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Sample records for active seismic zone

  1. Structure and seismic activity of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, M.; Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Laigle, M.; Ruiz Fernandez, M.; Kopp, H.; Hirn, A.; Flueh, E. R.; Thales Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Several active and passive seismic experiments conducted in 2007 in the framework of the European program "Thales Was Right" and of the French ANR program "Subsismanti" provided a unique set of geophysical data highlighting the deep structure of the central part of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, offshore Dominica and Martinique, and its seismic activity during a period of 8 months. The region is characterized by a relatively low rate of seismicity that is often attributed to the slow (2 cm/yr) subduction of the old, 90 My, Atlantic lithosphere beneath the Caribbean Plate. Based on tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic data, the forearc can clearly be divided into an inner forearc, characterised by a high vertical velocity gradient in the igneous crust, and an outer forearc with lower crustal velocity gradient. The thick, high velocity, inner forearc is possibly the extension at depth of the Mesozoic Caribbean crust outcropping in La Désirade Island. The outer forearc, up to 70 km wide in the northern part of the study area, is getting narrower to the south and disappears offshore Martinique. Based on its seismic velocity structure with velocities higher than 6 km/s the backstop consists, at least partly, of magmatic rocks. The outer forearc is also highly deformed and faulted within the subducting trend of the Tiburon Ridge. With respect to the inner forearc velocity structure the outer forearc basement could either correspond to an accreted oceanic terrane or made of highly fractured rocks. The inner forearc is a dense, poorly deformable crustal block, tilted southward as a whole. It acts as a rigid buttress increasing the strain within both the overriding and subducting plates. This appears clearly in the current local seismicity affecting the subducting and the overriding plates that is located beneath the inner forearc. We detected earthquakes beneath the Caribbean forearc and in the Atlantic oceanic plate as well. The main seismic activity is

  2. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP): Active Rift Processes in the Brawley Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lazaro-Mancilla, O.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), funded by NSF and USGS, acquired seismic data in and across the Salton Trough in southern California and northern Mexico in March 2011. The project addresses both rifting processes at the northern end of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. Seven lines of onshore refraction and low-fold reflection data were acquired in the Coachella, Imperial, and Mexicali Valleys, two lines and a grid of airgun and OBS data were acquired in the Salton Sea, and onshore-offshore data were recorded. Almost 2800 land seismometers and 50 OBS's were used in almost 5000 deployments at almost 4300 sites, in spacing as dense as 100 m. These instruments received seismic signals from 126 explosive shots up to 1400 kg and over 2300 airgun shots. In the central Salton Trough, North American lithosphere appears to have been rifted completely apart. Based primarily on a 1979 seismic refraction project, the 20-22 km thick crust is apparently composed entirely of new crust added by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. Active rifting of this new crust is manifested by shallow (<10km depth) seismicity in the oblique Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ), small Salton Buttes volcanoes aligned perpendicular to the transform faults, very high heat flow (~140 mW/m2), and geothermal energy production. This presentation is focused on an onshore-offshore line of densely sampled refraction and low-fold reflection data that crosses the Brawley Seismic Zone and Salton Buttes in the direction of plate motion. At the time of abstract submission, data analysis was very preliminary, consisting of first-arrival tomography of the onshore half of the line for upper crustal seismic velocity. Crystalline basement (>5 km/s), comprised of late-Pliocene to Quaternary sediment metamorphosed by the high heat flow, occurs at ~2 km depth beneath the Salton Buttes and geothermal field and ~4 km

  3. Delineation of Active Basement Faults in the Eastern Tennessee and Charlevoix Intraplate Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.; Langston, C. A.; Cooley, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recognition of distinct, seismogenic basement faults within the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ) is now possible using local earthquake tomography and datasets containing a sufficiently large number of earthquakes. Unlike the New Madrid seismic zone where seismicity clearly defines active fault segments, earthquake activity in the ETSZ and CSZ appears diffuse. New arrival time inversions for hypocenter relocations and 3-D velocity variations using datasets in excess of 1000 earthquakes suggest the presence of distinct basement faults in both seismic zones. In the ETSZ, relocated hypocenters align in near-vertical segments trending NE-SW, parallel to the long dimension of the seismic zone. Earthquakes in the most seismogenic portion of the ETSZ delineate another set of near-vertical faults trending roughly E-ESE. These apparent trends and steep dips are compatible with ETSZ focal mechanism solutions. The solutions are remarkably consistent and indicate strike-slip motion along the entire length of the seismic zone. Relocated hypocenter clusters in the CSZ define planes that trend and dip in directions that are compatible with known Iapitan rift faults. Seismicity defining the planes becomes disrupted where the rift faults encounter a major zone of deformation produced by a Devonian meteor impact. We will perform a joint statistical analysis of hypocenter alignments and focal mechanism nodal plane orientations in the ETSZ and the CSZ to determine the spatial orientations of dominant seismogenic basement faults. Quantifying the locations and dimensions of active basement faults will be important for seismic hazard assessment and for models addressing the driving mechanisms for these intraplate zones.

  4. New Madrid Seismic Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NEW MADRID SEISMIC ZONE BY COLONEL J.DAVID NORWOOD United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...mCTBB l USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT New Madrid Seismic Zone by J. David Norwood, COL, USA Michael A. Pearson, COL, USA Project Advisor The...ABSTRACT AUTHOR: J. David Norwood, Colonel, U.S. Army TITLE: New Madrid Seismic Zone FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 22 April 1998 . PAGES:

  5. Seismic evidence for active underplating below the megathrust earthquake zone in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hisanori; Takeda, Tetsuya; Obara, Kazushige; Kasahara, Keiji

    2010-07-09

    Determining the structure of subduction zones is important for understanding mechanisms for the generation of interplate phenomena such as megathrust earthquakes. The peeling off of the uppermost part of a subducting slab and accretion to the bottom of an overlying plate (underplating) at deep regions has been inferred from exhumed metamorphic rocks and deep seismic imaging, but direct seismic evidence of this process is lacking. By comparing seismic reflection profiles with microearthquake distributions in central Japan, we show that repeating microearthquakes occur along the bottom interface of the layer peeling off from the subducting Philippine Sea plate. This region coincides with the location of slow-slip events that may serve as signals for monitoring active underplating.

  6. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  7. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. John; Denny, F. Brett; Follmer, Leon R.; Masters, John M.

    1999-05-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  8. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  9. Structure of the active rift zone and margins of the northern Imperial Valley from Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livers, A.; Han, L.; Delph, J. R.; White-Gaynor, A. L.; Petit, R.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    First-arrival refraction data were used to create a seismic velocity model of the upper crust across the actively rifting northern Imperial Valley and its margins. The densely sampled seismic refraction data were acquired by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) , which is investigating rift processes in the northern-most rift segment of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. A 95-km long seismic line was acquired across the northern Imperial Valley, through the Salton Sea geothermal field, parallel to the five Salton Butte volcanoes and perpendicular to the Brawley Seismic Zone and major strike-slip faults. Nineteen explosive shots were recorded with 100 m seismometer spacing across the valley and with 300-500 m spacing into the adjacent ranges. First-arrival travel times were picked from shot gathers along this line and a seismic velocity model was produced using tomographic inversion. Sedimentary basement and seismic basement in the valley are interpreted to be sediment metamorphosed by the very high heat flow. The velocity model shows that this basement to the west of the Brawley Seismic Zone is at ~4-km depth. The basement shallows to ~2-km depth in the active geothermal field and Salton Buttes volcanic field which locally coincide with the Brawley Seismic Zone. At the eastern edge of the geothermal field, the basement drops off again to ~3.5-km depth. The eastern edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the along-strike extension of the Sand Hills Fault, an inactive strike-slip fault. The seismic velocities to the east of the fault correspond to metamorphic rock of the Chocolate Mountains, different from the metamorphosed basement in the valley. The western edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the active Superstition Hills Fault. To the west of the valley, >4-km deep valley basement extends to the active Superstition Hills Fault. Basement then shallows

  10. New features revealed by multi-method seismic imaging of the seismic structure and activity of the Lesser Antilles and Hellenic subduction zones, and their comparison with Tohoku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, A.; Laigle, M.; Sachpazi, M.; Charvis, P.; Flueh, E. R.; Becel, A.; Diaz, J.; Gesret, A.; Galvé, A.; Sapin, M.; Charalampakis, M.; Lebrun, J.; Evain, M.; Ruiz, M.; Kopp, H.; Hello, Y.; Gallart, J.; Kissling, E. H.; Nicolich, R.; Raffaele, R.

    2012-12-01

    The densely populated two subduction zones on the European Union territory, in the western Hellenic and the Lesser Antilles regions have been currently considered as having a low seismic coupling, that is aseismic from the point of view of megathrust earthquakes which have been commonly unexpected there. The occurrence of the 2004 megathrust event in Sumatra, also unexpected, prompted support to our research projects submitted before. The unexpected occurrence of the Tohoku 2011 event since, provides terms of comparison for our results. We applied to both subduction zones specific approaches to the seismic structure and activity by a cluster of active and passive offshore-onshore seismic experiments with Research Vessels, OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometers) and land seismometer arrays and funding from several countries, coordinated within the "Thales was right" proposal to the European Union action (see also Laigle et al. in session T02, and Sachpazi et al. in the present session). Each of the two studies allows comparing different seismic methods, in their resolution-penetration, and building on their joint use: i) MCS multichannel reflection seismics, ii) OBS and offshore-onshore refraction seismics and shot tomography, iii) Teleseismic converted waves imaging of deep and steep interfaces (e.g. RF, receiver-function), iv) local earthquakes high-resolution location by OBS and land arrays, v) search for non-volcanic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes. A number of features revealed in spite of the much lower level of current seismic activity share a similarity with those originally interpreted in the frame of a largely aseismic subduction zone in Tohoku, for which the occurrence of the 2011 event imposed another view. Such features are: i) the extent of the crust on crust subduction thrust, proxy to the downdip extent of the seismogenic, could be identified and mapped much landward than commonly considered, ii) furthermore, the Tohoku rupture showed the seismogenic

  11. Discrimination and Assessment of Induced Seismicity in Active Tectonic Zones: A Case Study from Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, C. E.; Lindsey, N.; Foxall, W.; Robertson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes induced by human activity have become a matter of heightened public concern during recent years. Of particular concern is seismicity associated with wastewater injection, which has included events having magnitudes greater than 5. The causes of the induced events are primarily changes in pore-pressure, fluid volume and perhaps temperature due to injection. Recent research in the US has focused on mid-continental regions having low rates of naturally-occurring seismicity, where induced events can be identified by relatively straightforward spatial and temporal correlation of seismicity with high-volume injection activities. Recent examples include events correlated with injection of wastewater in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas and Ohio, and long-term brine injection in the Paradox Valley in Colorado. Even in some of the cases where there appears at first sight to be a clear spatial correlation between seismicity and injection, it has been difficult to establish causality definitively. Here, we discuss methods to identify induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. We concentrate our study on Southern California, where large numbers of wastewater injection wells are located in oil-producing basins that experience moderate to high rates of naturally-occurring seismicity. Using the catalog of high-precision CISN relocations produced by Hauksson et al. (BSSA, 2012), we aim to discriminate induced from natural events based on spatio-temporal patterns of seismicity occurrence characteristics and their relationships to injection activities, known active faults and other faults favorably oriented for slip under the tectonic stress field. Since the vast majority of induced earthquakes are very small, it is crucial to include all events above the detection threshold of the CISN in each area studied. In addition to exploring the correlation of seismicity to injection activities in time and space, we analyze variations in frequency-magnitude distributions, which can

  12. Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data

    SciTech Connect

    SGP-TR-150-16

    1995-01-26

    Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems is of a vital importance to plan geothermal production and injection drilling, since an active fault zone often acts as a fracture-extensive low-velocity wave guide to seismic waves. We have located an active fault zone in the Coso geothermal field, California, by identifying and analyzing a fault-zone trapped Rayleigh-type guided wave from microearthquake data. The wavelet transform is employed to characterize guided-wave's velocity-frequency dispersion, and numerical methods are used to simulate the guided-wave propagation. The modeling calculation suggests that the fault zone is {approx} 200m wide, and has a P wave velocity of 4.80 km/s and a S wave velocity of 3.00 km/s, which is sandwiched between two half spaces with relatively higher velocities (P wave velocity 5.60 km/s, and S wave velocity 3.20 km/s). zones having vertical or nearly vertical dipping fault planes.

  13. Physical modeling of the formation and evolution of seismically active fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponomarev, A.V.; Zavyalov, A.D.; Smirnov, V.B.; Lockner, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) in rocks is studied as a model of natural seismicity. A special technique for rock loading has been used to help study the processes that control the development of AE during brittle deformation. This technique allows us to extend to hours fault growth which would normally occur very rapidly. In this way, the period of most intense interaction of acoustic events can be studied in detail. Characteristics of the acoustic regime (AR) include the Gutenberg-Richter b-value, spatial distribution of hypocenters with characteristic fractal (correlation) dimension d, Hurst exponent H, and crack concentration parameter Pc. The fractal structure of AR changes with the onset of the drop in differential stress during sample deformation. The change results from the active interaction of microcracks. This transition of the spatial distribution of AE hypocenters is accompanied by a corresponding change in the temporal correlation of events and in the distribution of event amplitudes as signified by a decrease of b-value. The characteristic structure that develops in the low-energy background AE is similar to the sequence of the strongest microfracture events. When the AR fractal structure develops, the variations of d and b are synchronous and d = 3b. This relation which occurs once the fractal structure is formed only holds for average values of d and b. Time variations of d and b are anticorrelated. The degree of temporal correlation of AR has time variations that are similar to d and b variations. The observed variations in laboratory AE experiments are compared with natural seismicity parameters. The close correspondence between laboratory-scale observations and naturally occurring seismicity suggests a possible new approach for understanding the evolution of complex seismicity patterns in nature. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. New Madrid seismic zone recurrence intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Schweig, E.S. Center for Earthquake Research and Information, Memphis, TN ); Ellis, M.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Frequency-magnitude relations in the New Madrid seismic zone suggest that great earthquakes should occur every 700--1,200 yrs, implying relatively high strain rates. These estimates are supported by some geological and GPS results. Recurrence intervals of this order should have produced about 50 km of strike-slip offset since Miocene time. No subsurface evidence for such large displacements is known within the seismic zone. Moreover, the irregular fault pattern forming a compressive step that one sees today is not compatible with large displacements. There are at least three possible interpretations of the observations of short recurrence intervals and high strain rates, but apparently youthful fault geometry and lack of major post-Miocene deformation. One is that the seismological and geodetic evidence are misleading. A second possibility is that activity in the region is cyclic. That is, the geological and geodetic observations that suggest relatively short recurrence intervals reflect a time of high, but geologically temporary, pore-fluid pressure. Zoback and Zoback have suggested such a model for intraplate seismicity in general. Alternatively, the New Madrid seismic zone is geologically young feature that has been active for only the last few tens of thousands of years. In support of this, observe an irregular fault geometry associated with a unstable compressive step, a series of en echelon and discontinuous lineaments that may define the position of a youthful linking fault, and the general absence of significant post-Eocene faulting or topography.

  15. Active crustal deformation of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) using GPS data: Implications in seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staller, Alejandra; Benito, Belen; Jesús Martínez-Díaz, José; Hernández, Douglas; Hernández-Rey, Román; Alonso-Henar, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    El Salvador, Central America, is part of the Chortis block in the northwestern boundary of the Caribbean plate. This block is interacting with a diffuse triple junction point with the Cocos and North American plates. Among the structures that cut the Miocene to Pleistocene volcanic deposits stands out the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ): It is oriented in N90º-100ºE direction, and it is composed of several structural segments that deform Quaternary deposits with right-lateral and oblique slip motions. The ESFZ is seismically active and capable of producing earthquakes such as the February 13, 2001 with Mw 6.6 (Martínez-Díaz et al., 2004), that seriously affected the population, leaving many casualties. This structure plays an important role in the tectonics of the Chortis block, since its motion is directly related to the drift of the Caribbean plate to the east and not with the partitioning of the deformation of the Cocos subduction (here not coupled) (Álvarez-Gómez et al., 2008). Together with the volcanic arc of El Salvador, this zone constitutes a weakness area that allows the motion of forearc block toward the NW. The geometry and the degree of activity of the ESFZ are not studied enough. However their knowledge is essential to understand the seismic hazard associated to this important seismogenic structure. For this reason, since 2007 a GPS dense network was established along the ESFZ (ZFESNet) in order to obtain GPS velocity measurements which are later used to explain the nature of strain accumulation on major faults along the ESFZ. The current work aims at understanding active crustal deformation of the ESFZ through kinematic model. The results provide significant information to be included in a new estimation of seismic hazard taking into account the major structures in ESFZ.

  16. Seismicity of the eastern Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruestle, A.; Kueperkoch, L.; Rische, M.; Meier, T.; Friederich, W.; Egelados Working Group

    2012-04-01

    The Hellenic Subduction Zone (HSZ) is the seismically most active region of Europe. The African plate is subducting beneath the Aegean lithosphere with a relative velocity of 4 cm per year. A detailed picture of the microseismicity of the eastern HSZ was obtained by the recordings of the temporary networks CYCNET (September 2002 - September 2005) and EGELADOS (October 2005 - March 2007). In total, nearly 7000 earthquakes were located with a location uncertainty of less than 20 km. The SE Aegean is dominated by (1) shallow intraplate seismicity within the Aegean plate, by (2) interplate seismicity at the plate contact and by (3) intermediate deep seismicity along the subducting African slab. Strong shallow seismicity in the upper plate is observed along the Ptolemy graben south of Crete extending towards the Karpathos Basin, indicating intense recent deformation of the forearc. In contrary, low shallow seismicity around Rhodes indicates only minor seismic crustal deformation of the upper plate. An almost NS-striking zone of microseismicity has been located, running from the Karpathos basin via the Nisyros volcanic complex towards the EW striking Gökova graben. In the SE Aegean the geometry of the Wadati-Benioff-Zone (WBZ) within the subducting African plate is revealed in detail by the observed microseismicity. Between about 50 to 100 km depth a continuous band of intermediate deep seismicity describes the strongly curved geometry of the slab. From the central to the eastern margin of the HSZ, the dip direction of the WBZ changes from N to NW with a strong increase of the dip angle beneath the eastern Cretan Sea. The margin of the dipping African slab is marked by an abrupt end of the observed WBZ beneath SW Anatolia. Below 100 km depth, the WBZ of the eastern HSZ is dominated by an isolated cluster of intense intermediate deep seismicity (at 100-180 km depth) beneath the Nisyros volcanic complex. It has an extension of about 100x80 km and is build up of 3 parallel

  17. Artificial Seismic Shadow Zone by Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Das, Mukunda P.

    2013-08-01

    We developed a new method of earthquake-proof engineering to create an artificial seismic shadow zone using acoustic metamaterials. By designing huge empty boxes with a few side-holes corresponding to the resonance frequencies of seismic waves and burying them around the buildings that we want to protect, the velocity of the seismic wave becomes imaginary. The meta-barrier composed of many meta-boxes attenuates the seismic waves, which reduces the amplitude of the wave exponentially by dissipating the seismic energy. This is a mechanical method of converting the seismic energy into sound and heat. We estimated the sound level generated from a seismic wave. This method of area protection differs from the point protection of conventional seismic design, including the traditional cloaking method. The artificial seismic shadow zone is tested by computer simulation and compared with a normal barrier.

  18. Study on Seismic Zoning of Sino-Mongolia Arc Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.

    2015-12-01

    According to the agreement of Cooperation on seismic zoning between Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration and Research Center of Astronomy and Geophysics, Mongolian Academy of Science, the data of geotectonics, active faults, seismicity and geophysical field were collected and analyzed, then field investigation proceeded for Bolnay Faults, Ar Hutul Faults and Gobi Altay Faults, and a uniform earthquake catalogue of Mongolia and North China were established for the seismic hazard study in Sino-Mongolia arc areas. Furthermore the active faults and epicenters were mapped and 2 seismic belts and their 54 potential seismic sources are determined. Based on the data and results above mentioned the seismicity parameters for the two seismic belts and their potential sources were studied. Finally, the seismic zoning with different probability in Sino-Mongolia arc areas was carried out using China probabilistic hazard analysis method. By analyzing the data and results, we draw the following main conclusions. Firstly, the origin of tectonic stress field in the study areas is the collision and pressure of the India Plate to Eurasian Plate, passing from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. This is the reason why the seismicity is higher in the west than in the east, and all of earthquakes with magnitude 8 or greater occurred in the west. Secondly, the determination of the 2 arc seismic belts, Altay seismic belt and Bolnay-Baikal seismic belt, are reasonable in terms of their geotectonic location, geodynamic origin and seismicity characteristics. Finally, there are some differences between our results and the Mongolia Intensity Zoning map published in 1985 in terms of shape of seismic zoning map, especially in the areas near Ulaanbaatar. We argue that our relsults are reasonable if we take into account the data use of recent study of active faults and their parameters, so it can be used as a reference for seismic design.

  19. Seismicity and seismotectonic study of the Kermit Seismic Zone, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, G.R.; Rogers, A.M.; Lund, R.J.; Orr, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This work presents and summarizes all data that were collected during the operation of a 12-station seismograph network in the vicinity of Kermit, Texas, during the period December 1975 to September 1979. The results of this study have several implications relating to the seismic hazard at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. First, the widespread occurrence of small earthquakes within the seismic network area suggests that additional microearthquake studies in regions closer to the WIPP site are warranted. Second, the apparent relation between hydrocarbon production and earthquake occurrence indicates that the WIPP site probably should not be included in the same seismic source region as the central basin platform because the WIPP site is isolated from the major hydrocarbon producing zones. Third, the maximum magnitude of earthquakes in the active zone may be limited, if these earthquakes are in fact induced by secondary hydrocarbon recovery operations, because the spatial extent of artificial pressure increases is limited, and increase of more than 70 bars have resulted in earthquakes with magnitudes consistently less than 4.0. 14 references.

  20. Reassessing the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Gail; Bakun, Bill; Bodin, Paul; Boore, David; Camer, Chris; Frankel, Art; Gasperini, Paulo; Gomberg, Joan; Hanks, Tom; Hermann, Bob; Hough, Susan; Johnston, Arch; Kenner, Shelley; Langston, Chuck; Linker, Mark; Mayne, Paul; Petersen, Mark; Powell, Christine; Prescott, Will; Schweig, Eugene; Segall, Paul; Stein, Seth; Stuart, Bill; Tuttle, Martitia; VanArsdale, Roy

    The central enigma of the mid-continent region in the United States known as the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ; Figure 1) involves the mechanisms that give rise to recurrent great earthquakes far from plate boundaries. Given the lack of significant topographic relief that is the hallmark of tectonic activity in most actively deforming regions, most of us feel a need to “pinch ourselves to see if we're dreaming” when confronted with evidence that, at some probability levels, the earthquake hazard throughout the NMSZ is comparable to that estimated for the San Francisco Bay region.Although assessing the hazard in the NMSZ is in many ways more challenging than in the western United States, and the uncertainties are much greater, careful scientific study has led to a consensus on the issues most critical to seismic hazard assessment.

  1. A seismic source zone model for the seismic hazard assessment of Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hók, Jozef; Kysel, Robert; Kováč, Michal; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Kristeková, Miriam; Šujan, Martin

    2016-06-01

    We present a new seismic source zone model for the seismic hazard assessment of Slovakia based on a new seismotectonic model of the territory of Slovakia and adjacent areas. The seismotectonic model has been developed using a new Slovak earthquake catalogue (SLOVEC 2011), successive division of the large-scale geological structures into tectonic regions, seismogeological domains and seismogenic structures. The main criteria for definitions of regions, domains and structures are the age of the last tectonic consolidation of geological structures, thickness of lithosphere, thickness of crust, geothermal conditions, current tectonic regime and seismic activity. The seismic source zones are presented on a 1:1,000,000 scale map.

  2. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  3. Crustal Structure Across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Initial Results From the PRIDE-SEISORZ Active-Source Seismic Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J. P.; Moffat, L.; Lizarralde, D.; Laletsang, K.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Modisi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa Rift System, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi. The SEISORZ active-source seismic component of PRIDE focused on the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana, with the main goal of imaging the crustal structure across the ORZ. This will allow us to estimate total crustal extension, determine the pattern and amount of thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrasts in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a fold belt. In November 2014 we conducted a crustal-scale, 450-km-long seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile consisting of 19 sources (shots in 30-m-deep boreholes) spaced ~25 km apart from each other, and 900 receivers (IRIS/PASSCAL "Texan" dataloggers and 4.5Hz geophones) with ~500 m spacing. From NW to SE, the profile crosses several tectonic domains: the Congo craton, the Damara metamorphic belt and the Ghanzi-Chobe fold belt where the axis of the ORZ is located, and continues into the Kalahari craton. The record sections display clear crustal refraction (Pg) and wide-angle Moho reflection (PmP) phases for all 17 of the good-quality shots, and a mantle refraction arrival (Pn), with the Pg-PmP-Pn triplication appearing at 175 km offset. There are distinct changes in the traveltime and amplitude of these phases along the transect, and on either side of the axis, that seem to correlate with sharp transitions across tectonic terrains. Initial modeling suggests: (1) the presence of a sedimentary half-graben structure at the rift axis beneath the Okavango delta, bounded to the SE by the Kunyere-Thamalakane fault system; (2) faster crustal Vp in the domains to the NW of the ORZ; and (3) thicker crust (45-50 km) at both ends of the profile within the Congo and Kalahari craton domains than at the ORZ and

  4. The New Madrid Seismic Zone: not dead yet.

    PubMed

    Page, Morgan T; Hough, Susan E

    2014-02-14

    The extent to which ongoing seismicity in intraplate regions represents long-lived aftershock activity is unclear. We examined historical and instrumental seismicity in the New Madrid central U.S. region to determine whether present-day seismicity is composed predominantly of aftershocks of the 1811-1812 earthquake sequence. High aftershock productivity is required both to match the observation of multiple mainshocks and to explain the modern level of activity as aftershocks; synthetic sequences consistent with these observations substantially overpredict the number of events of magnitude ≥ 6 that were observed in the past 200 years. Our results imply that ongoing background seismicity in the New Madrid region is driven by ongoing strain accrual processes and that, despite low deformation rates, seismic activity in the zone is not decaying with time.

  5. Deep crustal fracture zones control fluid escape and the seismic cycle in the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, Benoît; Reynard, Bruno; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Debayle, Eric; Bodin, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Seismic activity and non-volcanic tremors are often associated with fluid circulation resulting from the dehydration of subducting plates. Tremors in the overriding continental crust of several subduction zones suggest fluid circulation at shallower depths, but potential fluid pathways are still poorly documented. Using receiver function analysis in the Cascadia subduction zone, we provide evidence for a seismic discontinuity near 15 km depth in the crust of the overriding North American plate. This interface is segmented, and its interruptions are spatially correlated with conductive regions of the forearc and shallow swarms of seismicity and non-volcanic tremors. These observations suggest that fluid circulation in the overriding plate is controlled by fault zones separating blocks of accreted terranes. These zones constitute fluid escape routes that may influence the seismic cycle by releasing fluid pressure from the megathrust.

  6. Gravity of the New Madrid seismic zone; a preliminary study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    In the winter of 1811-12, three of the largest historic earthquakes in the United States occurred near New Madrid, Mo. Seismicity continues to the present day throughout a tightly clustered pattern of epicenters centered on the bootheel of Missouri, including parts of northeastern Arkansas, northwestern Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. In 1990, the New Madrid seismic zone/Central United States became the first seismically active region east of the Rocky Mountains to be designated a priority research area within the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). This Professional Paper is a collection of papers, some published separately, presenting results of the newly intensified research program in this area. Major components of this research program include tectonic framework studies, seismicity and deformation monitoring and modeling, improved seismic hazard and risk assessments, and cooperative hazard mitigation studies.

  7. Upper plate deformation and seismic barrier in front of Nazca subduction zone: The Chololo Fault System and active tectonics along the Coastal Cordillera, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Lacan, Pierre; Tavera, Hernando; Bondoux, Francis

    2008-11-01

    The South America plate boundary is one of the most active subduction zone. The recent Mw = 8.4 Arequipa 2001 earthquake ruptured the subduction plane toward the south over 400 km and stopped abruptly on the Ilo Peninsula. In this exact region, the subduction seismic crisis induced the reactivation of continental fault systems in the coastal area. We studied the main reactivated fault system that trends perpendicular to the trench by detailed mapping of fault related-geomorphic features. Also, at a longer time scale, a recurrent Quaternary transtensive tectonic activity of the CFS is expressed by offset river gullies and alluvial fans. The presence of such extensional fault systems trending orthogonal to the trench along the Coastal Cordillera in southern Peru is interpreted to reflect a strong coupling between the two plates. In this particular case, stress transfer to the upper plate, at least along the coastal fringe, appears to have induced crustal seismic events that were initiated mainly during and after the 2001 earthquake. The seafloor roughness of the subducting plate is usually thought to be a cause of segmentation along subduction zones. However, after comparing and discussing the role of inherited structures within the upper plate to the subduction zone segmentation in southern Peru, we suggest that the continental structure itself may exert some feedback control on the segmentation of the subduction zone and thus participate to define the rupture pattern of major subduction earthquakes along the southern Peru continental margin.

  8. Multiscale seismic imaging of active fault zones for hazard assessment: A case study of the Santa Monica fault zone, Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, T.L.; Dolan, J.F.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.; Templeton, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles at two different scales were acquired across the transpressional Santa Monica Fault of north Los Angeles as part of an integrated hazard assessment of the fault. The seismic data confirm the location of the fault and related shallow faulting seen in a trench to deeper structures known from regional studies. The trench shows a series of near-vertical strike-slip faults beneath a topographic scarp inferred to be caused by thrusting on the Santa Monica fault. Analysis of the disruption of soil horizons in the trench indicates multiple earthquakes have occurred on these strike-slip faults within the past 50 000 years, with the latest being 1000 to 3000 years ago. A 3.8-km-long, high-resolution seismic reflection profile shows reflector truncations that constrain the shallow portion of the Santa Monica Fault (upper 300 m) to dip northward between 30?? and 55??, most likely 30?? to 35??, in contrast to the 60?? to 70?? dip interpreted for the deeper portion of the fault. Prominent, nearly continuous reflectors on the profile are interpreted to be the erosional unconformity between the 1.2 Ma and older Pico Formation and the base of alluvial fan deposits. The unconformity lies at depths of 30-60 m north of the fault and 110-130 m south of the fault, with about 100 m of vertical displacement (180 m of dip-slip motion on a 30??-35?? dipping fault) across the fault since deposition of the upper Pico Formation. The continuity of the unconformity on the seismic profile constrains the fault to lie in a relatively narrow (50 m) zone, and to project to the surface beneath Ohio Avenue immediately south of the trench. A very high-resolution seismic profile adjacent to the trench images reflectors in the 15 to 60 m depth range that are arched slightly by folding just north of the fault. A disrupted zone on the profile beneath the south end of the trench is interpreted as being caused by the deeper portions of the trenched strike

  9. Active seismic monitoring of changes of the reflection response of a crystalline shear zone due to fluid injection in the crust at the Continental Deep Drilling Site, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilecke, T.; Kurt, B.; Stefan, B.

    2005-12-01

    In theory and in the laboratory variations of the hydraulic pressure can be detected with seismic methods: A lowering of the hydraulic pressure leads to the closure of micro-cracks within the rock (increase of the differential or effective pressure). Subsequently, the seismic velocities increase. An increase of the hydraulic pressure leads to reverse seismic effects. Consequently, seismic impedance contrasts and associated reflection amplitudes vary in the case of a propagating fluid pressure front in a rock matrix with inhomogeneous permeability - as is the case at shear zones. The largest amplitude changes can be expected with vertical ray inclination on the impedance contrast. Generally, the expected effects are small however (Kaselow, 2004). The practical utilization of active seismics for the detection of pressure changes at large scale in hard rock is currently being studied at the Continental Deep Drilling Site (KTB). The injection of water (200 l/min) in a depth of about 4000 m into the so-called SE2 shear zone in the KTB pilot hole was monitored with active seismics between May 2004 and April 2005. The core of the experiment layout is a fixed 5-arm geophone array consisting of 24 3-component geophones, buried at about 70 cm depth. The source signal is a vertical vibrator sweep of 30 s length with the spectrum 30-120 Hz. The signal is sent into the ground 32 times during each cycle, detected with the array and recorded separately for each geophone channel, without prior correlation with the source signal. This allows maximum post-processing with seismic processing and analysis tools and especially permits the use of array properties to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Critical parameters of the experiment are the repeatability of the source signal as well as the stability of the receiver properties. Another pivot is the hydraulic pressure and its distribution built up within the rock matrix. Estimations based on model calculations show that a change of

  10. A seismic hazard uncertainty analysis for the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, C.H.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the scientific issues relevant to characterizing earthquake sources in the New Madrid seismic zone has led to the development of a logic tree of possible alternative parameters. A variability analysis, using Monte Carlo sampling of this consensus logic tree, is presented and discussed. The analysis shows that for 2%-exceedence-in-50-year hazard, the best-estimate seismic hazard map is similar to previously published seismic hazard maps for the area. For peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration at 0.2 and 1.0 s (0.2 and 1.0 s Sa), the coefficient of variation (COV) representing the knowledge-based uncertainty in seismic hazard can exceed 0.6 over the New Madrid seismic zone and diminishes to about 0.1 away from areas of seismic activity. Sensitivity analyses show that the largest contributor to PGA, 0.2 and 1.0 s Sa seismic hazard variability is the uncertainty in the location of future 1811-1812 New Madrid sized earthquakes. This is followed by the variability due to the choice of ground motion attenuation relation, the magnitude for the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes, and the recurrence interval for M>6.5 events. Seismic hazard is not very sensitive to the variability in seismogenic width and length. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. The Olmsted fault zone, southernmost Illinois: A key to understanding seismic hazard in the northern new Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, C.E.; McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Geological deformation in the northern New Madrid seismic zone, near Olmsted, Illinois (USA), is analyzed using integrated compressional-wave (P) and horizontally polarized-wave (SH) seismic reflection and regional and dedicated borehole information. Seismic hazards are of special concern because of strategic facilities (e.g., lock and dam sites and chemical plants on the Ohio River near its confluence with the Mississippi River) and because of alluvial soils subject to high amplification of earthquake shock. We use an integrated approach starting with lower resolution, but deeper penetration, P-wave reflection profiles to identify displacement of Paleozoic bedrock. Higher resolution, but shallower penetration, SH-wave images show deformation that has propagated upward from bedrock faults into Pleistocene loess. We have mapped an intricate zone more than 8 km wide of high-angle faults in Mississippi embayment sediments localized over Paleozoic bedrock faults that trend north to northeast, parallel to the Ohio River. These faults align with the pattern of epicenters in the New Madrid seismic zone. Normal and reverse offsets along with positive flower structures imply a component of strike-slip; the current stress regime favors right-lateral slip on northeast-trending faults. The largest fault, the Olmsted fault, underwent principal displacement near the end of the Cretaceous Period 65 to 70 million years ago. Strata of this age (dated via fossil pollen) thicken greatly on the downthrown side of the Olmsted fault into a locally subsiding basin. Small offsets of Tertiary and Quaternary strata are evident on high-resolution SH-wave seismic profiles. Our results imply recent reactivation and possible future seismic activity in a critical area of the New Madrid seismic zone. This integrated approach provides a strategy for evaluating shallow seismic hazard-related targets for engineering concerns. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural and thermal control of seismic activity and megathrust rupture dynamics in subduction zones: Lessons from the Mw 9.0, 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satriano, Claudio; Dionicio, Viviana; Miyake, Hiroe; Uchida, Naoki; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    The 2011 Tohoku megathrust earthquake ruptured a vast region of the northeast Japan Trench subduction zone in a way that had not been enough anticipated by earthquake and tsunami risk scenarios. We analyzed the Tohoku rupture combining high-frequency back-projection analysis with low frequency kinematic inversion of the co-seismic slip. Results support the to-day well-accepted broadband characteristics of this earthquake. Most of the seismic moment is released during the first 100 s, with large co-seismic slip (up to 55 m) offshore Miyagi in a compact region on the landward side of the trench. Coherent high-frequency radiation areas and relatively low co-seismic slip are a distinctive signature of the slab-mantle interface. The broadband characteristics of the Tohoku rupture are interpreted, integrating the seismic activity and structure information on the NE Japan forearc region, as a signature of along-dip segmentation and segment interactions, that result from thermal structure, plate geometry, material composition and fracture heterogeneities along the plate boundary interface. Deep mantle corner flow and low dehydration rates along the cold subduction slab interface lead to an extended seismogenic slab-mantle interface, with strong bi-material contrast controlling larger propagation distance in the downdip preferred rupture direction. Off Miyagi, plate bending below the mantle wedge, ∼142.3°E at ∼25 km depth, is associated with the eastern limit of the deep M7-8-class thrust-earthquakes, and of the strongest coherent high-frequency generation areas. The region of the slab-crust interface between the mantle wedge limit, ∼142.7°E at ∼20 km depth, and a trenchward plate bending, ∼143.2°E at ∼15 km, acted as an effective barrier resisting for many centuries to stress-loading gradient induced by deep stable sliding and large earthquakes along the slab-mantle interface. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, whose hypocenter is located on the east side of the

  13. Teleseismic Tomography of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasanmi, Olorunfemi Temitope

    This research investigates the properties of the crust and the upper mantle beneath the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ). The ETSZ is a major seismic feature that is located in the southeastern United States. The zone spans portions of eastern Tennessee, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Alabama and is, after the New Madrid seismic zone, the second most active seismic region of the North America east of the Rocky Mountains. This NE trending zone of intraplate seismicity is about 300km long and 100km wide. A striking geophysical anomaly crossing this region is called the New York-Alabama magnetic lineament. The most seismically active part of this zone is along and to the SW of this aeromagnetic anomaly. In this thesis 3-D velocity images of the earth beneath the ETSZ were obtained by using Fast Marching Teleseismic Tomography package. The starting data was adopted from the previous study by Agbaje (2012) and consisted of 2855 residuals from 217 teleseismic events that were recorded by 28 stations within the ETSZ. The tomographic images show significant velocity anomalies, confirming complex tectonic evolution and revealing basement features that can be correlated with regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. The results of the tomographic inversion in the crust agree with the previous tomographic studies that used local earthquake data (Powell et al., 2014). However, the most significant anomaly resolved persists through most of the upper mantle and suggests the presence of a major, southeast dipping, high velocity anomaly located beneath the Blue Ridge province. The anomaly is interpreted to possibly be a fossil slab dating back to the accretion of Carolina terrane during Devonian.

  14. Trenching in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Trenching studies of the San Andreas fault have been of great value to geologists in California for determining not only the prehistoric occurrences of earthquakes on the fault but also the age of these movements. In the New Madrid seismic zone, US Geological Survey scientists have been trenching across suspected faults to try to assess earthquake frequency in the Central US. The following photographs document these trenching studies.

  15. Seismic coupling and uncoupling at subduction zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the correlations concerning the properties of subduction zones are reviewed. A quantitative global comparison of many subduction zones reveals that the largest earthquakes occur in zones with young lithosphere and fast convergence rates. Maximum earthquake size is directly related to the asperity distribution on the fault plane. This observation can be translated into a simple model of seismic coupling where the horizontal compressive stress between two plates is proportional to the ratio of the summed asperity area to the total area of the contact surface. Plate age and rate can control asperity distribution directly through the horizontal compressive stress associated with the vertical and horizontal velocities of subducting slabs. The basalt to eclogite phase change in the down-going oceanic crust may be largely responsible for the uncoupling of subduction zones below a depth of about 40 km.

  16. The mechanics of the South Iceland Seismic Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackman, M. Christine; Bilham, Roger; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanics of the South Iceland Seismic Zone is examined by means of boundary element modeling. The differences between the observed geometry of the major tectonically active features and that of a geometrically orthogonal ridge-transform system (which assumes that the upper part of the earth's crust is an elastic plate containing vertical cuts) are examined. It is suggested that north-south faults can accommodate transform deformation only if the faults are longer or more numerous than those observed so far. This is considered reasonable because earthquake surface rupture lengths are commonly less than the inferred fault length at depth. The South Iceland Seismic Zone is subject to sequences of large earthquake every 45-112 years. In comparing the seismic moment release derived from earthquake magnitudes with that predicted by the models, it is confirmed that the system of north-south faults can act as a transform fault.

  17. Fault-zone attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakeslee, Sam; Malin, Peter; Alvarez, Marcos

    1989-11-01

    We have developed a technique to measure seismic attenuation within an active fault-zone at seismogenic depths. Utilizing a pair of stations and pairs of earthquakes, spectral ratios are performed to isolate attenuation produced by wave-propagation within the fault-zone. This empirical approach eliminates common source, propagation, instrument and near-surface site effects. The technique was applied to a cluster of 19 earthquakes recorded by a pair of downhole instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at Parkfield California. Over the 1-40 Hz bandwidth used in this analysis, amplitudes are found to decrease exponentially with frequency. Furthermore, the fault-zone propagation distance correlates with the severity of attenuation. Assuming a constant Q attenuation operator, the S-wave quality factor within the fault-zone at a depth of 5-6 kilometers is 31 (+7,-5). If fault-zones are low-Q environments, then near-source attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves may help to explain phenomenon such as fmax. Fault-zone Q may prove to be a valuable indicator of the mechanical behavior and rheology of fault-zones. Specific asperities can be monitored for precursory changes associated with the evolving stress-field within the fault-zone. The spatial and temporal resolution of the technique is fundamentally limited by the uncertainty in earthquake location and the interval time between earthquakes.

  18. Teleseismic Tomography of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasanmi, O. T.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we perform a tomographic inversion of teleseismic data to investigate the properties of the crust and the uppermost mantle beneath the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ). The ETSZ is a major seismic feature located in the southeastern United States. The zone spans portions of eastern Tennessee, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Alabama and is, after the New Madrid seismic zone, the second most active seismic region of the North America east of the Rocky Mountains. Earthquakes in the ETSZ appear to align along a sharp, linear magnetic feature, called the New York-Alabama Lineament (NYAL), which acts as the northwest edge of the seismic zone and is attributed to a strike-slip fault affecting the Precambrian basement. A total of 2652 relative P-wave arrival time residuals from 201 teleseismic events recorded at 28 regional seismic station have been extracted from the continuous records using the adaptive stacking code. The three-dimensional model was computed down to 300km. The tomographic images show significant velocity anomalies, confirming complex tectonic evolution and revealing basement features that can be correlated with regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. One of the main features of the three-dimensional model is a significant velocity contrast across the NYAL that extends through the crust and the uppermost mantle, with high velocity anomalies northwest of the NYAL and lower velocities southwest of the NYAL. Our results support the hypothesis that the lineament is a major basement fault associated with a tectonic boundary produced by merging of the southern Appalachian basement with the Granite-Rhyolite basement during the Grenville orogeny.

  19. Seismic Investigations of the Zagros-Bitlis Thrust Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, R.; Sibol, M.; Caron, P.; Quigley, K.; Ghalib, H.; Chen, Y.

    2009-05-01

    We present results of crustal studies obtained with seismic data from the Northern Iraq Seismic Network (NISN). NISN has operated 10 broadband stations in north-eastern Iraq since late 2005. At present, over 800 GB of seismic waveform data have been analyzed. The aim of the present study is to derive models of the local and regional crustal structure of north and north-eastern Iraq, including the northern extension of the Zagros collision zone. This goal is, in part, achieved by estimating local and regional seismic velocity models using receiver function- and surface wave dispersion analyses and to use these velocity models to obtain accurate hypocenter locations and event focal mechanisms. Our analysis of hypocenter locations produces a clear picture of the seismicity associated with the tectonics of the region. The largest seismicity rate is confined to the active northern section of the Zagros thrust zone, while it decreases towards the southern end, before the intensity increases in the Bandar Abbas region again. Additionally, the rift zones in the Read Sea and the Gulf of Aden are clearly demarked by high seismicity rates. Our analysis of waveform data indicates clear propagation paths from the west or south-west across the Arabian shield as well as from the north and east into NISN. Phases including Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg, as well as LR are clearly observed on these seismograms. In contrast, blockage or attenuation of Pg and Sg-wave energy is observed for propagation paths across the Zagros-Bitlis zone from the south, while Pn and Sn phases are not affected. These findings are in support of earlier tectonic models that suggested the existence of multiple parallel listric faults splitting off the main Zagros fault zone in east-west direction. These faults appear to attenuate the crustal phases while the refracted phases, propagating across the mantle lid, remain unaffected. We will present surface wave analysis in support of these findings, indicating multi

  20. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOEpatents

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  1. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismic moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.

  2. Cockade-textured cataclasite and silica gel from damage zone in carbonated ultramafics: markers of cycles of seismic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarsi, Marco; Crispini, Laura; Garofalo, Paolo; Capponi, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Shallow crustal processes occurring during seismic slips and generating fracture networks are of great interest due to their complex interplay with a spectrum of other geological processes . Our study focuses on faults with peculiar core textures, similar to those of "cockade breccia" (Genna et al., 1996) and "clast cortex grains" (Rempe et al., 2014), and on their relation with syntectonic hydrothermal alteration linked with Au bearing-quartz and chalcedony veins. Our work aims to study the enviromental conditions for the formation of such peculiar texture, their relation with the hydrothermal vein system and their potential as shallow seismic indicators. We present field, microstructural and petrochemical data of a peculiar damage zone of fault rocks located in carbonated peridotites and serpentinites of the Ligurian Alps (Voltri Massif, Italy). These are mainly reverse faults, which are coeval with syntectonic Au-bearing quartz veins and chalcedony veins (Giorza et al., 2010), in which lherzolites occupy the hangingwall of the faults and serpentinites the footwall. The fault rocks show evidence for carbonation, as olivine and serpentine are clearly transformed into an assemblage made of magnesite, dolomite and minor ankerite. The damage zones of the faults are serpentinite-rich and about 10 m in thickness, while the cataclasite cores are carbonate-rich and ca. 1 m thick. The top of the fault core shows the occurrence of a chalcedony shear veins with chatter marks and slikenlines on the surface. The "cockade breccia" is made of spherical aggregates of Fe-Mg carbonates and are 1 mm to 3 cm in size. These aggregates show cores of microcrystalline Fe-Mg carbonates, and concentric outer layers of relatively coarser Fe-Mg carbonates with radial or laminated texture. In some cases, these aggregates show evidence for rotation along secondary slip zones. We interpret all these features as the products of chemical interaction between the olivine and serpentine initially

  3. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  4. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    and collecting these into "disturbance geobodies". These seismic image processing methods represents a first efficient step toward a construction of a robust technique to investigate sub-seismic strain, mapping noisy deformed zones and displacement within subsurface geology (Dutzer et al.,2011; Iacopini et al.,2012). In all these cases, accurate fault interpretation is critical in applied geology to building a robust and reliable reservoir model, and is essential for further study of fault seal behavior, and reservoir compartmentalization. They are also fundamental for understanding how deformation localizes within sedimentary basins, including the processes associated with active seismogenetic faults and mega-thrust systems in subduction zones. Dutzer, JF, Basford., H., Purves., S. 2009, Investigating fault sealing potential through fault relative seismic volume analysis. Petroleum Geology Conference series 2010, 7:509-515; doi:10.1144/0070509 Marfurt, K.J., Chopra, S., 2007, Seismic attributes for prospect identification and reservoir characterization. SEG Geophysical development Iacopini, D., Butler, RWH. & Purves, S. (2012). 'Seismic imaging of thrust faults and structural damage: a visualization workflow for deepwater thrust belts'. First Break, vol 5, no. 30, pp. 39-46.

  5. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; ...

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismicmore » moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.« less

  6. The proportionality between relative plate velocity and seismicity in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    Maximum earthquake magnitude and the rate of seismic activity apparently differ among subduction zones. This variation is attributed to factors such as subduction zone temperature and stress, and the type of material being subducted. The relative velocity between the downgoing and overriding plates controls their tectonic deformation. It is also thought to correlate with seismicity. Here I use the epidemic type aftershock sequence model to calculate the background seismicity rate--the frequency of seismic events above magnitude 4.5--for 117 sections of subduction zones worldwide, during the past century. I demonstrate a proportionality relationship whereby relative plate velocity correlates positively with seismicity rate. This relationship is prominent in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. However, although seismically active, this region has not experienced a magnitude 9 earthquake since 1900. In contrast, the Cascadia, Nankai, southern Chilean and Alaskan subduction zones exhibit low background seismicity rates, yet have experienced magnitude 9 earthquakes in the past century. Slow slip occurs in many of these regions, implying that slow deformation may aid nucleation of very large earthquakes. The proportionality relationship could be used to assess the seismic risk between two endmembers: active subduction zones that generate moderate earthquakes and quiet subduction zones that generate extremely large earthquakes.

  7. Identifying active interplate and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean plate from seismic reflection data and the significance of the Pedro Bank fault zone in the tectonic history of the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the western Caribbean Sea is an approximately 500,000 km2 area of Precambrian to Late Cretaceous tectonic terranes that have been assembled during the Late Cretaceous formation of the Caribbean plate and include: 1) the Chortis block, a continental fragment; 2) the Great Arc of the Caribbean, a deformed Cretaceous arc, and 3) the Caribbean large igneous province formed in late Cretaceous time. Middle Eocene to Recent eastward motion of the Caribbean plate has been largely controlled by strike-slip faulting along the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone that bounds the northern margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. These faults reactivate older rift structures near the island of Jamaica and form the transtensional basins of the Honduran Borderlands near Honduras. Recent GPS studies suggest that small amount of intraplate motion within the current margin of error of GPS measurements (1-3 mm/yr) may occur within the center of the western Caribbean plate at the Pedro Bank fault zone and Hess Escarpment. This study uses a database of over 54,000 km of modern and vintage 2D seismic data, combined with earthquake data and results from previous GPS studies to define the active areas of inter- and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean. Intraplate deformation occurs along the 700-km-long Pedro Bank fault zone that traverses the center of the Nicaraguan Rise and reactivates the paleo suture zone between the Great Arc of the Caribbean and the Caribbean large igneous province. The Pedro Bank fault zone also drives active extension at the 200-km-long San Andres rift along the southwest margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. Influence of the Cocos Ridge indentor may be contributing to reactivation of faulting along the southwesternmost, active segment of the Hess Escarpment.

  8. Seismic Zone of Craiova and its Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Laura-Simona

    2013-04-01

    The mapping of the Romanian area, based of the seismic range, put Craiova and the metropolitan zone, in seismic class C of level 8. This increased level is due to crustal fissure, oriented N-S on the Craiova meridian, which resonates with seismic waves from Vrancea epicenter. Craiova and the metropolitan zone is placed on the separated lithologic substrates, so, the effects of seism are not uniform between urban and peri-urban areas. The highest piedmont area and the terraces (V, IV, III), with a predominant substrate of conglomerate and sandstone, decrease effect of the earthquake. The first and the second terraces and the meadow, with a predominant content of marls and clays, are very elastic and increase the effect of earthquake. The most exposed are the villages placed on the right side of the Jiu River, where these landforms are very common and in case of earthquake, can be reactivated. In Romania there are just shallow depth and intermediate depth earthquakes. The frequency of earthquakes with a greater than 7.2 magnitude on the Richter scale is three times in a century. The most magnitude for a Romanian earthquake took place on 10 of November 1940 and it has a magnitude of 7.6 on the Richter scale. The 1977 Vrancea Earthquake occurred on March 4, 21:20 local time. It had a magnitude of 7.2 with an epicenter in Vrancea. The fracture occurred at a depth of 94 kilometers but it was a multishock earthquake with several outbreaks in the south-west part of Vrancea County. In 55 seconds the earthquake killed about 1,500 people in Romania (1,400 in Bucharest), wounded more than 11,300 and about 33,000 buildings and structures collapsed. The shock wave was felt in almost all countries in the Balkan Peninsula, as well as Ukraine and Moldova, but with a lower intensity. When the moving is vertically, in a time of 7-8 seconds, the next move is horizontally. The horizontally waves, shear waves, carry 75% of total energy. The poorly constructed buildings will fall even

  9. Exploring the seismic expression of fault zones in 3D seismic volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, D.; Butler, R. W. H.; Purves, S.; McArdle, N.; De Freslon, N.

    2016-08-01

    Mapping and understanding distributed deformation is a major challenge for the structural interpretation of seismic data. However, volumes of seismic signal disturbance with low signal/noise ratio are systematically observed within 3D seismic datasets around fault systems. These seismic disturbance zones (SDZ) are commonly characterized by complex perturbations of the signal and occur at the sub-seismic (10 s m) to seismic scale (100 s m). They may store important information on deformation distributed around those larger scale structures that may be readily interpreted in conventional amplitude displays of seismic data. We introduce a method to detect fault-related disturbance zones and to discriminate between this and other noise sources such as those associated with the seismic acquisition (footprint noise). Two case studies from the Taranaki basin and deep-water Niger delta are presented. These resolve SDZs using tensor and semblance attributes along with conventional seismic mapping. The tensor attribute is more efficient in tracking volumes containing structural displacements while structurally-oriented semblance coherency is commonly disturbed by small waveform variations around the fault throw. We propose a workflow to map and cross-plot seismic waveform signal properties extracted from the seismic disturbance zone as a tool to investigate the seismic signature and explore seismic facies of a SDZ.

  10. Exploring the seismic expression of fault zones in 3D seismic volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Mapping and understanding distributed deformation is a major challenge for the structural interpretation of seismic data. However, volumes of seismic signal disturbance with low signal/noise ratio are systematically observed within 3D seismic datasets around fault systems. These seismic disturbance zones (SDZ) are commonly characterized by complex perturbations of the signal and occur at the sub-seismic to seismic scale. They may store important information on deformation distributed around those larger scale structures that may be readily interpreted in conventional amplitude displays of seismic data scale. We introduce a method to detect fault-related disturbance zones and to discriminate between this and other noise sources such as those associated with the seismic acquisition (footprint noise). Two case studies, from the Taranaki basin and deep-water Niger delta are presented. These resolve structure within SDZs using tensor and semblance attributes along with conventional seismic mapping. The tensor attribute is more efficient in tracking volumes containing structural displacements while structurally-oriented semblance coherency is commonly disturbed by small waveform variations around the fault throw. We propose a workflow to map and cross-plot seismic waveform signal properties extracted from the seismic disturbance zone as a tool to investigate the seismic signature and explore seismic facies of a SDZ.

  11. Seismic hazard impact of the Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone (SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilanova, Susana P.; Fonseca, Joao F. B. D.

    The seismic hazard of SW Iberia is composed of two contributions: offshore, large to very large events on the plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia such as the Lisbon earthquake of 1755 or the Gorringe Bank earthquake of 1969; and onshore, moderate to strong intraplate earthquakes on inherited crustal fractures. One of these zones of crustal weakness is the Lower Tagus Valley (LTV) fault zone, which displays the highest level of seismic hazard in Western Iberia. In this paper we review the active tectonics and seismicity of the LTV, integrating previous geophysical data with recent results of paleoseismological investigations, and discuss its impact on the seismic hazard of SW Iberia. We conclude that the seismic zonation for hazard assessment currently in force in the building code is biased towards the scenario of distant offshore rupture, and does not take adequately into account the LTV seismic source.

  12. Evidence of Nonextensive Statistical Physics behavior of the Hellenic Subduction Zone seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, Giorgos; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sammonds, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The Hellenic Subduction Zone (HSZ) is the most seismically active region in Europe. Many destructive earthquakes have taken place along the HSZ in the past. In this study we investigate the seismicity of the HSZ based on the science of complex systems. The spatiotemporal distributions of seismicity as well as the magnitude distribution are studied using the concept of Nonextensive Statistical Physics (NESP). Defining five seismic zones and forming an earthquake dataset that covers the period 1976-2009, we apply the NESP ideas to formulate the cumulative distribution functions of the inter-event times and distances and the magnitude distribution along the HSZ. Our results indicate that the nonextensive parameter qT, which is related with the inter-event time distribution, presents almost similar values in each of the seismic zones and reflects the long term scale of the seismicity evolution in the HSZ. The qD parameter, which is related with the inter-event distance distribution, presents a significant variation along the seismic zones. This variation is related with the different degree of spatial earthquake clustering in each of the seismic zones of the HSZ. Moreover, in the framework of the fragment-asperity model, the thermostatistical parameter qM, which is related with the frequency-magnitude distribution, could be used as an additional index to inform us about the physical state of each seismic zone along the HSZ. The variations of the qM parameter are related with the energy release rate in each seismic zone. The models used, fit rather well to the observed distributions, implying the usefulness of NESP in investigating such phenomena exhibiting scale-free nature and long range memory effects.

  13. Monitoring seismic wave speed by an active seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.; Okubo, M.; Saiga, A.

    2012-12-01

    Decreases in elastic wave speed around cracked zones prior to faulting in rock fracture experiments have been reported (e.g., Yukutake, 1989; Yoshimitsu et al., 2009). These decreases in wave speed have been considered to be associated with crack and fault growth based on non-destructive observation using X-ray CT scan (Kawakata et al., 1999). Meanwhile, there were some reports on the decreases in seismic wave speed along paths that cross the hypocentral area in periods including some large earthquakes. Uchida et al. (2002) analyzed seismic waveform with explosive sources before and after the 1998 northern Iwate prefecture earthquake, and they showed that the decrease in seismic wave speed approximately 0.1-0.9 % by the earthquake occurrence. Justin et al. (2007) reported the reduction in seismic wave speed accompanied with the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake around the rupture area by using the four repeating earthquakes that occurred before and after the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake. However, seismograms of explosive sources or repeating earthquakes are hard to be frequently recorded, which makes the time intervals of estimated seismic wave speed be too long to distinguish preseismic changes from coseismic and post seismic changes. In order to monitor crustal structures and detecting the variation of rock properties in the crust, a kind of active seismic source systems ACROSS (Accurately Controlled Routinely Operated Signal System) has been developed(e.g., Kunitomo and Kumazawa, 2004). We used the controlled seismic source ACROSS, which installed at the Tono mine, Gifu prefecture, central Japan and has been routinely operated by Tono Geoscience center of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), automatically. Frequency modulated seismic waves are continuously radiated from approximately 10-20 Hz by eccentric rotation of the source. In order to investigate the stability of ACROSS signals, we used seismograms recorded at the 110m depth of Shobasama observing site, which is

  14. Fault gouge evolution during rupture and healing: Continual active-seismic observations across laboratory-scale fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysta, M.; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Nikkinen, M.; Carter, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    In order to support its mission of monitoring compliance with the treaty banning nuclear explosions, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) operates four global networks of, respectively, seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic sensors and air samplers accompanied with radionuclide detectors. The role of the International Data Centre (IDC) of CTBTO is to associate the signals detected in the monitoring networks with the physical phenomena which emitted these signals, by forming events. One of the aspects of associating detections with emitters is the problem of inferring the sources of radionuclides from the detections made at CTBTO radionuclide network stations. This task is particularly challenging because the average transport distance between a release point and detectors is large. Complex processes of turbulent diffusion are responsible for efficient mixing and consequently for decreasing the information content of detections with an increasing distance from the source. The problem is generally addressed in a two-step process. In the first step, an atmospheric transport model establishes a link between the detections and the regions of possible source location. In the second step this link is inverted to infer source information from the detections. In this presentation, we will discuss enhancements of the presently used regression-based inversion algorithm to reconstruct a source of radionuclides. To this aim, modern inversion algorithms accounting for prior information and appropriately regularizing an under-determined reconstruction problem will be briefly introduced. Emphasis will be on the CTBTO context and the choice of inversion methods. An illustration of the first tests will be provided using a framework of twin experiments, i.e. fictitious detections in the CTBTO radionuclide network generated with an atmospheric transport model.

  15. Seismic-wave attenuation associated with crustal faults in the new madrid seismic zone.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R M; Mooney, W D

    1990-04-20

    The attenuation of upper crustal seismic waves that are refracted with a velocity of about 6 kilometers per second varies greatly among profiles in the area of the New Madrid seismic zone in the central Mississippi Valley. The waves that have the strongest attenuation pass through the seismic trend along the axis of the Reelfoot rift in the area of the Blytheville arch. Defocusing of the waves in a low-velocity zone and/or seismic scattering and absorption could cause the attenuation; these effects are most likely associated with the highly deformed rocks along the arch. Consequently, strong seismic-wave attenuation may be a useful criterion for identifying seismogenic fault zones.

  16. An analysis of seismic hazard in the Upper Rhine Graben enlightened by the example of the New Madrid seismic zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubre, Cécile; Masson, Frédéric; Mazzotti, Stéphane; Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2014-05-01

    Seismic hazard in the "stable" continental regions and low-level deformation zones is one of the most difficult issues to address in Earth sciences. In these zones, instrumental and historical seismicity are not well known (sparse seismic networks, seismic cycle too long to be covered by the human history, episodic seismic activity) and many active structures remain poorly characterized or unknown. This is the case of the Upper Rhine Graben, the central segment of the European Cenozoic rift system (ECRIS) of Oligocene age, which extends from the North Sea through Germany and France to the Mediterranean coast over a distance of some 1100 km. Even if this region has already experienced some destructive earthquakes, its present-day seismicity is moderate and the deformation observed by geodesy is very small (below the current measurement accuracy). The strain rate does not exceed 10-10 and paleoseismic studies indicate an average return period of 2.5 to 3 103 ka for large earthquakes. The largest earthquake known for this zone is the 1356 Basel earthquake, with a magnitude generally estimated about 6.5 (Meghraoui et al., 2001) but recently re-evaluated between 6.7 and 7.1 (Fäh et al et al., 2009). A comparison of the Upper Rhine Graben with equivalent regions around the world could help improve our evaluation of seismic hazard of this region. This is the case of the New Madrid seismic zone, one of the best studied intraplate system in central USA, which experienced an M 7.0 - 7.5 earthquake in 1811-1812 and shares several characteristics with the Upper Rhine Graben, i.e. the general framework of inherited geological structures (reactivation of a failed rift / graben), seismicity patterns (spatial variability of small and large earthquakes), the null or low rate of deformation, and the location in a "stable" continental interior. Looking at the Upper Rhine Graben as an analogue of the New Madrid seismic zone, we can re-evaluate its seismic hazard and consider the

  17. The role of seismicity models in probabilistic seismic hazard estimation: comparison of a zoning and a smoothing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauval, Céline; Scotti, Oona; Bonilla, Fabian

    2006-05-01

    Seismic hazard estimations are compared using two approaches based on two different seismicity models: one which models earthquake recurrence by applying the truncated Gutenberg-Richter law and a second one which smoothes the epicentre location of past events according to the fractal distribution of earthquakes in space (Woo 1996). The first method requires the definition of homogeneous source zones and the determination of maximum possible magnitudes whereas the second method requires the definition of a smoothing function. Our results show that the two approaches lead to similar hazard estimates in low seismicity regions. In regions of increased seismic activity, on the other hand, the smoothing approach yields systematically lower estimates than the zoning method. This epicentre-smoothing approach can thus be considered as a lower bound estimator for seismic hazard and can help in decision making in moderate seismicity regions where source zone definition and estimation of maximum possible magnitudes can lead to a wide variety of estimates due to lack of knowledge. The two approaches lead, however, to very different earthquake scenarios. Disaggregation studies at a representative number of sites show that if the distributions of contributions according to source-site distance are comparable between the two approaches, the distributions of contributions according to magnitude differ, reflecting the very different seismicity models used. The epicentre-smoothing method leads to scenarios with predominantly intermediate magnitudes events (5 <=M<= 5.5) while the zoning method leads to scenarios with magnitudes that increase with the return period from the minimum to the maximum magnitudes considered. These trends demonstrate that the seismicity model used plays a fundamental role in the determination of the controlling scenarios and ways to discriminate between the most appropriate models remains an important issue.

