or rather its decorrelation D = 1 - CC, performs more robustly as a misfit criterion than ℓp norms, more commonly used as sample-by-sample measures of misfit based on distances between individual time samples. From a set of over 900 user-supervised, deterministic earthquake source solutions treated as a quality-controlled reference, we derive the noise distribution on signal decorrelation D = 1 - CC of the broadband seismogram fits between observed and modelled waveforms. The noise on D is found to approximately follow a log-normal distribution, a fortunate fact that readily accommodates the formulation of an empirical likelihood function for D for our multivariate problem. The first and second moments of this multivariate distribution are shown to depend mostly on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the CC measurements and on the back-azimuthal distances of seismic stations. By identifying and quantifying this likelihood function, we make D and thus waveform cross

  16. Infrasonic source location imaging with the USArray: Application to one year of seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, K. T.; Shelby, R.; Hedlin, M. A.; Degroot-Hedlin, C. D.

    2010-12-01

    The USArray directly measures ground motion, which can mostly be attributed to ocean waves, earthquakes, volcanoes, and weather systems that load the Earth’s surface. Another source of ground motion is the transfer of atmospheric acoustic energy into seismic energy at the Earth’s surface. Infrasound (low frequency sound below ~20 Hz) can travel great distances unattenuated in atmospheric ducts. The infrasonic wave field is rich due to a variety of anthropogenic and geophysical phenomena including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, meteors, lightning and sprites, auroras, and oceanic and atmospheric processes. Globally spaced microbarometer arrays with apertures of 100 m to 2 km are typically used to study these sources. However, these arrays are separated by thousands of kilometers, which places considerable limits on what they can teach us about infrasound source physics. The USArray is in a position to study infrasound sources in unprecedented detail. Here we apply reverse-time migration to acoustic-to-seismic coupled signals recorded by the USArray to detect and locate in two-dimensional space and time several hundred infrasound sources in the western U.S. that occurred during 2008. Each event is visually inspected and assigned a quality rating. Confidence regions are determined using a bootstrap technique. The highest quality signals can be observed out to at least 1500 km range. We report the source location parameters for these events and investigate detection and location patterns. These results suggest that seismic networks near nuclear test monitoring infrasound arrays could be used to reduce the false alarm rate by identifying nearby, repeating sources of infrasound that create signals that are detected by the infrasound arrays. More fundamentally, these detected events comprise a ground truth database that can be used to validate or improve atmospheric velocity models.

  17. Broadband calibration of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth four-string seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoy, M.; Diebold, J.; Doermann, L.; Nooner, S.; Webb, S. C.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Crone, T. J.; Holmes, R. C.

    2009-08-01

    The R/V Marcus G. Langseth is the first 3-D seismic vessel operated by the U.S. academic community. With up to a four-string, 36-element source and four 6-km-long solid state hydrophone arrays, this vessel promises significant new insights into Earth science processes. The potential impact of anthropogenic sound sources on marine life is an important topic to the marine seismic community. To ensure that operations fully comply with existing and future marine mammal permitting requirements, a calibration experiment was conducted in the Gulf of Mexico in 2007-2008. Results are presented from deep (˜1.6 km) and shallow (˜50 m) water sites, obtained using the full 36-element (6600 cubic inches) seismic source. This array configuration will require the largest safety radii, and the deep and shallow sites provide two contrasting operational environments. Results show that safety radii and the offset between root-mean-square and sound exposure level measurements were highly dependent on water depth.

  18. Application of neural networks to seismic active control

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-07-01

    An exploratory study on seismic active control using an artificial neural network (ANN) is presented in which a singledegree-of-freedom (SDF) structural system is controlled by a trained neural network. A feed-forward neural network and the backpropagation training method are used in the study. In backpropagation training, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each training cycle. The training patterns for the neural net are generated randomly. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control algorithm. The control strategy proposed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to destroy the build-up of the system response. The ground motions considered in the simulations are the N21E and N69W components of the Lake Hughes No. 12 record that occurred in the San Fernando Valley in California on February 9, 1971. Significant reduction of the structural response by one order of magnitude is observed. Also, it is shown that the proposed control strategy has the ability to reduce the peak that occurs during the first few cycles of the time history. These promising results assert the potential of applying ANNs to active structural control under seismic loads.

  19. Large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture, seismic profiling on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarchow, Craig M.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Lutter, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Clear subsurface seismic images have been obtained at low cost on the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The Columbia Plateau is perhaps the most notorious of all 'bad-data' areas because large impedance contrasts in surface flood basalts severely degrade the seismic wavefield. This degradation was mitigated in this study via a large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture shooting method.The shooting method emphasizes the wide-angle portion of the wavefield, where Fermat's principle guarantees reverberation will not interfere with the seismic manifestations of crucial geologic interfaces. The basalt diving wave, normally discarded in standard common midpoint (CMP) seismic profiling, can be used to image basalt velocity structure via traveltime inversion. Maximum depth-penetration of the diving wave tightly constrains basalt-sediment interface depth. An arrival observed only at shot-receiver offsets greater than 15 km can be used to determine the velocity and geometry of basement via simultaneous inversion.The results from this study suggest that previous geologic hypotheses and hydrocarbon play concepts for the Columbia Plateau may have been in error.

  20. The WALPASS - Walvis Ridge Passive-Source Seismic Experiment in Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heit, B.; Yuan, X.; Geissler, W.; Lushetile, B.; Weber, M.; Jokat, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Etendeka continental flood-basalt province in northern Namibia, linked by the Walvis Ridge to the Tristan da Cunha hotspot, has a great importance in global plate tectonic concepts, and is an ideal place to understand the roll of the plume-lithosphere interaction during the break-up of the Southern Atlantic Ocean. Within this frame we are operating an amphibian passive-source seismic network (WALPASS) at the position, where the Walvis Ridge intersects with the continental margin of northern Namibia. The broadband seismic network is composed of 28 three-component land stations and 12 ocean-bottom stations, and will be operating for two year. This configuration of stations will allow us to map the lithospheric and deeper upper mantle structure in the ocean-continent transition beneath the passive continental margin of northern Namibia and to find seismic anomalies related to the postulated hotspot track from the continent to the ocean along the Walvis Ridge. The acquired should help us to study the velocity anomaly in the lowermost mantle caused by the Africa super plume and to improve the distribution of seismicity in this geophysically little studied region. We present here some receiver function results in the first attempt to map the lithosphere and the upper mantle in an area known to be the place of a plume/flood basalt province that has the potential to unravel the impact of a continental break-up in the lower crust and mantle lithosphere.

  1. Large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture, seismic profiling on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Jarchow, C.M. . Dept. of Geophysics); Catchings, R.D.; Lutter, W.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Clear subsurface seismic images have been obtained at low cost on the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The Columbia Plateau is perhaps the most notorious of all bad-data'' areas because large impedance contrasts in surface flood basalts severely degrade the seismic wavefield. This degradation was mitigated in this study via a large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture shooting method. The shooting method emphasizes the wide-angle portion of the wavefield, where Fermat's principle guarantees reverberation will not interfere with the seismic manifestations of crucial geologic interfaces. The basalt diving wave, normally discarded in standard common midpoint (CMP) seismic profiling, can be used to image basalt velocity structure via travel-time inversion. Maximum depth-penetration of the diving wave tightly constrains basalt-sediment interface depth. An arrival observed only at shot-receiver offsets greater than 15 km can be used to determine the velocity and geometry of basement via simultaneous inversion. The results from this study suggest that previous geologic hypotheses and hydrocarbon play concepts for the Columbia Plateau may have been in error.

  2. Advancing Explosion Source Theory through Experimentation: Results from Seismic Experiments Since the Moratorium on Nuclear Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, J. L.; Stump, B. W.

    2011-12-01

    On 23 September 1992, the United States conducted the nuclear explosion DIVIDER at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It would become the last US nuclear test when a moratorium ended testing the following month. Many of the theoretical explosion seismic models used today were developed from observations of hundreds of nuclear tests at NTS and around the world. Since the moratorium, researchers have turned to chemical explosions as a possible surrogate for continued nuclear explosion research. This talk reviews experiments since the moratorium that have used chemical explosions to advance explosion source models. The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment examined single-point, fully contained chemical-nuclear equivalence by detonating over a kiloton of chemical explosive at NTS in close proximity to previous nuclear explosion tests. When compared with data from these nearby nuclear explosions, the regional and near-source seismic data were found to be essentially identical after accounting for different yield scaling factors for chemical and nuclear explosions. The relationship between contained chemical explosions and large production mining shots was studied at the Black Thunder coal mine in Wyoming in 1995. The research led to an improved source model for delay-fired mining explosions and a better understanding of mining explosion detection by the International Monitoring System (IMS). The effect of depth was examined in a 1997 Kazakhstan Depth of Burial experiment. Researchers used local and regional seismic observations to conclude that the dominant mechanism for enhanced regional shear waves was local Rg scattering. Travel-time calibration for the IMS was the focus of the 1999 Dead Sea Experiment where a 10-ton shot was recorded as far away as 5000 km. The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments provided a comparison of fully- and partially-contained chemical shots with mining explosions, thus quantifying the reduction in seismic amplitudes associated with partial

  3. Detailed Analysis of the Interoccurrence Time Statistics in Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Aizawa, Yoji

    2017-02-01

    The interoccurrence time statistics of seismiciry is studied theoretically as well as numerically by taking into account the conditional probability and the correlations among many earthquakes in different magnitude levels. It is known so far that the interoccurrence time statistics is well approximated by the Weibull distribution, but the more detailed information about the interoccurrence times can be obtained from the analysis of the conditional probability. Firstly, we propose the Embedding Equation Theory (EET), where the conditional probability is described by two kinds of correlation coefficients; one is the magnitude correlation and the other is the inter-event time correlation. Furthermore, the scaling law of each correlation coefficient is clearly determined from the numerical data-analysis carrying out with the Preliminary Determination of Epicenter (PDE) Catalog and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Catalog. Secondly, the EET is examined to derive the magnitude dependence of the interoccurrence time statistics and the multi-fractal relation is successfully formulated. Theoretically we cannot prove the universality of the multi-fractal relation in seismic activity; nevertheless, the theoretical results well reproduce all numerical data in our analysis, where several common features or the invariant aspects are clearly observed. Especially in the case of stationary ensembles the multi-fractal relation seems to obey an invariant curve, furthermore in the case of non-stationary (moving time) ensembles for the aftershock regime the multi-fractal relation seems to satisfy a certain invariant curve at any moving times. It is emphasized that the multi-fractal relation plays an important role to unify the statistical laws of seismicity: actually the Gutenberg-Richter law and the Weibull distribution are unified in the multi-fractal relation, and some universality conjectures regarding the seismicity are briefly discussed.

  4. False alarms and mine seismicity: An example from the Gentry Mountain mining region, Utah. Los Alamos Source Region Project

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.R.

    1992-09-23

    Mining regions are a cause of concern for monitoring of nuclear test ban treaties because they present the opportunity for clandestine nuclear tests (i.e. decoupled explosions). Mining operations are often characterized by high seismicity rates and can provide the cover for excavating voids for decoupling. Chemical explosions (seemingly as part of normal mining activities) can be used to complicate the signals from a simultaneous decoupled nuclear explosion. Thus, most concern about mines has dealt with the issue of missed violations to a test ban treaty. In this study, we raise the diplomatic concern of false alarms associated with mining activities. Numerous reports and papers have been published about anomalous seismicity associated with mining activities. As part of a large discrimination study in the western US (Taylor et al., 1989), we had one earthquake that was consistently classified as an explosion. The magnitude 3.5 disturbance occurred on May 14, 1981 and was conspicuous in its lack of Love waves, relative lack of high- frequency energy, low Lg/Pg ratio, and high m{sub b} {minus} M{sub s}. A moment-tensor solution by Patton and Zandt (1991) indicated the event had a large implosional component. The event occurred in the Gentry Mountain coal mining region in the eastern Wasatch Plateau, Utah. Using a simple source representation, we modeled the event as a tabular excavation collapse that occurred as a result of normal mining activities. This study raises the importance of having a good catalogue of seismic data and information about mining activities from potential proliferant nations.

  5. Zephyr: Open-source Parallel Seismic Waveform Inversion in an Integrated Python-based Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithyman, B. R.; Pratt, R. G.; Hadden, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic Full-Waveform Inversion (FWI) is an advanced method to reconstruct wave properties of materials in the Earth from a series of seismic measurements. These methods have been developed by researchers since the late 1980s, and now see significant interest from the seismic exploration industry. As researchers move towards implementing advanced numerical modelling (e.g., 3D, multi-component, anisotropic and visco-elastic physics), it is desirable to make use of a modular approach, minimizing the effort developing a new set of tools for each new numerical problem. SimPEG (http://simpeg.xyz) is an open source project aimed at constructing a general framework to enable geophysical inversion in various domains. In this abstract we describe Zephyr (https://github.com/bsmithyman/zephyr), which is a coupled research project focused on parallel FWI in the seismic context. The software is built on top of Python, Numpy and IPython, which enables very flexible testing and implementation of new features. Zephyr is an open source project, and is released freely to enable reproducible research. We currently implement a parallel, distributed seismic forward modelling approach that solves the 2.5D (two-and-one-half dimensional) viscoacoustic Helmholtz equation at a range modelling frequencies, generating forward solutions for a given source behaviour, and gradient solutions for a given set of observed data. Solutions are computed in a distributed manner on a set of heterogeneous workers. The researcher's frontend computer may be separated from the worker cluster by a network link to enable full support for computation on remote clusters from individual workstations or laptops. The present codebase introduces a numerical discretization equivalent to that used by FULLWV, a well-known seismic FWI research codebase. This makes it straightforward to compare results from Zephyr directly with FULLWV. The flexibility introduced by the use of a Python programming environment makes

  6. Source location of long period seismicity at Volcàn de Colima, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosino, Simona; Cusano, Paola; La Rocca, Mario; Galluzzo, Danilo; Orozco-Rojas, Justo; Bretón, Mauricio; Ibáñez, Jesus; Del Pezzo, Edoardo

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of seismicity associated with the volcanic activity of Volcàn de Colima (México) and recorded in the period November 2005-April 2006 during a field survey by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)-Osservatorio Vesuviano, the Observatorio Vulcanologico de Colima of Colima University and the Instituto Andaluz de Geofisica, University of Granada. Three different types of volcanic earthquakes have been identified on the basis of their spectral properties: Type A (0.3-1 Hz), Type B (1-5 Hz) and Type C (3-4 Hz). Results of polarization analysis applied to Type A events show a predominance of radial motion, indicating that the wavefield comprises compressional waves (P) and shear waves polarized in the vertical plane (SV), while the signal always begins with a negative polarity. Type A, B and C earthquakes have been located using both a flat layered model and a 3D model including topography. Hypocentre distributions indicate that the source of Type A signals is very shallow and confined to a small volume lying about 1 km below the crater. In contrast, the source of Type B and C events is significantly deeper, with most hypocentres located in a volume of about 1 km3 centred at 2.5-3 km depth. A cluster analysis based on the cross-correlation among the waveforms of different events recorded at the same station was applied to Type A earthquakes. Only two clusters, which include only a small percentage of events were found, indicating that earthquake families were uncommon during the period of our survey.

  7. Boundary separating the seismically active reelfoot rift from the sparsely seismic Rough Creek graben, Kentucky and Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Reelfoot rift is the most active of six Iapetan rifts and grabens in central and eastern North America. In contrast, the Rough Creek graben is one of the least active, being seismically indistinguishable from the central craton of North America. Yet the rift and graben adjoin. Hazard assessment in the rift and graben would be aided by identification of a boundary between them. Changes in the strikes of single large faults, the location of a Cambrian transfer zone, and the geographic extent of alkaline igneous rocks provide three independent estimates of the location of a structural boundary between the rift and the graben. The boundary trends north-northwest through the northeastern part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex of Kentucky and Illinois, and has no obvious surface expression. The boundary involves the largest faults, which are the most likely to penetrate to hypocentral depths, and the boundary coincides with the geographic change from abundant seismicity in the rift to sparse seismicity in the graben. Because the structural boundary was defined by geologic variables that are expected to be causally associated with seismicity, it may continue to bound the Reelfoot rift seismicity in the future.

  8. Application of normal mode theory to seismic source and structure problems: Seismic investigations of upper mantle lateral heterogeneity. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okal, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of the normal modes of the earth is investigated and used to build synthetic seismograms in order to solve source and structural problems. A study is made of the physical properties of spheroidal modes leading to a rational classification. Two problems addressed are the observability of deep isotropic seismic sources and the investigation of the physical properties of the earth in the neighborhood of the Core-Mantle boundary, using SH waves diffracted at the core's surface. Data sets of seismic body and surface waves are used in a search for possible deep lateral heterogeneities in the mantle. In both cases, it is found that seismic data do not require structural differences between oceans and continents to extend deeper than 250 km. In general, differences between oceans and continents are found to be on the same order of magnitude as the intrinsic lateral heterogeneity in the oceanic plate brought about by the aging of the oceanic lithosphere.

  9. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring earthquake activity and verification of the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. We show results from our continuing effort in developing efficient waveform cross-correlation and double-difference analysis methods for the large-scale processing of regional and global seismic archives to improve existing earthquake parameter estimates, detect seismic events with magnitudes below current detection thresholds, and improve real-time monitoring procedures. We demonstrate the performance of these algorithms as applied to the 28-year long seismic archive of the Northern California Seismic Network. The tools enable the computation of periodic updates of a high-resolution earthquake catalog of currently over 500,000 earthquakes using simultaneous double-difference inversions, achieving up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. This catalog, together with associated metadata, form the underlying relational database for a real-time double-difference scheme, DDRT, which rapidly computes high-precision correlation times and hypocenter locations of new events with respect to the background archive (http://ddrt.ldeo.columbia.edu). The DDRT system facilitates near-real-time seismicity analysis, including the ability to search at an unprecedented resolution for spatio-temporal changes in seismogenic properties. In areas with continuously recording stations, we show that a detector built around a scaled cross-correlation function can lower the detection threshold by one magnitude unit compared to the STA/LTA based detector employed at the network. This leads to increased event density, which in turn pushes the resolution capability of our location algorithms. On a global scale, we are currently building

  10. The 26 December 2004 tsunami source estimated from satellite radar altimetry and seismic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Tony Y.; Ji, Chen; Fu, L. -L.; Zlotnicki, Victor; Shum, C. K.; Yi, Yuchan; Hjorleifsdottir, Vala

    2005-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was the first earthquake tsunami of its magnitude to occur since the advent of both digital seismometry and satellite radar altimetry. Both have independently recorded the event from different physical aspects. The seismic data has then been used to estimate the earthquake fault parameters, and a three-dimensional ocean-general-circulation-model (OGCM) coupled with the fault information has been used to simulate the satellite-observed tsunami waves. Here we show that these two datasets consistently provide the tsunami source using independent methodologies of seismic waveform inversion and ocean modeling. Cross-examining the two independent results confirms that the slip function is the most important condition controlling the tsunami strength, while the geometry and the rupture velocity of the tectonic plane determine the spatial patterns of the tsunami.

  11. Source scaling relationships of microearthquakes at Parkfield, CA, determined using the SAFOD Pilot Hole Seismic Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Kazutoshi; Ellsworth, William L.

    We estimate the source parameters of 34 microearthquakes at Parkfield, CA, ranging in size from M -0.2 to M 2.1, by analyzing seismograms recorded by the 32-level, 3-component seismic array installed in the SAFOD Pilot Hole. We succeeded in obtaining stable spectral ratios by stacking the ratios calculated from the moving windows taken along the record following the direct waves. These spectral ratios were modeled to determine seismic moments and corner frequencies assuming an omega-squared model. Static stress drops and apparent stresses of microearthquakes at Parkfield display moment-independent scaling in agreement with scaling laws reported for moderate and large earthquakes. It is likely that the dynamics of microearthquakes at Parkfield is macroscopically similar to that of larger tectonic earthquakes.

  12. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    SciTech Connect

    Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  13. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono, Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli, Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat; Sugiharto, Anton

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green's functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  14. Probabilistic seismic hazard study based on active fault and finite element geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastelic, Vanja; Carafa, Michele M. C.; Visini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We present a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) that is exclusively based on active faults and geodynamic finite element input models whereas seismic catalogues were used only in a posterior comparison. We applied the developed model in the External Dinarides, a slow deforming thrust-and-fold belt at the contact between Adria and Eurasia.. is the Our method consists of establishing s two earthquake rupture forecast models: (i) a geological active fault input (GEO) model and, (ii) a finite element (FEM) model. The GEO model is based on active fault database that provides information on fault location and its geometric and kinematic parameters together with estimations on its slip rate. By default in this model all deformation is set to be released along the active faults. The FEM model is based on a numerical geodynamic model developed for the region of study. In this model the deformation is, besides along the active faults, released also in the volumetric continuum elements. From both models we calculated their corresponding activity rates, its earthquake rates and their final expected peak ground accelerations. We investigated both the source model and the earthquake model uncertainties by varying the main active fault and earthquake rate calculation parameters through constructing corresponding branches of the seismic hazard logic tree. Hazard maps and UHS curves have been produced for horizontal ground motion on bedrock conditions VS 30 ≥ 800 m/s), thereby not considering local site amplification effects. The hazard was computed over a 0.2° spaced grid considering 648 branches of the logic tree and the mean value of 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years hazard level, while the 5th and 95th percentiles were also computed to investigate the model limits. We conducted a sensitivity analysis to control which of the input parameters influence the final hazard results in which measure. The results of such comparison evidence the deformation model and

  15. Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods Cyndi Kelly1, Jesse F. Lawrence1, Cindy Ebinger2 1Stanford University, Department of Geophysics, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA 2University of Rochester, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, 227 Hutchison Hall, Rochester, NY 14627, USA Low-magnitude seismic signals generated by processes that characterize volcanic and hydrothermal systems and their plumbing networks are difficult to observe remotely. Seismic records from these systems tend to be extremely 'noisy', making it difficult to resolve 3D subsurface structures using traditional seismic methods. Easily identifiable high-amplitude bursts within the noise that might be suitable for use with traditional seismic methods (i.e. eruptions) tend to occur relatively infrequently compared to the length of an entire eruptive cycle. Furthermore, while these impulsive events might help constrain the dynamics of a particular eruption, they shed little insight into the mechanisms that occur throughout an entire eruption sequence. It has been shown, however, that the much more abundant low-amplitude seismic 'noise' in these records (i.e. volcanic or geyser 'tremor') actually represents a series of overlapping low-magnitude displacements that can be directly linked to magma, fluid, and volatile movement at depth. This 'noisy' data therefore likely contains valuable information about the processes occurring in the volcanic or hydrothermal system before, during and after eruption events. In this study, we present a new method to comprehensively study how the seismic source distribution of all events - including micro-events - evolves during different phases of the eruption sequence of Sierra Negra Volcano in the Galapagos Islands. We apply a back-projection search algorithm to image sources of seismic 'noise' at Sierra Negra Volcano during a proposed intrusion event. By analyzing

  16. Model Space Exploration for Determining Landslide Source History from Long-Period Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Moretti, Laurent; Mangeney, Anne; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Kanamori, Hiroo; Capdeville, Yann; Calder, Eliza S.; Hibert, Clément; Smith, Patrick J.; Cole, Paul; LeFriant, Anne

    2015-02-01

    The seismic signals generated by two large volcanic debris avalanches (Montserrat, Lesser Antilles, 1997 and Mount St. Helens, USA, 1980) and a large rock-ice avalanche (Mount Steller, USA, 2005) have been analyzed. For the two debris avalanches, given the times and locations of such landslides, their signals were recorded by only a few seismic stations. Moreover, these signals cover only a very narrow frequency band and include considerable noise. The Mount Steller, on the contrary, was precisely recorded. For each event, the source mechanism (i.e., point force) has been determined by waveform inversion using at most two broadband seismic stations. The resulting force is very difficult to interpret in terms of landslide characteristics. A Monte-Carlo inversion was therefore performed by imposing a simple force model associated with the landslide, based on the schematic view of an accelerating/decelerating mass traveling down the slope. The best parameter set of the force model was then found by minimizing misfits and maximizing correlations between data and synthetic signals. This model appears to contain the minimum degree of complexity required to well reproduce the seismic data. We detail here the method for the Montserrat debris avalanche and then present it's validation on the well studied Mount St. Helens debris avalanche and the well recorded Mount Steller rock-ice avalanche. The horizontal and vertical components of the resulting force have different source time functions. The best force model compares well with the force obtained by waveform inversion. Finally, this simple force model was interpreted using analytical and empirical relations derived from the sliding block model, granular flow model and landslide studies. This made it possible to estimate the order of magnitude of the mass, flow duration and direction, initial topography slope, mean velocity and travel distance of the avalanches. For these three avalanches, the calculated characteristics

  17. Energetic analysis of the white light emission associated to seismically active flares in solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Martinez Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam

    2014-06-01

    Solar flares are explosive phenomena, thought to be driven by magnetic free energy accumulated in the solar corona. Some flares release seismic transients, "sunquakes", into the Sun's interior. Different mechanisms are being considered to explain how sunquakes are generated. We are conducting an analysis of white-light emission associated with those seismically active solar flares that have been reported by different authors within the current solar cycle. Seismic diagnostics are based upon standard time-distance techniques, including seismic holography, applied to Dopplergrams obtained by SDO/HMI and GONG. The relation between white-light emissions and seismic activity may provide important information on impulsive chromospheric heating during flares, a prospective contributor to seismic transient emission, at least in some instances. We develop a method to get an estimation of Energy associated whit white-light emission and compare those results whit values of energy needed to generate a sunquake according with holographic helioseismology techniques.

