Science.gov

Sample records for active sensing surface

  1. Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at Microwave Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    This report summarizes research activities and results obtained under grant N000l4-99-1-0627 "Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at...Measurements were completed during April 1999 by the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts.

  2. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science. PMID:27694937

  3. Improvement in LPG sensing response by surface activation of ZnO thick films with Cr2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastir, Anita; Virpal, Kaur, Jasmeet; Singh, Gurpreet; Kohli, Nipin; Singh, Onkar; Singh, Ravi Chand

    2015-05-01

    Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) sensing response of pure and Cr2O3 activated ZnO has been investigated in this study. Zinc oxide was synthesized by co-precipitation route and deposited as a thick film on an alumina substrate. The surface of ZnO sensor was activated by chromium oxide on surface oxidation by chromium chloride. The concentration of chromium chloride solution used to activate the ZnO sensor surface has been varied from 0 to 5 %. It is observed that response to LPG has improved as compared to pure ZnO.

  4. Microwave backscattering theory and active remote sensing of the ocean surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S.; Miller, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    The status is reviewed of electromagnetic scattering theory relative to the interpretation of microwave remote sensing data acquired from spaceborne platforms over the ocean surface. Particular emphasis is given to the assumptions which are either implicit or explicit in the theory. The multiple scale scattering theory developed during this investigation is extended to non-Gaussian surface statistics. It is shown that the important statistic for the case is the probability density function of the small scale heights conditioned on the large scale slopes; this dependence may explain the anisotropic scattering measurements recently obtained with the AAFE Radscat. It is noted that present surface measurements are inadequate to verify or reject the existing scattering theories. Surface measurements are recommended for qualifying sensor data from radar altimeters and scatterometers. Additional scattering investigations are suggested for imaging type radars employing synthetically generated apertures.

  5. Active and passvie microwave remote sensing of springtime near-surface soil that at mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Tsunekawa, A.; Tsubo, M.

    2010-12-01

    Springtime near-surface soil thaw event is important for understanding the near-surface earth system. Previous researches based on both active and passive microwave remote sensing technologies have paid scant attention, especially at mid-latitudes where the near-surface earth system has been changed substantially by climate change and human activities, and are characterized by more complex climate and land surface conditions than the permafrost areas. SSM/I brightness temperature and QuikSCAT Ku-band backscatter were applied in this study at a case study area of northern China and Mongolia in springtime. The soil freeze-thaw algorithm was employed for SSM/I data, and a random sampling technique was applied to determine the brightness temperature threshold for 37 GHz vertically polarized radiation: 258.2 and 260.1 K for the morning and evening satellite passes, respectively. A multi-step method was proposed for QuikSCAT Ku-band backscatter based on both field observed soil thaw events and the typical signature of radar backscatter time series when soil thaw event occurred. The method is mainly focuses on the estimated boundary of thaw events and detection of primary thaw date. Finally, based on those results, a theoretical method by applying both active and passive microwave remote sensing was proposed for understanding different types of frozen grounds and their specific characters (e.g. initial and end date of springtime soil freeze-thaw transition period) in mid-latitudes.

  6. Active gas replenishment and sensing of the wetting state in a submerged superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Ben P; Bartlett, Philip N; Wood, Robert J K

    2017-02-15

    Previously superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated effective drag reduction by trapping a lubricious gas layer on the surface with micron-sized hydrophobic features. However, prolonged reduction of drag is hindered by the dissolution of the gas into the surrounding water. This paper demonstrates a novel combination of superhydrophobic surface design and electrochemical control methods which allow quick determination of the wetted area and a gas replenishment mechanism to maintain the desirable gas filled state. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is used to measure the capacitance of the surface which is shown to be proportional to the solid/liquid interface area. To maintain a full gas coverage for prolonged periods the surface is held at an electrical potential which leads to hydrogen evolution. In the desired gas filled state the water does not touch the metallic area of the surface, however after gas has dissolved the water touches the metal which closes the electrochemical circuit causing hydrogen to be produced replenishing the gas in the surface and returning to the gas filled state; in this way the system is self-actuating. This type of surface and electrochemical control shows promise for applications where the gas filled state of superhydrophobic surfaces must be maintained when submerged for long periods of time.

  7. Glucose Evokes Rapid Ca2+ and Cyclic AMP Signals by Activating the Cell-Surface Glucose-Sensing Receptor in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Medina, Johan; Kojima, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a primary stimulator of insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. High concentration of glucose has been thought to exert its action solely through its metabolism. In this regard, we have recently reported that glucose also activates a cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor and facilitates its own metabolism. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose activates the glucose-sensing receptor and elicits receptor-mediated rapid actions. In MIN6 cells and isolated mouse β-cells, glucose induced triphasic changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c); glucose evoked an immediate elevation of [Ca(2+)]c, which was followed by a decrease in [Ca(2+)]c, and after a certain lag period it induced large oscillatory elevations of [Ca(2+)]c. Initial rapid peak and subsequent reduction of [Ca(2+)]c were independent of glucose metabolism and reproduced by a nonmetabolizable glucose analogue. These signals were also blocked by an inhibitor of T1R3, a subunit of the glucose-sensing receptor, and by deletion of the T1R3 gene. Besides Ca(2+), glucose also induced an immediate and sustained elevation of intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]c). The elevation of [cAMP]c was blocked by transduction of the dominant-negative Gs, and deletion of the T1R3 gene. These results indicate that glucose induces rapid changes in [Ca(2+)]c and [cAMP]c by activating the cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor. Hence, glucose generates rapid intracellular signals by activating the cell-surface receptor.

  8. Combined active and passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture for vegetated surfaces at L-band

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distorted Born approximation (DBA) combined with the numerical solutions of Maxwell equations (NMM3D) has been used for the radar backscattering model for the SMAP mission. The models for vegetated surfaces such as wheat, grass, soybean and corn have been validated with the Soil Moisture Active ...

  9. Simulation and Fabrication of SAW-Based Gas Sensor with Modified Surface State of Active Layer and Electrode Orientation for Enhanced H2 Gas Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Nazibul; Maity, Santanu; Sarkar, Argha; Bhunia, Chandan Tilak; Acharjee, Debabrata; Joseph, Aneesh M.

    2017-02-01

    The design, analysis, optimization, and fabrication of layered and nanostructure-based surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors are presented. A lithium niobate and zinc oxide (ZnO) nano multilayer structure is proposed to enhance the sensitivity of the SAW-based gas sensor. Different materials are considered for the intermediate layer in the design for optimization purposes. The sensitivity of the sensor could be improved due to increased active surface area obtained by varying the aspect ratio of the nanorods, the thickness of the intermediate layer, and the gap between the electrodes. The total displacement and frequency shift of the device were significantly improved. Overall, the mechanically engineered surface-based (nanorod) SAW gas sensor offered better sensing response than the layered SAW gas sensor in terms of sensitivity performance.

  10. Microwave Remote Sensing Modeling of Ocean Surface Salinity and Winds Using an Empirical Sea Surface Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques have been investigated for the remote sensing of ocean surface wind and salinity. We revised an ocean surface spectrum using the CMOD-5 geophysical model function (GMF) for the European Remote Sensing (ERS) C-band scatterometer and the Ku-band GMF for the NASA SeaWinds scatterometer. The predictions of microwave brightness temperatures from this model agree well with satellite, aircraft and tower-based microwave radiometer data. This suggests that the impact of surface roughness on microwave brightness temperatures and radar scattering coefficients of sea surfaces can be consistently characterized by a roughness spectrum, providing physical basis for using combined active and passive remote sensing techniques for ocean surface wind and salinity remote sensing.

  11. Lasing Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Lun; Wang, Suo; Li, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Dai, Lun; Ma, Ren-Min

    2017-03-01

    The resonance phenomena of surface plasmons has enabled development of a novel class of noncontact, real-time and label-free optical sensors, which have emerged as a prominent tool in biochemical sensing and detection. However, various forms of surface plasmon resonances occur with natively strong non-radiative Drude damping that weakens the resonance and limits the sensing performance fundamentally. Here we experimentally demonstrate the first lasing-enhanced surface plasmon resonance (LESPR) refractive index sensor. The figure of merit (FOM) of intensity sensing is 84,000, which is about 400 times higher than state-of-the-art surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. We found that the high FOM originates from three unique features of LESPR sensors: high-quality factor, nearly zero background emission and the Gaussian-shaped lasing spectra. The LESPR sensors may form the basis for a novel class of plasmonic sensors with unprecedented performance for a broad range of applications.

  12. Enhancing Extreme Heat Health-Related Intervention and Preparedness Activities Using Remote Sensing Analysis of Daily Surface Temperature, Surface Observation Networks and Ecmwf Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, R. L.; Booth, J.; Hondula, D.; Ross, K. W.; Stuyvesant, A.; Alm, G.; Baghel, E.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme heat causes more human fatalities in the United States than any other natural disaster, elevating the concern of heat-related mortality. Maricopa County Arizona is known for its high heat index and its sprawling metropolitan complex which makes this region a perfect candidate for human health research. Individuals at higher risk are unequally spatially distributed, leaving the poor, homeless, non-native English speakers, elderly, and the socially isolated vulnerable to heat events. The Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona State University and NASA DEVELOP LaRC are working to establish a more effective method of placing hydration and cooling centers in addition to enhancing the heat warning system to aid those with the highest exposure. Using NASA's Earth Observation Systems from Aqua and Terra satellites, the daily spatial variability within the UHI was quantified over the summer heat seasons from 2005 - 2014, effectively establishing a remotely sensed surface temperature climatology for the county. A series of One-way Analysis of Variance revealed significant differences between daily surface temperature averages of the top 30% of census tracts within the study period. Furthermore, synoptic upper tropospheric circulation patterns were classified to relate surface weather types and heat index. The surface weather observation networks were also reviewed for analyzing the veracity of the other methods. The results provide detailed information regarding nuances within the UHI effect and will allow pertinent recommendations regarding the health department's adaptive capacity. They also hold essential components for future policy decision-making regarding appropriate locations for cooling centers and efficient warning systems.

  13. Remote sensing of land surface phenology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, G.A.; Brown, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of land-surface phenology is an important method for studying the patterns of plant and animal growth cycles. Phenological events are sensitive to climate variation; therefore phenology data provide important baseline information documenting trends in ecology and detecting the impacts of climate change on multiple scales. The USGS Remote sensing of land surface phenology program produces annually, nine phenology indicator variables at 250 m and 1,000 m resolution for the contiguous U.S. The 12 year archive is available at http://phenology.cr.usgs.gov/index.php.

  14. Surface studies of gas sensing metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Batzill, Matthias; Diebold, Ulrike

    2007-05-21

    The relation of surface science studies of single crystal metal oxides to gas sensing applications is reviewed. Most metal oxide gas sensors are used to detect oxidizing or reducing gases and therefore this article focuses on surface reduction processes and the interaction of oxygen with these surfaces. The systems that are discussed are: (i) the oxygen vacancy formation on the surface of the ion conductor CeO(2)(111); (ii) interaction of oxygen with TiO(2) (both adsorption processes and the incorporation of oxygen into the TiO(2)(110) lattice are discussed); (iii) the varying surface composition of SnO(2)(101) and its consequence for the adsorption of water; and (iv) Cu modified ZnO(0001)-Zn surfaces and its interaction with oxygen. These examples are chosen to give a comprehensive overview of surface science studies of different kinds of gas sensing materials and to illustrate the potential that surface science studies have to give fundamental insight into gas sensing phenomena.

  15. Multiple scattering effects with cyclical terms in active remote sensing of vegetated surface using vector radiative transfer theory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The energy transport in a vegetated (corn) surface layer is examined by solving the vector radiative transfer equation using a numerical iterative approach. This approach allows a higher order that includes the multiple scattering effects. Multiple scattering effects are important when the optical t...

  16. Inter-seasonal surface deformations of an active rock glacier imaged with radar and lidar remote sensing; Turtmann valley, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Andrew; Buchli, Thomas; Strozzi, Tazio; Springman, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    Inter-seasonal changes in surface deformation were imaged using a portable radar interferometer and terrestrial laser scanner during a series of three campaigns that took place in autumn 2011, summer 2012 and autumn 2012 on a rock glacier located in the Turtmann valley, Switzerland. Satellite radar interferometry (ERS 1 & 2, CosmoSkymed) indicate that accelerated downslope movement of the rock glacier commenced during the 1990s. Due to signal decorrelation associated with the satellite repeat pass time interval, continuous ground-based radar interferometry measurements were undertaken. Results show that the rock glacier accelerated significantly in Summer (Vmax = 6.0cm/25hrs), probably in response to the condition of the subsurface hydrology (e.g. post-peak spring snow melt and/or infiltration of rainfall). In autumn, the displacement velocity was reduced (Vmax = 2.0cm/25hrs). A one year surface difference of the glacier topography, derived from terrestrial laser scanning, provided insight into the rock glacier kinematics. Ongoing research is aimed at integrating surface displacement results with an extensive borehole monitoring system consisting of inclinometers and temperature sensors.

  17. Monitoring of the ground surface temperature and the active layer in NorthEastern Canadian permafrost areas using remote sensing data assimilated in a climate land surface scheme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, N.; Royer, A.; Krinner, G.; Roy, A.