  18. Western Rainier Seismic Zone Airborne Laser Swath Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David J.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Scott, Kevin M.; Weaver, Craig S.; Martinez, Diana M.; Zeigler, John C.; Latypov, Damir

    2003-01-01

    Airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) of the Puget Lowland conducted by TerraPoint LLC for the Purget Sound Lidar Concortium (PSLC), has been successful in revealing Holocene fault scarps and lendsliders hidden beneath the dense, temperate rain forest cover and in quantifying shoreline terrace uplift. Expanding the PSLC efforts, NASA-USGS collaboration is now focusing on topographic mapping of seismogenic zones adjacent to volcanois in the western Cascades range in order to assess the presence of active faulting and tectonic deformation, better define the extend of lahars and understand their flow processes, and characterize landslide occurrence. Mapping of the western Rainier zone (WRZ) was conducted by TerraPoint in late 2002, after leaf fall and before snow accumulation. The WRZ is a NNW-trending, approx. 30 km-long zone of seismicity west of Mount Rainier National Park. The Puget Lowland ALSM methods were modified to accommodate challenges posed by the steep, high relief terrian. The laser data, acquired with a density of approx. 2 pulses /sq m, was filtered to identify returns from the ground from which a bare Earth digital elevation model (DEM) was produced with a grid size of 1.8 m. The RMS elevation accuracy of the DEM in flat, unvegetated areas is approx. 10cm based on consistency between overlapping flight swaths and comparisons to ground control points. The resulting DEM substantially improves upon Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and USGS photogrammetric mapping. For example, the DEM defines the size and spatial distribution of flood erratics left by the Electron lahar and of megaclasts within the Round Pass lahar, important for characterizing the lahar hydraulics. A previously unknown lateral levee on the Round Pass lahar is also revealed. In addition, to illustrating geomorfic feature within the WRZ, future plans for laser mapping of the Saint Helens and Darrington seismic zones will be described.

  19. Long Term Seismic Observation in Mariana by OBSs : Double Seismic Zone and Upper Mantle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, H.; Sugioka, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Oki, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Fukao, Y.; Suyehiro, K.

    2005-12-01

    In order to obtain the deep arc structural image of Mariana, a large-scale seismic observation by using 58 long-term ocean bottom seismometers (LTOBS) had been performed from June 2003 until April 2004, which is a part of the MARGINS program funded by the NSF. Prior to this observation, a pilot long-term seismic array observation was conducted in the same area by using 10 LTOBSs from Oct. 2001 until Feb. 2003. At that time, 8 LTOBSs were recovered but one had no data. Recently, 2 LTOBSs, had troubles in the releasing, were recovered by the manned submersible (Shinkai 6500, Jamstec) for the research of the malfunction in July 2005. By using all 9 LTOBS's data, those are about 11 months long, hypocenter determination was performed and more than 3000 local events were found. Even with the 1D velocity structure based on the iasp91 model, double seismic zones and a systematic shift of epicenters between the PDE and this study were observed. To investigate the detail of hypocenter distribution and the 3D velocity structure, the DD inversion (tomoDD: Zhang and Thurber, 2003) was applied for this data set with the 1D structure initial model except for the crust, which has been surveyed by using a dense airgun-OBS system (Takahashi et al., 2003). The result of relocated hypocenters shows clear double seismic zones until about 200 km depth, a high activity area around the fore-arc serpentine sea-mount, the Big Blue, and a lined focuses along the current ridge axis in the back-arc basin, and the result of the tomography shows a image of subducting slab and a low-Vs region below the same sea-mount mentioned. The wedge mantle structure was not clearly resolved due to the inadequate source-receiver coverage, which will be done in the recent experiment.

  20. Imaging the West Bohemia Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Calo, M.; Bouchaala, F.; Vavrycuk, V.

    2013-12-01

    West Bohemia is located at the suture of three mantle lithosphere plates, the Eger Rift, the Cheb basin and is the site of Quaternary volcanism. This complex tectonic setting results in localized, periodic earthquake swarms throughout the region and many CO2 springs and gas exhalation sites. Nový Kostel, the most active swarm area, experiences frequent swarms of several hundreds to thousands of earthquakes over a period of weeks to several months. It is a unique study area, since the swarm region is surrounded by the West Bohemia Seismic Network (WEBNET), providing observations in all directions. Larger swarms, such as those in 1985/1986, 1997, 2000, 2007 and 2008, have been studied in terms of source mechanisms and swarm characteristics (Fischer and Michálek, 2003; Fischer et al., 2010; Vavryčuk, 2011). The seismicity is always located in the same area and depth range (6-15 km), however the active fault planes differ. This indicates changes to the local stress field, and may relate to the complicated tectonic situation and/or migrating fluids. Many studies have examined individual swarms and compared the earthquake episodes, however the mechanisms behind the phenomenon are still not understood. This has motivated many studies, including recent proposals for a reflection seismic profile directly over the swarm area and multidisciplinary monitoring through ICDP. In this study, we image the velocity structure within and around the swarm area using double-difference tomography (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) and Weighted Average Model (WAM) post-processing analysis (Calò et al., 2011). The WAM analysis averages together velocity models calculated with a variety of reasonable starting parameters. The velocities are weighted by the raypath proximity and density at an inversion node. This reduces starting model bias and artifacts, and yields a weighted standard deviation at each grid point. Earthquake locations and WEBNET P and S arrival times for the two most recent large

  1. The proportionality between relative plate velocity and seismicity in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, S.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic activity differs among subduction zones due to various factors such as relative plate velocity, temperature, stress, and subducting materials. Relative plate velocity has a direct control on tectonic deformation and an overall correlation with seismicity has been suggested, as a global average or for large regions. Here I show a positive correlation between relative plate velocity and seismicity by estimating the background seismicity rate for 117 sections of subduction zones worldwide using the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model. The background rate is stably estimated even for the period following M9-class earthquakes in Chile and Japan. A prominent proportional relationship is evident in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. Given that M9-class earthquakes occur independently of one another, the lack of M9 earthquakes in the southwestern Pacific Ocean over the last century is difficult to explain by chance. On the other hand, some subduction zones have extremely low background seismicity, and have experienced very large earthquakes. Slow earthquakes have been discovered in many of these quiet zones. Thus, this proportionality relation may be useful in assessing the seismic risk in subduction zones worldwide between two apparently confusing end members: 'active and moderate' and 'quiet and extreme'.

  2. Seismological investigation of earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Final report, September 1986--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, R.B.; Nguyen, B.

    1993-08-01

    Earthquake activity in the New Madrid Seismic Zone had been monitored by regional seismic networks since 1975. During this time period, over 3,700 earthquakes have been located within the region bounded by latitudes 35{degrees}--39{degrees}N and longitudes 87{degrees}--92{degrees}W. Most of these earthquakes occur within a 1.5{degrees} x 2{degrees} zone centered on the Missouri Bootheel. Source parameters of larger earthquakes in the zone and in eastern North America are determined using surface-wave spectral amplitudes and broadband waveforms for the purpose of determining the focal mechanism, source depth and seismic moment. Waveform modeling of broadband data is shown to be a powerful tool in defining these source parameters when used complementary with regional seismic network data, and in addition, in verifying the correctness of previously published focal mechanism solutions.

  3. Seismic source zoning and maximum credible earthquake prognosis of the Greater Kashmir Territory, NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hamid; Nath, Sankar Kumar

    2016-09-01

    We present the seismic source zoning of the tectonically active Greater Kashmir territory of the Northwestern Himalaya and seismicity analysis (Gutenberg-Richter parameters) and maximum credible earthquake (m max) estimation of each zone. The earthquake catalogue used in the analysis is an extensive one compiled from various sources which spans from 1907 to 2012. Five seismogenic zones were delineated, viz. Hazara-Kashmir Syntaxis, Karakorum Seismic Zone, Kohistan Seismic Zone, Nanga Parbat Syntaxis, and SE-Kashmir Seismic Zone. Then, the seismicity analysis and maximum credible earthquake estimation were carried out for each zone. The low b value (<1.0) indicates a higher stress regime in all the zones except Nanga Parbat Syntaxis Seismic Zone and SE-Kashmir Seismic Zone. The m max was estimated following three different methodologies, the fault parameter approach, convergence rates using geodetic measurements, and the probabilistic approach using the earthquake catalogue and is estimated to be M w 7.7, M w 8.5, and M w 8.1, respectively. The maximum credible earthquake (m max) estimated for each zone shows that Hazara Kashmir Syntaxis Seismic Zone has the highest m max of M w 8.1 (±0.36), which is espoused by the historical 1555 Kashmir earthquake of M w 7.6 as well as the recent 8 October 2005 Kashmir earthquake of M w 7.6. The variation in the estimated m max by the above discussed methodologies is obvious, as the definition and interpretation of the m max change with the method. Interestingly, historical archives (˜900 years) do not speak of a great earthquake in this region, which is attributed to the complex and unique tectonic and geologic setup of the Kashmir Himalaya. The convergence is this part of the Himalaya is distributed not only along the main boundary faults but also along the various active out-of-sequence faults as compared to the Central Himalaya, where it is mainly adjusted along the main boundary fault.

  4. Prediction of subsurface fracture in mining zone of Papua using passive seismic tomography based on Fresnel zone

    SciTech Connect

    Setiadi, Herlan; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Wely, Woen; Riyanto, Erwin

    2015-04-16

    Fracture prediction in a block cave of underground mine is very important to monitor the structure of the fracture that can be harmful to the mining activities. Many methods can be used to obtain such information, such as TDR (Time Domain Relectometry) and open hole. Both of them have limitations in range measurement. Passive seismic tomography is one of the subsurface imaging method. It has advantage in terms of measurements, cost, and rich of rock physical information. This passive seismic tomography studies using Fresnel zone to model the wavepath by using frequency parameter. Fresnel zone was developed by Nurhandoko in 2000. The result of this study is tomography of P and S wave velocity which can predict position of fracture. The study also attempted to use sum of the wavefronts to obtain position and time of seismic event occurence. Fresnel zone tomography and the summation wavefront can predict location of geological structure of mine area as well.

  5. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  6. A non extensive statistical physics analysis of the Hellenic subduction zone seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, F.; Papadakis, G.; Michas, G.; Sammonds, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Hellenic subduction zone is the most seismically active region in Europe [Becker & Meier, 2010]. The spatial and temporal distribution of seismicity as well as the analysis of the magnitude distribution of earthquakes concerning the Hellenic subduction zone, has been studied using the concept of Non-Extensive Statistical Physics (NESP) [Tsallis, 1988 ; Tsallis, 2009]. Non-Extensive Statistical Physics, which is a generalization of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical physics, seems a suitable framework for studying complex systems (Vallianatos, 2011). Using this concept, Abe & Suzuki (2003;2005) investigated the spatial and temporal properties of the seismicity in California and Japan and recently Darooneh & Dadashinia (2008) in Iran. Furthermore, Telesca (2011) calculated the thermodynamic parameter q of the magnitude distribution of earthquakes of the southern California earthquake catalogue. Using the external seismic zones of 36 seismic sources of shallow earthquakes in the Aegean and the surrounding area [Papazachos, 1990], we formed a dataset concerning the seismicity of shallow earthquakes (focal depth ≤ 60km) of the subduction zone, which is based on the instrumental data of the Geodynamic Institute of the National Observatory of Athens (http://www.gein.noa.gr/, period 1990-2011). The catalogue consists of 12800 seismic events which correspond to 15 polygons of the aforementioned external seismic zones. These polygons define the subduction zone, as they are associated with the compressional stress field which characterizes a subducting regime. For each event, moment magnitude was calculated from ML according to the suggestions of Papazachos et al. (1997). The cumulative distribution functions of the inter-event times and the inter-event distances as well as the magnitude distribution for each seismic zone have been estimated, presenting a variation in the q-triplet along the Hellenic subduction zone. The models used, fit rather well to the observed

  7. Imaging the Seismogenic Coupling Zone in Chile: The 3-Component Reflection Seismic Survey of Project TIPTEQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Micksch, U.; Gross, K.; Buske, S.; Stiller, M.; Wigger, P.; Araneda, M.; Bataille, K.; Bribach, J.; Lüth, S.; Mechie, J.; Schulze, A.; Shapiro, S. A.; Ziegenhagen, T.

    2005-12-01

    One of the main tasks in subduction zone research is that of the structural and petrophysical understanding of the seismogenic coupling zone, and especially its down-dip end. Here, mega-thrust earthquakes are suggested to initiate, but the trigger and processes that shape them are less understood. Amongst 13 sub-projects within TIPTEQ (from The Incoming Plate to mega-Thrust EarthQuake processes), the reflection seismic sub-project aims at the imaging and identification of processes in the seismogenic coupling zone of the present state of the ruptured plate interface at the southern Central Chilean margin. Together with the marine SPOC data, the newly acquired high-resolution 3-component reflection seismic land data will yield a reflection seismic section that will cover the entire seismogenic coupling zone. In addition, an expanding spread experiment component focuses on the down-dip limit (30-50 km depth). S-wave source signals were generated and S-waves obtained with 3-component recordings should yield an improved picture of the petrophysical contrasts within the subduction zone system. The first high-resolution reflection seismic section of the seismogenic coupling zone between the subducting Nazca Plate and the South American continent is presented. It shows that the sediment subduction mode observed offshore corresponds well with the landward reflection seismic extension towards the east at 38° 15' S. Structural evidence suggests that material is transported down in a subduction channel. From slow uplift of the Coastal Cordillera we conclude that basal accretion of parts of this material controls the seismic architecture and growth of the south Chilean crust. At present, almost no seismicity is observed along the entire, approximately 130 km wide seismogenic coupling zone, which could point to a higher coupling and stress accumulation in the region. We discuss underplating, forearc uplift and dehydration/serpentinisation processes at the top of the active

  8. Rapid intraplate strain accumulation in the new madrid seismic zone.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zoback, M D; Segall, P

    1992-09-18

    Remeasurement of a triangulation network in the southern part of the New Madrid seismic zone with the Global Positioning System has revealed rapid crustal strain accumulation since the 1950s. This area experienced three large (moment magnitudes >8) earthquakes in 1811 to 1812. The orientation and sense of shear is consistent with right-lateral strike slip motion along a northeast-trending fault zone (as indicated by current seismicity). Detection of crustal strain accumulation may be a useful discriminant for identifying areas where potentially damaging intraplate earthquakes may occur despite the absence of large earthquakes during historic time.

  9. Rapid intraplate strain accumulation in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Zoback, M.D.; Segall, P. USGS, Menlo Park, CA )

    1992-09-01

    Remeasurement of a triangulation network in the southern part of the New Madrid seismic zone with the Global Positioning System has revealed rapid crustal strain accumulation since the 1950s. This area experienced three large (moment magnitudes greater than 8) earthquakes in 1811 to 1812. The orientation and sense of shear is consistent with right-lateral strike slip motion along a northeast-trending fault zone (as indicated by current seismicity). Detection of crustal strain accumulation may be a useful discriminant for identifying areas where potentially damaging intraplate earthquakes may occur despite the absence of large earthquakes during historic time. 34 refs.

  10. Rapid intraplate strain accumulation in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, L.; Zoback, M.D.; Segall, P.

    1992-01-01

    Remeasurement of a triangulation network in the southern part of the New Madrid seismic zone with the Global Positioning System has revealed rapid crustal strain accumulation since the 1950s. This area experienced three large (moment magnitudes >8) earthquakes in 1811 to 1812. The orientation and sense of shear is consistent with right-lateral strike slip motion along a northeast-trending fault zone (as indicated by current seismicity). Detection of crustal strain accumulation may be a useful discriminant for identifying areas where potentially damaging intraplate earthquakes may occur despite the absence of large earthquakes during historic time.

  11. Towards a bayesian seismotectonic zoning for use in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA)

    SciTech Connect

    Le Goff, Boris; Fitzenz, Delphine; Beauval, Celine

    2011-03-14

    The mathematical representation of seismic sources is an important part of probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. It reflects the association of the seismicity with the tectonically-active geological structures evidenced by seismotectonic studies. Given that most active faults are not characterized well enough, seismic sources are generally defined as areal zones, delimited with finite boundary polygons, within which the geological features of active tectonics and the seismicity are deemed homogeneous (e.g., focal depth, seismicity rate, and maximum magnitude). Besides the lack of data (e.g., narrow range of recorded magnitudes), the application of this representation generates different problems: 1) a large sensitivity of resulting hazard maps on the location of zone boundaries, while these boundaries are set by expert decision; 2) the zoning can not represent any variation in faulting mechanism; 3) the seismicity rates are distributed throughout the zones and we lose the location of the determinant information used for their calculation. We propose an exploratory study for an alternative procedure in area source modeling. First, different data (e.g., geomorphology, geology, fault orientations) will be combined by using automated spatial partitioning (investigation of both supervised and unsupervised methods) in order to obtain several information classes, which may be defined as areal source zones. Then, a given hypocenter belonging to a given ''zone'', from now on called seismicity model, will be expressed by a probability computed from the 2D (spatial) probability density function (pdf) for the active tectonic model used as an a priori and updated with specific data from seismicity catalogs (e.g., focal mechanism) or other new data sources (e.g., geomorphology, subsurface exploration). This hypocenter will thus be allowed to contribute to several models, with weights given by the value of the pdf for each model. The annual rate of occurrence, for a given

  12. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project: Seismic velocity structure of the Brawley Seismic Zone, Salton Buttes and Geothermal Field, Salton Trough, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, J.; Hole, J. A.; Fuis, G. S.; Stock, J. M.; Rymer, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Trough is an active rift in southern California in a step-over between the plate-bounding Imperial and San Andreas Faults. In March 2011, the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) investigated the rift's crustal structure by acquiring several seismic refraction and reflection lines. One of the densely sampled refraction lines crosses the northern-most Imperial Valley, perpendicular to the strike-slip faults and parallel to a line of small Quaternary rhyolitic volcanoes. The line crosses the obliquely extensional Brawley Seismic Zone and goes through one of the most geothermally productive areas in the United States. Well logs indicate the valley is filled by several kilometers of late Pliocene-recent lacustrine, fluvial, and shallow marine sediment. The 42-km long seismic line was comprised of eleven 110-460 kg explosive shots and receivers at a 100 m spacing. First arrival travel times were used to build a tomographic seismic velocity image of the upper crust. Velocity in the valley increases smoothly from <2 km/s to >5 km/s, indicating diagenesis and gradational metamorphism of rift sediments at very shallow depth due to an elevated geotherm. The velocity gradient is much smaller in the relatively low velocity (<6 km/s) crystalline basement comprised of recently metamorphosed sediment reaching greenschist to lower amphibolite facies. The depth of this basement is about 4-km below the aseismic region of the valley west of the Brawley Seismic Zone, but rises sharply to ~2 km depth beneath the seismically, geothermally, and volcanically active area of the Brawley Seismic Zone. The basement deepens to the northeast of the active tectonic zone and then is abruptly offset to shallower depth on the northeast side of the valley. This offset may be the subsurficial expression of a paleofault, most likely an extension of the Sand Hills Fault, which bounds the basin to the east. Basement velocity east of the fault is ~5.7 km/s, consistent with the granitic rocks

  13. On the mechanism of seismic decoupling and back are spreading at subduction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, C.H.; Campos, J.

    1995-11-10

    This report discusses a force model for the mechanics of seismic decoupling and back arc spreading at subduction zones. This model predicts three regimes: seismically coupled compressional arcs; seismically decoupled extensional arcs; and strongly extensional arcs with back arc spreading.

  14. Seismic Holography of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The basic goal of the project was to extend holographic seismic imaging techniques developed under a previous NASA contract, and to incorporate phase diagnostics. Phase-sensitive imaging gives us a powerful probe of local thermal and Doppler perturbations in active region subphotospheres, allowing us to map thermal structure and flows associated with "acoustic moats" and "acoustic glories". These remarkable features were discovered during our work, by applying simple acoustic power holography to active regions. Included in the original project statement was an effort to obtain the first seismic images of active regions on the Sun's far surface.

  15. Seismic gaps and source zones of recent large earthquakes in coastal Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, J.W.; Spence, W.

    1979-01-01

    The earthquakes of central coastal Peru occur principally in two distinct zones of shallow earthquake activity that are inland of and parallel to the axis of the Peru Trench. The interface-thrust (IT) zone includes the great thrust-fault earthquakes of 17 October 1966 and 3 October 1974. The coastal-plate interior (CPI) zone includes the great earthquake of 31 May 1970, and is located about 50 km inland of and 30 km deeper than the interface thrust zone. The occurrence of a large earthquake in one zone may not relieve elastic strain in the adjoining zone, thus complicating the application of the seismic gap concept to central coastal Peru. However, recognition of two seismic zones may facilitate detection of seismicity precursory to a large earthquake in a given zone; removal of probable CPI-zone earthquakes from plots of seismicity prior to the 1974 main shock dramatically emphasizes the high seismic activity near the rupture zone of that earthquake in the five years preceding the main shock. Other conclusions on the seismicity of coastal Peru that affect the application of the seismic gap concept to this region are: (1) Aftershocks of the great earthquakes of 1966, 1970, and 1974 occurred in spatially separated clusters. Some clusters may represent distinct small source regions triggered by the main shock rather than delimiting the total extent of main-shock rupture. The uncertainty in the interpretation of aftershock clusters results in corresponding uncertainties in estimates of stress drop and estimates of the dimensions of the seismic gap that has been filled by a major earthquake. (2) Aftershocks of the great thrust-fault earthquakes of 1966 and 1974 generally did not extend seaward as far as the Peru Trench. (3) None of the three great earthquakes produced significant teleseismic activity in the following month in the source regions of the other two earthquakes. The earthquake hypocenters that form the basis of this study were relocated using station

  16. Rheological control of Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodholt, John; Stein, Seth

    1988-01-01

    Intermediate and deep focus earthquakes in Wadati-Benioff zones are considered, and it is suggested that although seismicity in downgoing slabs is restricted to their cold and strong interior, the seismicity distribution is not easily described as being controlled by a single lithospheric strength value. A numerical thermal model is used to compute strength contours for flow law constants reported from laboratory experiments, and it is shown that the expected pressure strengthening is large enough that the slab should have considerable strength well below the deepest seismicity. The results indicate that either a strongly depth-dependent limiting strength in downgoing slabs exists, or factors in addition to strength control the distribution of subduction zone earthquakes.

  17. Recurrent intraplate tectonism in the new madrid seismic zone.

    PubMed

    Zoback, M D; Hamilton, R M; Crone, A J; Russ, D P; McKeown, F A; Brockman, S R

    1980-08-29

    For the first time, New Madrid seismicity can be linked to specific structural features that have been reactivated through geologic time. Extensive seismic reflection profiling reveals major faults coincident with the main earthquake trends in the area and with structural deformation apparently caused by repeated episodes of igneous activity.

  18. Recurrent intraplate tectonism in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Zoback, M.D.; Hamilton, R.M.; Crone, A.J.; Russ, D.P.; McKeown, F.A.; Brockman, S.R.

    1980-08-29

    For the first time, New Madrid seismicity can be linked to specific structural features that have been reactivated through geologic time. Extensive seismic reflection profiling reveals major faults coincident with the main earthquake trends in the area and with structural deformation apparently caused by repeated episodes of igneous activity.

  19. Transition Zone of the Cascadia Subduction Fault: Insights from Seismic Imaging of Slow Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.

    2012-12-01

    Transition zone lies between the updip locked and downdip freely slipping zone, and presumably marks the downdip extent of rupture during large megathrust earthquakes. Tectonic behavior of the transition zone and its possible implications on the occurrence of destructive megathurst earthquakes, however, remain poorly understood mainly due to lack of seismic events in this zone. Slow earthquakes, marked by seismically observed tremor and geodetically observed slow slip, occur in the transition zone offering a unique window to this zone, and allow us to study the dynamics of this enigmatic part of the fault. I developed a novel multi beam-backprojection (MBBP) algorithm to image slow earthquakes with high resolution using small-aperture seismic arrays. Application of MBBP technique on slow earthquakes in Cascadia indicates that the majority of the tremor is located near the plate interface [Ghosh et al., JGR, 2012]. Spatiotemporal distribution of tremor is fairly complex, and strikingly different over different time scales. Transition zone appears to be characterized by several patches with dimension of tens of kilometers. The patches behave like asperities, and possibly represent more seismic part of the fault embedded within a relatively aseismic background. Tremor asperities are spatially stable and marked by prolific tremor activity. These tremor asperities seem to control evolution of slow earthquakes and likely represent rheological and/or frictional heterogeneity on the fault plane. In addition, structural features on the fault plane of the transition zone seem to play an important role in shaping the characteristics of the seismic energy radiated from here. Dynamically evolving state-of-stress during slow earthquakes and its interaction with the fault structures possibly govern near-continuous rapid streaking of tremor [Ghosh et al., G-cubed, 2010] and diverse nature of tremor propagations observed over different time scales. Overall, slow quakes are giving

  20. An Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography Focused on the New Madrid Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The ambient seismic field has emerged as a viable tool for imaging Earth structure through the estimation of surface-wave Green's functions. The seismotectonic context of the New Madrid Fault Zone is puzzling, and we aim to better understand the structure using surface waves. The signature of an active fault zone should translate into relatively high attenuation and clear velocity variations. We use the Spatial AutoCorrelation Method to extract phase velocity and attenuation measurements from USArray mobile seismic network data in the central and eastern United States. We produce images of spatial variation in phase velocity and attenuation, sampling the crust and upper mantle at various depths. We investigate the lithospheric context within which the New Madrid fault zone resides, to help shed light on its likelihood for future seismic hazard.

  1. Velocity Structure in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone: Velocity Models Retrieved from different Earthquake Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Löberich, E.; Kieslich, A.; Calo, M.; Vavrycuk, V.; Buske, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake swarms, fluid migration and gas springs are indications of the ongoing geodynamic processes within the West Bohemia seismic zone located at the Czech-German border. The possible relationship between the fluids, gas and seismicity is of particular interest and has motivated numerous past, ongoing and future studies, including a multidisciplinary monitoring proposal through the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). The most seismically active area within the West Bohemia seismic zone is located at the Czech town Nový Kostel. The Nový Kostel zone experiences frequent swarms of several hundreds to thousands of earthquakes over a period of weeks to several months. The seismicity is always located in the same area and depth range (~5-15 km), however the activated fault segments and planes differ. For example, the 2008 swarm activated faults along the southern end of the seismic zone, the 2011 swarm activated the northern segment, and the recent 2014 swarm activated the middle of the seismic zone. This indicates changes to the local stress field, and may relate to fluid migration and/or the complicated tectonic situation. The West Bohemia Seismic Network (WEBNET) is ideally located for studying the Nový Kostel swarm area and provides good azimuthal coverage. Here, we use the high quality P- and S-wave arrival picks recorded by WEBNET to calculate swarm-dependent velocity models for the 2008 and 2011 swarms, and an averaged (swarm independent) model using earthquakes recorded between 1991 and 2011. To this end, we use double-difference tomography to calculate P- and S-wave velocity models. The models are compared and examined in terms of swarm-dependent velocities and structures. Since the P-to-S velocity ratio is particularly sensitive to the presence of pore fluids, we derive ratio models directly from the inverted P- and S-wave models in order to investigate the potential influence of fluids on the seismicity. Finally, clustering

  2. Tsunami potential assessment based on rupture zones, focal mechanisms and repeat times of strong earthquakes in the major Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agalos, Apostolos; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.; Kijko, Andrzej; Papageorgiou, Antonia; Smit, Ansie; Triantafyllou, Ioanna

    2016-04-01

    In the major Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone, extended from Azores islands in the west to the easternmost Mediterranean Sea in the east, including the Marmara and Black Seas, a number of 22 tsunamigenic zones have been determined from historical and instrumental tsunami documentation. Although some tsunamis were produced by volcanic activity or landslides, the majority of them was generated by strong earthquakes. Since the generation of seismic tsunamis depends on several factors, like the earthquake size, focal depth and focal mechanism, the study of such parameters is of particular importance for the assessment of the potential for the generation of future tsunamis. However, one may not rule out the possibility for tsunami generation in areas outside of the 22 zones determined so far. For the Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone we have compiled a catalogue of strong, potentially tsunamigenic (focal depth less than 100 km) historical earthquakes from various data bases and other sources. The lateral areas of rupture zones of these earthquakes were determined. Rupture zone is the area where the strain after the earthquake has dropped substantially with respect the strain before the earthquake. Aftershock areas were assumed to determine areas of rupture zones for instrumental earthquakes. For historical earthquakes macroseismic criteria were used such as spots of higher-degree seismic intensity and of important ground failures. For the period of instrumental seismicity, focal mechanism solutions from CMT, EMMA and other data bases were selected for strong earthquakes. From the geographical distribution of seismic rupture zones and the corresponding focal mechanisms in the entire Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone we determined potentially tsunamigenic zones regardless they are known to have produced seismic tsunamis in the past or not. An attempt has been made to calculate in each one of such zones the repeat times of strong

  3. Log of an exploratory trench in the New Madrid seismic zone near Blytheville, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haller, Kathleen M.; Crone, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    During the winter of 1811-12, at least three major earthquakes having estimated magnitudes of MS 8.3-8.8 (Nuttli and Herrmann, 1984) struck the area near New Madrid, Mo. Since the 1811-12 series of earthquakes, 20 damaging earthquakes have occurred in the area (Nuttli, 1982), making the New Madrid seismic zone (fig. 1) the most seismically active area in the Eastern United States (Hadley and Devine, 1974).  The zone, extending from about lat 35° to 37° N., approximately parallels the Mississippi River and encompasses an area roughly 50 km wide (Nuttli, 1979).

  4. Is there a zone of weakness beneath the New Madrid and Wabash Valley Seismic Zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Gilbert, H. J.; Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.; Yang, X.; Marshak, S.; Larson, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The US midcontinent contains several intraplate seismic zones, including the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) sitting above the Reelfoot Rift, and the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone (WVSZ), associated with a smaller Grayville Graben, stretching along the border between Illinois and Indiana. This study provides a new estimate of the velocity structure beneath the area based on observations from the Transportable Array and the OIINK (Ozarks-Illinois-INdiana-Kentucky) FlexArray experiment in the region. Numerous models, involving a zone of weakness either in the crust or the mantle, have been used to explain the seismicity in the NMSZ. Here we present a shear velocity model of the lithosphere beneath the midcontinent by inverting dispersion curves of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, which are primarily sensitive to the shear wave speeds. We find no spatial correlation between the crustal velocity variations and the two seismic zones. But we do observe that low velocities (~ 4% lower than the measured average of the area) exist in the mantle beneath the NMSZ at depths between 90 and 125 km. The low upper mantle velocities extend to the north and reach the WVSZ, where they are about 3% lower than the average. Velocity variations can result from thermal or compositional heterogeneities, although a thermal perturbation is less likely in this area because no clear surface heat flow anomaly is observed. Compositional heterogeneities, such as the presence of hydrous minerals or contamination by enriched mantle from a plume can reduce seismic velocities as well as the mechanical strength of a region, which would produce a weak zone. The lithosphere beneath a failed rift which has already undergone an earlier phase of deformation is more susceptible to compositional modification and weakening compared to an intact part of a craton. Thus, the two seismic zones may mark locations where deformation has been localized in the crust above a weak mantle due to their lower integrated

  5. Seismic investigation of an ocean-continent transition zone in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Qiu, X.; Xu, H.; Zhan, W.; Sun, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Rifted continental margins and basins are mainly formed by the lithospheric extension. Thined lithosphere of passive continental margins results in decompression melt of magma and created oceanic crust and thined ocean-continent transition (OCT) zone. Two refraction profiles used ocean bottom seismometers deployed in the broad continental shelf and three multi-channel seismic reflection lines in the northern South China Sea, acquired by the ship "Shiyan 2" of the South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2010, are processed and interpreted in this study. Seismic reflection lines cut through the Dongsha rise, Zhu-1 and Zhu-2 depression within a Tertiary basin, Pear River Mouth basin (called as Zhujiangkou basin). These tectonic features are clear imaged in the seismic reflection records. Numerous normal faults, cutted through the basement and related to the stretch of the northern South China Sea margin, are imaged and interpreted. Reflection characteristics of the ocean-continent transition (OCT) zone are summaried and outlined. The COT zone is mainly divided into the northern syn-rift subsidence zone, central volcano or buried volcano uplift zone and tilt faulted block near the South Chia Sea basin. Compared to the previous seismic reflection data and refraction velocity models, the segmentation range of the OCT zone is outlined, from width of about 225 km in the northeastern South China Sea , of 160 km in the central to of 110 km in the north-central South China Sea. Based on the epicenter distribution of sporadic and large than 6 magnitude earthquakes, it suggests the OCT zone in the northern South China Sea at present is still an active seismic zone.

  6. Major Existence of Very Low Frequency Earthquakes in Background Seismicity Along Subduction Zone of South-western Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The condense, high quality and equalized broadband seismic network provided us to recognize the variety of seismic sources. The active volcanoes excite seismic waves with various frequency characteristics. Some cases show the long period seismic waves greater than 10 sec associates with volcanic activities. The tectonic seismic events originated at the close to trench zone are frequently lack of high frequency, greater than 1 Hz, seismic wave component. Meanwhile, the many low frequency earthquakes and tremors whose sources are not explicated are occurred in lower crust and subcrustal region. The subduction zone of Philippine Sea plate in south-western Japan is actively genetic area of low frequency earthquake group. The broadband seismic array of Japan region observed unknown long period ground motions. The seismograms are higher amplitude between 10 and 30 sec period than ground noise level. The earthquake JMA and USGS catalogues don_ft list about these long period seismograms. The arrival order of wave packet means that these events locate subduction zone around Japan. The hypocenters of unknown events are estimated by arrival times of vertical peak amplitude using the assumption that the ground motion dominates Rayleigh wave. The more detailed determination of major events is performed by combined technique for moment tensor inversion and grid search. The moment magnitude of uncatalogued event is greater than 3.5 because of the detection limitation. The largest event is distributed to about 4.5 Mw level and special event is greater than 5.0. The frequency characteristics show that source time is 7 to 20 sec by comparison with synthetic seismograms. We call these uncatalogued events _gvery low frequency earthquake_h. The hypocenters are located to two kinds of zones along the Philippine Sea subducting plate in south-western Japan. The one zone is very close to the trough. The seismicity listed by earthquake catalogues is low level in the zone and hypocenters are

  7. Seismic structure beneath the Rivera subduction zone from finite-frequency seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ting; Grand, Stephen P.; Wilson, David; Guzman-Speziale, Marco; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan Martin; Dominguez-Reyes, Tonatiuh; Ni, James

    2009-01-01

    The subduction zone of western Mexico is a unique region on Earth where microplate capture and overriding plate disruption are occurring today. The young, small Rivera plate and the adjacent Cocos plate are subducting beneath the Jalisco block of Mexico. Here, we present a P wave tomographic model of the upper mantle to 400 km depth beneath the Jalisco block and surrounding regions using teleseismic P waves recorded by the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone (MARS) and Colima Volcano Deep Seismic Experiment (CODEX) seismic arrays. The inversion used 12,188 P wave residuals and finite-frequency theory to backproject the 3-D traveltime sensitivity kernels through the model. Below a depth of 150 km, the tomography model shows a clear gap between the Rivera and Cocos slabs that increases in size with depth. The gap between the plates lies beneath the northern part of the Colima graben and may be responsible for the location of Colima volcano. The images indicate that the deep Rivera plate is subducting more steeply than does the adjacent Cocos plate and also has a more northerly trajection. At a depth of about 100 km, both the Rivera and Cocos slabs have increased dips such that the slabs are deeper than 200 km beneath the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). It is also found that the Rivera plate is at roughly 140-km depth beneath the young central Jalisco Volcanic lineament. Our images suggest that the Rivera plate and westernmost Cocos plate have recently rolled back toward the trench. This scenario may explain the unusual magmatic activity seen in the TMVB.

  8. Storage of fluids and melts at subduction zones detectable by seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luehr, B. G.; Koulakov, I.; Rabbel, W.; Brotopuspito, K. S.; Surono, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades investigations at active continental margins discovered the link between the subduction of fluid saturated oceanic plates and the process of ascent of these fluids and partial melts forming a magmatic system that leads to volcanism at the earth surface. For this purpose the geophysical structure of the mantle and crustal range above the down going slap has been imaged. Information is required about the slap, the ascent paths, as well as the reservoires of fluids and partial melts in the mantle and the crust up to the volcanoes at the surface. Statistically the distance between the volcanoes of volcanic arcs down to their Wadati Benioff zone results of approximately 100 kilometers in mean value. Surprisingly, this depth range shows pronounced seismicity at most of all subduction zones. Additionally, mineralogical laboratory investigations have shown that dehydration of the diving plate has a maximum at temperature and pressure conditions we find at around 100 km depth. The ascent of the fluids and the appearance of partial melts as well as the distribution of these materials in the crust can be resolved by seismic tomographic methods using records of local natural seismicity. With these methods these areas are corresponding to lowered seismic velocities, high Vp/Vs ratios, as well as increased attenuation of seismic shear waves. The anomalies and their time dependence are controlled by the fluids. The seismic velocity anomalies detected so far are within a range of a few per cent to more than 30% reduction. But, to explore plate boundaries large and complex amphibious experiments are required, in which active and passive seismic investigations should be combined to achieve best results. The seismic station distribution should cover an area from before the trench up to far behind the volcanic chain, to provide under favorable conditions information down to 150 km depth. Findings of different subduction zones will be compared and discussed.

  9. Seismic anisotropy in the Morcles nappe shear zone: Implications for seismic imaging of crustal scale shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Hirt, Ann M.; Herwegh, Marco; Ebert, Andreas; Walter, Jens M.; Leiss, Bernd; Burlini, Luigi

    2013-09-01

    Microstructures and textures of calcite mylonites from the Morcles nappe large-scale shear zone in southwestern Switzerland develop principally as a function of 1) extrinsic physical parameters including temperature, stress, strain, strain rate and 2) intrinsic parameters, such as mineral composition. We collected rock samples at a single location from this shear zone, on which laboratory ultrasonic velocities, texture and microstructures were investigated and quantified. The samples had different concentration of secondary mineral phases (< 5 up to 40 vol.%). Measured seismic P wave anisotropy ranges from 6.5% for polyphase mylonites (~ 40 vol.%) to 18.4% in mylonites with < 5 vol.% secondary phases. Texture strength of calcite is the main factor governing the seismic P wave anisotropy. Measured S wave splitting is generally highest in the foliation plane, but its origin is more difficult to explain solely by calcite texture. Additional texture measurements were made on calcite mylonites with low concentration of secondary phases (≤ 10 vol.%) along the metamorphic gradient of the shear zone (15 km distance). A systematic increase in texture strength is observed moving from the frontal part of the shear zone (anchimetamorphism; 280 °C) to the higher temperature, basal part (greenschist facies; 350-400 °C). Calculated P wave velocities become increasingly anisotropic towards the high-strain part of the nappe, from an average of 5.8% in the frontal part to 13.2% in the root of the basal part. Secondary phases raise an additional complexity, and may act either to increase or decrease seismic anisotropy of shear zone mylonites. In light of our findings we reinterpret the origin of some seismically reflective layers in the Grône-Zweisimmen line in southwestern Switzerland (PNR20 Swiss National Research Program). We hypothesize that reflections originate in part from the lateral variation in textural and microstructural arrangement of calcite mylonites in shear

  10. Group velocity tomography of the upper crust in the eastern Tennessee seismic zone from ambient noise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandmayr, Enrico; Kuponiyi, Ayodeji Paul; Arroucau, Pierre; Vlahovic, Gordana

    2016-10-01

    The eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) is the second most seismically active area in the central and eastern United States after the New Madrid seismic zone, but the relatively weak seismicity and the absence of correlation between the seismicity distribution and the surface geology make its seismogenic potential controversial. In this work we investigate the structure of the upper crust in the ETSZ by means of group velocity tomography maps from seismic noise data. Results show that the seismic activity is associated with a relatively low velocity anomaly mainly located in one or more basement blocks. These blocks, bounded to the NW by the NY-AL lineament and to the SE by the Clingman lineaments, are buried beneath low velocity strata consistent with the presence of a relatively thick sedimentary cover. The imaged low velocity anomaly migrates towards the SE at increasing periods, suggesting a possible SE dipping weak structure where most of the seismic activity takes place. The correlation between the NY-AL magnetic signature and the position of the seismic velocity anomalies supports the interpretation of the low velocity zone as a major basement fault projected to the surface as the NY-AL magnetic lineaments. The fault juxtaposes Granite-Rhyolite basement to the NW with Grenville southern Appalachian basement to the SE.

  11. Fault slip rates in the modern new madrid seismic zone

    PubMed

    Mueller; Champion; Guccione; Kelson

    1999-11-05

    Structural and geomorphic analysis of late Holocene sediments in the Lake County region of the New Madrid seismic zone indicates that they are deformed by fault-related folding above the blind Reelfoot thrust fault. The widths of narrow kink bands exposed in trenches were used to model the Reelfoot scarp as a forelimb on a fault-bend fold; this, coupled with the age of folded sediment, yields a slip rate on the blind thrust of 6.1 +/- 0.7 mm/year for the past 2300 +/- 100 years. An alternative method used structural relief across the scarp and the estimated dip of the underlying blind thrust to calculate a slip rate of 4.8 +/- 0.2 mm/year. Geometric relations suggest that the right lateral slip rate on the New Madrid seismic zone is 1.8 to 2.0 mm/year.

  12. The earthquake potential of the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.; Sims, J.D.; Lafferty, R.H.; Wolf, L.W.; Haynes, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    The fault system responsible for New Madrid seismicity has generated temporally clustered very large earthquakes in A.D. 900 ?? 100 years and A.D. 1450 ?? 150 years as well as in 1811-1812. Given the uncertainties in dating liquefaction features, the time between the past three New Madrid events may be as short as 200 years and as long as 800 years, with an average of 500 years. This advance in understanding the Late Holocene history of the New Madrid seismic zone and thus, the contemporary tectonic behavior of the associated fault system was made through studies of hundreds of earthquake-induced liquefaction features at more than 250 sites across the New Madrid region. We have found evidence that prehistoric sand blows, like those that formed during the 1811-1812 earthquakes, are probably compound structures resulting from multiple earthquakes closely clustered in time or earthquake sequences. From the spatial distribution and size of sand blows and their sedimentary units, we infer the source zones and estimate the magnitudes of earthquakes within each sequence and thereby characterize the detailed behavior of the fault system. It appears that fault rupture was complex and that the central branch of the seismic zone produced very large earthquakes during the A.D. 900 and A.D. 1450 events as well as in 1811-1812. On the basis of a minimum recurrence rate of 200 years, we are now entering the period during which the next 1811-1812-type event could occur.

  13. Multiscale seismic imaging of the Western-Pacific subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2011-12-01

    We used multiscale seismic tomography to determine the detailed 3-D structure of the crust and mantle under the Western-Pacific subduction zone. The subducting Pacific and Philippine Sea (PHS) slabs are imaged clearly from their entering the mantle at the oceanic trenches to their reaching the mantle transition zone and finally to the core-mantle boundary (CMB). High-resolution local tomography of Northeast Japan has imaged the shallow portion of the slab from the Japan Trench down to about 200 km depth under Japan Sea. The 3-D Vp and Vs structures of the forearc region under the Pacific Ocean are constrained by locating suboceanic events precisely with sP depth phases. Strong structural heterogeneity is revealed in the megathrust zone under the forearc region, and there is a good correlation between the heterogeneity and the distribution of large thrust earthquakes including the great 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0). A joint inversion of local and teleseismic data imaged the subducting Pacific slab down to 670 km depth under the Japan Islands and the Japan Sea. The PHS slab is detected down to 500 km depth under SW Japan. A mantle upwelling is found under SW Japan that rises from about 400 km depth right above the Pacific slab up to the PHS slab. Regional and global tomography revealed the Pacific slab that is stagnant in the mantle transition zone under Eastern China. A big mantle wedge (BMW) has formed in the upper mantle above the stagnant slab. Convective circulations in the BMW and deep dehydration of the stagnant slab may have caused the intraplate volcanoes in NE Asia, such as the Changbai and Wudalianchi volcanoes. The active Tengchong volcanism in SW China is caused by a similar process in the BMW above the subducting Burma (or Indian) slab. Global tomography shows pieces of fast anomalies in the middle and lower mantle as well as in the D" layer above the CMB, suggesting that the stagnant slab finally collapses down to the lower mantle and CMB as a

  14. Seismicity and focal parameters of the coastal zone of Guerrero-Oaxaca states, Mexico and its relation with the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaleta Ramos, A.; Quintanar, L.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we analyzed the seismicity in the coastal zone of Mexican states Guerrero and Oaxaca, occurred in the period of 1998-2009. For last the 6 months, a temporary seismic network was used, and a permanent station of the Mexican Seismological Service. We try with this analysis to have a better understanding of the micro seismicity of the zone, and find out a relation with the seismic cycle. Using the Seismic Moment Tensor determination, we also determine the stress transference in the coseismic stage. We located 373 events whose magnitudes oscillate within the rank from 1,4 to 6.0. The epicentral distribution shows a seismic activity accumulation in 2 zones, which suggests the existence of individual zones of weakening or asperities, as reported by other authors during the so-called “doublet” of Ometepec 1982. The focal mechanisms determined for the majors events show an inverse faulting mostly. Hypocentral profiles of the microseismicity allow us to sketch an angle of subduction of the Cocos plate of nearly 10° in the zone.

  15. Tectonic stress within the New Madrid seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grana, Jeffrey P.; Richardson, Randall M.

    1996-03-01

    Refraction data indicate a significant high-density rift pillow beneath the New Madrid seismic zone. We present results of linear and nonlinear viscoelastic finite element modeling to determine whether support of the rift pillow may contribute significantly to the total present-day stress field, and we consider the implications for intraplate seismicity. These models were run for a loading time of 100 m.y. to account for relaxation and transfer of stress since the last reactivation of the rift in the mid-Mesozoic. Results indicate that the nonlinear viscoelastic model with rheological stratification based on composition and temperature agrees well with the observed deformation within the seismic zone and with estimates of regional stress magnitudes. The model predicts a maximum compression of 30-40 MPa above the rift pillow in the center of the rift axis. If the magnitude of local compression predicted by the nonlinear model produces the inferred clockwise rotation of the order of 10°-30° in the direction of SHmax (maximum horizontal compression) near the rift axis, the magnitude of regional compression is a factor of 1 to 2 times the magnitude of local compression and consistent with an origin due to ridge push forces. The addition of the local stress associated with the rift pillow, however, results in an approximately 30% reduction in the resolved maximum horizontal shear stress. Thus, while the stress associated with the rift pillow can rotate the stress field into an orientation favorable for failure, reduction in the resolved shear stress requires a separate mechanism for strength reduction. Results of the modeling indicate that stresses from the load of the rift pillow may still be present in the upper crust even after 100 m.y. and may still play a role in present-day deformation and seismicity of the New Madrid seismic zone. Local stress fields of significant tectonic magnitudes may also occur around other ancient rift pillows and help explain the

  16. High-resolution 3D seismic imaging of the Longmenshan fault zone structure using double-difference seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Yu, X.; Zhang, W.

    2011-12-01

    The Longmenshan fault zone where the 2008 M8.0 Wenchuan, China, earthquake occurred is located in the boundary area between the Songpan-Garze block to the west and the Sichuan basin to the east. This area is characterized by complex structures and active seismotectonics. We collected both direct P wave absolute arrival times and differential arrival times from 2551 events in the period of 1992 to 1999 recorded by China National Seismic Network. The double-difference seismic tomography (tomoDD) method is used to determine event relocations and the P wave crustal and upper mantle velocity structure. Our results show that obvious velocity variations exist in the crust and upper mantle beneath the Longmenshan fault zone. The inferred velocity structure of the upper crust correlates well with the surface geological and topographic features in this area: the east of Tibet plateau is imaged as a prominent high-velocity zone, while the Longmenshan fault and Sichuan basin are imaged as a low-velocity feature. Compared with upper crust, the Longmenshan fault zone lies in the transition zone between high velocity anomalies to the west and low velocity anomalies to the east in the middle crust, where most earthquakes occurred. While in the lower crust, the fault zone lies in the transition zone between low velocity anomalies to the west and high velocity anomalies to the east. In upper mantle, a prominent low velocity anomaly exists under the Wenchuan main shock region. This suggests that lower crustal flow has affect on the occurrence of the Wenchuan earthquake. There is also a obvious velocity structure difference between the south and north segment of the Longmenshan fault zone in the whole crust and upper mantle, low velocity anomalies in the south segment and prominent lateral heterogeneous in the north segment, respectively. The velocity difference maybe resulted in the northeastwards of the Wenchuan aftershocks.

  17. On subduction zone earthquakes and the Pacific Northwest seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Dae H.

    1991-12-01

    A short review of subduction zone earthquakes and the seismicity of the Pacific Northwest region of the United States is provided for the purpose of a basis for assessing issues related to earthquake hazard evaluations for the region. This review of seismotectonics regarding historical subduction zone earthquakes and more recent seismological studies pertaining to rupture processes of subduction zone earthquakes, with specific references to the Pacific Northwest, is made in this brief study. Subduction zone earthquakes tend to rupture updip and laterally from the hypocenter. Thus, the rupture surface tends to become more elongated as one considers larger earthquakes (there is limited updip distance that is strongly coupled, whereas rupture length can be quite large). The great Aleutian-Alaska earthquakes of 1957, 1964, and 1965 had rupture lengths of greater than 650 km. The largest earthquake observed instrumentally, the M{sub W} 9.5, 1960 Chile Earthquake, had a rupture length over 1000 km. However, earthquakes of this magnitude are very unlikely on Cascadia. The degree of surface shaking has a very strong dependency on the depth and style of rupture. The rupture surface during a great earthquake shows heterogeneous stress drop, displacement, energy release, etc. The high strength zones are traditionally termed asperities and these asperities control when and how large an earthquake is generated. Mapping of these asperities in specific subduction zones is very difficult before an earthquake. They show up more easily in inversions of dynamic source studies of earthquake ruptures, after an earthquake. Because seismic moment is based on the total radiated-energy from an earthquake, the moment-based magnitude M{sub W} is superior to all other magnitude estimates, such as M{sub L}, m{sub b}, M{sub bLg}, M{sub S}, etc Probably, just to have a common language, non-moment magnitudes should be converted to M{sub W} in any discussions of subduction zone earthquakes.

  18. Correlation between Induced Seismic Events and Hydraulic Fracturing activities in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R.; Aminzadeh, F.; Tiwari, A.

    2014-12-01

    Induced seismicity observed in Oklahoma and Ohio have raised environmental concern to an alarming level and thus any plausible correlation between subsurface injection and production activities have become an significant area of study. As per US Seismic Hazard map, California lies in highly sensitive zone, which makes understanding of stimulation induced seismic events critically important. The copious number of seismic events due to presence of numerous faults in California benefits understanding seismicity of the region but makes it difficult to distinguish induced seismic events from naturally occurring seismic events. Since regional models are considered more effective in understanding the seismicity of the region, this study aims in understanding impact of hydraulic fracturing activities in various oilfields in California. The focus of the study is to identify sensitive zones in California which might have observed seismic activities induced due to hydraulic fracturing. This has been done using the criteria of spatial and temporal co-relation between fracturing activities and seismic events for oilfields with significant number of fracturing activities. The seismic and well data used for this study is acquired from public sources and have been integrated in an efficient manner using the GIS tool and iterative querying. The two step methodology implemented for this work involves segregating the induced seismic events from natural events based on the depth of the event and seismic history of the region and then spatially and temporally studying it with regards to hydraulic fracturing in vicinity of the seismic event.

  19. Neotectonic structure in the central new madrid seismic zone: Evidence from multimode seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolery, E.W.; Street, R.L.; Wang, Z.; Harris, J.B.; McIntyre, J.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 14.5 km of conventional P-wave and 2.2 km of horizontally polarized shear-wave seismic-reflection data acquired in the Kentucky Bend area of the central New Madrid Seismic Zone provide evidence of extensive neotectonic near-surface structure. The style and geometry of the deformation are consistent with documented historical geomorphic features, contemporary geomorphic features, and contemporary seismicity. The data image high-angle transpressional faults that strike between N30??W and N50??W. The fault planes exhibit apparent northeast and southwest dips. The opposing high-angle planes represent secondary splay or imbricate faults that responded to torsional bending of a lower-angle master fault.

  20. CPT site characterization for seismic hazards in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, T.; Mayne, P.W.; Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.; Van Arsdale, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    A series of cone penetration tests (CPTs) were conducted in the vicinity of the New Madrid seismic zone in central USA for quantifying seismic hazards, obtaining geotechnical soil properties, and conducting studies at liquefaction sites related to the 1811-1812 and prehistoric New Madrid earthquakes. The seismic piezocone provides four independent measurements for delineating the stratigraphy, liquefaction potential, and site amplification parameters. At the same location, two independent assessments of soil liquefaction susceptibility can be made using both the normalized tip resistance (qc1N) and shear wave velocity (Vs1). In lieu of traditional deterministic approaches, the CPT data can be processed using probability curves to assess the level and likelihood of future liquefaction occurrence. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Seismic Evidence for a Low-Velocity Zone in the Upper Crust Beneath Mount Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, A.; Gasparini, P.; Virieux, J.; Le Meur, H.; de Natale, G.; Biella, G.; Boschi, E.; Capuano, P.; de Franco, R.; dell'Aversna, P.; de Matteis, R.; Guerra, I.; Iannaccone, G.; Mirabile, L.; Vilardo, G.

    1996-10-01

    A two-dimensional active seismic experiment was performed on Mount Vesuvius: Explosive charges were set off at three sites, and the seismic signal along a dense line of 82 seismometers was recorded. A high-velocity basement, formed by Mesozoic carbonates, was identified 2 to 3 kilometers beneath the volcano. A slower (P-wave velocity V_P backsimeq 3.4 to 3.8 kilometers per second) and shallower high-velocity zone underlies the central part of the volcano. Large-amplitude late arrivals with a dominant horizontal wave motion and low-frequency content were identified as a P to S phase converted at a depth of about 10 kilometers at the top of a low-velocity zone (V_P < 3 kilometers per second), which might represent a melting zone.

  2. Fault zone regulation, seismic hazard, and social vulnerability in Los Angeles, California: Hazard or urban amenity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toké, Nathan A.; Boone, Christopher G.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón

    2014-09-01

    Public perception and regulation of environmental hazards are important factors in the development and configuration of cities. Throughout California, probabilistic seismic hazard mapping and geologic investigations of active faults have spatially quantified earthquake hazard. In Los Angeles, these analyses have informed earthquake engineering, public awareness, the insurance industry, and the government regulation of developments near faults. Understanding the impact of natural hazards regulation on the social and built geography of cities is vital for informing future science and policy directions. We constructed a relative social vulnerability index classification for Los Angeles to examine the social condition within regions of significant seismic hazard, including areas regulated as Alquist-Priolo (AP) Act earthquake fault zones. Despite hazard disclosures, social vulnerability is lowest within AP regulatory zones and vulnerability increases with distance from them. Because the AP Act requires building setbacks from active faults, newer developments in these zones are bisected by parks. Parcel-level analysis demonstrates that homes adjacent to these fault zone parks are the most valuable in their neighborhoods. At a broad scale, a Landsat-based normalized difference vegetation index shows that greenness near AP zones is greater than the rest of the metropolitan area. In the parks-poor city of Los Angeles, fault zone regulation has contributed to the construction of park space within areas of earthquake hazard, thus transforming zones of natural hazard into amenities, attracting populations of relatively high social status, and demonstrating that the distribution of social vulnerability is sometimes more strongly tied to amenities than hazards.

  3. Landslides in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Jibson, R.W.; Keefer, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    During the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12, bluffs bordering the Mississippi alluvial plain in the epicentral region underwent large-scale landsliding. Between Cairo, Illinois and Memphis, Tennessee, the authors mapped 221 large landslides of three types: (1) old, eroded, coherent block slides and slumps; (2) old earth flows; and (3) young, fresh slumps that occur only along near-river bluffs and are the only landslides present along such bluffs. Historical accounts and field evidence indicate that most or all old coherent slides and earth flows date to the 1811-12 earthquakes and that the only currently active, large-scale landsliding in the area occurs along bluffs bordering the river. Analysis of old coherent slides and earth flows indicates that landslide distribution is most strongly affected by slope height, but that proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes also has a significant effect. Slope-stability analyses of an old coherent slide and an earth flow selected as representative of the principal kinds of landslides present indicate that both were stable in aseismic conditions even when water tables were at highest possible levels. However, a dynamic Newmark displacement analysis shows that ground shaking such as that in 1811-12 would cause large displacements leading to catastrophic failure in both slides. These results indicate that in large earthquakes landsliding in much of the study are is likely. Moderate earthquakes may also trigger landslides at some locations.

  4. New Madrid Seismic Zone: a test case for naturally induced seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, S.J.

    1983-09-01

    Induced seismicity caused by man-made events, such as the filling of reservoirs has been well documented. In contrast, naturally induced seismicity has received little attention. It has been shown that a fluctuation of as little as several bars can trigger reservoir induced earthquakes. Naturally occurring phenomena generate similar fluctuations and could trigger earthquakes where the faults in ambient stress field are suitably oriented and close to failure. The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) presents an ideal test case for the study of naturally induced seismicity. The ideal data set for a study of triggering effects must contain a statistically significant number of events, a constant accumulated strain, and a limited focal region. New Madrid earthquakes are well documented from 1974 to the present, down to a magnitude approx. 1.8. They lie in a distinct fault pattern and occur as a reaction to the regional stress regime. A statistical correlation was made between the earthquakes and a variety of different types of loads, to see if New Madrid seismicity could be triggered by natural fluctuations. The types of triggers investigated ranged from solid earth tides to variations in barometric pressure, rainfall, and stages of the Mississippi River. This analysis becomes complex because each factor investigated creates individual stresses, as well as having imbedded in it a reaction to other factors.

  5. Subduction zone locking, strain partitioning, intraplate deformation and their implications to Seismic Hazards in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgana, G. A.; Mahdyiar, M.; Shen-Tu, B.; Pontbriand, C. W.; Klein, E.; Wang, F.; Shabestari, K.; Yang, W.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze active crustal deformation in South America (SA) using published GPS observations and historic seismicity along the Nazca Trench and the active Ecuador-Colombia-Venezuela Plate boundary Zone. GPS-constrained kinematisc models that incorporate block and continuum techniques are used to assess patterns of regional tectonic deformation and its implications to seismic potential. We determine interplate coupling distributions, fault slip-rates, and intraplate crustal strain rates in combination with historic earthquakes within 40 seismic zones crust to provide moment rate constraints. Along the Nazca subduction zone, we resolve a series of highly coupled patches, interpreted as high-friction producing "asperities" beneath the coasts of Ecuador, Peru and Chile. These include areas responsible for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule Earthquake and the 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique Earthquake. Predicted tectonic block motions and fault slip rates reveal that the northern part of South America deforms rapidly, with crustal fault slip rates as much as ~20 mm/a. Fault slip and locking patterns reveal that the Oca Ancón-Pilar-Boconó fault system plays a key role in absorbing most of the complex eastward and southward convergence patterns in northeastern Colombia and Venezuela, while the near-parallel system of faults in eastern Colombia and Ecuador absorb part of the transpressional motion due to the ~55 mm/a Nazca-SA plate convergence. These kinematic models, in combination with historic seismicity rates, provide moment deficit rates that reveal regions with high seismic potential, such as coastal Ecuador, Bucaramanga, Arica and Antofagasta. We eventually use the combined information from moment rates and fault coupling patterns to further constrain stochastic seismic hazard models of the region by implementing realistic trench rupture scenarios (see Mahdyiar et al., this volume).

  6. Seismic Forecasting of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Douglas; Lindsey, Charles

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and improved helioseismic imaging techniques of the far-side of the Sun as part of a synoptic monitor of solar activity. In collaboration with the MIDI team at Stanford University we are routinely applying our analysis to images within 24 hours of their acquisition by SOHO. For the first time, real-time seismic maps of large active regions on the Sun's far surface are publicly available. The synoptic images show examples of active regions persisting for one or more solar rotations, as well as those initially detected forming on the solar far side. Until recently, imaging the far surface of the Sun has been essentially blind to active regions more than about 50 degrees from the antipode of disk center. In a paper recently accepted for publication, we have demonstrated how acoustic travel-time perturbations may be mapped over the entire hemisphere of the Sun facing away from the Earth, including the polar regions. In addition to offering significant improvements to ongoing space weather forecasting efforts, the procedure offers the possibility of local seismic monitoring of both the temporal and spatial variations in the acoustic properties of the Sun over the entire far surface.

  7. A classification of morphoseismic features in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, R.; Stewart, D. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-03-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) contains thousands of surface features distributed over 5,000 square miles in four states. These are attributable to some combination of (1) seismically-induced liquefaction (SIL), (2) secondary deformation, and (3) seismically-induced slope failures. Most of these features were produced by the 1811--12 series of great earthquakes, but some predate and some postdate 1811--12. Subsequent non-seismic factors, such as hydrologically-induced liquefaction (HIL), mechanically-induced liquefaction (MIL), human activities, mass wasting, eolian and fluvial processes have modified all of these features. Morphoseismic features are new landforms produced by earthquakes, or are pre-existing landforms modified by them. Involved are complex interrelationships among several variables, including: (1) intensity and duration of seismic ground motion, (2) surface wave harmonics, (3) depth to water table, (4) depth to basement, (5) particle size, composition, and sorting of sediment making up the liquefied (LZ) and non-liquefied zones (NLZ), (6) topographic parameters, and (7) attitudes of beds and lenses susceptible to liquefaction. Morphoseismic features are depicted as results of a time-flow sequence initiated by primary basement disturbances which produce three major categories of surface response: secondary deformation, liquefaction and slope failure. Nine subcategories incorporate features produced by or resulting in: extruded sand, intruded sand, lateral spreading, faulting, subsidence of large areas, uplift of large areas, altered streams, coherent landslides, and incoherent landslides. The total morphoseismic features identified by this classification are 34 in number.

  8. Background seismicity rate at subduction zones linked to slab-bending-related hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Tomoaki; Ide, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Tectonic properties strongly control variations in seismicity among subduction zones. In particular, fluid distribution in subduction zones influences earthquake occurrence, and it varies among subduction zones due to variations in fluid sources such as hydrated oceanic plates. However, the relationship between variations in fluid distribution and variations in seismicity among subduction zones is unclear. Here we divide Earth's subduction zones into 111 regions and estimate background seismicity rates using the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We demonstrate that background seismicity rate correlates to the amount of bending of the incoming oceanic plate, which in turn is related to the hydration of oceanic plates via slab-bending-related faults. Regions with large bending may have high-seismicity rates because a strongly hydrated oceanic plate causes high pore fluid pressure and reduces the strength of the plate interface. We suggest that variations in fluid distribution can also cause variations in seismicity in subduction zones.

  9. Seismic exploration noise reduction in the Marginal Ice Zone.

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Dag; Sagen, Hanne

    2014-07-01

    A sonobuoy field was deployed in the Marginal Ice Zone of the Fram Strait in June 2011 to study the spatial variability of ambient noise. High noise levels observed at 10-200 Hz are attributed to distant (1400 km range) seismic exploration. The noise levels decreased with range into the ice cover; the reduction is fitted by a spreading loss model with a frequency-dependent attenuation factor less than for under-ice interior Arctic propagation. Numerical modeling predicts transmission loss of the same order as the observed noise level reduction and indicates a significant loss contribution from under-ice interaction.

  10. Seismic reflection imaging of two megathrust shear zones in the northern Cascadia subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Andrew J

    2004-03-11

    At convergent continental margins, the relative motion between the subducting oceanic plate and the overriding continent is usually accommodated by movement along a single, thin interface known as a megathrust. Great thrust earthquakes occur on the shallow part of this interface where the two plates are locked together. Earthquakes of lower magnitude occur within the underlying oceanic plate, and have been linked to geochemical dehydration reactions caused by the plate's descent. Here I present deep seismic reflection data from the northern Cascadia subduction zone that show that the inter-plate boundary is up to 16 km thick and comprises two megathrust shear zones that bound a >5-km-thick, approximately 110-km-wide region of imbricated crustal rocks. Earthquakes within the subducting plate occur predominantly in two geographic bands where the dip of the plate is inferred to increase as it is forced around the edges of the imbricated inter-plate boundary zone. This implies that seismicity in the subducting slab is controlled primarily by deformation in the upper part of the plate. Slip on the shallower megathrust shear zone, which may occur by aseismic slow slip, will transport crustal rocks into the upper mantle above the subducting oceanic plate and may, in part, provide an explanation for the unusually low seismic wave speeds that are observed there.