  18. Point spread functions for earthquake source imaging: an interpretation based on seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Hisashi; Haney, Matthew M.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, various methods have been proposed and applied for earthquake source imaging, and theoretical relationships among the methods have been studied. In this study, we make a follow-up theoretical study to better understand the meanings of earthquake source imaging. For imaging problems, the point spread function (PSF) is used to describe the degree of blurring and degradation in an obtained image of a target object as a response of an imaging system. In this study, we formulate PSFs for earthquake source imaging. By calculating the PSFs, we find that waveform source inversion methods remove the effect of the PSF and are free from artefacts. However, the other source imaging methods are affected by the PSF and suffer from the effect of blurring and degradation due to the restricted distribution of receivers. Consequently, careful treatment of the effect is necessary when using the source imaging methods other than waveform inversions. Moreover, the PSF for source imaging is found to have a link with seismic interferometry with the help of the source-receiver reciprocity of Green's functions. In particular, the PSF can be related to Green's function for cases in which receivers are distributed so as to completely surround the sources. Furthermore, the PSF acts as a low-pass filter. Given these considerations, the PSF is quite useful for understanding the physical meaning of earthquake source imaging.

  19. Point spread functions for earthquake source imaging: An interpretation based on seismic interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakahara, Hisashi; Haney, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Recently, various methods have been proposed and applied for earthquake source imaging, and theoretical relationships among the methods have been studied. In this study, we make a follow-up theoretical study to better understand the meanings of earthquake source imaging. For imaging problems, the point spread function (PSF) is used to describe the degree of blurring and degradation in an obtained image of a target object as a response of an imaging system. In this study, we formulate PSFs for earthquake source imaging. By calculating the PSFs, we find that waveform source inversion methods remove the effect of the PSF and are free from artifacts. However, the other source imaging methods are affected by the PSF and suffer from the effect of blurring and degradation due to the restricted distribution of receivers. Consequently, careful treatment of the effect is necessary when using the source imaging methods other than waveform inversions. Moreover, the PSF for source imaging is found to have a link with seismic interferometry with the help of the source-receiver reciprocity of Green’s functions. In particular, the PSF can be related to Green’s function for cases in which receivers are distributed so as to completely surround the sources. Furthermore, the PSF acts as a low-pass filter. Given these considerations, the PSF is quite useful for understanding the physical meaning of earthquake source imaging.

  20. Considering uncertainties in the determination of earthquake source parameters from seismic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Aristizabal, Alexander; Caciagli, Marco; Selva, Jacopo

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a method for handling uncertainties in the determination of the source parameters of earthquakes from spectral data. We propose a robust framework for estimating earthquake source parameters and relative uncertainties, which are propagated down to the estimation of basic seismic parameters of interest such as the seismic moment, the moment magnitude, the source size and the static stress drop. In practice, we put together a Bayesian approach for model parameter estimation and a weighted statistical mixing of multiple solutions obtained from a network of instruments, providing a useful framework for extracting meaningful data from intrinsically uncertain data sets. The Bayesian approach used to estimate the source spectra parameters is a simple but powerful mechanism for non-linear model fitting, providing also the opportunity to naturally propagate uncertainties and to assess the quality and uniqueness of the solution. Another important added value of such an approach is the possibility of integrating information from the expertise of seismologists. Such data can be encoded in a prior state of information that is then updated with the information provided by seismological data. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated analysing data from the 1909 April 23 earthquake occurred near Benavente (Portugal).

  1. Commerce geophysical lineament - Its source, geometry, and relation to the Reelfoot rift and New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Hildenbrand, T.G.

    1997-01-01

    The Commerce geophysical lineament is a northeast-trending magnetic and gravity feature that extends from central Arkansas to southern Illinois over a distance of ???400 km. It is parallel to the trend of the Reelfoot graben, but offset ???40 km to the northwest of the western margin of the rift floor. Modeling indicates that the source of the aeromagnetic and gravity anomalies is probably a mafic dike swarm. The age of the source of the Commerce geophysical lineament is not known, but the linearity and trend of the anomalies suggest a relationship with the Reelfoot rift, which has undergone episodic igneous activity. The Commerce geophysical lineament coincides with several topographic lineaments, movement on associated faults at least as young as Quaternary, and intrusions of various ages. Several earthquakes (Mb > 3) coincide with the Commerce geophysical lineament, but the diversity of associated focal mechanisms and the variety of surface structural features along the length of the Commerce geophysical lineament obscure its relation to the release of present-day strain. With the available seismicity data, it is difficult to attribute individual earthquakes to a specific structural lineament such as the Commerce geophysical lineament. However, the close correspondence between Quaternary faulting and present-day seismicity along the Commerce geophysical lineament is intriguing and warrants further study.

  2. Seismic sources and stress transfer interaction among axial normal faults and external thrust fronts in the Northern Apennines (Italy): A working hypothesis based on the 1916-1920 time-space cluster of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco; Corti, Giacomo; Donne, Dario Delle; Sani, Federico; Piccardi, Luigi; Vannucci, Gianfranco; Genco, Riccardo; Martelli, Luca; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    In this study we analyse the main potential seismic sources in some axial and frontal sectors of the Northern Apennines, in Italy. This region was hit by a peculiar series of earthquakes that started in 1916 on the external thrust fronts near Rimini. Later, in 1917-1921, seismicity (up to Mw ≈ 6.5) shifted into the axial zone and clearly migrated north-westward, along the belt of active normal faults. The collection of fault-slip data focused on the active normal faults potentially involved in this earthquake series. The acquired data allowed us to better characterize the geometry and kinematics of the faults. In a few instances, the installation of local seismic networks during recent seismic sequences allowed the identification of the causative faults that are hinted to be also responsible for past earthquakes, particularly in the Romagna region and north-eastern Mugello. The Coulomb stress changes produced by the historical earthquakes generally brought closer to failure all the faults that supposedly caused the main seismic events of 1916-1921. However, the stress change magnitude is generally small and thus the static stress interaction among the main seismic sources is not supported by a significant seismic correlation. Significant stress change loading may be instead inferred for the triggering of a number of seismic events on neighbouring normal faults by the Garfagnana 1920 earthquake. In addition, the computation of the seismic stress changes suggests that seismic events with magnitude ≥ 6 may transmit stresses from the axial normal faults to specific external thrusts and vice versa. It is possible that a correlation may be made between loading applied by the major 1917-1920 extensional ruptures and the increased seismicity on the distal external thrusts.

  3. Tracking Stress and Hydrothermal Activity Along Oceanic Spreading Centers Using Tomographic Images of Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. A.; Conder, J. A.; Canales, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Marine controlled-source seismic tomography experiments now utilize 50+ ocean-bottom seismographs and source grids consisting of many tens of seismic lines with <500 m shot spacing. These dense experiments focus on the upper 10 km of the lithosphere over areas approaching 9000 sq-km. Because of the dense sampling and large azimuthal coverage of ray paths (200,000+ travel time measurements possible), it is now feasible to solve for 3-D images of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy with resolving lengths approaching 1km. Recent examples include the L-SCAN and MARINER experiments, performed at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Mid-Atlantic Ridge (36N), respectively. In each case, background anisotropy of ~4% is found in the upper 3-4 km of lithosphere and is consistent with pervasive stress-aligned cracks and microcracks. The fast axes are generally oriented parallel to the trend of the spreading center, as expected for cracks that form in association with seafloor spreading. Three-dimensional images of anisotropy magnitude and orientation reveal variations interpreted as arising from changes in the ambient stress field. Near the ends of ridge segments, where the ridge axis jumps from one spreading center to the next, anisotropy is high with orientations that are out of alignment relative to the background trend. This agrees with numerical models and seafloor morphology that suggest tensile stress concentration and brittle crack formation in these areas. Anisotropy also increases in areas along the ridges where the underlying magma supply and hydrothermal output are greater. This is opposite the trend expected if simple tectonic stress models govern anisotropy. Increased hydrothermal activity, due to increased magma supply, can explain higher anisotropy via increased pore pressure and hydrofracturing. These studies provide the first evidence that images of seismic anisotropy can be used to map variations in hydrologic activity along the crests of oceanic spreading centers.

  4. Seismic source functions from free-field ground motions recorded on SPE: Implications for source models of small, shallow explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougier, Esteban; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-05-01

    Reduced displacement potentials (RDPs) for chemical explosions of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) in granite at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site are estimated from free-field ground motion recordings. Far-field P wave source functions are proportional to the time derivative of RDPs. Frequency domain comparisons between measured source functions and model predictions show that high-frequency amplitudes roll off as ω- 2, but models fail to predict the observed seismic moment, corner frequency, and spectral overshoot. All three features are fit satisfactorily for the SPE-2 test after cavity radius Rc is reduced by 12%, elastic radius is reduced by 58%, and peak-to-static pressure ratio on the elastic radius is increased by 100%, all with respect to the Mueller-Murphy model modified with the Denny-Johnson Rc scaling law. A large discrepancy is found between the cavity volume inferred from RDPs and the volume estimated from laser scans of the emplacement hole. The measurements imply a scaled Rc of ~5 m/kt1/3, more than a factor of 2 smaller than nuclear explosions. Less than 25% of the seismic moment can be attributed to cavity formation. A breakdown of the incompressibility assumption due to shear dilatancy of the source medium around the cavity is the likely explanation. New formulas are developed for volume changes due to medium bulking (or compaction). A 0.04% decrease of average density inside the elastic radius accounts for the missing volumetric moment. Assuming incompressibility, established Rc scaling laws predicted the moment reasonable well, but it was only fortuitous because dilation of the source medium compensated for the small cavity volume.

  5. Source Dynamics of Long-Period Seismicity in Volcanic and Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B. A.

    2006-12-01

    Long-period (LP) seismicity, including individual LP events and tremor, is widely observed in relation to magmatic and hydrothermal activities in volcanic areas and is recognized as a precursory phenomenon for eruptive activity. The waveform of the LP event is characterized by simple decaying harmonic oscillations except for a brief interval at the event onset. This characteristic event signature is commonly interpreted as oscillations of a fluid-filled resonator in response to a time-localized excitation. By the same token, tremor may be viewed as oscillations of the same resonator in response to a sustained excitation. Because the properties of the resonator system at the source of the LP event can be inferred from the complex frequencies of the decaying harmonic oscillations in the tail of the seismogram, these events are particularly important in the quantification of volcanic and hydrothermal processes. The damped oscillations in the LP coda are characterized by two parameters, T and Q, where T is the period of the dominant mode of oscillation, and Q is the quality factor of the oscillatory system representing the combined effects of radiation and intrinsic losses. Typical periods observed for LP events are in the range 0.2 - 2 s, while observed Q range from values near 1 to values larger than 100. Waveform inversions of LP signals carried out so far point to a crack geometry at the source of these events. Detailed investigations of the oscillating characteristics of LP sources based on the fluid-filled crack model suggest source dimensions ranging from tens to several hundred meters. Such studies further indicate that dusty gases and bubbly basalt are the most common types of fluids involved at the source of LP events in magmatic systems, while misty gases, steam and bubbly water commonly represent LP events of hydrothermal origin. Observations carried out in different volcanic settings point to a wide variety of LP excitation mechanisms. At Stromboli

  6. Combined use of repeated active shots and ambient noise to detect temporal changes in seismic velocity: application to Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Takashi; Nakahara, Hisashi; Nishimura, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    Coda-wave interferometry is a technique to detect small seismic velocity changes using phase changes in similar waveforms from repeating natural or artificial sources. Seismic interferometry is another technique for detecting seismic velocity changes from cross-correlation functions of ambient seismic noise. We simultaneously use these two techniques to clarify seismic velocity changes at Sakurajima volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, examining the two methods. We apply coda-wave interferometry to the records of repeated active seismic experiments conducted once a year from 2011 to 2014, and seismic interferometry to the ambient seismic noise data. We directly compare seismic velocity changes from these two techniques. In coda-wave interferometry analyses, we detect significant seismic velocity increases between 2011 and 2013, and seismic velocity decreases between 2013 and 2014 at the northern and eastern flanks of the volcano. The absolute values are at a maximum 0.47 ± 0.06% for 2-4 Hz, 0.24 ± 0.03% for 4-8 Hz, and 0.15 ± 0.03% for 8-16 Hz, respectively. In seismic interferometry analyses, vertical-vertical cross-correlations in 1-2, 2-4, and 4-8 Hz bands indicate seismic velocity increases and decreases during 3 years of 2012-2014 with the maximum amplitudes of velocity change of ±0.3% for 1-2 Hz, ±0.4% for 2-4 Hz, and ±0.2% for 4-8 Hz, respectively. Relative velocity changes indicate the almost annual change. These periodical changes are well matched with volcano deformation detected by GNSS receivers deployed around the volcano. We compare the results from coda-wave interferometry with those from seismic interferometry on the shot days and find that most of them are consistent. This study illustrates that the combined use of coda-wave interferometry and seismic interferometry is useful to obtain accurate and continuous measurements of seismic velocity changes.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: Earthquake locations and source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, N.A.; Prejean, S.; Hansen, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: earthquake locations and source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Natalia G.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Hansen, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field.

  9. Seismic Activity Seen Through Evolution of the Hurst Exponent Model in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño Ortiz, J.; Carreño Aguilera, R.; Balankin, A. S.; Patiño Ortiz, M.; Tovar Rodriguez, J. C.; Acevedo Mosqueda, M. A.; Martinez Cruz, M. A.; Yu, Wen

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics seismic activity occurred in the Cocos Plate - Mexico is analyzed through the evolution of Hurst exponent and 3D fractal dimension, under the mathematical fractal structure based on seismic activity time series, taking into account the magnitude (M) as the main parameter to be estimated. The seismic activity time series and, annual intervals are considered first for finding the Hurst exponent of each year since 1988 (the year in which the database is consistent) until 2012, and then the following years are accumulated describing the cumulative Hurst exponent. The seismic activity description is based on Cocos Plate data information; during a period conform from 1 January 1988 to 31 December 2012. Analyses were performed following methods, mainly considering that the Hurst exponent analysis provides the ability to find the seismicity behavior time-space, described by parameters obtained under the fractal dimension and complex systems.

  10. Determination of temporal changes in seismic velocity caused by volcanic activity in and around Hakone volcano, central Japan, using ambient seismic noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukutake, Yohei; Ueno, Tomotake; Miyaoka, Kazuki

    2016-12-01

    Autocorrelation functions (ACFs) for ambient seismic noise are considered to be useful tools for estimating temporal changes in the subsurface structure. Velocity changes at Hakone volcano in central Japan, where remarkable swarm activity has often been observed, were investigated in this study. Significant velocity changes were detected during two seismic activities in 2011 and 2013. The 2011 activity began immediately after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, suggesting remote triggering by the dynamic stress changes resulting from the earthquake. During the 2013 activity, which exhibited swarm-like features, crustal deformations were detected by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations and tiltmeters, suggesting a pressure increment of a Mogi point source at a depth of 7 km and two shallow open cracks. Waveforms that were bandpass-filtered between 1 and 3 Hz were used to calculate ACFs using a one-bit correlation technique. Fluctuations in the velocity structure were obtained using the stretching method. A gradual decrease in the velocity structure was observed prior to the 2013 activity at the KOM station near the central cone of the caldera, which started after the onset of crustal expansion observed by the GNSS stations. Additionally, a sudden significant velocity decrease was observed at the OWD station near a fumarolic area just after the onset of the 2013 activity and the tilt changes. The changes in the stress and strain caused by the deformation sources were likely the main contributors to these decreases in velocity. The precursory velocity reduction at the KOM station likely resulted from the inflation of the deep Mogi source, whereas the sudden velocity decrease at the OWD station may reflect changes in the strain caused by the shallow open-crack source. Rapid velocity decreases were also detected at many stations in and around the volcano after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The velocity changes may reflect the redistribution of hydrothermal

  11. ActiveSeismoPick3D - automatic first arrival determination for large active seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffrath, Marcel; Küperkoch, Ludger; Wehling-Benatelli, Sebastian; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We developed a tool for automatic determination of first arrivals in active seismic data based on an approach, that utilises higher order statistics (HOS) and the Akaike information criterion (AIC), commonly used in seismology, but not in active seismics. Automatic picking is highly desirable in active seismics as the number of data provided by large seismic arrays rapidly exceeds of what an analyst can evaluate in a reasonable amount of time. To bring the functionality of automatic phase picking into the context of active data, the software package ActiveSeismoPick3D was developed in Python. It uses a modified algorithm for the determination of first arrivals which searches for the HOS maximum in unfiltered data. Additionally, it offers tools for manual quality control and postprocessing, e.g. various visualisation and repicking functionalities. For flexibility, the tool also includes methods for the preparation of geometry information of large seismic arrays and improved interfaces to the Fast Marching Tomography Package (FMTOMO), which can be used for the prediction of travel times and inversion for subsurface properties. Output files are generated in the VTK format, allowing the 3D visualization of e.g. the inversion results. As a test case, a data set consisting of 9216 traces from 64 shots was gathered, recorded at 144 receivers deployed in a regular 2D array of a size of 100 x 100 m. ActiveSeismoPick3D automatically checks the determined first arrivals by a dynamic signal to noise ratio threshold. From the data a 3D model of the subsurface was generated using the export functionality of the package and FMTOMO.

  12. Using supervirtual first arrivals in controlled-source hardrock seismic imaging—well worth the effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Place, Joachim; Malehmir, Alireza

    2016-07-01

    Varied applications of seismic interferometry have arisen in the last decade; however, the potential of the method to improve reflection seismic processing in hardrock environments has not explicitly been regarded. Therefore, in this paper we investigate the potential of retrieving the first arrivals originally hindered by high noise level in the exploitation of controlled-source data acquired over the iron-oxide apatite-rich deposit at Grängesberg (Sweden) and its mining-induced structures. The supervirtual first arrivals retrieved using interferometry methodologies allowed first breaks to be picked more extensively than in the original data. Revised static corrections significantly improved the linearity of the first arrivals and continuity of reflections in the source gathers. Especially, reflections considerably enhanced in the source gathers stacked constructively in the final section. Comparison with geological data, supported by traveltime forward modelling, indicates that these reflections represent the unmined part of the deposit. Other reflections at shallower depth are interpreted as anthropogenic faults possibly located at lithological contacts. Tomographic inversion was also run using the augmented traveltime data. The greater resolution and penetration of this new tomographic image allowed better bridging with the results of the reflection seismic section. Velocity anomalies depict the presence of mining-induced structures and a potential `Brewery fault', which is believed to put at risks an urban area. Even though the potential of first-arrival retrieval seems to be case-dependent, this study illustrates that interferometry may substantially improve the accuracy of static corrections and subsequent stack for hardrock imaging, as well as in the penetration and resolution of traveltime tomograms.

  13. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, "weight-drop" source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  14. Complete regional waveform modeling to estimate seismic velocity structure and source parameters for CTBT monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Bredbeck, T; Rodgers, A; Walter, W

    1999-07-23

    The velocity structures and source parameters estimated by waveform modeling provide valuable information for CTBT monitoring. The inferred crustal and uppermost mantle structures advance understanding of tectonics and guides regionalization for event location and identification efforts. Estimation of source parameters such as seismic moment, depth and mechanism (whether earthquake, explosion or collapse) is crucial to event identification. In this paper we briefly outline some of the waveform modeling research for CTBT monitoring performed in the last year. In the future we will estimate structure for new regions by modeling waveforms of large well-observed events along additional paths. Of particular interest will be the estimation of velocity structure in aseismic regions such as most of Africa and the Former Soviet Union. Our previous work on aseismic regions in the Middle East, north Africa and south Asia give us confidence to proceed with our current methods. Using the inferred velocity models we plan to estimate source parameters for smaller events. It is especially important to obtain seismic moments of earthquakes for use in applying the Magnitude-Distance Amplitude Correction (MDAC; Taylor et al., 1999) to regional body-wave amplitudes for discrimination and calibrating the coda-based magnitude scales.

  15. Source Mechanism of Soputan Volcano based on Seismic and Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparman, Y.; Pamitro, Y.; Kriswati, E.; Akbar, W.

    2012-12-01

    Moment tensor analysis have been conducted to understand the source mechanism in Soputan Volcano during October - November 2010 period. The record shows shallow earthquakes with frequency about 5 - 9 Hz. Polarity distribution of P-wave first onset indicates that the recorded earthquakes are predominated by earthquakes where almost at all stations have same direction of P-wave first motions. In this article, the seismic source mechanism is described as the second derivative of moment tensor, approached with first motion amplitude inversion of P-wave at some seismic stations. The result of moment tensor decomposition are predominated by earthquakes with big percentage in ISO and CLVD component. Focal mechanism shows that the recorded earthquakes have the same strike in Northeast-Southwest direction with dip about 40 - 60. Inversion modeling, using weighted-damped-least-squares method, of magnetic profile shows geometry which interpreted as a fault structure. The sources of the high frequency shallow earthquakes are in the form of tensile-shear cracks or a combination between crack and tensile faulting.

  16. Iceberg calving as a primary source of regional‐scale glacier‐generated seismicity in the St. Elias Mountains, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neel, Shad; Larsen, Christopher F.; Rupert, Natalia; Hansen, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Since the installation of the Alaska Regional Seismic Network in the 1970s, data analysts have noted nontectonic seismic events thought to be related to glacier dynamics. While loose associations with the glaciers of the St. Elias Mountains have been made, no detailed study of the source locations has been undertaken. We performed a two-step investigation surrounding these events, beginning with manual locations that guided an automated detection and event sifting routine. Results from the manual investigation highlight characteristics of the seismic waveforms including single-peaked (narrowband) spectra, emergent onsets, lack of distinct phase arrivals, and a predominant cluster of locations near the calving termini of several neighboring tidewater glaciers. Through these locations, comparison with previous work, analyses of waveform characteristics, frequency-magnitude statistics and temporal patterns in seismicity, we suggest calving as a source for the seismicity. Statistical properties and time series analysis of the event catalog suggest a scale-invariant process that has no single or simple forcing. These results support the idea that calving is often a response to short-lived or localized stress perturbations. Our results demonstrate the utility of passive seismic instrumentation to monitor relative changes in the rate and magnitude of iceberg calving at tidewater glaciers that may be volatile or susceptible to ensuing rapid retreat, especially when existing seismic infrastructure can be used.