    2014-12-01

    Projected future warming is particularly strong in the Northern high latitudes where increases of temperatures are up to 2 to 6 °C. Permafrost is present on 25 % of the northern hemisphere lands and contain high quantities of « frozen » carbon, estimated at 1400 Gt (40 % of the global terrestrial carbon). The aim of this study is to improve our understanding of the climate evolution in arctic areas, and more specifically of land areas covered by snow. The objective is to describe the ground temperature year round including under snow cover, and to analyse the active layer thickness evolution in relation to the climate variability. We use satellite data (fusion of MODIS land surface temperature « LST » and microwave AMSR-E brightness temperature « Tb ») assimilated in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) of the Canadian climate model coupled with a simple radiative transfer model (HUT). This approach benefits from the advantages of each of the data type in order to complete two objectives : 1- build a solid methodology for retrieving the ground temperature, with and without snow cover, in taïga and tundra areas ; 2 - from those retrieved ground temperatures, derive the summer melt duration and the active layer depth. We describe the coupling of the models and the methodology that adjusts the meteorological input parameters of the CLASS model (mainly air temperature and precipitations derived from the NARR database) in order to minimise the simulated LST and Tb ouputs in comparison with satellite measurements. Using ground-based meteorological data as validation references in NorthEastern Canadian tundra, the results show that the proposed approach improves the soil temperatures estimates when using the MODIS LST and Tb at 10 and 19 GHz to constrain the model in comparison with the model outputs without satellite data. Error analysis is discussed for the summer period (2.5 - 4 K) and for the snow covered winter period (2 - 3.5 K). Further steps are

  18. Preparation of a Superhydrophobic and Peroxidase-like Activity Array Chip for H2O2 Sensing by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi; Park, Yeonju; Chen, Lei; Zhao, Bing; Jung, Young Mee; Cong, Qian

    2015-10-28

    In this paper, we propose a novel and simple method for preparing a dual-biomimetic functional array possessing both superhydrophobic and peroxidase-like activity that can be used for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensing. The proposed method is an integration innovation that combines the above two properties and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We integrated a series of well-ordered arrays of Au points (d = 1 mm) onto a superhydrophobic copper (Cu)/silver (Ag) surface by replicating an arrayed molybdenum template. Instead of using photoresists and the traditional lithography method, we utilized a chemical etching method (a substitution reaction between Cu and HAuCl4) with a Cu/Ag superhydrophobic surface as the barrier layer, which has the benefit of water repellency. The as-prepared Au points were observed to possess peroxidase-like activity, allowing for catalytic oxidation of the chromogenic molecule o-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (OPD). Oxidation was evidenced by a color change in the presence of H2O2, which allows the array chip to act as an H2O2 sensor. In this study, the water repellency of the superhydrophobic surface was used to fabricate the array chip and increase the local reactant concentration during the catalytic reaction. As a result, the catalytic reaction occurred when only 2 μL of an aqueous sample (OPD/H2O2) was placed onto the Au point, and the enzymatic product, 2,3-diaminophenazine, showed a SERS signal distinguishable from that of OPD after mixing with 2 μL of colloidal Au. Using the dual-biomimetic functional array chip, quantitative analysis of H2O2 was performed by observing the change in the SERS spectra, which showed a concentration-dependent behavior for H2O2. This method allows for the detection of H2O2 at concentrations as low as 3 pmol per 2 μL of sample, which is a considerable advantage in H2O2 analysis. The as-prepared substrate was convenient for H2O2 detection because only a small amount of sample was required in

  19. Whisking mechanics and active sensing.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nicholas E; Solla, Sara A; Hartmann, Mitra Jz

    2016-10-01

    We describe recent advances in quantifying the three-dimensional (3D) geometry and mechanics of whisking. Careful delineation of relevant 3D reference frames reveals important geometric and mechanical distinctions between the localization problem ('where' is an object) and the feature extraction problem ('what' is an object). Head-centered and resting-whisker reference frames lend themselves to quantifying temporal and kinematic cues used for object localization. The whisking-centered reference frame lends itself to quantifying the contact mechanics likely associated with feature extraction. We offer the 'windowed sampling' hypothesis for active sensing: that rats can estimate an object's spatial features by integrating mechanical information across whiskers during brief (25-60ms) windows of 'haptic enclosure' with the whiskers, a motion that resembles a hand grasp.

  20. Brazil's remote sensing activities in the Eighties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raupp, M. A.; Pereiradacunha, R.; Novaes, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the remote sensing activities in Brazil have been conducted by the Institute for Space Research (INPE). This report describes briefly INPE's activities in remote sensing in the last years. INPE has been engaged in research (e.g., radiance studies), development (e.g., CCD-scanners, image processing devices) and applications (e.g., crop survey, land use, mineral resources, etc.) of remote sensing. INPE is also responsible for the operation (data reception and processing) of the LANDSATs and meteorological satellites. Data acquisition activities include the development of CCD-Camera to be deployed on board the space shuttle and the construction of a remote sensing satellite.

  1. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of August 1, 1984...active and passive microwave remote sensing , (2) used the strong fluctuation theory and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to calculate the brightness

  2. Electrostatic Assemblies of Well-Dispersed AgNPs on the Surface of Electrospun Nanofibers as Highly Active SERS Substrates for Wide-Range pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tong; Ma, Jun; Zhen, Shu Jun; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-06-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has shown high promise in analysis and bioanalysis, wherein noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) such as silver nanoparticles were employed as substrates because of their strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties. However, SERS-based pH sensing was restricted because of the aggregation of NMNPs in acidic medium or biosamples with high ionic strength. Herein, by using the electrostatic interaction as a driving force, AgNPs are assembled on the surface of ethylene imine polymer (PEI)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) electrospun nanofibers, which are then applied as highly sensitive and reproducible SERS substrate with an enhancement factor (EF) of 10(7)-10(8). When p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP) is used as an indicator with its b2 mode, a good and wide linear response to pH ranging from 2.56 to 11.20 could be available, and the as-prepared nanocomposite fibers then could be fabricated as excellent pH sensors in complicated biological samples such as urine, considering that the pH of urine could reflect the acid-base status of a person. This work not only emerges a cost-effective, direct, and convenient approach to homogeneously decorate AgNPs on the surface of polymer nanofibers but also supplies a route for preparing other noble metal nanofibrous sensing membranes.

  3. Remote Sensing of Surface Visibility from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, A. L.; Wang, J.; Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid growth in the use of satellite-derived Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) measurements for estimating surface particulate matter (PM) concentrations for air quality and health studies. Although the two properties may be correlated, physically connecting the two quantities requires prior knowledge of aerosol type and relative humidity. AOD is an ambient, column-integrated optical property, and PM is a dry mass quantity measured at the surface. Surface visibility, however, is an ambient optical property, and may have closer physical ties to AOD. Since ambient visibility is so important for the safety of both aviation and ground transportation, there are near-continuous measurements at airports and other sites of commercial interest. Yet, like ground PM monitors, measurements of visibility have limited spatial coverage. In this study, we evaluate whether remote sensing techniques can help to determine surface visibility. AOD measurements from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) are compared with one-minute extinction coefficient data (visibility = 3.0/σext) from the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS). However, since ASOS data lack quality control regulations, we first develop methods for quality control, including steps to limit unrealistic variability, poor calibration, and inconsistent formatting. Then we test different protocols for temporal averaging of the ASOS data (±10, 30, and 60 minutes) and spatial averaging of the MODIS data (1x1, 3x3, and 5x5 pixels) to collocate and compare the two data sets. Preliminary results for the U.S. mid-Atlantic show overall moderate correlation between MODIS AOD and ASOS extinction coefficient with higher correlations during summer months and lower correlations during winter months.

  4. Optimizing a remote sensing instrument to measure atmospheric surface pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckham, G. E.; Gatley, C.; Flower, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric surface pressure can be remotely sensed from a satellite by an active instrument which measures return echoes from the ocean at frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. The instrument is optimized by selecting its frequencies of operation, transmitter powers and antenna size through a new procedure baesd on numerical simulation which maximizes the retrieval accuracy. The predicted standard deviation error in the retrieved surface pressure is 1 mb. In addition the measurements can be used to retrieve water vapor, cloud liquid water and sea state, which is related to wind speed.

  5. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of February 1, 1984...the emissivities as functions of viewing angles and polarizations. They are used to interpret the passive microwave remote sensing data from

  6. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-26

    92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice NO0014-89-J-l 107 6. AUTHOR(S) 425f023-08 Prof. J.A. Kong 7... REMOTE SENSING OF ICE Sponsored by: Department of the Navy Office of Naval Research Contract number: N00014-89-J-1107 Research Organization: Center for...J. A. Kong Period covered: October 1, 1988 - November 30, 1992 St ACTIVE AND PASSIVE REMOTE SENSING OF ICE FINAL REPORT This annual report covers

  7. Remote Sensing: Environmental Effects of Surface Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-15

    Spangle Program and other related activities of the Program Office. The Principal Investigator, William D. Garrett, was also involved in an ONR...developing new film measurement technologies. Consequently, he was requested by the Spangle Program Manager to present information on sea surface film...al. [1970], Gas transport reduction ... Jarvis et al. [1962]’ Brockmann et al. 119801" PetrmannI 1976 ]’ I Oleophilic pollutant accumula- l irtung and

  8. Methods of Determining Playa Surface Conditions Using Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-08

    NO. 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) METHODS OF DETERMINING PLAYA SURFACE CONDITIONS USING REMOTE SENSING 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) J. PONDER...PLAYA SURFACE CONDITIONS USING REMOTE SENSING J. Ponder Henley U. S. Army Engineer Topographic Laboratories Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060-5546 "ABSTRACT...geochemistry, hydrology and remote sensing but all of these are important to the understanding of these unique geomorphic features. There is a large body

  9. Indicators of international remote sensing activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The extent of worldwide remote sensing activities, including the use of satellite and high/medium altitude aircraft data was studied. Data were obtained from numerous individuals and organizations with international remote sensing responsibilities. Indicators were selected to evaluate the nature and scope of remote sensing activities in each country. These indicators ranged from attendance at remote sensing workshops and training courses to the establishment of earth resources satellite ground stations and plans for the launch of earth resources satellites. Results indicate that this technology constitutes a rapidly increasing component of environmental, land use, and natural resources investigations in many countries, and most of these countries rely on the LANDSAT satellites for a major portion of their data.

  10. Surface acoustic wave devices for harsh environment wireless sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao -Lun; Zheng, Peng; ...

    2013-05-24

    In this study, langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensormore » with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.« less

  11. Surface acoustic wave devices for harsh environment wireless sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao -Lun; Zheng, Peng; Ohodnicki, Paul; Baltrus, John; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2013-05-24

    In this study, langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.

  12. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices for Harsh Environment Wireless Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Zheng, Peng; Ohodnicki, Paul; Baltrus, John; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2013-01-01

    Langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh-environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity. PMID:23708273

  13. Optical Sensing of Microbial Life on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Triggs, G. J.; Krauss, T. F.

    2015-01-01

    The label-free detection of microbial cells attached to a surface is an active field of research. The field is driven by the need to understand and control the growth of biofilms in a number of applications, including basic research in natural environments, industrial facilities, and clinical devices, to name a few. Despite significant progress in the ability to monitor the growth of biofilms and related living cells, the sensitivity and selectivity of such sensors are still a challenge. We believe that among the many different technologies available for monitoring biofilm growth, optical techniques are the most promising, as they afford direct imaging and offer high sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, as each technique offers different insights into the biofilm growth mechanism, our analysis allows us to provide an overview of the biological processes at play. In addition, we use a set of key parameters to compare state-of-the-art techniques in the field, including a critical assessment of each method, to identify the most promising types of sensors. We highlight the challenges that need to be overcome to improve the characteristics of current biofilm sensor technologies and indicate where further developments are required. In addition, we provide guidelines for selecting a suitable sensor for detecting microbial cells on a surface. PMID:26637605

  14. Sea Surface Salinity: The Next Remote Sensing Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Swift, Calvin T.; LeVine, David M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of salinity remote sensing is presented. The role of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the far north Atlantic and the influence of salinity variations on upper ocean dynamics in the tropics are described. An assessment of the present state of the technology of the SSS satellite remote sensing is given.

  15. Sensing Human Activity: GPS Tracking

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Stefan; van Schaick, Jeroen; de Bois, Peter; de Haan, Remco

    2009-01-01

    The enhancement of GPS technology enables the use of GPS devices not only as navigation and orientation tools, but also as instruments used to capture travelled routes: as sensors that measure activity on a city scale or the regional scale. TU Delft developed a process and database architecture for collecting data on pedestrian movement in three European city centres, Norwich, Rouen and Koblenz, and in another experiment for collecting activity data of 13 families in Almere (The Netherlands) for one week. The question posed in this paper is: what is the value of GPS as ‘sensor technology’ measuring activities of people? The conclusion is that GPS offers a widely useable instrument to collect invaluable spatial-temporal data on different scales and in different settings adding new layers of knowledge to urban studies, but the use of GPS-technology and deployment of GPS-devices still offers significant challenges for future research. PMID:22574061

  16. A New Computational Framework for Atmospheric and Surface Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timucin, Dogan A.

    2004-01-01

    A Bayesian data-analysis framework is described for atmospheric and surface retrievals from remotely-sensed hyper-spectral data. Some computational techniques are high- lighted for improved accuracy in the forward physics model.

  17. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    be confidently detected. Some of these activities are focussed to develop and deploy instrumentation suitable for the collection of precise in situ measurements of the SSST which can be used to improve the accuracy of satellite measurements, while others develop techniques to generate improved global analyses of sea surface temperature using historical data.

  18. New Surface-Enhanced Raman Sensing Chip Designed for On-Site Detection of Active Ricin in Complex Matrices Based on Specific Depurination.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ji-Jun; Sun, Jie-Fang; Lui, Rui; Zhang, Zong-Mian; Liu, Jing-Fu; Xie, Jian-Wei

    2016-01-27

    Quick and accurate on-site detection of active ricin has very important realistic significance in view of national security and defense. In this paper, optimized single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides named poly(21dA), which function as a depurination substrate of active ricin, were screened and chemically attached on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, ∼100 nm) via the Au-S bond [poly(21dA)-AuNPs]. Subsequently, poly(21dA)-AuNPs were assembled on a dihydrogen lipoic-acid-modified Si wafer (SH-Si), thus forming the specific surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) chip [poly(21dA)-AuNPs@SH-Si] for depurination of active ricin. Under optimized conditions, active ricin could specifically hydrolyze multiple adenines from poly(21dA) on the chip. This depurination-induced composition change could be conveniently monitored by measuring the distinct attenuation of the SERS signature corresponding to adenine. To improve sensitivity of this method, a silver nanoshell was deposited on post-reacted poly(21dA)-AuNPs, which lowered the limit of detection to 8.9 ng mL(-1). The utility of this well-controlled SERS chip was successfully demonstrated in food and biological matrices spiked with different concentrations of active ricin, thus showing to be very promising assay for reliable and rapid on-site detection of active ricin.

  19. Symbol Sense Behavior in Digital Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokhove, Christian; Drijvers, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The algebraic expertise that mathematics education is aiming for includes both procedural skills and conceptual understanding. To capture the latter, notions such as symbol sense, gestalt view and visual salience have been developed. We wonder if digital activities can be designed that not only require procedural algebraic skills, but also invite…

  20. Remote Sensing Simulation Activities for Earthlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krockover, Gerald H.; Odden, Thomas D.