  11. Aftershock seismicity of the 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake rupture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dietrich; Tilmann, Frederik; Barrientos, Sergio E.; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Methe, Pascal; Moreno, Marcos; Heit, Ben; Agurto, Hans; Bernard, Pascal; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Beck, Susan

    2012-02-01

    On 27 February 2010 the Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake in Central Chile ruptured a seismic gap where significant strain had accumulated since 1835. Shortly after the mainshock a dense network of temporary seismic stations was installed along the whole rupture zone in order to capture the aftershock activity. Here, we present the aftershock distribution and first motion polarity focal mechanisms based on automatic detection algorithms and picking engines. By processing the seismic data between 15 March and 30 September 2010 from stations from IRIS, IPGP, GFZ and University of Liverpool we determined 20,205 hypocentres with magnitudes Mw between 1 and 5.5. Seismic activity occurs in six groups: 1.) Normal faulting outer rise events 2.) A shallow group of plate interface seismicity apparent at 25-35 km depth and 50-120 km distance to the trench with some variations between profiles. Along strike, the aftershocks occur largely within the zone of coseismic slip but extend ~ 50 km further north, and with predominantly shallowly dipping thrust mechanisms. Along dip, the events are either within the zone of coseismic slip, or downdip from it, depending on the coseismic slip model used. 3.) A third band of seismicity is observed further downdip at 40-50 km depth and further inland at 150-160 km trench perpendicular distance, with mostly shallow dipping (~ 28°) thrust focal mechanisms indicating rupture of the plate interface significantly downdip of the coseismic rupture, and presumably above the intersection of the continental Moho with the plate interface. 4.) A deep group of intermediate depth events between 80 and 120 km depth is present north of 36°S. Within the Maule segment, a large portion of events during the inter-seismic phase originated from this depth range. 5.) The magmatic arc exhibits a small amount of crustal seismicity but does not appear to show significantly enhanced activity after the Mw 8.8 Maule 2010 earthquake. 6.) Pronounced crustal aftershock activity

  12. Seismic characteristics of outer-rise earthquakes in the different seismic coupling subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Lin, Jing-Yi

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing the seismogenic zone of major subduction plate boundaries provides us a possible to reduce large earthquakes hazard. In the past several decades, many scientists have analyzed various geophysical methods and datasets, such as seismic and geodetic ground motion data, historical tsunami deposits, aftershock distributions, and seafloor bathymetry, trying to understand the mechanisms behind great devastating earthquakes, and to estimate the probability of a major earthquake occurrence in the future. In this study, by using the global earthquake catalog (GCMT) from January 1, 1976 to December 31, 2011. We firstly re-examines the outer-rise earthquake model proposed by the Christensen (1988) at the subduction zones suggested to have different coupling levels. The compressive stress cumulated during the subducting processes are often reflected by the occurrence of compressional outer-rise earthquakes. Thus, in the region where the compressional outer-rise earthquakes take place without any corresponding large underthrusting earthquakes, the seismic potential is usually considered to be high. We re-examined the high seismic potential areas determined by this criteria in Christensen (1988) and confirm that the large underthrusting earthquakes did really occur in the 30 years following the appearance of compressional outer-rise events, such as in Tonga region in the vicinity of 20S, a Mw 8.3 large earthquake occurred in 2006. This result represents that the outer-rise earthquake model could be an indicator for the generation of large earthquakes along subduction zones. In addition, to have a more accurate estimation for the seismic potential, we discuss the relationship between the generation of earthquakes and the change of cumulative gravitational potential energy caused by earthquakes (ΔGPE) over time. Our result shows an acceleration of ΔGPE before large earthquakes. Our result also shows that the extensional outer-rise events for strong seismic coupling

  13. Monitoring of low-energy seismic activity in Elbrus volcanic area with the use of underground seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, V.; Sobisevitch, A.

    2012-04-01

    Results of experiment with underground seismic array for studying low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area are presented. Linear seismic array of 2.5 km aperture is created in the tunnel of Baksan neutrino observatory. Horizontal tunnel of 4.3 km length is drilled in the mount Andyrchi at a distance of 20 km from Elbrus volcano. Array includes 6 three-component seismic sensors with 24-byte recorders installed with 500 m interval one from another along the tunnel. Underground seismic array is the new instrument of geophysical observatory organized for studies of geophysical processes in the Elbrus volcanic area. The observatory equipped with modern geophysical instruments including broadband tri-axial seismometers, quartz tilt-meters, magnetic variometers, geo-acoustic sensors, hi-precision distributed thermal sensors and gravimeters. The initial analysis of seismic signals recorded by seismic array allows us to detect low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area beginning from the distance of 3-5 km (the faults in a vicinity of mount Andyrchi) up to 15-25 km (area of Elbrus volcano). The regional micro-earthquakes with magnitude 1-2 at the distances 50-100 km was also recorded. 2.5 km aperture of the underground linear seismic array make it possible to determine with high accuracy hypocenters of local seismic events associated with geodynamic of volcanic magmatic structures and to realize seismo-emission tomography of the active zones of Elbrus volcano.

  14. Slow deformation and lower seismic hazard at the new madrid seismic zone

    PubMed

    Newman; Stein; Weber; Engeln; Mao; Dixon

    1999-04-23

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements across the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in the central United States show little, if any, motion. These data are consistent with platewide continuous GPS data away from the NMSZ, which show no motion within uncertainties. Both these data and the frequency-magnitude relation for seismicity imply that had the largest shocks in the series of earthquakes that occurred in 1811 and 1812 been magnitude 8, their recurrence interval should well exceed 2500 years, longer than has been assumed. Alternatively, the largest 1811 and 1812 earthquakes and those in the paleoseismic record may have been much smaller than typically assumed. Hence, the hazard posed by great earthquakes in the NMSZ appears to be overestimated.

  15. Seismic reflection images of shallow faulting, northernmost Mississippi embayment, north of the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Nelson, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection surveys document tectonic faults that displace Pleistocene and older strata just beyond the northeast termination of the New Madrid seismic zone, at the northernmost extent of the Mississippi embayment. These faults, which are part of the Fluorspar Area fault complex in southeastern Illinois, are directly in line with the northeast-trending seismic zone. The reflection data were acquired using an elastic weight-drop source recorded to 500 msec by a 48-geophone array (24-fold) with a 10-ft (??3.0m) station interval. Recognizable reflections were recorded to about 200 msec (100-150 m). The effects of multiple reflections, numerous diffractions, low apparent velocity (i.e., steeply dipping) noise, and the relatively low-frequency content of the recorded signal provided challenges for data processing and interpreting subtle fault offsets. Data processing steps that were critical to the detection of faults included residual statics, post-stack migration, deconvolution, and noise-reduction filtering. Seismic migration was crucial for detecting and mitigating complex fault-related diffraction patterns, which produced an apparent 'folding' of reflectors on unmigrated sections. Detected individual offsets of shallow reflectors range from 5 to 10 m for the top of Paleozoic bedrock and younger strata. The migrated sections generally indicate vertical to steeply dipping normal and reverse faults, which in places outline small horsts and/or grabens. Tilting or folding of stratal reflectors associated with faulting is also locally observed. At one site, the observed faulting is superimposed over a prominent antiformal structure, which may itself be a product of the Quaternary deformation that produced the steep normal and reverse faults. Our results suggest that faulting of the Paleozoic bedrock and younger sediments of the northern Mississippi embayment is more pervasive and less localized than previously thought.

  16. Crustal Structure of the Northern Zagros Zone from Seismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibol, M.; Gritto, R.; Siegel, J. E.; Ghalib, H. A.; Chen, Y.; Herrmann, R. B.; Aleqab, G. I.; Tkalcic, H.; Quigley, K. C.

    2008-12-01

    The current study is concerned with estimating the local and regional crustal structure of north and northeastern Iraq, including the northern extension of the Zagros collision zone. The goal of our work is to derive local and regional seismic velocity structures using receiver function- and surface wave dispersion analyses and to use these velocity models to obtain accurate hypocenter locations and event focal mechanisms. Global seismic network coverage in this region is poor and extrapolated velocity models found in the literature lack sufficient accuracy to permit events to be located with significant precision. Ten three- component broadband stations composing the North Iraq Seismographic Network (NISN) were installed in late 2005. At present, over 650 GB of seismic waveform data have been analyzed. Our analysis of waveform data indicates clear propagation paths from the south or west across the Arabian shield as well as from the north into NISN. Phases including Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg, as well as LR are clearly observed on these seismograms. In contrast, blockage or attenuation of S-wave energy is observed for propagation paths across the Zagros- Bitlis zone from the east, as well as along the axis of the Zagros from the south-east. Supporting these findings are the results of surface wave analysis. Waves generated by events located to the south of NISN propagating across the Arabian shield produce dispersion curves with energy distributed over a broad frequency band including the development of higher modes. In contrast, waves from events to the south-east which propagate along the axis of the Zagros mountains generate dispersion curves that diverge over a broad frequency range, indicating multi-pathing caused by the complex structure of the Zagros zone. These results are corroborated by receiver function analyses which indicate a dipping Moho beneath the Zagros mountains. While the Moho below the foothills is estimated at 40-50 km depth, it dips to 45-55 km depth

  17. Probing the Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of Subduction Zones Using Advanced Seismic Tomography Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2005-12-01

    Subduction zones are one of the most important components of the Earth's plate tectonic system. Knowing the detailed seismic velocity structure within and around subducting slabs is vital to understand the constitution of the slab, the cause of intermediate depth earthquakes inside the slab, the fluid distribution and recycling, and tremor occurrence [Hacker et al., 2001; Obara, 2002].Thanks to the ability of double-difference tomography [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] to resolve the fine-scale structure near the source region and the favorable seismicity distribution inside many subducting slabs, it is now possible to characterize the fine details of the velocity structure and earthquake locations inside the slab, as shown in the study of the Japan subduction zone [Zhang et al., 2004]. We further develop the double-difference tomography method in two aspects: the first improvement is to use an adaptive inversion mesh rather than a regular inversion grid and the second improvement is to determine a reliable Vp/Vs structure using various strategies rather than directly from Vp and Vs [see our abstract ``Strategies to solve for a better Vp/Vs model using P and S arrival time'' at Session T29]. The adaptive mesh seismic tomography method is based on tetrahedral diagrams and can automatically adjust the inversion mesh according to the ray distribution so that the inversion mesh nodes are denser where there are more rays and vice versa [Zhang and Thurber, 2005]. As a result, the number of inversion mesh nodes is greatly reduced compared to a regular inversion grid with comparable spatial resolution, and the tomographic system is more stable and better conditioned. This improvement is quite valuable for characterizing the fine structure of the subduction zone considering the highly uneven distribution of earthquakes within and around the subducting slab. The second improvement, to determine a reliable Vp/Vs model, lies in jointly inverting Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs using P, S, and S

  18. Stress development in heterogenetic lithosphere: Insights into earthquake processes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yan; Hou, Guiting; Kusky, Timothy; Gregg, Patricia M.

    2016-03-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the Midwestern United States was the site of several major M 6.8-8 earthquakes in 1811-1812, and remains seismically active. Although this region has been investigated extensively, the ultimate controls on earthquake initiation and the duration of the seismicity remain unclear. In this study, we develop a finite element model for the Central United States to conduct a series of numerical experiments with the goal of determining the impact of heterogeneity in the upper crust, the lower crust, and the mantle on earthquake nucleation and rupture processes. Regional seismic tomography data (CITE) are utilized to infer the viscosity structure of the lithosphere which provide an important input to the numerical models. Results indicate that when differential stresses build in the Central United States, the stresses accumulating beneath the Reelfoot Rift in the NMSZ are highly concentrated, whereas the stresses below the geologically similar Midcontinent Rift System are comparatively low. The numerical observations coincide with the observed distribution of seismicity throughout the region. By comparing the numerical results with three reference models, we argue that an extensive mantle low velocity zone beneath the NMSZ produces differential stress localization in the layers above. Furthermore, the relatively strong crust in this region, exhibited by high seismic velocities, enables the elevated stress to extend to the base of the ancient rift system, reactivating fossil rifting faults and therefore triggering earthquakes. These results show that, if boundary displacements are significant, the NMSZ is able to localize tectonic stresses, which may be released when faults close to failure are triggered by external processes such as melting of the Laurentide ice sheet or rapid river incision.

  19. Late Pleistocene and Holocene paleoseismology of an intraplate seismic zone in a large alluvial valley, the New Madrid seismic zone, Central USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guccione, Margaret J.

    2005-10-01

    . Seven fault segments are recognized by microseismicity and geomorphology. Surface faulting has been recognized at three of these segments, Reelfoot fault, New Madrid North fault, and Bootheel fault. The Reelfoot fault is a compressive stepover along the strike-slip fault and has up to 11 m of surface relief ([Carlson, S.D., 2000. Formation and geomorphic history of Reelfoot Lake: insight into the New Madrid seismic zone. M.S. Thesis, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, U.S.A]) deforming abandoned and active Mississippi River channels ([Guccione, M.J., Mueller, K., Champion, J., Shepherd, S., Odhiambo, B., 2002b. Stream response to repeated co-seismic folding, Tiptonville dome, western Tennessee. Geomorphology 43 (2002), 313 349]). The New Madrid North fault apparently has only strike-slip motion and is recognized by modern microseismicity, geomorphic anomalies, and sand cataclasis ([Baldwin, J.N., Barron A.D., Kelson, K.I., Harris, J.B., Cashman, S., 2002. Preliminary paleoseismic and geophysical investigation of the North Farrenburg lineament: primary tectonic deformation associated with the New Madrid North Fault?. Seismological Research Letters 73, 393 413]). The Bootheel fault, which is not identified by the modern microseismicity, is associated with extensive liquefaction and offset channels ([Guccione, M.J., Marple, R., Autin, W.J., 2005, Evidence for Holocene displacements on the Bootheel fault (lineament) in southeastern Missouri: Seismotectonic implications for the New Madrid region. Geological Society of America Bulletin 117, 319 333]). The fault has dominantly strike-slip motion but also has a vertical component of slip. Other recognized surface deformation includes relatively low-relief folding at Big Lake/Manila high ([Guccione, M.J., VanArdale, R.B., Hehr, L.H., 2000. Origin and age of the Manila high and associated Big Lake “Sunklands”, New Madrid seismic zone, northeastern Arkansas. Geological Society of America Bulletin 112, 579 590

  20. Seismicity, shear failure and modes of deformation in deep subduction zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul R.; Giardini, Domenico

    1992-01-01

    The joint hypocentral determination method is used to relocate deep seismicity reported in the International Seismological Center catalog for earthquakes deeper than 400 km in the Honshu, Bonin, Mariannas, Java, Banda, and South America subduction zones. Each deep seismic zone is found to display planar features of seismicity parallel to the Harvard centroid-moment tensor nodal planes, which are identified as planes of shear failure. The sense of displacement on these planes is one of resistance to deeper penetration.

  1. Seismic Readings from the Deepest Borehole in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Woolery, Edward W; Wang, Zhenming; Sturchio, Neil C

    2006-03-01

    Since the 1980s, the research associated with the UK network has been primarily strong-motion seismology of engineering interest. Currently the University of Kentucky operates a strong-motion network of nine stations in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. A unique feature of the network is the inclusions of vertical strong-motion arrays, each with one or two downhole accelerometers. The deepest borehole array is 260 m below the surfaces at station VASA in Fulton County, Kentucky. A preliminary surface seismic refraction survey was conducted at the site before drilling the hole at VSAS (Woolery and Wang, 2002). The depth to the Paleozoic bedrock at the site was estimated to be approximately 595 m, and the depth to the first very stiff layer (i.e. Porters Creek Clay) was found to be about 260 m. These depths and stratigraphic interpretation correlated well with a proprietary seismic reflection line and the Ken-Ten Oil Exploration No. 1 Sanger hole (Schwalb, 1969), as well as our experience in the area (Street et al., 1995; Woolery et al., 1999).

  2. Fault zone structure and seismic reflection characteristics in zones of slow slip and tsunami earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Henrys, Stuart; Sutherland, Rupert; Barker, Daniel; Wallace, Laura; Holden, Caroline; Power, William; Wang, Xiaoming; Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Downes, Gaye

    2015-04-01

    Over the last couple of decades we have learned that a whole spectrum of different fault slip behaviour takes place on subduction megathrust faults from stick-slip earthquakes to slow slip and stable sliding. Geophysical data, including seismic reflection data, can be used to characterise margins and fault zones that undergo different modes of slip. In this presentation we will focus on the Hikurangi margin, New Zealand, which exhibits marked along-strike changes in seismic behaviour and margin characteristics. Campaign and continuous GPS measurements reveal deep interseismic coupling and deep slow slip events (~30-60 km) at the southern Hikurangi margin. The northern margin, in contrast, experiences aseismic slip and shallow (<10-15 km) slow slip events (SSE) every 18-24 months with equivalent moment magnitudes of Mw 6.5-6.8. Updip of the SSE region two unusual megathrust earthquakes occurred in March and May 1947 with characteristics typical of tsunami earthquakes. The Hikurangi margin is therefore an excellent natural laboratory to study differential fault slip behaviour. Using 2D seismic reflection, magnetic anomaly and geodetic data we observe in the source areas of the 1947 tsunami earthquakes i) low amplitude interface reflectivity, ii) shallower interface relief, iii) bathymetric ridges, iv) magnetic anomaly highs and in the case of the March 1947 earthquake v) stronger geodetic coupling. We suggest that this is due to the subduction of seamounts, similar in dimensions to seamounts observed on the incoming Pacific plate, to depths of <10 km. We propose a source model for the 1947 tsunami earthquakes based on geophysical data and find that extremely low rupture velocities (c. 300 m/s) are required to model the observed large tsunami run-up heights (Bell et al. 2014, EPSL). Our study suggests that subducted topography can cause the nucleation of moderate earthquakes with complex, low velocity rupture scenarios that enhance tsunami waves, and the role of

  3. Summary of Pre-2011 Seismic Monitoring Results for the Central Virginia Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    The M 5.7 earthquake affecting Louisa county, Virginia on September 23, 2011 occurred in the central Virginia seismic zone, in the Piedmont physiographic province of Virginia. The largest previous shock occurred on December 22, 1875 with magnitude 5.0 estimated from intensity reports. Other events causing minor damage and widespread alarm occurred in 1774, 1833, 1852, 1907, 1929, 1984 (mbLg 4.2) and 2003 (M 4.3). Previous studies have documented that the seismic zone overlies a major change in crustal thickness and that the seismogenic upper crust is comprised of Appalachian thrust sheets. However, the area was affected by early Mesozoic extensional tectonics and includes several Triassic fault-bounded basins (Culpepper, Scottsville, Farmville, and Richmond). Local network stations have operated in central Virginia since the mid-1970's, although hypocenter location capability has declined since the mid-1990's. The monitoring indicates a mean focal depth of 8 km and maximum depth of approximately 13 km: approximately 75% of the well-located shocks have focal depths above 10 km, and most events are in allochthonous rocks above the Blue Ridge thrust (resolved on seismic reflection profiles). This is in contrast to the situation west of the Blue Ridge province in the Southern Appalachians, where earthquakes generally occur in Grenville basement. The central Virginia seismicity occurs on multiple seismogenic structures. Focal mechanisms of the pre-2011 events exhibit a mixture of strike-slip and reverse faulting on steeply dipping planes showing variable strike. The seismicity has exhibited both temporal and spatial clustering. The M 4.3 December 9, 2003 compound earthquake occurred at a depth of 10 km, and probably represented reverse faulting on a steeply dipping (69 deg) N190E-striking nodal plane, although no aftershocks were recorded to confirm actual fault orientation. The epicenter of the August 23, 2011 shock was only 20 km to the north-northeast of the 2003

  4. Gravity anomalies, forearc morphology and seismicity in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, D.; Watts, A. B.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    We apply spectral averaging techniques to isolate and remove the long-wavelength large-amplitude trench-normal topographic and free-air gravity anomaly "high" and "low" associated with subduction zones. The residual grids generated illuminate the short-wavelength structure of the forearc. Systematic analysis of all subduction boundaries on Earth has enabled a classification of these grids with particular emphasis placed on topography and gravity anomalies observed in the region above the shallow seismogenic portion of the plate interface. The isostatic compensation of these anomalies is investigated using 3D calculations of the gravitational admittance and coherence. In the shallow region of the megathrust, typically within 100 km from the trench, isolated residual anomalies with amplitudes of up to 2.5 km and 125 mGal are generally interpreted as accreted/subducting relief in the form of seamounts and other bathymetric features. While most of these anomalies, which have radii < 50km, are correlated with areas of reduced seismicity, several in regions such as Japan and Java appear to have influenced the nucleation and/or propagation of large magnitude earthquakes. Long-wavelength (500 - >1000 km) trench-parallel forearc ridges with residual anomalies of up to 1.5 km and 150 mGal are identified in approximately one-third of the subduction zones analyzed. Despite great length along strike, these ridges are less than 100 km wide and several appear uncompensated. A high proportion of arc-normal structure and the truncation/morphological transition of trench-parallel forearc ridges is explained through the identification and tracking of pre-existing structure on the over-riding and subducting plates into the seismogenic portion of the plate boundary. Spatial correlations between regions with well-defined trench-parallel forearc ridges and the occurrence of large magnitude interplate earthquakes, in addition to the uncompensated state of these ridges, suggest links

  5. High Resolution Imaging of Fault Zone Structures With Seismic Fault Zone Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.; Zhigang, P.; Lewis, M. A.; McGuire, J.

    2006-12-01

    Large fault zone (FZ) structures with damaged rocks and material discontinuity interfaces can generate several indicative wave propagation signals. High crack density may produce prominent scattering and non-linear effects. A preferred crack orientation can lead to shear wave splitting. A lithology contrast can produce FZ head waves that propagate along the material interface with the velocity and motion polarity of the faster medium. A coherent low velocity layer may generate FZ trapped waves. These signals can be used to obtain high resolution imaging of the subsurface structure of fault zones, and to track possible temporal evolution of FZ material properties. Several results have emerged from recent systematic analyses of such signals. The trapped waves are generated typically by ~100 m wide layers that extend only to ~3-4 km depth and are characterized by 30-50% velocity reduction and strong attenuation. The trapping structures are surrounded by broader anisotropic and scattering zones limited primarily also to the shallow crust. Results associated with anisotropy and scattering around the North Anatolian fault using repeating earthquake clusters do not show precursory temporal evolution. The anisotropy results show small co-seismic changes, while the scattering results show larger co-seismic changes and post-seismic logarithmic recovery. The temporal changes probably reflect damage evolution in the top few hundred m of the crust. Systematic analyses of head waves along several sections of the San Andreas fault reveal material interfaces that extend to the bottom of the seismogenic zone. Joint arrival time inversions of direct and FZ head waves imply velocity contrasts of 20% or more in the top 3 km and lower contrasts of 5-15% in the deeper section. In several places, analyses of trapped and head waves indicate that the shallow damaged layers are asymmetric across the fault. The observed damage asymmetry may reflect preferred propagation direction of

  6. Investigating the time dynamics of seismicity by using the visibility graph approach: Application to seismicity of Mexican subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesca, Luciano; Lovallo, Michele; Ramirez-Rojas, Alejandro; Flores-Marquez, Leticia

    2013-12-01

    By using the method of the visibility graph (VG), five magnitude time series extracted from the seismic catalog of the Mexican subduction zone were investigated. The five seismic sequences represent the seismicity which occurred between 2005 and 2012 in five seismic areas: Guerrero, Chiapas, Oaxaca, Jalisco and Michoacán. Among the five seismic sequences, the Jalisco sequence shows VG properties significantly different from those shown by the other four. Such a difference could be inherent in the different tectonic settings of Jalisco with respect to those characterizing the other four areas. The VG properties of the seismic sequences have been put in relationship with the more typical seismological characteristics (b-value and a-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law).

  7. Geophysical setting of the Reelfoot Rift and relations between rift structures and the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, T.G.; Hendricks, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    In the winter of 1811-12, three of the largest historic earthquakes in the United States occurred near New Madrid, Missouri. Seismicity continues to the present day throughout a tightly clustered pattern of epicenters centered on the bootheel of Missouri, including parts of northeastern Arkansas, northwestern Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. In 1990, the New Madrid seismic zone/Central United States became the first seismically active region east of the Rocky Mountains to be designated a priority research area within the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). This Professional Paper is a collection of papers, some published separately, presenting results of the newly intensified research program in this area. Major components of this research program include tectonic framework studies, seismicity and deformation monitoring and modeling, improved seismic hazard and risk assessments, and cooperative hazard mitigation studies.

  8. Observations of intraplate deformation in continental interiors: examples from the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Tim; Calais, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between intraplate seismicity and the accumulation and distribution of intraplate strain remain a controversial topic. Strain-rates are typically very low, and often below that observable using routine geodetic techniques, despite numerous intraplate regions evidencing the capacity to produce large magnitude earthquakes. One of the best-known examples of major intraplate earthquakes are the M7-7.5 New Madrid events of 1811-1812 (Central-Eastern United States), and their associated aftershock sequence, which continues to this day - occurring in a region with little geomorphic expression of active tectonics, and little measurable strain accumulation observable so far on the timescales of modern geodesy. Here we present the results of a study into the factors influencing earthquake occurrence in the New Madrid Seismic Zone, one of the most seismically active regions of intraplate North America. We present updated geodetic observations of the New Madrid region, along with the surrounding areas, resulting from over 13 years of continuous GPS observations. The relationship between both long-term secular and short-term periodic signals in the geodetic data and the observed seismic activity of the region leads to an enhanced understanding of the factors modulating the timing and occurrence of intraplate earthquakes in this region.

  9. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  10. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    LBNL, in consultation with the EPA, expanded upon a previous study by injecting directly into a 3D representation of a hypothetical fault zone located in the geologic units between the shale-gas reservoir and the drinking water aquifer.

  11. Aftershock Seismicity of the 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule Earthquake Rupture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, D.; Tilmann, F. J.; Barrientos, S. E.; Bataille, K.; Beck, S. L.; Bernard, P.; Campos, J. A.; Comte, D.; Haberland, C. A.; Heit, B.; Methe, P.; Peyrat, S.; Rietbrock, A.; Roecker, S.; Schurr, B.; Vilotte, J.

    2010-12-01

    On 27 February 2010 the Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake in Central Chile ruptured a well known seismic gap, which last broke in 1835. Shortly after the mainshock Chilean agencies (UC Santiago, UC Concepción) and the international seismological community (USA (IRIS), France (IPGP), UK (University of Liverpool), Germany (GFZ)) installed a total of 142 portable seismic stations along the whole rupture zone in order to capture the aftershock activity. Here, we present the aftershock distribution based on automatic detection algorithms and picking engines (MPX; STA/LTA) which will be calibrated with a subset of manually picked events. Initial processing of 70 days of continuous data (20 March until 29 May 2010) from IRIS and GFZ stations resulted in the detection of well over 30,000 events. Of these, we consider a higher quality subset of 12,824 hypocentres based on more than 12 automatically picked P arrivals. Because picking errors can be large for the smaller arrivals, the depths of located events are not always reliable, particularly far from the coast. Nevertheless, a few first order features can be identified: 1.) A pronounced cluster of seismicity is apparent at 25-35 km depth and 50-120 km perpendicular distance from the trench (with some NS variation). 2.) A secondary band of seismicity can be identified at 40-50 km depth and ~150-160 km perpendicular trench distance and between 34° and 37°S. Although the secondary band lies along the continuation of the primary one, it is clearly separated from it by a gap with sparse seismicity. It is not yet possible to state whether these events occurred on the plate interface or in the downgoing plate. 3.) Intense crustal seismicity is found in the region of Pichilemu. This region hosted the strongest aftershock (Mw=6.9), a normal faulting event with NW strike. The aftershocks extend from the plate interface to the surface and are aligned on a NNW-SSE oriented band in map view. 4.) An isolated shallow cluster of crustal

  12. Seismogenic structures in the central Virginia seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Coruh, C.; Bollinger, G.A.; Costain, J.K.

    1988-08-01

    A correlation between earthquake hypocenters and seismic reflection data in central Virginia has become apparent on an automatic line drawing (ALD) display of seismic reflection data. With the reprocessed Virginia I-64 reflection Vibroseis data extended to 14 s, reflectors are imaged from the lower crust as well as from the upper crust. Specifically, the improved resolution and data quality of ALDs have produced an image of an antiformal structure bounded by mid-crustal reflections on the bottom and by major thrusts at the top. The reflections that define the roof of the antiform are most prominent from about 6 s (18 km) on the east near Richmond under the Coastal Plain sediments, to 1-1.3 s (3-4 km) between Richmond and Charlottesville, and to 3.5 s (10.5 km) on the west. Seismic signatures that can be followed downward from the surface between Charlottesville and Richmond appear to be truncated at the roof of the antiform. The dominant reflections that define the roof correlate with the seismic signature of the transported Taconic suture on the west flank and mylonites on the east flank. The distribution of hypocenters in the area shows an excellent correlation with the westward-dipping reflections that form the roof of the antiform on its western flank. Earthquake activity in this locale may be related to reactivation of the thrusts defining the roof and/or faults above the antiformal structure; however, distribution of the easternmost and deepest set of hypocenters appears to be related to an extensive near-vertical diabase dike swarm of Mesozoic age.

  13. Seismicity Patterns of the Oaxacan Segment of the Middle American Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouse, N.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2012-12-01

    steepens rapidly but contiguously from subhorizontal near 98°W to ~40° dip near 96°W. At shallower depths, seismicity concentrates just in from the coastline, but is remarkably clustered with several orders of magnitude fewer events in a few small (<20 km) gaps along strike. The band of seismicity presumably marks the downdip end of the seismogenic zone of the plate interface, and a lack of seismicity offshore is consistent with the locked portion of the seismogenic zone. The lone exception is the region immediately offshore from the Ometepec earthquake, although this region was active in the years before the earthquake. This earthquake has a clear thrust mechanism and the shallowly dipping zone of aftershocks we observed supports the notion it occurred on the plate interface. The hypocenter places this event at the downdip edge of concentrated background seismicity that outlines the seismogenic zone, which is consistent with preliminary indications that this event may have been triggered by slow slip in the adjacent transition zone.

  14. Seismic Characterization of the Transition from Continental to Oceanic Subduction along the western Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, F. D.; Rondenay, S.; Zhang, H.; Sachpazi, M.; Charalampakis, M.; Royden, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Hellenic subduction zone is located in the east-central Mediterranean region and exhibits large variations in convergence rate along its western edge. Differences in the lithosphere entering the subduction zone are believed to drive the different rates of convergence. While seismic reflection data has shown a transition from continental to oceanic lithosphere along the foreland, no detailed images of the mantle-wedge structure have been available to test this hypothesis. Here, we use high-resolution seismic images across northern and southern Greece to investigate differences in the subducted crust along the western Hellenic subduction zone. We deployed 40 broadband seismometers from the IRIS PASSCAL pool across Greece in a northern line (NL, across Northern Greece) and southern line (SL, across Peloponnesus, Attica, and Evia), each roughly perpendicular to the trench axis. We recorded over 50 high-quality teleseismic events with good azimuthal coverage from each line. We processed them using a 2D teleseismic migration algorithm based on the Generalized Radon Transform and a 3D receiver function algorithm that includes dipping interfaces. In addition, we constructed a 3D velocity model by applying double-difference tomography to ~5000 local earthquakes. The 3D velocity model was used to construct an optimal background model for the teleseismic imaging. Migration and RF images reveal N60E dipping low-velocity layers beneath both NL and SL. From high-resolution migration images, we interpret an ~8 km thick low-velocity layer beneath SL as subducted oceanic crust and a ~20 km thick low-velocity layer beneath NL as subducted continental crust. Relocated earthquakes show that the NL subducted crust is seismically active near the foreland down to 50 km depth presumably as a result of slab flexure. Beyond this region, the subducted crust is aseismic until its signal disappears at ~70 km depth. In contrast, the SL subducted crust is marked by seismicity that extends

  15. Stress changes induced at neighbouring faults by the June 2000 earthquakes, South Iceland Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plateaux, Romain; Angelier, Jacques; Bergerat, Françoise; Cappa, Frédéric; Stefansson, Ragnar

    2010-05-01

    The Icelandic rift system belongs to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and is connected to the offshore Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey ridges by two active transform zones. Plate separation occurs at a rate of nearly 2 cm/yr along the N105°E direction. With respect to the Icelandic Hotspot, westward plate velocities in Iceland are 1.8-2.2 cm/yr for North America and 0-0.4 cm/yr for Eurasia, resulting in a westward displacement of the Icelandic Rift relative to the hotspot. Rift jumps occur when the plate boundary has migrated to a critical point to the west, and a new rift develops above the hotspot apex while the old rift is dying out. The two active transform zones, the Tjörnes Fracture Zone (TFZ) and the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ), resulted from such eastward rift jumps. Our study focuses on the SISZ which is an onland, E-W trending transform zone where N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults accommodate left-lateral transform motion as revealed by historical seismicity. During the most recent seismic crisis, in June 2000, two major earthquakes of magnitude (Mw) 6.4 occurred along N-S right-lateral faults in the central segment of the SISZ. The high sensitivity SIL (South Iceland Lowlands) seismic network run by the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) provided a complete record of earthquakes down to magnitude Mw = -1. Here, we present an analysis of this earthquakes sequence in term of stress regimes in order to examine the response of two faults that did not experience significant motion during the earthquakes, and hence to determine how far such fault zones provide information about stress changes in space and time when large earthquakes occur at distance of some tens of kilometres. The faults considered are the Skard and Leirubakki faults, along which large earthquakes and significant displacement occurred in the past Using seismological data recorded from 1991 to 2007, we carried out stress inversion of focal mechanisms of 1,340 earthquakes that affected

  16. Seismotectonics and Seismic Hazard of the Sierran Nevada Great Basin Boundary Zone and Yucca Mountain Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K.; von Seggern, D.; Biasi, G. P.; Depolo, D.

    2003-12-01

    Geodetic data indicate that the Sierra Nevada block is moving at about 14 mm/yr N40-450W relative to stable North America. This motion accounts for about 20-25% of the current western North American plate motion budget and is oblique to active faults along the Sierra Nevada-Great Basin boundary zone and Walker Lane belt in a transtensional deformation field. Faulting over the past few million years has been concentrated along faults of the Eastern California shear zone, and the Walker Lane belt. Linear strike-slip faults of the Eastern California shear zone terminate near the Long Valley Caldera region marking an abrupt transition in the deformational style between the southern and northern western Great Basin. These tectonic transitions are reflected in the distribution and character of the historical and instrumental seismicity. North of Long Valley, through going strike-slip faulting is concentrated outboard from the Sierran Range front in the Central Walker Lane belt, whereas normal faulting in a series of left-stepping range bounding faults exhibiting E-W extension characterizes the Sierra Great Basin Boundary region from Long Valley to about the latitude of Reno-Lake Tahoe. Seismicity in the Lake Tahoe region is primarily concentrated in the transition between left-stepping normal faults in zones of high-angle conjugate strike-slip faulting. These observations suggest potential shortening as a mechanism of slip transfer between normal fault systems along the range front. Also, these slip transition zones show different recurrence behavior, activity rates and maximum magnitudes than the adjacent primary normal fault systems. One important kinematic problem is how to reconcile extension directions observed from instrumental seismicity and Sierran motion in the central western Great Basin. An upgrade to a digital seismic network in southern Nevada under the DOE Yucca Mountain Project has increased the detection threshold by about 1 magnitude unit (the catalog is

  17. Seismic Tomography of the Arabian-Eurasian Collision Zone and Surrounding Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    in the upper mantle beneath the collision zone . The fate of the Neotethys plate subducted prior to the continental collision remains largely unknown...There are no intermediate and deep earthquakes under the Zagros-Bitlis suture zone , yet the subduction is too recent for the slab to reach thermal...2005). In the Makran subduction zone in the south, seismicity and structure have been studied with the deployment of dense seismic networks (Yamini

  18. The seismic structure of the Rivera subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, S. P.; Yang, T.; Wilson, D.; Guzman Speziale, M.; Gomez Gonzalez, J.; Dominguez Reyes, T.; Ni, J.

    2007-12-01

    The subduction zone of western Mexico is a unique region on Earth where microplate capture and overriding plate disruption are occurring today. The small Rivera plate is subducting beneath western most Mexico primarily beneath Jalisco state while to the east it is the Cocos plate that is subducting. Above the Rivera plate the Jalisco block of Mexico is bounded by the north trending Colima Rift and the northwest trending Tepic-Chapala Rift and may form a microplate in its own right. Magmatism is present throughout the region and is unusual for a subduction zone in that geochemical analyses indicate an ocean island basalt component to some of the lavas. Also, Colima volcano is offset trenchward from other volcanoes in the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Little is known of the subducting Rivera plate geometry due to the paucity of seismicity within the plate yet the geometry of the Rivera and Cocos plates at depth are likely critical for understanding the tectonic evolution of western Mexico. The MARS (MApping the Rivera Subduction zone) project consists of the deployment of 50 broadband seismometers covering the Jalisco block from the coast to the Tepic-Chapala rift in the north and about 150 km to the west of the Colima rift. The instruments were deployed in January, 2006 and removed in June, 2007. The goal of the project is to seismically image the subducting Rivera and Cocos plates at depth as well as the mantle wedge above the plates. We present the results of a P-wave tomography inversion using teleseisms recorded by MARS. The inversion used 10,495 residuals and finite frequency theory to back project the kernels through the model. At shallow depths it is difficult to discern the subducting Cocos and Rivera plates but at depths deeper than about 80 km both plates are clearly imaged in the tomography model. Below a depth of 150 km, a clear gap between the Rivera and Cocos slabs is apparent that increases in size at further depths. The images indicate that the deeper

  19. Seismic structure of the Rivera subduction zone - the MARS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, S. P.; Yang, T.; Sudharja, S.; Wilson, D.; Guzman Speziale, M.; Gomez Gonzalez, J.; Leon-Soto, G.; Ni, J.; Dominguez Reyes, T.

    2007-05-01

    The subduction zone of western Mexico is a unique region on Earth where microplate capture and overriding plate disruption are occurring today. The small Rivera plate is subducting beneath western most Mexico primarily beneath Jalisco state while to the east it is the Cocos plate that is subducting. Above the Rivera plate the Jalisco block of Mexico is bounded by the north trending Colima Rift and the northwest trending Tepic-Chapala Rift and may form a microplate in its own right. Magmatism is present throughout the region and is unusual for a subduction zone in that geochemical analyses indicate an ocean island basalt component to some of the lavas. Also, Colima volcano is offset trenchward from other volcanoes in the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Little is known of the subducting Rivera plate geometry due to the paucity of seismicity within the plate yet the geometry of the Rivera and Cocos plates at depth are likely critical for understanding the tectonic evolution of western Mexico. The MARS (MApping the Rivera Subduction zone) project consists of the deployment of 50 broadband seismometers covering the Jalisco block from the coast to the Tepic-Chapala rift in the north and about 150 km to the west of the Colima rift. The instruments were deployed in January, 2006 and will be removed in June, 2007. The goal of the project is to seismically image the subducting Rivera and Cocos plates at depth as well as the mantle wedge above the plates. A number of different analyses of MARS data are underway including teleseismic tomography, receiver function analysis, and shear wave splitting analysis. The preliminary tomography results clearly show both subducting plates with a sharp change in dip to the east of the Colima rift probably indicating a tear between the two plates along a trend more eastward than the trend of the rift. The images also show extremely slow shallow mantle velocities beneath the Tepic-Chapala rift but not beneath the Colima rift. Receiver functions

  20. Strain distribution across magmatic margins during the breakup stage: Seismicity patterns in the Afar rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.; Gregg, T.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Aronovitz, A.; Campbell, E.

    2008-12-01

    Fault patterns record the strain history along passive continental margins, but geochronological constraints are, in general, too sparse to evaluate these patterns in 3D. The Afar depression in Ethiopia provides a unique setting to evaluate the time and space relations between faulting and magmatism across an incipient passive margin that formed above a mantle plume. The margin comprises a high elevation flood basalt province with thick, underplated continental crust, a narrow fault-line escarpment underlain by stretched and intruded crust, and a broad zone of highly intruded, mafic crust lying near sealevel. We analyze fault and seismicity patterns across and along the length of the Afar rift zone to determine the spatial distribution of strain during the final stages of continental breakup, and its relation to active magmatism and dike intrusions. Seismicity data include historic data and 2005-2007 data from the collaborative US-UK-Ethiopia Afar Geodynamics Project that includes the 2005-present Dabbahu rift episode. Earthquake epicenters cluster within discrete, 50 km-long magmatic segments that lack any fault linkage. Swarms also cluster along the fault-line scarp between the unstretched and highly stretched Afar rift zone; these earthquakes may signal release of stresses generated by large lateral density contrasts. We compare Coulomb static stress models with focal mechanisms and fault kinematics to discriminate between segmented magma intrusion and crank- arm models for the central Afar rift zone.

  1. Seismicity and shallow slab geometry in the central Vanuatu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillard, Christian; Crawford, Wayne C.; Ballu, Valérie; Régnier, Marc; Pelletier, Bernard; Garaebiti, Esline

    2015-08-01

    The Vanuatu arc in the southwest Pacific Ocean is one of the world's most seismically active regions, with almost 39 magnitude 7+ earthquakes in the past 43 years. Convergence rates are around 90-120 mm/yr along most of the arc, but drop to 25-43 mm/yr in the central section, probably due to the subduction of the d'Entrecasteaux ridge. We characterize the slab geometry and tectonic state in this central section by analyzing data from a 10 month deployment of 30 seismometers over this section. We located more than 30,000 events (all less than magnitude 5.5), constructed an improved 1-D velocity model, calculated focal mechanisms and cluster geometries, and determined the 3-D geometry of the interplate seismogenic zone. The seismogenic zone has a shallow bulge in front of the d'Entrecasteaux ridge, which could be explained by the ridge's buoyancy contributing to the uplift of the fore-arc islands. The seismogenic zone extends to ~45 km depth, significantly below the 26-27 km depth of the fore-arc Moho, indicating that the upper mantle wedge is not significantly serpentinized, which is consistent with the relatively high thermal parameter of the subducting plate. The maximum width of the seismogenic zone is 80 km, indicating an upper earthquake magnitude limit of Mw 7.85 ± 0.4, assuming standard rupture zone aspect ratios. The data also reveal a double seismic zone, 20 to 30 km below the seismogenic zone, which is presumably caused by flexure of the downgoing plate.

  2. Seismic structure and tectonics of the Shackleton Fracture Zone (Drake Passage, Scotia Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geletti, Riccardo; Lodolo, Emanuele; Schreider, Anatoly A.; Polonia, Alina

    2005-03-01

    The structural framework of the southern part of the Shackleton Fracture Zone has been investigated through the analysis of a 130-km-long multichannel seismic reflection profile acquired orthogonally to the fracture zone near 60° S. The Shackleton Fracture Zone is a 800-km-long, mostly rectilinear and pronounced bathymetric lineation joining the westernmost South Scotia Ridge to southern South America south of Cape Horn, separating the western Scotia Sea plate from the Antarctic plate. Conventional processing applied to the seismic data outlines the main structures of the Shackleton Fracture Zone, but only the use of enhanced techniques, such as accurate velocity analyses and pre-stack depth migration, provides a good definition of the acoustic basement and the architecture of the sedimentary sequences. In particular, a strong and mostly continuous reflector found at about 8.0 s two-way traveltime is very clear across the entire section and is interpreted as the Moho discontinuity. Data show a complex system of troughs developed along the eastern flank of the crustal ridge, containing tilted and rotated blocks, and the presence of a prominent listric normal fault developed within the oceanic crust. Positive flower structures developed within the oceanic basement indicate strike-slip tectonism and partial reactivation of pre-existing faults. Present-day tectonic activity is found mostly in correspondence to the relief, whereas fault-induced deformation is negligible across the entire trough system. This indicates that the E W-directed stress regime present in the Drake Passage region is mainly dissipated along a narrow zone within the Shackleton Ridge axis. A reappraisal of all available magnetic anomaly identifications in the western Scotia Sea and in the former Phoenix plate, in conjunction with new magnetic profiles acquired to the east of the Shackleton Fracture Zone off the Tierra del Fuego continental margin, has allowed us to propose a simple reconstruction

  3. Imaging the New Madrid Seismic Zone using double-difference tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Meredith; DeShon, Heather R.; Powell, Christine A.

    2013-10-01

    P and S wave velocity (VP and VS) models and high-resolution earthquake relocations are determined for the New Madrid Seismic Zone using double-difference local earthquake tomography. The data set consists of arrival times and differential times recorded by the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network (CNMSN) from 2000 to 2007 and the 1989-1992 Portable Array Network and Data Acquisition deployment. Waveform cross correlation-derived differential times for the CNMSN data are also incorporated. The velocity solutions are compatible with previous solutions centered on the active arms of seismicity and cover a broader area, including mafic intrusions along the margin of the Reelfoot rift. Major features include elevated VP and VS associated with the mafic plutons and reduced VP and VS along and southeast of the Axial fault (AF), a major arm of seismicity trending along the rift axis. Low VP extends to a depth of at least 20 km along the portion of the AF that extends south of the Missouri bootheel. A locally high VP/VS anomaly imaged along the central portion of the Reelfoot fault is spatially correlated with a significant change in fault trend and is interpreted as a region containing high pore pressure and/or water-filled microcracks.

  4. A fast partitioning algorithm using adaptive Mahalanobis clustering with application to seismic zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Esteban, Antonio; Martínez-Álvarez, Francisco; Scitovski, Sanja; Scitovski, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we construct an efficient adaptive Mahalanobis k-means algorithm. In addition, we propose a new efficient algorithm to search for a globally optimal partition obtained by using the adoptive Mahalanobis distance-like function. The algorithm is a generalization of the previously proposed incremental algorithm (Scitovski and Scitovski, 2013). It successively finds optimal partitions with k = 2 , 3 , … clusters. Therefore, it can also be used for the estimation of the most appropriate number of clusters in a partition by using various validity indexes. The algorithm has been applied to the seismic catalogues of Croatia and the Iberian Peninsula. Both regions are characterized by a moderate seismic activity. One of the main advantages of the algorithm is its ability to discover not only circular but also elliptical shapes, whose geometry fits the faults better. Three seismogenic zonings are proposed for Croatia and two for the Iberian Peninsula and adjacent areas, according to the clusters discovered by the algorithm.

  5. Seismic potential of the Queen Charlotte-Alaska-Aleutian seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Nishenko, S.P. ); Jacob, K.H. )

    1990-03-10

    The 5,000 km long Queen Charlotte-Alaska-Aleutian seismic zone is subdivided into 17 unequally sized segments. The 17 segments are chosen to represent areas likely to be ruptured by characteristic earthquakes. This term usually implies repeated breakage of a plate boundary segment by either a large or great earthquake, whose source dimensions remain consistent from cycle to cycle. Formal computations of the conditional probabilities for future large and great earthquakes in the 17 segments of the Queen Charlotte-Alaska-Aleutian seismic zone are based on the following data sets and findings: (1) recurrence intervals from historic and geologic data; (2) direct recurrence time estimates based on rates of relative plate motion and the size or displacement of the most recent characteristic event in each segment; and (3) the application of a lognormal distribution of recurrence times for large and great earthquakes. Results of these computations indicate seven areas that have high (i.e., {ge} 60%) conditional probabilities for the recurrence of either large or great earthquakes within the next 20 years (1988-2008). These areas include Cape St. James, Yakataga, the Shumagin Islands, Unimak Island, and the Fox, Delarof, and Near Islands segments of the Aleutian arc. When a shorter time interval is considered (1988-1998), those segments more likely to rupture in large (M{sub S} 7-7.7) rather than great earthquakes have a high conditional probability. These areas include the Unimak, Fox, and Delarof Islands segments. The largest uncertainties in these forecasts stem from the short historic record (providing a single recurrence time estimate for some segments, or widely varying estimates for others); from the unknown importance of aseismic slip; and from a vague definition of characteristic earthquake size. In fact, characteristic earthquake size may not be a time-invariant quantity.

  6. Seismic image of the Ivanhoe Lake Fault Zone in the Kapuskasing Uplift of the Canadian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianjun; Mereu, Robert F.; Percival, John A.

    1992-02-01

    The Kapuskasing uplift, located in the central Canadian shield, represents an oblique exposure of the Archean middle to lower crust. The Ivanhoe Lake fault zone, believed to be the basal thrust carrying the high-grade rocks of the Kapuskasing zone over the low-grade Abitibi greenstone belt, holds the key to understanding the nature and evolution of the Kapuskasing uplift. Despite numerous geological and geophysical studies, including LITHOPROBE deep seismic reflection profiles, and because of very limited bedrock exposure in the area, the shallow structure of the Ivanhoe Lake fault zone remains obscure. Here we present results obtained by reprocessing data from a LITHOPROBE seismic reflection profile across the fault zone. For the first time, the Ivanhoe Lake fault zone is clearly imaged on the seismic section as a series of west-dipping reflectors with an average dip of 20°, which can be traced to the surface. The results support the conclusion that fault zones form good reflectors.

  7. Stress development in heterogenetic lithosphere: Insights into earthquake processes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Y.; Gregg, P. M.; Hou, G.

    2015-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) is the site of several major M 6.8-8 earthquakes in 1811-1812, and remains seismically active. Although extensive investigations have been carried out, the ultimate controls on earthquake initiation and the duration of the seismicity remains unclear. Especially ambiguous is the role of a heterogenetic lithosphere in the development and propagation of stress throughout the crust in intraplate settings. In this study, we develop a finite element model to conduct a series of numerical experiments, the goal of which is to determine the impact of heterogeneity in the Upper Crust, the Lower Crust, and the Mantle on earthquake nucleation and rupture processes. Results indicate that when the differential stresses are built up from boundary displacements, similar to tectonic loading, the stresses below the Reelfoot Rift in the NMSZ are highly concentrated, whereas the stresses below the geologically similar Midcontinent Rift System are low, corresponding with the earthquakes distribution. By comparing the results with three reference models, we argue that the extensive Mantle Low Velocity Zone (MLVZ) beneath the NMSZ produces differential stress localization in the layers above. Furthermore, the relatively strong crust in this region, exhibited by high seismic velocity, enables the elevated stress to extend to the bottom of the ancient rift system, reactivating fossil rifting faults and therefore triggering earthquakes. Although our numerical models focus on loading by a far-field stress source, they explain why the New Madrid inevitably became the most earthquake susceptible region in the CEUS since a heterogeneous lithosphere. Specifically, the presence of the MLVZ will further concentrate stresses resulting from other unloading process, such as melting of the ice sheets or sudden river incision.

  8. Analysis of stress drops and rupture lengths along the northern segment of the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Mickus, K.L. )

    1993-03-01

    The New Madrid seismic zone is the most seismically active region in the central US. The seismic zone consists of three linear trends bounded by latitudes 35.5[degree] to 37[degree] N and longitudes 89[degree] to 90.5[degree] W. This study is concerned with the most northern segment that trends northeast from New Madrid, Missouri to Charleston, Missouri. The purpose of this study is to determine stress drops and rupture lengths of small earthquakes (M less than 3.5). To determine the stress drops and rupture lengths, the author used waveforms collected by the St. Louis University seismic network. He used small events (M between 1.0 and 2.0) as empirical Green's functions to deconvolve out site, path and instrument effects on the P-waveforms on larger events (M between 2.0 and 3.6). Examining the seismic records from 1980 to the present, he found five larger events that had colocated (within 1 km) smaller events. To insure that the larger and smaller were colocated the events were relocated using a three-dimensional velocity model. After insuring the events were relocated, the deconvolved waveforms were used to determine the seismic moment and hence the stress drops and rupture lengths by estimating the area of the deconvolved waveforms and the rise time of each pulse.

  9. Patterns of seismic activity preceding large earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Bruce E.; Carlson, J. M.; Langer, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    A mechanical model of seismic faults is employed to investigate the seismic activities that occur prior to major events. The block-and-spring model dynamically generates a statistical distribution of smaller slipping events that precede large events, and the results satisfy the Gutenberg-Richter law. The scaling behavior during a loading cycle suggests small but systematic variations in space and time with maximum activity acceleration near the future epicenter. Activity patterns inferred from data on seismicity in California demonstrate a regional aspect; increased activity in certain areas are found to precede major earthquake events. One example is given regarding the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 which is located near a fault section associated with increased activity levels.

  10. Earthquake Rate Changes and Interevent Distance Distributions in the Brawley Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llenos, A. L.; Michael, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ), located in the Salton Trough of southern California, has a long history of earthquake swarm activity and a high level of geothermal energy exploitation activity. A swarm occurred in August 2012 near the North Brawley Geothermal Field (NBGF), which raised the question of whether it and other recent earthquake rate changes may have been induced by fluid extraction and injection activity (e.g., Chen and Shearer, JGR, 2011; Brodsky and Lajoie, Science, 2013). We explore this issue by examining earthquake rate changes and interevent distance distributions in two geothermal fields in the region, the NBGF and the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In Oklahoma and Arkansas, where considerable wastewater injection occurs, increases in background seismicity rate and aftershock productivity and decreases in interevent distance have been diagnostic of fluid-injection induced seismicity (Llenos and Michael, BSSA, in press). Here we test if similar changes occur that may be associated with fluid injection and extraction at the two geothermal fields. We identify clusters in earthquake catalogs from 1981-2012 in the SSGF and the NBGF, then compute interevent distances within each cluster. Preliminary results suggest that in both fields, the interevent spacing does not appear to change significantly with the start of fluid injection or extraction in 1982. We also use the stochastic Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model (Ogata, JASA, 1988) to determine if changes in the underlying earthquake driving processes, either natural or due to geothermal exploitation activities, have occurred in the BSZ, as shown by statistically significant changes in the model parameters. While increases in the background seismicity rate and aftershock productivity parameters were associated with fluid-injection induced earthquake rate changes in Oklahoma and Arkansas, preliminary results indicate that similar changes are not as apparent in the BSZ. The higher heat

  11. Principal Slip Zones in Carbonate: Microstructural Characterization and Implications for the Seismic Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven; Billi, Andrea; di Toro, Giulio

    2010-05-01

    Main shocks in central Italy, such as the L'Aquila Mw 6.3 earthquake on 6 April 2009, and associated foreshock and aftershock sequences, often nucleate within, and rupture through, carbonate-bearing rocks within the upper-crust. One way to understand the mechanical behaviour of such rocks during the passage of earthquake ruptures is to study the Principal Slip Zones (PSZs) of exhumed faults. The PSZs are thought to accommodate a majority of displacement during individual earthquake slip events, and potentially contain a rich variety of information about earthquake-related processes and, more generally, deformation mechanisms throughout the seismic cycle. At present, however, there are no reliable microstructural or geochemical indicators of seismic slip in carbonate rocks. We present detailed field and microstructural observations of the PSZs of large-displacement, seismically active normal fault zones in the central Apennines of Italy. The fault zones are exhumed from <3km depth and cut 3-5km thick sequences of platform limestone. Samples were collected from individual PSZs containing polished slip surfaces with both small (centimetres to metres) and large (metres to hundreds of metres) displacements, including the main PSZ that defines the active Quaternary fault scarp. Small displacement slipping zones are characterized by typical cataclastic fabrics, including angular grains cross-cut by brittle fractures, and a gradual decrease in grain-size towards the polished slip surface. In contrast, large-displacement slipping zones always contain a continuous, texturally-distinct layer up to 2-3mm in thickness that lies immediately beneath the polished slip surface. This layer is itself internally zoned; up to 6 distinct zones can be present, each between 200-300µm in thickness, and recognized on the basis of grain-size, colour, and textural variations. In some cases, the zones developed at the expense of one another. 100-200µm-thick, syn-tectonic calcite veins

  12. Two-dimensional seismic image of the San Andreas Fault in the Northern Gabilan Range, central California: Evidence for fluids in the fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurber, C.; Roecker, S.; Ellsworth, W.; Chen, Y.; Lutter, W.; Sessions, R.

    1997-01-01

    A joint inversion for two-dimensional P-wave velocity (Vp), P-to-S velocity ratio (Vp/Vs), and earthquake locations along the San Andreas fault (SAF) in central California reveals a complex relationship among seismicity, fault zone structure, and the surface fault trace. A zone of low Vp and high Vp/Vs lies beneath the SAF surface trace (SAFST), extending to a depth of about 6 km. Most of the seismic activity along the SAF occurs at depths of 3 to 7 km in a southwest-dipping zone that roughly intersects the SAFST, and lies near the southwest edge of the low Vp and high Vp/Vs zones. Tests indicate that models in which this seismic zone is significantly closer to vertical can be confidently rejected. A second high Vp/Vs zone extends to the northeast, apparently dipping beneath the Diablo Range. Another zone of seismicity underlies the northeast portion of this Vp/Vs high. The high Vp/Vs zones cut across areas of very different Vp values, indicating that the high Vp/Vs values are due to the presence of fluids, not just lithology. The close association between the zones of high Vp/Vs and seismicity suggests a direct involvement of fluids in the faulting process. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Three dimensional attenuation and high resolution earthquake location: Applications to the new Madrid seismic zone and Costa Rica seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, Shishay Tesfay

    Part 1: Event archives and continuous waveform data recorded by the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network (CNSMN) from 1995 to 2008 are analyzed with waveform cross-correlation techniques to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of MD < 2.4 earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). The resulting clusters are divided into swarm clusters and repeating earthquake clusters depending on interevent duration of time. Most swarm clusters occur near Ridgely, Tennessee. Other swarms and repeating earthquake clusters occur at proposed fault intersections in the crystalline basement or along strong velocity contrasts. The presence of anomalously high pore-fluid pressure is the most likely cause of swarm activity. Repeating earthquake ruptures are interpreted as reactivation of small asperities. Part 2: A three-dimensional, high-resolution P-wave seismic attenuation model (QP) for NMSZ is determined from P-wave path attenuation (t*) values of MD < 3.9 earthquakes recorded at 89 seismometers of the CNMSN and 40 seismometers of the Portable Array for Numerical Data Acquisition (PANDA) deployment. The amplitude spectra of all the earthquakes are simultaneously inverted for source, path and site parameters. The t* values are inverted for Qp using local earthquake tomography (LET) methods and a known 3D P-wave velocity model for the region. The four major seismicity arms of the NMSZ exhibit lower Q P values than the surrounding crust. The larger QP anomalies coincide with previously reported high swarm activity attributed to possibly fluid rich fractures along the southeast extension of the Reelfoot fault. Part 3: We use the spectra of 210 earthquakes recorded by 35 seismometers to image the attenuation structure of the seismogenic zone below Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. The amplitude spectra of the earthquakes are used to estimate t* using common spectrum method. An attenuation map is then obtained using LET using a previously constrained velocity model and

  14. Characterizing potentially induced earthquake rate changes in the Brawley Seismic Zone, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Llenos, Andrea L.; Michael, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The Brawley seismic zone (BSZ), in the Salton trough of southern California, has a history of earthquake swarms and geothermal energy exploitation. Some earthquake rate changes may have been induced by fluid extraction and injection activity at local geothermal fields, particularly at the North Brawley Geothermal Field (NBGF) and at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). We explore this issue by examining earthquake rate changes and interevent distance distributions in these fields. In Oklahoma and Arkansas, where considerable wastewater injection occurs, increases in background seismicity rate and aftershock productivity and decreases in interevent distance were indicative of fluid‐injection‐induced seismicity. Here, we test if similar changes occur that may be associated with fluid injection and extraction in geothermal areas. We use stochastic epidemic‐type aftershock sequence models to detect changes in the underlying seismogenic processes, shown by statistically significant changes in the model parameters. The most robust model changes in the SSGF roughly occur when large changes in net fluid production occur, but a similar correlation is not seen in the NBGF. Also, although both background seismicity rate and aftershock productivity increased for fluid‐injection‐induced earthquake rate changes in Oklahoma and Arkansas, the background rate increases significantly in the BSZ only, roughly corresponding with net fluid production rate increases. Moreover, in both fields the interevent spacing does not change significantly during active energy projects. This suggests that, although geothermal field activities in a tectonically active region may not significantly change the physics of earthquake interactions, earthquake rates may still be driven by fluid injection or extraction rates, particularly in the SSGF.

  15. Seismic constraints on a large dyking event and initiation of a transform fault zone in Western Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, AbdulHakim; Doubre, Cecile; Leroy, Sylvie; Perrot, Julie; Audin, Laurence; Rolandone, Frederique; Keir, Derek; Al-Ganad, Ismael; Sholan, Jamal; Khanbari, Khaled; Mohamed, Kassim; Vergne, Jerome; Jacques, Eric; Nercessian, Alex

    2013-04-01

    In November 2010, a large number of events were recorded by the world seismic networks showing important activity occurring along the western part of the Aden Ridge. West of the Shulka El Sheik fracture zone, events in this large seismic swarm (magnitudes above 5) occurred in a complex area, where the change of both the ridge direction and the bathymetry suggest the propagation of the ridge into a continental lithosphere and the influence of the Afar plume. We combine several sets of data from permanent networks and temporary 3C broad stations installed after the beginning of the event along the southern and eastern coasts of Yemen and Djibouti respectively, we located more than 600 earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from 2.5 to 5.6 that occurred during the first months following the first event. The spatial distribution of the main seismicity reveals a very clear N115° -trending alignment, parallel to the mean direction of the en-echelon spreading segments that form the ridge at this longitude. Half of the events, which represent half of the total seismic energy released during the first months, are located in the central third section of the segment. Here several volcanic cones and recent lava flows observed from bathymetric and acoustic reflectivity data during the Tadjouraden cruise (Audin, 1999, Dauteuil et al., 2001) constitute the sea floor. In addition to this main activity, two small groups of events suggest the activiation of landslides into a large fan and the activity in a volcanic area 50 km due east from the main active zone. The time evolution of the seismicity shows several bursts of activity. Some of them are clearly related to sudden activities within the volcanic areas, when others exhibit horizontal migration of the events, with velocity around ˜ 1 km/h. The time-space evolution of the seismicity clearly reveals the intrusion of dykes associated with magma propagation from the crustal magmatic centres into the rift zone. Taking into account

  16. Seismic imaging of a megathrust splay fault in the North Chilean subduction zone (Central Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, Ina; Buske, Stefan; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Wigger, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Prominent trench-parallel fault systems in the arc and fore-arc of the Chilean subduction zone can be traced for several thousand kilometers in north-south direction. These fault systems possibly crosscut the entire crust above the subduction megathrust and are expected to have a close relationship to transient processes of the subduction earthquake cycles. With the motivation to image and characterize the structural inventory and the processes that occur in the vicinity of these large-scale fault zones, we re-processed the ANCORP'96 controlled-source seismic data set to provide images of the faults at depth and to allow linking geological information at the surface to subsurface structures. The correlation of the imaging results with observed hypocenter locations around these fault systems reveals the origin and the nature of the seismicity bound to these fault systems. Active and passive seismic data together yield a picture of a megathrust splay fault beneath the Longitudinal Valley at mid-crustal level, which can be observed from the top of the subduction plate interface and which seems to be connected to the Precordilleran Fault System (PFS) known at the surface. This result supports a previously proposed tectonic model where a megathrust splay fault defines the Western Altiplano as a crustal-scale fault-bend-fold. Furthermore, we clearly imaged two branches of the Uyuni-Kenayani Fault (UKF) in a depth range between 0 and 20 km. In summary, imaging of these faults is important for a profound understanding of the tectonic evaluation and characterization of the subduction zone environment, for which the results of this study provide a reliable basis.