  17. A case study of the seismic source function: Salmon and sterling reevaluated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Marvin D.; Goodman, Dennis M.

    1990-11-01

    As part of a larger joint effort by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency and the Department of Energy to study the seismic source problem, a comprehensive reevaluation of the 1964 Salmon and 1966 Sterling nuclear explosions in dome salt was carried out. The Sterling source function originally estimated by Springer et al. (1968) conveys the impression that the cavity was badly overdriven; on reexamination this does not appear to be the case. The work of Glenn et al. (1987) on the Sterling free-field data is expanded upon, confirming that the cavity response was close to the theoretical expectation. Sterling's source function is estimated and is found to be comparable to Patterson's (1966) slightly weakened salt model. A source model for Salmon is derived from the Sterling source model and the five seismic stations that recorded both events. The new source model has a reduced displacement potential ψ∝ of about half that previously estimated. A temporary nonlinear two-wave system developed during the Salmon explosion as the compressional wave evolved from a shock wave; the separation of these two waves resulted in a high-frequency roll-off of the reduced velocity potential of ω-3. In addition, it is shown that the comer frequency is much higher and is created much closer to the cavity than the eigenfrequency. For both Salmon and Sterling the radial stresses are approximately a low-passed damped sinusoid superimposed on a small step function. The decoupling value of 72 obtained by Springer et al. (1968) is confirmed. A revision of Patterson's (1966) partial decoupling curve shows that the value for full decoupling in a shot-generated cavity would be only slightly higher. Contrary to previous studies, decoupling as a function of frequency for the surface waves is found to be the same as for the P waves. A new definition of decoupling appropriate to threshold test-ban treaty monitoring is also proposed.

  18. Exploring hydrocarbon-bearing shale formations with multi-component seismic technology and evaluating direct shear modes produced by vertical-force sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Engin

    -P modes, and (4) analyze P and S radiation patterns produced by a variety of seismic sources. The research done in this study has contributed to understanding the physics involved in direct-S radiation from vertical-force source stations. A U.S. Patent issued to the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System now protects the intellectual property the Exploration Geophysics Laboratory has developed related to S-wave generation by vertical-force sources. The University's Office of Technology Commercialization is actively engaged in commercializing this new S-wave reflection seismic technology on behalf of the Board of Regents.

  19. Broad-band calibration of marine seismic sources used by R/V Polarstern for academic research in polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, Monika; Boebel, Olaf; El Naggar, Saad; Jokat, Wilfried; Werner, Berthold

    2008-08-01

    Air guns and air-gun arrays of different volumes are used for scientific seismic surveys with R/V Polarstern in polar regions. To assess the potential risk of these research activities on marine mammal populations, knowledge of the sound pressure field of the seismic sources is essential. Therefore, a broad-band (0-80 kHz) calibration study was conducted at the Heggernes Acoustic Range, Norway. A GI (2.4 l), a G (8.5 l) and a Bolt gun (32.8 l) were deployed as single sources, 3 GI (7.4 l), 3 G (25.6 l) and 8 VLF™ Prakla-Seismos air guns (24.0 l) as arrays. Each configuration was fired along a line of 3-4 km length running between two hydrophone chains with receivers in 35, 100, 198 and 263 m depth. Peak-to-peak, zero-to-peak, rms and sound exposure levels (SEL) were analysed as functions of range. They show the typical dipole-like directivity of marine seismic sources with amplitude cancellation close to the sea surface, higher amplitudes in greater depths, and sound pressure levels which continuously decrease with range. Levels recorded during the approach are lower than during the departure indicating a shadowing effect of Polarsterns's hull. Backcalculated zero-to-peak source levels range from 224-240 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m. Spectral source levels are highest below 100 Hz and amount to 182-194 dB re 1 μPa Hz-1. They drop off continuously with range and frequency. At 1 kHz they are ~30 dB, at 80 kHz ~60 dB lower than the peak level. Above 1 kHz amplitude spectra are dominated by Polarstern's self-noise. From the rms and sound exposure levels of the deepest hydrophone radii for different thresholds are derived. For a 180 dB rms-level threshold radii maximally vary between 200 and 600 m, for a 186 dB SEL threshold between 50 and 300 m.

  20. A new tool for rapid and automatic estimation of earthquake source parameters and generation of seismic bulletins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    RISS S.r.l. is a Spin-off company recently born from the initiative of the research group constituting the Seismology Laboratory of the Department of Physics of the University of Naples Federico II. RISS is an innovative start-up, based on the decade-long experience in earthquake monitoring systems and seismic data analysis of its members and has the major goal to transform the most recent innovations of the scientific research into technological products and prototypes. With this aim, RISS has recently started the development of a new software, which is an elegant solution to manage and analyse seismic data and to create automatic earthquake bulletins. The software has been initially developed to manage data recorded at the ISNet network (Irpinia Seismic Network), which is a network of seismic stations deployed in Southern Apennines along the active fault system responsible for the 1980, November 23, MS 6.9 Irpinia earthquake. The software, however, is fully exportable and can be used to manage data from different networks, with any kind of station geometry or network configuration and is able to provide reliable estimates of earthquake source parameters, whichever is the background seismicity level of the area of interest. Here we present the real-time automated procedures and the analyses performed by the software package, which is essentially a chain of different modules, each of them aimed at the automatic computation of a specific source parameter. The P-wave arrival times are first detected on the real-time streaming of data and then the software performs the phase association and earthquake binding. As soon as an event is automatically detected by the binder, the earthquake location coordinates and the origin time are rapidly estimated, using a probabilistic, non-linear, exploration algorithm. Then, the software is able to automatically provide three different magnitude estimates. First, the local magnitude (Ml) is computed, using the peak-to-peak amplitude

  1. 75 FR 18160 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Antioch Bridge Seismic Retrofit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... existing bridge structure. This is where water depths are less than 10-ft below mean lower-low water (MLLW... Specified Activities; Antioch Bridge Seismic Retrofit Project, California AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... Bridge Seismic Retrofit Project. DATES: Effective August 15, 2010, through August 14, 2011. ADDRESSES:...

  2. Increased radon-222 in soil gas because of cumulative seismicity at active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Yoshinaga, Tohru; Ueyama, Takayoshi; Asaue, Hisafumi

    2014-12-01

    This study demonstrates how the radon-222 (222Rn) concentration of soil gas at an active fault is sensitive to cumulative recent seismicity by examining seven active faults in western Japan. The 222Rn concentration was found to correlate well with the total earthquake energy within a 100-km radius of each fault. This phenomenon can probably be ascribed to the increase of pore pressure around the source depth of 222Rn in shallow soil caused by frequently induced strain. This increase in pore pressure can enhance the ascent velocity of 222Rn carrier gas as governed by Darcy's law. Anomalous 222Rn concentrations are likely to originate from high gas velocities, rather than increased accumulations of parent nuclides. The high velocities also can yield unusual young gas under the radioactive nonequilibrium condition of short elapsed time since 222Rn generation. The results suggest that ongoing seismicity in the vicinity of an active fault can cause accumulation of strain in shallow fault soils. Therefore, the 222Rn concentration is a possible gauge for the degree of strain accumulation.

  3. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  4. Blind Source Separation of Seismic Events with Independent Component Analysis: CTBT related exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, Mikhail; Kitov, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Blind Source Separation (BSS) methods used in signal recovery applications are attractive for they use minimal a priori information about the signals they are dealing with. Homomorphic deconvolution and cepstrum estimation are probably the only methods used in certain extent in CTBT applications that can be attributed to the given branch of technology. However Expert Technical Analysis (ETA) conducted in CTBTO to improve the estimated values for the standard signal and event parameters according to the Protocol to the CTBT may face problems which cannot be resolved with certified CTBTO applications and may demand specific techniques not presently used. The problem to be considered within the ETA framework is the unambiguous separation of signals with close arrival times. Here, we examine two scenarios of interest: (1) separation of two almost co-located explosions conducted within fractions of seconds, and (2) extraction of explosion signals merged with wavetrains from strong earthquake. The importance of resolving the problem related to case 1 is connected with the correct explosion yield estimation. Case 2 is a well-known scenario of conducting clandestine nuclear tests. While the first case can be approached somehow with the means of cepstral methods, the second case can hardly be resolved with the conventional methods implemented at the International Data Centre, especially if the signals have close slowness and azimuth. Independent Component Analysis (in its FastICA implementation) implying non-Gaussianity of the underlying processes signal's mixture is a blind source separation method that we apply to resolve the mentioned above problems. We have tested this technique with synthetic waveforms, seismic data from DPRK explosions and mining blasts conducted within East-European platform as well as with signals from strong teleseismic events (Sumatra, April 2012 Mw=8.6, and Tohoku, March 2011 Mw=9.0 earthquakes). The data was recorded by seismic arrays of the

  5. Scaling Transition in Earthquake Sources: A Possible Link Between Seismic and Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagnini, Luca; Mayeda, Kevin; Nielsen, Stefan; Yoo, Seung-Hoon; Munafo', Irene; Rawles, Christopher; Boschi, Enzo

    2014-10-01

    We estimate the corner frequencies of 20 crustal seismic events from mainshock-aftershock sequences in different tectonic environments (mainshocks 5.7 < M W < 7.6) using the well-established seismic coda ratio technique ( Mayeda et al. in Geophys Res Lett 34:L11303, 2007; Mayeda and Malagnini in Geophys Res Lett, 2010), which provides optimal stability and does not require path or site corrections. For each sequence, we assumed the Brune source model and estimated all the events' corner frequencies and associated apparent stresses following the MDAC spectral formulation of Walter and Taylor (A revised magnitude and distance amplitude correction (MDAC2) procedure for regional seismic discriminants, 2001), which allows for the possibility of non-self-similar source scaling. Within each sequence, we observe a systematic deviation from the self-similar line, all data being rather compatible with , where ɛ > 0 ( Kanamori and Rivera in Bull Seismol Soc Am 94:314-319, 2004). The deviation from a strict self-similar behavior within each earthquake sequence of our collection is indicated by a systematic increase in the estimated average static stress drop and apparent stress with increasing seismic moment (moment magnitude). Our favored physical interpretation for the increased apparent stress with earthquake size is a progressive frictional weakening for increasing seismic slip, in agreement with recent results obtained in laboratory experiments performed on state-of-the-art apparatuses at slip rates of the order of 1 m/s or larger. At smaller magnitudes ( M W < 5.5), the overall data set is characterized by a variability in apparent stress of almost three orders of magnitude, mostly from the scatter observed in strike-slip sequences. Larger events ( M W > 5.5) show much less variability: about one order of magnitude. It appears that the apparent stress (and static stress drop) does not grow indefinitely at larger magnitudes: for example, in the case of the Chi

  6. Dynamics of radon activity due to earthquakes (by the example of Altai seismically active region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptikaeva, O. I.; Shitov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of monitoring radon emanations in the territory of Gorno-Altaisk due to seismic activity and their influence on human health are considered. It is shown that the level of activity of subsoil radon in the vicinity of the fault zone in the territory of Gorno-Altaisk exceeds such a level recorded in Moscow by 3-4 times. There is ambiguity in the behavior of radon as a precursor of a seismic event. Some radon anomalies are synchronous with moments of earthquakes and others correspond to quiet periods. The radon activity is more closely associated with the earthquakes localized in the aftershock zone of the Chuya earthquake. This is assumed to be caused by the network of fluid-conducting channels within the active fault between this region and the observation station.

  7. Long Period seismic source characterization at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P. B.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Chouet, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    The seismicity of Popocatépetl from December, 1999 to February, 2000 was dominated by long-period (LP) and very-long period (VLP) signals associated with hydrothermal processes and magmatic degassing. We model the source mechanism of repetitive LP signals in the 0.4 - 2 s band using data recorded on a 15-station broadband network. Cross-correlation and stacking of LP events with similar waveforms are performed prior to waveform inversion to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The observed LP signals are well reproduced by a point source about 250 m below the summit crater floor. The inferred seismic source mechanism includes a volumetric component that can be modeled as resonance of a horizontal steam-filled crack and a vertical single-force component. Previous moment-tensor analysis of VLP waveforms with periods longer than 15 s pointed to the expansion and compression of a sill at depth of ~1500 m below the crater floor, coupled with smaller components of expansion and compression of a dike which was interpreted to represent the primary conduit from the sill to the summit crater. The LP source centroid is positioned ~200 m from the inferred magma conduit, suggesting that the LP events are closely related to the interaction between the magmatic system and a perched hydrothermal system. Repetitive injection of fluid into the horizontal fracture and subsequent sudden discharge when a critical pressure threshold is met provides a natural non-destructive source for the LP events. The imaged single force may be attributed to the movement of the overlying magma column induced during steam escape.

  8. Development of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Hardage; J. L. Simmons, Jr.; M. DeAngelo

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves. The first was an explosive package that generates a strong, azimuth-oriented, horizontal force vector when deployed in a conventional shot hole. This vector-explosive source has never been available to industry before. The second source was a dipole formed by operating two vertical vibrators in either a force or phase imbalance. Field data are shown that document the strong S-wave modes generated by these sources.

  9. Multi-axial active isolation for seismic protection of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ming

    Structural control technology has been widely accepted as an effective means for the protection of structures against seismic hazards. Passive base isolation is one of the common structural control techniques used to enhance the performance of structures subjected to severe earthquake excitations. Isolation bearings employed at the base of a structure naturally increase its flexibility, but concurrently result in large base displacements. The combination of base isolation with active control, i.e., active base isolation, creates the possibility of achieving a balanced level of control performance, reducing both floor accelerations as well as base displacements. Many theoretical papers have been written by researchers regarding active base isolation, and a few experiments have been performed to verify these theories; however, challenges in appropriately scaling the structural system and modeling the complex nature of control-structure interaction have limited the applicability of these results. Moreover, most experiments only focus on the implementation of active base isolation under unidirectional excitations. Earthquakes are intrinsically multi-dimensional, resulting in out-of-plane responses, including torsional responses. Therefore, an active isolation system for buildings using multi-axial active control devices against multi-directional excitations must be considered. The focus of this dissertation is the development and experimental verification of active isolation strategies for multi-story buildings subjected to bi-directional earthquake loadings. First, a model building is designed to match the characteristics of a representative full-scale structure. The selected isolation bearings feature low friction and high vertical stiffness, providing stable behavior. In the context of the multi-dimensional response control, three, custom-manufactured actuators are employed to mitigate both in-plane and out-of-plane responses. To obtain a high-fidelity model of the

  10. Dense surface seismic data confirm non-double-couple source mechanisms induced by hydraulic fracturing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pesicek, Jeremy; Cieślik, Konrad; Lambert, Marc-André; Carrillo, Pedro; Birkelo, Brad

    2016-01-01

    We have determined source mechanisms for nine high-quality microseismic events induced during hydraulic fracturing of the Montney Shale in Canada. Seismic data were recorded using a dense regularly spaced grid of sensors at the surface. The design and geometry of the survey are such that the recorded P-wave amplitudes essentially map the upper focal hemisphere, allowing the source mechanism to be interpreted directly from the data. Given the inherent difficulties of computing reliable moment tensors (MTs) from high-frequency microseismic data, the surface amplitude and polarity maps provide important additional confirmation of the source mechanisms. This is especially critical when interpreting non-shear source processes, which are notoriously susceptible to artifacts due to incomplete or inaccurate source modeling. We have found that most of the nine events contain significant non-double-couple (DC) components, as evident in the surface amplitude data and the resulting MT models. Furthermore, we found that source models that are constrained to be purely shear do not explain the data for most events. Thus, even though non-DC components of MTs can often be attributed to modeling artifacts, we argue that they are required by the data in some cases, and can be reliably computed and confidently interpreted under favorable conditions.

  11. Analysis of seismic sources for different mechanisms of fracture growth for microseismic monitoring applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duchkov, A. A.; Stefanov, Yu. P.

    2015-10-27

    We have developed and illustrated an approach for geomechanic modeling of elastic wave generation (microsiesmic event occurrence) during incremental fracture growth. We then derived properties of effective point seismic sources (radiation patterns) approximating obtained wavefields. These results establish connection between geomechanic models of hydraulic fracturing and microseismic monitoring. Thus, the results of the moment tensor inversion of microseismic data can be related to different geomechanic scenarios of hydraulic fracture growth. In future, the results can be used for calibrating hydrofrac models. We carried out a series of numerical simulations and made some observations about wave generation during fracture growth. In particular when the growing fracture hits pre-existing crack then it generates much stronger microseismic event compared to fracture growth in homogeneous medium (radiation pattern is very close to the theoretical dipole-type source mechanism)

  12. Earthquake source parameters determined by the SAFOD Pilot Hole seismic array

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Imanishi, K.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Prejean, S.G.

    2004-01-01

    We estimate the source parameters of #3 microearthquakes by jointly analyzing seismograms recorded by the 32-level, 3-component seismic array installed in the SAFOD Pilot Hole. We applied an inversion procedure to estimate spectral parameters for the omega-square model (spectral level and corner frequency) and Q to displacement amplitude spectra. Because we expect spectral parameters and Q to vary slowly with depth in the well, we impose a smoothness constraint on those parameters as a function of depth using a linear first-differenfee operator. This method correctly resolves corner frequency and Q, which leads to a more accurate estimation of source parameters than can be obtained from single sensors. The stress drop of one example of the SAFOD target repeating earthquake falls in the range of typical tectonic earthquakes. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Source spectrum and source time function of volcanic tremor determined with a dense seismic network near the summit crater of Izu-Oshima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Jun; Ida, Yoshiaki; Yamaoka, Koshun

    1994-05-01

    Digital seismic records of episodic volcanic tremor, obtained with a dense seismic network near the summit crater of Izu-Oshima volcano, were analyzed to determine source spectrum and source time function. Source spectrum and transfer function could be separated because the seismic records showed a systematic change with distance from the source. The source spectrum of velocity amplitude had a different frequency, f, dependence above and below a corner frequency of 8 to 10 Hz. At high ranges, the spectrum was proportional to f(exp -2), while at low ranges, it was proportional to f(exp 2). Inversion of this frequency-dependent source spectrum yields a source time function that can be represented by an impulse that attenuates in about 0.1 s. Repeated impulses could explain observed volcanic tremor that persists for many minutes or longer and that have complicated phase spectra. The source spectrum gives an energy release rate of about 5.2 x 10(exp 2) J/s, so that the total energy released is about 1.0 x 10(exp 5) J during a tremor episode of about 3 min at Izu-Oshima. Such energy release is comparable to the seismic energy released by an earthquake of magnitude 0.1.

  14. Variation in harbour porpoise activity in response to seismic survey noise

    PubMed Central

    Pirotta, Enrico; Brookes, Kate L.; Graham, Isla M.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Animals exposed to anthropogenic disturbance make trade-offs between perceived risk and the cost of leaving disturbed areas. Impact assessments tend to focus on overt behavioural responses leading to displacement, but trade-offs may also impact individual energy budgets through reduced foraging performance. Previous studies found no evidence for broad-scale displacement of harbour porpoises exposed to impulse noise from a 10 day two-dimensional seismic survey. Here, we used an array of passive acoustic loggers coupled with calibrated noise measurements to test whether the seismic survey influenced the activity patterns of porpoises remaining in the area. We showed that the probability of recording a buzz declined by 15% in the ensonified area and was positively related to distance from the source vessel. We also estimated received levels at the hydrophones and characterized the noise response curve. Our results demonstrate how environmental impact assessments can be developed to assess more subtle effects of noise disturbance on activity patterns and foraging efficiency. PMID:24850891

  15. b values and ω−γ seismic source models: Implications for tectonic stress variations along active crustal fault zones and the estimation of high-frequency strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, Thomas C.

    1979-01-01

    In this study the tectonic stress along active crustal fault zones is taken to be of the form , where  is the average tectonic stress at depth y and Δσp(x, y) is a seismologically observable, essentially random function of both fault plane coordinates; the stress differences arising in the course of crustal faulting are derived from Δσp(x, y). Empirically known frequency of occurrence statistics, moment-magnitude relationships, and the constancy of earthquake stress drops may be used to infer that the number of earthquakes N of dimension ≥r is of the form N ∼ 1/r2 and that the spectral composition of Δσp(x, y) is of the form , where  is the two-dimensional Fourier transform of Δσp(x, y) expressed in radial wave number k. The γ = 2 model of the far-field shear wave displacement spectrum is consistent with the spectral composition , provided that the number of contributions to the spectral representation of the radiated field at frequency ƒ goes as (k/k0)2, consistent with the quasi-static frequency of occurrence relation N ∼ 1/r2;k0 is a reference wave number associated with the reciprocal source dimension. Separately, a variety of seismologic observations suggests that the γ = 2 model is the one generally, although certainly not always, applicable to the high-frequency spectral decay of the far-field radiation of earthquakes. In this framework, then, b values near 1, the general validity of the γ = 2 model, and the constancy of earthquake stress drops independent of size are all related to the average spectral composition of. Should one of these change as a result of premonitory effects leading to failure, as has been specifically proposed for b values, it seems likely that one or all of the other characteristics will change as well from their normative values. Irrespective of these associations, the far-field, high-frequency shear radiation for the γ = 2 model in the presence of anelastic attenuation may be interpreted as

  16. Waveform inversion of volcano-seismic signals for an extended source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a method to investigate the dimensions and oscillation characteristics of the source of volcano-seismic signals based on waveform inversion for an extended source. An extended source is realized by a set of point sources distributed on a grid surrounding the centroid of the source in accordance with the source geometry and orientation. The source-time functions for all point sources are estimated simultaneously by waveform inversion carried out in the frequency domain. We apply a smoothing constraint to suppress short-scale noisy fluctuations of source-time functions between adjacent sources. The strength of the smoothing constraint we select is that which minimizes the Akaike Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). We perform a series of numerical tests to investigate the capability of our method to recover the dimensions of the source and reconstruct its oscillation characteristics. First, we use synthesized waveforms radiated by a kinematic source model that mimics the radiation from an oscillating crack. Our results demonstrate almost complete recovery of the input source dimensions and source-time function of each point source, but also point to a weaker resolution of the higher modes of crack oscillation. Second, we use synthetic waveforms generated by the acoustic resonance of a fluid-filled crack, and consider two sets of waveforms dominated by the modes with wavelengths 2L/3 and 2W/3, or L and 2L/5, where W and L are the crack width and length, respectively. Results from these tests indicate that the oscillating signature of the 2L/3 and 2W/3 modes are successfully reconstructed. The oscillating signature of the L mode is also well recovered, in contrast to results obtained for a point source for which the moment tensor description is inadequate. However, the oscillating signature of the 2L/5 mode is poorly recovered owing to weaker resolution of short-scale crack wall motions. The triggering excitations of the oscillating cracks are successfully

  17. Regional Seismic Signals from Chemical Explosions, Nuclear Explosions and Earthquakes: Results from the Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Gok, R; Mayeda, K; Sicherman, A; Bonner, J; Leidig, M

    2005-09-02

    Routine industrial mining explosions play two important roles in seismic nuclear monitoring research: (1) they are a source of background events that need to be discriminated from potential nuclear explosions; (2) as some of the only explosions occurring in the current de facto global moratoria on nuclear testing, their signals should be exploited to improve the calibration of seismic m monitoring systems. A common issue monitoring arising in both of these roles is our limited physical understanding of the causes behind observed differences and similarities in the seismic signals produced by routine industrial mining blasts and small underground nuclear tests. In 2003 a consortium (Weston, SMU, LLNL, LANL and UTEP) carried out a Source Phenomenology Experiment (SPE), a series of dedicated explosions designed to improve this physical understanding, particularly as it relates to seismic methods of discriminating between signals from three different source types: earthquakes, industrial blasts, and nuclear tests. Here we very briefly review prior field experimental work that examined the seismic relationships between these source types.