    1977-01-01

    Suggested are activities using a Polaroid camera to illustrate the capabilities of remote sensing. Reading materials from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are suggested. Methods for (1) finding a camera's focal length, (2) calculating ground dimension photograph simulation, and (3) limiting size using film resolution are…

  1. Nanostructured surfaces for microfluidics and sensing applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Samuel Thomas; Piech, Marcin; Schneider, John F.; Vail, Sean; Hayes, Mark A.; Garcia, Anthony A.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Gust, D; Yang, Dongqing

    2007-01-01

    The present work demonstrates the use of light to move liquids on a photoresponsive monolayer, providing a new method for delivering analyses in lab-on-chip environments for microfluidic systems. The light-driven motion of liquids was achieved on photoresponsive azobenzene modified surfaces. The surface energy components of azobenzene modified surfaces were calculated by Van Oss theory. The motion of the liquid was achieved by generation of a surface tension gradient by isomerization of azobenzene monolayers using UV and Visible light, thereby establishing a surface energy heterogeneity on the edge of the droplet. Contact angle measurements of various solvents were used to demonstrate the requirement for fluid motion.

  2. Self-sensing active magnetic levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vischer, D.; Bleuler, H. )

    1993-03-01

    Magnetic bearing technology is now rapidly being introduced to industrial applications. The most popular configuration applied is the classical' one of gap sensor, current control, current-amplifier and magnetic coil. Here the authors present a magnetic levitation method which combines all the known advantages of active magnetic bearing in a self-sensing configuration. The novel method realizes stable and well damped levitation without any sensor hardware at the rotor. This is achieved by using the coil voltage of the magnetic bearing as system input (voltage instead of current amplifiers) and the current as system output. It is demonstrated that the resulting system is observable and controllable in the sense of control theory, allowing a magnetic bearing to be stabilized with a simple linear controller using current measurements alone. Several self-sensing bearings have been constructed. Their performance is comparable to systems with sensors, but hardware requirements and costs are substantially reduced. Experimental results are included.

  3. Hydrological Application of Remote Sensing: Surface States -- Snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Kelly, Richard E. J.; Foster, James L.; Chang, Alfred T. C.

    2004-01-01

    Remote sensing research of snow cover has been accomplished for nearly 40 years. The use of visible, near-infrared, active and passive-microwave remote sensing for the analysis of snow cover is reviewed with an emphasis on the work on the last decade.

  4. Gas sensing with surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. J.; Schweizer, K. S.; Ricco, A. J.; Zipperian, T. E.

    1985-03-01

    The use of a ZnO-on-Si surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator as a gas sensor is discussed. In particular, the sensitivity of the device to organic vapors is examined. The planar nature of the SAW device, in which the acoustic energy is confined to within roughly one acoustic wavelength of the surface, makes the device extremely sensitive to surface perturbations. This characteristic has been exploited in the construction of SAW gas sensors in which the surface wave propagation characteristics are altered by species adsorbed from the ambient gas. The porous nature of the sputtered ZnO film, in conjunction with the microbalance capability of the SAW device, gives the sensor the ability to distinguish molecules on the basis of both size and mass.

  5. Millimeter Wave Active Sensing Technology For Self-Contained Munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunton, Andrew J.

    1983-10-01

    Active millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology is playing an increasing role throughout the DoD research and development community in the area of Self Contained Munitions (SCM's), autonomous missiles and armament primarily intended for air and surface launched standoff antiarmor weapon systems. Each type of SCM, which requires fire-and-forget search, detection, discrimination and warhead aiming sensing functions, places varied operational, packaging and performance specifications on its MMW sensor subsystem. This paper attempts to portray the rationale for implementation of active MMW sensing devices into SCM's, along with a description of the spectrum of SCM sensor operational parameters. A treatise of active MMW sensor technologies required for ultimate successful weaponization will include discussions in the areas of signal processing and MMW RF hardware. Ultimately, as active MMW technology matures, the critical trade between complexity, cost and effectiveness must be analyzed for each SCM type. A qualitative discussion in this area will be covered as well, yielding insight into future MMW development areas which require increased heavy emphasis in order to meet the stringent requirements on SCM active MMW sensing subsystems.

  6. NASA's Future Active Remote Sensing Missing for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Jonathan B.

    2000-01-01

    Since the beginning of space remote sensing of the earth, there has been a natural progression widening the range of electromagnetic radiation used to sense the earth, and slowly, steadily increasing the spatial, spectral, and radiometric resolution of the measurements. There has also been a somewhat slower trend toward active measurements across the electromagnetic spectrum, motivated in part by increased resolution, but also by the ability to make new measurements. Active microwave instruments have been used to measure ocean topography, to study the land surface. and to study rainfall from space. Future NASA active microwave missions may add detail to the topographical studies, sense soil moisture, and better characterize the cryosphere. Only recently have active optical instruments been flown in space by NASA; however, there are currently several missions in development which will sense the earth with lasers and many more conceptual active optical missions which address the priorities of NASA's earth science program. Missions are under development to investigate the structure of the terrestrial vegetation canopy, to characterize the earth's ice caps, and to study clouds and aerosols. Future NASA missions may measure tropospheric vector winds and make vastly improved measurements of the chemical components of the earth's atmosphere.

  7. Novel silica surface charge density mediated control of the optical properties of embedded optically active materials and its application for fiber optic pH sensing at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congjun; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Su, Xin; Keller, Murphy; Brown, Thomas D; Baltrus, John P

    2015-02-14

    Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an intriguing optical effect of silica that, depending on the solution pH, amplifies or attenuates the optical absorption of a variety of embedded optically active materials with very distinct properties, such as plasmonic Au nanoparticles, non-plasmonic Pt nanoparticles, and the organic dye rhodamine B (not a pH indicator), coated on an optical fiber. Interestingly, the observed optical response to varying pH appears to follow the surface charge density of the silica matrix for all the three different optically active materials. To the best of our knowledge, this optical effect has not been previously reported and it appears universal in that it is likely that any optically active material can be incorporated into the silica matrix to respond to solution pH or surface charge density variations. A direct application of this effect is for optical pH sensing which has very attractive features that can enable minimally invasive, remote, real time and continuous distributed pH monitoring. Particularly, as demonstrated here, using highly stable metal nanoparticles embedded in an inorganic silica matrix can significantly improve the capability of pH sensing in extremely harsh environments which is of increasing importance for applications in unconventional oil and gas resource recovery, carbon sequestration, water quality monitoring, etc. Our approach opens a pathway towards possible future development of robust optical pH sensors for the most demanding environmental conditions. The newly discovered optical effect of silica also offers the potential for control of the optical properties of optically active materials for a range of other potential applications such as electrochromic devices.

  8. Remote sensing data assimilation in land surface process modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Heike; Mauser, Wolfram

    2002-01-01

    Land surface process models describe the energy-, water-, carbon- and nutrient-fluxes at the land surface on a regional scale by combining a given set of environmental parameters and variables (e.g. water balance model, plant physiology model, atmospheric boundary layer model, erosion model). They need spatially distributed input parameters, which can be delivered from remote sensing analyses using both optical and microwave sensors. Thus, land surface process models are the main drivers for four dimensional data assimilation (4DDA) which is based on the synergistic data utilization of remote sensing and ancillary data both in space and time. To ensure the constant flow of the necessary input parameters and variables, the development of adequate data-assimilation and data-fusion techniques is mandatory. Parameter models operate at the centre of this data fusion process to convert remote sensing measurements into a set of model input parameters and variables. Different strategies to use remote sensing derived parameters in models are demonstrated. They span from the simple delivery of static input-parameters, over the provision of dynamic model parameters, model forcing and recalibration of internal model variables, to inversion and validation of land surface process models. Examples will illustrate these different data assimilation strategies using SAR and optical data sources. The integration of land surface parameters derived from remote sensing (e.g. land use, digital terrain model, surface soil moisture) in flood forecast is a rather straight forward task. For water balance modelling, soil moisture and snow cover assessment will be illustrated. This task is already more complex, since a continuous process must be simulated and the data assimilation must avoid inconsistencies in model performance. The application of remote sensing data assimilation methods for crop growth and agricultural production models further requires complex feedback mechanisms. Examples

  9. Surface Energy Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David L.; Vukovich, Fred M.; Pontikes, Elizabeth G.

    1997-01-01

    Realistic estimates of surface energy heat fluxes are needed for the study of water and energy interactions between the land and atmosphere. The primary objective of this work is to study the estimation of surface heat energy fluxes using remote sensing derived parameters under different spatial and temporal conditions. Surface energy fluxes and remote sensing derived data from two sources were analyzed. First, we used surface heat flux, remote sensing, and ancillary data from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP), mapped at a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid. Second, we used NOAA AVHRR (1 km), weather station, and ancillary data to derive estimates of surface latent and sensible heat energy fluxes over a 100 sq kilometers area for three test sites: 1) First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) grassland site, Konza Prairie, Kansas; 2) Howland, Maine Forest Ecosystem Dynamics Site; and 3) Walnut Gulch, scrubland site, surrounding Tombstone, Arizona. Satellite derived estimates of land surface temperature, surface albedo, and spectral vegetation index are used in selected models to provide estimates of surface heat fluxes. Analysis of results from the 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid for North America indicated there were similar, overall correlations between sensible and latent heat energy fluxes versus remotely sensed vegetation index and ground temperature during dry and wet year conditions. However, there were significant differences in correlations between years when stratified by land cover class. Analysis of 100 km x 100 km data (1 km resolution) indicated partitioning the areas in to primary versus secondary cover, with the secondary cover comprising less than 5% of the area, significantly improved surface heat energy flux estimates.

  10. Implementation of remote-sensed surface water condition into a land surfaces model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Ui-Yong; Sung, Hyun Min; Hong, Je-Woo; Hong, Jinkyu; Kunstmann, Harald; Arnault, Joel

    2016-04-01

    We will present our current efforts to incorporate remote-sensed surface water conditions into a land surface model in the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) for better representation of cropland in East Asia. In this presentation, we introduce the model development and discuss its regional impacts on hydrological cycle in perspectives of the PBL-surface interactions and surface evapotranspiration tagging.

  11. Pesticides sensing by surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kalabina, N.A.; Ksenevich, T.I.; Beloglazov, A.A.; Nikitin, P.I.

    1995-12-31

    High toxicity of pesticides and their wide use in agriculture, represent a general danger for environmental welfare and could become a real threat to life. Screening of pesticides in the environment has become very important during last years due to low threshold values for pesticides in drinking water. An optical biosensor has been developed for detection of pesticides, based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. Concentration of the pesticides was measured in liquid or gas. The authors specially originated organic film on a disposable element. A setup on the base of the Kretschmann arrangement was improved by using a computer-controlled angular scanning system. The detection concentration limit of dinitrophenole (DNP) was 10{sup {minus}9} M. Some samples exhibited effect down to 10{sup {minus}11} M of DNP. The results obtained provide reason for further development of SPR sensor as applied to pesticides monitoring.

  12. Remote Sensing and Geochemistry of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    We have been examining the resources required to support potential life on Mars, as a way of understanding the possible abundance and distribution of life. Based on our understanding of the Earth, the necessary requirements for the environment to allow it to support life are (i) presence of liquid water, (ii) access to the biogenic elements (C, H, O, N, S, P, Ca, Fe, etc.), and (iii) a source of energy to drive chemical disequilibrium, such that the reactions back toward equilibrium can release energy to support metabolism. While even demonstrating that all of these requirements have been met would not mean that life would necessarily exist on Mars, they provide the context in which a search for life or analysis of geochemical characteristics that might be indicative of life might be carried out. Our previous work has focused on the first and third of these characteristics determine where and when liquid water might have been present, and understanding the availability of chemical energy from weathering reactions that might ID support life. In the analysis supported by this grant (covering the time period 2/15/01-2/14/02), we have been examining the second requirement--the abundance of the necessary biogenic elements, their geographical distribution on Mars and the information on the possible vertical distribution within the crust, and their geochemical accessibility and mobility within the crust and at the surface. In particular, our work during the performance period has emphasized phosphorous.

  13. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Active and Passive Microwave Ocean Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    of both analytical and efficient numerical methods for electromagnetics and hydrodynamics. New insights regarding these phenomena can then be applied to improve microwave active and passive remote sensing of the ocean surface.

  14. Validating surface energy balance fluxes derived from airborne remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Eguez, Jose Luis

    Remote sensing-derived energy balance components were compared against measured eddy covariance energy balance terms using heat flux source area models to validate the airborne multispectral remote sensing procedure in the estimation of instantaneous and daily evapotranspiration rates. A procedure was developed to generate raster layers of the footprint weights for weighting/integrating the different components of the energy balance model and obtain meaningful comparisons to similar energy balance terms measured at eddy covariance and/or Bowen ratio stations. Soil heat flux and surface aerodynamic temperature models were studied in an effort to improve the remote sensing estimation of distributed evapotranspiration rates. Aerial and ground data were acquired over a riparian corridor (Salt Cedar, Tamarix grove), soybean and cornfields (rainfed crops) in different ecosystems. The results confirmed that net radiation is well estimated with the remote sensing technique showing an estimation error of only -4.8 +/- 20.7 W m-2, (-0.5 +/- 3.6%). Linear and exponential soil heat flux models were found to correlate strongly to leaf area index and net radiation. The surface aerodynamic temperature term in the sensible heat flux equation was parameterized using surface radiometric temperature, air temperature, wind speed, and leaf area index. It is suggested that the surface aerodynamic temperature model be tested for a wide range of vegetation types, atmospheric stability conditions, surface heterogeneity, and ecosystems to assess the model limitations. The flux source area footprint model "FSAM" integrated heat flux pixels that compared better to measured values and it is recommended as a standard procedure to compare airborne remote sensing-derived heat fluxes against measured fluxes by eddy covariance systems; when compared to the "FASOWG" footprint model and simple arithmetic averages. Finally, the method that uses alfalfa reference daily evapotranspiration in

  15. Active microwave remote sensing research program plan. Recommendations of the Earth Resources Synthetic Aperture Radar Task Force. [application areas: vegetation canopies, surface water, surface morphology, rocks and soils, and man-made structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A research program plan developed by the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications to provide guidelines for a concentrated effort to improve the understanding of the measurement capabilities of active microwave imaging sensors, and to define the role of such sensors in future Earth observations programs is outlined. The focus of the planned activities is on renewable and non-renewable resources. Five general application areas are addressed: (1) vegetation canopies, (2) surface water, (3) surface morphology, (4) rocks and soils, and (5) man-made structures. Research tasks are described which, when accomplished, will clearly establish the measurement capabilities in each area, and provide the theoretical and empirical results needed to specify and justify satellite systems using imaging radar sensors for global observations.