  17. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2015-04-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone is located in the N-S striking Höllviken Graben and traverses the city of Copenhagen. The fault zone is a NNW-SSE striking structure in direct vicinity to the transition zone of the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent small earthquakes indicate activity in the area, although none of the mapped earthquakes appear to have occurred on the Carlsberg Fault. We examined the fault evolution by a combination of very high resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The chalk stratigraphy and the localization of the fault zone at depth was inferred from previous studies by other authors. We extrapolated the Jurassic and Triassic stratigraphy from the Pomeranian Bay to the area of investigation. The fault zone shows a flower structure in the Triassic as well as in Cretaceous sediments. The faulting geometry indicates strong influence of Triassic processes when subsidence and rifting prevailed in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. This finding contrasts the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighbouring structures, as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image structures in Quaternary layers in the Carlsberg Fault zone. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise

  18. Seismic Tomography of the Arabian-Eurasian Collision Zone and Surrounding Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    about the structure and processes in the upper mantle beneath the collision zone . The fate of the Neotethys plate subducted prior to the continental...collision remains largely unknown. There are no intermediate and deep earthquakes under the Zagros-Bitlis suture zone , yet the subduction is too...suture zone (Bird, 1978; Molinaro et al., 2005). In the Makran subduction zone in the south, seismicity and structure have been studied with the

  19. Cambrian to Recent Structures around the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, W. A.; Hickman, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    In the region of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), upper crustal structures indicate a long history of deformational events and persistent weak crust. Deep wells and seismic profiles document prominent structures: Cambrian northeast-striking Mississippi Valley graben (MVg), intersecting the east-striking Rough Creek graben (RCg); a late Paleozoic arch and reactivated faults; and Mesozoic-Cenozoic Mississippi Embayment syncline (MEs). MVg extension parallels that of the late stages of Iapetan rifting of Laurentia, oblique to strike of the RCg. A Middle Cambrian and older clastic succession thickens >1 km across the MVg boundary faults, and is ~8 km thick within the RCg. In the RCg, the west-striking northern boundary faults curve into southwestward splays; stratigraphic units dip northward into the northern boundary fault system and northwestward into the southwest-striking splays, suggesting pull-apart basins along strike-slip faults. Broad subregional thickening of Upper Cambrian-Lower Ordovician carbonate rocks indicates anomalous downwarp along the RCg during post-rift thermal subsidence; a regionally average carbonate thickness accumulated across the MVg. Low gradients of stratigraphic thickness change suggest little fault movement in the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician. Palinspastic restoration of the pre-Cretaceous unconformity shows a broad south-plunging arch in upper Paleozoic and older rocks along the southern part of the MVg. Reactivated normal faults have >500-m displacement in the upper Paleozoic rocks on the limbs of the arch and aggregate as much as 2 km of vertical separation at the top of Precambrian crystalline basement. Farther north near the intersection with the RCg, a high-amplitude short-wavelength diapiric anticline within the MVg has a core of ductilely deformed Middle Cambrian shale beneath the Upper Cambrian-Lower Ordovician carbonates. Geometry of the shale diapir suggests contraction approximately perpendicular to the graben

  20. Seismic activation of tectonic stresses by mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcak, Henryk; Mutke, Grzegorz

    2013-10-01

    Hard coal mining in the area of the Bytom Syncline (Upper Silesia Coal Basin, Poland) has been associated with the occurrence of high-energy seismic events (up to 109 J; local magnitude up to 4.0), which have been recorded by the local mining seismological network and regional seismological network. It has been noticed that the strongest seismic events occur when the mine longwall alignments coincide with the syncline axis. Data recorded by the improved local seismic network in the Bobrek Mine allow the estimation of the depths of the events’ hypocentres during excavation of longwall panel 3 as it approached the syncline axis. The recorded data were also used to estimate the location of the rupture surface and stress distribution in the seismic focus region. It was concluded that tectonic stresses, particularly horizontal stress components, are essential in the distribution of seismic tremors resulting from reverse faulting. The stresses induced by mining activity are only triggering tectonic deformations. The hypocentres of the strongest seismic events during mining of longwall panel 3/503 were located 300-800 m deeper than the level of coal seam 503.

  1. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  2. Seismic hazard and risk assessment in the intraplate environment: The New Madrid seismic zone of the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Although the causes of large intraplate earthquakes are still not fully understood, they pose certain hazard and risk to societies. Estimating hazard and risk in these regions is difficult because of lack of earthquake records. The New Madrid seismic zone is one such region where large and rare intraplate earthquakes (M = 7.0 or greater) pose significant hazard and risk. Many different definitions of hazard and risk have been used, and the resulting estimates differ dramatically. In this paper, seismic hazard is defined as the natural phenomenon generated by earthquakes, such as ground motion, and is quantified by two parameters: a level of hazard and its occurrence frequency or mean recurrence interval; seismic risk is defined as the probability of occurrence of a specific level of seismic hazard over a certain time and is quantified by three parameters: probability, a level of hazard, and exposure time. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), a commonly used method for estimating seismic hazard and risk, derives a relationship between a ground motion parameter and its return period (hazard curve). The return period is not an independent temporal parameter but a mathematical extrapolation of the recurrence interval of earthquakes and the uncertainty of ground motion. Therefore, it is difficult to understand and use PSHA. A new method is proposed and applied here for estimating seismic hazard in the New Madrid seismic zone. This method provides hazard estimates that are consistent with the state of our knowledge and can be easily applied to other intraplate regions. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  3. Apollo 14 active seismic experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, J. S.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Explosion seismic refraction data indicate that the lunar near-surface rocks at the Apollo 14 site consist of a regolith 8.5 meters thick and characterized by a compressional wave velocity of 104 meters per second. The regolith is underlain by a layer with a compressional wave velocity of 299 meters per second. The thickness of this layer, which we interpret to be the Fra Mauro Formation, is between 16 and 76 meters. The layer immediately beneath this has a velocity greater than 370 meters per second. We found no evidence of permafrost.

  4. Low Vp/Vs ratios and Earthquake Occurrence in Intraplate Seismic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    Local earthquake tomography results for three North American intraplate seismic zones demonstrate a correspondence between anomalously low Vp/Vs ratios and earthquake occurrence. Vp and Vs models are determined for the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ) and Vp/Vs ratios are found by dividing Vp by Vs in those portions of the models where P- and S-wave raypath coverage is similar. In the NMSZ, Vp/Vs ratios as low as 1.62 are associated with the northern portion of the Reelfoot fault and the two arms of seismicity extending from its northern end. In the ETSZ, Vp/Vs ratios of 1.68 occur at depths greater than 12 km and are associated with the most seismogenic portion of the zone. Only a limited data set is available for the CSZ but low Vp/Vs ratios of 1.68 occur at depths exceeding 8 km and correspond to the two major NE trending branches of seismicity. Low Vp/Vs ratios are produced by negative Vp anomalies and positive Vs anomalies in all three seismic zones, suggesting the controlling factor is rock composition rather than the presence of fractures and elevated pore pressure. Compositionally, low Vp/Vs ratios can be explained by the presence of quartz rich rocks. For example, the 1.62 Vp/Vs ratio in the NMSZ can be attributed to rocks containing about 25 to 30% (weight percent) more quartz than is commonly found in granite. Quartz is a weak mineral and the presence of quartz-rich rocks could facilitate ductile behavior (creep) at depth, resulting in shear strain loading and the generation of earthquakes in the crust above. The presence of quartz rich basement rocks may place an important constraint on the location of intraplate seismic zones.

  5. Regional Observation of Seismic Activity in Baekdu Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geunyoung; Che, Il-Young; Shin, Jin-Soo; Chi, Heon-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Seismic unrest in Baekdu Mountain area between North Korea and Northeast China region has called attention to geological research community in Northeast Asia due to her historical and cultural importance. Seismic bulletin shows level of seismic activity in the area is higher than that of Jilin Province of Northeast China. Local volcanic observation shows a symptom of magmatic unrest in period between 2002 and 2006. Regional seismic data have been used to analyze seismic activity of the area. The seismic activity could be differentiated from other seismic phenomena in the region by the analysis.

  6. Hydrothermal fault zone mapping using seismic and electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onacha, Stephen Alumasa

    This dissertation presents a new method of using earthquakes and resistivity data to characterize permeable hydrothermal reservoirs. The method is applied to field examples from Casa Diablo in the Long Valley Caldera, California; Mt. Longonot, Kenya; and Krafla, Iceland. The new method has significant practical value in the exploration and production of geothermal energy. The method uses P- and S-wave velocity, S-wave polarization and splitting magnitude, resistivity and magnetotelluric (MT) strike directions to determine fracture-porosity and orientation. The conceptual model used to characterize the buried, fluid-circulating fault zones in hydrothermal systems is based on geological and fracture models. The method has been tested with field earthquake and resistivity data; core samples; temperature measurements; and, for the case of Krafla, with a drilled well. The use of resistivity and microearthquake measurements is based on theoretical formulation of shared porosity, anisotropy and polarization. The relation of resistivity and a double porosity-operator is solved using a basis function. The porosity-operator is used to generate a correlation function between P-wave velocity and resistivity. This correlation is then used to generate P-wave velocity from 2-D resistivity models. The resistivity models are generated from magnetotelluric (MT) by using the Non-Linear Conjugate Gradient (NLCG) inversion method. The seismic and electrical measurements used come from portable, multi station microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring networks and multi-profile, MT and transient electromagnetic (TEM) observation campaigns. The main conclusions in this dissertation are listed below: (1) Strong evidence exists for correlation between MT strike direction and anisotropy and MEQ S-wave splitting at sites close to fluid-filled fracture zones. (2) A porosity operator generated from a double porosity model has been used to generate valid P-wave velocity models from resistivity data. This

  7. 3D absolute hypocentral determination - 13 years of seismicity in Ecuadorian subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Segovia, Monica; Theunissen, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    In Ecuador, the Nazca plate is subducting beneath the North Andean Block. This subduction triggered, during the last century, 4 major earthquakes of magnitude greater than 7.7. Between 1994 and 2007, the Geophysical Institute (Escuela National Politecnica, Quito) recorded about 40 000 events in whole Ecuador ranging from Mb 1.5 to 6.9. Unfortunately, the local network shows great density discrepancy between the Coastal and Andean regions where numerous stations were installed to survey volcanic activity. Consequently, seismicity in and around the interplate seismogenic zone - producer of the most destructive earthquakes and tsunamis - is not well constrained. This study aims to improve the location of 13 years seismicity occurred during an interseismic period in order to better localize the seismic deformation and gaps. The first step consists in the construction of a 3D "georealistic" velocity model. Because local tomography cannot provide satisfactory model, we combined all local crustal/lithospheric information on the geometry and velocity properties of different geological units. Those information cover the oceanic Nazca plate and sedimentary coverture the subducting plate dip angle; the North Andean Block margin composed of accreted oceanic plateaus (the Moho depth is approximated using gravity modeling); the metamorphic volcanic chain (oceanic nature for the occidental cordillera and inter-andean valley, continental one for the oriental cordillera); The continental Guyana shield and sedimentary basins. The resulting 3D velocity model extends from 2°N to 6.5°S and 277°E to 283°E and reaches a depth of 300 km. It is discretized in constant velocity blocks of 12 x 12 x 3 km in x, y and z, respectively. The second step consists in selecting an adequate sub-set of seismic stations in order to correct the effect of station density disequilibrium between coastal and volcanic regions. Consequently, we only keep the most representative volcanic stations in terms

  8. Gravity and magnetic anomalies used to delineate geologic features associated with earthquakes and aftershocks in the central Virginia seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. K.; Horton, J.; McNamara, D. E.; Spears, D.; Burton, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    Estimating seismic hazard in intraplate environments can be challenging partly because events are relatively rare and associated data thus limited. Additionally, in areas such as the central Virginia seismic zone, numerous pre-existing faults may or may not be candidates for modern tectonic activity, and other faults may not have been mapped. It is thus important to determine whether or not specific geologic features are associated with seismic events. Geophysical and geologic data collected in response to the Mw5.8 August 23, 2011 central Virginia earthquake provide excellent tools for this purpose. Portable seismographs deployed within days of the main shock showed a series of aftershocks mostly occurring at depths of 3-8 km along a southeast-dipping tabular zone ~10 km long, interpreted as the causative fault or fault zone. These instruments also recorded shallow (< 4 km) aftershocks clustered in several areas at distances of ~2-15 km from the main fault zone. We use new airborne geophysical surveys (gravity, magnetics, radiometrics, and LiDAR) to delineate the distribution of various surface and subsurface geologic features of interest in areas where the earthquake and aftershocks took place. The main (causative fault) aftershock cluster coincides with a linear, NE-trending gravity gradient (~ 2 mgal/km) that extends over 20 km in either direction from the Mw5.8 epicenter. Gravity modeling incorporating seismic estimates of Moho variations suggests the presence of a shallow low-density body overlying the main aftershock cluster, placing it within the upper 2-4 km of the main-fault hanging wall. The gravity, magnetic, and radiometric data also show a bend in generally NE-SW orientation of anomalies close to the Mw5.8 epicenter. Most shallow aftershock clusters occur near weaker short-wavelength gravity gradients of one to several km length. In several cases these gradients correspond to geologic contacts mapped at the surface. Along the gravity gradients, the

  9. An Algorithm for Evaluating Fresnel-Zone Textural Roughness for Seismic Facies Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, H.; Gao, D.

    2014-12-01

    In reflection seismic interpretation, a 1-D convolutional model is commonly used to interpret amplitude variations based on the geometric ray theory assuming seismic wave to reflect at a reflection point; however, the propagation of seismic waves actually occurs in a finite zone around the geometric ray path and gets reflected from a zone known as Fresnel zone. The collected signal at the surface turns out to be the superposition of reflections from within the Fresnel zone, which is a function of texture. Generally, for a rough texture such as sandstone, the dominant reflection is from the zone margin, while for a smooth texture such as marine shale, the dominant reflection is from the zone center. Based on this concept, Fresnel-zone texture directly affects amplitude variations with offset (AVO), azimuth (AVAZ), and frequency (AVF). Here we develop a computer algorithm for evaluating Fresnel-zone textural roughness. The algorithm starts with dividing the Fresnel zone into a set of micro-zones. It then builds an initial texture model to be convolved with an extracted wavelet. By comparing the synthetic signal from a Fresnel zone to the real seismic signal within an analysis window at a target location, the model is adjusted and updated until both synthetic and real signals match best. The roughness is evaluated as the correlation coefficient between the generated texture model within the Fresnel zone and the ideal model for a rough texture medium. Our new algorithm is applied to a deep-water 3D seismic volume over offshore Angola, west Africa. The results show that a rough texture is associated with channel sands, whereas a smooth texture with marine shale.

  10. Active Faults, Modern Seismicity And Block Structure Of Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatinsky, Y.; Rundquist, D.

    2004-12-01

    The analysis of on active faults and seismicity shows that the only a northern part of Eurasia should be regarded as an indivisible lithosphere unit. We defined it as the North Eurasian plate (Gatinsky, Rundquist, 2004) unlike the Eurasian plate s.l., which can be used only for paleotectonic reconstructions. The North Eurasian plate is bordered by zones of seismic activity traced along the Gakkel ridge, the Chersky and Stanovoi ranges, the Baikal rift, Altai--Sayany region, northern Tien Shan, Pamir, Hindu Kush and Kopet Dagh, Great Caucasus, northern Anatolia, Rhodopes, Carpathians, eastern and central Alps. Relationships between this plate and Europe west of the Rhine grabens remain ambiguous. The satellite measurements for them seem to be similar (Nocquet, Calais, 2003), but structural and seismic evidences allow suggesting their incipient division. Wide zones between this plate and neighboring ones can be distinguished outside north Eurasia. These zones consist of numerous blocks of various sizes. Block boundaries are mainly characterized by the high seismicity and development of active wrench faults, thrusts or modern rifts. Some of such zones were named earlier as "diffuse plate boundaries" (Stein et al., 2002; Bird et al, 2003). We suggest to name them as "transit zones" because they are situated between large lithosphere plates and as if transfer the stress field of one of them to other. Blocks within the transit zones reveal local divergences in GPS vectors of their displacements in the ITRF system and especially with respect to fixed Eurasia. At the same time data of satellite measurements emphasize the unity of the North Eurasian plate, which moves eastward in absolute coordinates with some clockwise rotation. The stress distribution in inner parts of the continent is being affected by the interaction with different plates and blocks. It can be more effectively illustrated by a «triangle» of the maximal seismic activity of Eurasia in the central Asia

  11. Galicia Bank Ocean-Continent Transition Zone: New Seismic Reflection Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, S. L.; Sawyer, D. S.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    The West Iberia continental margin is a type locale for magma-poor rifting, and studies there have been instrumental in changing the classical view of the ocean-continent transition (OCT) from a discrete boundary juxtaposing continental and oceanic crust, into a more complicated zone of varying width that can include exhumed mantle. This study examines two new seismic lines in the Galicia Bank area extending west of the Peridotite Ridge, showing high resolution images of five new ridges. These ridges could be hyperextended continental crust, exhumed continental mantle, or rough ultra-slow spreading oceanic crust. There are no tilted fault blocks with pre-syn rift stratigraphy that would indicate continental crust. There are also no faults indicating mid-ocean spreading with seismic layer stratigraphy indicating normal oceanic crust. The ridges have no coherent internal seismic structure, and some resemble the topographic profile of the Peridotite Ridge. Therefore, it is likely the western ridges are also mainly composed of serpentinized mantle. These western ridges are also similar to small oceanic core complexes observed along the active part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which also contain exhumed serpentinized mantle. This implies that there is a gradual transition within our study area from continental extension to seafloor spreading. Exhumation of continental mantle results in the formation of peridotite ridges, then transitions to episodic volcanism, which produces local thin basaltic crust, and exhumation of oceanic core complexes. Asymmetric processes during initial rifting and spreading results in contrasting structures on the two resulting margins.

  12. Galicia Bank ocean-continent transition zone: New seismic reflection constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, S. L.; Sawyer, D. S.; Morgan, J. K.

    2015-03-01

    The West Iberia continental margin is a type locale for magma-poor rifting, and studies there have been instrumental in changing the classical view of the ocean-continent transition (OCT) from a discrete boundary juxtaposing continental and oceanic crust, into a more complicated zone of varying width that can include exhumed mantle. This study examines two new seismic lines in the Galicia Bank area extending west of the Peridotite Ridge, showing high resolution images of five new ridges. These ridges could be hyperextended continental crust, exhumed continental mantle, or rough ultra-slow spreading oceanic crust. There are no tilted fault blocks with pre-syn rift stratigraphy that would indicate continental crust. There are also no faults indicating mid-ocean spreading with seismic layer stratigraphy indicating normal oceanic crust. The ridges have no coherent internal seismic structure, and some resemble the topographic profile of the Peridotite Ridge. Therefore, it is likely the western ridges are also mainly composed of serpentinized mantle. These western ridges are also similar to small oceanic core complexes observed along the active part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which also contain exhumed serpentinized mantle. This implies that there is a gradual transition within our study area from continental extension to seafloor spreading. Exhumation of continental mantle results in the formation of peridotite ridges, then transitions to episodic volcanism, which produces local thin basaltic crust, and exhumation of oceanic core complexes. Asymmetric processes during initial rifting and spreading result in contrasting structures on the two resulting margins.

  13. High-resolution 3-D P wave attenuation structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone using local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, Shishay T.; DeShon, Heather R.; Pesicek, Jeremy; Thurber, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), high-resolution P wave seismic attenuation model for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is determined using P wave path attenuation (t*) values of small-magnitude earthquakes (MD < 3.9). Events were recorded at 89 broadband and short-period seismometers of the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Zone Network and 40 short-period seismometers of the Portable Array for Numerical Data Acquisition experiment. The amplitude spectra of all the earthquakes are simultaneously inverted for source, path (t*), and site parameters. The t* values are inverted for QP using local earthquake tomography methods and a known 3-D P wave velocity model for the region. The four major seismicity arms of the NMSZ exhibit reduced QP (higher attenuation) than the surrounding crust. The highest attenuation anomalies coincide with areas of previously reported high swarm activity attributed to fluid-rich fractures along the southeast extension of the Reelfoot fault. The QP results are consistent with previous attenuation studies in the region, which showed that active fault zones and fractured crust in the NMSZ are highly attenuating.

  14. The May 29 2008 earthquake aftershock sequence within the South Iceland Seismic Zone: Fault locations and source parameters of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Parsons, M.; White, R. S.; Gudmundsson, O.; Drew, J.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Atlantic plate boundary breaks up into a series of segments across Iceland. The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is a complex transform zone where left-lateral E-W shear between the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone and the Eastern Volcanic Zone is accommodated by bookshelf faulting along N-S lateral strike-slip faults. The SISZ is also a transient feature, migrating sideways in response to the southward propagation of the Eastern Volcanic Zone. Sequences of large earthquakes (M > 6) lasting from days to years and affecting most of the seismic zone have occurred repeatedly in historical time (last 1100 years), separated by intervals of relative quiescence lasting decades to more than a century. On May 29 2008, a Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the western part of the South Iceland Seismic Zone, followed within seconds by a slightly smaller event on a second fault ~5 km further west. Aftershocks, detected by a temporal array of 11 seismometers and three permanent Icelandic Meteorological Office stations were located using an automated Coalescence Microseismic Mapping technique. The epicenters delineate two major and several smaller N-S faults as well as an E-W zone of activity stretching further west into the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone. Fault plane solutions show both right lateral and oblique strike slip mechanisms along the two major N-S faults. The aftershocks deepen from 3-5 km in the north to 8-9 km in the south, suggesting that the main faults dip southwards. The faulting is interpreted to be driven by the local stress due to transform motion between two parallel segments of the divergent plate boundary crossing Iceland.

  15. A joint local and teleseismic tomography study of the Mississippi Embayment and New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamwandha, Cecilia A.; Powell, Christine A.; Langston, Charles A.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed, upper mantle P and S wave velocity (Vp and Vs) models are developed for the northern Mississippi Embayment (ME), a major physiographic feature in the Central United States (U.S.) and the location of the active New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). This study incorporates local earthquake and teleseismic data from the New Madrid Seismic Network, the Earthscope Transportable Array, and the FlexArray Northern Embayment Lithospheric Experiment stations. The Vp and Vs solutions contain anomalies with similar magnitudes and spatial distributions. High velocities are present in the lower crust beneath the NMSZ. A pronounced low-velocity anomaly of ~ -3%--5% is imaged at depths of 100-250 km. High-velocity anomalies of ~ +3%-+4% are observed at depths of 80-160 km and are located along the sides and top of the low-velocity anomaly. The low-velocity anomaly is attributed to the presence of hot fluids upwelling from a flat slab segment stalled in the transition zone below the Central U.S.; the thinned and weakened ME lithosphere, still at slightly higher temperatures from the passage of the Bermuda hotspot in mid-Cretaceous, provides an optimal pathway for the ascent of the fluids. The observed high-velocity anomalies are attributed to the presence of mafic rocks emplaced beneath the ME during initial rifting in the early Paleozoic and to remnants of the depleted, lower portion of the lithosphere.

  16. Seismicity and Geometry Properties of the Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, E. E.; Karakostas, V. G.; Vallianatos, F.; Makropoulos, C.; Drakatos, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes that occurred along the Hellenic Arc-Trench system are engaged for approximating the geometry of the subducted oceanic plate. Seismicity and focal mechanisms confirm the gentle subduction (~15o-20o) of the oceanic crust reaching a depth of 20 km at a distance of 100 km from the trench. The slab is then bending at larger angles, and in particular at ~45o up to the depth of 80 km and at ~65o up to the depth of 180 km, when seismicity ceased. This geometry of the slab is shown in a bunch of cross sections normal to the convergence strike, up to ~25o (east Crete Island). To the east the sparse inslab seismicity reveals an almost vertical dipping of the lower part (from 80 km downdip) of the descending slab. The slab interface that accommodates hazardous earthquakes is clearly nonplanar with the main seismic moment release taking place on its up-dip side. The fore-arc, upper plate seismicity, is remarkably low in comparison with both subduction and back arc seismicity, and confined inside a seismogenic layer having a width not exceeding the 20km. Offshore seismicity is spatially variable forming distinctive streaks thus revealing that parts of the oceanic crust are probably slipped aseismically. This observation along with the fact that coupling in the Hellenic arc is only about a tenth of the plate motion, imply the presence of areas of lower and higher coupling across the subduction interface. Areas of high coupling imply areas of the slab interface subjected to high normal forces and correlate with earthquake asperities. Although asperity distributions vary substantially through time, identification of such characteristics in the seismogenesis can have a significant impact in the seismic hazard assessment. This research has been co-funded by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national resources under the framework of the "THALES Program: SEISMO FEAR HELLARC" project.

  17. Seismic imaging of the stagnant Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone under East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2008-12-01

    We used regional and global seismic tomography to determine high-resolution 3-D P-wave velocity structure of the crust and mantle down to 1200 km depth under Western Pacific to East Asia (Zhao, 2004, 2007; Huang and Zhao, 2006). A large number of arrival times of P, pP, PP and PcP waves recorded by many seismic stations in East Asia are used in the tomographic inversions. The subducting Pacific slab is imaged clearly as a high-velocity zone from the oceanic trenches down to 670-km depth, and intermediate-depth and deep earthquakes are located within the slab. The Pacific slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone under eastern China. The western edge of the stagnant slab is generally parallel with the Japan trench and the Ryukyu trench and roughly coincides with a prominent surface topographic boundary in East China. Although there are some discrepancies between the topographic boundary and the western edge of the stagnant slab, both of them are located approximately 1800 km west of the trenches. The entire Pacific slab is stagnant in the mantle transition zone under Northeast China (53-37 degree north latitude). Under 37-28 degree north latitude, however, some of the slab materials are visible below the 670-km discontinuity, though most of the slab materials are still in the transition zone, suggesting that part of the slab materials have started to drop down to the lower mantle. Under the Mariana arc, the Pacific slab penetrates directly down to the lower mantle. It is also visible that the Philippine Sea slab has subducted down to the mantle transition zone depth under western Japan and the Ryukyu back-arc region (Abdelwahed and Zhao, 2007). There are three active intraplate volcanoes in China. The Changbai and Wudalianchi volcanoes in Northeast China are underlain by significant slow anomalies in the upper mantle, above the stagnant Pacific slab, suggesting that the two active volcanoes are not hot spots but a kind of back-arc volcanoes associated with

  18. Anatomy of a megathrust: The 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake rupture zone imaged using seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen P.; Rietbrock, Andreas; Ryder, Isabelle M. A.; Lee, Chao-Shing; Miller, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Knowledge of seismic velocities in the seismogenic part of subduction zones can reveal how material properties may influence large ruptures. Observations of aftershocks that followed the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake provide an exceptional dataset to examine the physical properties of a megathrust rupture zone. We manually analysed aftershocks from onshore seismic stations and ocean bottom seismometers to derive a 3-D velocity model of the rupture zone using local earthquake tomography. From the trench to the magmatic arc, our velocity model illuminates the main features within the subduction zone. We interpret an east-dipping high P-wave velocity anomaly (>6.9 km/s) as the subducting oceanic crust and a low P-wave velocity (<6.25 km/s) in the marine forearc as the accretionary complex. We find two large P-wave velocity anomalies (∼7.8 km/s) beneath the coastline. These velocities indicate an ultramafic composition, possibly related to extension and a mantle upwelling during the Triassic. We assess the role played by physical heterogeneity in governing megathrust behaviour. Greatest slip during the Maule earthquake occurred in areas of moderate P-wave velocity (6.5-7.5 km/s), where the interface is structurally more uniform. At shallow depths, high fluid pressure likely influenced the up-dip limit of seismic activity. The high velocity bodies lie above portions of the plate interface where there was reduced coseismic slip and minimal postseismic activity. The northern velocity anomaly may have acted as a structural discontinuity within the forearc, influencing the pronounced crustal seismicity in the Pichilemu region. Our work provides evidence for how the ancient geological structure of the forearc may influence the seismic behaviour of subduction megathrusts.

  19. Earthquakes in the Orozco transform zone: seismicity, source mechanisms, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, Anne M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, a network of ocean bottom seismometers and hydrophones was deployed in order to determine the seismic characteristics of the Orozco transform fault in the central eastern Pacific. We present hypocentral locations and source mechanisms for 70 earthquakes recorded by this network. All epicenters are within the transform region of the Orozco Fracture Zone and clearly delineate the active plate boundary. About half of the epicenters define a narrow line of activity parallel to the spreading direction and situated along a deep topographic trough that forms the northern boundary of the transform zone (region 1). Most focal depths for these events are very shallow, within 4 km of the seafloor; several well-determined focal depths, however, are as great as 7 km. No shallowing of seismic activity is observed as the rise-transform intersection is approached; to the contrary, the deepest events are within 10 km of the intersection. First motion polarities for most of the earthquakes in region 1 are compatible with right-lateral strike slip faulting along a nearly vertical plane, striking parallel to the spreading direction. Another zone of activity is observed in the central part of the transform (region 2). The apparent horizontal and vertical distribution of activity in this region is more scattered than in the first, and the first motion radiation patterns of these events do not appear to be compatible with any known fault mechanism. Pronounced lateral variations in crustal velocity structure are indicated for the transform region from refraction data and measurements of wave propagation directions. The effect of this lateral heterogeneity on hypocenters and fault plane solutions is evaluated by tracing rays through a three-dimensional velocity grid. While findings for events in region 1 are not significantly affected, in region 2, epicentral mislocations of up to 10 km and azimuthal deflections of up to 45° may result from

  20. Seismic Measurement of the Locations of the Base of Convection Zone and Helium Ionization Zone for Stars in the Kepler Seismic LEGACY Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Raodeo, Keyuri; Antia, H. M.; Mazumdar, Anwesh; Basu, Sarbani; Lund, Mikkel N.; Silva Aguirre, Víctor

    2017-03-01

    Acoustic glitches are regions inside a star where the sound speed or its derivatives change abruptly. These leave a small characteristic oscillatory signature in the stellar oscillation frequencies. With the precision achieved by Kepler seismic data, it is now possible to extract these small amplitude oscillatory signatures, and infer the locations of the glitches. We perform glitch analysis for all the 66 stars in the Kepler seismic LEGACY sample to derive the locations of the base of the envelope convection zone (CZ) and the helium ionization zone. The signature from helium ionization zone is found to be robust for all stars in the sample, whereas the CZ signature is found to be weak and problematic, particularly for relatively massive stars with large errorbars on the oscillation frequencies. We demonstrate that the helium glitch signature can be used to constrain the properties of the helium ionization layers and the helium abundance.

  1. Abundant off-fault seismicity and orthogonal structures in the San Jacinto fault zone

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Zachary E.; Hauksson, Egill; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The trifurcation area of the San Jacinto fault zone has produced more than 10% of all earthquakes in southern California since 2000, including the June 2016 Mw (moment magnitude) 5.2 Borrego Springs earthquake. In this area, the fault splits into three subparallel strands and is associated with broad VP/VS anomalies. We synthesize spatiotemporal properties of historical background seismicity and aftershocks of the June 2016 event. A template matching technique is used to detect and locate more than 23,000 aftershocks, which illuminate highly complex active fault structures in conjunction with a high-resolution regional catalog. The hypocenters form dipping seismicity lineations both along strike and nearly orthogonal to the main fault, and are composed of interlaced strike-slip and normal faults. The primary faults change dip with depth and become listric by transitioning to a dip of ~70° near a depth of 10 km. The Mw 5.2 Borrego Springs earthquake and past events with M > 4.0 occurred on the main faults, whereas most of the low-magnitude events are located in a damage zone (several kilometers wide) at seismogenic depths. The lack of significant low-magnitude seismicity on the main fault traces suggests that they do not creep. The very high rate of aftershocks likely reflects the large geometrical fault complexity and perhaps a relatively high stress due to a significant length of time elapsed since the last major event. The results provide important insights into the physics of faulting near the brittle-ductile transition. PMID:28345036

  2. Abundant off-fault seismicity and orthogonal structures in the San Jacinto fault zone.

    PubMed

    Ross, Zachary E; Hauksson, Egill; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2017-03-01

    The trifurcation area of the San Jacinto fault zone has produced more than 10% of all earthquakes in southern California since 2000, including the June 2016 Mw (moment magnitude) 5.2 Borrego Springs earthquake. In this area, the fault splits into three subparallel strands and is associated with broad VP /VS anomalies. We synthesize spatiotemporal properties of historical background seismicity and aftershocks of the June 2016 event. A template matching technique is used to detect and locate more than 23,000 aftershocks, which illuminate highly complex active fault structures in conjunction with a high-resolution regional catalog. The hypocenters form dipping seismicity lineations both along strike and nearly orthogonal to the main fault, and are composed of interlaced strike-slip and normal faults. The primary faults change dip with depth and become listric by transitioning to a dip of ~70° near a depth of 10 km. The Mw 5.2 Borrego Springs earthquake and past events with M > 4.0 occurred on the main faults, whereas most of the low-magnitude events are located in a damage zone (several kilometers wide) at seismogenic depths. The lack of significant low-magnitude seismicity on the main fault traces suggests that they do not creep. The very high rate of aftershocks likely reflects the large geometrical fault complexity and perhaps a relatively high stress due to a significant length of time elapsed since the last major event. The results provide important insights into the physics of faulting near the brittle-ductile transition.

  3. Pre-seismic electromagnetic anomalies induced by intermediate-depth earthquakes (Vrancea zone-Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanica, Dumitru; Dragos Stanica, Armand

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies show that before the earthquake initiation, the high stress level which reached within the seismogenic volume may generate dehydration of rocks and fluids migration along surrounding faulting systems and could be reflected by electrical conductivity changes. In this paper, we investigate these changes of conductivity using ULF electromagnetic data recorded at the Geodynamic Observatory Provita de Sus, located on the Carpathian electrical conductivity anomaly (CECA), at about 100km distance of Vrancea epicentral zone. Using ground-based monitoring system (GMS 06 and MAG03 DAM electromagnetic and geomagnetic equipments, respectively), possible anomalous variations of the electromagnetic normalized functions (ENF) have been analyzed in correlation with earthquakes with Mw > 3.7 triggered in 2013 year at the intermediate depth interval 70-160km, in seismic active Vrancea zone. Thus, the daily mean distributions of the both functions Bzn = Bz/Bperp (where: Bz is vertical component of the geomagnetic field; Bperp is geomagnetic component perpendicular to the strike orientation) and Rn = Rpar/Rz (where: Rpar is resistivity parallel to strike; Rz is vertical resistivity), together with their standard deviation (SD) are performed by using the FFT band-pass filter analysis in the frequency range (0.001Hz to 0.016Hz). After analyzing the anomalous intervals of the Bzn* and Ron* values obtained by using a standardized random variable equation, we may conclude that: (i) a pre-seismic anomalous value of maximum related to the both ENF may reflect an impending earthquake; (ii) a superimposed effect of some earthquakes occurred at short time-intervals is also reflected by the anomalous maximum value; (iii) pre-seismic lead time is between 1 to 32 days before the impending earthquake.

  4. Seismic velocity models for the Denali fault zone along the Richardson Highway, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Lutter, W.J.; Christensen, N.I.; Ratchkovski, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Crustal-scale seismic-velocity models across the Denali fault zone along the Richardson Highway show a 50-km-thick crust, a near vertical fault trace, and a 5-km-wide damage zone associated with the fault near Trans-Alaska Pipeline Pump Station 10, which provided the closest strong ground motion recordings of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake. We compare models, derived from seismic reflection and refraction surveys acquired in 1986 and 1987, to laboratory measurements of seismic velocities for typical metamorphic rocks exposed along the profiles. Our model for the 1986 seismic reflection profile indicates a 5-km-wide low-velocity zone in the upper 1 km of the Denali fault zone, which we interpret as fault gouge. Deeper refractions from our 1987 line image a 40-km wide, 5-km-deep low-velocity zone along the Denali fault and nearby associated fault strands, which we attribute to a composite damage zone along several strands of the Denali fault zone and to the obliquity of the seismic line to the fault zone. Our velocity model and other geophysical data indicate a nearly vertical Denali fault zone to a depth of 30 km. After-shocks of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake and our velocity model provide evidence for a flower structure along the fault zone consisting of faults dipping toward and truncated by the Denali fault. Wide-angle reflections indicate that the crustal thickness beneath the Denali fault is transitional between the 60-km-thick crust beneath the Alaska Range to the south, and the extended, 30-km-thick crust of the Yukon-Tanana terrane to the north.

  5. Seismic blanking zones in the deep-water Ullung Basin, East Sea of Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae; Riedel, Michael; Yoo, Dong-Geun

    2015-04-01

    A total 12366.395 L.km of 2D multichannel seismic data were acquired by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) for detecting and mapping seismic indicators for the presence of gas hydrate in the deep-water Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea. The seismic data were acquired using Trilogy System of Geco-Prakla, Bolt Air-gun System onboard the R/V TAMHAE II of KIGAM during the years of 2000 to 2004. The seismic faices of shallow sediments were also analyzed to understand the sedimentary strata developed in the basin. Seismic data were processed to define gas hydrate indicators such as bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) and seismic blank zones. The BSR was identified by (a) its polarity opposite to the seafloor, (b) its seafloor-parallel reflection behavior, and (c) its occurrence at a sub-bottom depth corresponding to the expected base of gas hydrate stability zone, on heat flow and other thermal data for the region and on seismic velocity data. The seismic velocity analysis was also conducted for determining the velocity deviation effect of high-velocity gas hydrate and underlying low-velocity free gas. The BSRs occur mainly in the southern part of the basin where mass transport deposits are widely occurring. A number of vertical to sub-vertical seismic blanking zones were identified in the basin. The blanking zones are near-vertical broad chimney-like structures of reduced seismic reflectivity. They may be formed by gas and/or fluid upwelling through fractures and faults. Many of the blanking zones show apparent velocity pull-up effects of sediment layering structures that are interpreted to be a result of higher velocity gas hydrate. The presence of substantial amounts of gas hydrate in the blank zones were first found by piston coring in 2007, and subsequently confirmed by two deep-drilling expeditions in 2007 and 2010. Most of the blanking zones occur in well-bedded turbidite/hemi-pelagic sediments in the northern deep basin. The

  6. Slab temperature controls on the Tonga double seismic zone and slab mantle dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Wei, S. Shawn; Wiens, Douglas A.; van Keken, Peter E.; Cai, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Double seismic zones are two-layered distributions of intermediate-depth earthquakes that provide insight into the thermomechanical state of subducting slabs. We present new precise hypocenters of intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Tonga subduction zone obtained using data from local island–based, ocean-bottom, and global seismographs. The results show a downdip compressional upper plane and a downdip tensional lower plane with a separation of about 30 km. The double seismic zone in Tonga extends to a depth of about 300 km, deeper than in any other subduction system. This is due to the lower slab temperatures resulting from faster subduction, as indicated by a global trend toward deeper double seismic zones in colder slabs. In addition, a line of high seismicity in the upper plane is observed at a depth of 160 to 280 km, which shallows southward as the convergence rate decreases. Thermal modeling shows that the earthquakes in this “seismic belt” occur at various pressures but at a nearly constant temperature, highlighting the important role of temperature in triggering intermediate-depth earthquakes. This seismic belt may correspond to regions where the subducting mantle first reaches a temperature of ~500°C, implying that metamorphic dehydration of mantle minerals in the slab provides water to enhance faulting. PMID:28097220

  7. Slab temperature controls on the Tonga double seismic zone and slab mantle dehydration.

    PubMed

    Wei, S Shawn; Wiens, Douglas A; van Keken, Peter E; Cai, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Double seismic zones are two-layered distributions of intermediate-depth earthquakes that provide insight into the thermomechanical state of subducting slabs. We present new precise hypocenters of intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Tonga subduction zone obtained using data from local island-based, ocean-bottom, and global seismographs. The results show a downdip compressional upper plane and a downdip tensional lower plane with a separation of about 30 km. The double seismic zone in Tonga extends to a depth of about 300 km, deeper than in any other subduction system. This is due to the lower slab temperatures resulting from faster subduction, as indicated by a global trend toward deeper double seismic zones in colder slabs. In addition, a line of high seismicity in the upper plane is observed at a depth of 160 to 280 km, which shallows southward as the convergence rate decreases. Thermal modeling shows that the earthquakes in this "seismic belt" occur at various pressures but at a nearly constant temperature, highlighting the important role of temperature in triggering intermediate-depth earthquakes. This seismic belt may correspond to regions where the subducting mantle first reaches a temperature of ~500°C, implying that metamorphic dehydration of mantle minerals in the slab provides water to enhance faulting.

  8. Magnetic activity of seismic solar analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Beck, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    We present our latest results on the solar-stellar connection by studying 18 solar analogs that we identified among the Kepler seismic sample tep{salabert16a}. We measured their magnetic activity properties using observations collected by the Kepler satellite and the ground-based, high-resolution HERMES spectrograph. The photospheric (S{_ph}) and chromospheric (S) magnetic activity proxies of these seismic solar analogs are compared in relation to solar activity. We show that the activity of the Sun is actually comparable to the activity of the seismic solar analogs. Furthermore, we report on the discovery of temporal variability in the acoustic frequencies of the young (1 Gyr-old) solar analog KIC 10644253 with a modulation of about 1.5 years, which agrees with the derived photospheric activity tep{salabert16b}. It could actually be the signature of the short-period modulation, or quasi-biennal oscillation, of its magnetic activity as observed in the Sun and the 1-Gyr-old solar analog HD 30495. In addition, the lithium abundance and the chromospheric activity estimated from HERMES confirms that KIC 10644253 is a young and more active star than the Sun.

  9. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of Fault Zones: Methods and Examples From The San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Prentice, C. S.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic imaging of fault zones at shallow depths is challenging. Conventional seismic reflection methods do not work well in fault zones that consist of non-planar strata or that have large variations in velocity structure, two properties that occur in most fault zones. Understanding the structure and geometry of fault zones is important to elucidate the earthquake hazard associated with fault zones and the barrier effect that faults impose on subsurface fluid flow. In collaboration with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) at San Andreas Lake on the San Francisco peninsula, we acquired combined seismic P-wave and S-wave reflection, refraction, and guided-wave data to image the principal strand of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) that ruptured the surface during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and additional fault strands east of the rupture. The locations and geometries of these fault strands are important because the SFPUC is seismically retrofitting the Hetch Hetchy water delivery system, which provides much of the water for the San Francisco Bay area, and the delivery system is close to the SAF at San Andreas Lake. Seismic reflection images did not image the SAF zone well due to the brecciated bedrock, a lack of layered stratigraphy, and widely varying velocities. Tomographic P-wave velocity images clearly delineate the fault zone as a low-velocity zone at about 10 m depth in more competent rock, but due to soil saturation above the rock, the P-waves do not clearly image the fault strands at shallower depths. S-wave velocity images, however, clearly show a diagnostic low-velocity zone at the mapped 1906 surface break. To image the fault zone at greater depths, we utilized guided waves, which exhibit high amplitude seismic energy within fault zones. The guided waves appear to image the fault zone at varying depths depending on the frequency of the seismic waves. At higher frequencies (~30 to 40 Hz), the guided waves show strong amplification at the

  10. Seismic Tomography of the Arabian-Eurasian Collision Zone and Surrounding Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-20

    zone . The crustal models correlate well with geologic and tectonic features. The upper mantle tomograms show the images of the subducted Neotethys...Zhao, D., A. Hasegawa, H. Kanamori (1994). Deep structure of Japan subduction zone as derived from local, regional and teleseismic events, J. Geophys...AFRL-RV-HA-TR-2010-1043 Seismic Tomography of the Arabian-Eurasian Collision Zone and Surrounding Areas M. Nafi Toksöz Robert D. Van

  11. Variation of seismic coupling with slab detachment and upper plate structure along the western Hellenic subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laigle, Mireille; Sachpazi, Maria; Hirn, Alfred

    2004-10-01

    The western Hellenic subduction zone is characterized by a trenchward velocity of the upper plate. In the Ionian islands segment, complete seismic coupling is achieved, as is predicted by standard plate-tectonic models in which there is no slab pull force because the slab has broken off. The moderate local seismic moment rate relates to a shallow downdip limit for the seismogenic interface. This characteristic may be attributed to the ductility of the lower crust of the upper plate, which allows a décollement between the upper crust of the overriding plate and the subducting plate. Farther south, a deeper downdip limit of the seismogenic interface is indicated by thrust-faulting earthquakes, which persist much deeper in western Crete. A correspondingly larger downdip width of this seismogenic zone is consistent with the suggested larger maximum magnitude of earthquakes here. However, since the seismic moment release rate seems to be moderate in the Peloponnese and western Crete, like in in the Ionian islands, this seismically active interface cannot maintain complete seismic coupling across its larger downdip width. A cause may be the lateral addition of overweight to the part of the slab still attached in Crete, by the free fall of its part that has broken off from the surface further north. This increased slab pull reduces the compressive normal stress across the seismogenic interface and thus causes partial seismic coupling in its shallower part. However, the width of this part may provide an additional area contributing to slip in large earthquakes, which may nucleate deeper on stick-slip parts of the interface. Hints at anomalies in structure and seismicity, which need to be resolved, may relate to the present location of the edge of the tear in the slab.

  12. Dynamics of radon activity due to earthquakes (by the example of Altai seismically active region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptikaeva, O. I.; Shitov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of monitoring radon emanations in the territory of Gorno-Altaisk due to seismic activity and their influence on human health are considered. It is shown that the level of activity of subsoil radon in the vicinity of the fault zone in the territory of Gorno-Altaisk exceeds such a level recorded in Moscow by 3-4 times. There is ambiguity in the behavior of radon as a precursor of a seismic event. Some radon anomalies are synchronous with moments of earthquakes and others correspond to quiet periods. The radon activity is more closely associated with the earthquakes localized in the aftershock zone of the Chuya earthquake. This is assumed to be caused by the network of fluid-conducting channels within the active fault between this region and the observation station.

  13. Comparing the New Madrid Seismic Zone with the Osning Thrust: implications for GIA-induced intraplate tectonics in northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Tanner, David; Winsemann, Jutta

    2013-04-01

    Continental intraplate tectonics is a widespread phenomenon that causes significant earthquakes. These earthquakes even occur in areas that are characterized by low strain rates and there are often long intervals between the individual seismic events (Gangopadhyay & Talwani, 2003) that result in a hazard potential. To better understand the controlling factors of intraplate plate earthquakes in northern Germany, we compare the Osning Thrust with the intensively-studied New Madrid Seismic Zone in the Midwest USA. Both areas share major similarities such as a failed rift-basin setting, the presence of intrusive magmatic bodies in the subsurface, tectonic reactivation during the Late Cretaceous, paleo- and historic seismicity and comparable fault parameters. In addition, both areas have a very similar Late Pleistocene deglaciation history. New Madrid was c. 340 km south of the Laurentide ice sheet and ice retreat started around 21 ka and was completed by 8.5 ka (Grollimund & Zoback, 2001). The Osning Thrust was c. 310 km south of the Scandinavian ice sheet and deglaciation began at 24 ka. Both areas show historic seismicity in a similar time frame (New Madrid Seismic Zone: 1811-1812, Johnston & Schweig, 1996); Osning Thrust: 1612 and 1767, Grünthal & Bosse, 1997). We use numerical simulations to identify the timing of potentially GIA-induced fault activity, which are based on the fault stability margin concept of Wu & Hasegawa (1996). From our modelling results it is evident that the fault stability margin changed to negative between 16 and 13 ka for the Osning Thrust, which matches the OSL data of fault-related growth strata (Brandes et al., 2012). For the New Madrid Seismic Zone, the fault stability margin becomes zero between 2.5 ka BP (before 1812) to about 2 ka after the 1812 event, depending on the parameters of the model. This indicates that for both seismic zones, seismicity due to deglaciation was and still is very likely. From this study it can be derived

  14. Signatures of lightning activity in seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiszely, Márta; Bór, József; Mónus, Péter; Betz, Hans-Dieter

    2014-05-01

    A thunderstorm with intense lightning activity swept through Hungary on 28th August, 2013 between 00:00-09:00 UTC from the west towards north-east. Characteristic signal patterns could be observed in the time series recorded by seismometers in Hungary during the time the thunderstorm was close to a recording station. The signal patterns occurred coherently both in the vertical and in the horizontal seismic records. The patterns are composed of a sharp spike and a longer lasting disturbance which followed the spike after a gap of several seconds. This disturbance was of increased amplitude and lasted for up to a few tens of seconds. Detection times of spikes in the seismic records were compared to occurrence times of lightning strokes in the thunderstorm. Information on the occurrence time, polarity, type (CG or IC), peak current, and geographical location (including height estimation for IC events) of lightning strokes was provided by the LINET lightning detection network which uses magnetic loop antennas sensitive in the VLF-LF radio bands. A single lightning stroke could be unambiguously associated with each spike in the seismic records. This one-to-one correspondence suggests that the spike was caused by the electromagnetic shock wave from the lightning return stroke. The longer lasting disturbance is, on the other hand, most probably the signature of the subsequent air pressure wave which induced ground waves, too. In more than half of the examined cases, the time between the spike and the detection of a wave packet (peak amplitude) in the disturbance matched the expected propagation time of sound waves between the source location given by LINET and the seismic station. The direct sound wave associated wave packet, however, was not always the first arriving one in the seismic disturbance which suggests that coupling of sound waves and ground waves may not only occur at the seismic detector. The poster shows case studies of lightning associated seismic records

  15. Enriquillo–Plantain Garden fault zone in Jamaica: paleoseismology and seismic hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koehler, R.D.; Mann, P.; Prentice, Carol S.; Brown, L.; Benford, B.; Grandison-Wiggins, M.

    2013-01-01

    The countries of Jamaica, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic all straddle the Enriquillo–Plantain Garden fault zone ( EPGFZ), a major left-lateral, strike-slip fault system bounding the Caribbean and North American plates. Past large earthquakes that destroyed the capital cities of Kingston, Jamaica (1692, 1907), and Port-au-Prince, Haiti (1751, 1770), as well as the 2010 Haiti earthquake that killed more than 50,000 people, have heightened awareness of seismic hazards in the northern Caribbean. We present here new geomorphic and paleoseismic information bearing on the location and relative activity of the EPGFZ, which marks the plate boundary in Jamaica. Documentation of a river bank exposure and several trenches indicate that this fault is active and has the potential to cause major destructive earthquakes in Jamaica. The results suggest that the fault has not ruptured the surface in at least 500 yr and possibly as long as 28 ka. The long period of quiescence and subdued geomorphic expression of the EPGFZ indicates that it may only accommodate part of the ∼7–9 mm=yr plate deformation rate measured geodetically and that slip may be partitioned on other undocumented faults. Large uncertainties related to the neotectonic framework of Jamaica remain and more detailed fault characterization studies are necessary to accurately assess seismic hazards.

  16. Principal Slip Zones in Limestone: Microstructural Characterization and Implications for the Seismic Cycle (Tre Monti Fault, Central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven A. F.; Billi, Andrea; Toro, Giulio Di; Spiess, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Earthquakes in central Italy, and in other areas worldwide, often nucleate within and rupture through carbonates in the upper crust. During individual earthquake ruptures, most fault displacement is thought to be accommodated by thin principal slip zones. This study presents detailed microstructural observations of the slip zones of the seismically active Tre Monti normal fault zone. All of the slip zones cut limestone, and geological constraints indicate exhumation from <2 km depth, where ambient temperatures are ≪100°C. Scanning electron microscope observations suggest that the slip zones are composed of 100% calcite. The slip zones of secondary faults in the damage zone contain protocataclastic and cataclastic fabrics that are cross-cut by systematic fracture networks and stylolite dissolution surfaces. The slip zone of the principal fault has much more microstructural complexity, and contains a 2-10 mm thick ultracataclasite that lies immediately beneath the principal slip surface. The ultracataclasite itself is internally zoned; 200-300 μm-thick ultracataclastic sub-layers record extreme localization of slip. Syn-tectonic calcite vein networks spatially associated with the sub-layers suggest fluid involvement in faulting. The ultracataclastic sub-layers preserve compelling microstructural evidence of fluidization, and also contain peculiar rounded grains consisting of a central (often angular) clast wrapped by a laminated outer cortex of ultra-fine-grained calcite. These "clast-cortex grains" closely resemble those produced during layer fluidization in other settings, including the basal detachments of catastrophic landslides and saturated high-velocity friction experiments on clay-bearing gouges. An overprinting foliation is present in the slip zone of the principal fault, and electron backscatter diffraction analyses indicate the presence of a weak calcite crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) in the fine-grained matrix. The calcite c-axes are

  17. Location, structure, and seismicity of the Seattle fault zone, Washington: Evidence from aeromagnetic anomalies, geologic mapping, and seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Wells, R.E.; Weaver, C.S.; Johnson, S.Y.

    2002-01-01

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Puget Lowland shows details of the Seattle fault zone, an active but largely concealed east-trending zone of reverse faulting at the southern margin of the Seattle basin. Three elongate, east-trending magnetic anomalies are associated with north-dipping Tertiary strata exposed in the hanging wall; the magnetic anomalies indicate where these strata continue beneath glacial deposits. The northernmost anomaly, a narrow, elongate magnetic high, precisely correlates with magnetic Miocene volcanic conglomerate. The middle anomaly, a broad magnetic low, correlates with thick, nonmagnetic Eocene and Oligocene marine and fluvial strata. The southern anomaly, a broad, complex magnetic high, correlates with Eocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks. This tripartite package of anomalies is especially clear over Bainbridge Island west of Seattle and over the region east of Lake Washington. Although attenuated in the intervening region, the pattern can be correlated with the mapped strike of beds following a northwest-striking anticline beneath Seattle. The aeromagnetic and geologic data define three main strands of the Seattle fault zone identified in marine seismic-reflection profiles to be subparallel to mapped bedrock trends over a distance of >50 km. The locus of faulting coincides with a diffuse zone of shallow crustal seismicity and the region of uplift produced by the M 7 Seattle earthquake of A.D. 900-930.

  18. Seismic activity of Erebus volcano, antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada

    1987-11-01

    Mount Erebus is presently the only Antarctic volcano with sustained eruptive activity in the past few years. It is located on Ross Island and a convecting anorthoclase phonolite lava lake has occupied the summit crater of Mount Erebus from January 1973 to September 1984. A program to monitor the seismic activity of Mount Erebus named IMESS was started in December 1980 as an international cooperative program among Japan, the United States and New Zealand. A new volcanic episode began on 13 September, 1984 and continued until December. Our main observations from the seismic activity from 1982 1985 are as follows: (1) The average numbers of earthquakes which occurred around Mount Erebus in 1982, 1983 and January August 1984 were 64, 134 and 146 events per day, respectively. Several earthquake swarms occurred each year. (2) The averag number of earthquakes in 1985 is 23 events per day, with only one earthquake swarm. (3) A remarkable decrease of the background seismicity is recognized before and after the September 1984 activity. (4) Only a few earthquakes were located in the area surrounding Erebus mountain after the September 1984 activity. A magma reservoir is estimated to be located in the southwest area beneath the Erebus summit, based on the hypocenter distributions of earthquakes.

  19. Use of archaeology to date liquefaction features and seismic events in the new madrid seismic zone, Central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.P.; Lafferty, R. H.; Guccione, M.J.; Schweig, E. S.; Lopinot, N.; Cande, R.F.; Dyer-Williams, K.; Haynes, M.

    1996-01-01

    Prehistoric earthquake-induced liquefaction features occur in association with Native American occupation horizons in the New Madrid seismic zone. Age control of these liquefaction features, including sand-blow deposits, sand-blow craters, and sand dikes, can be accomplished by extensive sampling and flotation processing of datable materials as well as archaeobotanical analysis of associated archaeological horizons and pits. This approach increases both the amount of carbon for radiocarbon dating and the precision dating of artifact assemblages. Using this approach, we dated liquefaction features at four sites northwest of Blytheville, Arkansas, and found that at least one significant earthquake occurred in the New Madrid seismic zone between A.D. 1180 and 1400, probably about A.D. 1300 ?? 100 yr. In addition, we found three buried sand blows that formed between 3340 B.C. and A.D. 780. In this region where very large to great earthquakes appear to be closely timed, archaeology is helping to develop a paleoearthquake chronology for the New Madrid seismic zone. ?? 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. 3D Euler deconvolution in the New Madrid seismic zone (eastern US)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.; Powell, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The seismicity of intraplate continental interiors is one of the most challenging -though a bit overlooked- research topics in seismology. The most famous of those is undoubtedly the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), named after the city of New Madrid, Missouri, that was destroyed by one of the three M>7.0 earthquakes that occurred in central United States during the winter 1811-1812. After two centuries, there is still no consensus about what caused that crisis, how it is related to the current moderate magnitude activity of that region, and how likely it is that similarly large events will occur again in a near future in the NMSZ or in its vicinity. As often in such geodynamic settings, a key question is the role of structural reactivation in the current stress field. As modern earthquakes of the NMSZ mostly occur in the Precambrian basement, below the Mississippi embayment sedimentary cover and at such depths that no deformation is observed at the surface, almost no direct observation is available about faults segments that would be responsible for that seismicity. Yet the activity of the NMSZ is known to coincide with a Precambrian failed rift, the Reelfoot rift, whose geometry is mostly inferred from potential field data. In this work, we apply 3D Euler deconvolution to the total magnetic intensity field of the NMSZ. Euler deconvolution is a technique commonly used in exploration geophysics to determine the depth of magnetic sources and more generally to produce depth-to-basement maps and image deep structures buried beneath non-magnetic sedimentary cover. We obtain basement topography maps that we compare with previously published maps and with the earthquake distribution in the NMSZ.

  1. An Examination of Seismicity Linking the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, J. S.; Furlong, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Solomon Islands-Vanuatu composite subduction zone represents a tectonically complex region along the Pacific-Australia plate boundary in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Here the Australia plate subducts under the Pacific plate in two segments: the South Solomon Trench and the Vanuatu Trench. The two subducting sections are offset by a 200 km long, transform fault - the San Cristobal Trough (SCT) - which acts as a Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) fault. The subducting segments have experienced much more frequent and larger seismic events than the STEP fault. The northern Vanuatu trench hosted a M8.0 earthquake in 2013. In 2014, at the juncture of the western terminus of the SCT and the southern South Solomon Trench, two earthquakes (M7.4 and M7.6) occurred with disparate mechanisms (dominantly thrust and strike-slip respectively), which we interpret to indicate the tearing of the Australia plate as its northern section subducts and southern section translates along the SCT. During the 2013-2014 timeframe, little seismic activity occurred along the STEP fault. However, in May 2015, three M6.8-6.9 strike-slip events occurred in rapid succession as the STEP fault ruptured east to west. These recent events share similarities with a 1993 strike-slip STEP sequence on the SCT. Analysis of the 1993 and 2015 STEP earthquake sequences provides constraints on the plate boundary geometry of this major transform fault. Preliminary research suggests that plate motion along the STEP fault is partitioned between larger east-west oriented strike-slip events and smaller north-south thrust earthquakes. Additionally, the differences in seismic activity between the subducting slabs and the STEP fault can provide insights into how stress is transferred along the plate boundary and the mechanisms by which that stress is released.

  2. Stream networks and long-term surface uplift in the new madrid seismic zone.

    PubMed

    Merritts, D; Hesterberg, T

    1994-08-19

    Stream networks are sensitive to low rates of surface uplift and can be used to decipher the history of large earthquakes even where faults do not rupture the surface, as in intraplate seismic zones. Statistical analysis of alluvial network data from topographic maps in the New Madrid seismic zone, in the central United States, shows that stream-segment gradients deviate the most from an estimated natural stream profile where surface uplift is greatest. Evidence of cumulative deformation distilled from stream network patterns represents at least several meters of differential surface uplift during Holocene time, which suggests that more than one cycle of surface deformation occurred.

  3. Reconciling short recurrence intervals with minor deformation in the new madrid seismic zone.

    PubMed

    Schweig, E S; Ellis, M A

    1994-05-27

    At least three great earthquakes occurred in the New Madrid seismic zone in 1811 and 1812. Estimates of present-day strain rates suggest that such events may have a repeat time of 1000 years or less. Paleoseismological data also indicate that earthquakes large enough to cause soil liquefaction have occurred several times in the past 5000 years. However, pervasive crustal deformation expected from such a high frequency of large earthquakes is not observed. This suggests that the seismic zone is a young feature, possibly as young as several tens of thousands of years old and no more than a few million years old.

  4. Recent seismic activity of the Kivu Province, Western Rift Valley of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zana, N.; Kamba, M.; Katsongo, S.; Janssen, Th.

    1989-11-01

    The Kivu Province is located at the junction between the well-defined Ruzizi Valley to the south and the Lake Amin Trough to the north. In this zone, the Rift Valley is characterized by the highest uplift and by complex dislocations of the crust, accompanied by the most intensive volcanism of the East African Rift System. In this paper, we show the recent state of the seismic activity of this zone in connection with the seismic activity generated by the volcanoes Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira. The pattern of cumulative energy release by these volcanoes shows a steplike increase that is believed to be a precursor of volcanic eruptions.

  5. Microstructural study of the Mertz shear zone, East Antarctica. Implications for deformation processes and seismic anisotropy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarque, Gaëlle; Bascou, Jérôme; Maurice, Claire; Cottin, Jean-Yves; Ménot, René-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The Mertz Shear Zone (MSZ; 146°E 67°S; East Antarctica) is one major lithospheric-scale structure which outcrops on the eastern edge of the Terre Adélie Craton (Ménot et al., 2007) and that could connected with shear zones of South Australia (e.g., Kalinjala or Coorong shear zone (Kleinschmidt and Talarico, 2000; Gibson et al., 2013)) before the Cretaceous opening of the Southern Ocean. Geochronological and metamorphic studies indicated an MSZ activity at 1.7 and 1.5 Ga respectively in amphibolite and greenschists facies conditions. The deformation affects both the intermediate and lower crust levels, without associated voluminous magma injection. Granulite crop out in the area of the MSZ. They were dated at 2.4 Ga (Ménot et al., 2005) and could represent some preserved Neoarchean tectonites. These rocks show various degrees of deformation including penetrative structures that may display comparable features with that observed in amphibolite and greenschists facies rocks, i.e. NS-striking and steeply dipping foliation with weekly plunging lineation. In the field, cinematic indicators for the MSZ argue for a dominant dextral shear sense. We proceed to optical analysis and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements using EBSD technique in order to better constrain the deformation processes. Our results highlight (1) a microstructural gradient from highly deformed rocks (mylonites), forming plurimetric large shear bands and showing evidences of plastic deformation, to slightly deformed rocks in preserved cores with no evidences of plastic deformation or with a clear strong static recrystallization; (2) CPO of minerals related with variations on deformation conditions. Feldspar and quartz CPO argue for plastic deformation at high temperature in the most deformed domains and for the absence of deformation or an important stage of static recrystallization in preserved cores; (3) uncommon CPO in orthopyroxene which are characterized by [010]-axes

  6. Seismic imaging of deformation zones associated with normal fault-related folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapadat, Alexandru; Imber, Jonathan; Iacopini, David; Hobbs, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Folds associated with normal faulting, which are mainly the result of fault propagation and linkage of normal fault segments, can exhibit complex deformation patterns, with multiple synthetic splay faults, reverse faults and small antithetic Riedel structures accommodating flexure of the beds. Their identification is critical in evaluating connectivity of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and sealing capacity of faults. Previous research showed that seismic attributes can be successfully used to image complex structures and deformation distribution in submarine thrust folds. We use seismic trace and coherency attributes, a combination of instantaneous phase, tensor discontinuity and semblance attributes to identify deformation structures at the limit of seismic resolution, which accommodate seismic scale folding associated with normal faulting from Inner Moray Firth Basin, offshore Scotland. We identify synthetic splay faults and reverse faults adjacent to the master normal faults, which are localized in areas with highest fold amplitudes. This zone of small scale faulting is the widest in areas with highest fault throw / fold amplitude, or where a bend is present in the main fault surface. We also explore the possibility that changes in elastic properties of the rocks due to deformation can contribute to amplitude reductions in the fault damage zones. We analyse a pre-stack time-migrated 3D seismic data-set, where seismic reflections corresponding to a regionally-continuous and homogeneous carbonate layer display a positive correlation between strain distribution and amplitude variations adjacent to the faults. Seismic amplitude values are homogeneously distributed within the undeformed area of the footwall, with a minimum deviation from a mean amplitude value calculated for each seismic line. Meanwhile, the amplitude dimming zone is more pronounced (negative deviation increases) and widens within the relay zone, where sub-seismic scale faults, which accommodate

  7. Monitoring in situ deformation induced by a fluid injection in a fault zone in shale using seismic velocity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, D.; De Barros, L.; Guglielmi, Y.; Castilla, R.