  18. Numerical reconstruction of tsunami source using combined seismic, satellite and DART data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivorotko, Olga; Kabanikhin, Sergey; Marinin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    Recent tsunamis, for instance, in Japan (2011), in Sumatra (2004), and at the Indian coast (2004) showed that a system of producing exact and timely information about tsunamis is of a vital importance. Numerical simulation is an effective instrument for providing such information. Bottom relief characteristics and the initial perturbation data (a tsunami source) are required for the direct simulation of tsunamis. The seismic data about the source are usually obtained in a few tens of minutes after an event has occurred (the seismic waves velocity being about five hundred kilometres per minute, while the velocity of tsunami waves is less than twelve kilometres per minute). A difference in the arrival times of seismic and tsunami waves can be used when operationally refining the tsunami source parameters and modelling expected tsunami wave height on the shore. The most suitable physical models related to the tsunamis simulation are based on the shallow water equations. The problem of identification parameters of a tsunami source using additional measurements of a passing wave is called inverse tsunami problem. We investigate three different inverse problems of determining a tsunami source using three different additional data: Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) measurements, satellite wave-form images and seismic data. These problems are severely ill-posed. We apply regularization techniques to control the degree of ill-posedness such as Fourier expansion, truncated singular value decomposition, numerical regularization. The algorithm of selecting the truncated number of singular values of an inverse problem operator which is agreed with the error level in measured data is described and analyzed. In numerical experiment we used gradient methods (Landweber iteration and conjugate gradient method) for solving inverse tsunami problems. Gradient methods are based on minimizing the corresponding misfit function. To calculate the gradient of the misfit

  19. Seismic attenuation structure of the Seattle Basin, Washington State from explosive-source refraction data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Q.; Wilcock, W.S.D.; Pratt, T.L.; Snelson, C.M.; Brocher, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    We used waveform data from the 1999 SHIPS (Seismic Hazard Investigation of Puget Sound) seismic refraction experiment to constrain the attenuation structure of the Seattle basin, Washington State. We inverted the spectral amplitudes of compressional- and shear-wave arrivals for source spectra, site responses, and one- and two-dimensional Q-1 models at frequencies between 1 and 40 Hz for P waves and 1 and 10 Hz for S waves. We also obtained Q-1 models from t* values calculated from the spectral slopes of P waves between 10 and 40 Hz. One-dimensional inversions show that Qp at the surface is 22 at 1 Hz, 130 at 5 Hz, and 390 at 20 Hz. The corresponding values at 18 km depth are 100, 440, and 1900. Qs at the surface is 16 and 160 at 1 Hz and 8 Hz, respectively, increasing to 80 and 500 at 18 km depth. The t* inversion yields a Qp model that is consistent with the amplitude inversions at 20 and 30 Hz. The basin geometry is clearly resolved in the t* inversion, but the amplitude inversions only imaged the basin structure after removing anomalously high-amplitude shots near Seattle. When these shots are removed, we infer that Q-1 values may be ???30% higher in the center of the basin than the one-dimensional models predict. We infer that seismic attenuation in the Seattle basin will significantly reduce ground motions at frequencies at and above 1 Hz, partially countering amplification effects within the basin.

  20. Estimating the 2008 Quetame (Colombia) earthquake source parameters from seismic data and InSAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicelis, Gabriel; Assumpção, Marcelo; Kellogg, James; Pedraza, Patricia; Dias, Fábio

    2016-12-01

    Seismic waveforms and geodetic measurements (InSAR) were used to determine the location, focal mechanism and coseismic surface displacements of the Mw 5.9 earthquake which struck the center of Colombia on May 24, 2008. We determined the focal mechanism of the main event using teleseismic P wave arrivals and regional waveform inversion for the moment tensor. We relocated the best set of aftershocks (30 events) with magnitudes larger than 2.0 recorded from May to June 2008 by a temporary local network as well as by stations of the Colombia national network. We successfully estimated coseismic deformation using SAR interferometry, despite distortion in some areas of the interferogram by atmospheric noise. The deformation was compared to synthetic data for rectangular dislocations in an elastic half-space. Nine source parameters (strike, dip, length, width, strike-slip deformation, dip-slip deformation, latitude shift, longitude shift, and minimum depth) were inverted to fit the observed changes in line-of-sight (LOS) toward the satellite four derived parameters were also estimated (rake, average slip, maximum depth and seismic moment). The aftershock relocation, the focal mechanism and the coseismic dislocation model agree with a right-lateral strike-slip fault with nodal planes oriented NE-SW and NW-SE. We use the results of the waveform inversion, radar interferometry and aftershock relocations to identify the high-angle NE-SW nodal plane as the primary fault. The inferred subsurface rupture length is roughly 11 km, which is consistent with the 12 km long distribution of aftershocks. This coseismic model can provide insights on earthquake mechanisms and seismic hazard assessments for the area, including the 8 million residents of Colombia's nearby capital city Bogota. The 2008 Quetame earthquake appears to be associated with the northeastward "escape" of the North Andean block, and it may help to illuminate how margin-parallel shear slip is partitioned in the

  1. A study on the seismic source parameters for earthquakes occurring in the southern Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, H. M.; Sheen, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the characteristics of the seismic source parameters of the southern part of the Korean Peninsula for the 599 events with ML≥1.7 from 2001 to 2014. A large number of data are carefully selected by visual inspection in the time and frequency domains. The data set consist of 5,093 S-wave trains on three-component seismograms recorded at broadband seismograph stations which have been operating by the Korea Meteorological Administration and the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources. The corner frequency, stress drop, and moment magnitude of each event were measured by using the modified method of Jo and Baag (2001), based on the methods of Snoke (1987) and Andrews (1986). We found that this method could improve the stability of the estimation of source parameters from S-wave displacement spectrum by an iterative process. Then, we compared the source parameters with those obtained from previous studies and investigated the source scaling relationship and the regional variations of source parameters in the southern Korean Peninsula.

  2. Ocean-Based Seismic Noise Sources Recorded by a Moderate Aperture Array in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, M. J.; Winberry, J. P.; Wiens, D.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Euler, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    The deployment of a temporary, 60 km aperture, broadband seismic array on the Whillans Ice Stream (WIS), West Antarctica provides an opportunity to analyze ocean-derived seismic noise sources. The location of Antarctica, surrounded by the Southern Ocean and the seasonal effect of sea ice on shallow water noise production, allows for an intriguing experiment as to the production of primary and secondary microseisms. The WIS array was deployed for 2 months between December 2010-January 2011 with its primary objective to study WIS stick-slip events and glacial microseismicity. However, daylong stacks of station-to-station correlograms show directionality of the ambient noise field within the frequency bands of the primary and secondary microseisms. Although the WIS array is located close to the grounding line, it lies 700 km from the nearest open water at the end of the austral summer. The array consists of 17 broadband stations arranged in a series of offset concentric circles that minimizes spatial artifacts with regards to the array response. We use beamforming analysis to show that primary microseisms (~15 s) are sourced from three azimuthal directions with some ice-free coastline: Antarctic Peninsula, Victoria Land, and Dronning-Maude Land. Long-period secondary microseisms (~10 s) appear to be sourced in the deep Southern Ocean and track storm systems. Short-period secondary microseisms (~6 s) show much more dependence on the continental shelf and possibly coastal reflections. This is consistent with year-long noise spectra showing diminishment in the 15 s and 6 s bands [Grob et al. 2011]. Modeling of secondary microseism sources [Ardhuin et al. 2011] provides insight on the sources of surface wave noise at higher frequencies. We backproject daily P and PKPbc body wave microseism signals found at lower ray parameters sourced at distances of ~20-90° and ~145-155° respectively. The ocean sources for these arrivals remain fairly consistent, suggesting a

  3. A seismic field test with a Low-level Acoustic Combustion Source and Pseudo-Noise codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askeland, Bjørn; Ruud, Bent Ole; Hobæk, Halvor; Mjelde, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The Low-level Acoustic Combustion Source (LACS) which can fire its pulses at a high rate, has been tested successfully as a seismic marine source on shallow ice-age sediments in Byfjorden at Bergen, Norway. Pseudo-Noise pulsed signals with spiky autocorrelation functions were used to detect the sediments. Each transmitted sequence lasted 10 s and contained 43 pulses. While correlation gave a blurry result, deconvolution between the near-field recordings and the streamer recordings gave a clear seismic section. Compared to the section acquired with single air-gun shots along the same profile, the LACS gave a more clear presentation of the sediments and basement.

  4. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - II: Deception Island images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Posadas, Antonio M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we present regional maps of the inverse intrinsic quality factor (Qi-1), the inverse scattering quality factor (Qs-1) and total inverse quality factor (Qt-1) for the volcanic environment of Deception Island (Antarctica). Our attenuation study is based on diffusion approximation, which permits us to obtain the attenuation coefficients for every single couple source-receiver separately. The data set used in this research is derived from an active seismic experiment using more than 5200 offshore shots (air guns) recorded at 32 onshore seismic stations and four ocean bottom seismometers. To arrive at a regional distribution of these values, we used a new mapping technique based on a Gaussian space probability function. This approach led us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' of values of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation. The 2-D tomographic images confirm the existence of a high attenuation body below an inner bay of Deception Island. This structure, previously observed in 2-D and 3-D velocity tomography of the region, is associated with a massive magma reservoir. Magnetotelluric studies reach a similar interpretation of this strong anomaly. Additionally, we observed areas with lower attenuation effects that bear correlation with consolidated structures described in other studies and associated with the crystalline basement of the area. Our calculations of the transport mean-free path and absorption length for intrinsic attenuation gave respective values of ≈ 950 m and 5 km, which are lower than the values obtained in tectonic regions or volcanic areas such as Tenerife Island. However, as observed in other volcanic regions, our results indicate that scattering effects dominate strongly over the intrinsic attenuation.

  5. Crowd-Sourcing Seismic Data: Lessons Learned from the Quake-Catcher Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, E. S.; Sumy, D. F.; DeGroot, R. M.; Clayton, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Quake Catcher Network (QCN; qcn.caltech.edu) uses low cost micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) sensors hosted by volunteers to collect seismic data. Volunteers use accelerometers internal to laptop computers, phones, tablets or small (the size of a matchbox) MEMS sensors plugged into desktop computers using a USB connector to collect scientifically useful data. Data are collected and sent to a central server using the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) distributed computing software. Since 2008, when the first citizen scientists joined the QCN project, sensors installed in museums, schools, offices, and residences have collected thousands of earthquake records. We present and describe the rapid installations of very dense sensor networks that have been undertaken following several large earthquakes including the 2010 M8.8 Maule Chile, the 2010 M7.1 Darfield, New Zealand, and the 2015 M7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake. These large data sets allowed seismologists to develop new rapid earthquake detection capabilities and closely examine source, path, and site properties that impact ground shaking at a site. We show how QCN has engaged a wide sector of the public in scientific data collection, providing the public with insights into how seismic data are collected and used. Furthermore, we describe how students use data recorded by QCN sensors installed in their classrooms to explore and investigate earthquakes that they felt, as part of 'teachable moment' exercises.

  6. RESEARCH PAPERS : Statistical inversion of controlled-source seismic data using parabolic wave scattering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Line, C. E. R.; Hobbs, R. W.; Hudson, J. A.; Snyder, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    Statistical parameters describing heterogeneity in the Proterozoic basement of the Baltic Shield were estimated from controlled-source seismic data, using a statistical inversion based on the theory of wave propagation through random media (WPRM), derived from the parabolic wave approximation. Synthetic plane-wave seismograms generated from models of random media show consistency with WPRM theory for forward propagation in the weak-scattering regime, whilst for two-way propagation a discrepancy exists that is due to contamination of the primary wave by backscattered energy. Inverse modelling of the real seismic data suggests that the upper crust to depths of ~ 15 km can be characterized, subject to the range of spatial resolution of the method, by a medium with an exponential spatial autocorrelation function, an rms velocity fluctuation of 1.5 +/- 0.5 per cent and a correlation length of 150 +/- 50 m. Further inversions show that scattering is predominantly occurring in the uppermost ~ 2 km of crust, where rms velocity fluctuation is 3 - 6 per cent. Although values of correlation distance are well constrained by these inversions, there is a trade-off between thickness of scattering layer and rms velocity perturbation estimates, with both being relatively poorly resolved. The higher near-surface heterogeneity is interpreted to arise from fractures in the basement rocks that close under lithostatic pressure for depths greater than 2 - 3 km.

  7. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for oceanic T-wave generation and propagation from deep seismic sources.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott D; Collis, Jon M; Odom, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Oceanic T-waves are earthquake signals that originate when elastic waves interact with the fluid-elastic interface at the ocean bottom and are converted to acoustic waves in the ocean. These waves propagate long distances in the Sound Fixing and Ranging (SOFAR) channel and tend to be the largest observed arrivals from seismic events. Thus, an understanding of their generation is important for event detection, localization, and source-type discrimination. Recently benchmarked seismic self-starting fields are used to generate elastic parabolic equation solutions that demonstrate generation and propagation of oceanic T-waves in range-dependent underwater acoustic environments. Both downward sloping and abyssal ocean range-dependent environments are considered, and results demonstrate conversion of elastic waves into water-borne oceanic T-waves. Examples demonstrating long-range broadband T-wave propagation in range-dependent environments are shown. These results confirm that elastic parabolic equation solutions are valuable for characterization of the relationships between T-wave propagation and variations in range-dependent bathymetry or elastic material parameters, as well as for modeling T-wave receptions at hydrophone arrays or coastal receiving stations.

  8. P wave attenuation of the Yellowstone Caldera from three-dimensional inversion of spectral decay using explosion source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clawson, Steven R.; Smith, Robert B.; Benz, Harley M.

    1989-06-01

    Using explosion source, seismic refraction data, recorded in the 1978 and 1980 Yellowstone-Snake River Plain seismic experiments, a three-dimensional inversion of differential P wave attenuation was used to assess the relative variations in Q-1 in and around the volcanically active, 45 km by 70 km, Yellowstone caldera, northwestern Wyoming. Differential attenuation was derived from spectral decay of upper crustal Pg phases, observed from six explosions and recorded at 90 temporary stations. Because of the relatively short time windows used to determine the spectral content, a maximum entropy technique was employed to estimate the spectra that yielded an optimally small variance. Differential P wave attenuation was calculated from least squares determinations of the spectral ratios corrected for source and path effects. The observed differential attenuation parameters were then inverted using a weighted least squares technique for a discretized, 70×105 km, three-dimensional surface and upper crustal Q-1 model of the Yellowstone caldera and surrounding region. Results showed that the surface layer, to depths of 2 km within the Yellowstone caldera, is characterized by relatively high attenuation with low Q values less than 30, compared to values of 38 to 50 outside the caldera. The higher attenuation in the caldera's surface layer is thought to be associated with Quaternary lake sediments, highly altered rhyolites, and the possible influence of steam in areas of hydrothermal activity. In the crystalline upper crust, at depths of 2 km to 12 km, Q values of 40 to 70 were observed in areas of thick sedimentary fill northwest of the caldera and in areas of hydrothermal activity. Within the caldera, upper crustal attenuation generally corresponded to Q of 200 in areas that are interpreted to be associated with hot but now solidified granitic material. In comparison, relatively high attenuation, Q = 40, was observed in the upper crust of the northeastern Yellowstone

  9. Detection of quasi-static displacement components of LP seismic sources near the volcanic summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thun, Johannes; Bean, Christopher J.; Lokmer, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Seismic long-period (LP) events are still not completely understood, but widely accepted source models involve fluids and fluid-driven resonance processes. Due to the difficulties related to installing seismometers in summit regions of volcanoes, the observations of volcanic seismicity are usually performed at distances not closer than 1-2 km from the hypocentre of a seismic event. Observations from high-density network experiments on different volcanoes lead to a new model proposed by Bean et al. (Nature Geoscience, January 2014). Therein LP events are explained as a consequence of a brittle-ductile failure occurring under the low-stress conditions in the shallow volcanic edifice, rather than fluid-driven resonance. One consequence of this model is a static displacement associated with these LP events. Unfortunately, the expected amplitude of the static shift is only several micrometres, i.e. not detectable by typical deformation measurements. Therefore, we try to develop methods for using seismometers as static shift detecting sensors. Our current inability to recover the full spectrum of recorded displacement results in a band-limited representation of the true process derived from moment-tensor inversions. If the actual source process is of a broadband character, our narrow-band results can be quite misleading. In this study we are focusing on quasi-static displacements we observed on seismometer data from Turrialba Volcano (Costa Rica) and Mt Etna (Italy). These appear as ramp-like signals on displacement traces of LP events, most commonly on all three seismometer components, and have a magnitude of a few micrometres. Laboratory tests confirm that the seismometers used in our field experiments can indeed measure step-like signals, but they also show that long period noise can be a problem when trying to interpret these. Normal high pass filters suitable to remove this noise cannot be applied without losing the signal we are interested in. Therefore special

  10. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter during the recent seismic activity of Fthiotida, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael; Aarabelos, Dimitrios; Vergos, Georgios; Spatalas, Spyridon

    2014-05-01

    Applying the Hi(stogram)Cum(ulation) method, which was introduced recently by Cadicheanu, van Ruymbecke and Zhu (2007), we analyze the series of the earthquakes occurred in the last 50 years in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ) . The result of the analysis for all the areas indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations and the same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identifiation of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance, p, as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence and we check on posterior if the variation of the confidence level index, p, indicate the fault matureness in the case of the recent seismic activity at Fthiotida, Greece. In this paper we present the results of this test. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M andZhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the seismic area of Mygdonia basin, North Greece, in Terrestrial and Stellar Environment, eds.D. Arabelos, M

  11. Explosion Source Location Study Using Collocated Acoustic and Seismic Networks in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, V.; Gitterman, Y.; Arrowsmith, S.; Ben-Horin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We explore a joined analysis of seismic and infrasonic signals for improvement in automatic monitoring of small local/regional events, such as construction and quarry blasts, military chemical explosions, sonic booms, etc. using collocated seismic and infrasonic networks recently build in Israel (ISIN) in the frame of the project sponsored by the Bi-national USA-Israel Science Foundation (BSF). The general target is to create an automatic system, which will provide detection, location and identification of explosions in real-time or close-to-real time manner. At the moment the network comprises 15 stations hosting a microphone and seismometer (or accelerometer), operated by the Geophysical Institute of Israel (GII), plus two infrasonic arrays, operated by the National Data Center, Soreq: IOB in the South (Negev desert) and IMA in the North of Israel (Upper Galilee),collocated with the IMS seismic array MMAI. The study utilizes a ground-truth data-base of numerous Rotem phosphate quarry blasts, a number of controlled explosions for demolition of outdated ammunitions and experimental surface explosions for a structure protection research, at the Sayarim Military Range. A special event, comprising four military explosions in a neighboring country, that provided both strong seismic (up to 400 km) and infrasound waves (up to 300 km), is also analyzed. For all of these events the ground-truth coordinates and/or the results of seismic location by the Israel Seismic Network (ISN) have been provided. For automatic event detection and phase picking we tested the new recursive picker, based on Statistically optimal detector. The results were compared to the manual picks. Several location techniques have been tested using the ground-truth event recordings and the preliminary results obtained have been compared to the ground-truth locations: 1) a number of events have been located as intersection of azimuths estimated using the wide-band F-K analysis technique applied to the

  12. Issues Related to Seismic Activity Induced by the Injection of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Sminchak, Joel; Gupta, Neeraj; Byrer, Charles; Bergman, Perry

    2001-05-31

    Case studies, theory, regulation, and special considerations regarding the disposal of carbon dioxide (CO2) into deep saline aquifers were investigated to assess the potential for induced seismic activity. Formations capable of accepting large volumes of CO2 make deep well injection of CO2 an attractive option. While seismic implications must be considered for injection facilities, induced seismic activity may be prevented through proper siting, installation, operation, and monitoring. Instances of induced seismic activity have been documented at hazardous waste disposal wells, oil fields, and other sites. Induced seismic activity usually occurs along previously faulted rocks and may be investigated by analyzing the stress conditions at depth. Seismic events are unlikely to occur due to injection in porous rocks unless very high injection pressures cause hydraulic fracturing. Injection wells in the United States are regulated through the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program. UIC guidance requires an injection facility to perform extensive characterization, testing, and monitoring. Special considerations related to the properties of CO2 may have seismic ramifications to a deep well injection facility. Supercritical CO2 liquid is less dense than water and may cause density-driven stress conditions at depth or interact with formation water and rocks, causing a reduction in permeability and pressure buildup leading to seismic activity. Structural compatibility, historical seismic activity, cases of seismic activity triggered by deep well injection, and formation capacity were considered in evaluating the regional seismic suitability in the United States. Regions in the central, midwestern, and southeastern United States appear best suited for deep well injection. In Ohio, substantial deep well injection at a waste disposal facility has not caused seismic events in a seismically active area. Current

  13. Long period seismic source characterization at Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Dawson, Phillip; Chouet, Bernard A.

    2012-01-01

    The seismicity of Popocatépetl is dominated by long-period and very-long period signals associated with hydrothermal processes and magmatic degassing. We model the source mechanism of repetitive long-period signals in the 0.4–2 s band from a 15-station broadband network by stacking long-period events with similar waveforms to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The data are well fitted by a point source located within the summit crater ~250 m below the crater floor and ~200 m from the inferred magma conduit. The inferred source includes a volumetric component that can be modeled as resonance of a horizontal steam-filled crack and a vertical single force component. The long-period events are thought to be related to the interaction between the magmatic system and a perched hydrothermal system. Repetitive injection of fluid into the horizontal fracture and subsequent sudden discharge when a critical pressure threshold is met provides a non-destructive source process.