  16. Pneumatic distortion compensation for aircraft surface pressure sensing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Leondes, Cornelius T.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a technique of compensating for pneumatic distortion in aircraft surface pressure sensing devices is developed. The compensation allows conventional pressure sensing technology to obtain improved unsteady pressure measurements. Pressure distortion caused by frictional attenuation and pneumatic resonance within the sensing system makes obtaining unsteady pressure measurements by conventional sensors difficult. Typically, most of the distortion occurs within the pneumatic tubing used to transmit pressure impulses from the surface of the aircraft to the measurement transducer. This paper develops a second-order distortion model that accurately describes the behavior of the primary wave harmonic of the pneumatic tubing. The model is expressed in state-variable form and is coupled with standard results from minimum-variance estimation theory to develop an algorithm to compensate for the effects of pneumatic distortion. Both postflight and real-time algorithms are developed and evaluated using simulated and flight data. Covariance selection and filter-tuning examples are presented. Results presented verify that, given appropriate covariance magnitudes, the algorithms accurately reconstruct surface pressure values from remotely sensed pressure measurements.

  17. Label-free surface plasmon sensing towards cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Goutham

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop a conventional, home-built SPR bio-sensor to demonstrate bio-sensing applications. This emphasizes the understanding of basic concepts of Surface Plasmon Resonance and various interrogation techniques. Intensity Modulation was opted to perform the label-free SPR bio-sensing experiments due to its cost-efficient and compact setup. Later, label-free surface plasmon sensing was carried out to study and understand the bio-molecular interactions between (1). BSA and Anti BSA molecules and (2). Exosome/Liposome on thin metal (Au) films. Exosomes are cell-derived vesicles present in bodily fluids like blood, saliva, urine, epididymal fluid containing miRNAs, RNA, proteins, etc., at stable quantities during normal health conditions. The exosomes comprise varied constituents based on their cell origin from where they are secreted and is specific to that particular origin. However an exacerbated release is observed during tumor or cancer conditions. This increased level of exosomes present in the sample, can be detected using the SPR bio-sensor demonstrated in this thesis and effective thickness of adsorption on Au surface can be estimated. Also, chemically synthesized liposome particles were studied to determine if they can generate an equivalent sensor response to that of exosomes to consider them as an alternate. Finally a 10ppb Mercury (Hg) sensing was performed as part of Environment Monitoring application and results have been tabulated and compared.

  18. The Remote Sensing of Surface Radiative Temperature over Barbados.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    remote sensing of surface radiative temperature over Barbados was undertaken using a PRT-5 attached to a light aircraft. Traverses across the centre of the island, over the rugged east coast area, and the urban area of Bridgetown were undertaken at different times of day and night in the last week of June and the first week of December, 1969. These traverses show that surface variations in long-wave radiation emission lie within plus or minus 5% of the observations over grass at a representative site. The quick response of the surface to sunset and sunrise was

  19. Evaluating Remotely-Sensed Surface Soil Moisture Estimates Using Triple Collocation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent work has demonstrated the potential of enhancing remotely-sensed surface soil moisture validation activities through the application of triple collocation techniques which compare time series of three mutually independent geophysical variable estimates in order to acquire the root-mean-square...

  20. Active microwave remote sensing of earth/land, chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Geoscience applications of active microwave remote sensing systems are examined. Major application areas for the system include: (1) exploration of petroleum, mineral, and ground water resources, (2) mapping surface and structural features, (3) terrain analysis, both morphometric and genetic, (4) application in civil works, and (5) application in the areas of earthquake prediction and crustal movements. Although the success of radar surveys has not been widely publicized, they have been used as a prime reconnaissance data base for mineral exploration and land-use evaluation in areas where photography cannot be obtained.

  1. Multi-layer surface profiling using gated wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Nordin, Nur Dalilla; Tik, Eddy Chow Mun; Tan, ChingSeong; Chew, Kuew Wai; Menoni, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, multi-layer surface profiling and inspection has been considered an emerging topic that can be used to solve various manufacturing inspection problems, such as graded index lenses, TSV (Thru-Silicon Via), and optical coating. In our study, we proposed a gated wavefront sensing approach to estimate the multi-layer surface profile. In this paper, we set up an experimental platform to validate our theoretical models and methods. Our test bed consists of pulse laser, collimator, prism, well-defined focusing lens, testing specimen, and gated wavefront sensing assembly (e.g., lenslet and gated camera). Typical wavefront measurement steps are carried out for the gated system, except the reflectance is timed against its time of flight as well as its intensity profile. By synchronizing the laser pulses to the camera gate time, it is possible to discriminate a multi-layer wavefront from its neighbouring discrete layer reflections.

  2. Surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy substrate for arsenic sensing in groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Mulvihill, Martin; Tao, Andrea R.; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Arnold, John

    2015-06-16

    A surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate formed from a plurality of monolayers of polyhedral silver nanocrystals, wherein at least one of the monolayers has polyvinypyrrolidone (PVP) on its surface, and thereby configured for sensing arsenic is described. Highly active SERS substrates are formed by assembling high density monolayers of differently shaped silver nanocrystals onto a solid support. SERS detection is performed directly on this substrate by placing a droplet of the analyte solution onto the nanocrystal monolayer. Adsorbed polymer, polyvinypyrrolidone (PVP), on the surface of the nanoparticles facilitates the binding of both arsenate and arsenite near the silver surface, allowing for highly accurate and sensitive detection capabilities.

  3. ColiSense, today's sample today: A rapid on-site detection of β-D-Glucuronidase activity in surface water as a surrogate for E. coli.

    PubMed

    Heery, Brendan; Briciu-Burghina, Ciprian; Zhang, Dian; Duffy, Gillian; Brabazon, Dermot; O'Connor, Noel; Regan, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive field-portable fluorimeter with incubating capability and triplicate sample chambers was designed and built. The system was optimised for the on-site analysis of E. coli in recreational waters using fluorescent based enzyme assays. The target analyte was β-D-Glucuronidase (GUS) which hydrolyses a synthetic substrate 6-Chloro-4-Methyl-Umbelliferyl-β-D-Glucuronide (6-CMUG) to release the fluorescent molecule 6-Chloro-4-Methyl-Umbelliferyl (6-CMU). The system was calibrated with 6-CMU standards. A LOD of 5 nM and a resolution of less than 1 nM was determined while enzyme kinetic tests showed detection of activities below 1 pmol min(-1) mL(-1) of sample. A field portable sample preparation, enzyme extraction protocol and continuous assay were applied with the system to analyse freshwater and marine samples. Results from a one day field trial are shown which demonstrated the ability of the system to deliver results on-site within a 75 min period.

  4. Sea surface and remotely sensed temperatures off Cape Mendocino, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, L. C.; Arvesen, J. C.; Frydenlund, D.; Myers, J. S.; Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    During September 3 to 5, 1979, a multisensor oceanographic experiment was conducted off Cape Mendocino, California. The purpose of this experiment was to validate the use of remote sensing techniques over an area along the U.S. west coast where coasted upwelling is known to be intense. Remotely sensed mutlispectral data, including thermal infrared imagery, were collected above an upwelling feature off Cape Mendocino. Data were acquired from the TIRNOS-N and NOAA-6 polar orbiting satellites, the NASA Ames Research Center's high altitude U-2 aircraft, and a U.S. Coast Guard C-130 aircraft. Supporting surface truth data over the same feature were collected aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship, OCEANOGRAPHER. Atmospheric soundings were also taken aboard the ship. The results indicate that shipboard measurements of sea surface temperatures can be reproduction within 1 C or better through remote observation of absolute infrared radiance values (whether measured aboard the NOAA polar orbiting satellite, the U-2 aircraft, or the Coast Guard aircraft) by using appropriate atmospheric corrections. Also, the patterns of sea surface temperature which were derived independently from the various remote platforms provide a consistent interpretation of the surface temperature field.

  5. Hydrologic Remote Sensing and Land Surface Data Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Moradkhani, Hamid

    2008-05-06

    Accurate, reliable and skillful forecasting of key environmental variables such as soil moisture and snow are of paramount importance due to their strong influence on many water resources applications including flood control, agricultural production and effective water resources management which collectively control the behavior of the climate system. Soil moisture is a key state variable in land surface-atmosphere interactions affecting surface energy fluxes, runoff and the radiation balance. Snow processes also have a large influence on land-atmosphere energy exchanges due to snow high albedo, low thermal conductivity and considerable spatial and temporal variability resulting in the dramatic change on surface and ground temperature. Measurement of these two variables is possible through variety of methods using ground-based and remote sensing procedures. Remote sensing, however, holds great promise for soil moisture and snow measurements which have considerable spatial and temporal variability. Merging these measurements with hydrologic model outputs in a systematic and effective way results in an improvement of land surface model prediction. Data Assimilation provides a mechanism to combine these two sources of estimation. Much success has been attained in recent years in using data from passive microwave sensors and assimilating them into the models. This paper provides an overview of the remote sensing measurement techniques for soil moisture and snow data and describes the advances in data assimilation techniques through the ensemble filtering, mainly Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and Particle filter (PF), for improving the model prediction and reducing the uncertainties involved in prediction process. It is believed that PF provides a complete representation of the probability distribution of state variables of interests (according to sequential Bayes law) and could be a strong alternative to EnKF which is subject to some limitations including the linear

  6. National activities in remote sensing: a Canadian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Bruce

    A brief review of the federal government's role in developing remote sensing activities in Canada over the years is given. The struggle to map a large country, together with an interest in space, brought about the Canadian remote sensing program. In particular, the paper focuses on the role of Energy, Mines and Resources Canada in coordinating research activities by all levels of government in remote sensing, thus fostering the growth of the remote sensing industry in Canada. An overview is given of the expanding remote sensing market. In addition, the paper looks at the present applications of remote sensing to agriculture, forestry and the study of ice caps and fresh water, for example, as well as its use in assessing and preventing environmental disasters. The paper concludes by stressing the importance of remote sensing in meeting the "Challenge of the 90's"—making sustainable development a way of life.

  7. Optical Sensing and Trapping Based on Localized Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhiwen

    This project involves the study of novel plasmonic nanodevices that provide unique functionality in optical sensing, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and optical trapping. The first design is based on a coupling system involving double-layered metal nano-strips arrays. This system has the advantages of simple geometry and direct integration with microfluidic chips. The intense optical localization due to field coupling within the system can enhance detection sensitivity of target molecules, especially by virtue of the optical trapping of plasmonic nanoparticles. The optical resonant condition is obtained theoretically through analyzing the SPs modes. Numerical modeling based on two-dimensional (2D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is consistent with the theoretical analysis and demonstrates the feasibility of using this system for optical sensing and trapping. In the second design, a gold nano-ring structure is demonstrated to be an effective approach for plasmonic nano-optical tweezers (PNOTs) for trapping metallic nanoparticles. In our demonstration example, we have optimized a device for SERS operation at the wavelength of 785 nm. Three-dimensional (3D) FDTD techniques have been employed to calculate the optical response, and the optical force distribution have been derived using the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) method. Simulation results indicate that the nano-ring produces a maximum trapping potential well of ~32 kBT on a 20 nm gold nanoparticle. The existence of multiple potential well results in a very large active trapping volume of ~106 nm3 for the target particles. Furthermore, the trapped gold nanoparticles further lead to the formation of nano-gaps that offer a near-field enhancement of ~160 times, resulting in an achievable EF of 108 for SERS. In the third design, we propose a concept of all-optical nano-manipulation. We show that target molecules, after being trapped, can be transferred between the trapping sites within a linear array of

  8. Remote sensing of surface water for environmental flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulbure, M. G.; Kingsford, R.; Lucas, R.; Keith, D.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental flows represent water management activities that release flushes of water stored in dams on regulated rivers during dry periods. These flows aim to mimic natural flow and inundation regimes to maintain ecological health and function of rivers and wetlands. Assessment and understanding of the effectiveness of environmental flows requires quantification of temporal and spatial pattern of surface water and inundation dynamic in a synoptic yet detailed way and understanding dynamics of vegetation response to flooding. Here we focused on the on the entire Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia as a case study. The MDB is a large semi-arid region with scarce water resources, high hydroclimatic variability and competing water demands, impacted by climate change, altered flow regimes and land use changes. The basin covers 14% of the Australian continent and contains the nation's largest river system, important groundwater systems, and represents the most important agricultural area in the country. We used Landsat TM and ETM+ data time series to synoptically map the dynamic of surface water extent with an internally consistent algorithm over decades. Within the basin-wide study area we carried out a detailed investigation of the largest river red gum forest in the world, a key site for environmental flow and conservation management. Here we tracked the response of vegetation community condition to flooding across space and time. Results show high interannual variability in number and size of flooded areas. Vegetation community response to flooding varied in space and time and with vegetation types, densities and location relative to areas frequently inundated by environmental water release. Knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamic of flooding and the response of vegetation communities to flooding is important for management of floodplain wetlands and vegetation communities and for investigating effectiveness of environmental flows and flow regimes in the

  9. Hydrologic Remote Sensing and Land Surface Data Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and skillful forecasting of key environmental variables such as soil moisture and snow are of paramount importance due to their strong influence on many water resources applications including flood control, agricultural production and effective water resources management which collectively control the behavior of the climate system. Soil moisture is a key state variable in land surface–atmosphere interactions affecting surface energy fluxes, runoff and the radiation balance. Snow processes also have a large influence on land-atmosphere energy exchanges due to snow high albedo, low thermal conductivity and considerable spatial and temporal variability resulting in the dramatic change on surface and ground temperature. Measurement of these two variables is possible through variety of methods using ground-based and remote sensing procedures. Remote sensing, however, holds great promise for soil moisture and snow measurements which have considerable spatial and temporal variability. Merging these measurements with hydrologic model outputs in a systematic and effective way results in an improvement of land surface model prediction. Data Assimilation provides a mechanism to combine these two sources of estimation. Much success has been attained in recent years in using data from passive microwave sensors and assimilating them into the models. This paper provides an overview of the remote sensing measurement techniques for soil moisture and snow data and describes the advances in data assimilation techniques through the ensemble filtering, mainly Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and Particle filter (PF), for improving the model prediction and reducing the uncertainties involved in prediction process. It is believed that PF provides a complete representation of the probability distribution of state variables of interests (according to sequential Bayes law) and could be a strong alternative to EnKF which is subject to some limitations including the linear

  10. Hydrostatic pressure sensing with surface-core fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report the employment of surface-core fibers for hydrostatic pressure sensing. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the use of these fibers for the referenced purpose. Theoretical simulations of the fiber structure were performed in order to estimate fiber phase and group birefringence values and its pressure sensitivity coefficient. In order to test fiber performance when acting as a pressure sensor, the same was placed in an polarimetric setup and its spectral response was measured. A sensitivity of 4.8 nm/MPa was achieved, showing good resemblance to the expected sensitivity value (4.6 nm/MPa).