    2015-12-01

    We monitor seismic velocity changes during an experiment at decametric scale aimed at artificially reactivate a fault zone by a high-pressure hydraulic injection in a shale formation of the underground site of Tournemire, South of France. A dense and a multidisciplinary instrumentation, with measures of pressure, fluid flow, strain, seismicity, seismic properties and resistivity allow for the monitoring of this experiment. We couple hydromechanical and seismic observations of the fault and its adjacent areas to better understand the deformation process preceding ruptures, and the role played by fluids. 9 accelerometers recorded repeated hammers shots on the tunnel walls. For each hammer shot we measured small travel time delays on direct P and S waves. We then located the seismic velocity perturbations using a tomography method. At low injection pressure, i.e. P< 15 Bars, we observe an increase of P-waves velocity around the injection, while we measure no change in S waves velocity. When the pressure overcomes 15 Bars, velocity perturbations dramatically increase with both P and S waves affected. A decrease of velocity is observed close to the injection point and is surrounded by regions of increasing velocity. Our observations are consistent with hydromechanical measures. Below 15 Bars, we interpret the P-wave velocity increase to be related to the compression of the fault zone around the injection chamber. Above 15 Bars, we measure a shear and dilatant fault movement, and a rapid increase in the injected fluid flow. At this step, our measures are coherent with a poroelastic opening of the fault with velocities decrease at the injection source and velocities increase related to stress transfer in the far field. Velocity changes prove to be efficient to monitor stress/strain variation in an activated fault, even if these observations might produce complex signals due to the highly contrasted hydromechanical responses in a heterogeneous media such as a fault zone.

  8. Seismological investigation of earthquakes in the New Madrid seismic zone and the northeastern extent of the New Madrid seismic zone: Final report, September 1981-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, R.B.; Taylor, K.; Nguyen, B.

    1988-07-01

    Earthquake activity in the Central Mississippi Valley has been monitored by an eight station seismograph network in the Wabash River Valley of southeastern Illinois and by a six station seismograph network in the New Madrid seismic zone. This network is a major component of a larger network in the region, jointly sponsored by the NRC, USGS, universities and states. During the time period of the contract, October 1981 through December 1986, 1206 earthquakes were located in the Central Mississippi Valley, of which 808 were in the New Madrid, Missouri area. Significant earthquakes studied in detail occurred in northeastern Ohio on January 31, 1986 and in southeastern Illinois on June 10, 1987. Focal mechanisms have been calculated for the 10 June 1987 southern Illinois earthquake using both P-wave first motions and long-period surface-wave spectral amplitude data. The long-period surface-wave and strong ground motion accelerogram recordings of the January 3, 1986, northeastern Ohio earthquake were used to estimate the focal mechanism and source time function of the source.reverse arrow

  9. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Trench Canyon Fault Zone, Mono Lake, Northeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novick, M. W.; Jayko, A. S.; Roeske, S.; McClain, J. S.; Hart, P. E.; Boyle, M.

    2009-12-01

    High resolution seismic imaging of Mono Lake, located in northeastern California, has revealed an approximately northwest striking fault in the area to the west of aerially exposed Negit Volcano. This fault, henceforth referred to as the Trench Canyon Fault (TCF), has also been mapped onshore along a correlating strike as far north as Cedar Hill Volcano, located to the northeast of the lake on the California/Nevada border. Onshore, the TCF was mapped for approximately 10 kilometers using air photos, DEM images, and standard geologic pace and compass mapping techniques. The TCF post- dates the last glacial maximum, evidenced by the cutting of wave cut benches along Cedar Hill Volcano. Relict, non-historic shorelines, left by the steady evaporation of Mono Lake beginning approximately 13k, are also repeatedly cut by the fault. Additional evidence of fault presence includes sag ponds, pressure ridges, tectonically fractured rocks, and normal fault scarps found along strike. Offshore, DEM images show a northeast striking structure to the northwest of Negit Volcano, which is co-linear with the onshore TCF. High resolution seismic imaging of the structure, using an applied acoustic/SIG mini-sparker system, reveals steeply dipping Holocene sediments, as well as volcanic deposits from active vents which have erupted in the last 1000 years, offset by the fault. Detailed structural analysis of the previously unstudied Trench Canyon Fault (TFC) and faults in the Cedar Hill region of northern California, along with seismic studies of sediments beneath Mono Lake not only allow for a better comprehension of this minor fault system, but provide greater understanding of the larger and more complex Walker Lane Shear Zone. Fault analyses, combined and correlated with those from CHV, give a better understanding of how slip is transferred into the complicated Mina defection to the east, from the dextral and normal faults along the Sierra Nevada Range front.

  10. Microseismicity and b-values of the Wabash Valley Intraplate Seismic Zone from short-period phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, J. A.; Milliron, K.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-01

    Two phased arrays of 9 short-period stations each are currently recording in the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone (WVSZ) as part of the EarthScope Wabash FlexArray project. The phased arrays aim to address the level of microseismicity produced by the intraplate seismic zone. Although seismic hazard maps of the U.S. Midwest are dominated by the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), the WVSZ has released 40% more seismic energy than the NMSZ over the last half century with four events larger than M5 and only one in the NMSZ reaching that threshold. A comparison of event frequency statistics suggests two markedly different systems. The NMSZ exhibits b-values near unity, but the WVSZ exhibits much smaller b-values in the 0.6-0.7 range. Deviations less than unity may be controlled through crack geometry and/or greater shear stresses possibly indicating a time-dependent, or migrating, behavior in mid-continent. Alternatively, it may be the case that the low b-values are simply a reflection of less complete catalog than the NMSZ. A previous short-term microseismicity study of the WVSZ shows a dearth of non-anthropogenic sources in the Wabash. The phased array near the central portion of the WVSZ largely confirms the previously noted lack of substantial natural seismicity along the central portion of the fault system and the associated low b-values. However, the phased array near the southern termination of the fault system shows significantly more activity. Importantly, the largest events from the Wabash, including the 2008 M5.4 Mt. Carmel and the 1968 M5.5 Harrisburg events occurred near the northern and southern ends of the fault system. The phased arrays seem to indicate different portions of the fault system yielding different levels of activity. As the catalogs become more complete, there is a preliminary suggestion that the anomalously low b-values for the Wabash do not denote a system under significantly larger stresses, but rather a conflation of regions along-strike of the

  11. Little or no Thermal Weakening Under the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, J.; Stein, S.; Stein, C.

    2006-12-01

    A fundamental question about continental intraplate earthquakes is why they are where they are. For example, why are New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) earthquakes concentrated on the Reelfoot Rift, when many fossil structures seem equally likely candidates? A key to this question is the thermo-mechanical structure of the seismic zone. If it is hotter and thus weaker than its surroundings, it can concentrate stress and seismicity. A weak zone that recently relaxed has been proposed as a mechanism by which strains can be released faster than they are observed to accunulate by geodesy (Kenner and Segall, 2000). Alternatively, if it is not significantly hotter and weaker than its surroundings, the seismicity is likely to be a transient phenomenon that migrates among many similar fossil weak zones. The sparse heat flow data in the New Madrid area can be interpreted as supporting either hypothesis. There is a possible small elevation of heat flow depending on the New Madrid and regional averages chosen. The inferred high heat flow has been interpreted (Liu and Zoback, 1997) as indicating that the crust and upper mantle are significantly hotter and weaker than surrounding areas. However, reanalysis of the heat flow indicates that the anomaly is either absent or much smaller (3 rather than 15 mW/m**2) than assumed in that analysis, leading to much (90 percent) smaller temperature anomalies and essentially the same lithospheric strength. Moreover, if a small heat flow anomaly exists, it may result from groundwater flow in the rift's fractured upper crust, rather than higher temperatures. The latter interpretation seems more consistent with studies that find low seismic velocities only in parts of the seismic zone and at shallow depths. Hence although the question cannot be resolved without additional heat flow data, we find no compelling case for assuming that the NMSZ is significantly hotter and weaker than its surroundings.

  12. Seismic evidence for an inner core transition zone

    PubMed

    Song; Helmberger

    1998-10-30

    Seismic waves that traverse Earth's inner core along north-south paths produce unusually broad pulse shapes at long periods (compared with waves along east-west paths) and reflections from below the inner core boundary at short periods. The observations provide compelling evidence for a seismic velocity discontinuity along north-south paths about 200 kilometers below the inner core boundary separating an isotropic upper inner core from an anisotropic lower inner core. The triplication associated with such a structure might be responsible for reported waveform complexity of short-period inner core arrivals along north-south paths and, if the depth of the boundary is laterally variable, their large travel-time variation.

  13. Subduction processes off chile (SPOC) - results from The amphibious wide-angle seismic experiment across The chilean subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueth, S.; Spoc Resaerch Group

    2003-04-01

    One component of the onshore-offshore, active-passive seismic experiment SPOC (Krawczyk et al., Stiller et al., this vol.) was a 2-D wide-angle seismic experiment covering the Chilean subduction zone from the Nazca Plate to the Magmatic Arc in the main cordillera. Three W-E-profiles of 52 stations each and up to 240 km long were deployed between 36° and 39° S. These profiles recorded chemical shots at their ends and, in order to extend the onshore profiles, the airgun pulses from RV SONNE cruising simultaneously on offshore profiles. On the southernmost of the three profiles OBHs/OBSs were deployed offshore, thus providing continuous wide-angle seismic data from the Nazca Plate to the South-American continent. Data examples, correlations, and velocity models along the three transects will be presented. The Moho of the subducted oceanic crust can be constrained by PmP-reflections down to 45 km depth under the coastal cordillera. The P-wave velocity field of the crust of the upper plate is characterized by gradually increasing P-wave velocities from East to West. Low seismic velocities (Vp < ~5 km/s) indicate the location of a young accretionary complex at the western tip of the continent. The highest seismic velocities (Vp > ~6.5 km/s below 10 km depth) are observed at the eastern margin of the investigated area.

  14. Issues Related to Seismic Activity Induced by the Injection of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Sminchak, Joel; Gupta, Neeraj; Byrer, Charles; Bergman, Perry

    2001-05-31

    technology provides effective tools for investigating and preventing induced seismic activity. More research is recommended on developing site selection criteria and operational constraints for CO2 storage sites near zones of seismic concerns.

  15. Geochemistry of soil gas in the seismic fault zone produced by the Wenchuan Ms 8.0 earthquake, southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The spatio-temporal variations of soil gas in the seismic fault zone produced by the 12 May 2008 Wenchuan Ms 8.0 earthquake were investigated based on the field measurements of soil gas concentrations after the main shock. Concentrations of He, H2, CO2, CH4, O2, N2, Rn, and Hg in soil gas were measured in the field at eight short profiles across the seismic rupture zone in June and December 2008 and July 2009. Soil-gas concentrations of more than 800 sampling sites were obtained. The data showed that the magnitudes of the He and H2 anomalies of three surveys declined significantly with decreasing strength of the aftershocks with time. The maximum concentrations of He and H2 (40 and 279.4 ppm, respectively) were found in three replicates at the south part of the rupture zone close to the epicenter. The spatio-temporal variations of CO2, Rn, and Hg concentrations differed obviously between the north and south parts of the fault zone. The maximum He and H2 concentrations in Jun 2008 occurred near the parts of the rupture zone where vertical displacements were larger. The anomalies of He, H2, CO2, Rn, and Hg concentrations could be related to the variation in the regional stress field and the aftershock activity. PMID:21134257

  16. Ionospheric Response Due to Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Signatures of the seismic activity in the ionospheric F2 region have been studied by analyzing the measurement of electron and ion temperatures during the occurrence of earthquake. The ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data recorded by the RPA payload aboard the Indian SROSS-C2 satellite during the period from January 1995 to December 2000 were used for the altitude range 430-630 km over Indian region. The normal day's electron and ion temperatures have been compared to the temperatures recorded during the seismic activity. The details of seismic events were obtained from USGS earthquake data information website. It has been found that the average electron temperature is enhanced during the occurrence of earthquakes by 1.2 to 1.5 times and this enhancement was for ion temperature ranging from 1.1to 1.3 times over the normal day's average temperatures. The above careful quantitative analysis of ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data shows the consistent enhancement in the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures. It is expected that the seismogenic vertical electrical field propagates up to the ionospheric heights and induces Joule heating that may cause the enhancement in ionospheric temperatures.

  17. Current (1985-1988) seismic activity in Belgium: Comparison with historical and instrumental seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camelbeeck, T.

    1990-12-01

    Reliable information concerning the historical and instrumental seismicity in Belgium is discussed in comparison with the more recent data of microseismicity. The Brabant Massif and the north of France are characterized by an important historical seismicity. Since the Middle Ages, four earthquakes caused considerable concern in that region. The actual seismic activity is not well known due to the lack of seismological stations. It is thus impossible to base the tectonic pattern on seismological data. The seismic activity in Hainaut was analyzed with the data of the seismic sequence near Dour in 1987 and the reexamination of the bigger earthquakes having occurred since 1965. The seismogenic layer is limited to the 8 first km of the crust. The occurrence under the form of swarms or sequences is an evidence of strong fracturation. The fault-plane solution of the Dour earthquake in 1987 indicates an almost north-south extension at this place of the Mons Basin. The focal mechanisms of 5 earthquakes in the center region shows a north-west south-east oriented maximal horizontal compressive stress. This information is in agreement with the dextral strike-slip of the 'shear zone of north-Artois' made conspicuous by geology. Important information about the seismotectonics in the eastern part of Belgium is given by the study of the actual microseismicity with a dense network of seismological stations. The fault-plane solution of the Malmedy (12 May 1985, M (sub L) = 2.5) earthquake indicates a south-west north-east extension along a fault of rhenish orientation. This is a favorable argument to the hypothesis of the prolongation across the Ardennes of the quaternary faults of the lower Rhine embayment. The analysis of the Bilzen (16 Jul. 1985, M(sub L) = 3.0), Gulpen (17 Oct. 1988, M(sub L) = 3.5), and Sprimont (27 Dec. 1988, M(sub L) = 3.6) earthquakes supplies new information on the complex tectonics of the Liege region.

  18. Thrust-type subduction-zone earthquakes and seamount asperites: A physical model for seismic rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Cloos, M. )

    1992-07-01

    A thrust-type subduction-zone earthquake of M{sub W} 7.6 ruptures an area of {approximately}6,000 km{sup 2}, has a seismic slip of {approximately}1 m, and is nucleated by the rupture of an asperity {approximately}25km across. A model for thrust-type subduction-zone seismicity is proposed in which basaltic seamounts jammed against the base of the overriding plate act as strong asperities that rupture by stick-slip faulting. A M{sub W} 7.6 event would correspond to the near-basal rupture of a {approximately}2-km-tall seamount. The base of the seamount is surrounded by a low shear-strength layer composed of subducting sediment that also deforms between seismic events by distributed strain (viscous flow). Planar faults form in this layer as the seismic rupture propagates out of the seamount at speeds of kilometers per second. The faults in the shear zone are disrupted after the event by aseismic, slow viscous flow of the subducting sediment layer. Consequently, the extent of fault rupture varies for different earthquakes nucleated at the same seamount asperity because new fault surfaces form in the surrounding subducting sediment layer during each fast seismic rupture.

  19. High-frequency seismic radiation during Maule earthquake (Chile, 27/02/2010, Mw 8.8) inferred by backprojection of P waves: evidence of activation of two distinct zones at the downdip part of the plate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, M.; Tilmann, F. J.; Krueger, F.; Ehlert, L.; Lange, D.; Rietbrock, A.; Jenkins, J.; Hicks, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    zones of the subduction interface at different depths, the deeper of which is characterised by a large number of repeating event clusters (Rietbrock, Jenkins et al., this session). Thus, our backprojection analysis in combination with the aftershock distribution demonstrates the existence of a peculiar doubled downdip transition from seismogenic behaviour to stable sliding. We suspect fluids released from the downgoing plate to be the cause of the transitions in frictional behaviour because of (1) the co-location of high Vp/Vs ratios with the deep interface seismicity, (2) systematic decrease of depth of onset of deeper seismicity with younging incoming plate age, (3) patchy occurrence along-strike of deeper seismicity.

  20. Boundary separating the seismically active reelfoot rift from the sparsely seismic Rough Creek graben, Kentucky and Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Reelfoot rift is the most active of six Iapetan rifts and grabens in central and eastern North America. In contrast, the Rough Creek graben is one of the least active, being seismically indistinguishable from the central craton of North America. Yet the rift and graben adjoin. Hazard assessment in the rift and graben would be aided by identification of a boundary between them. Changes in the strikes of single large faults, the location of a Cambrian transfer zone, and the geographic extent of alkaline igneous rocks provide three independent estimates of the location of a structural boundary between the rift and the graben. The boundary trends north-northwest through the northeastern part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex of Kentucky and Illinois, and has no obvious surface expression. The boundary involves the largest faults, which are the most likely to penetrate to hypocentral depths, and the boundary coincides with the geographic change from abundant seismicity in the rift to sparse seismicity in the graben. Because the structural boundary was defined by geologic variables that are expected to be causally associated with seismicity, it may continue to bound the Reelfoot rift seismicity in the future.

  1. Deep critical zone weathering at the southern Sierra Nevada Critical Zone Observatory imaged by seismic waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, J. L.; Holbrook, W.; Riebe, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    We present seismic velocity profiles that constrain the extent of weathering and frequency of velocity heterogeneities at depths less than 40 m in the southern Sierra Nevada Critical Zone Observatory (SSCZO) from waveform tomography modeling of a seismic refraction experiment. Near-surface variations in seismic velocity reflect differences in alteration of parent material by chemical, hydrological and biological processes. Previous traveltime tomography models from these data suggest that the depth to bedrock in the SSCZO is typically ~25 m; thus the potential for subsurface water storage in regolith may be a larger component of water storage than previously thought. Traveltime tomography is unable to resolve heterogeneities with horizontal wavelengths less than 10 m, such as those observed along a surveyed road cut beneath our seismic profile. For a higher resolution seismic image, we apply waveform tomography, which is more robust than traveltime tomography at approximating the wave equation and thus should provide images of subsurface heterogeneities such as corestones and fracture networks. This technique uses a weak scattering approximation to account for the amplitude and phase of the recorded waveforms, rather than just the traveltimes. A 48-channel vertical geophone array and hammer source was deployed over a 7 m high road cut with receiver and shot spacing of 2 m and 4 m respectively. The road cut displays lateral variation in weathering from a friable saprolite to coherent granodiorite which are compared to velocity variations modeled using waveform tomography.

  2. Some Probabilistic and Statistical Properties of the Seismic Regime of Zemmouri (Algeria) Seismoactive Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddari, Kamel; Bellalem, Fouzi; Baddari, Ibtihel; Makdeche, Said

    2016-10-01

    Statistical tests have been used to adjust the Zemmouri seismic data using a distribution function. The Pareto law has been used and the probabilities of various expected earthquakes were computed. A mathematical expression giving the quantiles was established. The extreme values limiting law confirmed the accuracy of the adjustment method. Using the moment magnitude scale, a probabilistic model was made to predict the occurrences of strong earthquakes. The seismic structure has been characterized by the slope of the recurrence plot γ, fractal dimension D, concentration parameter K sr, Hurst exponents H r and H t. The values of D, γ, K sr, H r, and H t diminished many months before the principal seismic shock ( M = 6.9) of the studied seismoactive zone has occurred. Three stages of the deformation of the geophysical medium are manifested in the variation of the coefficient G% of the clustering of minor seismic events.

  3. Evidence of contemporary and ancient excess fluid pressure in the New Madrid seismic zone of the Reelfoot Rift, central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKeown, F.A.; Diehl, S.

    1994-01-01

    In the winter of 1811-12, three of the largest historic earthquakes in the United States occurred near New Madrid, Missouri. Seismicity continues to the present day throughout a tightly clustered pattern of epicenters centered on the bootheel of Missouri, including parts of northeastern Arkansas, northwestern Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. In 1990, the New Madrid seismic zone/central United States became the first seismically active region east of the Rocky Mountains to be designated a priority research area within the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). This professional paper is a collection of papers, some published separately, presenting results of the newly intensified research program in this area. Major components of this research program include tectonic framework studies, seismicity and deformation monitoring and modeling, improved seismic hazard and risk assessments, and cooperative hazard mitigation studies.

  4. Reconciling short recurrence intervals with minor deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweig, E.S.; Ellis, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    At least three great earthquakes occurred in the New Madrid seismic zone in 1811 and 1812. Estimates of present-day strain rates suggest that such events may have a repeat time of 1000 years or less. Paleoseismological data also indicate that earthquakes large enough to cause soil liquefaction have occurred several times in the past 5000 years. However, pervasive crustal deformation expected from such a high frequency of large earthquakes is not observed. This suggests that the seismic zone is a young feature, possibly as young as several tens of thousands of years old and no more than a few million years old.At least three great earthquakes occurred in the New Madrid seismic zone in 1811 and 1812. Estimates of present-day strain rates suggest that such events may have a repeat time of 1000 years or less. Paleoseismological data also indicate that earthquakes large enough to cause soil liquefaction have occurred several times in the past 5000 years. However, pervasive crustal deformation expected from such a high frequency of large earthquakes is not observed. This suggests that the seismic zone is a young feature, possibly as young as several tens of thousands of years old and no more than a few million years old.

  5. 2010 Maule earthquake slip correlates with pre-seismic locking of Andean subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Marcos; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2010-09-09

    The magnitude-8.8 Maule (Chile) earthquake of 27 February 2010 ruptured a segment of the Andean subduction zone megathrust that has been suspected to be of high seismic potential. It is the largest earthquake to rupture a mature seismic gap in a subduction zone that has been monitored with a dense space-geodetic network before the event. This provides an image of the pre-seismically locked state of the plate interface of unprecedentedly high resolution, allowing for an assessment of the spatial correlation of interseismic locking with coseismic slip. Pre-seismic locking might be used to anticipate future ruptures in many seismic gaps, given the fundamental assumption that locking and slip are similar. This hypothesis, however, could not be tested without the occurrence of the first gap-filling earthquake. Here we show evidence that the 2010 Maule earthquake slip distribution correlates closely with the patchwork of interseismic locking distribution as derived by inversion of global positioning system (GPS) observations during the previous decade. The earthquake nucleated in a region of high locking gradient and released most of the stresses accumulated in the area since the last major event in 1835. Two regions of high seismic slip (asperities) appeared to be nearly fully locked before the earthquake. Between these asperities, the rupture bridged a zone that was creeping interseismically with consistently low coseismic slip. The rupture stopped in areas that were highly locked before the earthquake but where pre-stress had been significantly reduced by overlapping twentieth-century earthquakes. Our work suggests that coseismic slip heterogeneity at the scale of single asperities should indicate the seismic potential of future great earthquakes, which thus might be anticipated by geodetic observations.

  6. Estimating Strain Accumulation in the New Madrid and Wabash Valley Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, T. J.; Calais, E.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical behaviour -- and hence earthquake potential -- of faults in continental interiors is a question of critical importance for the resultant seismic hazard, but no consensus has yet been reached on this controversial topic. The debate has focused on the central and eastern United States, in particular the New Madrid Seismic Zone, struck by three magnitude 7 or greater earthquakes in 1811--1812, and to a lesser extent the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone just to the north. A key aspect of this issue is the rate at which strain is currently accruing on those faults in the plate interior, a quantity that remains debated. Understanding if the present-day strain rates indicate sufficient motion to account for the historical and paleoseismological earthquakes by steady-state fault behaviour, or if strain accumulation is time-dependent in this area, is critical for investigating the causative process driving this seismicity in the plate interior, and how regional strain reflects the interplay between stresses arising from different geological processes. Here we address this issue with an analysis of up to 14 years of continuous GPS data from a network of 200 sites in the central United States centred on the New Madrid and Wabash Valley seismic zones. We find that high-quality sites in these regions show motions that are consistently within the 95% confidence limit of zero deformation relative to a rigid background. These results place an upper bound on regional strain accrual of 0.2 mm/yr and 0.5 mm/yr in the New Madrid and Wabash Valley Seismic Zones, respectively. These results, together with increasing evidence for temporal clustering and spatial migration of earthquake sequences in continental interiors, indicate that either tectonic loading rates or fault properties vary with time in the NMSZ and possibly plate-wide.

  7. Seismic Wave Attenuation Estimated from Tectonic Tremor and Radiated Energy in Tremor for Various Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, S.; Baltay, A.; Ide, S.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ground motion prediction is an essential component of earthquake hazard assessment. Seismic wave attenuation with distance is an important, yet difficult to constrain, factor for such estimation. Using the empirical method of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), seismic wave attenuation with distance, which includes both the effect of anelastic attenuation and scattering, can be estimated from the distance decay of peak ground velocity (PGV) or peak ground acceleration (PGA) of ordinary earthquakes; however, in some regions where plate-boundary earthquakes are infrequent, such as Cascadia and Nankai, there are fewer data with which to constrain the empirical parameters. In both of those subduction zones, tectonic tremor occurs often. In this study, we use tectonic tremor to estimate the seismic wave attenuation with distance, and in turn use the attenuation results to estimate the radiated seismic energy of tremor. Our primary interest is in the variations among subduction zones. Ground motion attenuation and the distribution of released seismic energy from tremors are two important subduction zone characteristics. Therefore, it is very interesting to see whether there are variations of these parameters in different subduction zones, or regionally within the same subduction zone. It is also useful to estimate how much energy is released by tectonic tremor from accumulated energy to help understand subduction dynamics and the difference between ordinary earthquakes and tremor. We use the tectonic tremor catalog of Ide (2012) in Nankai, Cascadia, Mexico and southern Chile. We measured PGV and PGA of individual tremor bursts at each station. We assume a simple GMPE relationship and estimate seismic attenuation and relative site amplification factors from the data. In the Nankai subduction zone, there are almost no earthquakes on the plate interface, but intra-slab earthquakes occur frequently. Both the seismic wave attenuation with distance and the site

  8. Variable post-Paleozoic deformation detected by seismic reflection profiling across the northwestern "prong" of New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; Devera, J.A.; Denny, F.B.; Woolery, E.W.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution shallow seismic reflection profiles across the northwesternmost part of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and northwestern margin of the Reelfoot rift, near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers in the northern Mississippi embayment, reveal intense structural deformation that apparently took place during the late Paleozoic and/or Mesozoic up to near the end of the Cretaceous Period. The seismic profiles were sited on both sides of the northeast-trending Olmsted fault, defined by varying elevations of the top of Mississippian (locally base of Cretaceous) bedrock. The trend of this fault is close to and parallel with an unusually straight segment of the Ohio River and is approximately on trend with the westernmost of two groups of northeast-aligned epicenters ("prongs") in the NMSZ. Initially suspected on the basis of pre-existing borehole data, the deformation along the fault has been confirmed by four seismic reflection profiles, combined with some new information from drilling. The new data reveal (1) many high-angle normal and reverse faults expressed as narrow grabens and anticlines (suggesting both extensional and compressional regimes) that involved the largest displacements during the late Cretaceous (McNairy); (2) a different style of deformation involving probably more horizontal displacements (i.e., thrusting) that occurred at the end of this phase near the end of McNairy deposition, with some fault offsets of Paleocene and younger units; (3) zones of steeply dipping faults that bound chaotic blocks similar to that observed previously from the nearby Commerce geophysical lineament (CGL); and (4) complex internal deformation stratigraphically restricted to the McNairy, suggestive of major sediment liquefaction or landsliding. Our results thus confirm the prevalence of complex Cretaceous deformations continuing up into Tertiary strata near the northern terminus of the NMSZ. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Earthquake Hazard in the New Madrid Seismic Zone Remains a Concern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.D.; Applegate, D.; Tuttle, M.P.; Williams, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    There is broad agreement in the scientific community that a continuing concern exists for a major destructive earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone. Many structures in Memphis, Tenn., St. Louis, Mo., and other communities in the central Mississippi River Valley region are vulnerable and at risk from severe ground shaking. This assessment is based on decades of research on New Madrid earthquakes and related phenomena by dozens of Federal, university, State, and consulting earth scientists. Considerable interest has developed recently from media reports that the New Madrid seismic zone may be shutting down. These reports stem from published research using global positioning system (GPS) instruments with results of geodetic measurements of strain in the Earth's crust. Because of a lack of measurable strain at the surface in some areas of the seismic zone over the past 14 years, arguments have been advanced that there is no buildup of stress at depth within the New Madrid seismic zone and that the zone may no longer pose a significant hazard. As part of the consensus-building process used to develop the national seismic hazard maps, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop of experts in 2006 to evaluate the latest findings in earthquake hazards in the Eastern United States. These experts considered the GPS data from New Madrid available at that time that also showed little to no ground movement at the surface. The experts did not find the GPS data to be a convincing reason to lower the assessment of earthquake hazard in the New Madrid region, especially in light of the many other types of data that are used to construct the hazard assessment, several of which are described here.

  10. Structure of the eastern Seattle fault zone, Washington state: New insights from seismic reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liberty, L.M.; Pratt, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    We identify and characterize the active Seattle fault zone (SFZ) east of Lake Washington with newly acquired seismic reflection data. Our results focus on structures observed in the upper 1 km below the cities of Bellevue, Sammamish, Newcastle, and Fall City, Washington. The SFZ appears as a broad zone of faulting and folding at the southern boundary of the Seattle basin and north edge of the Seattle uplift. We interpret the Seattle fault as a thrust fault that accommodates north-south shortening by forming a fault-propagation fold with a forelimb breakthrough. The blind tip of the main fault forms a synclinal growth fold (deformation front) that extends at least 8 km east of Vasa Park (west side of Lake Sammamish) and defines the south edge of the Seattle basin. South of the deformation front is the forelimb break-through fault, which was exposed in a trench at Vasa Park. The Newcastle Hills anticline, a broad anticline forming the north part of the Seattle uplift east of Lake Washington, is interpreted to lie between the main blind strand of the Seattle fault and a backthrust. Our profiles, on the northern limb of this anticline, consistently image north-dipping strata. A structural model for the SFZ east of Lake Washington is consistent with about 8 km of slip on the upper part of the Seattle fault, but the amount of motion is only loosely constrained.

  11. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  12. Suture Zones, Seismic Wave Propagation and Tectonics of Central Asia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-10

    prominent strike-slip faults in the Eurasian hinter- lands of the frontal fold and thrust belt (e.g., the Chaman and Herat faults) have shown only...with dextral shear (associated with crustal shortening) in the Quetta-Sibi syntaxial region and sinistral shear along the Chaman fault. Similar zones

  13. High-Resolution Subduction Zone Seismicity and Velocity Structure in Ibaraki, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelly, D. R.; Beroza, G. C.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.; Ide, S.

    2004-12-01

    We use double-difference tomography (tomoDD) [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] and waveform-derived cross-correlation differential arrival times to invert for the earthquake locations and P- and S-wave velocity distributions in the subduction zone under Ibaraki Prefecture of north-central Honshu, Japan. The Ibaraki region is attractive for its high rate of slab seismicity and for the presence of an intermediate-depth double seismic zone. We relocate ~8000 events occurring in this region between June 2002 and June 2004. We use a combination of ~200,000 absolute travel times, ~5 million catalog-derived differential times, and ~5 million cross-correlation differential times derived from more than 150,000 waveforms, with roughly equal numbers of P- and S-wave data. Many of the waveforms are from HiNet borehole stations that provide particularly high-quality data. We also use data from JMA, the University of Tokyo, and Tohoku University. Since it is natural to expect sharp velocity contrasts in a subduction zone, we regularize the inversion using the total variation (TV) approach implemented through iteratively reweighted least squares. Because TV is an L1-norm regularization, sharp changes in velocity are penalized no more than gradual ones, but undulations in the velocity model remain damped. We will compare the TV results with those determined by standard least-squares, L2-norm regularization. Our results show increasingly organized seismicity including narrowing by up to 50% of the upper and lower limbs of the double seismic zone as viewed in cross-section. We find a zone of interplate events extending as deep as 60 km, forming a very distinct lineation in cross-section. Focal mechanisms support the interpretation that these are low angle, subduction interface events. These earthquakes are accompanied by a zone of very high Vp/Vs ratio within the downgoing plate, just beneath the seismicity, suggesting that high pore-pressures may enable seismic slip on the subduction

  14. Methods and systems for low frequency seismic and infrasound detection of geo-pressure transition zones

    DOEpatents

    Shook, G. Michael; LeRoy, Samuel D.; Benzing, William M.

    2006-07-18

    Methods for determining the existence and characteristics of a gradational pressurized zone within a subterranean formation are disclosed. One embodiment involves employing an attenuation relationship between a seismic response signal and increasing wavelet wavelength, which relationship may be used to detect a gradational pressurized zone and/or determine characteristics thereof. In another embodiment, a method for analyzing data contained within a response signal for signal characteristics that may change in relation to the distance between an input signal source and the gradational pressurized zone is disclosed. In a further embodiment, the relationship between response signal wavelet frequency and comparative amplitude may be used to estimate an optimal wavelet wavelength or range of wavelengths used for data processing or input signal selection. Systems for seismic exploration and data analysis for practicing the above-mentioned method embodiments are also disclosed.

  15. Systems for low frequency seismic and infrasound detection of geo-pressure transition zones

    DOEpatents

    Shook, G. Michael; LeRoy, Samuel D.; Benzing, William M.

    2007-10-16

    Methods for determining the existence and characteristics of a gradational pressurized zone within a subterranean formation are disclosed. One embodiment involves employing an attenuation relationship between a seismic response signal and increasing wavelet wavelength, which relationship may be used to detect a gradational pressurized zone and/or determine characteristics thereof. In another embodiment, a method for analyzing data contained within a response signal for signal characteristics that may change in relation to the distance between an input signal source and the gradational pressurized zone is disclosed. In a further embodiment, the relationship between response signal wavelet frequency and comparative amplitude may be used to estimate an optimal wavelet wavelength or range of wavelengths used for data processing or input signal selection. Systems for seismic exploration and data analysis for practicing the above-mentioned method embodiments are also disclosed.

  16. The seismicity of Ethiopia; active plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohr, P.

    1981-01-01

    Ethiopia, descended from the semimythical Kingdom of Punt, lies at the strategic intersection of Schmidt's jigsaw puzzle where the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the African Rift System meet. Because of geologically recent uplift combined with rapid downcutting erosion by rivers, notably the Blue Nile (Abbay), Ethiopia is the most mountainous country in Africa. It is also the most volcanically active, while its historical seismicity matches that of the midocean ridges. And, in a sense, Ethiopia is host to an evoloving ocean ridge system. 

  17. Kinematics of the New Madrid seismic zone, central United States, based on stepover models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Seismicity in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) of the central United States is generally attributed to a stepover structure in which the Reelfoot thrust fault transfers slip between parallel strike-slip faults. However, some arms of the seismic zone do not fit this simple model. Comparison of the NMSZ with an analog sandbox model of a restraining stepover structure explains all of the arms of seismicity as only part of the extensive pattern of faults that characterizes stepover structures. Computer models show that the stepover structure may form because differences in the trends of lower crustal shearing and inherited upper crustal faults make a step between en echelon fault segments the easiest path for slip in the upper crust. The models predict that the modern seismicity occurs only on a subset of the faults in the New Madrid stepover structure, that only the southern part of the stepover structure ruptured in the A.D. 1811–1812 earthquakes, and that the stepover formed because the trends of older faults are not the same as the current direction of shearing.

  18. Juan de Fuca slab geometry and its relation to Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Waldhause, Felix; Oppenheimer, David H.

    2012-01-01

    A new model of the subducted Juan de Fuca plate beneath western North America allows first-order correlations between the occurrence of Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes and slab geometry, temperature, and hydration state. The geo-referenced 3D model, constructed from weighted control points, integrates depth information from earthquake locations and regional seismic velocity studies. We use the model to separate earthquakes that occur in the Cascadia forearc from those that occur within the underlying Juan de Fuca plate and thereby reveal previously obscured details regarding the spatial distribution of earthquakes. Seismicity within the slab is most prevalent where the slab is warped beneath northwestern California and western Washington suggesting that slab flexure, in addition to expected metamorphic dehydration processes, promotes earthquake occurrence within the subducted oceanic plate. Earthquake patterns beneath western Vancouver Island are consistent with slab dehydration processes. Conversely, the lack of slab earthquakes beneath western Oregon is consistent with an anhydrous slab. Double-differenced relocated seismicity resolves a double seismic zone within the slab beneath northwestern California that strongly constrains the location of the plate interface and delineates a cluster of seismicity 10 km above the surface that includes the 1992 M7.1 Mendocino earthquake. We infer that this earthquake ruptured a surface within the Cascadia accretionary margin above the Juan de Fuca plate. We further speculate that this earthquake is associated with a detached fragment of former Farallon plate. Other subsurface tectonic elements within the forearc may have the potential to generate similar damaging earthquakes.

  19. Crust and upper mantle structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone: Insight into intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuanxu; Zhao, Dapeng; Wu, Shiguo

    2014-05-01

    We determine a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle down to 400 km depth to investigate structural heterogeneity and its influences on the generation of intraplate earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. We used 4871 high-quality arrival times from 187 local earthquakes and 30,846 precise travel-time residuals from 1041 teleseismic events recorded by the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array. Our results show that, beneath the Reelfoot rift, a significant low-velocity (low-V) zone exists in the upper mantle down to 200 km depth, with a large volume of 200 × 200 × 150 km3. The origin of the low-V zone may be related to the passage of the Bermuda hotspot and the stalled ancient Farallon slab materials foundering in the mantle transition zone. This low-V zone may have relatively low shear strength and act as a viscously weak zone embedded in the lithosphere, being apt to concentrate tectonic stress and transfer stress to the seismogenic faults in the upper crust, leading to the large intraplate earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone.

  20. Monitoring transient changes within overpressured regions of subduction zones using ambient seismic noise

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Esteban J.; Schwartz, Susan Y.

    2016-01-01

    In subduction zones, elevated pore fluid pressure, generally linked to metamorphic dehydration reactions, has a profound influence on the mechanical behavior of the plate interface and forearc crust through its control on effective stress. We use seismic noise–based monitoring to characterize seismic velocity variations following the 2012 Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica earthquake [Mw (moment magnitude) 7.6] that we attribute to the presence of pressurized pore fluids. Our study reveals a strong velocity reduction (~0.6%) in a region where previous work identified high forearc pore fluid pressure. The depth of this velocity reduction is constrained to be below 5 km and therefore not the result of near-surface damage due to strong ground motions; rather, we posit that it is caused by fracturing of the fluid-pressurized weakened crust due to dynamic stresses. Although pressurized fluids have been implicated in causing coseismic velocity reductions beneath the Japanese volcanic arc, this is the first report of a similar phenomenon in a subduction zone setting. It demonstrates the potential to identify pressurized fluids in subduction zones using temporal variations of seismic velocity inferred from ambient seismic noise correlations. PMID:26824075

  1. Monitoring transient changes within overpressured regions of subduction zones using ambient seismic noise.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Esteban J; Schwartz, Susan Y

    2016-01-01

    In subduction zones, elevated pore fluid pressure, generally linked to metamorphic dehydration reactions, has a profound influence on the mechanical behavior of the plate interface and forearc crust through its control on effective stress. We use seismic noise-based monitoring to characterize seismic velocity variations following the 2012 Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica earthquake [M w (moment magnitude) 7.6] that we attribute to the presence of pressurized pore fluids. Our study reveals a strong velocity reduction (~0.6%) in a region where previous work identified high forearc pore fluid pressure. The depth of this velocity reduction is constrained to be below 5 km and therefore not the result of near-surface damage due to strong ground motions; rather, we posit that it is caused by fracturing of the fluid-pressurized weakened crust due to dynamic stresses. Although pressurized fluids have been implicated in causing coseismic velocity reductions beneath the Japanese volcanic arc, this is the first report of a similar phenomenon in a subduction zone setting. It demonstrates the potential to identify pressurized fluids in subduction zones using temporal variations of seismic velocity inferred from ambient seismic noise correlations.

  2. Cyclic stressing and seismicity at strongly coupled subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, M.A.J.; Zheng, G.; Rice, J.R.; Stuart, W.D.; Dmowska, R.

    1996-01-01

    We use the finite element method to analyze stress variations in and near a strongly coupled subduction zone during an earthquake cycle. Deformation is assumed to be uniform along strike (plane strain on a cross section normal to the trench axis), and periodic earthquake slip is imposed consistent with the long-term rate of plate convergence and degree of coupling. Simulations of stress and displacement rate fields represent periodic fluctuations in time superimposed on an average field. The oceanic plate, descending slab, and continental lithosphere are assumed here to respond elastically to these fluctuations, and the remaining mantle under and between plates is assumed to respond as Maxwell viscoelastic. In the first part of the analysis we find that computed stress fluctuations in space and time are generally consistent with observed earthquake mechanism variations with time since a great thrust event. In particular, trench-normal extensional earthquakes tend to occur early in the earthquake cycle toward the outer rise but occur more abundantly late in the cycle in the subducting slab downdip of the main thrust zone. Compressional earthquakes, when they occur at all, have the opposite pattern. Our results suggest also that the actual timing of extensional outer rise events is controlled by the rheology of the shallow aseismic portion of the thrust interface. The second part of the analysis shows the effects of mantle relaxation on the rate of ground surface deformation during the earthquake cycle. Models without relaxation predict a strong overall compressional strain rate in the continental plate above the main thrust zone, with the strain rate constant between mainshocks. However with significant relaxation present, a localized region of unusually low compressional, or even slightly extensional, strain rate develops along the surface of the continental plate above and somewhat inland from the downdip edge of the locked main thrust zone. The low strain rate

  3. Application of seismic interferometry to seafloor and subseafloor seismic data acquired in the Nankai Trough subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.; Araki, E.; Mikada, H.; Kitada, K.; Kinoshita, M.

    2012-12-01

    We apply seismic interferometry to seafloor and sub-seafloor seismic data to estimate seismic velocity structure beneath the seafloor in the Nankai Trough subduction zone. The sub-seafloor and seafloor seismic data are acquired by a three-component geophone installed in the bottom of the IODP C0002 borehole observatory and a broad-band seismometer installed at the DONET KMD16 seafloor observatory, respectively. Seismic interferometry can produce the virtual shot record by the cross-correlation of seismic records simultaneously acquired by the two seismometers. Therefore, the obtained downgoing virtual shot record is expected to provide us the knowledge of velocity structure between the bottom of the borehole and seafloor as a proxy of strain and stress field, and fluid migration near the borehole above the plate boundary seismogenic zone. Only 30 minute continuous records were used for data processing. Before calculating the cross-correlation, we conducted some preprocessing including band-pass filter and resampling. In power spectral density plots, we found predominant microseismic peaks in the range from 0.15 Hz to 2 Hz. Microseisms are generated by ocean swell loading onto the seafloor, and are the major contributor to produce the virtual shot records. We applied band-pass filter with a pass-band from 1 to 15 Hz to the raw data to keep a resolution for our target scale, although some energy of microseisms could be eliminated. Then we calculated the cross-correlation to obtain virtual shot records in which some characteristic phases were found. The seafloor seismometer and borehole geophone became a virtual source and a receiver, respectively. We performed numerical simulations using the three-dimensional finite difference method to evaluate the obtained virtual shot records. We performed a simulation using randomly distributed vertical stress sources on the seafloor to simulate microseisms records. We also performed another simulation using an impulsive point

  4. Evidences of a Lithospheric Fault Zone in the Sicily Channel Continental Rift (Southern Italy) from Instrumental Seismicity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, L.; Calo, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Sicily Channel continental rift is located in the African Plate and is submerged by a shallow sea extending from the northern coast of Africa to the southern coast of Sicily (southern Italy). The area is affected by an extensional regime since early Pliocene, which thins the continental crust and produces NW-SE oriented Pantelleria, Linosa and Malta grabens. The rift-related volcanic activity is represented by Pantelleria and Linosa Islands and a series of magmatic manifestations roughly NNE-SSW aligned, from Linosa Island to the Nameless Bank, in proximity of the Sicilian coast. Recent rapid magmatic ascents occurred along the strip near to the Sicilian coast in a region named Graham Bank. The NNE-SSW strip has already been recognised as a separation belt between the western sector of the rift (Pantelleria graben) and the eastern one (Linosa and Malta grabens). Seismic profiles suggest the presence of near vertical structures associated with strike slip fault zones. Bathymetric data show a 15-20 km wide zone characterised by several shallow basins irregularly alternated by topographic highs. However, evidences of a N-S or NNE-SSW orientated faults have not been found. In this work we re-localised the instrumental seismicity recorded between 1981 and 2012 in the Sicily Channel and western Sicily using the Double Difference method (Waldhauser, 2001, 2012) and 3D Vp and Vs models (Calò et al., 2013). The statistical analysis of the relocated seismicity together with the study of seismic energy release distribution allows us to describe the main patterns associated with the active faults in the western Sicily Straits. Here we find that most of the events in the Sicily Channel are highly clustered between 12.5°- 13.5°E and 35.5°-37°N with hypocentral depth between 5-40 km, reaching in some cases 70 km of depth. Seismic events seem to be aligned along a sub-vertical shear zone that is long at least 250 km and oriented approximately NNE-SSW. The spatial

  5. Seismic properties of lawsonite eclogites from the southern Motagua fault zone, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyeong; Wallis, Simon; Endo, Shunsuke; Ree, Jin-Han

    2016-05-01

    We present new data on the crystal preferred orientation (CPO) and seismic properties of omphacite and lawsonite in extremely fresh eclogite from the southern Motagua fault zone, Guatemala, to discuss the seismic anisotropy of subducting oceanic crust. The CPO of omphacite is characterized by (010)[001], and it shows P-wave seismic anisotropies (AVP) of 1.4%-3.2% and S-wave seismic anisotropies (AVS) of 1.4%-2.7%. Lawsonite exhibits (001) planes parallel to the foliation and [010] axes parallel to the lineation, and seismic anisotropies of 1.7%-6.6% AVP and 3.4%-14.7% AVS. The seismic anisotropy of a rock mass consisting solely of omphacite and lawsonite is 1.2%-4.1% AVP and 1.8%-6.8% AVS. For events that propagate more or less parallel to the maximum extension direction, X, the fast S-wave velocity (VS) polarization is parallel to the Z in the Y-Z section (rotated from the X-Z section), causing trench-normal seismic anisotropy for orthogonal subduction. Based on the high modal abundance and strong fabric of lawsonite, the AVS of eclogites is estimated as ~ 11.7% in the case that lawsonite makes up ~ 75% of the rock mass. On this basis, we suggest that lawsonite in both blueschist and eclogite may play important roles in the formation of complex pattern of seismic anisotropy observed in NE Japan: weak trench-parallel anisotropy in the forearc basin domains and trench-normal anisotropy in the backarc region.

  6. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    SciTech Connect

    Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  7. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono, Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli, Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat; Sugiharto, Anton

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green's functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  8. Northern Wabash Valley Seismic Zone and the La Salle anticline seismicity determined by a short period phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazitis, Daniel

    The Wabash Valley Seismic Zone (WVSZ) has produced three moderate sized earthquakes greater than or equal to mb 5.0 in the past 50 years. The majority of Wabash Valley faults originate near the junction of the Rough Creek and Cottage Grove faults and extend northeastward along the Wabash River. These faults extend through the Paleozoic and into the Precambrian and are believe to be associated with the Reelfoot Rift. Two of these moderate sized earthquakes have occurred north of the terminus of the Wabash Valley faults that the WVSZ is commonly associated with. This suggests that other sources of seismicity exist. The La Salle anticline, a Precambrian basement feature, is oriented NW to SE just north of the termination of these faults. The La Salle anticline creates up to a 750 meter uplift in the above Paleozoic strata. This uplift creates faults within the Paleozoic strata and within the La Salle anticline. This study uses seismometers arranged in a phased array near the southern terminus of the La Salle anticline to analyze the seismicity of the region. Analyzing the seismicity of the region over a 6-month period found 834 events. The vast majority were determined to be mine blasts or otherwise human induced. Two small earthquakes ( M 1.0) located near the La Salle anticline. These earthquakes likely occur on faults associated with the anticline. The lack of earthquakes suggested the b-value of the La Salle region could be as low as 0.56. This is lower than the typical value of 1, but consistent with other intraplate regions and previous studies of the WVSZ finding values nearer 0.7.

  9. Seismic evidence for deep fluid circulation in the overriding plate of subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, B.; Reynard, B.; Bodin, T.; Perrillat, J. P.; Debayle, E.

    2015-12-01

    In subduction zones, non-volcanic tremors are associated with fluid circulations (Obara, 2002). Their sources are often located on the interplate boundary (Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Shelly et al, 2006; La Rocca, 2009), consistent with fluids released by the dehydration of subducted plates (Hacker et al., 2003). Reports of tremors in the overriding continental crust of several subduction zones in the world (Kao et al., 2005; Payero et al., 2008; Ide, 2012) suggest fluid circulation at shallower depths but potential fluid paths are poorly documented. Here we obtained seismic observations from receiver functions that evidence the close association between the shallow tremor zone, electrical conductivity, and tectonic features of the Cascadia overriding plate. A seismic discontinuity near 15 km depth in the crust of the overriding North American plate is attributed to the Conrad discontinuity. This interface is segmented, and its interruption is spatially correlated with conductive regions and shallow swarms of seismicity and non-volcanic tremors. These observations suggest that shallow fluid circulation, tremors and seismicity are controlled by fault zones limiting blocks of accreted terranes in the overriding plate (Brudzinski and Allen, 2007). These zones constitute fluid "escape" routes that may contribute unloading fluid pressure on the megathrust. Obara, K. (2002). Science, 296, 1679-1681. Rogers, G., & Dragert, H. (2003). Science, 300, 1942-1943. Shelly, D. R., et al. (2006). Nature, 442, 188-191. La Rocca, M., et al. (2009). Science, 323, 620-623. Kao, H., et al. (2005). Nature, 436, 841-844. Payero, J. S., et al. (2008). Geophysical Research Letters, 35. Ide, S. (2012). Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 117. Brudzinski, M. R., & Allen, R. M. (2007). Geology, 35, 907-910.

  10. Crust and Upper Mantle Velocity Structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamwandha, C. A.; Powell, C. A.; Langston, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed P wave velocity (Vp) and S wave velocity models (Vs) and Vp/Vs ratios for the crust and upper mantle associated with the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) are presented. The specific study region spans latitude 34 to 39.5 degrees north and longitude 87 to 93 degrees west and extends to a depth of at least 500 km. The density of data from three networks - The Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network (CNMSN) operated by CERI, the Earthscope transportable array (TA), and the FlexArray (FA) Northern Embayment Lithospheric Embayment (NELE) project stations - provides us with the opportunity to derive detailed velocity models for this region. We use arrival times from local and regional earthquakes and travel time residuals from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by the three networks from September 2011 to date. The teleseismic body wave arrival times are measured using an Automated and Interactive Measurement of Body Wave Arrival Times (AIMBAT) package (Lou et al., 2012). We perform a joint local and teleseismic inversion (Zhao et al.,1994) to determine the velocity structure. For the local events, the hypocenters are relocated iteratively in the inversion process using an efficient 3-D ray tracing technique. We image a significant low velocity anomaly in the upper mantle with a concentration at about 200 - 300 km depth and it is a consistent feature in both the Vp and Vs tomography results. Checkerboard tests show that the spatial resolution is high in the upper mantle especially for the Vp model. The spatial resolution in the crust is fairly high for most of the study area except at the edges and the southeastern part, which can be attributed to diminished local earthquake activity. We perform synthetic tests to isolate smearing effects and further confirm the features in the tomographic images. Vp/Vs ratios are determined for the portions of the model with highest resolution. Preliminary results indicate that significant Vp/Vs ratio variations are present only at

  11. Estimation of recurrence interval of large earthquakes on the central Longmen Shan fault zone based on seismic moment accumulation/release model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Junjie; Zhang, Shimin

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence interval of large earthquake on an active fault zone is an important parameter in assessing seismic hazard. The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9) occurred on the central Longmen Shan fault zone and ruptured the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (YBF) and the Guanxian-Jiangyou fault (GJF). However, there is a considerable discrepancy among recurrence intervals of large earthquake in preseismic and postseismic estimates based on slip rate and paleoseismologic results. Post-seismic trenches showed that the central Longmen Shan fault zone probably undertakes an event similar to the 2008 quake, suggesting a characteristic earthquake model. In this paper, we use the published seismogenic model of the 2008 earthquake based on Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data and construct a characteristic seismic moment accumulation/release model to estimate recurrence interval of large earthquakes on the central Longmen Shan fault zone. Our results show that the seismogenic zone accommodates a moment rate of (2.7 ± 0.3) × 10¹⁷ N m/yr, and a recurrence interval of 3900 ± 400 yrs is necessary for accumulation of strain energy equivalent to the 2008 earthquake. This study provides a preferred interval estimation of large earthquakes for seismic hazard analysis in the Longmen Shan region.

  12. Estimation of Recurrence Interval of Large Earthquakes on the Central Longmen Shan Fault Zone Based on Seismic Moment Accumulation/Release Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shimin

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence interval of large earthquake on an active fault zone is an important parameter in assessing seismic hazard. The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9) occurred on the central Longmen Shan fault zone and ruptured the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (YBF) and the Guanxian-Jiangyou fault (GJF). However, there is a considerable discrepancy among recurrence intervals of large earthquake in preseismic and postseismic estimates based on slip rate and paleoseismologic results. Post-seismic trenches showed that the central Longmen Shan fault zone probably undertakes an event similar to the 2008 quake, suggesting a characteristic earthquake model. In this paper, we use the published seismogenic model of the 2008 earthquake based on Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data and construct a characteristic seismic moment accumulation/release model to estimate recurrence interval of large earthquakes on the central Longmen Shan fault zone. Our results show that the seismogenic zone accommodates a moment rate of (2.7 ± 0.3) × 1017 N m/yr, and a recurrence interval of 3900 ± 400 yrs is necessary for accumulation of strain energy equivalent to the 2008 earthquake. This study provides a preferred interval estimation of large earthquakes for seismic hazard analysis in the Longmen Shan region. PMID:23878524

  13. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    the computational framework for double-difference processing the combined parametric and waveform archives of the ISC, NEIC, and IRIS with over three million recorded earthquakes worldwide. Since our methods are scalable and run on inexpensive Beowulf clusters, periodic re-analysis of such archives may thus become a routine procedure to continuously improve resolution in existing global earthquake catalogs. Results from subduction zones and aftershock sequences of recent great earthquakes demonstrate the considerable social and economic impact that high-resolution images of active faults, when available in real-time, will have in the prompt evaluation and mitigation of seismic hazards. These results also highlight the need for consistent long-term seismic monitoring and archiving of records.

  14. Periodic variation of stress field in the Koyna-Warna reservoir triggered seismic zone inferred from focal mechanism studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. Purnachandra; Shashidhar, D.

    2016-06-01

    The Koyna-Warna region in western India is globally recognized as the premier site of reservoir triggered seismicity (RTS) associated with the Koyna and Warna reservoirs. The region is characterized by continuous seismic activity observed since several decades, including the world's largest triggered earthquake of M6.3 which occurred in Koyna in 1967. While the role of reservoirs in triggering earthquakes has been widely discussed, the actual tectonic mechanism controlling earthquake genesis in this region is hardly understood. The Koyna-Warna region is exclusively governed by earthquakes of strike-slip and normal fault mechanism distinct from the thrust faulting seen in other active zones in the Indian region. In the present study, a comprehensive catalog of 50 focal mechanism solutions of earthquakes that occurred during the last 45 years in the Koyna-Warna region is developed, both from previous literature and from moment tensor inversion studies by the authors using broadband data from a local seismic network operating since 2005. The seismicity and fault plane data have enabled precise delineation of trends of the major causative faults, which are further accentuated using the double-difference technique. Stress inversion of the focal mechanism data has provided the best fitting principal compressive and tensile stress field of the region, which in conjunction with the deciphered fault zones provides a feasible model of seismogenesis in this region. Based on the observed temporal variation of faulting mechanism a model of alternating cycles of predominantly strike-slip and normal faulting is proposed, which is attributed to a periodic peaking and relaxation respectively of the horizontal compressive stress field in this region due to the Indian plate collision with Eurasia.

  15. Wide-Angle Seismic Experiment Across the Oeste Fault Zone, Central Andes, Northern Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Yáñez, G. A.; Vera, E. E.; Sepúlveda, J.

    2008-12-01

    From December 6-21, 2007, we conducted a 3-component, radio-telemetric, seismic survey along a ~ 15-km wide E-W transect in the Central Andes, at a latitude of ~ 22.41° S, centered north of the city of Calama (68.9° W), Chile. The study area is sandwiched between the Central Depression in the west and the Andean Western Cordillera of Chile. Recording stations, nominally spaced at intervals of either 125 or 250 m collected up to 3.5 s of refracted seismic arrivals at maximum source-receiver offsets exceeding 15 km. Ten shothole sources, spaced 2-6 km apart focused energy on the shallow (0-3 km), crustal, Paleogene-age structures. Preliminary, tomographic inversions of refracted first arrivals show the top of a shallow (< 1km), high- velocity (VP, ~5 km/s) crust, deepening sharply eastward to at least 2 km. At the surface, this central basement step correlates to a regionally extensive (> 600 km), strike-slip fault zone known as the Oeste fault. Turning ray densities suggest the base of the overlying velocity gradient unit (VP, 2-4 km/s) dips inwardly from both east and west directions toward the Oeste fault to depths of almost 1 km. Plate reorganization commencing at least by the latter half of the Oligocene led from oblique to more orthogonal convergence between the South American and the Nazca (Farallon) Plates. We interpret previously mapped, older, minor faults as being generated within the right-lateral, orogen-parallel, Oeste strike-slip fault zone, and postdated by Neogene, N-S striking thrust faults. In this context we also interpret that the spatial distribution of velocity units requires an period of extensional activity that may (1) postdate the transpressional strike slip fault activity of the Neogene, (2) be related to a later releasing bend through the translation and interaction of rigid blocks hidden at depth or even (3) be the consequence of inelastic failure from the result of flexural loading.

  16. Angola Seismicity MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  17. Microstructures, deformation mechanisms and seismic properties of a Palaeoproterozoic shear zone: The Mertz shear zone, East-Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarque, Gaëlle; Bascou, Jérôme; Maurice, Claire; Cottin, Jean-Yves; Riel, Nicolas; Ménot, René-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The Mertz shear zone (MSZ) is a lithospheric scale structure that recorded mid-crustal deformation during the 1.7 Ga orogeny. We performed a microstructural and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) study of samples from both mylonites and tectonic boudins that constitute relics of the Terre Adélie Craton (TAC). The deformation is highly accommodated in the MSZ by anastomosed shear bands, which become more scattered elsewhere in the TAC. Most of the MSZ amphibolite-facies mylonites display similar CPO, thermal conditions, intensity of deformation and dominant shear strain. Preserved granulite-facies boudins show both coaxial and non-coaxial strains related to the previous 2.45 Ga event. This former deformation is more penetrative and less localized and shows a deformation gradient, later affected by a major phase of recrystallization during retrogression at 2.42 Ga. Both MSZ samples and granulite-facies tectonic boudins present microstructures that reflect a variety of deformation mechanisms associated with the rock creep that induce contrasted CPO of minerals (quartz, feldspar, biotite, amphibole and orthopyroxene). In particular, we highlight the development of an "uncommon" CPO in orthopyroxene from weakly deformed samples characterized by (010)-planes oriented parallel to the foliation plane, [001]-axes parallel to the stretching lineation and clustering of [100]-axes near the Y structural direction. Lastly, we computed the seismic properties of the amphibolite and granulite facies rocks in the MSZ area in order to evaluate the contribution of the deformed intermediate and lower continental crust to the seismic anisotropy recorded above the MSZ. Our results reveal that (i) the low content of amphibole and biotite in the rock formations of the TAC, and (ii) the interactions between the CPO of the different mineralogical phases, generate a seismically isotropic crust. Thus, the seismic anisotropy recorded by the seismic stations of the TAC, including the

  18. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  19. InSight detection of a Lithospheric Low Seismic Velocity Zone in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Nimmo, F.; Lay, T.

    2014-12-01

    Most seismological models for the interior of Mars lack an upper mantle low velocity zone. However, there is expected to be a large thermal gradient across the stagnant conductive lid (lithosphere) of Mars. This gradient should tend to decrease elastic wave velocities with increasing depth, with this effect dominating the opposing tendency caused by increasing pressure with depth because Mars has low gravity. An upper mantle lithosphere with a low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath a thin high velocity "seismic lid" is thus predicted. The upcoming NASA InSight mission includes a three-component seismometer, which should provide the first opportunity to directly detect any lithospheric LVZ in Mars. Seismic wavefields expected for Mars mantle velocity structures with or without a strong LVZ are very distinct and may be distinguished by observing a modest number of seismic sources at different epicentral ranges. The LVZ models predict shadow zones for high-frequency seismic body wave phases such as P, S, PP and SS, etc. The most diagnostic waves that can be used to evaluate presence of a lithospheric LVZ given a single seismometer are intermediate period surface waves, which travel along the great circle from a seismic source to the seismometer along both minor- and (if the source is large enough) major-arc directions. An LVZ produces distinctive dispersion, with a Rayleigh wave Airy phase around 100 s period and very different surface wave seismograms compared to a model with no LVZ. Even a single observation of long-period surface waves from a known range can be diagnostic of the lithospheric structure. Establishing the existence of an LVZ has major implications for thermal evolution, volatile content and internal dynamics of the planet.

  20. Seismic imaging of transition zone discontinuities suggests hot mantle west of Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Cao, Q; van der Hilst, R D; de Hoop, M V; Shim, S-H

    2011-05-27

    The Hawaiian hotspot is often attributed to hot material rising from depth in the mantle, but efforts to detect a thermal plume seismically have been inconclusive. To investigate pertinent thermal anomalies, we imaged with inverse scattering of SS waves the depths to seismic discontinuities below the Central Pacific, which we explain with olivine and garnet transitions in a pyrolitic mantle. The presence of an 800- to 2000-kilometer-wide thermal anomaly (ΔT(max) ~300 to 400 kelvin) deep in the transition zone west of Hawaii suggests that hot material does not rise from the lower mantle through a narrow vertical plume but accumulates near the base of the transition zone before being entrained in flow toward Hawaii and, perhaps, other islands. This implies that geochemical trends in Hawaiian lavas cannot constrain lower mantle domains directly.

  1. Slab seismicity in the Western Hellenic Subduction Zone: Constraints from tomography and double-difference relocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpaap, Felix; Rondenay, Stéphane; Ottemöller, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The Western Hellenic subduction zone is characterized by a transition from oceanic to continental subduction. In the southern oceanic portion of the system, abundant seismicity reaches intermediate depths of 100-120 km, while the northern continental portion rarely exhibits deep earthquakes. Our study aims to investigate how this oceanic-continental transition affects fluid release and related seismicity along strike, by focusing on the distribution of intermediate depth earthquakes. To obtain a detailed image of the seismicity, we carry out a tomographic inversion for P- and S-velocities and double-difference earthquake relocation using a dataset of unprecedented spatial coverage in this area. Here we present results of these analyses in conjunction with high-resolution profiles from migrated receiver function images obtained from the MEDUSA experiment. We generate tomographic models by inverting data from 237 manually picked, well locatable events recorded at up to 130 stations. Stations from the permanent Greek network and the EGELADOS experiment supplement the 3-D coverage of the modeled domain, which covers a large part of mainland Greece and surrounding offshore areas. Corrections for the sphericity of the Earth and our update to the SIMULR16 package, which now allows S-inversion, help improve our previous models. Flexible gridding focusses the inversion on the domains of highest gradient around the slab, and we evaluate the resolution with checker board tests. We use the resulting velocity model to relocate earthquakes via the Double-Difference method, using a large dataset of differential traveltimes obtained by crosscorrelation of seismograms. Tens of earthquakes align along two planes forming a double seismic zone in the southern, oceanic portion of the subduction zone. With increasing subduction depth, the earthquakes appear closer to the center of the slab, outlining probable deserpentinization of the slab and concomitant eclogitization of dry crustal

  2. Low-velocity zone atop the 410-km seismic discontinuity in the northwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Song, Teh-Ru Alex; Helmberger, Don V; Grand, Stephen P

    2004-02-05

    The seismic discontinuity at 410 km depth in the Earth's mantle is generally attributed to the phase transition of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 (refs 1, 2) from the olivine to wadsleyite structure. Variation in the depth of this discontinuity is often taken as a proxy for mantle temperature owing to its response to thermal perturbations. For example, a cold anomaly would elevate the 410-km discontinuity, because of its positive Clapeyron slope, whereas a warm anomaly would depress the discontinuity. But trade-offs between seismic wave-speed heterogeneity and discontinuity topography often inhibit detailed analysis of these discontinuities, and structure often appears very complicated. Here we simultaneously model seismic refracted waves and scattered waves from the 410-km discontinuity in the western United States to constrain structure in the region. We find a low-velocity zone, with a shear-wave velocity drop of 5%, on top of the 410-km discontinuity beneath the northwestern United States, extending from southwestern Oregon to the northern Basin and Range province. This low-velocity zone has a thickness that varies from 20 to 90 km with rapid lateral variations. Its spatial extent coincides with both an anomalous composition of overlying volcanism and seismic 'receiver-function' observations observed above the region. We interpret the low-velocity zone as a compositional anomaly, possibly due to a dense partial-melt layer, which may be linked to prior subduction of the Farallon plate and back-arc extension. The existence of such a layer could be indicative of high water content in the Earth's transition zone.