  14. Seismicity and stress transfer studies in eastern California and Nevada: Implications for earthquake sources and tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinose, Gene Aaron

    The source parameters for eastern California and western Nevada earthquakes are estimated from regionally recorded seismograms using a moment tensor inversion. We use the point source approximation and fit the seismograms, at long periods. We generated a moment tensor catalog for Mw > 4.0 since 1997 and Mw > 5.0 since 1990. The catalog includes centroid depths, seismic moments, and focal mechanisms. The regions with the most moderate sized earthquakes in the last decade were in aftershock zones located in Eureka Valley, Double Spring Flat, Coso, Ridgecrest, Fish Lake Valley, and Scotty's Junction. The remaining moderate size earthquakes were distributed across the region. The 1993 (Mw 6.0) Eureka Valley earthquake occurred in the Eastern California Shear Zone. Careful aftershock relocations were used to resolve structure from aftershock clusters. The mainshock appears to rupture along the western side of the Last Change Range along a 30° to 60° west dipping fault plane, consistent with previous geodetic modeling. We estimate the source parameters for aftershocks at source-receiver distances less than 20 km using waveform modeling. The relocated aftershocks and waveform modeling results do not indicate any significant evidence of low angle faulting (dips > 30°. The results did reveal deformation along vertical faults within the hanging-wall block, consistent with observed surface rupture along the Saline Range above the dipping fault plane. The 1994 (Mw 5.8) Double Spring Flat earthquake occurred along the eastern Sierra Nevada between overlapping normal faults. Aftershock migration and cross fault triggering occurred in the following two years, producing seventeen Mw > 4 aftershocks The source parameters for the largest aftershocks were estimated from regionally recorded seismograms using moment tensor inversion. We estimate the source parameters for two moderate sized earthquakes which occurred near Reno, Nevada, the 1995 (Mw 4.4) Border Town, and the 1998 (Mw

  15. From the Atlas to the Rif a Crustal seismic image across Morocco: The SIMA & RIFSEIS control source wide-angle seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Ramon; Ayarza, Puy; Gallart, Josep; Diaz, Jordi; Harnafi, Mimoun; Levander, Alan; Teixell, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The velocity structure of the crust and the geometry of the Moho across Morocco has been the main target of two recently acquired wide-angle seismic reflection transects. One is the SIMA experiment which provided seismic constraints beneath the Atlas Mountains and the second has been the RIFSEIS experiment which sampled the RIF orogen. Jointly these controlled source wide-angle seismic reflection data results in an almost 700 km, seismic profile going from the the Sahara craton across the High and Middle Atlas and Rif Mountain till the Gibraltar-Arc (Alboran). Current work on the interpretation of the seismic data-set is based on forward modeling, ray-tracing, as well as low fold wide-angle stacking. The data has resulted in a detailed crustal structure and velocity model for the Atlas Mountains and a 700 km transect revealing the irregular topography of the Moho beneath these two mountain orogens. Results indicate that the High Atlas features a moderate crustal thickness and that shortening is resolved at depth through a crustal root where the Saharan crust under-thrusts below the Moroccan crust, defining a lower crust imbrication which locally places the Moho boundary at, approximately, 40 km depth. The P-wave velocity model is characterized, in averaged, by relatively low velocities. These low deep crustal velocities together with other geophysical observables such as: conductivity estimates derived from Mt measurements; moderate Bouguer gravity anomaly; surface exposures of recent alkaline volcanics; lead the interpretation to propose that partial melts are currently emplaced in the deep crustal levels and in the upper mantle. The Moho discontinuity defines a crust which is in average relatively thin beneath the Atlas which is almost a 4000 m high orogenic belt. The resulting model supports existence of mantle upwelling as a possible mechanism that contributes, significantly, to maintain the High Atlas topography.

  16. Improving the Detectability of the Catalan Seismic Network for Local Seismic Activity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, Jose Antonio; Frontera, Tànit; Batlló, Josep; Goula, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The seismic survey of the territory of Catalonia is mainly performed by the regional seismic network operated by the Cartographic and Geologic Institute of Catalonia (ICGC). After successive deployments and upgrades, the current network consists of 16 permanent stations equipped with 3 component broadband seismometers (STS2, STS2.5, CMG3ESP and CMG3T), 24 bits digitizers (Nanometrics Trident) and VSAT telemetry. Data are continuously sent in real-time via Hispasat 1D satellite to the ICGC datacenter in Barcelona. Additionally, data from other 10 stations of neighboring areas (Spain, France and Andorra) are continuously received since 2011 via Internet or VSAT, contributing both to detect and to locate events affecting the region. More than 300 local events with Ml ≥ 0.7 have been yearly detected and located in the region. Nevertheless, small magnitude earthquakes, especially those located in the south and south-west of Catalonia may still go undetected by the automatic detection system (DAS), based on Earthworm (USGS). Thus, in order to improve the detection and characterization of these missed events, one or two new stations should be installed. Before making the decision about where to install these new stations, the performance of each existing station is evaluated taking into account the fraction of detected events using the station records, compared to the total number of events in the catalogue, occurred during the station operation time from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2014. These evaluations allow us to build an Event Detection Probability Map (EDPM), a required tool to simulate EDPMs resulting from different network topology scenarios depending on where these new stations are sited, and becoming essential for the decision-making process to increase and optimize the event detection probability of the seismic network.

  17. Theoretical model of DC electric field formation in the ionosphere stimulated by seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, V. M.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Yaschenko, A. K.

    2005-09-01

    Seismic activity is accompanied by emanation of soil gases into the atmosphere. These gases transfer positive and negative charged aerosols. Atmospheric convection of charged aerosols forms external electric current, which works as a source of perturbation in the atmosphere ionosphere electric circuit. It is shown that DC electric field generated in the ionosphere by this current reaches up to 10 mV/m, while the long-term vertical electric field disturbances near the Earth's surface do not exceed 100 V/m. Such a limitation of the near-ground field is caused by the formation of potential barrier for charged particles at the Earth's surface in a process of their transport from soil to atmosphere. This paper presents the method for calculation of the electric field in the atmosphere and the ionosphere generated by given distribution of external electric current in the atmosphere.

  18. Seismic Activity at Vailulu'u, Samoa's Youngest Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konter, J.; Staudigel, H.; Hart, S.

    2002-12-01

    Submarine volcanic systems, as a product of the Earth's mantle, play an essential role in the Earth's heat budget and in the interaction between the solid Earth and the hydrosphere and biosphere. Their eruptive and intrusive activity exerts an important control on these hydrothermal systems. In March 2000, we deployed an array of five ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) on the summit region (625-995 m water depth) of Vailulu'u Volcano (14°12.9'S;169°03.5'W); this volcano represents the active end of the Samoan hotspot chain and is one of only a few well-studied intra-plate submarine volcanoes. We monitored seismic activity for up to 12 months at low sample rate (25 Hz), and for shorter times at a higher sample rate (125 Hz). We have begun to catalogue and locate a variety of acoustic events from this network. Ambient ocean noise was filtered out by a 4th-order Butterworth bandpass filter (2.3 - 10 Hz). We distinguish small local earthquakes from teleseismic activity, mostly identified by T- (acoustic) waves, by comparison with a nearby GSN station (AFI). Most of the detected events are T-phases from teleseismic earthquakes, characterized by their emergent coda and high frequency content (up to 30 Hz); the latter distinguishes them from low frequency emergent signals associated with the volcano (e.g. tremor). A second type of event is characterized by impulsive arrivals, with coda lasting a few seconds. The differences in arrival times between stations on the volcano are too small for these events to be T-waves; they are very likely to be local events, since the GSN station in Western Samoa (AFI) shows no arrivals close in time to these events. Preliminary locations show that these small events occur approximately once per day and are located within the volcano (the 95% confidence ellipse is similar to the size of the volcano, due to the small size of the OBH network). Several events are located relatively close to each other (within a km radius) just NW of the crater.

  19. Comparative morphological analysis of the diurnal rhythms in geomagnetic and seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desherevskii, A. V.; Sidorin, A. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    To verify the hypothesis of the possible influence of geomagnetic variations on seismicity, the structures of the diurnal rhythms of seismicity in Garm research area, Tajikistan, and geomagnetic activity are investigated in detail using the regional index of geomagnetic activity at the Tashkent Astronomical Observatory. We compare (1) the average shape of the diurnal variations and its seasonal changes; (2) temporal changes in special coefficients of the amplitude variations and the diurnal variation stability. It is revealed that the dynamics of the mentioned parameters differ considerably between the geomagnetic and seismic activities. We conclude that the results obtained on the basis of the used data and processing techniques do not confirm the hypothesis of possible influence of weak geomagnetic variations on background seismicity in the Garm region, Tajikistan.

  20. Modelling Active Faults in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) with OpenQuake: Definition, Design and Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherill, Graeme; Garcia, Julio; Poggi, Valerio; Chen, Yen-Shin; Pagani, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) has, since its inception in 2009, made many contributions to the practice of seismic hazard modeling in different regions of the globe. The OpenQuake-engine (hereafter referred to simply as OpenQuake), GEM's open-source software for calculation of earthquake hazard and risk, has found application in many countries, spanning a diversity of tectonic environments. GEM itself has produced a database of national and regional seismic hazard models, harmonizing into OpenQuake's own definition the varied seismogenic sources found therein. The characterization of active faults in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is at the centre of this process, motivating many of the developments in OpenQuake and presenting hazard modellers with the challenge of reconciling seismological, geological and geodetic information for the different regions of the world. Faced with these challenges, and from the experience gained in the process of harmonizing existing models of seismic hazard, four critical issues are addressed. The challenge GEM has faced in the development of software is how to define a representation of an active fault (both in terms of geometry and earthquake behaviour) that is sufficiently flexible to adapt to different tectonic conditions and levels of data completeness. By exploring the different fault typologies supported by OpenQuake we illustrate how seismic hazard calculations can, and do, take into account complexities such as geometrical irregularity of faults in the prediction of ground motion, highlighting some of the potential pitfalls and inconsistencies that can arise. This exploration leads to the second main challenge in active fault modeling, what elements of the fault source model impact most upon the hazard at a site, and when does this matter? Through a series of sensitivity studies we show how different configurations of fault geometry, and the corresponding characterisation of near-fault phenomena (including

  1. A source discrimination study of a Chinese seismic event of May 4, 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, S. K.; Basu, T. K.

    1984-11-01

    A weak seismic event that occurred on May 4, 1983, close to the Lop Nor underground test site in Southern Sinkiang province, China, has been studied for source discrimination. Digital waveforms, obtained at Gauribidanur array, India, of this event, of six known shallow-focus earthquakes from Southern Sinkiang and of two known underground nuclear explosions in Lop Nor, were processed for further analysis. The estimates of signal complexity and TMF (third moment of frequency) parameters of the May 4 event were found to be quite different from those of the known explosions whereas they were consistent with those of the known earthquakes. On this basis the event under investigation appeared to be a crustal-focus earthquake.

  2. An open-source Matlab code package for improved rank-reduction 3D seismic data denoising and reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangkang; Huang, Weilin; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Simultaneous seismic data denoising and reconstruction is a currently popular research subject in modern reflection seismology. Traditional rank-reduction based 3D seismic data denoising and reconstruction algorithm will cause strong residual noise in the reconstructed data and thus affect the following processing and interpretation tasks. In this paper, we propose an improved rank-reduction method by modifying the truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) formula used in the traditional method. The proposed approach can help us obtain nearly perfect reconstruction performance even in the case of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The proposed algorithm is tested via one synthetic and field data examples. Considering that seismic data interpolation and denoising source packages are seldom in the public domain, we also provide a program template for the rank-reduction based simultaneous denoising and reconstruction algorithm by providing an open-source Matlab package.

  3. Induced seismicity during the construction of the Gotthard Base Tunnel, Switzerland: hypocenter locations and source dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husen, Stephan; Kissling, Edi; von Deschwanden, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A series of 112 earthquakes was recorded between October 2005 and August 2007 during the excavation of the MFS Faido, the southernmost access point of the new Gotthard Base Tunnel. Earthquakes were recorded at a dense network of 11 stations, including 2 stations in the tunnel. Local magnitudes computed from Wood-Anderson-filtered horizontal component seismograms ranged from -1.0 to 2.4; the largest earthquake was strongly felt at the surface and caused considerable damage in the tunnel. Hypocenter locations obtained routinely using a regional 3-D P-wave velocity model and a constant Vp/Vs ratio 1.71 were about 2 km below the tunnel. The use of seismic velocities calibrated from a shot in the tunnel revealed that routinely obtained hypocenter locations were systematically biased to greater depth and are now relocated to be on the tunnel level. Relocation of the shot using these calibrated velocities yields a location accuracy of 25 m in longitude, 70 m in latitude, and 250 m in focal depth. Double-difference relative relocations of two clusters with highly similar waveforms showed a NW-SE striking trend that is consistent with the strike of mapped faults in the MFS Faido. Source dimensions computed using the quasidynamic model of Madariaga (Bull Seismo Soc Am 66(3):639-666, 1976) range from 50 to 170 m. Overlapping source dimensions for earthquakes within the two main clusters suggests that the same fault patch was ruptured repeatedly. The observed seismicity was likely caused by stress redistribution due to the excavation work in the MFS Faido.

  4. Delineation of Active Basement Faults in the Eastern Tennessee and Charlevoix Intraplate Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.; Langston, C. A.; Cooley, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recognition of distinct, seismogenic basement faults within the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ) is now possible using local earthquake tomography and datasets containing a sufficiently large number of earthquakes. Unlike the New Madrid seismic zone where seismicity clearly defines active fault segments, earthquake activity in the ETSZ and CSZ appears diffuse. New arrival time inversions for hypocenter relocations and 3-D velocity variations using datasets in excess of 1000 earthquakes suggest the presence of distinct basement faults in both seismic zones. In the ETSZ, relocated hypocenters align in near-vertical segments trending NE-SW, parallel to the long dimension of the seismic zone. Earthquakes in the most seismogenic portion of the ETSZ delineate another set of near-vertical faults trending roughly E-ESE. These apparent trends and steep dips are compatible with ETSZ focal mechanism solutions. The solutions are remarkably consistent and indicate strike-slip motion along the entire length of the seismic zone. Relocated hypocenter clusters in the CSZ define planes that trend and dip in directions that are compatible with known Iapitan rift faults. Seismicity defining the planes becomes disrupted where the rift faults encounter a major zone of deformation produced by a Devonian meteor impact. We will perform a joint statistical analysis of hypocenter alignments and focal mechanism nodal plane orientations in the ETSZ and the CSZ to determine the spatial orientations of dominant seismogenic basement faults. Quantifying the locations and dimensions of active basement faults will be important for seismic hazard assessment and for models addressing the driving mechanisms for these intraplate zones.

  5. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  6. The Seismic Tool-Kit (STK): an open source software for seismology and signal processing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymond, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    We present an open source software project (GNU public license), named STK: Seismic ToolKit, that is dedicated mainly for seismology and signal processing. The STK project that started in 2007, is hosted by SourceForge.net, and count more than 19 500 downloads at the date of writing. The STK project is composed of two main branches: First, a graphical interface dedicated to signal processing (in the SAC format (SAC_ASCII and SAC_BIN): where the signal can be plotted, zoomed, filtered, integrated, derivated, ... etc. (a large variety of IFR and FIR filter is proposed). The estimation of spectral density of the signal are performed via the Fourier transform, with visualization of the Power Spectral Density (PSD) in linear or log scale, and also the evolutive time-frequency representation (or sonagram). The 3-components signals can be also processed for estimating their polarization properties, either for a given window, or either for evolutive windows along the time. This polarization analysis is useful for extracting the polarized noises, differentiating P waves, Rayleigh waves, Love waves, ... etc. Secondly, a panel of Utilities-Program are proposed for working in a terminal mode, with basic programs for computing azimuth and distance in spherical geometry, inter/auto-correlation, spectral density, time-frequency for an entire directory of signals, focal planes, and main components axis, radiation pattern of P waves, Polarization analysis of different waves (including noize), under/over-sampling the signals, cubic-spline smoothing, and linear/non linear regression analysis of data set. A MINimum library of Linear AlGebra (MIN-LINAG) is also provided for computing the main matrix process like: QR/QL decomposition, Cholesky solve of linear system, finding eigen value/eigen vectors, QR-solve/Eigen-solve of linear equations systems ... etc. STK is developed in C/C++, mainly under Linux OS, and it has been also partially implemented under MS-Windows. Usefull links: http://sourceforge.net/projects/seismic

  7. A Sled-Mounted Vibroseis Seismic Source for Geological Studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speece, M. A.; Luyendyk, B. P.; Harwood, D. M.; Powell, R. D.; Wilson, D. S.; Pekar, S. F.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Rack, F. R.

    2013-12-01

    Given the success of recent vibrator seismic source (vibroseis) tests in Antarctica, we propose the purchase of a large vibroseis for dedicated use by United States Antarctic Program (USAP) projects in Antarctica. Long seismic reflection profiles across Antarctica can be accomplished efficiently by pulling a sled-mounted vibrator that in turn pulls a snow streamer of gimbaled geophones. A baseplate or pad in the center of the sled will be lowered to the ground and support most of the weight of the vibrator assembly while an actuator vibrates the ground at each source location. The vibroseis will be moved to remote locations using over-ice/snow traverses given the increased reliance on traversing for supplying remote sites in Antarctica. Total vibrator hold-down weight when fully assembled will be ~66,000 lbs. Other design features include a 475 HP Caterpillar C15 diesel engine for the hydraulic power unit. The new vibrator will use an INOVA P-wave vibrator system: new Model PLS-362 actuator with up to 60,000 lbs of peak force and frequency limit of 5 Hz to 250Hz. Antarctic research objectives that could be impacted by the use of a vibrator include: (1) mapping of sub-ice stratigraphic sequences for drilling for paleoclimate information, e.g. the deep sedimentary basins of West Antarctica (Ross and Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelves and related divides); (2) correlating offshore and onshore seismic data and complementing airborne geophysical surveys to help determine Antarctica's geologic history; (3) identifying ice-bedrock interface properties and exploring grounding-line processes for ice dynamics; (4) exploring subglacial lakes and water-routing systems; and, (5) investigating the physical properties of ice sheets. An Antarctic Vibroseis Advisory Committee (AVAC) will promote the use of the vibroseis capability among Antarctic geophysical, geological, glaciological and related scientists and groups by encouraging and facilitating the development and submission of

  8. Model space exploration for determining landslide source history from long period seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Mangeney, A.; Stutzmann, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Moretti, L.; Calder, E. S.; Smith, P. J.; Cole, P.; Le Friant, A.

    2012-12-01

    The seismic signals generated by high magnitude landslide events can be recorded at remote stations, which provides access to the landslide process. During the "Boxing Day" eruption at Montserrat in 1997, the long-period seismic signals generated by the debris avalanche are recorded by two stations at distances of 450km and 1261km. We investigate the landslide process considering that the landslide source can be described by single forces. The period band 25-50 sec is selected for which the landslide signal is clearly visible at the two stations. We first use the transverse component of the closest station to determine the horizontal forces. We model the seismogram by normal mode summation and investigate the model space. Two horizontal forces are found that best fit the data. These two horizontal forces have similar amplitude, but opposite direction and they are separated in time by 70 sec. The radiation pattern of the transverse component does not enable to determine the exact azimuth of these forces. We then model the vertical component of the seismograms which enable to retrieve both the vertical and horizontal forces. Using the parameter previously determined (amplitude ratio and time shift of the 2 horizontal forces), we further investigate the model space and show that a single vertical force together with the 2 horizontal forces enable to fit the data. The complete source time function can be described as follows: a horizontal force toward the opposite direction of the landslide flow is followed 40 sec later by a vertical downward force and 30 more seconds later by a horizontal force toward the direction of the flow. The volume of the landslide estimated from the force magnitude is compatible with the volume determined by field survey. Inverting directly the seismograms in the period band 25-50sec enable to retrieve a source time function that is consistent with the 3 forces determined previously. The source time function in this narrow period band alone

  9. Model space exploration for determining landslide source history from long period seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Mangeney, Anne; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Capdeville, Yann; Moretti, Laurent; Calder, Eliza S.; Smith, Patrick J.; Cole, Paul; Le Friant, Anne

    2013-04-01

    The seismic signals generated by high magnitude landslide events can be recorded at remote stations, which provides access to the landslide process. During the "Boxing Day" eruption at Montserrat in 1997, the long period seismic signals generated by the debris avalanche are recorded by two stations at distances of 450 km and 1261 km. We investigate the landslide process considering that the landslide source can be described by single forces. The period band 25-50 sec is selected for which the landslide signal is clearly visible at the two stations. We first use the transverse component of the closest station to determine the horizontal forces. We model the seismogram by normal mode summation and investigate the model space. Two horizontal forces are found that best fit the data. These two horizontal forces have similar amplitude, but opposite direction and they are separated in time by 70 sec. The radiation pattern of the transverse component does not enable to determine the exact azimuth of these forces. We then model the vertical component of the seismograms which enable to retrieve both the vertical and horizontal forces. Using the parameter previously determined (amplitude ratio and time shift of the 2 horizontal forces), we further investigate the model space and show that a single vertical force together with the 2 horizontal forces enable to fit the data. The complete source time function can be described as follows: a horizontal force toward the opposite direction of the landslide flow is followed 40 sec later by a vertical downward force and 30 more seconds later by a horizontal force toward the direction of the flow. Inverting directly the seismograms in the period band 25-50sec enable to retrieve a source time function that is consistent with the 3 forces determined previously. The source time function in this narrow period band alone does not enable easily to recover the corresponding single forces. This method can be used to determine the source

  10. Trace Gases - A Warning Signs of Impending Major Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baijnath, J.; Freund, F.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Seismological models can predict future earthquakes only with wide uncertainty windows, typically on the order of decades to centuries. To improve short-term earthquake forecasts, it is essential to understand the non-seismic processes that take place in Earth's crust during the build-up of tectonic stresses. Days prior to the January 2001 M 7.6 Gujurat earthquake in India, there was a significant increase in the regional CO concentration, reaching 240 ppbv over a 100 squared kilometers, as derived from data of the MOPITT sensor onboard the NASA Terra satellite. A possible explanation for these observations is that when stresses in Earth's crust are building, positive hole charge carriers are activated, which are highly mobile and spread from deep below the earth to the surface. Positive holes act as highly oxidizing oxygen radicals, oxidizing water to hydrogen peroxide. It is hypothesized that, as positive hole charge carriers arrive from below and traverse the soil, they are expected to oxidize soil organics, converting aliphatics to ketones, formaldehyde, CO and CO2. This is tested by using a closed chamber with a slab of gabbro rock. Ultrasound generated by a pair of 50 W, 40 kHz piezoelectric transducers, applied to one end of the gabbro slab was used to activate the positive holes. This created a high concentration of positive holes at the end of the rock that the electrical conductivity through the rock increased more than 1000-fold, while the increase in conductivity through the other end of the gabbro slab was on the order of 100-fold. On the other end of the slab, rock dust and various soils were placed. A stainless steel mesh was also placed over the soil and dust to allow a current to flow through the granular material. When the far end of the slab was subjected to the ultrasound, currents as large as 250 nA were recorded flowing through the length of the gabbro slab and through the dust/soil pile. Dry dust/soil and dust samples impregnated with

  11. Acoustic and seismic imaging of the Adra Fault (NE Alboran Sea): in search of the source of the 1910 Adra earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gràcia, E.; Bartolome, R.; Lo Iacono, C.; Moreno, X.; Stich, D.; Martínez-Diaz, J. J.; Bozzano, G.; Martínez-Loriente, S.; Perea, H.; Diez, S.; Masana, E.; Dañobeitia, J. J.; Tello, O.; Sanz, J. L.; Carreño, E.; Event-Shelf Team

    2012-11-01

    Recently acquired swath-bathymetry data and high-resolution seismic reflection profiles offshore Adra (Almería, Spain) reveal the surficial expression of a NW-SE trending 20 km-long fault, which we termed the Adra Fault. Seismic imaging across the structure depicts a sub-vertical fault reaching the seafloor surface and slightly dipping to the NE showing an along-axis structural variability. Our new data suggest normal displacement of the uppermost units with probably a lateral component. Radiocarbon dating of a gravity core located in the area indicates that seafloor sediments are of Holocene age, suggesting present-day tectonic activity. The NE Alboran Sea area is characterized by significant low-magnitude earthquakes and by historical records of moderate magnitude, such as the Mw = 6.1 1910 Adra Earthquake. The location, dimension and kinematics of the Adra Fault agree with the fault solution and magnitude of the 1910 Adra Earthquake, whose moment tensor analysis indicates normal-dextral motion. The fault seismic parameters indicate that the Adra Fault is a potential source of large magnitude (Mw ≤ 6.5) earthquakes, which represents an unreported seismic hazard for the neighbouring coastal areas.