  11. High-conductivity silicon based spectrally selective plasmonic surfaces for sensing in the infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgulu, K.; Gok, A.; Yilmaz, M.; Topalli, K.; Okyay, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic perfect absorbers have found a wide range of applications in imaging, sensing, and light harvesting and emitting devices. Traditionally, metals are used to implement plasmonic structures. For sensing applications, it is desirable to integrate nanophotonic active surfaces with biasing and amplification circuitry to achieve monolithic low cost solutions. Commonly used plasmonic metals such as Au and Ag are not compatible with standard silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Here we demonstrate plasmonic perfect absorbers based on high conductivity silicon. Standard optical lithography and reactive ion etching techniques were used for the patterning of the samples. We present computational and experimental results of surface plasmon resonances excited on a silicon surface at normal and oblique incidences. We experimentally demonstrate our absorbers as ultra-low cost, CMOS-compatible and efficient refractive index sensing surfaces. The experimental results reveal that the structure exhibits a sensitivity of around 11 000 nm/RIU and a figure of merit of up to 2.5. We also show that the sensing performance of the structure can be improved by increasing doping density.

  12. Soil surface roughness characterization for microwave remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzahn, P.; Rieke-Zapp, D.; Ludwig, R.

    2012-04-01

    With this poster we present a simple and efficient method to measure soil surface roughness in an agricultural environment. Micro scale soil surface roughness is a crucial parameter in many environmental applications. In recent studies it is strongly recognized that soil surface roughness significantly influences the backscatter of agricultural surface, especially on bare fields. Indeed, while different roughness indices depend on their measurement length, no satisfying roughness parametrization and measurement technique has been found yet, introducing large uncertainty in the interpretation of the radar backscattering. In this study, we introduce a photogrammetric system which consists of a customized consumer grade Canon EOS 5d camera and a reference frame providing ground control points. With the system one can generate digital surface models (DSM) with a minimum size of 1 x 2.5 m2, extendable to any desired size, with a ground x,y- resolution of 2 mm. Using this approach, we generated a set of DSM with sizes ranging from 2.5 m2 to 22 m2, acquired over different roughness conditions representing ploughed, harrowed as well as crusted fields on different test sites. For roughness characterization we calculated in microwave remote sensing common roughness indices such as the RMS- height s and the autocorrelation length l. In an extensive statistical investigation we show the behavior of the roughness indices for different acquisition sizes of the proposed method. Results indicate, compared to results from profiles generated out of the dataset, that using a three dimensional measuring device, the calculated roughness indices are more robust in their estimation. In addition, a strong directional dependency of the proposed roughness indices was observed which could be related to the orientation of the seedbed rows to the acqusition direction. In a geostatistical analysis, we decomposed the acquired roughness indices into different scales, yielding a roughness quantity

  13. Mass sensitivity of layered shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave devices for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Trinchi, Adrian; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Holland, Anthony; Galatsis, Kosmas

    2001-11-01

    Layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices that allow the propagation of Love mode acoustic waves will be studied in this paper. In these devices, the substrate allows the propagation of Surface Skimming Bulks Waves (SSBWs). By depositing layers, that the speed of Shear Horizontal (SH) acoustic wave propagation is less than that of the substrate, the propagation mode transforms to Love mode. Love mode devices which will be studied in this paper, have SiO2 and ZnO acoustic guiding layers. As Love mode of propagation has no movement of particles component normal to the active sensor surface, they can be employed for the sensing applications in the liquid media.

  14. Surface phenomena with organic coatings for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greibl, Wolfgang; Hayden, Oliver; Achatz, Paul; Fischerauer, G.; Scholl, G.; Dickert, Franz L.

    2002-02-01

    The surface modification of SAW (surface acoustic wave)- and QCM (quartz crystal microbalance)-devices proves very important in chemical sensing. Silanes on one hand are very useful for hydrophobizing of quartz-surfaces whereas on the other hand thiols are used to adsorb on gold. In this way the influence of humidity on the transducers, which originates in the hydrophilicity of the quartz is decreased. These monolayers not only reduce the cross-sensitivity to water but also enhance the sensor effects of solvent vapors. In order to obtain better selectivity molecular hollows, like calix[n]arenes can be attached to the spacers. Another way to improve the selectivity was found in the treatment of the device with mixtures of silanes and thiols, respectively. In this way cavities are produced in which analytes are incorporated and thus are detected in the lower ppm range. The surface of mass-sensitive devices was also modified in order to detect analytes in the nano- to micrometer range. Here a stamping process with cells yields patterns on polymer surfaces which favor the reinclusion of these microorganisms. These effects are due to geometrical effects and chemical interactions via an adapted polarity and hydrogen bonds of the chosen polymer. The sensor responses proved highly selective to the bacteria in respect to nutrient liquid and other microorganisms.

  15. Sensing at the Surface of Graphene Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Jiang, Lin; van Geest, Erik P; Lima, Lia M C; Schneider, Grégory F

    2017-02-01

    Recent research trends now offer new opportunities for developing the next generations of label-free biochemical sensors using graphene and other two-dimensional materials. While the physics of graphene transistors operated in electrolyte is well grounded, important chemical challenges still remain to be addressed, namely the impact of the chemical functionalizations of graphene on the key electrical parameters and the sensing performances. In fact, graphene - at least ideal graphene - is highly chemically inert. The functionalizations and chemical alterations of the graphene surface - both covalently and non-covalently - are crucial steps that define the sensitivity of graphene. The presence, reactivity, adsorption of gas and ions, proteins, DNA, cells and tissues on graphene have been successfully monitored with graphene. This review aims to unify most of the work done so far on biochemical sensing at the surface of a (chemically functionalized) graphene field-effect transistor and the challenges that lie ahead. The authors are convinced that graphene biochemical sensors hold great promise to meet the ever-increasing demand for sensitivity, especially looking at the recent progresses suggesting that the obstacle of Debye screening can be overcome.

  16. Correcting for Atmospheric Spatial Variability When Estimating Surface Fluxes from Remotely Sensed Land Surface Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts to monitor the terrestrial water cycle require accurate estimates of evapotranspiration over the global land area. Flux towers provide valuable site-level data, but their collective footprints cover only a very small fraction of the land surface. Satellite remote sensing instruments, on th...

  17. Surface engineering of nanoparticles in suspension for particle based bio-sensing.

    PubMed

    Sen, Tapas; Bruce, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Surface activation of nanoparticles in suspension using amino organosilane has been carried out via strict control of a particle surface ad-layer of water using a simple but efficient protocol 'Tri-phasic Reverse Emulsion' (TPRE). This approach produced thin and ordered layers of particle surface functional groups which allowed the efficient conjugation of biomolecules. When used in bio-sensing applications, the resultant conjugates were highly efficient in the hybrid capture of complementary oligonucleotides and the detection of food borne microorganism. TPRE overcomes a number of fundamental problems associated with the surface modification of particles in aqueous suspension viz. particle aggregation, density and organization of resultant surface functional groups by controlling surface condensation of the aminosilane. The approach has potential for application in areas as diverse as nanomedicine, to food technology and industrial catalysis.

  18. Hybrid Architecture Active Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for performing relatively high-speed wavefront sensing and control to overcome thermal instabilities in a segmented primary mirror telescope [e.g., James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at L2], by using the onboard fine guidance sensor (FGS) to minimize expense and complexity. This FGS performs centroiding on a bright star to feed the information to the pointing and control system. The proposed concept is to beam split the image of the guide star (or use a single defocused guide star image) to perform wavefront sensing using phase retrieval techniques. Using the fine guidance sensor star image for guiding and fine phasing eliminates the need for other, more complex ways of achieving very accurate sensing and control that is needed for UV-optical applications. The phase retrieval occurs nearly constantly, so passive thermal stability over fourteen days is not required. Using the FGS as the sensor, one can feed segment update information to actuators on the primary mirror that can update the primary mirror segment fine phasing with this frequency. Because the thermal time constants of the primary mirror are very slow compared to this duration, the mirror will appear extremely stable during observations (to the level of accuracy of the sensing and control). The sensing can use the same phase retrieval techniques as the JWST by employing an additional beam splitter, and having each channel go through a weak lens (one positive and one negative). The channels can use common or separate detectors. Phase retrieval can be performed onboard. The actuation scheme would include a coarse stage able to achieve initial alignment of several millimeters of range (similar to JWST and can use a JWST heritage sensing approach in the science camera) and a fine stage capable of continual updates.

  19. Needs, Feedback, and the Future: Need Sensing Activities in 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Morgan V.

    A needs sensing project was conducted to identify the general needs of the field of career and technical education (CTE), dissemination activities, and major forces in the environment judged likely to influence education in the foreseeable future. The need sensing took place with networks developed in regions assigned to the five primary partner…

  20. Active microwave remote sensing of oceans, chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A rationale is developed for the use of active microwave sensing in future aerospace applications programs for the remote sensing of the world's oceans, lakes, and polar regions. Summaries pertaining to applications, local phenomena, and large-scale phenomena are given along with a discussion of orbital errors.

  1. Embodied information processing: vibrissa mechanics and texture features shape micromotions in actively sensing rats.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Jason T; Andermann, Mark L; Moore, Christopher I

    2008-02-28

    Peripheral sensory organs provide the first transformation of sensory information, and understanding how their physical embodiment shapes transduction is central to understanding perception. We report the characterization of surface transduction during active sensing in the rodent vibrissa sensory system, a widely used model. Employing high-speed videography, we tracked vibrissae while rats sampled rough and smooth textures. Variation in vibrissa length predicted motion mean frequencies, including for the highest velocity events, indicating that biomechanics, such as vibrissa resonance, shape signals most likely to drive neural activity. Rough surface contact generated large amplitude, high-velocity "stick-slip-ring" events, while smooth surfaces generated smaller and more regular stick-slip oscillations. Both surfaces produced velocities exceeding those applied in reduced preparations, indicating active sensation of surfaces generates more robust drive than previously predicted. These findings demonstrate a key role for embodiment in vibrissal sensing and the importance of input transformations in sensory representation.

  2. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology.

    PubMed

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R(2), RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  3. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R2, RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  4. Remote sensing of Arctic boundary layer clouds above snow surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, André; Bierwirth, Eike; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    In the Arctic remote sensing of clouds using reflected solar radiation is mostly related to high uncertainties as the contrast between the bright sea ice and snow surface and the clouds is low. Additionally, uncertainties result from variation of the snow grain size which changes the absorption of solar radiation similarly to the size of cloud particles. This is a major issue for understanding the response of Arctic clouds to climate warming as the quantification of cloud properties in this remote region mostly relies on satellite observations. We used spectral radiation measurements of the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART-Albedometer) to improve common used cloud remote sensing algorithms in case of snow surfaces. The measurements were collected during the airborne research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) above the Canadian Beaufort where both sea ice covered and ice free ocean areas were present during the observation period. Based on the spectral absorption characteristics of snow and clouds (assuming to be dominated by the liquid fraction) a combination of wavelengths was found which allows to separate the impact of clouds and snow surface on the reflected radiation measured above the clouds. While snow grain size dominates the absorption at a wavelength of 1.0 μm, information on cloud optical thickness and cloud particle effective radius can be extracted at wavelengths of 1.7 μm and 2.1 μm, respectively. Based on radiative transfer simulations lookup tables for the retrieval algorithm were calculated and used to estimate the theoretical uncertainties of the retrieval. It was found that using ratios instead of absolute radiances reduces the uncertainties significantly. The new algorithm was applied to a specific case observed during the VERDI campaign where a stratocumulus clouds was located above an ice edge. It could be shown that the method works also over water

  5. The Characterization of Surface Variegation Effects on Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    Improvements in remote sensing capabilities hinge very directly upon attaining an understanding of the physical processes contributing to the measurements. In order to devise new measurement strategies and to learn better techniques for processing remotely gathered data, it is necessary to understand and to characterize the complex radiative interactions of the atmosphere-surface system. In particular, it is important to understand the role of atmospheric structure, ground reflectance inhomogeneity and ground bidirectional reflectance type. The goals, then, are to model, analyze, and parameterize the observable effects of three dimensional atmospheric structure and composition and two dimensional variations in ground albedo and bidirectional reflectance. To achieve these goals, a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code is employed to model and analyze the effects of many of the complications which are present in nature.

  6. Active Sensing System with In Situ Adjustable Sensor Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Nurzaman, Surya G.; Culha, Utku; Brodbeck, Luzius; Wang, Liyu; Iida, Fumiya

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread use of sensors in engineering systems like robots and automation systems, the common paradigm is to have fixed sensor morphology tailored to fulfill a specific application. On the other hand, robotic systems are expected to operate in ever more uncertain environments. In order to cope with the challenge, it is worthy of note that biological systems show the importance of suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability to handle different kinds of sensing tasks with particular requirements. Methodology This paper presents a robotics active sensing system which is able to adjust its sensor morphology in situ in order to sense different physical quantities with desirable sensing characteristics. The approach taken is to use thermoplastic adhesive material, i.e. Hot Melt Adhesive (HMA). It will be shown that the thermoplastic and thermoadhesive nature of HMA enables the system to repeatedly fabricate, attach and detach mechanical structures with a variety of shape and size to the robot end effector for sensing purposes. Via active sensing capability, the robotic system utilizes the structure to physically probe an unknown target object with suitable motion and transduce the arising physical stimuli into information usable by a camera as its only built-in sensor. Conclusions/Significance The efficacy of the proposed system is verified based on two results. Firstly, it is confirmed that suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability enables the system to sense different physical quantities, i.e. softness and temperature, with desirable sensing characteristics. Secondly, given tasks of discriminating two visually indistinguishable objects with respect to softness and temperature, it is confirmed that the proposed robotic system is able to autonomously accomplish them. The way the results motivate new research directions which focus on in situ adjustment of sensor morphology will also be discussed. PMID:24416094

  7. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 3 - From theory to applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of volume scattering and emission theory are discussed, taking into account a weakly scattering medium, the Born approximation, first-order renormalization, the radiative transfer method, and the matrix-doubling method. Other topics explored are related to scatterometers and probing systems, the passive microwave sensing of the atmosphere, the passive microwave sensing of the ocean, the passive microwave sensing of land, the active microwave sensing of land, and radar remote sensing applications. Attention is given to inversion techniques, atmospheric attenuation and emission, a temperature profile retrieval from ground-based observations, mapping rainfall rates, the apparent temperature of the sea, the emission behavior of bare soil surfaces, the emission behavior of vegetation canopies, the emission behavior of snow, wind-vector radar scatterometry, radar measurements of sea ice, and the back-scattering behavior of cultural vegetation canopies.