  3. Relationship between shallow-and intermediate-depth seismicity in the eastern aleutian subduction zone

    SciTech Connect

    Abers, G.A. )

    1992-10-23

    The transition from shallow interplate thrusting to intermediate-depth seismicity is often poorly observed, but critical for understanding the fate of the downgoing slab. In order to better examine the transition, 1448 earthquakes are relocated from data recorded by a regional seismic network in the eastern Aleutian arc, using an improved three-dimensional velocity model and accurate ray tracing. Single-event first-motion solutions are determined from these rays for 31 slab events. The interplate thrust zone is a planar fault zone, dipping 10-15[degrees] at 25-35 km depth, and is no more than 5-10 km wide. Most intermediate-depth earthquakes are localized to a plane no wider than 5 km near the top of the descending plate. Fault-plane solution orientations for these events vary by several tens of degrees in orientation, although 73% show T axes aligned within 45[degrees] of the slab dip. A parallel seismic zone, 20-25 km deeper into the slab, also shows down-dip plunges of T axes for 3 to 5 solutions. The fault-plane solutions are poorly explained by plate bending ur unbending about a neutral fiber. Hypocenters show that intermediate-depth events are confined near the subducted oceanic crust, supporting compositional rather than pure thermal control of intermediate-depth seismicity. One explanation is that the upper-plane events are an indirect consequence of phase changes in subducted crust. Perhaps similar processes are important in producing earthquakes in the lower, parallel zone. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  4. New seismic images of the cascadia subduction zone from cruise SO 108-ORWELL

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flueh, E.R.; Fisher, M.A.; Bialas, J.; Childs, J. R.; Klaeschen, D.; Kukowski, Nina; Parsons, T.; Scholl, D. W.; ten Brink, U.; Trehu, A.M.; Vidal, N.

    1998-01-01

    In April and May 1996, a geophysical study of the Cascadia continental margin off Oregon and Washington was conducted aboard the German R/V Sonne. This cooperative experiment by GEOMAR and the USGS acquired wide-angle reflection and refraction seismic data, using ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and hydrophones (OBH), and multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data. The main goal of this experiment was to investigate the internal structure and associated earthquake hazard of the Cascadia subduction zone and to image the downgoing plate. Coincident MCS and wide-angle profiles along two tracks are presented here. The plate boundary has been imaged precisely beneath the wide accretionary wedge close to shore at c13km depth. Thus, the downgoing plate dips more shallowly than previously assumed. The dip of the plate changes from 2?? to 4?? at the eastern boundary of the wedge on the northern profile, whereas approximately 3km of sediment is entering the subduction zone. On the southern profile, where the incoming sedimentary section is about 2.2km thick, the plate dips about 0.5?? to 1.5?? near the deformation front and increases to 3.5?? further landwards. On both profiles, the deformation of the accretionary wedge has produced six ridges on the seafloor, three of which represent active faulting, as indicated by growth folding. The ridges are bordered by landward verging faults which reach as deep as the top of the oceanic basement. Thus, the entire incoming sediment package is being accreted. At least two phases of accretion are evident, and the rocks of the older accretionary phase(s) forms the backstop for the younger phase, which started around 1.5 Ma ago. This documents that the 30 to 50km wide frontal part of the accretionary wedge, which is characterized by landward vergent thrusts, is a Pleistocene feature which was formed in response to the high input of sediment building the fans during glacial periods. Velocities increase quite rapidly within the wedge, both

  5. Shear Wave Splitting from Local Earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we investigate crustal anisotropy in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), by analyzing shear wave splitting from local earthquake data. The NMSZ is centrally located in the United States, spanning portions of western Tennessee, northeastern Arkansas, and southeastern Missouri. The NMSZ is also the location in which three of the largest known earthquakes took place in North America, occurring in 1811-1812. Although many seismic studies have been performed in this region, there is no consensus about which driving mechanism could satisfy both the current observations, as well as the historically observed seismicity. Therefore, it is important to continue investigating the NMSZ, to gain a better understanding of its seismicity, and the possible mechanisms that drive it. The automated technique developed by Savage et al. (2010) is used to perform the shear wave splitting measurements at 120 seismic stations within the NMSZ. The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis provided data for 1151 earthquakes spanning the years 2003-2011. The initial event selection was reduced to 245 earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 2.0 to 4.6, which fell within the shear wave window of one or more of the stations. The results of this study provide information about orientation of microcracks in the upper portion of the crust; future work will include analysis for temporal and spatial variations in order to assess the state of stress in the region.

  6. Seismic Reflection Image Under The Eastern Uplift Zone of Songliao Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Baojun; Liu, Cai

    Songliao Basin is the most important base of oil/gas industry in China. The basin includes 2 uplift zones: the northeastern and southeastern uplifts. In order to understand the formation's mechanism of the basin, 4 nearly vertical reflection profiles were required in these two uplifts during 1996-1999, 2 East-West reflecting profiles were undertaken in the northeastern uplift, and one East-West and another one nearly South-North profile were taken in the southeastern uplift. After seismic processing of thes e seismic data, we obtained the seismic reflection images of the crustal structure with two-way traveltime of 15s under these 4 profiles. There are two or three strong reflection events on these migrated sections. In the northeastern uplift, the two-way traveltime of Moho varies within the range of 9.6-11.3s for the northeastern uplift, and 9.7 -10.3s for the southeastern uplift. In this paper, we present the seismic features of these seismic profiles, and make some discussion about the crustal structure, geodynamic process in these uplifts of Songliao basin.

  7. A Slow Slip and Seismic Swarm Sequence in a Weakly Coupled Subduction Zone in Northern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas Lanza, J. C.; Nocquet, J. M.; Rolandone, F.; Vallee, M.; Tavera, H.; Bondoux, F.; Tran, T. D.; Martin, X.; Chlieh, M.

    2015-12-01

    Processes releasing the stress accumulated along subduction megathrusts show a great diversity in their seismic and aseismic signatures, and in the ratio between the two modes of slip. Deep (30-50km) Slow Slip Events (SSE) are often accompanied by tremors, accounting for less than 0.1% of the total moment release. Shallow (<20km) SSE show synchronous intense microseismicity, whose contribution is 0.1 to a few percent of the total moment release. At the other end of the spectrum, earthquake-afterslip sequences usually show an aseismic/seismic moment release ratio between 20 to 100%, with some unusual cases reaching 400%. Here we document a seismic/aseismic sequence along the weakly coupled northern Peru subduction zone that departs from previously observed categories. The sequence took place at shallow depth (<25km), lasted 7 months, and the synchronous seismicity accounts for ~25% of the total moment release equivalent to Mw 6.7. Unlike SSE which show a progressive acceleration of slip, rapid transient slip started immediately after two earthquakes, before slowing down at logarithmic decay, similarly to the afterslip following large earthquakes. The earthquake which triggered the largest acceleration and slip amount shares most characteristics of tsunami earthquakes and probably occurred in the conditionally stable part of the subduction interface. Taken separately, the moment released by the transient aseismic slip following this latter earthquake is >1000% of the co-seismic moment and the observed transient slip cannot be explained by classical models of afterslip. This sequence suggests that Seismic Swarms that are commonly observed at subduction megathrusts actually release much more stress than indicated by their cumulative seismic moment.

  8. Precursory seismic quiescence along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukrungsri, Santawat; Pailoplee, Santi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the seismic quiescence prior to hazardous earthquakes was analyzed along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone (SASZ). The seismicity data were screened statistically with mainshock earthquakes of M w ≥ 4.4 reported during 1980-2015 being defined as the completeness database. In order to examine the possibility of using the seismic quiescence stage as a marker of subsequent earthquakes, the seismicity data reported prior to the eight major earthquakes along the SASZ were analyzed for changes in their seismicity rate using the statistical Z test. Iterative tests revealed that Z factors of N = 50 events and T = 2 years were optimal for detecting sudden rate changes such as quiescence and to map these spatially. The observed quiescence periods conformed to the subsequent major earthquake occurrences both spatially and temporally. Using suitable conditions obtained from successive retrospective tests, the seismicity rate changes were then mapped from the most up-to-date seismicity data available. This revealed three areas along the SASZ that might generate a major earthquake in the future: (i) Nicobar Islands (Z = 6.7), (ii) the western offshore side of Sumatra Island (Z = 7.1), and (iii) western Myanmar (Z = 6.7). The performance of a stochastic test using a number of synthetic randomized catalogues indicated these levels of anomalous Z value showed the above anomaly is unlikely due to chance or random fluctuations of the earthquake. Thus, these three areas have a high possibility of generating a strong-to-major earthquake in the future.

  9. A comparison of seismicity in world's subduction zones: Implication by the difference of b-values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2013-12-01

    Since the pioneering study of Uyeda and Kanamori (1979), it has been thought that world's subduction zones can be classified into two types: Chile and Mariana types. Ruff and Kanamori (1980) suggested that the maximum earthquake size within each subduction zone correlates with convergence rate and age of subducting lithosphere. Subduction zones with younger lithosphere and larger convergence rates are associated with great earthquakes (Chile), while subduction zones with older lithosphere and smaller convergence rates have low seismicity (Mariana). However, these correlations are obscured after the 2004 Sumatra earthquake and the 2009 Tohoku earthquake. Furthermore, McCaffrey (2008) pointed out that the history of observation is much shorter than the recurrence times of very large earthquakes, suggesting a possibility that any subduction zone may produce earthquakes larger than magnitude 9. In the present study, we compare world's subduction zones in terms of b-values in the Gutenberg-Richer relation. We divided world's subduction zones into 146 regions, each of which is bordered by a trench section of about 500 km and extends for 200 km from the trench section in the direction of relative plate motion. In each region, earthquakes equal to or larger than M4.5 occurring during 1988-2009 were extracted from ISC catalog. We find a positive correlation between b-values and ages of subducting lithosphere, which is one of the two important variables discussed in Ruff and Kanamori (1980). Subduction zones with younger lithosphere are associated with high b-values and vice versa, while we cannot find a correlation between b-values and convergence rates. We used the ages determined by Müller et al. (2008) and convergence rate calculated using PB2002 (Bird, 2003) for convergence rate. We also found a negative correlation between b-values and the estimates of seismic coupling, which is defined as the ratio of the observed seismic moment release rate to the rate calculated

  10. A mechanical model for intraplate earthquakes: application to the new madrid seismic zone

    PubMed

    Kenner; Segall

    2000-09-29

    We present a time-dependent model for the generation of repeated intraplate earthquakes that incorporates a weak lower crustal zone within an elastic lithosphere. Relaxation of this weak zone after tectonic perturbations transfers stress to the overlying crust, generating a sequence of earthquakes that continues until the zone fully relaxes. Simulations predict large (5 to 10 meters) slip events with recurrence intervals of 250 to 4000 years and cumulative offsets of about 100 meters, depending on material parameters and far-field stress magnitude. Most are consistent with earthquake magnitude, coseismic slip, recurrence intervals, cumulative offset, and surface deformation rates in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Computed interseismic strain rates may not be detectable with available geodetic data, implying that low observed rates of strain accumulation cannot be used to rule out future damaging earthquakes.

  11. Rigidity of the fault zones in the Earth's crust estimated from seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A. A.

    2011-07-01

    Nonlinear effects in seismic wave propagation are analyzed to determine the mechanical rigidity of different-order faults that thread the tectonic structures in the central part of the East European platform (Moscow syneclise and Voronezh Crystalline Massif) and the fault zones of the Balapan and Degelen mountain regions in Kazakhstan (the Degelen magmatic node in the Central Chingiz zone). The dependency of the rigidity of the fault zone on the fault's length is obtained. The rigidity of the tectonic structures is found to experience well-expressed temporal variations with periods of 13-15 days, 27-32 days, and about one year. In the different-order fault zones, the amplitudes of both normal k n and the shear k s rigidity for semimonthly, monthly, and annual variations can span a factor of 1.3, 1.5, and 2.5, respectively.

  12. Pyrometamorphism of Fault Zone Rocks Induced by Frictional Heating in High-velocity Friction Tests: Reliable Records of Seismic Slip?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ree, J.; Ando, J.; Kim, J.; Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-12-01

    Recognition of seismic slip zone is important for a better understanding of earthquake generation processes in fault zones and paleoseismology. However, there has been no reliable record of ancient seismic slip except pseudotachylyte. Recently, it has been suggested that decomposition (dehydration or decarbonation) products due to frictional heating can be used as a seismic slip record. The decomposition products, however, can be easily rehydrated or recarbonated with pervasive fluid migration in the fault zone after seismic slip, raising some question about their stability as a seismic slip record. Here, we review microstructural and mineralogical changes of the simulated fault zones induced by frictional heating (pyrometamorphism) from high-velocity friction tests (HVFT) on siltstone, sandstone and carbonates at seismic slip rates, and discuss on their stability after seismic slip. HVFT on siltstone generates pseuodotachylyte in the principal slip zone (0.30-0.75 mm thick) with 'damage' layer (0.1-0.2 mm thick) along its margins. Chlorite in the damage layer suffers an incipient dehydration with many voids (0.2-1.0 μm in diameter) in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), appearing as dark tiny spots both in plane-polarized light and back-scattered electron (BSE) photomicrographs. HVFT on brown sandstone induces a color change of wall rocks adjacent to the principal slip zone (brown to red) due to the dehydration of iron hydroxides with frictional heating. These dehydration products in siltstone and sandstone due to frictional heating may be unstable since they would be easily rehydrated with fluid infiltration after a seismic slip. HVFT on carbonates including Carrara marble and siderite-bearing gouges produces decarbonation products of nano-scale lime (CaO) and magnetite (Fe3O4), respectively. Lime is a very unstable phase whereas magnetite is a stable and thus may be used as an indicator of seismic slip. The simulated fault zones of Carrara marble contain

  13. Variations of seismic velocities in the Kachchh rift zone, Gujarat, India, during 2001-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik

    2016-03-01

    We herein study variations of seismic velocities in the main rupture zone (MRZ) of the Mw 7.7 2001 Bhuj earthquake for the time periods [2001-05, 2006-08, 2009-10 and 2011-13], by constructing dVp(%), dVs(%) and d(Vp/Vs)(%) tomograms using high-quality arrival times of 28,902 P- and 28,696 S-waves from 4644 precise JHD (joint hypocentral determination) relocations of local events. Differential tomograms for 2001-05 reveal a marked decrease in seismic velocities (low dVp, low dVs and high d(Vp/Vs)) in the MRZ (at 5-35 km depths) during 2001-10, which is attributed to an increase in crack/fracture density (higher pore fluid pressure) resulted from the intense fracturing that occurred during the mainshock and post-seismic periods. While we observe a slight recovery or increase in seismic velocities 2011-13, this could be related to the healing process (lower pore fluid pressure due to sealing of cracks) of the causative fault zone of the 2001 Bhuj mainshock. The temporal reduction in seismic velocities is observed to be higher at deeper levels (more fluid enrichment under near-lithostatic pressure) than that at shallower levels. Fluid source for low velocity zone (LVZ) at 0-10 km depths (with high d(Vp/Vs)) could be attributed to the presence of meteoric water or soft alluvium sediments with higher water content, while fluid source for LVZ at 10-35 km depths could be due to the presence of brine fluids (released from the metamorphic dewatering) and volatile CO2 (emanating from the crystallization of carbonatite melts in the asthenosphere), in fractures and pores. We also imaged two prominent LVZs associated with the Katrol Hill fault zone and Island Belt fault zone, extending from shallow upper-crust to sub-crustal depth, which might be facilitating the deeper circulation of metamorphic fluids/volatile CO2, thereby, the generation of lower crustal earthquakes occurring in the Kachchh rift zone.

  14. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    PubMed Central

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M.; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R.; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J. -Michael

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed. PMID:27436676

  15. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J-Michael

    2016-07-20

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed.

  16. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M.; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R.; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J.-Michael

    2016-07-01

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed.

  17. Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels of seismic waves to fault zone structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A. A.; Tape, C.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We analyse the volumetric sensitivity of fault zone seismic head and trapped waves by constructing finite-frequency sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels for these phases using a suite of idealized and tomographically derived velocity models of fault zones. We first validate numerical calculations by waveform comparisons with analytical results for two simple fault zone models: a vertical bimaterial interface separating two solids of differing elastic properties, and a `vertical sandwich' with a vertical low velocity zone surrounded on both sides by higher velocity media. Establishing numerical accuracy up to 12 Hz, we compute sensitivity kernels for various phases that arise in these and more realistic models. In contrast to direct P body waves, which have little or no sensitivity to the internal fault zone structure, the sensitivity kernels for head waves have sharp peaks with high values near the fault in the faster medium. Surface wave kernels show the broadest spatial distribution of sensitivity, while trapped wave kernels are extremely narrow with sensitivity focused entirely inside the low-velocity fault zone layer. Trapped waves are shown to exhibit sensitivity patterns similar to Love waves, with decreasing width as a function of frequency and multiple Fresnel zones of alternating polarity. In models that include smoothing of the boundaries of the low velocity zone, there is little effect on the trapped wave kernels, which are focused in the central core of the low velocity zone. When the source is located outside a shallow fault zone layer, trapped waves propagate through the surrounding medium with body wave sensitivity before becoming confined. The results provide building blocks for full waveform tomography of fault zone regions combining high-frequency head, trapped, body, and surface waves. Such an imaging approach can constrain fault zone structure across a larger range of scales than has previously been possible.

  18. The Pollino Seismic Sequence: Activated Graben Structures in a Seismic Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rößler, Dirk; Passarelli, Luigi; Govoni, Aladino; Bindi, Dino; Cesca, Simone; Hainzl, Sebatian; Maccaferri, Francesco; Rivalta, Eleonora; Woith, Heiko; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The Mercure Basin (MB) and the Castrovillari Fault (CF) in the Pollino range (Southern Apennines, Italy) represent one of the most prominent seismic gaps in the Italian seismic catalogue, with no M>5.5 earthquakes during the last centuries. In historical times several swarm-like seismic sequences occurred in the area including two intense swarms within the past two decades. The most energetic one started in 2010 and has been still active in 2014. The seismicity culminated in autumn 2012 with a M=5 event on 25 October. The range hosts a number of opposing normal faults forming a graben-like structure. Their rheology and their interactions are unclear. Current debates include the potential of the MB and the CF to host large earthquakes and the style of deformation. Understanding the seismicity and the behaviour of the faults is necessary to assess the tectonics and the seismic hazard. The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and INGV, Italy, have jointly monitored the ongoing seismicity using a small-aperture seismic array, integrated in a temporary seismic network. Based on this installation, we located more than 16,000 local earthquakes that occurred between November 2012 and September 2014. Here we investigate quantitatively all the phases of the seismic sequence starting from January 2010. Event locations along with moment tensor inversion constrain spatially the structures activated by the swarm and the migration pattern of the seismicity. The seismicity forms clusters concentrated within the southern part of the MB and along the Pollino Fault linking MB and CF. Most earthquakes are confined to the upper 10 km of the crust in an area of ~15x15 km2. However, sparse seismicity at depths between 15 and 20 km and moderate seismicity further north with deepening hypocenters also exist. In contrast, the CF appears aseismic; only the northern part has experienced micro-seismicity. The spatial distribution is however more complex than the major tectonic structures

  19. Deep Mantle Dynamics under the North American Continent Drives Localised Flow and Stress Below the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Moucha, R.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2007-12-01

    The origin of intraplate earthquakes represents one of the outstanding problems in modern geophysical research, and the major earthquake sequence that struck the central Mississippi River Valley in 1811-1812, the so-called New Madrid seismic sequence, has become a principal target of this research. As Johnston and Schweig (1996) have noted, the occurrence of such large magnitude earthquakes in "stable" North American crust, far from any plate boundaries, remains an enigma. To understand the possible origin of this enigmatic seismic activity we have developed a new high resolution model of mantle flow below North America. The model is constrained by simultaneously inverting global seismic and mantle-convection data sets and it includes an explicit treatment of the positive chemical buoyancy of the continental tectosphere. Moreover, it adopts a depth dependent mantle viscosity structure which reconciles both glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and convection data. The flow model successfully reproduces plate velocities and observations of surface gravity and topography, including the continent-scale quasi-linear depression (after corrections for GIA and crustal heterogeneity) extending from northern Alaska to Venezuela. The predictions also match lithospheric flow and stress fields inferred from local and regional measurements of seismic anisotropy and surface deformation. We demonstrate that these signals are largely driven by viscous flow coupled to density anomalies within the lower mantle associated with the descent of the ancient Kula-Farallon plate system. More importantly, the flow calculations elucidate how these large-scale heterogeneities give rise to flow and stress patterns below the New Madrid Seismic Zone which are favourably oriented with respect the local fault geometry in this portion of the Mississippi valley.

  20. Recognizing and dating prehistoric liquefaction features: Lessons learned in the New Madrid seismic zone, central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), which experienced severe liquefaction during the great New Madrid, Missouri, earthquakes of 1811 and 1812 as well as during several prehistoric earthquakes, is a superb laboratory for the study of world-class, arthquake-induced liquefaction features and their use in paleoseismology. In seismically active regions like the NMSZ, frequent large earthquakes can produce a complex record of liquefaction events that is difficult to interpret. Lessons learned studying liquefaction features in the NMSZ may help to unravel the paleoseismic record in other seismically active regions. Soil characteristics of liquefaction features, as well as their structural and sratigraphic relations to Native American occupation horizons and other cultural features, an help to distinguish prehistoric liquefaction features from historic features. In addition, analyses of artifact assemblages and botanical content of cultural horizons can help to narrow the age ranges of liquefaction features. Future research should focus on methods for defining source areas and estimating magnitudes of prehistoric earthquakes from liquefaction features. Also, new methods for dating liquefaction features are needed.

  1. Post-Seismic Crustal Deformation Following The 1999 Izmit Earthquake, Western Part Of North Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurkan, O.; Ozener, H.

    2004-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault is an about 1500 km long, extending from the Karliova to the North Aegean. Turkey is a natural laboratory with high tectonic activity caused by the relative motion of the Eurasian, Arabian and Anatolian plates. Western part of Turkey and its vicinity is a seismically active area. Since 1972 crustal deformation has been observed by various kinds of geodetic measurements in the area. Three GPS networks were installed in this region by Geodesy Department of Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute( KOERI ) of Bogazici University: (1) Iznik Network, installed on the Iznik-Mekece fault zone, seismically low active part, (2) Sapanca Network, installed on the Izmit-Sapanca fault zone, seismically active part, (3) Akyazi Network, installed on their intersection area, the Mudurnu fault zone. First period observations were performed by using terrestrial methods in 1990 and these observations were repeated annually until 1993. Since 1994, GPS measurements have been carried out at the temporary and permanent points in the area and the crustal movements are being monitored. Horizontal deformations, which have not been detected by terrestrial methods, were determined from the results of GPS measurements. A M=7.4 earthquake hit Izmit, northern Turkey, on August 17, 1999. After this earthquake many investigations have been started in the region. An international project has been performed with the collaboration of Massachussets Institute of Technology, Turkish General Command of Mapping, Istanbul Technical University, TUBITAK-Marmara Research Center and Geodesy Department of KOERI. Postseismic movements have been observed by the region-wide network. A GPS network including 49 well spread points in Marmara region was observed twice a year between 1999 and 2003 years. During these surveys, another network with 6 points has been formed by using 2 points from each 3 microgeodetic networks on NAFZ with appropriate coverage and geometry. These

  2. Modelling of Seismic Ground Motion in Santiago de Cuba City from Earthquakes in Oriente Fault Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, L.; Panza, G. F.; Vaccari, F.; González, B. E.

    We present the results of complete P-SV and SH waves modelling, up to a maximum frequency of 1Hz, along two profiles in Santiago de Cuba city. The seismic sources are located in the depth range from 10 to 40km on the Oriente fault zone at distances of several tens of kilometres from the city. The calculation has been made by a hybrid method: Modal summation in the regional anelastic model (one-dimensional) where the source is buried, and finite differences in the local sedimentary anelastic models (two-dimensional). The analysis of the influence of the depth and of the distance of the source on the site effects shows that standard traditional methods, based on the deconvolution analysis of the rock outcrop motion, can lead to erroneous results.

  3. Seismological implications of a lithospheric low seismic velocity zone in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yingcai; Nimmo, Francis; Lay, Thorne

    2015-03-01

    Most seismological models for the interior of Mars lack an upper mantle low velocity zone. However, there is expected to be a large thermal gradient across the stagnant conductive lid (lithosphere) of Mars. This gradient should tend to decrease elastic wave velocities with increasing depth, with this effect dominating the opposing tendency caused by increasing pressure with depth because Mars has low gravity. An upper mantle lithosphere with a low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath a thin high velocity "seismic lid" is thus predicted. The upcoming NASA InSight mission includes a three-component seismometer, which should provide the first opportunity to directly detect any lithospheric LVZ in Mars. Seismic wavefields expected for Mars mantle velocity structures with or without a strong LVZ are very distinct. The LVZ models predict shadow zones for high-frequency seismic body wave phases such as P, S, PP and SS, etc. The most diagnostic waves that can be used to evaluate presence of a lithospheric LVZ given a single seismometer are intermediate-period global surface waves, which travel along the great circle from a seismic source to the seismometer. An LVZ produces distinctive dispersion, with a Rayleigh wave Airy phase around 100 s period and very different surface wave seismograms compared to a model with no LVZ. Even a single observation of long-period surface waves from a known range can be diagnostic of the lithospheric structure. Establishing the existence of an LVZ has major implications for thermal evolution, volatile content and internal dynamics of the planet.

  4. The double seismic zone in downgoing slabs and the viscosity of the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    The seismic zone beneath several island arcs between about 100 and 200 km depth consists of an upper zone having down-dip compression and a lower zone having down-dip tension. Several numerical models of the Aleutian arc were computed to test the hypothesis that these double seismic zones are due to sagging of the slab under its own weight. This sagging occurs because the asthenosphere (between about 100 and 200 km) provides little support or resistance to the slab, which is supported from below by the more viscous mesosphere and from above by the lithosphere. The viscosity of the mesosphere was constrained to the interval between 0.25 x 10 to the 22nd and 0.5 x 10 to the 22nd P by noting that the slab would have mainly down-dip compression at higher viscosities and mainly down-dip tension at lower viscosities. The deviatoric stress in the slab and the fault plane between the slab and the island arc is about 200-300 bars (expressed as shear stress). The models were calibrated to the observed depth and gravity anomalies in the trench.

  5. Directly imaging steeply-dipping fault zones in geothermal fields with multicomponent seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ting; Huang, Lianjie

    2015-07-30

    For characterizing geothermal systems, it is important to have clear images of steeply-dipping fault zones because they may confine the boundaries of geothermal reservoirs and influence hydrothermal flow. Elastic reverse-time migration (ERTM) is the most promising tool for subsurface imaging with multicomponent seismic data. However, conventional ERTM usually generates significant artifacts caused by the cross correlation of undesired wavefields and the polarity reversal of shear waves. In addition, it is difficult for conventional ERTM to directly image steeply-dipping fault zones. We develop a new ERTM imaging method in this paper to reduce these artifacts and directly image steeply-dipping fault zones. In our new ERTM method, forward-propagated source wavefields and backward-propagated receiver wavefields are decomposed into compressional (P) and shear (S) components. Furthermore, each component of these wavefields is separated into left- and right-going, or downgoing and upgoing waves. The cross correlation imaging condition is applied to the separated wavefields along opposite propagation directions. For converted waves (P-to-S or S-to-P), the polarity correction is applied to the separated wavefields based on the analysis of Poynting vectors. Numerical imaging examples of synthetic seismic data demonstrate that our new ERTM method produces high-resolution images of steeply-dipping fault zones.

  6. Directly imaging steeply-dipping fault zones in geothermal fields with multicomponent seismic data

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Ting; Huang, Lianjie

    2015-07-30

    For characterizing geothermal systems, it is important to have clear images of steeply-dipping fault zones because they may confine the boundaries of geothermal reservoirs and influence hydrothermal flow. Elastic reverse-time migration (ERTM) is the most promising tool for subsurface imaging with multicomponent seismic data. However, conventional ERTM usually generates significant artifacts caused by the cross correlation of undesired wavefields and the polarity reversal of shear waves. In addition, it is difficult for conventional ERTM to directly image steeply-dipping fault zones. We develop a new ERTM imaging method in this paper to reduce these artifacts and directly image steeply-dipping fault zones.more » In our new ERTM method, forward-propagated source wavefields and backward-propagated receiver wavefields are decomposed into compressional (P) and shear (S) components. Furthermore, each component of these wavefields is separated into left- and right-going, or downgoing and upgoing waves. The cross correlation imaging condition is applied to the separated wavefields along opposite propagation directions. For converted waves (P-to-S or S-to-P), the polarity correction is applied to the separated wavefields based on the analysis of Poynting vectors. Numerical imaging examples of synthetic seismic data demonstrate that our new ERTM method produces high-resolution images of steeply-dipping fault zones.« less

  7. Imaging the Seismic Cycle in the Central Andean Subduction Zone from Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Culaciati, F.; Becerra-Carreño, V. C.; Socquet, A.; Jara, J.; Carrizo, D.; Norabuena, E. O.; Simons, M.; Vigny, C.; Bataille, K. D.; Moreno, M.; Baez, J. C.; Comte, D.; Contreras-Reyes, E.; Delorme, A.; Genrich, J. F.; Klein, E.; Ortega, I.; Valderas, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    We aim to quantify spatial and temporal evolution of fault slip behavior during all stages of the seismic cycle in subduction megathrusts, with the eventual goal of improving our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the subduction system and its implications for earthquake and tsunami hazards. In this work, we analyze the portion of the Nazca-SouthAmerican plates subduction zone affected by the 1868 southern Peru and 1877 northern Chile mega-earthquakes. The 1868 and 1878 events defined a seismic gap that did not experience a large earthquake for over 124 years. Only recently, the 1995 Mw 8.1 Antofagasta, 2001 Mw 8.4 Arequipa, 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, and 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua earthquakes released only a small fraction of the potential slip budget, thereby raising concerns about continued seismic and tsunami hazard. We use over a decade of observations from continuous and campaign GPS networks to analyze inter-seismic strain accumulation, as well as co-seimic deformation associated to the more recent earthquakes in the in the Central Andean region. We obtain inferences of slip (and back-slip) behavior using a consistent and robust inversion framework that accounts for the spatial variability of the constraint provided by the observations on slip across the subduction megathrust. We present an updated inter-seismic coupling model and estimates of pre-, co- and post- seismic slip behavior associated with the most recent 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua earthquake. We analyze our results, along with published information on the recent and historical large earthquakes, to characterize the regions of the megathrust that tend to behave aseismically, and those that are capable to accumulate a slip budget (ultimately leading to the generation of large earthquakes), to what extent such regions may overlap, and discuss the potential for large earthquakes in the region.

  8. Evidence of Possible Induced Seismicity in the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone from Improved Microearthquake Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagar, K. C.; Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    We reanalyzed data from a temporary seismic network in southern Indiana and Illinois deployed in November 1995 through July 1996. We produced the first comprehensive catalog of the complete 211 days of that experiment. The results are dominated by a cluster of 534 microearthquakes that occurred near the town of New Harmony, Indiana. Waveform similarity among all of the events suggests a more closely spaced grouping than that found by independent earthquake locations. We relocated the earthquakes using time-domain cross-correlation of the vertical traces and complex cross-correlation of the horizontal traces to improve arrival times for P- and S-waves, respectively. Additional constraints on the absolute locations were applied using arrival time difference analysis of earthquakes recorded by two stations. Average source depths from standard location methods and waveform modeling with synthetic seismograms indicate, in contrast to larger events in the region, the earthquakes occurred at depths < 4 km, within the sedimentary section of the Illinois Basin. We propose that these earthquakes are likely related to oil production, in particular water-injection for the purpose of secondary recovery. The primary evidence for this includes: (1) tight spatial clustering of earthquakes; (2) unusually shallow earthquake depths; (3) good spatial correlation of the relocated hypocenters to the existing wells and oil fields; and (4) an unusually steep slope in the log-linear relationship of earthquake magnitude and frequency. It is therefore necessary to discard the events in the cluster before consideration of magnitude-frequency relations for earthquake hazards estimates.

  9. Mapping Deep Low Velocity Zones in Alaskan Arctic Coastal Permafrost using Seismic Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Dreger, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Permafrost degradation may be an important amplifier of climate change; Thawing of near-surface sediments holds the potential of increasing greenhouse gas emissions due to microbial decomposition of preserved organic carbon. Recently, the characterization of "deep" carbon pools (several meters below the surface) in circumpolar frozen ground has increased the estimated amount of soil carbon to three times higher than what was previously thought. It is therefore potentially important to include the characteristics and processes of deeper permafrost strata (on the orders of a few to tens of meters below surface) in climate models for improving future predictions of accessible carbon and climate feedbacks. This extension is particularly relevant if deeper formations are not completely frozen and may harbor on-going microbial activity despite sub-zero temperatures. Unfortunately, the characterization of deep permafrost systems is non-trivial; logistics and drilling constraints often limit direct characterization to relatively shallow units. Geophysical measurements, either surface or airborne, are often the most effective tools for evaluating these regions. Of the available geophysical techniques, the analysis of seismic surface waves (e.g. MASW) has several unique advantages, mainly the ability to provide field-scale information with good depth resolution as well as penetration (10s to 100s of m with small portable sources). Surface wave methods are also able to resolve low velocity regions, a class of features that is difficult to characterize using traditional P-wave refraction methods. As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project, we conducted a three-day seismic field survey (May 12 - 14, 2012) at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, which is located within the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain. Even though permafrost at the study site is continuous, ice-rich and thick (>= 350m), our Multichannel Analysis of

  10. Crustal structure across a continental suture zone: a zone of focused crustal thickening, diffuse seismicity, and epiorogenic features in the mid continent of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, H. J.; Boschelli, J.; McGlannan, A.; Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.; Marshak, S.; Larson, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Continents grow as crustal terranes of various ages and origins accreted together. Suture zones mark the boundaries of these terranes and provide a discrete marker to investigate the process of continental growth. Investigating continental structure, we can identify whether properties such as crustal thickness or seismic wavespeed changes across suture zones. Further comparison between the locations of sutures and the distribution of tectonic events provides insight into the degree that sutures serve to localize regions of tectonism. In this study we investigate the mid continent of North America, where crust of the Mazatzal and Granite Rhyolite terranes accreted together to make up the Proterozoic basement. Using seismic data from the EarthScope Transportable Array and OIINK FlexArray, we inspect receiver functions and Rayleigh wave phase velocities to investigate lithospheric structures. Through this analysis, we identify a zone where the crust thickens from an average near 40 km, to more than 50 km in an area that encompasses the Illinois-Missouri border and lies along the suture zone between these two Proterozoic terranes. However, the wavespeeds of the crust do not appear to vary between the terranes or in the zone of crustal thickening. The boundary between the Ozark Plateau and Illinois Basin is located within the area of thickened crust and may indicate a potential role played by the suture zone in the formation of these two epiorogenic features. The dense mafic intrusions that were added to the crust during extension of the failed Reelfoot Rift, and now exhibit high seismic wavespeeds, may have provided the additional load that allowed the Illinois Basin to exploit the already weakened suture zone and subside. Diffuse seismicity in the St. Genevieve Fault Zone, which is located to the north of the New Madrid Seismic Zone, lies near the western edge of the area of thickened crust and suggests that ancient suture zones influence modern deformation within

  11. Seismic detection of rigid zones at the top of the core.

    PubMed

    Rost, S; Revenaugh, J

    2001-11-30

    Data from earthquakes in the Tonga-Fiji region recorded at a seismic array in northern Australia show evidence for rigid zones at the top of the outer core. The ScP waveforms can be modeled by thin (0.12 to 0.18 kilometer) zones of molten iron mixed with solid material with a small, but positive, S-wave velocity (0.6 to 0.8 kilometer per second) that enables the propagation of S-waves in the outermost core. The zones may be topographic highs of the core-mantle boundary filled by light core sediments and might be important for variation of Earth's nutation and for convection of the outer core.

  12. Fault zone amplified waves as a possible seismic hazard along the Calaveras fault in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, P.; Olsen, K.B.

    2001-01-01

    The Calaveras fault lies within a low velocity zone (LVZ) 1-2 km wide near Gilroy, California. Accelerographs G06, located in the LVZ 1.2 km from the Calaveras fault, and G07, 4 km from G06, recorded both the M 6.2 1984 Morgan Hill and the M 6.9 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes. Comparison of the ground motions shows that a large 0.6-1.0 Hz velocity pulse observed at G06 during the Morgan Hill event may be amplified by focussing caused by the LVZ. Such amplified waves might be a mappable seismic hazard, and the zone of increased hazard can extend as much as 1.2 km from the surface trace of the fault. Finite-difference simulations of ground motions in a simplified LVZ model show a zone of amplified motion similar to the observations.

  13. Seismic imaging of shallow reflectors in the eastern Kapuskasing structural zone, with correction of crossdip attitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jisoo; Moon, Wooil M.; Percival, John A.; West, F. G.

    1992-10-01

    Cascaded processes of crossdip correction and residual statics are tested and applied in the reprocessing of regional data from LITHOPROBE Kapuskasing Transect line 2. The objective was to improve seismic imaging of shallow, gently dipping reflectors in the eastern Kapuskasing structural zone, a thrusted slice of Archean middle to lower crust. This focusing strategy proved to be very effective in improving the image of the reflected energy and in identifying a set of conformally dipping reflectors whose true crossdip is estimated to be approximately 17 deg NW. The estimated crossdip for a reflective, compositionally layered zone and for the basal thrust, the Ivanhoe Lake Fault zone, support the previously estimated average dip of 15-20 deg.

  14. Imaging the Seattle Fault Zone with high-resolution seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, A.J.; Fisher, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Seattle fault, which trends east-west through the greater Seattle metropolitan area, is a thrust fault that, around 1100 years ago, produced a major earthquake believed to have had a magnitude greater than 7. We present the first high resolution image of the shallow P wave velocity variation across the fault zone obtained by tomographic inversion of first arrivals recorded on a seismic reflection profile shot through Puget Sound adjacent to Seattle. The velocity image shows that above 500 m depth the fault zone extending beneath Seattle comprises three distinct fault splays, the northernmost of which dips to the south at around 60??. The degree of uplift of Tertiary rocks within the fault zone suggests that the slip-rate along the northernmost splay during the Quaternary is 0.5 mm a-1, which is twice the average slip-rate of the Seattle fault over the last 40 Ma.

  15. Scaling of the critical slip distance for seismic faulting with shear strain in fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marone, C.; Kilgore, B.

    1993-01-01

    THEORETICAL and experimentally based laws for seismic faulting contain a critical slip distance1-5, Dc, which is the slip over which strength breaks down during earthquake nucleation. On an earthquake-generating fault, this distance plays a key role in determining the rupture nucleation dimension6, the amount of premonitory and post-seismic slip7-10, and the maximum seismic ground acceleration1,11. In laboratory friction experiments, Dc has been related to the size of surface contact junctions2,5,12; thus, the discrepancy between laboratory measurements of Dc (??? 10-5 m) and values obtained from modelling earthquakes (??? 10-2 m) has been attributed to differences in roughness between laboratory surfaces and natural faults5. This interpretation predicts a dependence of Dc on the particle size of fault gouge 2 (breccia and wear material) but not on shear strain. Here we present experimental results showing that Dc scales with shear strain in simulated fault gouge. Our data suggest a new physical interpretation for the critical slip distance, in which Dc is controlled by the thickness of the zone of localized shear strain. As gouge zones of mature faults are commonly 102-103 m thick13-17, whereas laboratory gouge layers are 1-10 mm thick, our data offer an alternative interpretation of the discrepancy between laboratory and field-based estimates of Dc.

  16. Revised magnitude-bound relation for the Wabash Valley seismic zone of the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, S.M.; Green, R.A.; Obermeier, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic hazard assessment in the central United States, and in particular the Wabash Valley seismic zone of Indiana-Illinois, frequently relies on empirical estimates of paleoearthquake magnitudes (M). In large part these estimates have been made using the magnitude-bound method. Existing region-specific magnitude-bound relations rely heavily on only a few historical earthquakes in the central United States and eastern Canada that induced reported liquefaction features. Recent seismological studies have suggested smaller magnitudes than previously presumed for some of these earthquakes, however, and other studies have reinterpreted site-to-source distances to liquefaction features associated with some of these earthquakes. In this paper, we re-examine historical earthquakes (M > ???5) that occurred in the central and eastern United States and eastern Canada; some of these earthquakes triggered liquefaction and others did not. Based on our findings, we reinterpret the region-specific magnitude-bound relation for the Wabash Valley. Using this revised magnitude-bound relation, we present magnitude estimates for four prehistoric earthquakes that occurred in the Wabash Valley seismic zone during Holocene time.

  17. Coulomb Stress evolution and seismic hazard along the Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang Fault Zone of Western Sichuan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, B.; Xiong, X.; Zheng, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault system (XXFS) in southwestern China is a curved left-lateral strike-slip structure extending at least 1400 km in the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Fieldworks confirm that the XXFS, whose slip motion releases strain that is related to the convergence between the Indian and Eurasian plates, is one of the largest and most seismically active faults in China. The entire fault has experienced at least 35 earthquakes of M>6 since 1700, and almost all segments of the system have been the locus of major earthquakes within the historic record. Since the XXFS region is heavily populated (over 50 million people), understanding the distribution of large earthquakes in space and time in this region is crucial for improving forecasting and reducing catastrophic life and monetary losses. We investigated a sequence of twenty-five earthquakes (M≥6.5) that occurred along the XXFS since 1713, and the interaction between the historical earthquakes and the Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake occurred on the Longmenshan Fault last year. The layered model used in the study and relevant parameters were constrained by seismic studies. Fault rupture locations and geometries, as well as slip distributions of earthquakes were taken from field observations and seismic studies. Numerical results showed a good correlation between stress transfer, accumulation and earthquakes. Fourteen of the twenty-four earthquakes occurred after the 1713 Xundian were encouraged by the preceding earthquakes with positive stress loading. Three events occurred in the stress shadow induced by preceding events. And others occurred in the probable area with Coulomb stress increment. The triggering process on the fault zone may exist. According to our results, there are three visible earthquake gaps along the fault zone, which are consistent with the results of historical earthquake study. The seismic activity and tectonic motion on XXFS reduced the shear stress on the epicenter of M8

  18. Seismic anisotropy in mylonites: an example from the Mannin Thrust Zone, southwest Connemara, Ireland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chroston, P.N.; Max, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Mylonites associated with the Mannin Thrust zone of southwesternmost Connemara formed when the high-grade metamorphic rocks typical of most of the Connemara massif were thrust to the southeast over low metamorphic grade (low greenschist facies?) acid volcanics and volcaniclastic sediments, while being metamorphosed in the epidote-amphibolite facies. Triaxial and biaxial ultrasonic velocity measurements of mylonite specimens from a 240 m borehole have established that there is significant seismic anisotropy up to about 11% when comparing velocities perpendicular and parallel to the foliation. This would ultimately lead to a reflection coefficient of about 0.02 when comparing the mean "isotropic" seismic velocity with that perpendicular to the foliation. The finely striped, discontinunous mineral lithons that define mylonitic foliation, but which form no real and continuous surfaces, could interact with seismic energy to produce "reflections" that do not relate to lithological contacts within the rocks but to a tectonically induced, orientated acoustic impedance. However, the results support the work of others in suggesting that on its own the fabric would not produce the high amplitude reflections observed on deep seismic lines and other mechanisms need to be investigated. ?? 1988.

  19. Dense lower crust elevates long-term earthquake rates in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levandowski, William Brower; Boyd, Oliver; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the local state of stress is critical in appraising intraplate seismic hazard. Inverting earthquake moment tensors, we demonstrate that principal stress directions in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) differ significantly from those in the surrounding region. Faults in the NMSZ that are incompatible with slip in the regional stress field are favorably oriented relative to local stress. We jointly analyze seismic velocity, gravity, and topography to develop a 3-D crustal and upper mantle density model, revealing uniquely dense lower crust beneath the NMSZ. Finite element simulations then estimate the stress tensor due to gravitational body forces, which sums with regional stress. The anomalous lower crust both elevates gravity-derived stress at seismogenic depths in the NMSZ and rotates it to interfere more constructively with far-field stress, producing a regionally maximal deviatoric stress coincident with the highest concentration of modern seismicity. Moreover, predicted principal stress directions mirror variations (observed independently in moment tensors) at the NMSZ and across the region.

  20. Dense lower crust elevates long-term earthquake rates in the New Madrid seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levandowski, Will; Boyd, Oliver S.; Ramirez-Guzmán, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of the local state of stress is critical in appraising intraplate seismic hazard. Inverting earthquake moment tensors, we demonstrate that principal stress directions in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) differ significantly from those in the surrounding region. Faults in the NMSZ that are incompatible with slip in the regional stress field are favorably oriented relative to local stress. We jointly analyze seismic velocity, gravity, and topography to develop a 3-D crustal and upper mantle density model, revealing uniquely dense lower crust beneath the NMSZ. Finite element simulations then estimate the stress tensor due to gravitational body forces, which sums with regional stress. The anomalous lower crust both elevates gravity-derived stress at seismogenic depths in the NMSZ and rotates it to interfere more constructively with far-field stress, producing a regionally maximal deviatoric stress coincident with the highest concentration of modern seismicity. Moreover, predicted principal stress directions mirror variations (observed independently in moment tensors) at the NMSZ and across the region.

  1. The Obsidian Creep Project: Seismic Imaging in the Brawley Seismic Zone and Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired medium- and high-resolution P- and S-wave seismic reflection and refraction data across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) and across part of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), Imperial Valley, California. Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities associated with the BSZ and SSGF. We acquired multiple seismic data sets along a north-south profile and a high-resolution P-wave profile along an east-west profile. The north-south profile included: 1) a 6.4-km-long P-wave (main) profile that was recorded on 320 Texan seismographs spaced at 20-m intervals, 2) a 1.2-km-long cabled, high-resolution profile along the northern end of the main profile, and 3) an approximately 1.2-km-long S-wave profile along the cabled profile. P-wave sources along the main profile were generated by 0.15- to 0.45-kg buried explosions spaced every 40 m, and P-wave sources along the cabled profile were generated by Betsy-Seisgun ‘shots’ spaced every 10 m. S-waves sources were generated by hammer impacts on the ends of an aluminum block. The east-west profile consisted of a 3.4-km-long high-resolution P-wave seismic profile with shots (Betsy-Seisgun) and geophones spaced every 10 m. Preliminary interpretation of shot gathers from blasts in the north-south profile suggests that the BSZ and SSGF are structurally complex, with abundant faults extending to or near the ground surface. Also, we observe relatively high-velocity material, apparent velocities of about 4.0 km/s in one direction and about 2.8 km/s in another relative to about 1.6 km/s for shallower material, that shallows beneath the SSGF. This may be due to high temperatures and resultant metamorphism of buried materials in the SSGF. From preliminary interpretation of shot gathers along the east-west profile we interpret a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on projection of the Kalin fault, from about 40 m to

  2. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Adriano; Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction, which stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard.

  3. Seismic structure off the Kii Peninsula, Japan, deduced from passive- and active-source seismographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yojiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kaiho, Yuka; Obana, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Ayako; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2017-03-01

    We conduct seismic tomography to model subsurface seismicity between 2010 and 2012 and structural heterogeneity off the Kii Peninsula, southwestern Japan, and to investigate their relationships with segmentation of the Nankai and Tonankai seismogenic zones of the Nankai Trough. In order to constrain both the shallow and deep structure of the offshore seismogenic segments, we use both active- and passive-source data recorded by both ocean-bottom seismometers and land seismic stations. The relocated microearthquakes indicate a lack of seismic activity in the Tonankai seismogenic segment off Kumano, whereas there was active intraslab seismicity in the Kii Channel area of the Nankai seismogenic segment. Based on comparisons among the distribution of seismicity, age, and spreading rate of the subducting Philippine Sea plate, and the slip-deficit distribution, we conclude that seismicity in the subducting slab under the Kii Channel region nucleated from structures in the Philippine Sea slab that pre-date subduction and that fluids released by dehydration are related to decreased interplate coupling of these intraslab earthquakes. Our velocity model clearly shows the areal extent of two key structures reported in previous 2-D active-source surveys: a high-velocity zone beneath Cape Shionomisaki and a subducted seamount off Cape Muroto, both of which are roughly circular and of 15-20 km radius. The epicenters of the 1944 Tonankai and 1946 Nankai earthquakes are near the edge of the high-velocity body beneath Cape Shionomisaki, suggesting that this anomalous structure is related to the nucleation of these two earthquakes. We identify several other high- and low-velocity zones immediately above the plate boundary in the Tonankai and Nankai seismogenic segments. In comparison with the slip-deficit model, some of the low-velocity zones appear to correspond to an area of strong coupling. Our observations suggest that, unlike the Japan Trench subduction zone, in our study area

  4. Global seismic data reveal little water in the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C.

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of the Earth's present water content is necessary to constrain the amount of water and other volatiles the Earth acquired during its formation and the amount that is cycled back into the interior from the surface. This study compares 410 and 660 km discontinuity depth with shear wave tomography within the mantle transition zone to identify regions with seismic signals consistent with water. The depth of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities is determined from a large updated dataset of SS-S410S and SS-S660S differential travel times, known as SS precursors. The discontinuity depths measured from binning and stacking the SS precursor data are then compared to the shear velocity model HMSL-S06 in the transition zone. Mapping all the possible combinations, very few locations match the predictions from mineral physics for the effects of water on discontinuity depth and shear velocity. The predictions, although not yet measured at actual transition zone temperatures and pressures, are a shallow 410 km discontinuity, a deep 660 km discontinuity, and a slow shear velocity. Only 8% of the bins with high-quality data are consistent with these predictions, and the calculated average water content within these bins is around 0.6 wt.%. A few isolated locations have patterns of velocity/topography that are consistent with water, while there are large regional-scale patterns consistent with cold/hot temperature anomalies. Combining this global analysis of long period seismic data and the current mineral physics predictions for water in transition zone minerals, I find that the mantle transition zone is generally dry, containing less than one Earth ocean of water. Although subduction zones could be locally hydrated, the combined discontinuity and velocity data show no evidence that wadsleyite or ringwoodite have been globally hydrated by subduction or initial Earth conditions.

  5. Crustal structure of a land-ocean transitional zone in the northern South China Sea, from an onshore-offshore seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Xia, S.; Xu, H.; Sun, J.

    2012-12-01

    The littoral fault zone(LFZ), a east-northeast-trending rupture region, which is located at an land-ocean transition area in the northern margin of South China Sea(SCS). Previous work in the northern SCS identified the LFZ as the most hazardous fault in the coastal South China, in history distribution of destructive erathquakes with magnitudes greater than 7.0 occured almost all along the LFZ. But in the maritime space off the Pearl River Mouth(PRM), the LFZ is intersected with a northwest-trending fault zone, where the seismic activity level to be significantly lower in recent hundreds of years, therefore it is very important to obtain detailed deep seismogenic structure in this potential strong earthquake zone. To investigate the crustal structure of the LFZ and the potential strong earthquake zone off the PMR, a wide-angle onshore-offshore seismic experiment and a coincident multi-channel seismic(MCS) profile were carried out in the northern SCS during July and August, 2010. The seismic source was an array of four guns and the shots were recorded simultaneously by ocean bottom seismometers and portable and permanent land stations. The preliminary processing result demonstrated good quality data, clear shallow-crustal structure is obtained from the MCS data, and the permanent seismic stations received air-gun signals over a distance of 360 km. Observed and calculated P-wave traveltimes were matched by forwad modelling prior to the inversion. Finally we got the optimal two-dimensional P-wave velocity model, and the model cross the northern margin of SCS shows the Moho depth is gradually thinned from land to sea, and the LFZ is a 10 km wide low-velocity rupture zone.

  6. Insights from the 2011 Prague, Oklahoma earthquake sequence on the role of damage zones in the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, H. M.; Dieck, C. C.; Keranen, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Although most faults are surrounded by a halo of fractured rock known as a damage zone, it is not clear what role damage zones play during the seismic cycle on mature faults. Here, we present a superbly-located foreshock-mainshock-aftershock sequence that demonstrates most aftershocks are located within the damage zone surrounding the fault. The 2011 Prague, Oklahoma sequence included three M5+ earthquakes along three different faults over a three-day period. The third event was captured with an array of nine seismometers with ~2 km spacing, allowing for precise event location. We located more than 1000 foreshocks and aftershocks of the November 8 M5 event within a 14 hour time window, and relocated these aftershocks using singular-value decomposition in HypoDD. Because of the accuracy in event horizontal location, we can use these events to compare aftershock distribution to fracture distributions within damage zones surrounding faults. The aftershock sequence localizes to a damage zone thickness that scales with the length of the rupture patch, similar to previously documented scaling between fault length and damage zone thickness. Furthermore, the falloff in aftershock density decays precipitously away from the fault, in a similar fashion to fracture density decay in damage zones. Most aftershocks in this sequence occur within the first hour after the mainshock, and there is no obvious migration of aftershocks away from the fault with time. Finally, foreshock activity along this fault was limited to the intersection with the fault that had hosted a M5.7 earthquake two days prior.

  7. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter during the recent seismic activity of Fthiotida, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael; Aarabelos, Dimitrios; Vergos, Georgios; Spatalas, Spyridon

    2014-05-01

    Applying the Hi(stogram)Cum(ulation) method, which was introduced recently by Cadicheanu, van Ruymbecke and Zhu (2007), we analyze the series of the earthquakes occurred in the last 50 years in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ) . The result of the analysis for all the areas indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations and the same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identifiation of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance, p, as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence and we check on posterior if the variation of the confidence level index, p, indicate the fault matureness in the case of the recent seismic activity at Fthiotida, Greece. In this paper we present the results of this test. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M andZhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the seismic area of Mygdonia basin, North Greece, in Terrestrial and Stellar Environment, eds.D. Arabelos, M

  8. Water, oceanic fracture zones and the lubrication of subducting plate boundaries—insights from seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaphorst, David; Kendall, J.-Michael; Collier, Jenny S.; Verdon, James P.; Blundy, Jon; Baptie, Brian; Latchman, Joan L.; Massin, Frederic; Bouin, Marie-Paule

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the relationship between subduction processes and related seismicity for the Lesser Antilles Arc using the Gutenberg-Richter law. This power law describes the earthquake-magnitude distribution, with the gradient of the cumulative magnitude distribution being commonly known as the b-value. The Lesser Antilles Arc was chosen because of its along-strike variability in sediment subduction and the transition from subduction to strike-slip movement towards its northern and southern ends. The data are derived from the seismicity catalogues from the Seismic Research Centre of The University of the West Indies and the Observatoires Volcanologiques et Sismologiques of the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and consist of subcrustal events primarily from the slab interface. The b-value is found using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for a maximum-likelihood straight line-fitting routine. We investigate spatial variations in b-values using a grid-search with circular cells as well as an along-arc projection. Tests with different algorithms and the two independent earthquake cataloges provide confidence in the robustness of our results. We observe a strong spatial variability of the b-value that cannot be explained by the uncertainties. Rather than obtaining a simple north-south b-value distribution suggestive of the dominant control on earthquake triggering being water released from the sedimentary cover on the incoming American Plates, or a b-value distribution that correlates with on the obliquity of subduction, we obtain a series of discrete, high b-value `bull's-eyes' along strike. These bull's-eyes, which indicate stress release through a higher fraction of small earthquakes, coincide with the locations of known incoming oceanic fracture zones on the American Plates. We interpret the results in terms of water being delivered to the Lesser Antilles subduction zone in the vicinity of fracture zones providing lubrication and thus changing the character of the

  9. Predicting brittle zones in the Bakken Formation using well logs and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecher, Michael E.

    The oil-in-place estimate for the Bakken Formation has varied from 10 billion barrels in 1974 to 503 billion barrels in 1999. However, only a small fraction of this estimate is recoverable due to the formation having very low porosity and permeability. Implementation of hydraulic fracture stages along horizontal wells in the Bakken has been productive. Recently, identification of zones where the formation is brittle has been used to improve hydraulic fracture stimulation efficiency in an effort to improve production. The first goal for this thesis is to identify a correlation between brittleness and production data by using elastic moduli and normalized production values. The hypothesis for this study is that rock with a low Poisson's ratio and high Young's modulus will be more brittle and will ultimately produce a higher amount of oil than more ductile rock. The next goal was to create and test a method to identify brittle zones with high normalized production in a 3D seismic data set without well control using producing wells from outside the survey with dipole sonic logs from the Bakken Formation. Correlations between normalized production values and elastic moduli were subsequently identified. Cumulative first-four-months' production was found to have the best correlation to the elastic moduli. Correlations of normalized production values and Poisson's ratio showed that sections of the middle Bakken with low Poisson's ratio yield higher normalized production values. Correlations of Young's modulus and normalized production showed that middle Bakken zones with low Young's modulus have higher normalized production values. However, when using additional wells that were not used for well-to-3D seismic correlations, the correlation shows that higher Young's modulus yield higher normalized production. The correlation with additional wells best represented the data and agrees with the initial hypothesis. Brittle zones were mapped in a 3D seismic data set by

  10. Fluid and mass transfer into the cold mantle wedge of subduction zones: budgets and seismic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, G. A.; Hacker, B. R.; Van Keken, P. E.; Nakajima, J.; Kita, S.

    2015-12-01

    Dehydration of subducting plates should hydrate the shallow overlying mantle wedge where mantle is cold. In the shallow mantle wedge hydrous phases, notably serpentines, chlorite, brucite and talc should be stable to form a significant reservoir for H2O. Beneath this cold nose thermal models suggest only limited slab dehydration occurs at depths less than ca. 80 km except in warm subduction zones, but fluids may flow updip from deeper within the subducting plate to hydrate the shallow mantle. We estimate the total water storage capacity in cold noses, at temperatures where hydrous phases are stable, to be roughly 2-3% the mass of the global ocean. At modern subduction flux rates its full hydration could be achieved in 50-100 Ma if all subducting water devolatilized in the upper 100 km flows into the wedge; these estimates have at least a factor of two uncertainty. To investigate the extent to which wedge hydration actually occurs we compile and generate seismic images of forearc mantle regions. The compilation includes P- and S-velocity images with good sampling below the Moho and above the downgoing slab in forearcs, from active-source imaging, local earthquake tomography and receiver functions, while avoiding areas of complex tectonics. Well-resolved images exist for Cascadia, Alaska, the Andes, Central America, North Island New Zealand, and Japan. We compare the observed velocities to those predicted from thermal-petrologic models. Among these forearcs, Cascadia stands out as having upper-mantle seismic velocities lower than overriding crust, consistent with high (>50%) hydration. Most other forearcs show Vp close to 8.0 km/s and Vp/Vs of 1.73-1.80. We compare these observations to velocities predicted from thermal-mineralogical models. Velocities are slightly slower than expected for dry peridotite and allow 10-20% hydration, but also could also be explained as relict accreted rock, or delaminated, relaminated, or offscraped crustal material mixed with mantle

  11. Strong ground motion synthesis along the Sanyi-Tungshih-Puli seismic zone using empirical Green`s functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, L.; Foxall, W.; Kasameyer, P.; Wu, F.T.; Rau, R.-J.; Jarpe, S.

    1997-01-01

    We synthesize strong ground motion from a M=7.25 earthquake along the NW-trending Sanyi-Tungshih-Puli seismic zone. This trend extends from Houlong to Taichung and forms a nearly continuous 78 km long seismic zone identified by the occurrence of M<5 events. It extends from a shallow depth all the way down to about 40 km. The entire length of the fault, if activated at one time, can lead to an event comparable to that the 1995 Kobe earthquake. With the improved digital CWBSN data now provided routinely by CWBSN, it becomes possible to use these data as empirical Green`s functions to synthesize potential ground motion for future large earthquakes. We developed a suite of 100 rupture scenarios for the earthquake and computed the commensurate strong ground motion time histories. We synthesized strong ground motion with physics-based solutions of earthquake rupture and applied physical bounds on rupture parameters. the synthesized ground motions obtained for a fixed magnitude and identifying the hazard to a site from the statistical distribution of engineering parameters, we have introduced a probabilistic component to the deterministic hazard calculation, The time histories suggested for engineering design are the ones that most closely match either the average or one standard deviation absolute acceleration response values.

  12. Historical seismicity near Chagos - A complex deformation zone in the equatorial Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The historical seismicity of the Chagos region of the Indian Ocean is analyzed, using earthquake relocation methods and a moment variance technique to determine the focal mechanisms of quakes occurring before 1964. Moment variance analysis showed a thrust faulting mechanism associated with the earthquake of 1944 near the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge; a strike-slip mechanism was associated with a smaller 1957 event occurring west of the Chagos Bank. The location of the 1944 event, one of the largest intraplate earthquakes known (1.4 x 10 to the 27th dyne/cm), would imply that the Chagos seismicity is due to a zone of tectonic deformation stretching across the equatorial Indian Ocean. The possibility of a slow diffuse boundary extending west of the Central Indian Ridge is also discussed. This boundary is confirmed by recent plate motion studies which suggest that it separates the Australian plate from a single Indo-Arabian plate.

  13. SEISMIC STRUCTURE AND STRATIGRAPHY OF NORTHERN EDGE OF BAHAMAN-CUBAN COLLISION ZONE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, M.M.; Martin, R.G.; Bock, W.D.; Sylwester, R.E.; Bowles, R.M.; Taylor, D.; Coward, E.L.; Dodd, J.E.; Gilbert, L.

    1985-01-01

    Common-depth-point (CDP) seismic reflection data in the southwestern Bahamas reveal the northern edge of the tectonized zone that resulted from the late Mesozoic-early Cenozoic collision of Cuba and the Bahamas. Two seismic facies are present. A 10-km broad anticline occurs at the south end of Santaren Channel. Platform carbonates in the core of this structure overlie Early Cretaceous and older basinal carbonate deposits and are onlapped by Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic basinal facies. The structure is inferred to be a hanging-wall anticline at the northern limit of the Cuban fold-thrust belt formed in the Late Cretaceous. A deeper water embayment extended northward into the Straits of Florida, around northern Cay Sal Bank, and back into Santaren Channel during the Early Cretaceous.

  14. Preliminary results of characteristic seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wiyono, Samsul H.; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Determining of seismic anisotropy allowed us for understanding the deformation processes that occured in the past and present. In this study, we performed shear wave splitting to characterize seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone. For about 1,610 XKS waveforms from INATEWS-BMKG networks have been analyzed. From its measurements showed that fast polarization direction is consistent with trench-perpendicular orientation but several stations presented different orientation. We also compared between fast polarization direction with absolute plate motion in the no net rotation and hotspot frame. Its result showed that both absolute plate motion frame had strong correlation with fast polarization direction. Strong correlation between the fast polarization direction and the absolute plate motion can be interpreted as the possibility of dominant anisotropy is in the asthenosphere.