  12. A new view for the geodynamics of Ecuador: Implication in seismogenic source definition and seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes, Hugo; Audin, Laurence; Alvarado, Alexandra; Beauval, Céline; Aguilar, Jorge; Font, Yvonne; Cotton, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    A new view of Ecuador's complex geodynamics has been developed in the course of modeling seismic source zones for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. This study focuses on two aspects of the plates' interaction at a continental scale: (a) age-related differences in rheology between Farallon and Nazca plates—marked by the Grijalva rifted margin and its inland projection—as they subduct underneath central Ecuador, and (b) the rapidly changing convergence obliquity resulting from the convex shape of the South American northwestern continental margin. Both conditions satisfactorily explain several characteristics of the observed seismicity and of the interseismic coupling. Intermediate-depth seismicity reveals a severe flexure in the Farallon slab as it dips and contorts at depth, originating the El Puyo seismic cluster. The two slabs position and geometry below continental Ecuador also correlate with surface expressions observable in the local and regional geology and tectonics. The interseismic coupling is weak and shallow south of the Grijalva rifted margin and increases northward, with a heterogeneous pattern locally associated to the Carnegie ridge subduction. High convergence obliquity is responsible for the North Andean Block northeastward movement along localized fault systems. The Cosanga and Pallatanga fault segments of the North Andean Block-South American boundary concentrate most of the seismic moment release in continental Ecuador. Other inner block faults located along the western border of the inter-Andean Depression also show a high rate of moderate-size earthquake production. Finally, a total of 19 seismic source zones were modeled in accordance with the proposed geodynamic and neotectonic scheme.

  13. Contribution of Satellite Gravimetry to Understanding Seismic Source Processes of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Shin-Chan; Sauber, Jeanne; Riva, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 great Tohoku-Oki earthquake, apart from shaking the ground, perturbed the motions of satellites orbiting some hundreds km away above the ground, such as GRACE, due to coseismic change in the gravity field. Significant changes in inter-satellite distance were observed after the earthquake. These unconventional satellite measurements were inverted to examine the earthquake source processes from a radically different perspective that complements the analyses of seismic and geodetic ground recordings. We found the average slip located up-dip of the hypocenter but within the lower crust, as characterized by a limited range of bulk and shear moduli. The GRACE data constrained a group of earthquake source parameters that yield increasing dip (7-16 degrees plus or minus 2 degrees) and, simultaneously, decreasing moment magnitude (9.17-9.02 plus or minus 0.04) with increasing source depth (15-24 kilometers). The GRACE solution includes the cumulative moment released over a month and demonstrates a unique view of the long-wavelength gravimetric response to all mass redistribution processes associated with the dynamic rupture and short-term postseismic mechanisms to improve our understanding of the physics of megathrusts.

  14. Probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment at Seaside, Oregon, for near-and far-field seismic sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonzalez, F.I.; Geist, E.L.; Jaffe, B.; Kanoglu, U.; Mofjeld, H.; Synolakis, C.E.; Titov, V.V.; Areas, D.; Bellomo, D.; Carlton, D.; Horning, T.; Johnson, J.; Newman, J.; Parsons, T.; Peters, R.; Peterson, C.; Priest, G.; Venturato, A.; Weber, J.; Wong, F.; Yalciner, A.

    2009-01-01

    The first probabilistic tsunami flooding maps have been developed. The methodology, called probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment (PTHA), integrates tsunami inundation modeling with methods of probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA). Application of the methodology to Seaside, Oregon, has yielded estimates of the spatial distribution of 100- and 500-year maximum tsunami amplitudes, i.e., amplitudes with 1% and 0.2% annual probability of exceedance. The 100-year tsunami is generated most frequently by far-field sources in the Alaska-Aleutian Subduction Zone and is characterized by maximum amplitudes that do not exceed 4 m, with an inland extent of less than 500 m. In contrast, the 500-year tsunami is dominated by local sources in the Cascadia Subduction Zone and is characterized by maximum amplitudes in excess of 10 m and an inland extent of more than 1 km. The primary sources of uncertainty in these results include those associated with interevent time estimates, modeling of background sea level, and accounting for temporal changes in bathymetry and topography. Nonetheless, PTHA represents an important contribution to tsunami hazard assessment techniques; viewed in the broader context of risk analysis, PTHA provides a method for quantifying estimates of the likelihood and severity of the tsunami hazard, which can then be combined with vulnerability and exposure to yield estimates of tsunami risk. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. A test of a mechanical multi-impact shear-wave seismic source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worley, David M.; Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.

    2001-01-01

    We modified two gasoline-engine-powered earth tampers, commonly used as compressional-(P) wave seismic energy sources for shallow reflection studies, for use as shear(S)-wave energy sources. This new configuration, termed ?Hacker? (horizontal Wacker?), is evaluated as an alternative to the manual sledgehammer typically used in conjunction with a large timber held down by the front wheels of a vehicle. The Hacker maximizes the use of existing equipment by a quick changeover of bolt-on accessories as opposed to the handling of a separate source, and is intended to improve the depth of penetration of S-wave data by stacking hundreds of impacts over a two to three minute period. Records were made with a variety of configurations involving up to two Hackers simultaneously then compared to a reference record made with a sledgehammer. Preliminary results indicate moderate success by the higher amplitude S-waves recorded with the Hacker as compared to the hammer method. False triggers generated by the backswing of the Hacker add unwanted noise and we are currently working to modify the device to eliminate this effect. Correlation noise caused by insufficient randomness of the Hacker impact sequence is also a significant noise problem that we hope to reduce by improving the coupling of the Hacker to the timber so that the operator has more control over the impact sequence.

  16. Short-term spasmodic switching of volcanic tremor source activation in a conduit of the 2011 Kirishima eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, T.; Uehira, K.; Yamashita, Y.; Nakamoto, M.; Miyazaki, M.; Chikura, H.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic tremors are seismic indicators providing clues for magma behavior, which is related to volcanic eruptions and activity. Detection of spatial and temporal variations of volcanic tremors is important for understanding the mechanism of volcanic eruptions. However, temporal variations of tremor activity in short-term than a minute have not been previously detected by seismological observations around volcanoes. Here, we show that volcanic tremor sources were activated at the top of the conduit (i.e. the crater) and at its lower end by analyzing seismograms from a dense seismic array during the 2011 Kirishima eruption. We observed spasmodic switching in the seismic ray direction during a volcanic tremor sequence. Such fine volcanic tremor structure suggests an interaction between tremor sources located in both deep and shallow depths. Our result suggests that seismic array observations can monitor the magma behavior and contribute to the evaluation of the activity's transition.

  17. A Program for Calculating and Plotting Synthetic Common-Source Seismic-Reflection Traces for Multilayered Earth Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramananantoandro, Ramanantsoa

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a description of a BASIC program to be used on an IBM microcomputer for calculating and plotting synthetic seismic-reflection traces for multilayered earth models. Discusses finding raypaths for given source-receiver offsets using the "shooting method" and calculating the corresponding travel times. (Author/CW)

  18. Ion density and temperature variations at altitude of 500 km during moderate seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Ananna; Khurana, M. S.; Bahal, B. M.; Aggarwal, Malini; Sharma, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Ionospheric ions (O+ and H+) and temperature (Ti) as precursory parameters to seismic activity have been analysed from year 1995 till 1998, using SROSS-C2 (average altitude range of ∼500 km) satellite measurements for moderate magnitude earthquakes. The details of seismic events during this period are downloaded from United State Geological Survey (USGS) and National Earthquake Information Centre (NEIC) website. 13 seismic events of moderate magnitude (M = 4-5.5) from 1995 to 1998, using SROSS-C2 satellite measurements have been analysed. During seismic affected period, considerable decrease in the density of heavier ion - O+ and increase in the ion temperature (Ti) is observed during all the selected events. Lighter ion - H+ doesn't show any significant change. Electric field and electromagnetic emissions generated due to seismogenic activity could be the plausible initializing agents responsible for change in ion concentration and temperature values during these events.

  19. New inferences from spectral seismic energy measurement of a link between regional seismicity and volcanic activity at Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, R.; Falsaperla, S.; Marrero, J. M.; Messina, A.

    2009-04-01

    The existence of a relationship between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity has been the subject of several studies in the last years. Generally, activity in basaltic volcanoes such as Villarica (Chile) and Tungurahua (Ecuador) shows very little changes after the occurrence of regional earthquakes. In a few cases volcanic activity has changed before the occurrence of regional earthquakes, such as observed at Teide, Tenerife, in 2004 and 2005 (Tárraga et al., 2006). In this paper we explore the possible link between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity at Mt. Etna in 2006 and 2007. On 24 November, 2006 at 4:37:40 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 4.7 stroke the eastern coast of Sicily. The epicenter was localized 50 km SE of the south coast of the island, and at about 160 km from the summit craters of Mt. Etna. The SSEM (Spectral Seismic Energy Measurement) of the seismic signal at stations at 1 km and 6 km from the craters highlights that four hours before this earthquake the energy associated with volcanic tremor increased, reached a maximum, and finally became steady when the earthquake occurred. Conversely, neither before nor after the earthquake, the SSEM of stations located between 80 km and 120 km from the epicentre and outside the volcano edifice showed changes. On 5 September, 2007 at 21:24:13 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 3.2 and 7.9 km depth stroke the Lipari Island, at the north of Sicily. About 38 hours before the earthquake occurrence, there was an episode of lava fountain lasting 20 hours at Etna volcano. The SSEM of the seismic signal recorded during the lava fountain at a station located at 6 km from the craters highlights changes heralding this earthquake ten hours before its occurrence using the FFM method (e.g., Voight, 1988; Ortiz et al., 2003). A change in volcanic activity - with the onset of ash emission and Strombolian explosions - was observed a couple of hours before the occurrence of the regional

  20. CMBACT: CMB from ACTive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosian, Levon; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2011-06-01

    This code is based on the cosmic string model described in this paper by Pogosian and Vachaspati, as well as on the CMBFAST code created by Uros Seljak and Matias Zaldarriaga. It contains an integrator for the vector contribution to the CMB temperature and polarization. The code is reconfigured to make it easier to use with or without active sources. To produce inflationary CMB spectra one simply sets the string tension to zero (gmu=0.0d0). For a non-zero value of tension only the string contribution is calculated. An option is added to randomize the directions of velocities of consolidated segments as they evolve in time. In the original segment model, which is still the default version (irandomv=0), each segment is given a random velocity initially, but then continues to move in a straight line for the rest of its life. The new option (irandomv=1) allows to additionally randomize velocities of each segment at roughly each Hubble time. However, the merits of this new option are still under investigation. The default version (irandomv=0) is strongly recommended, since it actually gives reasonable unequal time correlators. For each Fourier mode, k, the string stress-energy components are now evaluated on a time grid sufficiently fine for that k.

  1. Effects of heterogeneities on the propagation, scattering and attenuation of seismic waves and the characterization of seismic source. Final report, 1 December 1982-30 November 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.; Cormier, V.F.; Toksoz, M.N.

    1985-01-01

    During this reporting period, work was completed on testing alternative measures of body-wave magnitude. It was found that alternative measures of body waves magnitude often exhibit as much scatter as classical measures of magnitude, although coda magnitudes usually have slightly less scatter than spectral and classical magnitudes. In the cases investigated, these differences were usually not statistically significant. Another completed task was an investigation of the intrinsic attenuation of the Earth's mantle selected paths from the Sea of Okhotsk to Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) and Global Digital Seismic Network (GDSN) Stations in North America. It was concluded that the intrinsic attenuation in the mantle beneath eastern North America is both depth and frequency dependent and that spectral and time domain studies of attenuation can be reconciled in the frequency band up to 2 Hz. The focus of the project was then divided between source problems related to scattering and seismic wave propagation in three-dimensional, heterogeneous media. A significant result was that short period and broadband waveforms can improve the depth-resolution-determined earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions, forming a powerful discriminant. Scattering was studied theoretically and observationally. The significant result of that work is that the Earth's lithosphere must possess multiple scales of heterogeneity in order to explain both the amplitude and phase fluctuations at large arrays as well as the shapes of local S coda.

  2. A preliminary census of engineering activities located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Marco; Briffa, Emanuela; Cannata, Andrea; Cannavò, Flavio; Gambino, Salvatore; Maiolino, Vincenza; Maugeri, Roberto; Palano, Mimmo; Privitera, Eugenio; Scaltrito, Antonio; Spampinato, Salvatore; Ursino, Andrea; Velardita, Rosanna

    2015-04-01

    The seismic events caused by human engineering activities are commonly termed as "triggered" and "induced". This class of earthquakes, though characterized by low-to-moderate magnitude, have significant social and economical implications since they occur close to the engineering activity responsible for triggering/inducing them and can be felt by the inhabitants living nearby, and may even produce damage. One of the first well-documented examples of induced seismicity was observed in 1932 in Algeria, when a shallow magnitude 3.0 earthquake occurred close to the Oued Fodda Dam. By the continuous global improvement of seismic monitoring networks, numerous other examples of human-induced earthquakes have been identified. Induced earthquakes occur at shallow depths and are related to a number of human activities, such as fluid injection under high pressure (e.g. waste-water disposal in deep wells, hydrofracturing activities in enhanced geothermal systems and oil recovery, shale-gas fracking, natural and CO2 gas storage), hydrocarbon exploitation, groundwater extraction, deep underground mining, large water impoundments and underground nuclear tests. In Italy, induced/triggered seismicity is suspected to have contributed to the disaster of the Vajont dam in 1963. Despite this suspected case and the presence in the Italian territory of a large amount of engineering activities "capable" of inducing seismicity, no extensive researches on this topic have been conducted to date. Hence, in order to improve knowledge and correctly assess the potential hazard at a specific location in the future, here we started a preliminary study on the entire range of engineering activities currently located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity. To this end, we performed: • a preliminary census of all engineering activities located in the study area by collecting all the useful information coming from available on-line catalogues; • a detailed compilation

  3. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.B.; Chouet, B.A.; Power, J.

    2011-01-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Power, John

    2011-02-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data.

  5. Source Stacking for Numerical Wavefield Computations - Application to Global Scale Seismic Mantle Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, L. S.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wavefield computations using the Spectral Element Method are now regularly used to recover tomographic images of the upper mantle and crust at the local, regional, and global scales (e.g. Fichtner et al., GJI, 2009; Tape et al., Science 2010; Lekic and Romanowicz, GJI, 2011; French and Romanowicz, GJI, 2014). However, the heaviness of the computations remains a challenge, and contributes to limiting the resolution of the produced images. Using source stacking, as suggested by Capdeville et al. (GJI,2005), can considerably speed up the process by reducing the wavefield computations to only one per each set of N sources. This method was demonstrated through synthetic tests on low frequency datasets, and therefore should work for global mantle tomography. However, the large amplitudes of surface waves dominates the stacked seismograms and these cases can no longer be separated by windowing in the time domain. We have developed a processing approach that helps address this issue and demonstrate its usefulness through a series of synthetic tests performed at long periods (T >60 s) on toy upper mantle models. The summed synthetics are computed using the CSEM code (Capdeville et al., 2002). As for the inverse part of the procedure, we use a quasi-Newton method, computing Frechet derivatives and Hessian using normal mode perturbation theory.

  6. Bolide Airbursts as a Seismic Source for the 2018 Mars InSight Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanović, J.; Teanby, N. A.; Wookey, J.; Selby, N.; Daubar, I. J.; Vaubaillon, J.; Garcia, R.

    2017-01-01

    In 2018, NASA will launch InSight, a single-station suite of geophysical instruments, designed to characterise the martian interior. We investigate the seismo-acoustic signal generated by a bolide entering the martian atmosphere and exploding in a terminal airburst, and assess this phenomenon as a potential observable for the SEIS seismic payload. Terrestrial analogue data from four recent events are used to identify diagnostic airburst characteristics in both the time and frequency domain. In order to estimate a potential number of detectable events for InSight, we first model the impactor source population from observations made on the Earth, scaled for planetary radius, entry velocity and source density. We go on to calculate a range of potential airbursts from the larger incident impactor population. We estimate there to be {˜} 1000 events of this nature per year on Mars. To then derive a detectable number of airbursts for InSight, we scale this number according to atmospheric attenuation, air-to-ground coupling inefficiencies and by instrument capability for SEIS. We predict between 10-200 detectable events per year for InSight.

  7. Controlled-source seismic investigations of the crustal structure beneath Erebus volcano and Ross Island, Antarctica: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraj, S.; Kyle, P. R.; Zandomeneghi, D.; Knox, H. A.; Aster, R. C.; Snelson, C. M.; Miller, P. E.; Kaip, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    During the 2008-09 Austral summer field season we undertook a controlled-source seismic experiment (Tomo-Erebus, TE) to examine the shallow magmatic system beneath the active Erebus volcano (TE-3D) and the crustal structure beneath Ross Island. Here we report on the TE-2D component, which was designed to produce a two-dimensional P-wave velocity model along an east-west profile across Ross Island. Marine geophysical observations near Ross Island have identified the north-south trending Terror Rift within the older and broader Victoria Land Basin, which are a component of the intraplate West Antarctic Rift System. Mount Erebus and Ross Island are circumstantially associated with the Terror Rift and its thin (~20 km) crust. The nature, extent and role of the Terror Rift in controlling the evolution of Ross Island volcanism and the on-going eruptive activity of Erebus volcano are unknown. In TE-2D, we deployed 21 seismic recorders (Ref Tek 130) with three-component 4.5 Hz geophones (Sercel L-28-3D) along a 90-km east-west line between Capes Royds and Crozier. These were supplemented by 79 similar instruments deployed for the high-resolution TE-3D experiment within a 3 x 3 km grid around the summit crater of Erebus, an array of 8 permanent short period and broadband sensors used to monitor the activity of Erebus and 23 three-component sensors (Guralp CMG-40T, 30s-100 Hz) positioned around the flanks and summit of Erebus. Fifteen chemical sources were loaded in holes drilled about 15 m deep in the snow and ice. The size of these shots ranged from 75 to 600 kg of ANFO with the largest shots at the ends of the profile. An additional shot was detonated in the sea (McMurdo Sound) using 200 kg of dynamite. Due to the rugged terrain, short field seasons and large area to be covered, the seismometer spacing along the TE-2D profile is quite large (~ 5 km spacing), resulting in poor near-surface data resolution. However, the data have a high signal to noise ratio with clear

  8. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors <2 km. These events concentrated mainly below Tres Virgenes volcanoes, and the geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  9. Constraints from sill intrusions and their deeper source magma chambers (seismic high velocity bodies) on the origins of volcanic rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic rifted margins are characterized by massive igneous activity originating from the rift margin, characterized by seaward dipping reflectors. These consist of basalt flows and associated magmatic products, from deep magma chambers imaged on seismic data as High Velocity Bodies (HVB) with seismic velocities between 7 and 7.5 km/s. The relationship between rifting and decompression melting have been well quantified, using the HVB's as constraints on magmatic production to match extension models. Crucial in this approach are the relationship between extension and mantle plumes, with HVB's generated by mantle plumes often indicative of velocities between 7.5 - 7.8 km/s. Here I address information that can be obtained from sill complexes in sedimentary basins associated with rifting, representing the earliest phase of magmatism. I use a simple crustal scale hydrostatic model for dikes while incorporating the presence of sills by calculating magmatic overpressures from differences in pressure gradients. It transpires that the presence of sills as observed on seismic reflection and outcrop data, can be predicted. Modelling further suggests that the source of these sill complexes are large magma chambers at or near the Moho, and equate to HVB's observed on seismic data. Utilizing simple mass balance calculations, the ratio of cumulate thickness (from HVB thickness) and expelled melt (from accumulated sill thicknesses) can be related to MgO content in expelled liquids, primary magma and cumulates. Higher MgO content translates in higher seismic velocities. Thus, HVB velocity can subsequently be used to discriminate between mantle plume, or shallow rift related melting. The theory is applied to various basins bordering the northern North Atlantic (Vøring Basin, Jameson Land Basin and Rockall Basin) and South Atlantic rifts (Namibia), associated with the Paleocene/Eocene Iceland mantle plume and the Early Cretaceous Tristan da Cunha mantle plume magmatism respectively.

  10. Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty seismic monitoring: 2012 USNAS report and recent explosions, earthquakes, and other seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Paul G.

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive ban on nuclear explosive testing is briefly characterized as an arms control initiative related to the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The work of monitoring for nuclear explosions uses several technologies of which the most important is seismology-a physics discipline that draws upon extensive and ever-growing assets to monitor for earthquakes and other ground-motion phenomena as well as for explosions. This paper outlines the basic methods of seismic monitoring within that wider context, and lists web-based and other resources for learning details. It also summarizes the main conclusions, concerning capability to monitor for test-ban treaty compliance, contained in a major study published in March 2012 by the US National Academy of Sciences.

  11. Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty seismic monitoring: 2012 USNAS report and recent explosions, earthquakes, and other seismic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Paul G.

    2014-05-09

    A comprehensive ban on nuclear explosive testing is briefly characterized as an arms control initiative related to the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The work of monitoring for nuclear explosions uses several technologies of which the most important is seismology-a physics discipline that draws upon extensive and ever-growing assets to monitor for earthquakes and other ground-motion phenomena as well as for explosions. This paper outlines the basic methods of seismic monitoring within that wider context, and lists web-based and other resources for learning details. It also summarizes the main conclusions, concerning capability to monitor for test-ban treaty compliance, contained in a major study published in March 2012 by the US National Academy of Sciences.

  12. The Gibraltar Arc seismogenic zone (part 2): Constraints on a shallow east dipping fault plane source for the 1755 Lisbon earthquake provided by tsunami modeling and seismic intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, M.-A.; Baptista, M. A.; Miranda, J. M.