  8. Active particles on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael

    Active systems have proved to be very sensitive to the geometry of their environment. This is often achieved by spending significant time at the boundary, probing its shape by gliding along it. I will discuss coarse graining the microscopic dynamics of self-propelled particles on a general curved surface to predict the way the density profile on the surface depends on its geometry. Beyond confined active particles, this formalism is a natural starting point to study objects that cannot leave the boundary at all, such as cells crawling on a curved substrate, animals running on uneven ground, or active colloids trapped at an interface.

  9. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.

  10. Remote sensing application to regional activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahrokhi, F.; Jones, N. L.; Sharber, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Two agencies within the State of Tennessee were identified whereby the transfer of aerospace technology, namely remote sensing, could be applied to their stated problem areas. Their stated problem areas are wetland and land classification and strip mining studies. In both studies, LANDSAT data was analyzed with the UTSI video-input analog/digital automatic analysis and classification facility. In the West Tennessee area three land-use classifications could be distinguished; cropland, wetland, and forest. In the East Tennessee study area, measurements were submitted to statistical tests which verified the significant differences due to natural terrain, stripped areas, various stages of reclamation, water, etc. Classifications for both studies were output in the form of maps of symbols and varying shades of gray.

  11. Near-field Oblique Remote Sensing of Stream Water-surface Elevation, Slope, and Surface Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.; McDonald, R.; Wright, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for estimating discharges during flood events or in steep channels is the difficulty and hazard inherent in obtaining in-stream measurements. One possible solution is to use near-field remote sensing to obtain simultaneous water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities. In this test case, we utilized Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to remotely measure water-surface elevations and slope in combination with surface velocities estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) obtained by video-camera and/or infrared camera. We tested this method at several sites in New Mexico and Colorado using independent validation data consisting of in-channel measurements from survey-grade GPS and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instruments. Preliminary results indicate that for relatively turbid or steep streams, TLS collects tens of thousands of water-surface elevations and slopes in minutes, much faster than conventional means and at relatively high precision, at least as good as continuous survey-grade GPS measurements. Estimated surface velocities from this technique are within 15% of measured velocity magnitudes and within 10 degrees from the measured velocity direction (using extrapolation from the shallowest bin of the ADCP measurements). Accurately aligning the PIV results into Cartesian coordinates appears to be one of the main sources of error, primarily due to the sensitivity at these shallow oblique look angles and the low numbers of stationary objects for rectification. Combining remotely-sensed water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities produces simultaneous velocity measurements from a large number of locations in the channel and is more spatially extensive than traditional velocity measurements. These factors make this technique useful for improving estimates of flow measurements during flood flows and in steep channels while also decreasing the difficulty and hazard associated with making measurements in these

  12. Photochromic cross-link polymer for color changing and sensing surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Richard; Shi, Jianmin; Forsythe, Eric; Srour, Merric

    2016-12-01

    Photochromic cross-link polymers were developed using patented ultraviolet (UV) photoinitiator and commercial photochromic dyes. The photochromic dyes have been characterized by measuring absorbance before and after UV activation using UV-visible (Vis) spectrometry with varying activation intensities and wavelengths. Photochromic cross-link polymers were characterized by a dynamic xenon and UV light activation and fading system. The curing processes on cloth were established and tested to obtain effective photochromic responses. Both PulseForge photonic curing and PulseForge plus heat surface curing processes had much better photochromic responses (18% to 19%, 16% to 25%, respectively) than the xenon lamp treatment (8%). The newly developed photochromic cross-link polymer showed remarkable coloration contrasts and fast and comparable coloration and fading rates. Those intelligent, controlled color changing and sensing capabilities will be used on flexible and "drapeable" surfaces, which will incorporate ultra-low power sensors, sensor indicators, and identifiers.

  13. Educational activities of remote sensing archaeology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Agapiou, Athos; Lysandrou, Vasilki; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Cuca, Branka; Nisantzi, Argyro; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Krauss, Thomas; Cerra, Daniele; Gessner, Ursula; Schreier, Gunter

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing science is increasingly being used to support archaeological and cultural heritage research in various ways. Satellite sensors either passive or active are currently used in a systematic basis to detect buried archaeological remains and to systematic monitor tangible heritage. In addition, airborne and low altitude systems are being used for documentation purposes. Ground surveys using remote sensing tools such as spectroradiometers and ground penetrating radars can detect variations of vegetation and soil respectively, which are linked to the presence of underground archaeological features. Education activities and training of remote sensing archaeology to young people is characterized of highly importance. Specific remote sensing tools relevant for archaeological research can be developed including web tools, small libraries, interactive learning games etc. These tools can be then combined and aligned with archaeology and cultural heritage. This can be achieved by presenting historical and pre-historical records, excavated sites or even artifacts under a "remote sensing" approach. Using such non-form educational approach, the students can be involved, ask, read, and seek to learn more about remote sensing and of course to learn about history. The paper aims to present a modern didactical concept and some examples of practical implementation of remote sensing archaeology in secondary schools in Cyprus. The idea was built upon an ongoing project (ATHENA) focused on the sue of remote sensing for archaeological research in Cyprus. Through H2020 ATHENA project, the Remote Sensing Science and Geo-Environment Research Laboratory at the Cyprus University of Technology (CUT), with the support of the National Research Council of Italy (CNR) and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) aims to enhance its performance in all these new technologies.

  14. Making Sense of Multiple Physical Activity Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B.; LeMasurier, Guy; Franks, B. Don

    2002-01-01

    This digest provides basic information designed to help people determine which of the many physical activity guidelines are most appropriate for use in specific situations. After an introduction, the digest focuses on: "Factors to Consider in Selecting Appropriate Physical Activity Guidelines" (group credibility and purpose, benefits to…

  15. Coexistence of sense and anti-sense mRNAs of variant surface protein in Giardia lamblia trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junli; Zheng, Wenyu; Wang, Yuehua; Li, Yao; Lu, Siqi; Feng, Xianmin

    2014-02-14

    A strategy of the parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia to evade attack from the host immune system is periodic changes of its surface antigen, a member of the variant surface protein (VSP) family. A post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism has been proposed to explain the presence of only one among many possible VSPs at any time. To investigate this phenomenon further, we extracted total RNA from cultured trophozoites of the G. lamblia C2 isolate, and cDNA was reverse-transcribed from the RNA. Sense and anti-sense VSPs were amplified from the total cDNA using nested PCR with primers designed from the 3'-conserved region and the known 5' or 3' end of the cDNA library. Sequence analyses of the amplified products revealed more than 34 full-length antisense VSPs and a smear of sense VSPs. Sequence alignments and comparisons revealed that these VSPs contained variable N-termini and conserved C-termini, and could be classified into 5 clades based on the sizes and variations of the N-terminal sequence. All antisense VSPs existed in the sense forms, but no corresponding antisense VSP existed for sense RNA (snsRNA) 16. The coexistence of sense and antisense VSP mRNAs in cultured G. lamblia supports the post-transcriptional regulation of VSP expression. We propose that VSPs transcribed simultaneously in the sense and antisense forms form double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) which are degraded by the Dicer endonuclease, while a VSP without an antisense transcription (e.g., snsRNA16) will be expressed on the surface of Giardia. In addition, in the course of this investigation VSPs were identified that were previously not known. PCR-based amplification of specific sense and antisense VSP cDNAs can be used to identify the specific VSP on G. lamblia trophozoites, which is easier than using specific monoclonal antibody approaches.

  16. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-01-01

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage. PMID:26978367

  17. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-03-11

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage.

  18. Evaluation of land ecological environment in Zhoushan Islands by remotely sensed impervious surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Pan, Delu; Chen, Jianyu; Chen, Peng; Jia, Yonghong

    2013-10-01

    Coastal islands are located in a transitional environment where land and ocean interact. During the past 20 years, large areas of the natural landscape of Zhoushan islands have been replaced by human features. There is limited research detailing the amount of impervious surface growth in the Zhoushan islands and trends in the land environment using remotely sensed technologies. The purpose of this paper is to assess the influences of anthropogenic activities on land ecological environment in Zhoushan islands based on remotely sensed impervious surfaces. First the impervious surfaces information of 1986, 1995 and 2006 were estimated using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, and then an integrated state indicator was built. The results reveal that imperious surfaces areas (ISA) of Zhoushan islands remarkably increased from 19.2 km2 (2.73%) in 1986 to 29.5 km2 (4.20%) in 1995, and to 58.2 km2 (8.27%) in 2006. The average state value for the total area was 0.70, 0.65, and 0.55 respectively for 1986, 1995, and 2006. Of the surrounding islands, the Lujiazhi, Xiaogan, Panzhi, and Cezi suffered the most land disturbance intensity from human activities, followed by the Jintang, Xiushan, and Damao, and the Changbai and Changzhi had the lowest disturbance values. It indicates that the land ecological environment of Zhoushan islands was variously disturbed by growing human activities over time. Further, we found that the topography, island size, spatial location from Zhoushan Island and economic policy had an influence on change of impervious surfaces for each island.

  19. Active and responsive polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilin; Han, Yanchun

    2010-02-01

    A central challenge in polymer science today is creating materials that dynamically alter their structures and properties on demand, or in response to changes in their environment. Surfaces represent an attractive area of focus, since they exert disproportionately large effects on properties such as wettability, adhesiveness, optical appearance, and bioactivity, enabling pronounced changes in properties to be accomplished through subtle changes in interfacial structure or chemistry. In this critical review, we review the recent research progress into active and responsive polymer surfaces. The chief purpose of this article is to summarize the advanced preparation techniques and applications in this field from the past decade. This review should be of interest both to new scientists in this field and the interdisciplinary researchers who are working on "intelligent" polymer surfaces (117 references).

  20. Active vibrissal sensing in rodents and marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Mitchinson, Ben; Grant, Robyn A.; Arkley, Kendra; Rankov, Vladan; Perkon, Igor; Prescott, Tony J.

    2011-01-01

    In rats, the long facial whiskers (mystacial macrovibrissae) are repetitively and rapidly swept back and forth during exploration in a behaviour known as ‘whisking’. In this paper, we summarize previous evidence from rats, and present new data for rat, mouse and the marsupial grey short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) showing that whisking in all three species is actively controlled both with respect to movement of the animal's body and relative to environmental structure. Using automatic whisker tracking, and Fourier analysis, we first show that the whisking motion of the mystacial vibrissae, in the horizontal plane, can be approximated as a blend of two sinusoids at the fundamental frequency (mean 8.5, 11.3 and 7.3 Hz in rat, mouse and opossum, respectively) and its second harmonic. The oscillation at the second harmonic is particularly strong in mouse (around 22 Hz) consistent with previous reports of fast whisking in that species. In all three species, we found evidence of asymmetric whisking during head turning and following unilateral object contacts consistent with active control of whisker movement. We propose that the presence of active vibrissal touch in both rodents and marsupials suggests that this behavioural capacity emerged at an early stage in the evolution of therian mammals. PMID:21969685

  1. An integrated active sensing system for damage identifcation and prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wait, J. R.; Park, G. H.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates an integrated approach for identifying structural damage. Two damage identification techniques, Lamb wave propagation and impedance-based methods, are investigated utilizing piezoelectric (PZT) actuators/sensors. The Lamb wave propagation and the impedance methods operate in high frequency ranges (typically > 30 kHz) at which there are measurable changes in structural responses even for incipient damage such as small cracks, debonding, delamination, and loose connections. In Lamb wave propagation, one PZT is used to launch an elastic wave through the structure, and responses are measured by an array of sensors. The technique used for the Lamb wave propagation method looks for the possibility of damage by tracking changes in transmission velocity and wave attenuation/reflections. Experimental results show that this method works well for surface anomalies. The impedance method monitors the variations in structural mechanical impedance, which is coupled with the electrical impedance of the PZT. Through monitoring the measured electrical impedance and comparing it to a baseline measurement, a decision can be made about whether or not structural damage has occurred or is imminent. In addition, significant advances have been made recently by incorporating advanced statistic-based signal processing techniques into the impedance methods. To date, several sets of experiments have been conducted on a cantilevered aluminum plate and composite plate to demonstrate the feasibility of this combined active sensing technology.

  2. Intercomparison of Land Surface Remote Sensing Products From Various Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobron, N.; Pinty, B.; Mélin, F.; Taberner, M.; Verstraete, M.; Widlowski, J.

    2003-12-01

    The biophysical activities on land surfaces are documented from spectral measurements made in space. Advances in the understanding of radiation transfer and availability of higher performance instruments have lead to the development of a new generation of geophysical products able to provide reliable, accurate information on the state and evolution of terrestrial environments. Specifically, a series of optimized algorithms have been developed to estimate the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) for various instruments. Such an approach allows the synergistic use of FAPAR products derived from different sensors and the construction of global FAPAR time series independent from the life time of these specific sensors. The outline of the methodology will be summarized and the preliminary results of an inter-comparison exercise conducted with SeaWiFS, MERIS(ENVISAT), MISR(Terra) and MODIS(Terra) products will be presented.

  3. Browsing Image Collections with Representations of Common-Sense Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Andrew S.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a methodology for creating networks of subject terms by manually representing a large number of common-sense activities that are broadly related to image subject terms. Application of this methodology to the Library of Congress Thesaurus for Graphic Materials produced 768 representations that supported users of a prototype browsing-based…

  4. Method of maintaining activity of hydrogen-sensing platinum electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, J. N., III

    1968-01-01

    Three-electrode hydrogen sensor containing a platinum electrode maintained in a highly catalytic state, operates with a minimal response time and maximal sensitivity to the hydrogen gas being sensed. Electronic control and readout circuitry reactivates the working electrode of the sensor to a state of maximal catalytic activity.

  5. Seasonal variation of land surface fluxes in regional scale by using a remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroizumi, T.; Nakamichi, T.; Miura, T.

    2012-12-01

    Land surface fluxes influence the coupling between the surface and the lower atmosphere, and are also important factors for forming a regional climate.In recent years, it became possible to observe the land surface states in the regional area by the development of the remote sensing technology, and some studies for estimating the land surface energy fluxes at regional scale using the remote sensing data have been carried out. In this study, the surface energy fluxes in the Kanto Plain in Japan where various land uses were mixed were estimated using a remote sensing data (Landsat 7 ETM+), and tried the analysis of the seasonal changes in the land surface energy fluxes. The energy balance and the bulk equations were used in order to estimate the land surface energy fluxes. The parameters in those models were identified using the micro-meteorological data observed above the land surface.

  6. Laboratory insights into the detection of surface biosignatures by remote-sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Roditi, I.; Frey, J.; Thomas, N.