  15. Anatomy of a Complex Fault Zone: Land Seismic Reflection Imaging of the Tacoma Fault Zone, Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, K.; Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    Preliminary interpretations of new land-based seismic reflection images across the Tacoma fault zone in western Washington State document a complex pattern of faulting and folding. The Tacoma fault zone bounds gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies for 50 km across the central Puget Lowland west of the city of Tacoma, and tomography data suggest there is as much as 6 km of post-Eocene uplift of the hanging wall relative to Tacoma basin sediments to the south. We acquired four north-south seismic reflection profiles to define the character and tectonic history of the Tacoma fault zone. The 6-km long Powerline Road profile, located west of Case Inlet, perpendicularly crosses the 4-km-long Catfish Lake scarp discerned from Lidar data and trenching. The profile shows flat-lying strata on the south, but the north part of the profile is dominated by south-dipping Tertiary and older strata that appear to form the limb of an anticline. There appears to be at least one, and likely two faults in the Tertiary and older strata, although it is not clear these faults penetrate the shallowest Pleistocene strata. The 8.5-km long Carney Lake profile is located east of Case Inlet and spans two scarps imaged on Lidar data. This profile shows a similar geometry to the Powerline Road profile, folded and faulted Tertiary and older strata adjacent to flat-lying marine sediments of the Tacoma Basin. The 9-km long Bethel-Burley profile across the east portion of the Tacoma fault near Gig Harbor shows a significantly different reflector geometry than the profiles to the west. The Bethel-Burley profile is dominated by a strong, south-dipping reflection that becomes a prominent arch near the north end of the section. The strength of the reflector suggests that it marks the top of the Eocene basement rocks. South-dipping strata on this profile match those imaged on marine profiles from Carr Inlet. The new seismic reflection data support an interpretation in which the north edge of the Tacoma basin

  16. Characterization and application of microearthquake clusters to problems of scaling, fault zone dynamics, and seismic monitoring at Parkfield, California

    SciTech Connect

    Nadeau, Robert Michael

    1995-10-01

    This document contains information about the characterization and application of microearthquake clusters and fault zone dynamics. Topics discussed include: Seismological studies; fault-zone dynamics; periodic recurrence; scaling of microearthquakes to large earthquakes; implications of fault mechanics and seismic hazards; and wave propagation and temporal changes.

  17. Structure of the North Anatolian Fault Zone from the Autocorrelation of Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, George; Rost, Sebastian; Houseman, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the technique of cross-correlating the ambient seismic noise wavefield at two seismometers to reconstruct empirical Green's Functions for the determination of Earth structure has been a powerful tool to study the Earth's interior without earthquakes or man-made sources. However, far less attention has been paid to using auto-correlations of seismic noise to reveal body wave reflections from interfaces in the subsurface. In principle, the Green's functions thus derived should be comparable to the Earth's impulse response to a co-located source and receiver. We use data from a dense seismic array (Dense Array for Northern Anatolia - DANA) deployed across the northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in the region of the 1999 magnitude 7.6 Izmit earthquake in western Turkey. The NAFZ is a major strike-slip system that extends ~1200 km across northern Turkey and continues to pose a high level of seismic hazard, in particular to the mega-city of Istanbul. We construct body wave images for the entire crust and the shallow upper mantle over the ~35 km by 70 km footprint of the 70-station DANA array. Using autocorrelations of the vertical component of ground motion, P-wave reflections can be retrieved from the wavefield to constrain crustal structure. We show that clear P-wave reflections from the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) can be retrieved using the autocorrelation technique, indicating topography on the Moho on horizontal scales of less than 10 km. Offsets in crustal structure can be identified that seem to be correlated with the surface expression of the northern branch of the fault zone, indicating that the NAFZ reaches the upper mantle as a narrow structure. The southern branch has a less clear effect on crustal structure. We also see evidence of several discontinuities in the mid-crust in addition to an upper mantle reflector that we interpret to represent the Hales discontinuity.

  18. Microstructural study of the partition between seismic and aseismic deformation along the North Anatolian Fault zone, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaduri, M.; Gratier, J. P.; Renard, F.; Cakir, Z.; Lasserre, C.

    2014-12-01

    Along the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey), fault sliding is accommodated both by earthquakes and by aseismic creep. The creep processes develop either as transient (post-seismic or interseismic) sliding or as permanent sliding along zones localized on specific segments of the fault. Creep processes relax the stress and contribute to stress redistribution within the seismogenic zone. They participate to the deformation budget during the seismic cycle, sometimes delaying or on the contrary helping triggering the occurrence of large earthquakes. Identifying the mechanisms controlling creep and their evolution with time and space represents a major challenge for predicting the mechanical evolution of active faults. Our goal is to answer three main questions: How to identify at the outcrop scale permanent creep from transient creep? Is aseismic creep controlled by lithology? How does creep evolve before and after earthquakes? The challenge is to understand which key parameters control the shift from seismic to aseismic deformation, such as the effect of fabric, rock lithology, fault roughness, strain-rate, fluid pressure or stress.We collected samples from a dozen of fresh and well-preserved fault outcrops along creeping and locked segments of the North Anatolian Fault. We used various methods such as microscopic and geological observations, SEM, XRD analysis, strain measurements from image processing approaches in order to quantitatively characterize the amount of deformation and the mechanisms involved. Results show different relationships between lithology and mechanisms of deformation: (i) Along the locked segments of the North Anatolian Fault, in massive limestone, we found evidence of large earthquakes followed by pre- or post-seismic (i.e. afterslip) creep. (ii) Along some creeping segments, we observed gouges with weak clay (saponite) that could accommodate (or have accommodated in the past) large permanent creep. (iii) Along other creeping segments, we observed

  19. Estimation of earthquake effects associated with a great earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopper, Margaret G.; Algermissen, Sylvester Theodore; Dobrovolny, Ernest E.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates have been made of the effects of a large Ms = 8.6, Io = XI earthquake hypothesed to occur anywhere in the New Madrid seismic zone. The estimates are based on the distributions of intensities associated with the earthquakes of 1811-12, 1843 and 1895 although the effects of other historical shocks are also considered. The resulting composite type intensity map for a maximum intensity XI is believed to represent the upper level of shaking likely to occur. Specific intensity maps have been developed for six cities near the epicentral region taking into account the most likely distribution of site response in each city. Intensities found are: IX for Carbondale, IL; VIII and IX for Evansville, IN; VI and VIII for Little Rock, AR; IX and X for Memphis, TN; VIII, IX, and X for Paducah, KY; and VIII and X for Poplar Bluff, MO. On a regional scale, intensities are found to attenuate from the New Madrid seismic zone most rapidly to the west and southwest sides of the zone, most slowly to the northwest along the Mississippi River, on the northeast along the Ohio River, and on the southeast toward Georgia and South Carolina. Intensities attenuate toward the north, east, and south in a more normal fashion. Known liquefaction effects are documented but much more research is needed to define the liquefaction potential.

  20. Structure and Deformation of the Hikurangi-Kermadec Subduction Zone - Transitions Revealed by Seismic Wide-angle Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherwath, M.; Kopp, H.; Flueh, E. R.; Henrys, S. A.; Sutherland, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Hikurangi-Kermadec subduction zone northeast of New Zealand represents an ideal target to study lateral variations of subduction zone processes. The incoming Pacific plate changes from being a large igneous province, called the Hikurangi Plateau, in the south to normal oceanic plate north of the Rapuhia Scarp. The overriding Australian plate of continental character in the south, forming the North Island of New Zealand, and changes to an island arc in the north. Further lateral variability exists in changes in volcanic and hydro-thermal activity, transitions from accretion to subduction erosion, backarc spreading and rifting, and is accompanied by northward increasing seismicity. As part of the MANGO project (Marine Geoscientific Investigations on the Input and Output of the Kermadec Subduction Zone), four marine geophysical transects of largely seismic reflection and refraction data provide constraints on the upper lithospheric structures across the Hikurangi-Kermadec Trench between 29-38 deg S. On MANGO profile 1 in the south, the initially shallow subduction of the incoming plateau coincides with crustal underplating beneath the East Cape ridge. To the west lies the 100 km wide and over 10 km deep Raukumara Basin. Seismic velocities of the upper mantle of both plates are around 8 km/s and are considered normal. In contrast, on MANGO profile 4, about 1000 km to the north around the volcanically active Raoul Island, the incoming oceanic crust appears to bend considerably steeper and thus causes a 50 km narrower forearc with a smaller forearc basin. Furthermore, the upper mantle velocities in both plates are relatively low (7.4-7.7 km/s), likely indicating strong bending related deformation of the incoming plate and thermal activity within the arc possibly due to spreading. The central two transects MANGO 2 and 3, though without data coverage of the structure of the incoming plate, are more similar to MANGO 4. The arc regions appear to be strongly affected by

  1. Seismic hazard assessment of Syria using seismicity, DEM, slope, active tectonic and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Raed; Adris, Ahmad; Singh, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we discuss the use of an integrated remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques for evaluation of seismic hazard areas in Syria. The present study is the first time effort to create seismic hazard map with the help of GIS. In the proposed approach, we have used Aster satellite data, digital elevation data (30 m resolution), earthquake data, and active tectonic maps. Many important factors for evaluation of seismic hazard were identified and corresponding thematic data layers (past earthquake epicenters, active faults, digital elevation model, and slope) were generated. A numerical rating scheme has been developed for spatial data analysis using GIS to identify ranking of parameters to be included in the evaluation of seismic hazard. The resulting earthquake potential map delineates the area into different relative susceptibility classes: high, moderate, low and very low. The potential earthquake map was validated by correlating the obtained different classes with the local probability that produced using conventional analysis of observed earthquakes. Using earthquake data of Syria and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) data is introduced to the model to develop final seismic hazard map based on Gutenberg-Richter (a and b values) parameters and using the concepts of local probability and recurrence time. The application of the proposed technique in Syrian region indicates that this method provides good estimate of seismic hazard map compared to those developed from traditional techniques (Deterministic (DSHA) and probabilistic seismic hazard (PSHA). For the first time we have used numerous parameters using remote sensing and GIS in preparation of seismic hazard map which is found to be very realistic.

  2. Fault zone structure observations from the SAFOD Pilot Hole vertical seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarria, A.; Shalev, E.; Malin, P.

    2003-04-01

    In July 2003 we installed a 32 level array of 15 Hz, 3-component seismometers in the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth Pilot Hole. The Pilot Hole sits on the southwestern side of the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault Zone. The array levels are spaced 40 m apart and cover the depth interval of 856 to 2096 m. Both surface explosion and earthquake data have been recorded with the array using sampling rates of 1 and 2 KHz, respectively. Because of their location below the complex structure and strong attenuation of the near surface, the microearthquake recordings contain seismic energy up to very high frequencies, for some events as high as 600 Hz. Travel time curves from these data contain evidence for the reflection and refraction of P and S waves within the fault zone. As can be expected, the curves are strong functions of azimuth, with phases traveling parallel to the fault showing significantly less uphole moveout than those traveling normal to it. This feature is a direct result of the 2-dimensionality of the local geology. There is a change in seismic velocities and amplitudes a few hundred meter below the top of the array. This is somewhat unexpected given that this is also a few hundred meters below the local sediment-granite basement contact. Further, the fault zone P and S wave velocity structures appear to vary in significantly different fashions. The same seems to be true for the fault zone P and S wave attenuation. The S-wave data show signs of shear wave splitting, possibly originating from the fault zones primary facture system. These fractures may also account for the difference in the P and S wave velocity variations and attenuation, particularly if these fractures are fluid filled.

  3. Wide Angle Seismic Imaging of (serpentinite ?) Fault Zones that Pass Through the Moho in a - Foreland Basin Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Henrys, S. A.; Okaya, D. A.; Dimech, J.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    We report strong, wide-angle, seismic reflections from the mantle beneath the Taranaki Fault zone, southwest North Island, New Zealand. We attribute these reflections to a serpentinised fault zone that accommodated large amounts (~100km) of shortening during the Miocene. Other manifestations of the collision zone are a fold and thrust belt in the overriding Australian plate, a 3-4 km deep foreland basin and fragments of serpentine outcropping at the surface. The 2011 SAHKE experiment carried out multi-component, active-source seismic surveys along a length of about 300 km. The middle 100 km of the line is on land. Twelve large explosions (500 kg weight) were detonated onshore into an array of ~ 900 vertical component and 300 horizontal component seismographs in the on land section. Deep reflections are evident on both the land and marine seismic data. At 30 s two way travel time (twtt) are ~ 100 km deep reflections that have been interpreted to be due to arise from the base of the subducting Pacific plate*. But at 20 s twtt there are back-dipping reflections that when migrated are located in the mantle wedge of the overriding Australian plate. These reflections are in the depth range of 40-70 km and dip ~45 degrees to the southeast. Coincident S-S reflections are also seen on the horizontal geophones of the land array coming in at ~ 34 s twtt. This timing implies a Vp/Vs ratio = 34/20= 1.7 for the time averaged reflection path. Zoeprittz equation solutions show that if both P-P and S-S arrivals are generated from a common reflector a negative impedance contrast is required. We suggest serpentinite is the most likely cause of the reflectivity. Marine reflection data also show low-frequency reflections around the Moho depths that we also associate with both serpentinite, and recently documented slow-slip events on the subducted plate interface. * Stern T.A. et al (2015). A seismic reflection image for the base of a tectonic plate, Nature, 518, pp. 85-88, doi10

  4. Earthquake-induced liquefaction features in the coastal setting of South Carolina and in the fluvial setting of the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Obermeier, S.F.; Jacobson, R.B.; Smoot, J.P.; Weems, R.E.; Gohn, G.S.; Powars, D.S. ); Monroe, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    In both coastal South Carolina and the New Madrid seismic zone, the earthquake-induced liquefaction features generally originated in clean sand deposits that contain no or few intercalated silt- or clay-rich strata. The local geologic setting is a major influence on both development and surface expression of sand blows. Major factors controlling sand-blow formation include the thickness and physical properties of the deposits above the source sands, and these relationships are illustrated by comparing sand blows found in coastal South Carolina (in marine deposits) with sand blows found in the New Madrid seismic zone (in fluvial deposits). In coastal South Carolina, the surface stratum is typically a thin (about 1 m) soil that is weakly cemented with humate, and the sand blows are expressed as craters surrounded by a thin sheet of sand; in the New Madrid seismic zone the surface stratum generally is a clay-rich deposit ranging in thickness from 2 to 10 m, in which case sand blows characteristically are expressed as sand mounded above the original ground surface. Recognition of the various features described in this paper, and identification of the most probable origin for each, provides a set of important tools for understanding paleoseismicity in areas such as the Central and Eastern US where faults are not exposed for study and strong seismic activity is infrequent.

  5. Joint hypocenter-velocity inversion for the eastern Tennessee seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahovic, Gordana; Powell, Christine A.; Chapman, Martin C.; Sibol, Matthew S.

    1998-03-01

    A joint hypocenter-velocity inversion for the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) has resolved velocity features in basement rock below detached Appalachian thrust sheets. P and S wave arrival times from 492 earthquakes have been inverted for one-(1-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) velocity models to midcrustal depths. The 3-D P and S wave velocity solutions are computed independly and are very similar. In relation to the 1-D model, velocity anomalies range from -8% to +16% in the first layer (upper 5 km) and between ±7% in deeper layers. Prominent velocity anomalies parallel the seismic zone and are consistent from layer to layer. The most persistent anomaly is a low-velocity region that borders the seismic zone to the northwest and is flanked on either side by regions of anomalously high velocity. The New York-Alabama (NY-AL) magnetic lineament coincides with or lies close to the southeast boundary of the prominent velocity low in both the P and S wave velocity images. The spatial coincidence between velocity, gravity, and magnetic gradients suggests that major discontinuities are present in the basement. Relocation in the 3-D velocity model reduced the number of very deep earthquakes (below 20 km) and further accentuated differences in seismogenic properties on either side of the NY-AL lineament. After relocation, most earthquakes occur in a vertically bounded region roughly 30 km wide extending from 4 to 22 km in depth. Most earthquakes occur in regions characterized by either average velocity or small velocity anomalies.

  6. Integration of P- and SH-wave high-resolution seismic reflection and micro-gravity techniques to improve interpretation of shallow subsurface structure: New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, C.E.; McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Ravat, D.; Biswas, S.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; Fillerup, M.A.; Tingey, B.E.; Wald, L.; Northcott, M.L.; South, J.V.; Okure, M.S.; Chandler, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    Shallow high-resolution seismic reflection surveys have traditionally been restricted to either compressional (P) or horizontally polarized shear (SH) waves in order to produce 2-D images of subsurface structure. The northernmost Mississippi embayment and coincident New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) provide an ideal laboratory to study the experimental use of integrating P- and SH-wave seismic profiles, integrated, where practicable, with micro-gravity data. In this area, the relation between "deeper" deformation of Paleozoic bedrock associated with the formation of the Reelfoot rift and NMSZ seismicity and "shallower" deformation of overlying sediments has remained elusive, but could be revealed using integrated P- and SH-wave reflection. Surface expressions of deformation are almost non-existent in this region, which makes seismic reflection surveying the only means of detecting structures that are possibly pertinent to seismic hazard assessment. Since P- and SH-waves respond differently to the rock and fluid properties and travel at dissimilar speeds, the resulting seismic profiles provide complementary views of the subsurface based on different levels of resolution and imaging capability. P-wave profiles acquired in southwestern Illinois and western Kentucky (USA) detect faulting of deep, Paleozoic bedrock and Cretaceous reflectors while coincident SH-wave surveys show that this deformation propagates higher into overlying Tertiary and Quaternary strata. Forward modeling of micro-gravity data acquired along one of the seismic profiles further supports an interpretation of faulting of bedrock and Cretaceous strata. The integration of the two seismic and the micro-gravity methods therefore increases the scope for investigating the relation between the older and younger deformation in an area of critical seismic hazard. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Upper-mantle seismic discontinuities and the thermal structure of subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vidale, J.E.; Benz, H.M.

    1992-01-01

    The precise depths at which seismic velocities change abruptly in the upper mantle are revealed by the analysis of data from hundreds of seismometers across the western United States. The boundary near 410 km depth is locally elevated, that near 660 km depressed. The depths of these boundaries, which mark phase transitions, provide an in situ thermometer in subduction zones: the observed temperature contrasts require at least moderate thickening of the subducting slab near 660 km depth. In addition, a reflector near 210 km depth may mark the bottom of the aesthenosphere.

  8. Studying geodesy and earthquake hazard in and around the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver Salz; Magistrale, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Workshop on New Madrid Geodesy and the Challenges of Understanding Intraplate Earthquakes; Norwood, Massachusetts, 4 March 2011 Twenty-six researchers gathered for a workshop sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and FM Global to discuss geodesy in and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and its relation to earthquake hazards. The group addressed the challenge of reconciling current geodetic measurements, which show low present-day surface strain rates, with paleoseismic evidence of recent, relatively frequent, major earthquakes in the region. The workshop presentations and conclusions will be available in a forthcoming USGS open-file report (http://pubs.usgs.gov).

  9. 3D Modelling of Seismically Active Parts of Underground Faults via Seismic Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzeskakis, Theofanis; Konstantaras, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    During the last few years rapid steps have been taken towards drilling for oil in the western Mediterranean sea. Since most of the countries in the region benefit mainly from tourism and considering that the Mediterranean is a closed sea only replenishing its water once every ninety years careful measures are being taken to ensure safe drilling. In that concept this research work attempts to derive a three dimensional model of the seismically active parts of the underlying underground faults in areas of petroleum interest. For that purpose seismic spatio-temporal clustering has been applied to seismic data to identify potential distinct seismic regions in the area of interest. Results have been coalesced with two dimensional maps of underground faults from past surveys and seismic epicentres, having followed careful reallocation processing, have been used to provide information regarding the vertical extent of multiple underground faults in the region of interest. The end product is a three dimensional map of the possible underground location and extent of the seismically active parts of underground faults. Indexing terms: underground faults modelling, seismic data mining, 3D visualisation, active seismic source mapping, seismic hazard evaluation, dangerous phenomena modelling Acknowledgment This research work is supported by the ESPA Operational Programme, Education and Life Long Learning, Students Practical Placement Initiative. References [1] Alves, T.M., Kokinou, E. and Zodiatis, G.: 'A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: The South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins', Marine Pollution Bulletin, In Press, 2014 [2] Ciappa, A., Costabile, S.: 'Oil spill hazard assessment using a reverse trajectory method for the Egadi marine protected area (Central Mediterranean Sea)', Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 84 (1-2), pp. 44-55, 2014 [3] Ganas, A., Karastathis, V., Moshou, A., Valkaniotis, S., Mouzakiotis

  10. Earthquake-induced liquefaction features in the coastal setting of South Carolina and in the fluvial setting of the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obermeier, S.F.; Jacobson, R.B.; Smoot, J.P.; Weems, R.E.; Gohn, G.S.; Monroe, J.E.; Powars, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    Many types of liquefaction-related features (sand blows, fissures, lateral spreads, dikes, and sills) have been induced by earthquakes in coastal South Carolina and in the New Madrid seismic zone in the Central United States. In addition, abundant features of unknown and nonseismic origin are present. Geologic criteria for interpreting an earthquake origin in these areas are illustrated in practical applications; these criteria can be used to determine the origin of liquefaction features in many other geographic and geologic settings. In both coastal South Carolina and the New Madrid seismic zone, the earthquake-induced liquefaction features generally originated in clean sand deposits that contain no or few intercalated silt or clay-rich strata. The local geologic setting is a major influence on both development and surface expression of sand blows. Major factors controlling sand-blow formation include the thickness and physical properties of the deposits above the source sands, and these relationships are illustrated by comparing sand blows found in coastal South Carolina (in marine deposits) with sand blows found in the New Madrid seismic zone (in fluvial deposits). In coastal South Carolina, the surface stratum is typically a thin (about 1 m) soil that is weakly cemented with humate, and the sand blows are expressed as craters surrounded by a thin sheet of sand; in the New Madrid seismic zone the surface stratum generally is a clay-rich deposit ranging in thickness from 2 to 10 m, in which case sand blows characteristically are expressed as sand mounded above the original ground surface. Recognition of the various features described in this paper, and identification of the most probable origin for each, provides a set of important tools for understanding paleoseismicity in areas such as the Central and Eastern United States where faults are not exposed for study and strong seismic activity is infrequent.

  11. Deep seismic survey images crustal structure of Tornquist Zone beneath southern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Sadowiak, P.; Thomas, S.; Wever, T.; Dickmann, T.; Flüh, E.; Berthelsen, A.; Thybo, H.; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Balling, N.; Nørmark, E.; Hobbs, R. W.; Klemperer, S. L.; Matthews, D. H.; Snyder, D. B.; Long, R.; Graham, D.; Matthews, T.; Blundell, D. J.; Lund, C.; Palm, H.; Pedersen, L.; Roberts, R.; Elming, S.-E.; Heikkinen, P.; Korhonen, H.; Luosto, U.; Hjelt, S.-E.; Komminaho, K.; Yliniemi, J.

    1991-06-01

    The Tornquist Zone is Europe's longest tectonic lineament and bisects the continent in a NW-SE direction from the North Sea (off NW Denmark) to the Black Sea. New deep seismic reflection and coincident refraction data have been collected across its 50 km wide, intensely faulted and inverted NW part. The marine reflection profile in the area north of Bornholm Island shows a tilted block structure in the rigid upper crust, whereas the lower crust seems to be more gently uplifted. A complex transition from the highly reflective lower crust to the mantle is indicated by mantle reflections and a curious wide-angle event recorded by a landstation on Bornholm Island. We suggest that deep-reaching inversion tectonics, induced by Alpine and Carpathian orogeny, were responsible for the development of the gross crust-mantle structure of the Tornquist Zone in our study area, which seems to be similar to that in Poland.

  12. Deep seismic survey images crustal structure of Tornquist Zone beneath southern Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The Tornquist Zone is Europe's longest tectonic lineament and bisects the continent in a NW-SE direction from the North Sea (off NW Denmark) to the Black Sea. New deep seismic reflection and coincident refraction data have been collected across its 50 km wide, intensely faulted and inverted NW part. The marine reflection profile in the area north of Bornholm Island shows a tilted block structure in the rigid upper crust, whereas the lower crust seems to be more gently uplifted. A complex transition from the highly reflective lower crust to the mantle is indicated by mantle reflections and a curious wide-angle event recorded by a landstation on Bornholm Island. The authors suggest that deep-reaching inversion tectonics, induced by Alpine and Carpathian orogeny, were responsible for the development of the gross crust-mantle structure of the Tornquist Zone in the study area, which seems to be similar to that in Poland.

  13. Characterizing fractures and shear zones in crystalline rock using seismic and GPR methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Jordi, Claudio; Laaksonlaita, Niko; Gischig, Valentin; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the natural or artificially created hydraulic conductivity of a rock mass is critical for the successful exploitation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The hydraulic response of fractured crystalline rock is largely governed by the spatial organization of permeable fractures. Defining the 3D geometry of these fractures and their connectivity is extremely challenging, because fractures can only be observed directly at their intersections with tunnels or boreholes. Borehole-based and tunnel-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic measurements have the potential to image fractures and other heterogeneities between and around boreholes and tunnels, and to monitor subtle time-lapse changes in great detail. We present the analysis of data acquired in the Grimsel rock laboratory as part of the In-situ Stimulation and Circulation (ISC) experiment, in which a series of stimulation experiments have been and will be performed. The experiments in the granitic rock range from hydraulic fracturing to controlled fault-slip experiments. The aim is to obtain a better understanding of coupled seismo-hydro-mechanical processes associated with high-pressure fluid injections in crystalline rocks and their impact on permeability creation and enhancement. GPR and seismic data have been recorded to improve the geological model and characterize permeable fractures and shear zones. The acquired and processed data include reflection GPR profiles measured from tunnel walls, single-borehole GPR images, and borehole-to-borehole and tunnel-to-tunnel seismic and GPR tomograms. The reflection GPR data reveal the geometry of shear zones up to a distance of 30 m from the tunnels and boreholes, but the interpretation is complicated by the geometrical ambiguity around tunnels and boreholes and by spurious reflections from man-made structures such as boreholes. The GPR and seismic traveltime tomography results reveal brittle fractured rock between two ductile shear zones. The

  14. Geomorphic evidence of deformation in the northern part of the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, K.J.; Schumm, S.A. )

    1993-03-01

    A geomorphic evaluation of the northern portion of the New Madrid seismic zone between Hickman, KY and Osceola, AR has identified several locations where anomalous geomorphic conditions indicate possible surface deformation. For example, the slope, course, sinuosity and dimensions of the Mississippi River have been affected by the Lake County uplift and Tertiary-age sediments are exposed in its channel. Also, anomalous channel behavior near Caruthersville, MO and Barfield, AR suggests that these two reaches of the Mississippi River are structurally controlled. The Black River northeast of Pocahontas follows a peculiar angular course that suggests fracture control, and course changes of the Black, St. Francis, and Little Rivers may be related to subsurface faulting, uplift, or downwarping, as well as to differential compaction or the effects of groundwater withdrawal. The topography of Crowley's Ridge suggests that, between Jonesboro and Castor River, it is composed of at least three structural blocks, that are bounded by northeast-southwest trending faults. Near Jonesboro, river patterns appear to be affected by the Jonesboro, AR pluton. The geomorphic evaluation has identified anomalous surface features in the New Madrid seismic zone. Some can be directly linked to mapped structures in the region, whereas others may result from previously unidentified areas of surface deformation. The identification of these anomalies should provide direction for scientists who are employing subsurface techniques in order to locate tectonic deformation in the area.

  15. Seismic activity of the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Moment magnitude M with objective confidence-level uncertainties are estimated for felt San Francisco Bay region earthquakes using Bakun and Wentworth's (1997) analysis strategy for seismic intensity observations. The frequency-magnitude distribution is well described for M ???5.5 events since 1850 by a Gutenberg-Richter relation with a b-value of 0.90. The seismic moment rate ??M0/yr since 1836 is 2.68 X 1018 N-m/yr (95% confidence range = 1.29 X 1018 N-m/yr to 4.07 X 1018 N-m/yr); the seismic moment rate since 1850 is nearly the same. ??M0/yr in the 56 years before 1906 is about 10 times that in the 70 years after 1906. In contrast, ??M0/yr since 1977 is about equal that in the 56 years before 1906. 80% (1?? = 14%) of the plate-motion moment accumulation rate is available for release in earthquakes. The historical ??M0/yr and the portion of the plate-motion moment accumulation rate available for release in earthquakes are used in a seismic cycle model to estimate the rate of seismic activity in the twenty-first century. High and low rates of future seismic activity are both permissible given the range of possible seismic-cycle recurrence times T and the uncertainties in the historical ??M0 and in the percentage of plate motion available for release in earthquakes. If the historical seismic moment rate is not greater than the estimated 2.68 X 1018 N-m/yr and the percentage of the plate-motion moment accumulation available for release in earthquakes is not less than the estimated 80%, then for all T, the rate of seismic moment release from now until the next 1906-sized shock will be comparable to the rate from 1836 to 1905 when M 6 1/2 shocks occurred every 15 to 20 years.

  16. Sinking mafic body in a reactivated lower crust: A mechanism for stress concentration at the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Kellogg, L.; Burgmann, R.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a geodynamic model for stress concentration in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ). The model postulates that a high-density (mafic) body situated in the deep crust directly beneath the most seismically active part of the NMSZ began sinking several thousands of years ago when the lower crust was suddenly weakened. Based on the fact that deformation rates in the NMSZ have accelerated over the past 9 k.y., we envision the source of this perturbation to be related to the last North American deglaciation. Excess mass of the mafic body exerts a downward pull on the elastic upper crust, leading to a cycle of primary thrust faulting with secondary strike-slip faulting, after which continued sinking of the mafic body reloads the upper crust and renews the process. This model is consistent with the youth of activity, the generation of a sequence of earthquakes, and the velocity evolution during interseismic periods, which depend upon the density contrast of the mafic body with respect to the surrounding crust, its volume, and the viscosity of the lower crust.

  17. Joint seismic, hydrogeological, and geomechanical investigations of a fracture zone in the Grimsel Rock Laboratory, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Myer, L.R.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.; Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Martel, S.J. ); Bluemling, P.; Vomvoris, S. )

    1990-06-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a rock mass as a geologic repository for nuclear waste. From 1987 to 1989 the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Swiss Cooperative for the Storage of Nuclear Waste (Nagra) participated in an agreement to carryout experiments for understanding the effect of fractures in the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. As part of this joint work field and laboratory experiments were conducted at a controlled site in the Nagra underground Grimsel test site in Switzerland. The primary goal of these experiments in this fractured granite was to determine the fundamental nature of the propagation of seismic waves in fractured media, and to relate the seismological parameters to the hydrological parameters. The work is ultimately aimed at the characterization and monitoring of subsurface sites for the storage of nuclear waste. The seismic experiments utilizes high frequency (1000 to 10,000 Hertz) signals in a cross-hole configuration at scales of several tens of meters. Two-, three-, and four-sided tomographic images of the fractures and geologic structure were produced from over 60,000 raypaths through a 10 by 21 meter region bounded by two nearly horizontal boreholes and two tunnels. Intersecting this region was a dominant fracture zone which was the target of the investigations. In addition to these controlled seismic imaging experiments, laboratory work using core from this region were studied for the relation between fracture content, saturation, and seismic velocity and attenuation. In-situ geomechanical and hydrologic tests were carried out to determine the mechanical stiffness and conductivity of the fractures. 20 refs., 90 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Aspect Controls on Bedrock Fracturing and Seismic Velocity within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, A.; Magill, C.; Hendricks, S.; Singha, K.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the controls of slope aspect on groundwater flow and geomorphic weathering within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory by studying the orientation and density of bedrock fracturing. Based on a series of seismic refraction surveys, we compare the seismic velocities and anisotropy of the subsurface soil and regolith with the distribution of fractures observed in 7 geophysical borehole logs. Conflicting hypotheses exist as to whether bedrock fracturing, and thus hydraulic conductivity, is controlled more by the regional tectonic stress field or by slope aspect. We examine bedrock fracturing on north- and south-facing slopes via the relationship between fracture orientation and seismic velocity, and find that our south-facing slope demonstrates pronounced seismic anisotropy, with velocities of up to 2,000 m/s in the E-W direction, and approximately 1,000 m/s in the N-S direction. By contrast, the north-facing aspect demonstrates no significant anisotropy, with velocities ranging from approximately 800-1,500 m/s. Similarly, borehole logs show conjugate sets of fractures on south-facing slopes striking in a general E-W direction, while north-facing borehole data reveal a high density of fracturing with less pronounced directional dependence. Based on current models of hillslope weathering, we interpret the slower and more isotropic velocities of the north-facing slope to be a more random orientation of fractures, caused primarily by more intense weathering processes. On the south-facing slope, we interpret the conjugate fracture sets and pronounced anisotropy to be fracturing resulting from tectonic stress. Assuming that both slopes experience similar tectonic stress, results suggest that slope aspect controls weathering and groundwater flow, and north-facing slopes demonstrate a more advanced state of weathering.

  19. Heterostegina zone carbonates, southeastern Louisiana-offshore Mississippi: Petrography, seismic stratigraphy, hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krutak, P.R. Fort Hays State Univ., Hays, KS ); Beron, P. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    A biostratigraphically calibrated electric log section approximately 106 mi long through 11 exploratory wells drilled in nearshore waters of southeastern Louisiana and western Mississippi reveals a thick (387 - 1000 ft) section of carbonates both above and below the Heterostegina zone. Lithologic logs of four cores (total 229 ft) from the Heterostegina zone, and petrographic analysis of 45 thin sections cut from these cores, indicates the presence of hermatypic framework and binding organisms that constructed reefal or algal mound accumulations. These buildups accumulated along a late Oligocene-early Miocene rimmed accretionary carbonate shelf. About 160 mi of seismic line, short roughly perpendicular to this shelf edge, confirms the presence of these buildups in the subsurface. Oil shows in the relatively thick porous and permeable carbonates both above and below the Heterostegina zone interval, regional unconformities at the top and bottom of these carbonates, and the listric faults at the Heterostegina zone hinge line indicate that additional Frio-Anahuac hydrocarbon reservoirs await discovery in this neglected [open quotes]frontier[close quotes] area of the Gulf Coastal Province.

  20. Heterostegina zone carbonates, southeastern Louisiana-offshore Mississippi: Petrography, seismic stratigraphy, hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krutak, P.R. ); Beron, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    A biostratigraphically calibrated electric log section about 106 miles long through 11 exploratory wells drilled in nearshore waters of southeastern Louisiana and western Mississippi reveals a thick (387-1000 ft) section of carbonates both above and below the Heterostegina zone. lithologic logs of four cores (total 229 ft) from the zone, and petrographic analysis of 45 thin sections cut from these cores, indicates the presence of hermatypic framework and binding organisms that constructed reefal or algal mound accumulations. These buildups accumulated along a Late Oligocene-Early Miocene rimmed accretionary carbonate shelf. About 160 miles of seismic line, shot roughly perpendicular to this shelf edge, confirms the presence of these bioherms in the subsurface. Oil shows in the relatively thick porous and permeable carbonates both above and below the Heterostegina zone interval, the regional unconformities at the top and bottom of these limestones, and the listric faults at the Heterostegina zone hinge line, indicate that additional Frio-Anahuac hydrocarbon reservoirs await discovery in this neglected frontier area of the Gulf Coastal Province.

  1. Tomographic Imaging of a New Seismic Zone in Northern Taiwan: Implications for Crustal Magnetism and Tectonic Inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Win-Bin; Chang, Gen-Sin; Hsu, Shu-Kun

    2016-04-01

    To the west of 121°E, we found that the northern South China Sea magnetic anomaly in central Taiwan is coincident with high seismic velocity zone derived from a joint analysis of gravity anomaly and seismic travel time data. To the east of 121°E, we found a new seismic zone which remains enigmatic because of its apparent relationship with both the emplacement of high magnetic anomaly and termination of Okinawa Trough. In order to understand the new seismic zone and breakup of the high magnetic anomaly, a joint analysis of gravity anomaly and seismic travel time data have been used to construct three-dimensional velocity structure for the study area. Earthquake data were collected by the Central Weather Bureau Seismological Network from 2000 to 2012. A modified velocity model obtained by previously local earthquake tomography, was used to construct an initial three-dimensional gravity model, using a linear velocity-density relationship. To derive a crustal velocity-density model that accounts for both types of observations, this study performed a sequential inversion of traveltime and gravity data. The main features of our three-dimensional velocity model are: (1) an uplifted zone with velocity greater than 6.5 km/s is observed in the lower crust, (2) the width and the shape of the uplifted zone is found strongly correlated with the high magnetic belt, (3) the trend of the high-velocity zone turns from NE to N in central Taiwan, where the feature of high magnetic was truncated. This study suggested that integration of seismic data with new perspectives on crustal magnetism will provide a better understanding of terrane accretion, rifting processes, and passive margin formation in the Taiwan region.

  2. Detecting seismic activity with a covariance matrix analysis of data recorded on seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.; Landès, M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously at the Earth's surface, providing dense spatial samples of the seismic wavefield. The aim of our study is to analyse these records with statistical array-based approaches to identify coherent time-series as a function of time and frequency. Using ideas mainly brought from the random matrix theory, we analyse the spatial coherence of the seismic wavefield from the width of the covariance matrix eigenvalue distribution. We propose a robust detection method that could be used for the analysis of weak and emergent signals embedded in background noise, such as the volcanic or tectonic tremors and local microseismicity, without any prior knowledge about the studied wavefields. We apply our algorithm to the records of the seismic monitoring network of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano located at La Réunion Island and composed of 21 receivers with an aperture of ˜15 km. This array recorded many teleseismic earthquakes as well as seismovolcanic events during the year 2010. We show that the analysis of the wavefield at frequencies smaller than ˜0.1 Hz results in detection of the majority of teleseismic events from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor database. The seismic activity related to the Piton de la Fournaise volcano is well detected at frequencies above 1 Hz.

  3. Seismic velocity structure around the shallow megathrust zone of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake deduced from onshore and offshore seismic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Obana, K.; Machida, Y.; Nakahigashi, K.; Shinohara, M.; Suzuki, K.; Ito, Y.; Hino, R.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.; Murai, Y.; Sato, T.; Uehira, K.; Yakiwara, H.; Hirata, K.; Sugioka, H.; Ito, A.; Suetsugu, D.

    2012-12-01

    The coseismic rupture area of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake has been estimated to be over the wide region from the coastline to near the Japan Trench. Several kinds of studies, such as tsunami source inversion [e.g., Fujii et al., 2011], coseismic slip inversion [e.g., Ide et al., 2011], submarine topography change [Fujiwara et al., 2011] and seafloor displacement observation [Sato et al., 2011; Ito et al., 2011; Kido et al., 2011], share the common feature that the largest coseismic slip occurred at the shallow plate boundary in close vicinity to the Japan Trench. However, the structural image just beneath the largest coseismic slip area was unclear since the observation areas of previous ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) in this region were limited and there were few OBSs near the Japan Trench [e.g., Yamamoto et al., 2011]. To understand the relationship between the coseismic rupture behavior and structural heterogeneities, it is necessary to know the seismic velocity structure around the plate boundary near the trench axis. After the occurrence of the 2011 earthquake, some National Universities (Hokkaido, Tohoku, Chiba, Tokyo, Kyushu, and Kagoshima), JAMSTEC, and Meteorological Research Institute together have conducted the aftershock observations along the landward slope of the Japan Trench to obtain detail hypocenter distribution [Shinohara et al., 2012]. Tohoku University has performed the other OBS observation off Miyagi prefecture from 2010 to 2011. During this observation, a sequence of foreshocks, the mainshock, and aftershocks of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake were recorded [Suzuki et al., 2012]. In addition, JAMSTEC has conducted the aftershock observation at outer slope of Japan Trench, around the epicenter of a Mw 7.6 earthquake that occurred about 40 minutes after the 2011 mainshock, from May to June in 2011[Obana et al., 2012]. In this study, we attempt to obtain the three-dimensional seismic velocity structure around the largest coseismic slip zone of the

  4. Ridge-transform interaction and seismic behavior within the Tjörnes Fracture Zone, N-Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Magnusdottir, S.; Einarsson, P.; Gudmundsson, G.; Detrick, R. S.; Driscoll, N. W.

    2013-12-01

    maximum earthquake magnitude exceeding 5. Fault mechanisms reveal both normal faulting and strike-slip movements. The seismic data indicate that the HFF is flanked by bookshelf faulting both within the DF and the region between the HFF and GRZ, sometimes referred to as the Tjörnes microplate. Lateral dike propagation during the 1974-1989 Krafla rifting episode, within the NIRZ, activated adjacent transform zones, triggering the M 6.2 strike-slip Kópasker earthquake of January 13, 1976, at the junction of the NIRZ with the GRZ at the initiation and largest of the rifting events. During the propagation of the second largest rifting event, January 1978, the northward propagation along the Krafla fissure swarm was temporarily halted at the junction of the NIRZ with the HFF during which earthquakes began to propagate along the HFF, followed by continued northward propagation. Although transform motion within the TFZ is currently taken up by two parallel systems the Tjörnes microplate will merge with the North American plate as continued northward propagation of the divergent plate boundary gradually deactivates the HFF.

  5. Seismic attenuation structure associated with episodic tremor and slip zone beneath Shikoku and the Kii peninsula, southwestern Japan, in the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Saeko; Matsubara, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    The three-dimensional seismic attenuation structure (frequency-independent Q) beneath southwestern Japan was analyzed using t* estimated by applying the S coda wave spectral ratio method to the waveform data from a dense permanent seismic network. The seismic attenuation (Qp-1) structure is clearly imaged for the region beneath Shikoku, the Kii peninsula, and eastern Kyushu at depths down to approximately 50 km. At depths of 5 to 35 km, the seismic attenuation structure changes at the Median tectonic line and other geological boundaries beneath Shikoku and the southwestern Kii peninsula. High-Qp zones within the lower crust of the overlying plate are found just above the slip regions at the centers of the long-term slow-slip events (SSEs) beneath the Bungo and Kii channels and central Shikoku. Beneath central Shikoku, within the overlying plate, a high-Qp zone bounded by low-Qp zones is located from the land surface to the plate interface of the subducting plate. The high-Qp zone and low-Qp zones correspond to high-Vp and low-Vp zones of previous study, respectively. The boundaries of the high- and low-Qp zones are consistent with the segment boundaries of tremors (segment boundaries of short-term SSEs). These results indicated that the locations of the long- and short-term SSEs could be limited by the inhomogeneous distribution of the materials and/or condition of the overlying plate, which is formed due to geological and geographical process. The heterogeneity of materials and/or condition within the fore-arc crust possibly makes an effect on inhomogeneous rheological strength distribution on the interface.

  6. Double-Difference Tomography in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone: A Study of the 2011 Earthquake Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löberich, Eric; Alexandrakis, Catherine; Calo, Marco; Vavryčuk, Václav; Buske, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Fluid migration, gas springs and particularly earthquake swarms are indications of ongoing geodynamic processes in the Bohemian Massif. This tectonically active region can be subdivided into several microplates, such as the Moldanubian and Saxothuringian and the block of the Teplá-Barrandian, which formed a complex sutured crust during the Variscian collision. Beyond this subdivision, the geological situation of the Bohemian Massif is further defined by the Eger Rift, the Cheb basin and the Smrčiny pluton. Moreover a thinned crust and lithosphere is typical for the region, whereby the seismic activity is controlled by the Mariánske Láznĕ Fault and the Počatky-Plesná Shear Zone. Former investigations have shown a relationship between the activated fault and the occurrence of swarm earthquakes. In this study, the analysis of the 2011 earthquake swarm was in the focus of the consideration, following previous findings from the 2008 earthquake swarm. Here, the aim is to improve the understanding between the mantle fluids and the generation of earthquake swarms in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone. Thereby double-difference tomography (tomoDD) was applied to the 2011 earthquake swarm data, leading to an enhanced location accuracy of the hypocenters and a sharper image of the fault system, which can be further controlled by hypoDD relocations. The rupture time series and clustering are also investigated. Additionally, a 3D velocity model for the P- and S-wave are derived and evaluated by considering the results of synthetic tests. The P- to S- wave velocity ratio, which is sensitive to the presence of fluids, is calculated directly from the P- and S-wave model and interpreted in relation to the potential presence of mantle fluids. In summary, this study combines the past knowledge about the fault systems and swarms, with the newly calculated velocity model, source migration pattern and cluster analysis. Moreover the earthquake characteristics are investigated in

  7. Seismic refraction studies of volcanic crust in Costa Rica and of critical zones in the southern Sierra Nevada, California and Laramie Range, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Jorden L.

    This work demonstrates the utility of seismic refraction surveys to understanding geologic processes at a range of scales. Each chapter presents subsurface maps of seismic p-wave velocities, which vary due to contrasts in elastic material properties. In the following chapters we examine seismic p-wave velocity variations that result from volcanic and tectonic processes within Earth's crust and chemical and physical weathering processes within Earth's near-surface environment. Chapter one presents results from an across-arc wide-angle seismic refraction survey of the Costa Rican volcanic front. These results support the hypothesis that juvenile continental crust may form along volcanic island arcs if built upon relatively thick substrates (i.e., large igneous provinces). Comparisons of velocity-depth functions show that velocities within the active arc of Costa Rica are lower than other modern island arcs (i.e., volcanic arcs built upon oceanic crust) and within the high-velocity extreme of bulk continental crust. Chapter two shows that physical processes can dominate over chemical processes in generating porosity in the deep critical zone and outlines a new framework for interpreting subsurface chemical and physical weathering at the landscape scale. Direct measurements of saprolite from boreholes at the Southern Sierra Nevada Critical Zone Observatory show that, contrary to convention, saprolite may experience high levels of volumetric strain (>35%) and uniform mass loss in the upper 11 m. By combining observations from boreholes and seismic refraction surveys we create a map of volumetric strain across the landscape. Variations in inferred volumetric strain are consistent with opening-mode fracture patterns predicted by topographic and tectonic stress models. Chapter three is a characterization of fracture distribution in the deep critical zone from geophysical and borehole observations in the Laramie Mountains, Wyoming. Data from core and down-hole acoustic

  8. Toward a consistent model for strain accrual and release for the New Madrid Seismic Zone, central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.; Page, M.

    2011-01-01

    At the heart of the conundrum of seismogenesis in the New Madrid Seismic Zone is the apparently substantial discrepancy between low strain rate and high recent seismic moment release. In this study we revisit the magnitudes of the four principal 1811–1812 earthquakes using intensity values determined from individual assessments from four experts. Using these values and the grid search method of Bakun and Wentworth (1997), we estimate magnitudes around 7.0 for all four events, values that are significantly lower than previously published magnitude estimates based on macroseismic intensities. We further show that the strain rate predicted from postglacial rebound is sufficient to produce a sequence with the moment release of one Mmax6.8 every 500 years, a rate that is much lower than previous estimates of late Holocene moment release. However, Mw6.8 is at the low end of the uncertainty range inferred from analysis of intensities for the largest 1811–1812 event. We show that Mw6.8 is also a reasonable value for the largest main shock given a plausible rupture scenario. One can also construct a range of consistent models that permit a somewhat higher Mmax, with a longer average recurrence rate. It is thus possible to reconcile predicted strain and seismic moment release rates with alternative models: one in which 1811–1812 sequences occur every 500 years, with the largest events being Mmax∼6.8, or one in which sequences occur, on average, less frequently, with Mmax of ∼7.0. Both models predict that the late Holocene rate of activity will continue for the next few to 10 thousand years.

  9. A strategy to address the task of seismic micro-zoning in landslide-prone areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessia, G.; Parise, M.; Tromba, G.

    2013-06-01

    As concerns landslide prevention and mitigation policies at the urban scale, the ability of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to combine multi-layered information with high precision enables technicians and researchers to devote efforts in managing multiple hazards, such as seismically induced instability in urbanized areas. As a matter of fact, many villages in the Italian Apennines, placed near high-energy seismic sources, are characterized by active sliding that are seasonally remobilized by rainfall. GIS tools can be useful whether accurate Digital Elevation Models (DEM) are available and detailed mechanical and hydraulic characterization of superficial deposits over significant portion of the urban territory is undertaken. Moreover, the classic methods for estimating the seismic-induced permanent displacements within natural slopes are drawn from the generalization of Newmark's method. Such method can be applied to planar sliding mechanism that can be considered still valid wherever shallow landslides are generated by an earthquake. The failure mechanism depends on the mechanical properties of the superficial deposits. In this paper, the town of Castelfranci (Campania, southern Italy) has been studied. This small town, hosting two thousand inhabitants, suffers from the seasonal reactivation of landslides in clayey soil deposits due to rainfall. Furthermore, the site is seismically classified by means of the peak ground acceleration (PGA) equal to 0.246 g with respect to a 475 yr return period. Several studies on the evolution of slopes have been undertaken at Castelfranci and maps have been drawn at the urban scale not taking into any account the seismic hazard. This paper shows possible seismically induced hazard scenarios within the Castelfranci municipal territory aimed at microzonation of level 2, by estimating the slope permanent displacements comparable to those caused by the strongest historical seismic event that hit this area: the 1980 Irpinia

  10. LiDAR Data Reveal New Details on Seismically Triggered Landslides in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. A.; Gold, R. D.; Jibson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Recently acquired LiDAR data along the bluffs east of the Mississippi River in western Tennessee illuminate new details about earthquake-induced landslides caused by the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquake sequence. Earthquake-induced landslides along the Mississippi River bluffs extend about 300 km, from Kentucky to northern Mississippi, and were first described in the late 1800s. The new data, however, provide the clearest images yet of the ground surface through this densely forested region and reveal previously undetected landslides. The data also confirm previous landslide localities interpreted from air photos in the 1980s and provide new details about the structure and extent of these features. In one case a newly identified landslide (about 400 m wide by 150 m long) near the southern end of the Reelfoot fault appears to have diverted and might have temporarily dammed a prominent drainage. In another case the internal structure of a low-angle, multiple-block rotational slump is clearly imaged for the first time. Field checks of these interpretations are planned. These data, which were collected at four pulses per square meter and will soon be publicly available, were collected under guidance of the U.S. Geological Survey and with funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The new data will provide opportunities to study the landscape for clues about (1) prehistoric earthquakes in about 1450 and 900 A.D., (2) the Reelfoot fault and, (3) the potential impacts of landslides on roads and infrastructure in future large New Madrid seismic zone earthquakes.

  11. Strain accumulation in the New Madrid and Wabash Valley seismic zones from 14 years of continuous GPS observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Timothy J.; Calais, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical behavior—and hence earthquake potential—of faults in continental interiors is an issue of critical importance for the resultant seismic hazard, but no consensus has yet been reached on this controversial topic. The debate has focused on the central and eastern United States, in particular, the New Madrid Seismic Zone, struck by four magnitude 7 or greater earthquakes in 1811-1812, and to a lesser extent the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone just to the north. A key aspect of this issue is the rate at which strain is currently accruing on those plate interior faults, a quantity that remains debated. Here we address this issue with an analysis of up to 14.6 years of continuous GPS data from a network of 200 sites in the central United States centered on the New Madrid and Wabash Valley seismic zones. We find that the high-quality sites in these regions show motions that are consistently within the 95% confidence limit of zero deformation. These results place an upper bound on strain accrual on faults of 0.2 mm/yr and 0.6 mm/yr in the New Madrid and Wabash Valley Seismic Zones, respectively. For the New Madrid region, where a paleoseismic record is available for the past ˜5000 years, we argue that strain accrual—if any—does not permit the 500-900 year repeat time of paleo-earthquakes observed in the Upper Mississippi Embayment. These results, together with increasing evidence for temporal clustering and spatial migration of earthquake sequences in continental interiors, indicate that either tectonic loading rates or fault properties vary with time in the New Madrid Seismic Zone and possibly plate wide.

  12. Comparing the Gibraltar and Calabrian subduction zones (central western Mediterranean) based on seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argnani, Andrea; Battista Cimini, Giovanni; Frugoni, Francesco; Monna, Stephen; Montuori, Caterina

    2016-04-01

    The Central Western Mediterranean (CWM) was shaped by a complex tectonic and geodynamic evolution. Deep seismicity and tomographic studies point to the existence, under the Alboran and Tyrrhenian Seas, of lithospheric slabs extending down to the bottom of the mantle transition zone, at 660 km depth. Two narrow arcs correspond to the two slabs, the Gibraltar and Calabrian Arcs (e.g., Monna et al., 2013; Montuori et al., 2007). Similarities in the tectonic and mantle structure of the two areas have been explained by a common subduction and roll-back mechanism for the opening of the CWM, in which the two arcs are symmetrical end products. In spite of this unifying model, a wide amount of literature from different disciplines shows that many aspects of the two areas are still controversial. We present a new 3-D tomographic model at mantle scale for the Calabrian Arc and compare it with a recently published 3-D tomographic model for the Gibraltar Arc by Monna et al (2013). The two models are based on non-linear inversion of teleseismic phase arrivals, and have scale and parametrization that allow for a direct comparison. Unlike previous studies the tomographic models here presented include Ocean Bottom Seismometer broadband data, which improved the resolution of the mantle structures in the marine areas surrounding the arcs. We focus on key features of the two models that constrain reconstructions of the geodynamic evolution of the CWM (e.g., Monna et al., 2015). At Tortonian time the opening of the Tyrrhenian basin was in its initial stage, and the Calabrian arc formed subsequently; on the contrary, the Gibraltar arc was almost completely defined. We hypothesize that the complexity of the continental margin approaching the subduction zone played a key role during the final stages of the arc formation. References Monna, S., G. B. Cimini, C. Montuori, L. Matias, W. H. Geissler, and P. Favali (2013), New insights from seismic tomography on the complex geodynamic evolution

  13. Recent high-resolution seismic reflection studies of active faults in the Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    In the past four years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in key gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland, western Washington State. Although extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area, these marine profiles lack coverage on land and in shallow or restricted waterways. The recent high-resolution seismic surveys have targeted key structures beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate, and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. The surveys can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test key elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. Results from these surveys have: 1) documented several meters of vertical displacement on at least two separate faults in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the Catfish Lake scarp and the underlying kink band in the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a first look at the structures beneath the north portion of the western Tacoma fault zone, north of previous marine profiles; 4) documented that deformation along the Seattle fault extends well east of Lake Sammamish; 5) imaged the Seattle fault beneath the Vasa Park trench; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in and south of the Seattle fault zone south of Bellevue. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic investigations of past earthquakes on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  14. Evaluation of Seismicity Using Density Analysis of 2000-2015 Earthquakes in The West Coastal Zone of Anatolia (Turkey) And Its Correlation with Geothermal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakak, Özde

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the seismic activity using the density analysis methods (point density and Kernel density analysis) for 2000-2015 earthquake catalogue belonging to the study area surrounded by Qanakkale to the north, Fethiye to the south and Denizli (Buharkent) to the east, and also to apply its correlation with geothermal regions. The earthquake data, in total 6.675 earthquakes with M>3 magnitudes were obtained from DDA Catalogue of Prime Ministry Disaster & Emergency Management Authority (AFAD) official website. In this survey, data analysis and maps were prepared using ArcGIS (version_10.1) program. The analysis maps present (1) the intensity clustered earthquakes dominant in Sigacik and Gokova Gulfs, (2) regions which have high seismic risk were determined according to Buffer analysis for 2 km distance, (3) geothermal areas (21.4-153°C) in the west coastal zone of Anatolia were mapped, (4) regions the most affected by seismic activity for the last 15 years were detected from 2015 population data, and as latest (5) Seferihisar, Urla, Gulbahge, Demircili, Bodrum, and Datga provinces are identified as areas having high seismic activity for the last 15 years. Consequently, all analysis results were compared with the geothermal areas, and the review made that earthquake catalogue has not the relationship with hot regions and also these shocks triggered by active faults in this region using ArcGIS program. the author recommends that these regions should be investigated the earthquake sensitivity analysis in the near future.

  15. Low S-wave-velocity layers in the transition zone: a review of seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnik, Lev

    2010-05-01

    I review the seismic data that suggest the presence of thin (a few tens km wide) low-S-velocity zones atop the 410-km discontinuity and in a depth range of 450 - 520 km. Most of the data are obtained with receiver function techniques. Contrary to the prediction of Bercovici and Karato (2003), the low velocity atop the 410-km discontinuity is found mostly in association with plume-like structures in the mantle of the Kaapvaal craton, the Siberian craton, the Arabian plate, West Siberia, China, West Africa and Antarctica (Vinnik and Farra, 2002, 2007). In southern Africa (Vinnik et al.,GJI 2009) this structure seems to be anisotropic. The latest observations of the low velocity atop the 410-km discontinuity are made in the western US and California (e.g. Vinnik et al. JGR 2010, in press). In southern California and the neighboring Pacific this layer, found with the S receiver function techniques, can be related to the Baja-Guadalupe hot-spot. The low velocity can be related to the high solubilty of water in wadsleyite in the mantle transition zone relative to olivine in the overlaying mantle, but other possibilities cannot be excluded. Most observations of the low-velocity zone in a depth range of 450-520 km are also related to plumes and plume-like structures (Afar, Iceland, Azores, Cameroon, south-eastern Atlantic). A plausible theory of this phenomenon should explain why the low S velocity never extends to depths exceeding 520 km.

  16. Seismic Attenuation in the Rupture Zone of the 2010 Maule, Chile, Earthquake: Two Spectral Ratio Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpey, M.; Russo, R. M.; Beck, S. L.; Meltzer, A.; Roecker, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    We used data from the IRIS CHAMP temporary seismic network, deployed for 6 months following the February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake, to estimate differential attenuation of P and S waves in the Maule rupture zone, 33°S - 38°S. We used two complementary spectral ratio methods both of which assume identical source-to-station travel paths which allowed us to neglect the source-time function and instrument response of each P-S phase pair. The first method iteratively determines 400 individual Qs values and uncertainties for each phase pair and the second method stacks the spectra of each of the 400 measurements to yield a composite spectrum from which we derive a single Qs. Measurements are deemed acceptable when the two methods agree. We examined 235 local events yielding a total of 1083 Qs measurements.The majority of ray paths evaluated show low Qs values (100-400) with an average Qs over the entire rupture zone of 350 and an average standard deviation of +/- 569. We are evaluating spatial and temporal variability in Qs; however, from our preliminary measurements we do not observe a temporal variability in Qs throughout the rupture zone nor do we recognize any consistent spatial pattern in the measurements. Tomographic inversion of the Qs measurements made along ray paths spanning the upper mantle wedge and South American crust above the Maule rupture region will allow us to interpret the observed Qs variability.

  17. Seismicity and active tectonics at Coloumbo Reef (Aegean Sea, Greece): Monitoring an active volcano at Santorini Volcanic Center using a temporary seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, I.; Karagianni, E.; Panagiotopoulos, D.; Papazachos, C.; Hatzidimitriou, P.; Bohnhoff, M.; Rische, M.; Meier, T.

    2009-02-01

    The volcanic center of Santorini Island is the most active volcano of the southern Aegean volcanic arc. Α dense seismic array consisting of fourteen portable broadband seismological stations has been deployed in order to monitor and study the seismo-volcanic activity at the broader area of the Santorini volcanic center between March 2003 and September 2003. Additional recordings from a neighbouring larger scale temporary network (CYCNET) were also used for the relocation of more than 240 earthquakes recorded by both arrays. A double-difference relocation technique was used, in order to obtain optimal focal parameters for the best-constrained earthquakes. The results indicate that the seismic activity of the Santorini volcanic center is strongly associated with the tectonic regime of the broader Southern Aegean Sea area as well as with the volcanic processes. The main cluster of the epicenters is located at the Coloumbo Reef, a submarine volcano of the volcanic system of Santorini Islands. A smaller cluster of events is located near the Anydros Islet, aligned in a NE-SW direction, running almost along the main tectonic feature of the area under study, the Santorini-Amorgos Fault Zone. In contrast, the main Santorini Island caldera is characterized by the almost complete absence of seismicity. This contrast is in very good agreement with recent volcanological and marine studies, with the Coloumbo volcanic center showing an intense high-temperature hydrothermal activity, in comparison to the corresponding low-level activity of the Santorini caldera. The high-resolution hypocentral relocations present a clear view of the volcanic submarine structure at the Coloumbo Reef, showing that the main seismic activity is located within a very narrow vertical column, mainly at depths between 6 and 9 km. The focal mechanisms of the best-located events show that the cluster at the Coloumbo Reef is associated with the "Kameni-Coloumbo Fracture Zone", which corresponds to the

  18. Subduction of the Tehuantepec oceanic fracture zone and the relationship with a seismic gap in southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Manea, Marina; Taras, Gerya; Valenzuela, Raul W.

    2016-04-01

    It is accepted that key constraints on the size and recurrence time of large subduction earthquakes originate from the degree of locking between the subducting and overriding plates. Since the interseismic locking degree is influenced by the rheological properties of crustal and mantle rocks, any variations along strike will result in significant changes in seismic behavior due to a change in frictional stability. Additionally, recent seismic studies show that the subduction of hydrothermally altered oceanic fracture zones induces strong pore-fluid pressure variations that control the degree of interseismic locking. The Mexico Subduction Zone (MSZ) is characterized by major along-strike changes in subduction geometry, as well as important structural variations of the incoming oceanic plate. One of the main tectonic features of the Cocos plate is the Tehuantepec fracture zone (FZ) that is currently subducting beneath southern Mexico. The analysis of seismicity revealed that the area around where Tehuantepec fracture zone is currently subducting is conspicuously quiet and considered a seismic gap. Here, no significant quake (Ms ≥ 7.0) has occurred in more than 100 years, and the origin of Tehuantepec Seismic Gap (TSG) has not been elucidated yet. Based on the dimensions of the Tehuantepec gap (125 km length and 80 km width), an earthquake of Mw = 8.0 may be possible. This study aims to shed some light on the relationship between the TSG with the subduction of Tehuantepec oceanic fracture zone. Previous studies show that the uppermost oceanic lithosphere beneath the Tehuantepec FZ is partially serpentinized due to seawater infiltrations along faults. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations specifically tailored for the subduction of the Tehuantepec FZ at MSZ we show that the weakened serpentinized fracture zone is partially scraped out in the forearc region because of its low strength and positive buoyancy

  19. Shear-wave splitting in Quaternary sediments: Neotectonic implications in the central New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Determining the extent and location of surface/near-surface structural deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) is very important for evaluating earthquake hazards. A shallow shear-wave splitting experiment, located near the crest of the Lake County uplift (LCU) in the central NMSZ, shows the presence of near-surface azimuthal anisotropy believed to be associated with neotectonic deformation. A shallow fourcomponent data set, recorded using a hammer and mass source, displayed abundant shallow reflection energy on records made with orthogonal source-receiver orientations, an indicator of shear-wave splitting. Following rotation of the data matrix by 40??, the S1 and S2 sections (principal components of the data matrix) were aligned with the natural coordinate system at orientations of N35??W and N55??E, respectively. A dynamic mis-tie of 8 ms at a two-way traveltime of 375 ms produced an average azimuthal anisotropy of ???2% between the target reflector (top of Quaternary gravel at a depth of 35 m) and the surface. Based on the shear-wave polarization data, two explanations for the azimuthal anisotropy in the study area are (1) fractures/cracks aligned in response to near-surface tensional stress produced by uplift of the LCU, and (2) faults/fractures oriented parallel to the Kentucky Bend scarp, a recently identified surface deformation feature believed to be associated with contemporary seismicity in the central NMSZ. In addition to increased seismic resolution by the use of shear-wave methods in unconsolidated, water-saturated sediments, measurement of near-surface directional polarizations, produced by shear-wave splitting, may provide valuable information for identifying neotectonic deformation and evaluating associated earthquake hazards.

  20. Fault zones ruptured during the early 2014 Cephalonia Island (Ionian Sea, Western Greece) earthquakes (January 26 and February 3, Mw 6.0) based on the associated co-seismic surface ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekkas, Efthymios L.; Mavroulis, Spyridon D.

    2016-01-01

    The early 2014 Cephalonia Island (Ionian Sea, Western Greece) earthquake sequence comprised two main shocks with almost the same magnitude (moment magnitude (Mw) 6.0) occurring successively within a short time (January 26 and February 3) and space (Paliki peninsula in Western Cephalonia) interval. Εach earthquake was induced by the rupture of a different pre-existing onshore active fault zone and produced different co-seismic surface rupture zones. Co-seismic surface rupture structures were predominantly strike-slip-related structures including V-shaped conjugate surface ruptures, dextral and sinistral strike-slip surface ruptures, restraining and releasing bends, Riedel structures ( R, R', P, T), small-scale bookshelf faulting, and flower structures. An extensional component was present across surface rupture zones resulting in ground openings (sinkholes), small-scale grabens, and co-seismic dip-slip (normal) displacements. A compressional component was also present across surface rupture zones resulting in co-seismic dip-slip (reverse) displacements. From the comparison of our field geological observations with already published surface deformation measurements by DInSAR Interferometry, it is concluded that there is a strong correlation among the surface rupture zones, the ruptured active fault zones, and the detected displacement discontinuities in Paliki peninsula.