    2006-10-01

    The Great Lisbon earthquake has the largest documented felt area of any shallow earthquake and an estimated magnitude of 8.5-9.0. The associated tsunami ravaged the coast of SW Portugal and the Gulf of Cadiz, with run-up heights reported to have reached 5-15 m. While several source regions offshore SW Portugal have been proposed (e.g.— Gorringe Bank, Marquis de Pombal fault), no single source appears to be able to account for the great seismic moment as well as all the historical tsunami amplitude and travel time observations. A shallow east dipping fault plane beneath the Gulf of Cadiz associated with active subduction beneath Gibraltar, represents a candidate source for the Lisbon earthquake of 1755. Here we consider the fault parameters implied by this hypothesis, with respect to total slip, seismic moment, and recurrence interval to test the viability of this source. The geometry of the seismogenic zone is obtained from deep crustal studies and can be represented by an east dipping fault plane with mean dimensions of 180 km (N-S) × 210 km (E-W). For 10 m of co-seismic slip an Mw 8.64 event results and for 20 m of slip an Mw 8.8 earthquake is generated. Thus, for convergence rates of about 1 cm/yr, an event of this magnitude could occur every 1000-2000 years. Available kinematic and sedimentological data are in general agreement with such a recurrence interval. Tsunami wave form modeling indicates a subduction source in the Gulf of Cadiz can partly satisfy the historical observations with respect to wave amplitudes and arrival times, though discrepancies remain for some stations. A macroseismic analysis is performed using site effect functions calculated from isoseismals observed during instrumentally recorded strong earthquakes in the region (M7.9 1969 and M6.8 1964). The resulting synthetic isoseismals for the 1755 event suggest a subduction source, possibly in combination with an additional source at the NW corner of the Gulf of Cadiz can satisfactorily

  13. Temporal Changes of Seismic Velocity of Shallow Structure Associated With the 2000 Miyakejima Volcano Activity as Inferred From Ambient Seismic Noise Correlation Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, T.; Nishimura, T.; Sato, H.; Ueda, H.; Ukawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Miyakejima Island, which is located about 170 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan, is an active volcano of basaltic magma. In 2000 volcanic activity started with magma ascent and migration northwestwardly on June 26 - 27. Then, the volcano formed a caldera on the summit in July, and large amount of volcanic gas emission continued from late August until now. We analyze the ambient seismic noise recorded at three NIED seismic stations (MKK, MKT, and MKS) in the island in order to study the volcano structure behavior associated with such significant volcanic activities. We apply cross correlation analyses to the continuous records of vertical component of short period seismometers (1 s). The data are sampled at a frequency of 100 Hz with an A/D resolution of 16-bit. We calculate cross correlation functions (CCFs) for time window of 60 s for each station pair. We stack the CCFs for each month and bandpass filter the stacked data at frequency band 0.4 - 0.8 Hz. The stacked CCFs, which may represent the Green function between two stations, at station pairs MKK - MKS (the distance is 1.8 km) and MKT - MKS (the distance is 3.9 km) show wave packets with large amplitudes at both sides (positive and negative time delays). The wave packets propagate at group velocities of about 0.8 - 1.0 km/s. The stacked CCFs for MKK - MKT (the distance is 3.1 km) is one sided (negative time delay). Such asymmetric might be due to the inhomogeneous distribution of propagation direction of ambient seismic noise, so we do not use the data for the following analyses. Comparing the CCFs obtained for periods from July 1999 to June 2000 with that of October 2002, we observe small phase difference of the main wave packet. Our results show that for station pair MKK - MKS, whose path crosses the northern part of the island, velocity increased about 1.6 % after the 2000 volcanic activity. For MKT - MKS, whose path closely crosses the newly formed caldera, we estimate the velocity decrease of about 1

  14. Very Long Period Seismicity Accompanying Increasing Shallower Activity at Cotopaxi Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, G.; Molina Polania, C. I.; Ruiz, M. C.; Kumagai, H.; Hernandez, S.; Plain, M.; Mothes, P. A.; Yepez, M.; Barrington, C.; Hidalgo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Cotopaxi is an andesitic stratovolcano, located in the highland region of Ecuador, which renewed its activity in April 2015, showing an increased number of volcano-tectonic (VT), long-period (LP), very long period events (VLP), and tremors. The VLP events were recorded in several episodes between 2002 and 2014, and have been interpreted as volumetric changes due to the release of gas and subsequent pressure drop and recovery in the magma intrusion. The two peaks of VLP seismicity in June 2002 and April 2015 preceded an increase of surficial activity (fumarolic increase) and the deformation data during those episodes suggested a small intrusion of magma beneath the volcano.Using polarization analysis, we found that most of these events were located at 2-3 km depth beneath the volcano summit, while the deformation data suggests the intrusion is deeper (5-10 km deep). Using tiltmeter data, Mogi point source modelling on successive periods of inflation and deflation show a significant shallowing of sources since the end of May 2015, matching the recent very large spike in SO2 emissions (~3000 t/d). From mid-February until the gas emission spikes in May 2015, Mogi source modelling has indicated inflation/deflation events at 11 to 10 km depth, having shallowed to a depth of between 8 and 7 km after the SO2 emission increase. Shallow source volumes suggested by deformation indicate values of 4 - 31x106 m3, with the most recent, most shallow inflation currently at 8x106 m3.

  15. Study of seismic activity during the ascending and descending phases of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukma, Indriani; Abidin, Zamri Zainal

    2016-12-01

    The study of the solar cycle and geomagnetic index associated with the seismic activity from the year 1901 to the end of 2015 has been done for an area that covers the majority of China and its bordering countries. Data of sunspot number, solar wind speed, daily storm time index and earthquake number are collected from NOAA, NASA, WDC, OMNI and USGS databases and websites. The earthquakes are classified into small (M < 5) and large (M ≥ 5) magnitudes (in Richter scale). We investigated the variation of earthquake activities with the geomagnetic storm index due to the solar wind. We focused on their variation in the ascending and descending phases of solar cycle. From our study, we conclude that there is a correlation between the phases' geomagnetic index and solar wind speed. We have also suggested that there is a certain degree of correlation between solar activity and seismicity in these phases. For every solar cycle, we find that there is a trend for earthquakes to occur in greater numbers during the descending phase. This can be explained by the increment in the solar wind speed and geomagnetic storm index during this phase.

  16. Near Source Structural Effects on Seismic Waves: Implication for Shear Motion Generation During SPE-4Prime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarka, A.

    2015-12-01

    Arben Pitarka, Souheil M. Ezzedine, Oleg Y. Vorobiev, Tarabay H. Antoun, Lew A. Glenn, William R. Walter, Robert J. Mellors, and Evan Hirakawa. We have analyzed effects of wave scattering due to near-source structural complexity and sliding joint motion on generation of shear waves from SPE-4Pprime, a shallow chemical explosion conducted at the Nevada National Security Site. In addition to analyzing far-field ground motion recorded on three-component geophones, we performed high-frequency simulations of the explosion using a finite difference method and heterogeneous media with stochastic variability. The stochastic variations of seismic velocity were modeled using Gaussian correlation functions. Using simulations and recorded waveforms we demonstrate the implication of wave scattering on generation of shear motion, and show the gradual increase of shear motion energy as the waves propagate through media with variable scattering. The amplitude and duration of shear waves resulting from wave scattering are found to be dependent on the model complexity and to a lesser extent to source distance. Analysis of shear-motion generation due to joint motion were conducted using numerical simulations performed with GEODYN-L, a parallelized Lagrangian hydrocode, while a stochastic approach was used in depicting the properties of joints. Separated effects of source and wave scattering on shear motion generation will be shown through simulated motion. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 Release Number: LLNL-ABS-675570

  17. Predicting earthquakes by analyzing accelerating precursory seismic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varnes, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    During 11 sequences of earthquakes that in retrospect can be classed as foreshocks, the accelerating rate at which seismic moment is released follows, at least in part, a simple equation. This equation (1) is {Mathematical expression},where {Mathematical expression} is the cumulative sum until time, t, of the square roots of seismic moments of individual foreshocks computed from reported magnitudes;C and n are constants; and tfis a limiting time at which the rate of seismic moment accumulation becomes infinite. The possible time of a major foreshock or main shock, tf,is found by the best fit of equation (1), or its integral, to step-like plots of {Mathematical expression} versus time using successive estimates of tfin linearized regressions until the maximum coefficient of determination, r2,is obtained. Analyzed examples include sequences preceding earthquakes at Cremasta, Greece, 2/5/66; Haicheng, China 2/4/75; Oaxaca, Mexico, 11/29/78; Petatlan, Mexico, 3/14/79; and Central Chile, 3/3/85. In 29 estimates of main-shock time, made as the sequences developed, the errors in 20 were less than one-half and in 9 less than one tenth the time remaining between the time of the last data used and the main shock. Some precursory sequences, or parts of them, yield no solution. Two sequences appear to include in their first parts the aftershocks of a previous event; plots using the integral of equation (1) show that the sequences are easily separable into aftershock and foreshock segments. Synthetic seismic sequences of shocks at equal time intervals were constructed to follow equation (1), using four values of n. In each series the resulting distributions of magnitudes closely follow the linear Gutenberg-Richter relation log N=a-bM, and the product n times b for each series is the same constant. In various forms and for decades, equation (1) has been used successfully to predict failure times of stressed metals and ceramics, landslides in soil and rock slopes, and volcanic

  18. Probabilistic tsunami hazard in the North East Atlantic due to seismic sources, implications for NEAMTWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omira, R.; Baptista, M.; Matias, L. M.; Miranda, J. M.; Carrilho, F.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, several studies on tsunami hazard assessment for the North East Atlantic coasts have been published. These studies use deterministic approach based upon the most credible earthquake scenario and/or the worst case scenario to derive tsunami coastal hazard in terms of wave elevation and inundation maps. In this work, we present the first thorough study on probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment due to earthquake sources for the North East Atlantic area. We consider three main seismogenic areas: the Gulf of Cadiz, the Gloria Fault and the Caribbean arc. For each seismogenic zone we derive the annual recurrence rate for each magnitude range, starting from Mw7.5 to Mw9.0, using the Bayesian method that incorporates seismic information from historical catalog and instrumental periods. A numerical code, solving the linear shallow water equations is employed to simulate the tsunami propagation and compute near shore wave heights along the entire NE Atlantic coast and at the forecast points of the NEAMTWS. To establish, for multiple sources, the joint probability that wave height exceeds a particular value for a given time period, we consider that the sources are independent (like in the Poison distribution). This process allows calculating the time-independent probability that wave height, simulated by numerical code, will be exceeded due to the occurrence of a tsunami source with a known average rate, derived from sources' recurrence assessment, during a period of time. The results are presented in terms of the probability of exceedance of a given tsunami amplitude for 100, 500 and 1000 years, and hazard curves for selected forecast points of the NEAMTWS countries. The level of hazard varies along the coast being maximum along the northern segment of the Morocco Atlantic coast, the southern Portuguese coast and the Spanish coast of the Gulf of Cadiz. The results show that the probability of a tsunami wave exceeding 1 m in the next 500 years reaches 100% in some

  19. Ground penetrating radar and active seismic investigation of stratigraphically verified pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gase, A.; Bradford, J. H.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and active seismic surveys in July and August, 2015 parallel to outcrops of the pyroclastic density current deposits of the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington. The primary objective of this study is to compare geophysical properties that influence electromagnetic and elastic wave velocities with stratigraphic parameters in the un-saturated zone. The deposits of interest are composed of pumice, volcanic ash, and lava blocks comprising a wide range of intrinsic porosities and grain sizes from sand to boulders. Single-offset GPR surveys for reflection data were performed with a Sensors and Software pulseEKKO Pro 100 GPR using 50 MHz, 100 MHz, and 200 MHz antennae. GPR data processing includes time-zero correction, dewow filter, migration, elevation correction. Multi-offset acquisition with 100 MHz antennae and offsets ranging from 1 m to 16 m are used for reflection tomography to create 2 D electromagnetic wave velocity models. Seismic surveys are performed with 72 geophones spaced at two meters using a sledge hammer source with shot points at each receiver point. We couple p- wave refraction tomography with Rayleigh wave inversion to compute Vp/Vs ratios. The two geophysical datasets are then compared with stratigraphic information to illustrate the influence of lithological parameters (e.g. stratification, grain-size distribution, porosity, and sorting) on geophysical properties of unsaturated pyroclastic deposits. Future work will include joint petrophysical inversion of the multiple datasets to estimate porosity and water content in the unsaturated zone.

  20. A portable vacuum hammer seismic source for use in tunnel environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.D.; Magner, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    Concern for the measurement of seismic refraction velocities in tunnel areas where cables, construction features, and other sensitive structures render the use of dynamite sources unwise, resulted in the design of a vacuum-driven impact system utilizing a 43-kg (94-lb) weight in a 2-m (6.5-ft) tube. The system is portable, quickly assembled and disassembled, and requires only standard electrical power, an air pressure supply, and a laboratory vacuum pump to operate. The maximum weight of any component is 84 kg (185 lb), the remaining components being significantly lighter. Tests in volcanic rock tunnels in Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site indicate maximum energy generated by the system is in the SV wave. When the system was employed at angles other than vertical, a polarized SH mode was also observed. The hammer was used to obtain velocities in an in-hole survey in a 138-m horizontal hole drilled behind the flat face of the Red Hot chamber after the Red Hot nuclear detonation. A large decrease was observed in compressional velocity compared with pre-event values. Because 20 years have elapsed since the explosion, one cannot separate the effect of ground shock on lowering the velocity from possible effects of destressing around adjacent underground openings over this period.

  1. On using surface-source downhole-receiver logging to determine seismic slownesses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Thompson, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method to solve for slowness models from surface-source downhole-receiver seismic travel-times. The method estimates the slownesses in a single inversion of the travel-times from all receiver depths and accounts for refractions at layer boundaries. The number and location of layer interfaces in the model can be selected based on lithologic changes or linear trends in the travel-time data. The interfaces based on linear trends in the data can be picked manually or by an automated algorithm. We illustrate the method with example sites for which geologic descriptions of the subsurface materials and independent slowness measurements are available. At each site we present slowness models that result from different interpretations of the data. The examples were carefully selected to address the reliability of interface-selection and the ability of the inversion to identify thin layers, large slowness contrasts, and slowness gradients. Additionally, we compare the models in terms of ground-motion amplification. These plots illustrate the sensitivity of site amplifications to the uncertainties in the slowness model. We show that one-dimensional site amplifications are insensitive to thin layers in the slowness models; although slowness is variable over short ranges of depth, this variability has little affect on ground-motion amplification at frequencies up to 5 Hz.

  2. A comparison of broadband source spectra, seismic energies, and stress drops of the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1988 Armenian earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, H. )

    1990-08-01

    Broadband source spectra of the 1989 Loma Prieta (M{sub W} = 6.9) and 1988 Armenian (M{sub W} = 6.7) earthquakes are computed at periods from 1 to 50 sec using digitally-recorded teleseismic P body waves. The effects of attenuation, geometrical spreading, and radiation pattern are removed from the spectra of individual stations, which are then averaged. The source spectra of the Loma Prieta and Armenian earthquakes are higher for their seismic moments than the spectra of 11 intraplate earthquakes studied by Zhuo and Kanamori (1987), which in turn are 2 to 4 times larger than average spectra of interplate subduction zone earthquakes. The seismically radiated energy can be computed from the source spectrum using Haskell's (1964) formulation assuming a point source with no directivity. An Orowan stress drop can be obtained from the seismic energy and moment. The Orowan stress drops for the Loma Prieta and Armenian earthquakes are both about 20 bars, significantly higher than Orowan stress drops of recent large interplate earthquakes. There is a positive correlation between the Orowan stress drops and the estimated repeat times, consistent with the notion that mechanical fault strength increases with increasing interseismic period.

  3. Recent Seismic and Geodetic Activity at Multiple Volcanoes in the Ecuadorean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, S.; Ruiz, M. C.; McCausland, W. A.; Prejean, S. G.; Mothes, P. A.; Bell, A. F.; Hidalgo, S.; Barrington, C.; Yepez, M.; Aguaiza, S.; Plain, M.

    2015-12-01

    The state of volcanic activity often fluctuates between periods of repose and unrest. The transition time between a period of repose and unrest, or vice versa for an open system, can occur within a matter of hours or days. Because of this short time scale, real-time seismic and geodetic (e.g. tiltmeter, GPS) monitoring networks are crucial for characterizing the state of activity of a volcano. In the Ecuadorean Andes, 5 volcanoes demonstrate long-term (Tungurahua, Reventador, and Guagua Pichincha) or recently reactivated (Cotopaxi, Chiles-Cerro Negro) seismic and geodetic activity. The Instituto Geofisico regularly characterizes volcano seismicity into long period, very long period, volcano-tectonic, and tremor events. Significant recent changes at these volcanoes include: rigorous reactivation of glacier-capped Cotopaxi, drumbeat seismicity absent a dome extrusion at Tungurahua, and regularly reoccurring (~7 day recurrence interval), shallow seismic swarms at Guagua Pichincha. These volcanoes locate along both the Western and Eastern Cordillera of the Ecuadorean Andes and, where data are available, manifest important variations in chemical composition, daily gas flux, and surficial deformation. We summarize the long-term geophysical parameters measured at each volcano and place recent changes in each parameter in a larger magmatic and hydrothermal context. All of the studied volcanoes present significant societal hazards to local and regional communities.

  4. Analysis of post-blasting source mechanisms of mining-induced seismic events in Rudna copper mine, Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputa, Alicja; Rudzinski, Lukasz; Talaga, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Copper ore exploitation in the Lower Silesian Copper District, Poland (LSCD), is connected with many specific hazards. The most hazardous one is induced seismicity and rockbursts which follow strong mining seismic events. One of the most effective method to reduce seismic activity is blasting in potentially hazardous mining panels. This way, small to moderate tremors are provoked and stress accumulation is substantially reduced. This work presents an analysis of post-blasting events using Full Moment Tensor (MT) inversion at the Rudna mine, Poland using signals dataset recorded on underground seismic network. We show that focal mechanisms for events that occurred after blasts exhibit common features in the MT solution. The strong isotropic and small Double Couple (DC) component of the MT, indicate that these events were provoked by detonations. On the other hand, post-blasting MT is considerably different than the MT obtained for common strong mining events. We believe that seismological analysis of provoked and unprovoked events can be a very useful tool in confirming the effectiveness of blasting in seismic hazard reduction in mining areas.

  5. Recent seismic activity of the Kivu Province, Western Rift Valley of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zana, N.; Kamba, M.; Katsongo, S.; Janssen, Th.

    1989-11-01

    The Kivu Province is located at the junction between the well-defined Ruzizi Valley to the south and the Lake Amin Trough to the north. In this zone, the Rift Valley is characterized by the highest uplift and by complex dislocations of the crust, accompanied by the most intensive volcanism of the East African Rift System. In this paper, we show the recent state of the seismic activity of this zone in connection with the seismic activity generated by the volcanoes Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira. The pattern of cumulative energy release by these volcanoes shows a steplike increase that is believed to be a precursor of volcanic eruptions.

  6. Source Characterization of the August 6, 2007 Crandall Canyon Mine Seismic Event in Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

    2008-07-01

    On August 6, 2007 a local magnitude 3.9 seismic event occurred at 08:48:40 UTC in central Utah. The epicenter is within the boundaries of the Crandall Canyon coal mine (c.f. Pechmann et al., this volume). We performed a moment tensor analysis with complete, three-component seismic recordings from stations operated by the USGS, the University of Utah, and EarthScope. The analysis method inverts the seismic records to retrieve the full seismic moment tensor, which allows for interpretation of both shearing (e.g., earthquakes) and volume-changing (e.g., explosions and collapses) seismic events. The results show that most of the recorded seismic wave energy is consistent with an underground collapse in the mine. We contrast the waveforms and moment tensor results of the Crandall Canyon Mine seismic event to a similar sized tectonic earthquake about 200 km away near Tremonton, Utah, that occurred on September 1, 2007. Our study does not address the actual cause of the mine collapse.

  7. Quantification of source uncertainties in Seismic Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (SPTHA): towards PTHA assessment for the coasts of Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva, Jacopo; Tonini, Roberto; Molinari, Irene; Tiberti, Mara M.; Romano, Fabrizio; Grezio, Anita; Melini, Daniele; Piatanesi, Alessio; Basili, Roberto; Lorito, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We propose a procedure for uncertainty quantification in Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA), with a special emphasis on the uncertainty related to statistical modelling of the earthquake source in Seismic PTHA (SPTHA), and on the separate treatment of subduction and crustal earthquakes. Differently from classical approaches that commonly adopt the hazard integral and logic tree, we use an event tree approach and ensemble modelling. The procedure was developed in the framework of the EC projects ASTARTE and STREST, of the Italian National Flagship project RITMARE, and of the agreement between Italian Civil Protection and INGV. A total of about 2 × 107 different potential seismic sources covering the entire Mediterranean Sea, and more than 1 × 105 alternative model implementations have been considered to quantify both the aleatory variability and the epistemic uncertainty. A set of hazard curves is obtained along the coasts of the entire Italian territory. They are the prototype of the first homogeneous Italian national SPTHA map.

  8. The Seismic source parameters of the 1991 Costa Rica aftershock sequence: Evidence for a transcurrent plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Guangwei; Beck, Susan L.; Wallace, Terry C.

    1993-09-01

    The April 22, 1991, Valle de la Estrella, Costa Rica earthquake (Ms=7.6) was a back-arc thrusting event associated with the underthrusting of the Caribbean plate beneath Central America. A network of three PASSCAL-type, portable instruments was deployed to monitor the aftershock activity in southern Costa Rica 2 to 6 weeks after the main shock. The waveforms recorded on three-component midperiod seismometers were used to recover source information for 15 small aftershocks (magnitudes between 3.2 and 4.4) with a linear moment tensor inversion method. We conducted several tests to investigate the effects of unknown structure and event mislocation on source parameter recovery. The longer-period waveforms, in general, are less sensitive to the effects of the structural details so that the essential source information can be successfully extracted from the waveform data. The earlier part of the seismic waveforms has proven to be the most important carrier of the source information. A gross crustal model can be used to describe the structure for the source study. The small changes in the waveform character resulting from the mislocation of the events, or inexact Green's functions generated from the oversimplified crustal model, do not prohibit us from the recovery of the source orientation at local distances. In contrast, the determination of the focal depth is subject to uncertainty because of the lack of detailed structural information. Our focal mechanisms are generally in good agreement with P wave first-motion fault plane solutions determined from a local short-period network. The aftershocks show a clear spatial segmentation based on focal mechanism type. Most aftershocks near or southeast of the main shock were thrusting events with focal mechanisms similar to the main shock. In contrast, a cluster of aftershocks northwest of the main shock showed dominantly left-lateral, strike-slip motion on a northeasterly striking nodal plane. This suggests that a diffuse

  9. Geochemical monitoring of thermal waters in Slovenia: relationships to seismic activity.

    PubMed

    Zmazek, B; Italiano, F; Zivcić, M; Vaupotic, J; Kobal, I; Martinelli, G

    2002-12-01

    Thermally anomalous fluids released in seismic areas in Slovenia were the subjects of geochemical monitoring. Thermal waters were surveyed from the seismically active area of Posocje (Bled and Zatolmin; NW Slovenia) and from Rogaska Slatina in eastern Slovenia. Continuous monitoring of geochemical parameters (radon concentration, electrical conductivity, and water temperature) was performed with discrete gas sampling for their (3)He/(4)He ratio. The observed values were correlated with meteorological parameters (rainfall, barometric pressure and air temperature) and with seismic activity. Only a few earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of the measuring sites during the monitoring period. Nevertheless, changes in radon concentration, water temperature, electrical conductivity and helium isotopic ratio were detected at the three thermal springs in the periods preceding the earthquakes. A close correlation was also observed of both water temperature and electrical conductivity with the Earth tide, making the observations in the selected sites a promising tool for addressing the widely debated question of earthquake prediction.

  10. Seismic activity response as observed in mantled howlers (Alouatta palliata), Cuero y Salado Wildlife Refuge, Honduras.

    PubMed

    Snarr, Kymberley Anne

    2005-10-01

    This report documents the response of wild mantled howlers (Alouatta palliata) to coseismic activity (seismic activity at the time of an earthquake). During field work on the north coast of Honduras, data were collected on a habituated troop of mantled howlers as they responded to coseismic activity. The seismic event occurred on 13 February 2001 at 0822 hours local time with a magnitude of Richter scale 6.6, focus depth of approximately 15 km at a distance of 341 km from the epicentre to the field site, Cuero y Salado. At the field site, based upon Jeffreys and Bullen (1988), body waves, noted as P and S waves, arrived at 60 and 87 s, respectively, with surface waves arriving approximately 103 s post-origin time of the seismic event. While there are three reports on non-human primate response to coseismic activity in the literature, they report on captive non-human primates. This is the first documented response on a non-captive troop. In addition, this report compares the intensity measure encountered by a wild troop of howlers and one captive group of orangutans as set out by the Modified Mercalli Intensity scale. The Modified Mercalli measure of intensity is one of two standard measures of seismic activity and rates what a person sees and feels at their location (Wood and Neumann 1931; Richter 1958). Thus, arboreal nonhuman primates are found to respond to coseismic activity ranging from Level IV to Level VI as based upon the modified Mercalli intensity scale.

  11. Exploiting seismic signal and noise in an intracratonic environment to constrain crustal structure and source parameters of infrequent earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Mallory K.; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Rawlinson, Nicholas; Reading, Anya M.