    2014-03-01

    With the progress of direct imaging techniques, it will be possible in the short or long-term future to retrieve more efficiently the information on the physical properties of the light reflected by rocky exoplanets (Traub et al., 2010). The search for visible-infrared absorption bands of peculiar gases (O2, CH4 etc.) in this light could give clues for the presence of life (Kaltenegger and Selsis, 2007). Even more uplifting would be the direct detection of life itself, on the surface of an exoplanet. Considering this latter possibility, what is the potential of optical remote-sensing methods to detect surface biosignatures? Reflected light from the surface of the Earth exhibits a strong surface biosignature in the form of an abrupt change of reflectance between the visible and infrared range of the spectrum (Seager et al., 2005). This spectral feature called "vegetation red-edge" is possibly the consequence of biological evolution selecting the right chemical structures enabling the plants to absorb the visible energy, while preventing them from overheating by reflecting more efficiently the infrared. Such red-edge is also found in primitive photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, that colonized the surface of the Earth ocean and continents billions of years before multicellular plants (Knacke, 2003). If life ever arose on an Earth-like exoplanet, one could hypothesize that some form of its surface-life evolves into similar photo-active organisms, also exhibiting a red-edge. In this paper, we will present our plan and preliminary results of a laboratory study aiming at precising the potentiality of remote sensing techniques in detecting such surface biosignatures. Using equipment that has been developed in our team for surface photometry studies (Pommerol 2011, Jost 2013, Pommerol 2013), we will investigate the reflectance spectra and bidirectional reflectance function of soils containing bacteria such as cyanobacteria, in various environmental conditions. We will

  7. Surface confined assemblies and polymers for sensing and molecular logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Graham; Altman, Marc; Motiei, Leila; Lahav, Michal; van der Boom, Milko E.

    2013-05-01

    Since the development of molecule-based sensors and the introduction of molecules mimicking the behavior of the AND gate in solution by de Silva in 1993, molecular (Boolean) Logic and Computing (MBLC) has become increasingly popular. The molecular approach toward Boolean logic resulted in intriguing proofs of concepts in solution including logic gates, half-adders, multiplexers, and flip-flop logic circuits. Molecular assemblies can perform diverse logic tasks by reconfiguring their inputs. Our recent research activities focus on MBLC with electrochromic polymers and immobilized polypyridyl complexes on solid support. We have designed a series of coordination-based thin films that are formed linearly by stepwise wet-chemical deposition or by self-propagating molecular assembly. The electrochromic properties of these films can be used for (i) detecting various analytes in solution and in the air, (ii) MBLC, (iii) electron-transfer studies, and (iv) interlayers for efficient inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cells. Our concept toward MBLC with functionalized surfaces is applicable to electrochemical and chemical inputs coupled with optical readout. Using this approach, we demonstrated various logic architectures with redox-active functionalized surfaces. Electrochemically operated sequential logic systems (e.g., flip-flops), multi-valued logic, and multi-state memory have been designed, which can improve computational power without increasing spatial requirements. Applying multi-valued digits in data storage and information processing could exponentially increase memory capacity. Our approach is applicable to highly diverse electrochromic thin films that operate at practical voltages (< 1.5 V).

  8. Engineering of Surface Chemistry for Enhanced Sensitivity in Nanoporous Interferometric Sensing Platforms.

    PubMed

    Law, Cheryl Suwen; Sylvia, Georgina M; Nemati, Madieh; Yu, Jingxian; Losic, Dusan; Abell, Andrew D; Santos, Abel

    2017-03-15

    We explore new approaches to engineering the surface chemistry of interferometric sensing platforms based on nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) and reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). Two surface engineering strategies are presented, namely (i) selective chemical functionalization of the inner surface of NAA pores with amine-terminated thiol molecules and (ii) selective chemical functionalization of the top surface of NAA with dithiol molecules. The strong molecular interaction of Au(3+) ions with thiol-containing functional molecules of alkane chain or peptide character provides a model sensing system with which to assess the sensitivity of these NAA platforms by both molecular feature and surface engineering. Changes in the effective optical thickness of the functionalized NAA photonic films (i.e., sensing principle), in response to gold ions, are monitored in real-time by RIfS. 6-Amino-1-hexanethiol (inner surface) and 1,6-hexanedithiol (top surface), the most sensitive functional molecules from approaches i and ii, respectively, were combined into a third sensing strategy whereby the NAA platforms are functionalized on both the top and inner surfaces concurrently. Engineering of the surface according to this approach resulted in an additive enhancement in sensitivity of up to 5-fold compared to previously reported systems. This study advances the rational engineering of surface chemistry for interferometric sensing on nanoporous platforms with potential applications for real-time monitoring of multiple analytes in dynamic environments.

  9. On the haptic nature of the active electric sense of fish.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Angel A; Aguilera, Pedro A; Carolina Pereira, Ana; Rodríguez-Cattáneo, Alejo

    2013-11-06

    Electroreception is a sensory modality present in chondrichthyes, actinopterygii, amphibians, and mammalian monotremes. The study of this non-intuitive sensory modality has provided insights for better understanding of sensory systems in general and inspired the development of innovative artificial devices. Here we review evidence obtained from the analysis of electrosensory images, neurophysiological data from the recording of unitary activity in the electrosensory lobe, and psychophysical data from analysis of novelty responses provoked in well-defined stimulus conditions, which all confirm that active electroreception has a short range, and that the influence of exploratory movements on object identification is strong. In active electric images two components can be identified: a "global" image profile depending on the volume, shape and global impedance of an object and a "texture" component depending on its surface attributes. There is a short range of the active electric sense and the progressive "blurring" of object image with distance. Consequently, the lack of precision regarding object location, considered together, challenge the current view of this sense as serving long range electrolocation and the commonly used metaphor of "electric vision". In fact, the active electric sense shares more commonalities with human active touch than with teleceptive senses as vision or audition. Taking into account that other skin exteroceptors and proprioception may be congruently stimulated during fish exploratory movements we propose that electric, mechanoceptive and proprioceptive sensory modalities found in electric fish could be considered together as a single haptic sensory system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012.

  10. Bragg gratings in surface-core fibers: Refractive index and directional curvature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Oliveira, Ricardo; Aristilde, Stenio; Chesini, Giancarlo; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Nogueira, Rogério N.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we report, to our knowledge, the first extended study of the inscription of Bragg gratings in surface-core fibers and their application in refractive index and directional curvature sensing. The research ranges from fiber fabrication and grating inscription in untapered and tapered fibers to the performance of simulations and sensing measurements. Maximum sensitivities of 40 nm/RIU and 202.7 pm/m-1 were attained in refractive index and curvature measurements respectively. The obtained results compares well to other fiber Bragg grating based devices. Ease of fabrication, robustness and versatility makes surface-core fibers an interesting platform when exploring fiber sensing devices.

  11. A systematic approach to the Kansei factors of tactile sense regarding the surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyungmee; Jun, Changrim

    2007-01-01

    Designing products to satisfy customers' emotion requires the information gathered through the human senses, which are visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile senses. By controlling certain design factors, customers' emotion can be evaluated, designed, and satisfied. In this study, a systematic approach is proposed to study the tactile sense regarding the surface roughness. Numerous pairs of antonymous tactile adjectives are collected and clustered. The optimal number of adjective clusters is estimated based on the several criterion functions. The representative average preferences of the final clusters are obtained as the estimates of engineering parameters to control the surface roughness of the commercial polymer-based products.

  12. Molecular Engineering of Surfaces for Sensing and Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    difference in protein orientation on different charged surfaces. Surface Plasmon Resonance ( SPR ) and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF...6 SPR STUDY OF PROTEIN ORIENTATION ON CHARGED SURFACES...THE LOW DETECTION REGION. ........................81 FIGURE 7.5 COMPENSATED SPR RESPONSE SHOWING A) A DETECTION OF 0.5 NG/ML AND B) NO CLEAR DETECTION

  13. Active sensing without efference copy: referent control of perception.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Anatol G

    2016-09-01

    Although action and perception are different behaviors, they are likely to be interrelated, as implied by the notions of perception-action coupling and active sensing. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the nervous system directly preprograms motor commands required for actions and uses a copy of them called efference copy (EC) to also influence our senses. This review offers a critical analysis of the EC concept by identifying its limitations. An alternative to the EC concept is based on the experimentally confirmed notion that sensory signals from receptors are perceived relative to referent signals specified by the brain. These referents also underlie the control of motor actions by predetermining where, in the spatial domain, muscles can work without preprogramming how they should work in terms of motor commands or EC. This approach helps solve several problems of action and explain several sensory experiences, including position sense and the sense that the world remains stationary despite changes in its retinal image during eye or body motion (visual space constancy). The phantom limb phenomenon and other kinesthetic illusions are also explained within this framework.

  14. Array-based sensing with nanoparticles: “Chemical noses” for sensing biomolecules and cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Oscar R.; Creran, Brian; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based arrays have been used to distinguish a wide range of biomolecular targets through pattern recognition. In this report, we highlight new “chemical nose” methodologies that use nanoparticle systems to provide high sensitivity sensing of biomolecular targets, including fluorescent polymer/gold nanoparticle complexes that can discriminate between different bioanalytes including proteins, bacteria, and mammalian cells as well as dye-based micellar systems for the detection of clinically important metallo- and non-metallo proteins. PMID:20801707

  15. Surface sensing and adhesion of Escherichia coli controlled by the Cpx-signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Karen; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is an important initial step in biofilm formation, which may cause problems in medical, environmental, and industrial settings. In spite of obvious phenotypic differences between attached and planktonic cells, knowledge about the genetic basis for these differences and how adhesion-induced changes are mediated is limited. The Cpx two-component signal transduction pathway responds specifically to stress caused by disturbances in the cell envelope and activates genes encoding periplasmic protein folding and degrading factors. Here, we address the role of the Cpx-signaling pathway in sensing and responding to the physical change occurring during adhesion of Escherichia coli to surfaces. We present evidence that the expression of Cpx-regulated genes is induced during initial adhesion of E. coli to abiotic surfaces. This induction is specifically observed upon attachment of stationary-phase cells to hydrophobic surfaces. Moreover, surface-induced activity of the Cpx response requires NlpE, an outer membrane lipoprotein, which has previously been shown to induce the Cpx system when overproduced. The importance of a functional Cpx response during adhesion is further supported by the fact that a dramatically lower number of cells attach to the surface and dynamic cell–surface interactions as measured by a quartz crystal microbalance technique are altered when the CpxRA pathway is disrupted. The defects in adhesion exhibited by the cpxR and nlpE mutants were strikingly similar to those of wild-type cells in which protein synthesis was inhibited, suggesting that the Cpx pathway plays a key role in the regulation of adhesion-induced gene expression. PMID:11830644

  16. Performance evaluation for different sensing surface of BICELLs bio-transducers for dry eye biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna, M. F.; Holgado, M.; Santamaría, B.; López, A.; Maigler, M.; Lavín, A.; de Vicente, J.; Soria, J.; Suarez, T.; Bardina, C.; Jara, M.; Sanza, F. J.; Casquel, R.; Otón, A.; Riesgo, T.

    2015-03-01

    Biophotonic Sensing Cells (BICELLs) are demonstrated to be an efficient technology for label-free biosensing and in concrete for evaluating dry eye diseases. The main advantage of BICELLs is its capability to be used by dropping directly a tear into the sensing surface without the need of complex microfluidics systems. Among this advantage, compact Point of Care read-out device is employed with the capability of evaluating different types of BICELLs packaged on Biochip-Kits that can be fabricated by using different sensing surfaces material. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of the combination of three sensing surface materials: (3-Glycidyloxypropyl) trimethoxysilane (GPTMS), SU-8 resist and Nitrocellulose (NC) for two different biomarkers relevant for dry eye diseases: PRDX-5 and ANXA-11.

  17. Integrating passive and active remote sensing methods to assess and map soil salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Chudnovsky Chudnovsky, Alexandra

    2013-04-01

    Irrigated lands in Israel are subjected to salinization processes, mostly as a result of using low-quality irrigation water. The Jezre'el Valley in northern Israel is an example of this phenomenon and thus it was selected to carry out this study. This area is characterized by increasing soil salinity over the years, followed by an increase in soil SAR (Sodium Adsorption Ration), which leads to a significant deterioration of the soil structure and a reduced infiltration rate. The traditional methods of mapping, by soil sampling (sampling, laboratory checks, and mapping) are time-consuming and do not provide near real-time information. An alternative method is suggested herein using active and passive remote sensing methods: (1) an hyperspectral data from the ground ASD field spectrometer and from the air, by AISA air-born sensor (2) EFDM- Frequency Domain Electro-Magnetic, and (3) GPR- ground penetration radar. The constructed PLS model was applied on the hyperspectral images, producing an EC thematic map of the surface. In addition, a sub-surface salinity map was generated by applying the surface - sub-surface correlation on the surface EC thematic map. The generated maps were found to be in good agreement with maps based on chemical data. The results indicated that traditional methods are correlated with the remote sensing ones and that merging the three remote sensing methodologies may yield a better picture than each of them alone. In addition, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of applied in this study methods. It can be concluded that it is possible to account for soil salinity based on active and passive remote sensing means.

  18. Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using Surface Reflected GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Maslanik, James; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Axelrad, Penina; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new research effort to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. Our experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and freshwater ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska indicating correlation between forward-scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered measurements.

  19. Measuring thermal budgets of active volcanoes by satellite remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L.; Francis, P. W.; Rothery, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Thematic Mapper measurements of the total radiant energy flux Q at Lascar volcano in north Chile for December 1984 are reported. The results are consistent with the earlier suggestion that a lava lake is the source of a reported thermal budget anomaly, and with values for 1985-1986 that are much lower, suggesting that fumarolic activity was then a more likely heat source. The results show that satellite remote sensing may be used to monitor the activity of a volcano quantitatively, in a way not possible by conventional ground studies, and may provide a method for predicting eruptions.

  20. Monitor senses amount of contamination deposited on surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehy, R. N.

    1968-01-01

    Monitoring device detects and indicates directly the amount of contamination deposited on a surface. It uses an optical system in conjunction with a reliable collimated light source and associated electronics. Change in its output signal is proportional to change in the optical absorption characteristics of the sample plate surface.

  1. Coherent gradient sensing method and system for measuring surface curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosakis, Ares J. (Inventor); Singh, Ramen P. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elizabeth (Inventor); Moore, Jr., Nicholas R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method for determining a curvature of a specularly reflective surface based on optical interference. Two optical gratings are used to produce a spatial displacement in an interference field of two different diffraction components produced by one grating from different diffraction components produced by another grating. Thus, the curvature of the surface can be determined.