  1. Coulomb stress changes in the South Iceland Seismic Zone due to two large earthquakes in June 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnadottir, Th.; Jonsson, S.; Pedersen, R.; Gudmundsson, G.

    2003-04-01

    The South Iceland Seismic Zone experienced the largest earthquakes for 88 years in June 2000. The earthquake sequence started with a M_S=6.6 earthquake on June 17, 2000 (15:40:41 UTC), located at 63.975^oN, 20.370^oW and 6.3 km depth. A second large event (M_S=6.6) occurred on June 21, 2000 (00:51:47 UTC), located 17 km west of the June 17 rupture, at 63.977^oN, 20.713^oW and 5.1 km depth. The June 17 and 21 mainshocks ruptured two parallel N--S striking, right-lateral strike slip faults. Seismicity increased over a large area in SW Iceland following the June 17 mainshock, with most of the off-fault activity located west and north of the epicenter. Surface waves from the June 17 mainshock probably triggered significant slip on three faults on the Reykjanes Peninsula. Less activity appears to have been triggered in the Hengill area and on Reykjanes Peninsula following the June 21 earthquake, although it occurred closer to these areas than the June 17 event. Coseismic crustal deformation due to these earthquakes was observed with continuous and network GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). The geodetic data have been combined to estimate fault geometries and distributed slip models for the June 17 and 21 mainshocks. In this study we use these slip models to calculate the static Coulomb failure stress (CFS) change for the June 2000 earthquakes. We find that the static CFS change caused by the June 17 event is about 0.1 MPa at the location of the June 21 hypocenter, promoting failure on the second fault. The locations of aftershocks agree well with areas of increased CFS. Seismicity in areas where the CFS increase was less than 0.01 MPa, such as on Reykjanes Peninsula and the Hengill volcanic area, may have been dynamically triggered. Our calculations indicate a positive CFS change in the area west of the southern end of the June 21 rupture, due to the two June 2000 mainshocks, which correlates well with a significant increase in seismicity

  2. Seismic activity in the Sunnyside mining district, Utah, during 1967

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Barton K.; Dunrud, C. Richard; Hernandez, Jerome

    1969-01-01

    A seismic monitoring network near Sunnyside, Utah, consisting of a triangular array of seismometer stations that encompasses most of the mine workings in the district, recorded over 50,000 local earth tremors during 1967. About 540 of the tremors were of sufficient magnitude to be accurately located. Most of these were located within 2-3 miles of mine workings and were also near known or suspected faults. The district-wide seismic activity generally consisted of two different patterns--a periodic increase in the daily number of tremors at weekly intervals, and also a less regular and longer term increase and decrease of seismic activity that occurred over a period of weeks or even months. The shorter and more regular pattern can be correlated with the mine work week and seems to result from mining. The longer term activity, however, does not correlate with known mining causes sad therefore seems to be .caused by natural stresses.

  3. Induced seismicity and CO2 leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection in a multilayered sedimentary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio Rinaldi, Antonio; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jeanne, Pierre; Cappa, Frederic; Guglielmi, Yves

    2014-05-01

    Overpressure caused by the direct injection of CO2 into a deep sedimentary system may produce changes in the state of stress, as well as, have an impact on the sealing capabilities of the targeted system. The importance of geomechanics including the potential for reactivating faults associated with large-scale geologic carbon sequestration operations has recently become more widely recognized. However, not withstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO2 to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is more important from safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on both short- and long-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence of potential leakage of either brine or CO2 to shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. The first part of this work aims to study the fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term (5 years) integrity of the CO2 repository, and hence on the potential leakage of CO2 to shallow groundwater aquifers. Increased pore pressure can alter the stress distribution on a fault/fracture zone, which may produce changes in the permeability related to the elastic and/or plastic strain (or stress) during single (or multiple) shear ruptures. We account for stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes along with strain and stress variations. We analyze several scenarios related to the injected amount of CO2 (and hence related to potential overpressure) involving both involving minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain permeability coupling functions, as well as increasing the complexity of the system in terms of hydromechanical heterogeneities. We conclude that

  4. Crustal deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone and the role of postseismic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Oliver S.; Smalley, Robert; Zeng, Yuehua

    2015-08-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System data across the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in the central United States over the period from 2000 through 2014 are analyzed and modeled with several deformation mechanisms including the following: (1) creep on subsurface dislocations, (2) postseismic frictional afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation from the 1811-1812 and 1450 earthquakes in the NMSZ, and (3) regional strain. In agreement with previous studies, a dislocation creeping at about 4 mm/yr between 12 and 20 km depth along the downdip extension of the Reelfoot fault reproduces the observations well. We find that a dynamic model of postseismic frictional afterslip from the 1450 and February 1812 Reelfoot fault events can explain this creep. Kinematic and dynamic models involving the Cottonwood Grove fault provide minimal predictive power. This is likely due to the smaller size of the December 1811 event on the Cottonwood Grove fault and a distribution of stations better suited to constrain localized strain across the Reelfoot fault. Regional compressive strain across the NMSZ is found to be less than 3 × 10-9/yr. If much of the present-day surface deformation results from afterslip, it is likely that many of the earthquakes we see today in the NMSZ are aftershocks from the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. Despite this conclusion, our results are consistent with observations and models of intraplate earthquake clustering. Given this and the recent paleoseismic history of the region, we suggest that seismic hazard is likely to remain significant.

  5. Developing a comprehensive seismic velocity model of the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.; Shen, Y.

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive and high-resolution velocity model is essential to understand the subduction dynamics and continental accretion in the Cascadia subduction zone. In this study, we image the seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle with the application of a full-wave tomographic method. The tomographic result provides important insights on addressing such scientific questions as the along-strike segmentation of Cascadia and the role of (de-)hydration of the slab/crust, which is thought to be critical for the occurrence of the episodic tremor and slip. We use continuous seismic data recorded between 1995 and 2011 by about 600 stations in an area covering from northernmost California to northern Vancouver Island, Canada. The empirical Green's functions are recovered from inter-station cross correlation at periods of 7-200 seconds. At the periods of our interest, the empirical Green's functions from cross correlation of vertical-vertical channels are primarily Rayleigh waves. We simulate full-wave propagation within a 3D reference velocity model. The travel time anomalies are measured from the observed and synthetic Green's functions at stations. The shear and compressional velocities are inverted jointly as Rayleigh waves are sensitive to both Vp and Vs. The solution from inversion is used to iteratively update the 3D reference model. The integration of various waves in a physically consistent way refines absolute P and S velocities and Vp/Vs ratio, which allows for more robust and reliable geodynamic interpretations.

  6. Crustal deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone and the role of postseismic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver; Robert Smalley, Jr; Zeng, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System data across the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in the central United States over the period from 2000 through 2014 are analyzed and modeled with several deformation mechanisms including the following: (1) creep on subsurface dislocations, (2) postseismic frictional afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation from the 1811–1812 and 1450 earthquakes in the NMSZ, and (3) regional strain. In agreement with previous studies, a dislocation creeping at about 4 mm/yr between 12 and 20 km depth along the downdip extension of the Reelfoot fault reproduces the observations well. We find that a dynamic model of postseismic frictional afterslip from the 1450 and February 1812 Reelfoot fault events can explain this creep. Kinematic and dynamic models involving the Cottonwood Grove fault provide minimal predictive power. This is likely due to the smaller size of the December 1811 event on the Cottonwood Grove fault and a distribution of stations better suited to constrain localized strain across the Reelfoot fault. Regional compressive strain across the NMSZ is found to be less than 3 × 10−9/yr. If much of the present-day surface deformation results from afterslip, it is likely that many of the earthquakes we see today in the NMSZ are aftershocks from the 1811–1812 New Madrid earthquakes. Despite this conclusion, our results are consistent with observations and models of intraplate earthquake clustering. Given this and the recent paleoseismic history of the region, we suggest that seismic hazard is likely to remain significant.

  7. Deformation and seismicity associated with continental rift zones propagating toward continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, V.; Segev, A.; Schattner, U.; Weinberger, R.

    2012-01-01

    We study the propagation of a continental rift and its interaction with a continental margin utilizing a 3-D lithospheric model with a seismogenic crust governed by a damage rheology. A long-standing problem in rift-mechanics, known as thetectonic force paradox, is that the magnitude of the tectonic forces required for rifting are not large enough in the absence of basaltic magmatism. Our modeling results demonstrate that under moderate rift-driving tectonic forces the rift propagation is feasible even in the absence of magmatism. This is due to gradual weakening and "long-term memory" of fractured rocks that lead to a significantly lower yielding stress than that of the surrounding intact rocks. We show that the style, rate and the associated seismicity pattern of the rift zone formation in the continental lithosphere depend not only on the applied tectonic forces, but also on the rate of healing. Accounting for the memory effect provides a feasible solution for thetectonic force paradox. Our modeling results also demonstrate how the lithosphere structure affects the geometry of the propagating rift system toward a continental margin. Thinning of the crystalline crust leads to a decrease in the propagation rate and possibly to rift termination across the margin. In such a case, a new fault system is created perpendicular to the direction of the rift propagation. These results reveal that the local lithosphere structure is one of the key factors controlling the geometry of the evolving rift system and seismicity pattern.

  8. Recordings from the deepest borehole in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Z.; Woolery, E.W.

    2006-01-01

    The recordings at the deepest vertical strong-motion array (VSAS) from three small events, the 21 October 2004 Tiptonville, Tennessee, earthquake; the 10 February 2005 Arkansas earthquake; and the 2 June 2005 Ridgely, Tennessee, earthquake show some interesting wave-propagation phenomena through the soils: the S-wave is attenuated from 260 m to 30 m depth and amplified from 30 m to the surface. The S-wave arrival times from the three events yielded different shear-wave velocity estimates for the soils. These different estimates may be the result of different incident angles of the S-waves due to different epicentral distances. The epicentral distances are about 22 km, 110 km, and 47 km for the Tiptonville, Arkansas, and Ridgely earthquakes, respectively. These recordings show the usefulness of the borehole strong-motion array. The vertical strong-motion arrays operated by the University of Kentucky have started to accumulate recordings that will provide a database for scientists and engineers to study the effects of the near-surface soils on the strong ground motion in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. More information about the Kentucky Seismic and Strong-Motion Network can be found at www.uky.edu/KGS/geologichazards. The digital recordings are available at ftp://kgsweb.uky.edu.

  9. Geoarchaeological evidence of strong prehistoric earthquakes in the New Madrid (Missouri) seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Saucier, R.T. )

    1991-04-01

    Sand blows and fissures that cover >10,500 km{sup 2} in northeastern Arkansas and southeastern Missouri attest to the severity of the 1811-1812 earthquake series in the New Madrid seismic zone. However, except for one occurence near New Madrid, Missouri, the region has been devoid of any evidence of other major shocks for at least 1.3 ka prior to 1811 and possibly for >9 ka. Stratigraphic relations and radiocarbon dating at a recently excavated archaeological site near East Prairie, Missouri, have revealed liquifaction phenomena attributable to a shock dated to within about 100 yr prior to A.D. 539 and a probable second one dated between about A.D. 539 and 991.

  10. Nonlinear study of seismicity in the Mexican subduction zone by means of visual recurrence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Rojas, A.; Moreno-Torres, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    The subduction in the Mexican South Pacific coast might be approximated as a subhorizontal slab bounded at the edge by the steep subduction geometry of the Cocos plate beneath the Caribbean plate to the east and of the Rivera plate beneath North America to the west. Singh et al. (1983), reported a study that takes into account the geometry of the subducted Rivera and Cocos plates beneath the North American lithosphere defining, according their geometry, four regions: Jalisco, Michoacán, Guerrero and Oaxaca. In this work we study the seismicity occurred in Mexico, for each region, by means of the visual recurrence analysis (VRA). Our analysis shows important differences between each region that could be associated with nonlinear dynamical properties of each region. Singh, S.K., M. Rodriguez, and L. Esteva (1983), Statistics of small earthquakes and frequency of occurrence of large earthquakes along the Mexican subduction zone, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 73, 6A, 1779-1796.

  11. The subduction zone flow field from seismic anisotropy: a global view.

    PubMed

    Long, Maureen D; Silver, Paul G

    2008-01-18

    Although the morphologies of subducting slabs have been relatively well characterized, the character of the mantle flow field that accompanies subduction remains poorly understood. To analyze this pattern of flow, we compiled observations of seismic anisotropy, as manifested by shear wave splitting. Data from 13 subduction zones reveal systematic variations in both mantle-wedge and subslab anisotropy with the magnitude of trench migration velocity |V(t)|. These variations can be explained by flow along the strike of the trench induced by trench motion. This flow dominates beneath the slab, where its magnitude scales with |V(t)|. In the mantle wedge, this flow interacts with classical corner flow produced by the convergence velocity V(c); their relative influence is governed by the relative magnitude of |V(t)| and V(c).

  12. Space geodetic evidence for rapid strain rates in the New Madrid seismic zone of central USA.

    PubMed

    Smalley, R; Ellis, M A; Paul, J; Van Arsdale, R B

    2005-06-23

    In the winter of 1811-1812, near the town of New Madrid in the central United States and more than 2,000 km from the nearest plate boundary, three earthquakes within three months shook the entire eastern half of the country and liquefied the ground over distances far greater than any historic earthquake in North America. The origin and modern significance of these earthquakes, however, is highly contentious. Geological evidence demonstrates that liquefaction due to strong ground shaking, similar in scale to that generated by the New Madrid earthquakes, has occurred at least three and possibly four times in the past 2,000 years (refs 4-6), consistent with recurrence statistics derived from regional seismicity. Here we show direct evidence for rapid strain rates in the area determined from a continuously operated global positioning system (GPS) network. Rates of strain are of the order of 10(-7) per year, comparable in magnitude to those across active plate boundaries, and are consistent with known active faults within the region. These results have significant implications for the definition of seismic hazard and for processes that drive intraplate seismicity.

  13. Characterizing a large shear-zone with seismic and magnetotelluric methods: The case of the Dead Sea Transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maercklin, N.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Haberland, C.; Ritter, O.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M.; Weckmann, U.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic tomography, imaging of seismic scatterers, and magnetotelluric soundings reveal a sharp lithologic contrast along a ???10 km long segment of the Arava Fault (AF), a prominent fault of the southern Dead Sea Transform (DST) in the Middle East. Low seismic velocities and resistivities occur on its western side and higher values east of it, and the boundary between the two units coincides partly with a seismic scattering image. At 1-4 km depth the boundary is offset to the east of the AF surface trace, suggesting that at least two fault strands exist, and that slip occurred on multiple strands throughout the margin's history. A westward fault jump, possibly associated with straightening of a fault bend, explains both our observations and the narrow fault zone observed by others. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Superdeep vertical seismic profiling at the KTB deep drill hole (Germany): Seismic close-up view of a major thrust zone down to 8.5 km depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbel, W.; Beilecke, T.; Bohlen, T.; Fischer, D.; Frank, A.; Hasenclever, J.; Borm, G.; Kück, J.; Bram, K.; Druivenga, G.; Lüschen, E.; Gebrande, H.; Pujol, J.; Smithson, S.

    2004-09-01

    The lowermost section of the continental superdeep drill hole German Continental Deep Drilling Program (KTB) (south Germany) has been investigated for the first time by vertical seismic profiling (VSP). The new VSP samples the still accessible range of 6-8.5 km depth. Between 7 and 8.5 km depth, the drill hole intersects a major cataclastic fault zone which can be traced back to the Earth's surface where it forms a lineament of regional importance, the Franconian line. To determine the seismic properties of the crust in situ, in particular within and around this deep fault zone, was one of the major goals of the VSP. For the measurements a newly developed high-pressure/high-temperature borehole geophone was used that was capable of withstanding temperatures and pressures up to 260°C and 140 MPa, respectively. The velocity-depth profiles and reflection images resulting from the VSP are of high spatial resolution due to a small geophone spacing of 12.5 m and a broad seismic signal spectrum. Compared to the upper part of the borehole, we found more than 10% decrease of the P wave velocity in the deep, fractured metamorphic rock formations. P wave velocity is ˜5.5 km/s at 8.5 km depth compared to 6.0-6.5 km/s at more shallow levels above 7 km. In addition, seismic anisotropy was observed to increase significantly within the deep fracture zone showing more than 10% shear wave splitting and azimuthal variation of S wave polarization. In order to quantify the effect of fractures on the seismic velocity in situ we compared lithologically identical rock units at shallow and large depths: Combining seismic velocity and structural logs, we could determine the elastic tensors for three gneiss sections. The analysis of these tensors showed that we need fracture porosity in the percent range in order to explain seismic velocity and anisotropy observed within the fault zone. The opening of significant pore space around 8 km depth can only be maintained by differential tectonic

  15. High-resolution seismic imaging, Mono Lake fault zone, eastern Sierra region, Walker Lane, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayko, A. S.; Childs, J. R.; Hart, P. E.; Bursik, M. I.; McClain, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Multiple strands of the Mono Lake fault zone (MLfz), a segment of the Sierra Nevada frontal fault zone, have been imaged on several high-resolution seismic reflection profiles collected during 2009 and 2011 at Mono Lake. The profiles show coherent reflectors to about 30-40 ms depth below the lake bottom (~30 m thick section) in nearshore areas north of the Lee Vining delta. The MLfz is well imaged on 8 lines including 4 lines ~normal to the trend of the fault zone. The fault zone is ~ 0.75 km wide. Deep reflection horizons appear gently tilted and rotated into the fault zone with a prominent clastic wedge overlying the west-tilted horizons. Shallow reflectors above the clastic wedge are generally east-sloping, but noticeably less inclined above the fault zone. At least two ruptures offset Holocene deposits, with ~0.5-1.8 m dip-slip offset around 2.5 ka and ~3.6-6.13 m dip-slip offset around 4.7 to 6.25 ka. The ages of reflection horizons are estimated using published Holocene and late Pleistocene sedimentation rates, as well as correlation with a published nearby shallow core. The short term fault slip rate based on the timing of the most recent event and multiple events in the profile lines suggests fault slip rates of about 0.26 to 0.55 m/ka using ages based only on sedimentation rate and of about 0.31 to 0.34 m/ka using correlation ages from nearby shallow core. This offshore dip-slip rate is significantly lower than previous published 1.0-2.0 m/ka dip-slip rates estimated using cosmogenic dating of Tioga glacial moraines in Lundy Canyon and offset older moraines. The offset on the large scarp in Lundy Canyon (~20 m) decreases both north and south of the canyon and flanking lateral moraines where the scarp is on the order of only ~4-7 m high. A possible explanation for the apparent difference in MLfz slip rates onshore and offshore in this part of Mono Basin may be soft sediment deformation of saturated glacial-deltaic sediment within Lundy Canyon that causes

  16. Testing the recent Santorini seismic activity for possible tidal triggering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael E.; Arabelos, Dimitrios N.; Vergos, George

    2013-04-01

    Applying the Hi(stogram)Cum(ulation) method, which was introduced recently by Cadicheanu, van Ruymbecke and Zhu (2007), we analyze the series of the earthquakes occurred in the last 50 years in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ). The result of the analysis for all the areas indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations and the same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identification of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence and we check if the recent increase in the seismic activity at the Santorini island complex indicate that the faults Kameni and Columbo (to which the seismicity is clustered) (Chouliaras et al. 2013) are mature for a stronger earthquake. In this paper we present the results of this test. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M andZhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the seismic area of Mygdonia basin, North Greece, in

  17. The energy release in earthquakes, and subduction zone seismicity and stress in slabs. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Energy release in earthquakes is discussed. Dynamic energy from source time function, a simplified procedure for modeling deep focus events, static energy estimates, near source energy studies, and energy and magnitude are addressed. Subduction zone seismicity and stress in slabs are also discussed.

  18. Study of time dynamics of seismicity for the Mexican subduction zone by means of the visibility graph method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Rojas, Alejandro; Telesca, Luciano; Lovallo, Michele; Flores, Leticia

    2015-04-01

    By using the method of the visibility graph (VG), five magnitude time series extracted from the seismic catalog of the Mexican subduction zone were investigated. The five seismic sequences represent the seismicity which occurred between 2005 and 2012 in five seismic areas: Guerrero, Chiapas, Oaxaca, Jalisco and Michoacan. Among the five seismic sequences, the Jalisco sequence shows VG properties significantly different from those shown by the other four. Such a difference could be inherent in the different tectonic settings of Jalisco with respect to those characterizing the other four areas. The VG properties of the seismic sequences have been put in relationship with the more typical seismological characteristics (b-value and a-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law). The present study was supported by the Bilateral Project Italy-Mexico "Experimental Stick-slip models of tectonic faults: innovative statistical approaches applied to synthetic seismic sequences", jointly funded by MAECI (Italy) and AMEXCID (Mexico) in the framework of the Bilateral Agreement for Scientific and Technological Cooperation PE 2014-2016

  19. Seismic constraints on the nature of lower crustal reflectors beneath the extending Southern Transition Zone of the Colorado Plateau, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Howie, John M.; Thompson, George A.

    1992-01-01

    We determine the reflection polarity and exploit variations in P and S wave reflectivity and P wave amplitude versus offset (AVO) to constrain the origin of lower crustal reflectivity observed on new three-component seismic data recorded across the structural transition of the Colorado Plateau. The near vertical incidence reflection data were collected by Stanford University in 1989 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Pacific to Arizona Crustal Experiment that traversed the Arizona Transition Zone of the Colorado Plateau. The results of independent waveform modeling methods are consistent with much of the lower crustal reflectivity resulting from thin, high-impedance layers. The reflection polarity of the cleanest lower crustal events is positive, which implies that these reflections result from high-velocity contrasts, and the waveform character indicates that the reflectors are probably layers less than or approximately equal to 200 m thick. The lower crustal events are generally less reflective to incident S waves than to P waves, which agrees with the predicted behavior of high-velocity mafic layering. Analysis of the P wave AVO character of lower crustal reflections demonstrates that the events maintain a constant amplitude with offset, which is most consistent with a mafic-layering model. One exception is a high-amplitude (10 dB above background) event near the base of lower crustal reflectivity which abruptly decreases in amplitude at increasing offsets. The event has a pronounced S wave response, which along with its negative AVO trend is a possible indication of the presence of fluids in the lower crust. The Arizona Transition Zone is an active but weakly extended province, which causes us to discard models of lower crustal layering resulting from shearing because of the high degree of strain required to create such layers. Instead, we favor horizontal basaltic intrusions as the primary origin of high-impedance reflectors based on (1) The fact that

  20. Presynaptic active zones in invertebrates and vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Frauke; Waites, Clarissa L; Garner, Craig C

    2015-01-01

    The regulated release of neurotransmitter occurs via the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane called active zones (AZs). These regions are defined by a cytoskeletal matrix assembled at AZs (CAZ), which functions to direct SVs toward docking and fusion sites and supports their maturation into the readily releasable pool. In addition, CAZ proteins localize voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at SV release sites, bringing the fusion machinery in close proximity to the calcium source. Proteins of the CAZ therefore ensure that vesicle fusion is temporally and spatially organized, allowing for the precise and reliable release of neurotransmitter. Importantly, AZs are highly dynamic structures, supporting presynaptic remodeling, changes in neurotransmitter release efficacy, and thus presynaptic forms of plasticity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the study of active zones, highlighting how the CAZ molecularly defines sites of neurotransmitter release, endocytic zones, and the integrity of synapses. PMID:26160654

  1. b values and ω−γ seismic source models: Implications for tectonic stress variations along active crustal fault zones and the estimation of high-frequency strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, Thomas C.

    1979-01-01

    In this study the tectonic stress along active crustal fault zones is taken to be of the form , where  is the average tectonic stress at depth y and Δσp(x, y) is a seismologically observable, essentially random function of both fault plane coordinates; the stress differences arising in the course of crustal faulting are derived from Δσp(x, y). Empirically known frequency of occurrence statistics, moment-magnitude relationships, and the constancy of earthquake stress drops may be used to infer that the number of earthquakes N of dimension ≥r is of the form N ∼ 1/r2 and that the spectral composition of Δσp(x, y) is of the form , where  is the two-dimensional Fourier transform of Δσp(x, y) expressed in radial wave number k. The γ = 2 model of the far-field shear wave displacement spectrum is consistent with the spectral composition , provided that the number of contributions to the spectral representation of the radiated field at frequency ƒ goes as (k/k0)2, consistent with the quasi-static frequency of occurrence relation N ∼ 1/r2;k0 is a reference wave number associated with the reciprocal source dimension. Separately, a variety of seismologic observations suggests that the γ = 2 model is the one generally, although certainly not always, applicable to the high-frequency spectral decay of the far-field radiation of earthquakes. In this framework, then, b values near 1, the general validity of the γ = 2 model, and the constancy of earthquake stress drops independent of size are all related to the average spectral composition of. Should one of these change as a result of premonitory effects leading to failure, as has been specifically proposed for b values, it seems likely that one or all of the other characteristics will change as well from their normative values. Irrespective of these associations, the far-field, high-frequency shear radiation for the γ = 2 model in the presence of anelastic attenuation may be interpreted as

  2. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors <2 km. These events concentrated mainly below Tres Virgenes volcanoes, and the geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  3. Operational earthquake forecasting in the South Iceland Seismic Zone: improving the earthquake catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzera, Francesco; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Zechar, J. Douglas; Eberhard, David

    2014-05-01

    A major earthquake sequence is ongoing in the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ), where experts expect earthquakes of up to MW = 7.1 in the coming years to decades. The historical seismicity in this region is well known and many major faults here and on Reykjanes Peninsula (RP) have already been mapped. The faults are predominantly N-S with right-lateral strike-slip motion, while the overall motion in the SISZ is E-W oriented left-lateral motion. The area that we propose for operational earthquake forecasting(OEF) contains both the SISZ and the RP. The earthquake catalogue considered for OEF, called the SIL catalogue, spans the period from 1991 until September 2013 and contains more than 200,000 earthquakes. Some of these events have a large azimuthal gap between stations, and some have large horizontal and vertical uncertainties. We are interested in building seismicity models using high-quality data, so we filter the catalogue using the criteria proposed by Gomberg et al. (1990) and Bondar et al. (2004). The resulting filtered catalogue contains around 130,000 earthquakes. Magnitude estimates in the Iceland catalogue also require special attention. The SIL system uses two methods to estimate magnitude. The first method is based on an empirical local magnitude (ML) relationship. The other magnitude scale is a so-called "local moment magnitude" (MLW), originally constructed by Slunga et al. (1984) to agree with local magnitude scales in Sweden. In the SIL catalogue, there are two main problems with the magnitude estimates and consequently it is not immediately possible to convert MLW to moment magnitude (MW). These problems are: (i) immediate aftershocks of large events are assigned magnitudes that are too high; and (ii) the seismic moment of large earthquakes is underestimated. For this reason the magnitude values in the catalogue must be corrected before developing an OEF system. To obtain a reliable MW estimate, we calibrate a magnitude relationship based on

  4. Seismic anisotropy beneath the Mississippi Embayment and the New Madrid Seismic Zone: A study of shear wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamwandha, Cecilia A.; Powell, Christine A.

    2016-11-01

    Shear wave splitting associated with the Mississippi Embayment (ME) is determined using teleseismic SKS phases recorded by the Northern Embayment Lithosphere Experiment (NELE), the USArray Transportable Array (TA), and the New Madrid seismic network for the period 2005-2016. Our data set consists of 5900 individual splitting measurements from 257 earthquakes recorded at 151 stations within and outside the ME. Stations outside of the ME exhibit significant shear wave splitting, with average delay times between 0.4 s and 1.8 s. To the northeast and east of the ME, nearly all observed fast orientations are approximately oriented northeast-southwest, in agreement with absolute plate motion (APM) predicted by HS3-Nuvel-1A. The homogeneity of the fast orientations in this region suggests that the splitting is due to active flow in the asthenosphere. A counterclockwise rotation in the splitting orientation is observed moving northeast to northwest across the study area. Inside the ME, some stations show large and systematic deviations of the measured fast orientations from the APM. The delay times within the entire ME range from 0.9 s to 2.1 s. Splitting complexity is attributed to relic lithospheric fabrics formed during past tectonic events including passage of a hot spot in mid-Cretaceous time. The anisotropy may also be linked to the presence of a southwest dipping region of low P and S wave velocities below the ME or to deeper flow in the asthenosphere.

  5. Evidence for large prehistoric earthquakes in the northern New Madrid Seismic Zone, central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.; Schweig, E.S.; Tuttle, M.P.; Ellis, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    We surveyed the area north of New Madris, Missouri, for prehistoric liquefaction deposits and uncovered two new sites with evidence of pre-1811 earthquakes. At one site, located about 20 km northeast of New Madrid, Missouri, radiocarbon dating indicates that an upper sand blow was probably deposited after A.D. 1510 and a lower sand blow was deposited prior to A.D. 1040. A sand blow at another site about 45 km northeast of New Madrid, Missouri, is dated as likely being deposited between A.D.55 and A.D. 1620 and represents the northernmost recognized expression of prehistoric liquefaction likely related to the New Madrid seismic zone. This study, taken together with other data, supports the occurrence of at least two earthquakes strong enough to indcue liquefaction or faulting before A.D. 1811, and after A.D. 400. One earthquake probably occurred around AD 900 and a second earthquake occurred around A.D. 1350. The data are not yet sufficient to estimate the magnitudes of the causative earthquakes for these liquefaction deposits although we conclude that all of the earthquakes are at least moment magnitude M ~6.8, the size of the 1895 Charleston, Missouri, earthquake. A more rigorous estimate of the number and sizes of prehistoric earthquakes in the New Madrid sesmic zone awaits evaluation of additional sites.

  6. Finite-frequency wave propagation through outer rise fault zones and seismic measurements of upper mantle hydration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Nathaniel; Lizarralde, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Effects of serpentine-filled fault zones on seismic wave propagation in the upper mantle at the outer rise of subduction zones are evaluated using acoustic wave propagation models. Modeled wave speeds depend on azimuth, with slowest speeds in the fault-normal direction. Propagation is fastest along faults, but, for fault widths on the order of the seismic wavelength, apparent wave speeds in this direction depend on frequency. For the 5–12 Hz Pn arrivals used in tomographic studies, joint-parallel wavefronts are slowed by joints. This delay can account for the slowing seen in tomographic images of the outer rise upper mantle. At the Middle America Trench, confining serpentine to fault zones, as opposed to a uniform distribution, reduces estimates of bulk upper mantle hydration from ~3.5 wt % to as low as 0.33 wt % H2O.

  7. Finite-frequency wave propagation through outer rise fault zones and seismic measurements of upper mantle hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathaniel C.; Lizarralde, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Effects of serpentine-filled fault zones on seismic wave propagation in the upper mantle at the outer rise of subduction zones are evaluated using acoustic wave propagation models. Modeled wave speeds depend on azimuth, with slowest speeds in the fault-normal direction. Propagation is fastest along faults, but, for fault widths on the order of the seismic wavelength, apparent wave speeds in this direction depend on frequency. For the 5-12 Hz Pn arrivals used in tomographic studies, joint-parallel wavefronts are slowed by joints. This delay can account for the slowing seen in tomographic images of the outer rise upper mantle. At the Middle America Trench, confining serpentine to fault zones, as opposed to a uniform distribution, reduces estimates of bulk upper mantle hydration from 3.5 wt % to as low as 0.33 wt % H2O.

  8. Seismicity patterns along the Ecuadorian subduction zone: new constraints from earthquake location in a 3-D a priori velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Segovia, Monica; Vaca, Sandro; Theunissen, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    To improve earthquake location, we create a 3-D a priori P-wave velocity model (3-DVM) that approximates the large velocity variations of the Ecuadorian subduction system. The 3-DVM is constructed from the integration of geophysical and geological data that depend on the structural geometry and velocity properties of the crust and the upper mantle. In addition, specific station selection is carried out to compensate for the high station density on the Andean Chain. 3-D synthetic experiments are then designed to evaluate the network capacity to recover the event position using only P arrivals and the MAXI technique. Three synthetic earthquake location experiments are proposed: (1) noise-free and (2) noisy arrivals used in the 3-DVM, and (3) noise-free arrivals used in a 1-DVM. Synthetic results indicate that, under the best conditions (exact arrival data set and 3-DVM), the spatiotemporal configuration of the Ecuadorian network can accurately locate 70 per cent of events in the frontal part of the subduction zone (average azimuthal gap is 289° ± 44°). Noisy P arrivals (up to ± 0.3 s) can accurately located 50 per cent of earthquakes. Processing earthquake location within a 1-DVM almost never allows accurate hypocentre position for offshore earthquakes (15 per cent), which highlights the role of using a 3-DVM in subduction zone. For the application to real data, the seismicity distribution from the 3-D-MAXI catalogue is also compared to the determinations obtained in a 1-D-layered VM. In addition to good-quality location uncertainties, the clustering and the depth distribution confirm the 3-D-MAXI catalogue reliability. The pattern of the seismicity distribution (a 13 yr record during the inter-seismic period of the seismic cycle) is compared to the pattern of rupture zone and asperity of the Mw = 7.9 1942 and the Mw = 7.7 1958 events (the Mw = 8.8 1906 asperity patch is not defined). We observe that the nucleation of 1942, 1958 and 1906 events coincides with

  9. High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection and Marine Magnetic Data Along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.; Watt, Janet T.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data in June 2008 in the offshore areas between the towns of Cayucos and Pismo Beach, Calif., from the nearshore (~6-m depth) to just west of the Hosgri Fault Zone (~200-m depth). These data are in support of the California State Waters Mapping Program and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and the U.S. Geological Survey. Seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data were acquired aboard the R/V Parke Snavely, using a SIG 2Mille minisparker seismic source and a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. More than 550 km of seismic and marine magnetic data was collected simultaneously along shore-perpendicular transects spaced 800 m apart, with an additional 220 km of marine magnetometer data collected across the Hosgri Fault Zone, resulting in spacing locally as smallas 400 m. This report includes maps of the seismic-survey sections, linked to Google Earth software, and digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats, as well as preliminary gridded marine-magnetic-anomaly and residual-magnetic-anomaly (shallow magnetic source) maps.

  10. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  11. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, S.S.N.; Umino, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ???30?? at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  12. Downdip variations in seismic reflection character: Implications for fault structure and seismogenic behavior in the Alaska subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiyao; Shillington, Donna J.; Bécel, Anne; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Webb, Spahr C.; Saffer, Demian M.; Keranen, Katie M.; Kuehn, Harold

    2015-11-01

    Seismic reflection data collected offshore of Alaska Peninsula across the western edge of the Semidi segment show distinctive variations in reflection characteristics of the megathrust fault with depth, suggesting changes in structure that may relate to seismic behavior. From the trench to ~40 km landward, two parallel reflections are observed, which we interpret as the top and bottom of the subducted sediment section. From ~50 to 95 km from the trench, the plate interface appears as a thin (<400 ms) reflection band. Deeper and farther landward, the plate interface transitions to a thicker (1-1.5 s) package of reflections, where it appears to intersect the fore-arc mantle wedge based on our preferred interpretation of the continental Moho. Synthetic waveform modeling suggests that the thin reflection band is best explained by a single ~100 to 250 m thick low-velocity zone, whereas the thick reflection band requires a 3 to 5 km thick zone of thin layers. The thin reflection band is located at the center of the 1938 Mw 8.2 Semidi earthquake rupture zone that now experiences little interplate seismicity. The thick reflection band starts at the downdip edge of the rupture zone, correlates with a dipping band of seismicity, and projects to the location of tremor at greater depth. We interpret the thin reflection band as a compacted sediment layer and/or localized shear zone. The thick reflection band could be caused by a wide deformation zone with branching faults and/or fluid-rich layers, representing a broad transition from stick-slip sliding to slow slip and tremor.

  13. Slope-area and stream length index analysis in the eastern Tennessee seismic zone: evidence for differential uplift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stearns, C.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that Digital Elevation Model (DEM) analysis could be used to quantify surface deformation in tectonically active regions, including slowly deforming areas such as intraplate continental interiors. Here, we investigate slope/area relationships and determine stream length index (SLI) spatial variations in 287 watersheds located in the Valley and Ridge physiographic province of the southern Appalachians, in a region known as the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ). The goal is to identify possible spatial variations in drainage network characteristics that could reveal different deformation rates and styles within the study area. The ETSZ, although seismically active, does not show any evidence of recent surface deformation that could be related to tectonic activity. The earthquakes mostly occur between 5 and 25 km depth and their epicenters form a SSW-NNE trending, 300 km long by 100 km wide, band of diffuse seismicity that aligns along the New York Alabama (NYAL) magnetic lineament, a linear magnetic feature attributed to a fault affecting the Precambrian basement but without signature at the surface. DEMs with a resolution of 30 meters and watershed boundaries of 287 drainage basins were obtained from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) and National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), respectively. After determining the local slope and drainage area for each 30 m x 30 m cell, reference concavity and steepness index values were calculated for the entire region. Then, the steepness index of each watershed was determined using the obtained reference concavity index. SLI values were also determined along extracted river profiles and average values calculated for each watershed. A good correlation is observed between steepness index and SLI, with low to mid-range values found in the Valley and Ridge province and higher values in two specific areas: at the transition between the Valley and Ridge province and

  14. Geometry and deformation history of the New Madrid seismic zone fault system, Central U.S. from high-resolution marine seismic reflection data, and implications for intraplate deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Magnani, M.; McIntosh, K. D.; Waldron, B. A.; Saustrup, S.; Fave, X. J.

    2010-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is the most seismically active area in the continental United States east of the Rocky Mountains, and by far the most studied intraplate seismic zone in the world. The occurrence of large magnitude historical and prehistorical earthquakes, as well as the high level of instrumental seismicity suggest that the North American plate is actively deforming in this region. This observation appears to clash with geodetic evidence that shows minimal motion across the faults illuminated by the present seismicity, suggesting that either the present GPS vectors recorded at the surface are not typical of the long term deformation rate of the NMSZ faults, or that the NMSZ fault system is presently unloaded and not deforming. To better constrain the long-term deformation history of the NMSZ fault system, in the summer of 2010 we acquired ~300 km of high-resolution seismic marine reflection data along the Mississippi River from Cape Girardeau, MO to Caruthersville, MO. The profile crosses a large portion of the Mississippi Embayment, including three of the four main NMSZ active faults, and images the gently south-dipping unconsolidated sediments of the Mississippi Embayment from the Quaternary alluvium of the Mississippi River down to the top of Paleozoic sequences, at a depth of ~650 m. Among the most remarkable structures imaged by the profile is the Reelfoot fault, interpreted as the NW-SE striking restraining bend connecting two NE-SW trending dextral strike-slip faults. The Reelfoot thrust intersects the profile at three locations along the river meander known as the Kentucky Bend. The multiple crossings allow mapping of the along-strike variations of the fault plane’s dip and structure. In particular the data show that a reverse offset of 42 m at the top of the Cretaceous is accommodated by a single fault at the crossing north of town of Tiptonville, TN, west of the location where the Reelfoot thrust ruptured during the 7 February 1812 M7

  15. Seismic activity triggered by water wells in the Paraná Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AssumpçãO, Marcelo; Yamabe, Tereza H.; Barbosa, José Roberto; Hamza, Valiya; Lopes, Afonso E. V.; Balancin, Lucas; Bianchi, Marcelo B.

    2010-07-01

    Triggered seismicity is commonly associated with deep water reservoirs or injection wells where water is injected at high pressure into the reservoir rock. However, earth tremors related solely to the opening of groundwater wells are extremely rare. Here we present a clear case of seismicity induced by pore-pressure changes following the drilling of water wells that exploit a confined aquifer in the intracratonic Paraná Basin of southeastern Brazil. Since 2004, shallow seismic activity, with magnitudes up to 2.9 and intensities V MM, has been observed near deep wells (120-200 m) that were drilled in early 2003 near the town of Bebedouro. The wells were drilled for irrigation purposes, cross a sandstone layer about 60-80 m thick and extract water from a confined aquifer in fractured zones between basalt flow layers. Seismic activity, mainly event swarms, has occurred yearly since 2004, mostly during the rainy season when the wells are not pumped. During the dry season when the wells are pumped almost continuously, the activity is very low. A seismographic network, installed in March 2005, has located more than 2000 microearthquakes. The events are less than 1 km deep (mostly within the 0.5 km thick basalt layer) and cover an area roughly 1.5 km × 5 km across. The seismicity generally starts in a small area and expands to larger distances with an equivalent hydraulic diffusivity ranging from 0.06 to 0.6 m2/s. Geophysical and geothermal logging of several wells in the area showed that water from the shallow sandstone aquifer enters the well at the top and usually forms waterfalls. The waterfalls flow down the sides of the wells and feed the confined, fractured aquifer in the basalt layer at the bottom. Two seismic areas are observed: the main area surrounds several wells that are pumped continuously during the dry season, and a second area near another well (about 10 km from the first area) that is not used for irrigation and not pumped regularly. The main area

  16. Underthrusting of Tarim beneath the Tien Shan and deep structure of their junction zone: Main results of seismic experiment along MANAS Profile Kashgar-Song-Köl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. I.; Alekseev, D. V.; Batalev, V. Yu.; Bataleva, E. A.; Belyaev, I. V.; Bragin, V. D.; Dergunov, N. T.; Efimova, N. N.; Leonov, M. G.; Munirova, L. M.; Pavlenkin, A. D.; Roecker, S.; Roslov, Yu. V.; Rybin, A. K.; Shchelochkov, G. G.

    2010-03-01

    The results of reflection CMP seismic profiling of the Central Tien Shan in the meridional tract 75-76° E from Lake Song-Köl in Kyrgyzstan to the town of Kashgar in China are considered. The seismic section demonstrating complex heterogeneous structure of the Earth’s crust and reflecting its near-horizontal delamination with vertical and inclined zones of compositional and structural differentiation was constructed from processing of initial data of reflection CMP seismic profiling, earthquake converted-wave method (ECWM), and seismic tomography. The most important is the large zone of underthrusting of the Tarim Massif beneath the Tien Shan.

  17. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase maintains active zone structure by stabilizing Bruchpilot

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Shaoyun; Ali, Yousuf O; Ruan, Kai; Zhai, R Grace

    2013-01-01

    Active zones are specialized presynaptic structures critical for neurotransmission. We show that a neuronal maintenance factor, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), is required for maintaining active zone structural integrity in Drosophila by interacting with the active zone protein, Bruchpilot (BRP), and shielding it from activity-induced ubiquitin–proteasome-mediated degradation. NMNAT localizes to the peri-active zone and interacts biochemically with BRP in an activity-dependent manner. Loss of NMNAT results in ubiquitination, mislocalization and aggregation of BRP, and subsequent active zone degeneration. We propose that, as a neuronal maintenance factor, NMNAT specifically maintains active zone structure by direct protein–protein interaction. PMID:23154466

  18. Observational Constraints from Waveform Relocated Southern California Seismicity and Refined Focal Mechanisms for Synthesizing Heterogeneities in Fault Zone Properties and Signatures of Seismic Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Yang, W.; Shearer, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    To study relationships between fault zones and seismic ruptures, we analyze the waveform relocated (1981 to 2011) catalog of more than 500,000 earthquakes, and 170,000 refined focal mechanisms. This seismicity, with five mainshocks of M>6.5, reflects regional tectonics and other crustal deformation processes as well as the physical properties of major fault zones. The plate boundary is expressed as a system of late Quaternary faults or principal slip zones (PSZs) that accommodate major earthquakes, with numerous adjacent smaller slip surfaces. The plate-tectonic strain loading causes the largest earthquakes along the PSZs, moderate-sized events in their immediate vicinity, and small earthquakes across the region. To determine properties of individual faults, we measure the hypocentral distance to the nearest PSZ. We assign geophysical parameters such as heat flow and shear or dilatation strain rates to each hypocenter. To analyze fault ruptures, we use stress drop values for ~60,000 events as well as focal mechanisms. Geometrical complexities, variations in the state of stress, and variability in rheology result in heterogeneities in fault zone properties, which may affect the different stages of major rupture along the PSZs. We analyze our data to investigate seismogenic thickness and fault zone width as well as source processes. We find that the seismicity rate is a function of location, with the rate dying off exponentially with distance from the PSZ. The distance decay is similar to the decay per kilometer of depth in the rate of earthquakes below 5 km. About 80% of the small earthquakes are located within 5 km of a PSZ. For small earthquakes, stress drops increase in size with distance away from the PSZs. The magnitude distribution near the PSZs suggests that large earthquakes are more common close to the PSZs, and they are more likely to occur at greater depth than small earthquakes. In contrast, small quakes can occur at any geographical location. Similarly

  19. Fault Intersections as Stress Concentrators for Current Stable Continental Region Seismicity in New Madrid and Middleton Place Summerville Seismic Zones in Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, A.; Talwani, P.

    2006-05-01

    Evaluation of seismic hazard in the eastern United States is being constantly debated primarily because of our inadequate understanding of the seismicity and deformation patterns in such stable continental interiors, which are characterized by low strain rates. In the pursuit of a better understanding of the dynamics of these regions, multidisciplinary data from 20 stable continental regions worldwide that had hosted 39 earthquakes (M >= 5) were synthesized. The results showed that fault intersections are spatially associated with the observed seismicity in majority of the regions. Simple 2D mechanical models of two major stable continental regions in the eastern U.S., namely, New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) and Middleton Place Summerville Seismic Zone (MPSSZ) supported a causal association. However, three-dimensional representation and analyses of these regions are more realistic and allow for adequate demonstration of vertical tectonics. This research is directed towards developing three-dimensional mechanical models of NMSZ and MPSSZ so as to better demonstrate the causal associations of fault intersections with stable continental region earthquakes. Numerical modeling using a Distinct Element Method was performed and the program used for the purpose is called 3DEC. The models comprise of the structural framework of the concerned region represented by a set of blocks with the faults within them treated as joints or discontinuities. The blocks and the faults are assigned elastic properties conforming to the known geology, and subjected to tectonic loading along the direction of maximum regional compression (SHmax) at a rate similar to the ambient plate velocity measured from GPS studies. The stresses and displacements of the blocks and along the faults are then observed at the end of the loading period. The results of the modeling indicate that locations of stress build-up in three-dimensions correlate well with those of the instrumental seismicity in these

  20. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  1. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  2. Shear Wave Splitting Beneath the New Madrid Seismic Zone and Adjacent Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moidaki, M.; Liu, K. H.; Gao, S. S.; Hogan, J. P.; Abdelsalam, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    Teleseismic shear-wave splitting parameters are determined at 15 permanent and portable broadband stations within and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in order to map the direction and strength of mantle fabrics and to explore the origin of seismic anisotropy. Both the splitting times and fast polarization directions of the fast shear-wave show significant spatial variations. The observed splitting times range from 0.7 to 1.7s with a mean value of 1.0s which is the same as the global average. The resulting fast directions range from 34 to 118 degrees from north with a mean of 65 degrees which is consistent with the motion direction of the North American plate in a hot-spot frame. Fast directions with ray-piercing points in the NMSZ are oblique to the rift axis. In the vicinity of the Ozarks Plateau, the split times range from 0.7s to 1.1s with a mean of 0.9s. The observed fast directions show a striking clockwise rotating pattern in which these change systematically from nearly N-S in the St. Francois Mountains to approximately NE-SW further north to be concordant to that of North American Craton. The area with anomalous fast directions has recently been suggested to be a downward asthenospheric flow as a result of the sinking of the Farallon slab in the lower mantle (Forte et al 2007). The observed anisotropy will be discussed in relation to the lower mantle flow, and the recently-proposed two-layer model of Marone and Romanowicz (2007).

  3. Using thermodynamic data to reproduce main seismic features of transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Ilya; Saukko, Anna; Edwards, Paul; Schiffer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Most of the seismic tomography studies nowadays are based on comprehensive models with optimization of lots of parameters. These models are able to resolve very subtle features of the Earth's mantle, but the influence of each specific parameter is not seen directly. In our research we try to minimize the number of processed parameters to produce simple synthetic cases. The main goals of our model are to see how water content influences the depth of the transition zone, and if melting at the transition zone is plausible. We also attempt to see how water content and the presence of melts influence the signal strength of the transition zone in receiver functions. Our MATLAB-code calculates phase assemblage according to specific temperature and pressure within 2D numerical domain (e.g. 300x700 km). Phase properties are calculated with database of Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni [2011], with corrections for water impact on elastic constants according to Liu et al., [2012]. We use the mantle phase composition 55% garnet and 45% olivine-polymorph, soliduses by Ohtani et al. [2004] and melt properties by Sakamaki et al. [2006]. These data are used to calculate seismic velocities and, furthermore, receiver functions with standard routines (e.g.[Schiffer et al., 2012]). Model predicts Vs within 5 to 5.5 km/s and Vp around 9.5-10 km/s within transition zone (Vp/Vs = 1.84-1.87), which is close to standard values. The presence of water enlarges the wadsleyite region, but also dampens the peak of receiver functions down to background level. Increase in water content causes melting at much shallower depths. Using a normal thermal gradient, we can get up to 10% of melt at depths around 390 km with 80% of water saturation, shown by a negative anomaly on receiver functions. This result is similar to data obtained for Afar Plateau [Thompson et al., 2015]. With cratonic thermal gradient, the olivine-wadsleyite transition and corresponding melt layer appear at depths around 350 km

  4. New data about seismicity and crustal velocity structure of the "continent-ocean" transition zone of the Barents-Kara region in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Alexey N.; Vaganova, Natalya V.; Konechnaya, Yana V.; Asming, Vladimir E.

    2015-01-01

    The recent (2011) installation of seismic station Zemlya Franca-Iocifa (ZFI) on Alexander Island in the Franz Josef Land Archipelago allows new seismic monitoring of the "continent-ocean" transition zone of the Barents-Kara Sea region. The region is seismically active, and we hypothesize that the prevailing geodynamic factor responsible for the occurrence of weak earthquakes is isostatic compensation of avalanche sedimentation in the "continent-ocean" transition zone. The crustal velocity structure beneath ZFI was determined using receiver functions. Crustal thickness is 30 km, based on an observed Moho discontinuity with underlying mantle velocities being Vp = 8.15 km/s and Vs = 4.5 km/s The model indicates a mid-crustal boundary at a depth of about 17 km with a velocity contrast between the upper ( Vp = 6.1 km/s, Vs = 3.6 km/s) and lower ( Vp = 6.8 km/s, Vs = 3.9 km/s) layers. In addition, the upper crustal sedimentary layer is about 4 km thick with Vp = 4.3 km/s and Vs = 2.36 km/s.

  5. Deformation of "stable" continental interiors by mantle convection: Implications for intraplate stress in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2011-12-01

    The enigmatic origin of large-magnitude earthquakes far from active plate boundaries, especially those occurring in so-called "stable" continental interiors, is a source of continuing controversy that has eluded a satisfactory explanation using past geophysical models of intraplate deformation and faulting. One outstanding case of such major intraplate earthquakes is the 1811-1812 series of events in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). We contend that the origin of some of these enigmatic intraplate events is due to regional variations in the pattern of tectonic stress generated by mantle convective flow acting on the overlying lithosphere and crust. Mantle convection affects the entire surface of the planet, irrespective of the current configuration of surface plate boundaries. In addition, it must be appreciated that plate tectonics is not a 2-D process, because the convective flow that drives the observed horizontal motions of the tectonic plates also drives vertical displacements of the crust across distances as great as 2 to 3 km. This dynamic topography is directly correlated with convection-driven stress field variations in the crust and lithosphere and these stresses can be locally focussed if the mantle rheology below the lithosphere is characterised by sufficiently low viscosities. We have developed global models of convection-driven mantle flow [Forte et al. 2009,2010] that are based on recent high-resolution 3-D tomography models derived from joint inversions of seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data [Simmons et al. 2007,2008,2010]. These tomography-based mantle convection models also include a full suite of surface geodynamic (postglacial rebound and convection) constraints on the depth-dependent average viscosity of the mantle [Mitrovica & Forte 2004]. Our latest tomography-based and geodynamically-constrained convection calculations reveal that mantle flow under the central US are driven by density anomalies within the lower mantle associated

  6. Defining the southwestern end of the Blytheville Arch, northeastern Arkansas: delimiting a seismic source zone in the New Madrid region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Vibroseis seismic-reflection profiles around the southwestern end of the Blytheville arch document the southwesternly extent of the arch and refine the length of a fault zone that coincides with the arch. The 74.3 km of newly interpreted profiles and previously described profiles form a network of lines across and around the southern end of the arch. The southwestern terminus of the arch is defined by the absence of significantly upwarped or extensively disrupted reflectors, which are diagnostic traits of the arch where it is well developed. The arch is 134 km long as documented here, which is only slightly longer than the length reported by previous studies. Differing opinions about the magnitude of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes could be partly explained by substantially longer seismic source zones, but this minor increase in source zone length does not reconcile the large differences in magnitude estimates of the events. If future earthquake ruptures associated with the arch are confined to areas of extensive deformation, then this well documented southwestern termination precludes a rupture substantially longer than ~134 km along the zone of seismicity that coincides with the axis of the Reelfoot rift.

  7. Coulomb Stress Change and Seismic Hazard of Rift Zones in Southern Tibet after the 2015 Mw7.8 Nepal Earthquake and Its Mw7.3 Aftershock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z.; Zha, X.; Lu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In southern Tibet (30~34N, 80~95E), many north-trending rifts, such as Yadong-Gulu and Lunggar rifts, are characterized by internally drained graben or half-graben basins bounded by active normal faults. Some developed rifts have become a portion of important transportation lines in Tibet, China. Since 1976, eighty-seven >Mw5.0 earthquakes have happened in the rift regions, and fifty-five events have normal faulting focal mechanisms according to the GCMT catalog. These rifts and normal faults are associated with both the EW-trending extension of the southern Tibet and the convergence between Indian and Tibet. The 2015 Mw7.8 Nepal great earthquake and its Mw7.3 aftershock occurred at the main Himalayan Thrust zone and caused tremendous damages in Kathmandu region. Those earthquakes will lead to significant viscoelastic deformation and stress changes in the southern Tibet in the future. To evaluate the seismic hazard in the active rift regions in southern Tibet, we modeled the slip distribution of the 2015 Nepal great earthquakes using the InSAR displacement field from the ALOS-2 satellite SAR data, and calculated the Coulomb failure stress (CFS) on these active normal faults in the rift zones. Because the estimated CFS depends on the geometrical parameters of receiver faults, it is necessary to get the accurate fault parameters in the rift zones. Some historical earthquakes have been studied using the field data, teleseismic data and InSAR observations, but results are in not agreement with each other. In this study, we revaluated the geometrical parameters of seismogenic faults occurred in the rift zones using some high-quality coseismic InSAR observations and teleseismic body-wave data. Finally, we will evaluate the seismic hazard in the rift zones according to the value of the estimated CFS and aftershock distribution.

  8. A Bayesian approach for Inter-seismic Inter-plate Coupling Probabilities for the Central Andes Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Culaciati, F. H.; Simons, M.

    2009-12-01

    We aim to characterize the apparent extent of plate coupling on subduction zone megathrusts with the eventual goal of understanding spatial variations of fault zone rheology. In this study we approach the problem from a Bayesian perspective, where we ask not for a single optimum model, but rather for a posteriori estimates of the range of allowable models, exploiting the full potential of Bayesian methods to completely characterize the model parameter space. Adopting a simple kinematic back-slip model and a 3D geometry of the inter-plate contact zone, we use the Bayesian approach to provide the inter-seismic inter-plate coupling probabilities that are consistent with physically plausible a-priori information and available geodetic measurements. We highlight the importance of using the vertical component of the velocity field to properly constrain the downdip limit of the coupled zone, and also we show how the chosen parameterization of the model plays an important role along with the a-priori, and a-posteriori information on the model parameters. We apply this methodology in the Chilean-Peruvian subduction zone (12S - 24S) with the desire to understand the state of inter-seismic coupling on that margin. We obtain patch like features for the probability of 100% apparent inter-seismic coupling with higher values located between 15km and 60km depth. The larger of these features are located in the regions associated with the rupture process of the 2001 (Mw 8.4) Arequipa and the 2007 (Mw 8.0) Pisco Earthquakes, both occurred after the time period where the measurements take place; and the region identified as the Arica bend seismic gap, which has not experienced a large earthquake since 1877.

  9. Investigation of the Maule, Chile rupture zone using seismic attenuation tomography and shear wave splitting methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpey, Megan Elizabeth

    The Maule, Chile 2010 Mw 8.8 earthquake afforded the opportunity to study the rupture zone (33°S-38°S) in detail using aftershocks recorded by the rapid-response IRIS CHAMP seismic network. We used measurements of differential S to P seismic attenuation to characterize the attenuation structure of the South American crust and upper mantle wedge. We implemented an evolving time window to determine Qs-1 values using a spectral ratio method and incorporated these measurements into a bounded linear inequality least squares inversion to solve for Qs -1 in a 3D volume. On a large-scale, we observe an east-dipping low attenuation feature, consistent with the location of the Nazca oceanic slab, and image progressively greater attenuation as we move towards the surface of our model. A dramatic feature in our model is a large, low-attenuation body in the same location where Hicks et al. (2014) resolved a high P wave velocity anomaly in their velocity tomography model. We calculated the shear wave splitting intensity of the Maule rupture zone by implementing the multichannel method of Chevrot (2000) which calculates the splitting intensity of teleseismic SK(K)S phases and splitting parameters, ϕ and deltat. The results we obtained show an overall fast direction with a strong component of trench parallel splitting and very few trench normal splits. The fast directions do not parallel the Nazca APM, but are instead dominated by splits rotated 40°-50° counter-clockwise from Nazca APM. Based on these data, we see little evidence for sub-slab entrained mantle flow and invoke the trench-parallel retrograde flow model as an explanation for our measurements. We developed an extended splitting intensity method to allow for use of the upgoing S phase from Maule aftershocks, utilizing the initial event polarization. For this local dataset, we observe three dominant fast directions oriented N20°W, N40°E, and N10°W-20°E and a subset of fast directions trending N60°-90°E which

  10. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  11. Investigating active faulting in the south-central Chilean forearc by local seismicity and moment tensor inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbrock, A.; Bohm, M.; Echtler, H.; Melnick, D.; Bruhn, C.; Bataille, K.

    2004-12-01

    The seismological ISSA experiment is giving a detailed insight into the seismicity distribution of southern Chile, where major earthquakes (M>8) have repeatedly ruptured the surface, involving vertical offsets of several meters. During a nearly 5-month observation period in 1999 and 2000 a temporary seismic network recorded approximately 350 local earthquakes. Two localized areas, North and South of the Arauco peninsula, showed a very high seismic activity in and above the interplate seismic zone of the Nazca-South America convergent margin. We used a double-difference relocation technique to obtain detailed images of the seismicity distribution in these areas. We also determined fault plane solutions to interpret the observed alignment of earthquakes hypocenters. Due to the low signal to noise ratio reliable first motion reading were difficult to achieve, which only very few clear readings. To overcome this problem we used moment tensor inversions to estimate reliable source mechanisms. However, for small magnitude earthquakes (<5) the biggest obstacle is the alignment of synthetic and observed waveforms. Inverting only for the amplitude spectrum, and therefore dropping the information in the phase spectrum can mostly circumvent the alignment problem. The two clusters investigated show high waveform correlation coefficients for most of the earthquakes indicating that possibly changes in fluid pressure can be responsible for triggering the events. After relocation most of the hypocenters in each of the two clusters align on a eastward dipping fault. Source mechanisms obtained indicate thrust faulting, where one of the possible fault planes aligns with the steep eastward dipping fault based on the seismicity distribution. These faults are reaching down to the top of the seismogenic zone and may serve as pathways for ascending fluids released in the subduction process. Active crustal-scale faulting below and active uplift of the coast account for active tectonic

  12. Principal Slip Zones in Limestone: Natural and Experimental Examples of `Clast-Cortex Grains' and Implications for the Seismic Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A.; Billi, A.; di Toro, G.; Niemeijer, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Many earthquakes in central Italy (e.g L’Aquila Mw 6.3, 6 April 2009), and in other areas worldwide, nucleate within and rupture through limestones. During individual earthquakes a majority of fault displacement is accommodated by thin principal slip zones (PSZs). At present, however, there are no reliable microstructural or geochemical indicators of seismic slip in carbonate rocks. We present detailed field and microstructural observations of the PSZs of seismically active normal faults that cut limestones in central Italy, and compare these PSZs to experiments on layers of simulated calcite gouge using a recently-installed high velocity rotary shear apparatus at INGV, Rome. Geological constraints indicate that the natural PSZs are exhumed from <3km depth, where ambient temperatures are <100°C. SEM and XRD observations suggest that the PSZs are composed of c. 100% calcite. The PSZs contain a 2-10mm thick, texturally-distinct ultracataclasite layer immediately adjacent to the slip surface. The ultracataclasite is itself internally zoned; 200-300μm thick ultracataclastic sub-layers record extreme localization of slip, and some of the sub-layers contain microstructural evidence for fluidization. 100-200μm thick, syn-tectonic calcite veins suggest fluid involvement in faulting. Peculiar rounded grains up to 3mm in diameter consisting of a central (often angular) clast wrapped by a laminated outer cortex of ultra-fine grained calcite are found in the ultracataclasite. The cortex can display concentric or lensoid internal laminations and appears to have developed by progressive accretion of matrix material. These ‘clast-cortex grains’ closely resemble: 1) accretionary lapilli in pyroclastic deposits; 2) ‘armoured’ grains found in the basal detachments of mega-landslides, and; 3) ‘clay-clast aggregates’ produced in saturated high-velocity friction experiments and found in some natural clay-bearing faults. We suggest that localized fluidization of

  13. The radiated seismic energy and apparent stress of interplate and intraplate earthquakes at subduction zone environments; implications for seismic hazard estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, George L.; Boatwright, John L.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2001-01-01

    The radiated seismic energies (ES) of 980 shallow subduction-zone earthquakes with magnitudes ? 5.8 are used to examine global patterns of energy release and apparent stress. In contrast to traditional methods which have relied upon empirical formulas, these energies are computed through direct spectral analysis of broadband seismic waveforms. Energy gives a physically different measure of earthquake size than moment. Moment, being derived from the low-frequency asymptote of the displacement spectra, is related to the final static displacement. Thus, moment is crucial to the long-term tectonic implication of an earthquake. In contrast, energy, being derived from the velocity power spectra, is more a measure of seismic potential for damage to anthropogenic structures. There is considerable scatter in the plot of ES-M0 for worldwide earthquakes. For any given M0, the ES can vary by as much as an order of magnitude about the mean regression line. The global variation between ES and M0, while large, is not random. When subsets of ES-M0 are plotted as a function of seismic region, tectonic setting and faulting type, the scatter in data is often substantially reduced. There are two profound implications for the estimation of seismic and tsunamic hazard. First, it is now feasible to characterize the apparent stress for particular regions. Second, a given M0 does not have a unique ES. This means that M0 alone is not sufficient to describe all aspects of an earthquake. In particular, we have found examples of interplate thrust-faulting earthquakes and intraslab normal-faulting earthquakes occurring in the same epicentral region with vastly different macroseismic effects. Despite the gross macroseismic disparities, the MW?s in these examples were identical. However, the Me?s (energy magnitudes) successfully distinguished the earthquakes that were more damaging.

  14. Stressing of the New Madrid seismic zone by a lower crust detachment fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.D.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Simpson, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    A new mechanical model for the cause of the New Madrid seismic zone in the central United States is analyzed. The model contains a subhorizontal detachment fault which is assumed to be near the domed top surface of locally thickened anomalous lower crust ("rift pillow"). Regional horizontal compression induces slip on the fault, and the slip creates a stress concentration in the upper crust above the rift pillow dome. In the coseismic stage of the model earthquake cycle, where the three largest magnitude 7-8 earthquakes in 1811-1812 are represented by a single model mainshock on a vertical northeast trending fault, the model mainshock has a moment equivalent to a magnitude 8 event. During the interseismic stage, corresponding to the present time, slip on the detachment fault exerts a right-lateral shear stress on the locked vertical fault whose failure produc