    2012-03-01

    In many regions of the world characterized by a relatively low rate of seismicity, the determination of local and regional seismic source parameters is often restricted to an analysis of the first onsets of P waves (or first motion analysis) due to incomplete information about Earth structure and the small size of the events. When rare large earthquakes occur in these regions, their waveforms can be used to model Earth structure. This, however, makes the nature of the earthquake source determination problem circular, as source information is mapped as structure. Presented here is one possible remedy to this situation, where through a two-step approach we first constrain Earth structure using data independent of the earthquake of interest. In this study, we focus on a region in Western Australia with low seismicity and minimal instrument coverage and use the CAPRA/LP temporary deployment to demonstrate that reliable structural models of the upper lithosphere can be obtained from an independent collection of teleseismic and ambient noise datasets. Apart from teleseismic receiver functions (RFs), we obtain group velocities from the cross-correlation of ambient noise and phase velocities from the traditional two-station method using carefully selected teleseismic earthquakes and station pairs. Crustal models are then developed through the joint inversion of dispersion data and RFs, and structural Green's functions are computed from a layered composite model. In the second step of this comprehensive approach, we apply full waveform inversion (three-component body and surface waves) to the 2007 ML= 5.3 Shark Bay, Western Australia, earthquake to estimate its source parameters (seismic moment, focal mechanism, and depth). We conclude that the full waveform inversion analysis provides constraints on the orientation of fault planes superior to a first motion interpretation.

  12. Anthropogenically-Induced Superficial Seismic Activity Modulated By Slow-Slip Events in Guerrero, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, W.; Shapiro, N.; Husker, A. L.; Kostoglodov, V.; Campillo, M.

    2014-12-01

    We use the data of the MASE seismic experiment operated during 2.5 years in Guerrero, Mexico to create a large catalog of seismic multiplets. This catalog is dominated by families of Low-Frequency Earthquakes (LFE) occurring in vicinity of the main subduction interface. In addition to more than one thousand LFE families, we detected nine repeating seismic event families that are located in the upper crust and are anthropogenically induced (AI) by mining blasts. Analysis of the recurrence of these AI events in time shows that their activity significantly increases during the strong Slow-Slip Event (SSE) in 2006. Modeled static stress perturbations induced by the SSE at the surface are ~5 kPa that is on the same order of magnitude as dynamic stress perturbations observed to trigger other low stress drop phenomena, such as tectonic tremor. We propose therefore that strong SSEs in Guerrero impose an extensional regime throughout the continental crust, modifying the stress field near the surface and increasing AI activity. This modulation of the recurrence of the crustal seismic events by the SSE-induced stress might be related to another recent observation: the SSE-induced reduction of seismic velocities linked to nonlinear elastic effects caused by opening of cracks (Rivet et al., 2011, 2014).

  13. Properties of seismic noise at the Virgo site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; Amico, P.; Arnaud, N.; Babusci, D.; Barillé, R.; Barone, F.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Beauville, F.; Bizouard, M. A.; Boccara, C.; Bondu, F.; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Bracci, L.; Braccini, S.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Brocco, L.; Buskulic, D.; Calamai, G.; Calloni, E.; Campagna, E.; Cavalier, F.; Cella, G.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cleva, F.; Cokelaer, T.; Corda, C.; Coulon, J. P.; Cuoco, E.; Dattilo, V.; Davier, M.; De Rosa, R.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dujardin, B.; Eleuteri, A.; Enard, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J. D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gennai, A.; Giazotto, A.; Giordano, G.; Guidi, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heusse, P.; Holloway, L.; Kreckelbergh, S.; La Penna, P.; Loriette, V.; Loupias, M.; Losurdo, G.; Mackowski, J. M.; Majorana, E.; Man, C. N.; Marion, F.; Martelli, F.; Masserot, A.; Massonnet, L.; Mazzoni, M.; Milano, L.; Moreau, J.; Moreau, F.; Morgado, N.; Mornet, F.; Mours, B.; Pacheco, J.; Pai, A.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Perniola, B.; Pinard, L.; Poggiani, R.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Qipiani, K.; Ramonet, J.; Rapagnani, P.; Reita, V.; Remillieux, A.; Ricci, F.; Ricciardi, I.; Russo, G.; Solimeno, S.; Stanga, R.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Trinquet, H.; Varvella, M.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Veziant, O.; Viceré, A.; Vinet, J. Y.; Vocca, H.; Yvert, M.

    2004-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the major low-frequency sources of seismic activity at the Virgo site. These sources are of natural and human origin: oceanic microseism (below 1 Hz), local traffic and human activity on site (below 10 Hz). Using data collected during the commissioning of the central Virgo interferometer (CITF) we have measured the seismic coupling to the interferometer, demonstrating that seismic noise contributed to the CITF dark fringe noise only below approximately 2 Hz.

  14. Variations of terrestrial geomagnetic activity correlated to M6+ global seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    From the surface of the Sun, as a result of a solar flare, are expelled a coronal mass (CME or Coronal Mass Ejection) that can be observed from the Earth through a coronagraph in white light. This ejected material can be compared to an electrically charged cloud (plasma) mainly composed of electrons, protons and other small quantities of heavier elements such as helium, oxygen and iron that run radially from the Sun along the lines of the solar magnetic field and pushing into interplanetary space. Sometimes the CME able to reach the Earth causing major disruptions of its magnetosphere: mashed in the region illuminated by the Sun and expanding in the region not illuminated. This interaction creates extensive disruption of the Earth's geomagnetic field that can be detected by a radio receiver tuned to the ELF band (Extreme Low Frequency 0-30 Hz). The Radio Emissions Project (scientific research project founded in February 2009 by Gabriele Cataldi and Daniele Cataldi), analyzing the change in the Earth's geomagnetic field through an induction magnetometer tuned between 0.001 and 5 Hz (bandwidth in which possible to observe the geomagnetic pulsations) was able to detect the existence of a close relationship between this geomagnetic perturbations and the global seismic activity M6+. During the arrival of the CME on Earth, in the Earth's geomagnetic field are generated sudden and intensive emissions that have a bandwidth including between 0 and 15 Hz, an average duration of 2-8 hours, that preceding of 0-12 hours M6+ earthquakes. Between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012, all M6+ earthquakes recorded on a global scale were preceded by this type of signals which, due to their characteristics, have been called "Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors" (S.G.P.). The main feature of Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors is represented by the close relationship that they have with the solar activity. In fact, because the S.G.P. are geomagnetic emissions, their temporal modulation depends

  15. Gamma source for active interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Barletta, William A.

    2009-09-29

    A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

  16. Gamma source for active interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Barletta, William A.

    2012-10-02

    A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

  17. Seismic surveys negatively affect humpback whale singing activity off northern Angola.

    PubMed

    Cerchio, Salvatore; Strindberg, Samantha; Collins, Tim; Bennett, Chanda; Rosenbaum, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring was used to document the presence of singing humpback whales off the coast of Northern Angola, and opportunistically test for the effect of seismic survey activity in the vicinity on the number of singing whales. Two Marine Autonomous Recording Units (MARUs) were deployed between March and December 2008 in the offshore environment. Song was first heard in mid June and continued through the remaining duration of the study. Seismic survey activity was heard regularly during two separate periods, consistently throughout July and intermittently in mid-October/November. Numbers of singers were counted during the first ten minutes of every hour for the period from 24 May to 1 December, and Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs) were used to assess the effect of survey day (seasonality), hour (diel variation), moon phase and received levels of seismic survey pulses (measured from a single pulse during each ten-minute sampled period) on singer number. Application of GAMMs indicated significant seasonal variation, which was the most pronounced effect when assessing the full dataset across the entire season (p<0.001); however seasonality almost entirely dropped out of top-ranked models when applied to a reduced dataset during the July period of seismic survey activity. Diel variation was significant in both the full and reduced datasets (from p<0.01 to p<0.05) and often included in the top-ranked models. The number of singers significantly decreased with increasing received level of seismic survey pulses (from p<0.01 to p<0.05); this explanatory variable was included among the top ranked models for one MARU in the full dataset and both MARUs in the reduced dataset. This suggests that the breeding display of humpback whales is disrupted by seismic survey activity, and thus merits further attention and study, and potentially conservation action in the case of sensitive breeding populations.

  18. Seismic hydraulic fracture migration originated by successive deep magma pulses: The 2011-2013 seismic series associated to the volcanic activity of El Hierro Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Moreno, A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; De Angelis, S.; García-Yeguas, A.; Prudencio, J.; Morales, J.; Tuvè, T.; García, L.

    2015-11-01

    In this manuscript we present a new interpretation of the seismic series that accompanied eruptive activity off the coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands, during 2011-2013. We estimated temporal variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value throughout the period of analysis, and performed high-precision relocations of the preeruptive and syneruptive seismicity using a realistic 3-D velocity model. Our results suggest that eruptive activity and the accompanying seismicity were caused by repeated injections of magma from the mantle into the lower crust. These magma pulses occurred within a small and well-defined volume resulting in the emplacement of fresh magma along the crust-mantle boundary underneath El Hierro. We analyzed the distribution of earthquake hypocenters in time and space in order to assess seismic diffusivity in the lower crust. Our results suggest that very high earthquake rates underneath El Hierro represent the response of a stable lower crust to stress perturbations with pulsatory character, linked to the injection of magma from the mantle. Magma input from depth caused large stress perturbations to propagate into the lower crust generating energetic seismic swarms. The absence of any preferential alignment in the spatial pattern of seismicity reinforces our hypothesis that stress perturbation and related seismicity, had diffusive character. We conclude that the temporal and spatial evolution of seismicity was neither tracking the path of magma migration nor it defines the boundaries of magma storage volumes such as a midcrustal sill. Our conceptual model considers pulsatory magma injection from the upper mantle and its propagation along the Moho. We suggest, within this framework, that the spatial and temporal distributions of earthquake hypocenters reflect hydraulic fracturing processes associated with stress propagation due to magma movement.

  19. Investigation of model based beamforming and Bayesian inversion signal processing methods for seismic localization of underground sources.

    PubMed

    Oh, Geok Lian; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-08-01

    Techniques have been studied for the localization of an underground source with seismic interrogation signals. Much of the work has involved defining either a P-wave acoustic model or a dispersive surface wave model to the received signal and applying the time-delay processing technique and frequency-wavenumber processing to determine the location of the underground tunnel. Considering the case of determining the location of an underground tunnel, this paper proposed two physical models, the acoustic approximation ray tracing model and the finite difference time domain three-dimensional (3D) elastic wave model to represent the received seismic signal. Two localization algorithms, beamforming and Bayesian inversion, are developed for each physical model. The beam-forming algorithms implemented are the modified time-and-delay beamformer and the F-K beamformer. Inversion is posed as an optimization problem to estimate the unknown position variable using the described physical forward models. The proposed four methodologies are demonstrated and compared using seismic signals recorded by geophones set up on ground surface generated by a surface seismic excitation. The examples show that for field data, inversion for localization is most advantageous when the forward model completely describe all the elastic wave components as is the case of the FDTD 3D elastic model.

  20. Active Seismicity and Tectonics in Central Asia from Seismological Data Recorded in the Pamir and Tien Shan Mountain Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian; Schurr, Bernd; Schneider, Felix M.; Yuan, Xiaohui; Mechie, James; Minaev, Vladislav; Abdybachaev, Ulan A.; Gadoev, Mustafo; Oimahmadov, Ilhomjon

    2010-05-01

    installation of 40 seismic stations, 30 in Tajikistan and 10 in Kyrgyzstan, for a total time of two years starting summer 2008. In 2009, the configuration of the stations was changed from a 24-station North-South profile plus 16 additional stations distributed throughout the Pamirs to a 40-station 2D setup evenly covering the whole study region. Moreover, the first half of the data was retrieved, for which we will present preliminary results. The high density of seismic stations allows precise location of earthquake hypocenters and determination of source mechanisms for selected events. So far we detected some 10,000 events, a significant proportion of which are related to aftershocks of a Mw 6.6 earthquake that occurred in October 2008 in the border triangle of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and China, directly beneath one of our stations. The hypocenter distribution of a selection of detected events provides a good indication on active faults in the region, thus enabling us to interpret ongoing tectonic activity. We will also present seismicity cross-sections through interesting subparts of the study region that will shed a new light on the complex geometry of mantle deformation.

  1. Tomographic image of a seismically active volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Pitt, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP/VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California, using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (5.1 × 109 to 5.9 × 1010m3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ∼2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α = 1.6 × 10−3 to 7.9 × 10−3 (crack-like pores) and mean gas volume fraction ϕ = 8.1 × 10−4 to 3.4 × 10−3. The pore density parameter κ = 3ϕ/(4πα) = na3=0.11, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to be 4.6 × 109 to 1.9 × 1011 kg. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 500 tons day−1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ∼25–1040 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  2. Tomographic Image of a Seismically Active Volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P. B.; Chouet, B. A.; Pitt, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP /VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (˜50 km3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ˜2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is primarily due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate-spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α ˜8 x 10-4 (crack-like pores) and gas volume fraction φ ˜4 x 10-4. The pore density parameter κ = 3φ / (4πα) = na3 = 0.12, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to range up to ˜1.6 x 1010 kg if the pores exclusively contain CO2, although he presence of an aqueous phase may lower this estimate by up to one order of magnitude. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 5 x 105 kg day-1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ˜8 to ˜90 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  3. Tomographic image of a seismically active volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip; Chouet, Bernard; Pitt, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP/VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California, using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (5.1 × 109 to 5.9 × 1010m3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ˜2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α = 1.6 × 10-3 to 7.9 × 10-3 (crack-like pores) and mean gas volume fraction ϕ = 8.1 × 10-4 to 3.4 × 10-3. The pore density parameter κ = 3ϕ/(4πα) = na3=0.11, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to be 4.6 × 109 to 1.9 × 1011 kg. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 500 tons day-1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ˜25-1040 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  4. Probabilistic seismic hazard at Mt. Etna (Italy): The contribution of local fault activity in mid-term assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzaro, R.; D'Amico, S.; Peruzza, L.; Tuvè, T.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we tackle the problem of seismic hazard at Etna deriving from the recurrent seismogenic activity of local faults, by adopting two independent methods based on probabilistic approaches. We assess the hazard in terms of macroseismic intensity and represent the occurrence probability calculated for different exposure times both on maps and at fault scale. Seismic hazard maps obtained by applying the "site approach" through the SASHA code and a new probabilistic attenuation model, indicate the eastern flank of the volcano as the most hazardous, with expected intensity (Iexp) in 50 years (i.e. the standard exposure time adopted in the seismic regulations) ranging from degrees IX to X EMS. In shorter exposure periods (20, 10, 5 years), values of Iexp up to IX are also reached in the same area, but they are clearly determined by the earthquakes generated by the Timpe fault system. In order to quantify the contribution of local seismogenic sources to the hazard of the region, we reconstruct the seismic history of each fault and calculate with SASHA the probability that earthquakes of a given intensity may be generated in different exposure times. Results confirm the high level of hazard due to the S. Tecla, Moscarello and Fiandaca faults especially for earthquakes of moderate intensity, i.e. VI ≤ I0 ≤ VII, with probabilities respectively exceeding 50% and 20% in 10 years, and 30% and 10% in 5 years. Occurrence probability of major events (I0 ≥ VIII) at the fault scale has also been investigated by statistics on intertimes. Under stationary assumptions we obtain a probability of 6.8% in 5 years for each structure; by introducing the time-dependency (time elapsed since the last event occurred on each fault) through a BPT model, we identify the Moscarello and S. Tecla faults as the most probable sources to be activated in the next 5 years (2013-2017). This result may represent a useful indication to establish priority criteria for actions aimed at reducing

  5. Estimation of aquifer dimensions from passive seismic signals in the presence of material and source uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lähivaara, T.; Dudley Ward, N. F.; Huttunen, T.; Rawlinson, Z.; Kaipio, J. P.

    2015-03-01

    Small magnitude seismic activity has recently been considered for the assessment of aquifer properties and state. Since the aquifers are modelled as poroelastic, the computational resources needed to simulate the related wave propagation accurately can prove to be impracticable for field studies. Furthermore, the related parameter estimation problem poses significantly higher requirements. In this paper, we investigate model reduction and the Bayesian approximation error (BAE) approach under additional model uncertainties, and establish its feasibility for the estimation of aquifer geometry. The main model approximation is the use of an elastic model in lieu of a poroelastic model. However, the use of an elastic model alone results in a posterior distribution that does not capture the actual parameters. We use the BAE to recover from the model errors. The main uncertainties on which we focus here are related to the unknown material properties and the earthquake itself, including the location and moments. In this feasibility study, we show that the overall approach is able to provide posterior models that capture the actual parameters.

  6. Seismic Response Control Of Structures Using Semi-Active and Passive Variable Stiffness Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Mohamed M. A.

    Controllable devices such as Magneto-Rheological Fluid Dampers, Electro-Rheological Dampers, and controllable friction devices have been studied extensively with limited implementation in real structures. Such devices have shown great potential in reducing seismic demands, either as smart base isolation systems, or as smart devices for multistory structures. Although variable stiffness devices can be used for seismic control of structures, the vast majority of research effort has been given to the control of damping. The primary focus of this dissertation is to evaluate the seismic control of structures using semi-active and passive variable stiffness characteristics. Smart base isolation systems employing variable stiffness devices have been studied, and two semi-active control strategies are proposed. The control algorithms were designed to reduce the superstructure and base accelerations of seismically isolated structures subject to near-fault and far-field ground motions. Computational simulations of the proposed control algorithms on the benchmark structure have shown that excessive base displacements associated with the near-fault ground motions may be better mitigated with the use of variable stiffness devices. However, the device properties must be controllable to produce a wide range of stiffness changes for an effective control of the base displacements. The potential of controllable stiffness devices in limiting the base displacement due to near-fault excitation without compromising the performance of conventionally isolated structures, is illustrated. The application of passive variable stiffness devices for seismic response mitigation of multistory structures is also investigated. A stiffening bracing system (SBS) is proposed to replace the conventional bracing systems of braced frames. An optimization process for the SBS parameters has been developed. The main objective of the design process is to maintain a uniform inter-story drift angle over the

  7. Evaluating the Relationship Between Seismicity and Subsurface Well Activity in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, L. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between seismicity and subsurface well activity is crucial to evaluating the seismic hazard of transient, non-tectonic seismicity. Several studies have demonstrated correlations between increased frequency of earthquake occurrence and the injection/production of fluids (e.g. oil, water) in nearby subsurface wells in intracontinental settings (e.g. Arkansas, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas). Here, we evaluate all earthquake magnitudes for the past 20-30 years across the diverse seismotectonic settings of Utah. We explore earthquakes within 5 km and subsequent to completion dates of oil and gas wells. We compare seismicity rates prior to well establishment with rates after well establishment in an attempt to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic earthquakes in areas of naturally high background seismicity. In a few central Utah locations, we find that the frequency of shallow (0-10 km) earthquakes increased subsequent to completion of gas wells within 5 km, and at depths broadly similar to bottom hole depths. However, these regions typically correspond to mining regions of the Wasatch Plateau, complicating our ability to distinguish between earthquakes related to either well activity or mining. We calculate earthquake density and well density and compare their ratio (earthquakes per area/wells per area) with several published metrics of seismotectonic setting. Areas with a higher earthquake-well ratio are located in relatively high strain regions (determined from GPS) associated with the Intermountain Seismic Belt, but cannot be attributed to any specific Quaternary-active fault. Additionally, higher ratio areas do not appear to coincide with anomalously high heat flow values, where rocks are typically thermally weakened. Incorporation of timing and volume data for well injection/production would allow for more robust temporal statistical analysis and hazard analysis.

  8. A previously unreported type of seismic source in the firn layer of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, Amanda C.; Barcheck, C. Grace; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar

    2015-11-01

    We identify a unique type of seismic source in the uppermost part of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet recorded by temporary broadband seismic arrays in East Antarctica. These sources, termed "firnquakes," are characterized by dispersed surface wave trains with frequencies of 1-10 Hz detectable at distances up to 1000 km. Events show strong dispersed Rayleigh wave trains and an absence of observable body wave arrivals; most events also show weaker Love waves. Initial events were discovered by standard detection schemes; additional events were then detected with a correlation scanner using the initial arrivals as templates. We locate sources by determining the L2 misfit for a grid of potential source locations using Rayleigh wave arrival times and polarization directions. We then perform a multiple-filter analysis to calculate the Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion and invert the group velocity for shear velocity structure. The resulting velocity structure is used as an input model to calculate synthetic seismograms. Inverting the dispersion curves yields ice velocity structures consistent with a low-velocity firn layer ~100 m thick and show that velocity structure is laterally variable. The absence of observable body wave phases and the relative amplitudes of Rayleigh waves and noise constrain the source depth to be less than 20 m. The presence of Love waves for most events suggests the source is not isotropic. We propose the events are linked to the formation of small crevasses in the firn, and several events correlate with shallow crevasse fields mapped in satellite imagery.

  9. Investigation of Seismic Waves from Non-Natural Sources: A Case Study for Building Collapse and Surface Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houng, S.; Hong, T.

    2013-12-01

    The nature and excitation mechanism of incidents or non-natural events have been widely investigated using seismological techniques. With introduction of dense seismic networks, small-sized non-natural events such as building collapse and chemical explosions are well recorded. Two representative non-natural seismic sources are investigated. A 5-story building in South Korea, Sampoong department store, was collapsed in June 25, 1995, causing casualty of 1445. This accident is known to be the second deadliest non-terror-related building collapse in the world. The event was well recorded by a local station in ~ 9 km away. P and S waves were recorded weak, while monotonic Rayleigh waves were observed well. The origin time is determined using surface-wave arrival time. The magnitude of event is determined to be 1.2, which coincides with a theoretical estimate based on the mass and volume of building. Synthetic waveforms are modeled for various combinations of velocity structures and source time functions, which allow us to constrain the process of building collapse. It appears that the building was collapsed once within a couple of seconds. We also investigate a M2.1 chemical explosion at a fertilizer plant in Texas on April 18, 2013. It was reported that more than one hundred people were dead or injured by the explosion. Seismic waveforms for nearby stations are collected from Incorporated Research Institution of Seismology (IRIS). The event was well recorded at stations in ~500 km away from the source. Strong acoustic signals were observed at stations in a certain great-circle direction. This observation suggests preferential propagation of acoustic waves depending on atmospheric environment. Waveform cross-correlation, spectral analysis and waveform modeling are applied to understand the source physics. We discuss the nature of source and source excitation mechanism.

  10. Introduction of uncertainty of Green's function into waveform inversion for seismic source processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Yuji; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2011-08-01

    In principle, we can never know the true Green's function, which is a major error source in seismic waveform inversion. So far, many studies have devoted their efforts to obtain a Green's function as precise as possible. In this study, we propose a new strategy to cope with this problem. That is to say, we introduce uncertainty of Green's function into waveform inversion analyses. Due to the propagation law of errors, the uncertainty of Green's function results in a data covariance matrix with significant off-diagonal components, which naturally reduce the weight of observed data in later phases. Because the data covariance matrix depends on the model parameters that express slip distribution, the inverse problem to be solved becomes non-linear. Applying the developed inverse method to the teleseismic P-wave data of the 2006 Java, Indonesia, tsunami earthquake, we obtained a reasonable slip-rate distribution and moment-rate function without the non-negative slip constraint. The solution was independent of the initial values of the model parameters. If we neglect the modelling errors due to Green's function as in the conventional formulation, the total slip distribution is much rougher with significant opposite slip components, whereas the moment-rate function is much smoother. If we use a stronger smoothing constraint, more plausible slip distribution can be obtained, but then the moment-rate function becomes even smoother. By comparing the observed waveforms with the synthetic waveforms, we found that high-frequency components were well reproduced only by the new formulation. The modelling errors are essentially impor