  2. Non-Lambertian effects on remote sensing of surface reflectance and vegetation index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. Y.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of non-Lambertian reflection from a homogeneous surface on remote sensing of the surface reflectance and vegetation index from a satellite. Remote measurement of the surface characteristics is perturbed by atmospheric scattering of sun light. This scattering tends to smooth the angular dependence of non-Lambertian surface reflectances, an effect that is not present in the case of Lambertian surfaces. This effect is calculated to test the validity of a Lambertian assumption used in remote sensing. For the three types of vegetations considered in this study, the assumption of Lambertian surface can be used satisfactorily in the derivation of surface reflectance from remotely measured radiance for a view angle outside the backscattering region. Within the backscattering region, however, the use of the assumption can result in a considerable error in the derived surface reflectance. Accuracy also deteriorates with increasing solar zenith angle. The angular distribution of the surface reflectance derived from remote measurements is smoother than that at the surface. The effect of surface non-Lambertianity on remote sensing of vegetation index is very weak. Since the effect is similiar in the visible and near infrared part of the solar spectrum for the vegetations treated in this study, it is canceled in deriving the vegetation index. The effect of the diffuse skylight on surface reflectance measurements at ground level is also discussed.

  3. Tribotronic Transistor Array as an Active Tactile Sensing System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi Wei; Pang, Yaokun; Zhang, Limin; Lu, Cunxin; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-12-27

    Large-scale tactile sensor arrays are of great importance in flexible electronics, human-robot interaction, and medical monitoring. In this paper, a flexible 10 × 10 tribotronic transistor array (TTA) is developed as an active tactile sensing system by incorporating field-effect transistor units and triboelectric nanogenerators into a polyimide substrate. The drain-source current of each tribotronic transistor can be individually modulated by the corresponding external contact, which has induced a local electrostatic potential to act as the conventional gate voltage. By scaling down the pixel size from 5 × 5 to 0.5 × 0.5 mm(2), the sensitivities of single pixels are systematically investigated. The pixels of the TTA show excellent durability, independence, and synchronicity, which are suitable for applications in real-time tactile sensing, motion monitoring, and spatial mapping. The integrated tribotronics provides an unconventional route to realize an active tactile sensing system, with prospective applications in wearable electronics, human-machine interfaces, fingerprint identification, and so on.

  4. Dynorphin Activates Quorum Sensing Quinolone Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zaborina, Olga; Lepine, Francois; Xiao, Gaoping; Valuckaite, Vesta; Chen, Yimei; Li, Terry; Ciancio, Mae; Zaborin, Alex; Petroff, Elaine; Turner, Jerrold R; Rahme, Laurence G; Chang, Eugene; Alverdy, John C

    2007-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that compounds released during host stress directly activate the virulence of certain opportunistic pathogens. Here, we considered that endogenous opioids might function as such compounds, given that they are among the first signals to be released at multiple tissue sites during host stress. We tested the ability of various opioid compounds to enhance the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using pyocyanin production as a biological readout, and demonstrated enhanced virulence when P. aeruginosa was exposed to synthetic (U-50,488) and endogenous (dynorphin) κ-agonists. Using various mutants and reporter strains of P. aeruginosa, we identified involvement of key elements of the quorum sensing circuitry such as the global transcriptional regulator MvfR and the quorum sensing-related quinolone signaling molecules PQS, HHQ, and HQNO that respond to κ-opioids. The in vivo significance of κ-opioid signaling of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated in mice by showing that dynorphin is released from the intestinal mucosa following ischemia/reperfusion injury, activates quinolone signaling in P. aeruginosa, and enhances the virulence of P. aeruginosa against Lactobacillus spp. and Caenorhabditis elegans. Taken together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa can intercept opioid compounds released during host stress and integrate them into core elements of quorum sensing circuitry leading to enhanced virulence. PMID:17367209

  5. Surface enhanced Raman scattering for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrift, Will; Bhattacharjee, Arunima; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, Mahsa; Lu, Ying; Hochbaum, Allon; Capolino, Filippo; Whiteson, Katrine; Ragan, Regina

    2015-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a biofilm forming bacterium, commonly affects cystic fibrosis, burn victims, and immunocompromised patients. PA produces pyocyanin, an aromatic, redox active, secondary metabolite as part of its quorum sensing signaling system activated during biofilm formation. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors composed of Au nanospheres chemically assembled into clusters on diblock copolymer templates were fabricated and the ability to detect pyocyanin to monitor biofilm formation was investigated. Electromagnetic full wave simulations of clusters observed in scanning electron microcopy images show that the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength is 696 nm for a dimer with a gap spacing of 1 nm in an average dielectric environment of the polymer and analyte; the local electric field enhancement is on the order of 400 at resonance, relative to free space. SERS data acquired at 785 nm excitation from a monolayer of benzenethiol on fabricated samples was compared with Raman data of pure benzenethiol and enhancement factors as large as 8×109 were calculated that are consistent with simulated field enhancements. Using this system, the limit of detection of pyocyanin in pure gradients was determined to be 10 parts per billion. In SERS data of the supernatant from the time dependent growth of PA shaking cultures, pyocyanin vibrational modes were clearly observable during the logarithmic growth phase corresponding to activation of genes related to biofilm formation. These results pave the way for the use of SERS sensors for the early detection of biofilm formation, leading to reduced healthcare costs and better patient outcomes.

  6. LAnd surface remote sensing Products VAlidation System (LAPVAS) and its preliminary application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xingwen; Wen, Jianguang; Tang, Yong; Ma, Mingguo; Dou, Baocheng; Wu, Xiaodan; Meng, Lumin

    2014-11-01

    The long term record of remote sensing product shows the land surface parameters with spatial and temporal change to support regional and global scientific research widely. Remote sensing product with different sensors and different algorithms is necessary to be validated to ensure the high quality remote sensing product. Investigation about the remote sensing product validation shows that it is a complex processing both the quality of in-situ data requirement and method of precision assessment. A comprehensive validation should be needed with long time series and multiple land surface types. So a system named as land surface remote sensing product is designed in this paper to assess the uncertainty information of the remote sensing products based on a amount of in situ data and the validation techniques. The designed validation system platform consists of three parts: Validation databases Precision analysis subsystem, Inter-external interface of system. These three parts are built by some essential service modules, such as Data-Read service modules, Data-Insert service modules, Data-Associated service modules, Precision-Analysis service modules, Scale-Change service modules and so on. To run the validation system platform, users could order these service modules and choreograph them by the user interactive and then compete the validation tasks of remote sensing products (such as LAI ,ALBEDO ,VI etc.) . Taking SOA-based architecture as the framework of this system. The benefit of this architecture is the good service modules which could be independent of any development environment by standards such as the Web-Service Description Language(WSDL). The standard language: C++ and java will used as the primary programming language to create service modules. One of the key land surface parameter, albedo, is selected as an example of the system application. It is illustrated that the LAPVAS has a good performance to implement the land surface remote sensing product

  7. Observations of Land Surface Variability Using Passive Microwave Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the global variability of land surface wetness (soil moisture), skin temperature, and related surface fluxes of heat and moisture is key to assessing the importance of the land surface in influencing climate. The feasibility of producing model estimates of these quantities is being studied as part of the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP). In the GSWP approach, meteorological observations and analyses are used to drive global circulation models. Satellite measurements can provide independent estimates of key land surface parameters that are needed for initializing and validating the climate models and for monitoring long-term change. Satellite observations of the land surface can also be assimilated into soil models to estimate moisture in the root zone. In our research, passive microwave satellite data recorded during 1978-1987 from the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) are being used to examine spatial and temporal trends in surface soil moisture, vegetation, and temperature. These data include observations at C and X bands (6.6 and 10.7 GHz), which are not available on the current Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and are precursors to data that will become available from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) on Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS-II) and Earth Observing System (EOS) PM1 in the year 2000. A chart shows a time-series of SMMR-derived surface temperature, T-e and surface soil moisture M, retrieved on a 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg grid and further averaged over a 4 deg x 10 deg study region in the African Sahel. Also shown are National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) model outputs of surface temperature, T-sfc, and soil wetness, Soil-w. The variables have been scaled to have similar dynamic ranges on the plots. The NCEP data from the NCEP Reanalysis Project are monthly averages on a 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg grid averaged over

  8. Towards GPS Surface Reflection Remote Sensing of Sea Ice Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Axelrad, P.; Katzberg, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the research to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. The characteristics of the GPS signals and equipment afford the possibility of new measurements not possible with existing radar and passive microwave systems. In particular, the GPS receiving systems are small and light-weight, and as such are particularly well suited to be deployed on small aircraft or satellite platforms with minimal impact. Our preliminary models and experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and fresh-water ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska suggesting correlation between forward scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered signals.

  9. California nearshore surface currents. [monitoring by remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirie, D. M.; Murphy, M. J.; Edmisten, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    During the oceanic period from July to November, the southward flowing California current dominates the nearshore current patterns. Commencing about the middle of November and extending to mid-February, the Davidson current, a northward moving countercurrent, is the dominant inshore transporter of water and suspensates. The phenomenon of upwelling is prevalent during the period from the middle of February to the end of July. Thus, every year along the coast of California, there are three successive current seasons: the oceanic, the Davidson, and the upwelling. This paper is a discussion of the nature of these nearshore currents. In addition, the capabilities of various remote sensing platforms and systems for providing methods of monitoring the coastal processes associated with the current seasons of California are demonstrated herein.

  10. Using Temperature-Dependent Phenomena at Oxide Surfaces for Species Recognition in Chemical Sensing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semancik, Steve; Meier, Douglas; Evju, Jon; Benkstein, Kurt; Boger, Zvi; Montgomery, Chip

    2006-03-01

    Nanostructured films of SnO2 and TiO2 have been deposited on elements in MEMS arrays to fabricate solid state conductometric gas microsensors. The multilevel platforms within an array, called microhotplates, are individually addressable for localized temperature control and measurement of sensing film electrical conductance. Temperature variations of the microhotplates are employed in thermally-activated CVD oxide film growth, and for rapid temperature-programmed operation of the microsensors. Analytical information on environmental gas phase composition is produced temporally as purposeful thermal fluctuations provide energetic and kinetic control of surface reaction and adsorption/desorption phenomena. Resulting modulations of oxide adsorbate populations cause changing charge transfer behavior and measurable conductance responses. Rich data streams from different sensing films in the arrays have been analyzed by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to successfully recognize low concentration species in mixed gases. We illustrate capabilities of the approach and technology in the homeland security area, where dangerous chemicals (TICs, CWSs and CWAs) have been detected at 10-100 ppb levels in interference-spiked air backgrounds.

  11. Microstrip Antenna for Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramhat-Samii, Yahya; Kona, Keerti; Manteghi, Majid; Dinardo, Steven; Hunter, Don; Njoku, Eni; Wilson, Wiliam; Yueh, Simon

    2009-01-01

    This compact, lightweight, dual-frequency antenna feed developed for future soil moisture and sea surface salinity (SSS) missions can benefit future soil and ocean studies by lowering mass, volume, and cost of the antenna system. It also allows for airborne soil moisture and salinity remote sensors operating on small aircraft. While microstrip antenna technology has been developed for radio communications, it has yet to be applied to combined radar and radiometer for Earth remote sensing. The antenna feed provides a key instrument element enabling high-resolution radiometric observations with large, deployable antennas. The design is based on the microstrip stacked-patch array (MSPA) used to feed a large, lightweight, deployable, rotating mesh antenna for spaceborne L-band (approximately equal to 1 GHz) passive and active sensing systems. The array consists of stacked patches to provide dual-frequency capability and suitable radiation patterns. The stacked-patch microstrip element was designed to cover the required L-band center frequencies at 1.26 GHz (lower patch) and 1.413 GHz (upper patch), with dual-linear polarization capabilities. The dimension of patches produces the required frequencies. To achieve excellent polarization isolation and control of antenna sidelobes for the MSPA, the orientation of each stacked-patch element within the array is optimized to reduce the cross-polarization. A specialized feed-distribution network was designed to achieve the required excitation amplitude and phase for each stacked-patch element.

  12. Improvement of Gas-Sensing Performance of Large-Area Tungsten Disulfide Nanosheets by Surface Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyung Yong; Song, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Youngjun; Choi, Taejin; Shin, Sera; Lee, Chang Wan; Lee, Kyounghoon; Koo, Jahyun; Lee, Hoonkyung; Kim, Jongbaeg; Lee, Taeyoon; Park, Jusang; Kim, Hyungjun

    2016-10-05

    Semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are promising gas-sensing materials due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. However, their poor gas-sensing performance resulting from the low response, incomplete recovery, and insufficient selectivity hinders the realization of high-performance 2D TMDC gas sensors. Here, we demonstrate the improvement of gas-sensing performance of large-area tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheets through surface functionalization using Ag nanowires (NWs). Large-area WS2 nanosheets were synthesized through atomic layer deposition of WO3 followed by sulfurization. The pristine WS2 gas sensors exhibited a significant response to acetone and NO2 but an incomplete recovery in the case of NO2 sensing. After AgNW functionalization, the WS2 gas sensor showed dramatically improved response (667%) and recovery upon NO2 exposure. Our results establish that the proposed method is a promising strategy to improve 2D TMDC gas sensors.

  13. Wageningen UR Unmanned Aerial Remote Sensing Facility - Overview of activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, Harm; Keesstra, Saskia; Kooistra, Lammert; Suomalainen, Juha; Mucher, Sander; Kramer, Henk; Franke, Jappe

    2016-04-01

    To support environmental management there is an increasing need for timely, accurate and detailed information on our land. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are increasingly used to monitor agricultural crop development, habitat quality or urban heat efficiency. An important reason is that UAS technology is maturing quickly while the flexible capabilities of UAS fill a gap between satellite based and ground based geo-sensing systems. In 2012, different groups within Wageningen University and Research Centre have established an Unmanned Airborne Remote Sensing Facility. The objective of this facility is threefold: a) To develop innovation in the field of remote sensing science by providing a platform for dedicated and high-quality experiments; b) To support high quality UAS services by providing calibration facilities and disseminating processing procedures to the UAS user community; and c) To promote and test the use of UAS in a broad range of application fields like habitat monitoring, precision agriculture and land degradation assessment. The facility is hosted by the Laboratory of Geo-Information Science and Remote Sensing (GRS) and the Department of Soil Physics and Land Management (SLM) of Wageningen University together with the team Earth Informatics (EI) of Alterra. The added value of the Unmanned Aerial Remote Sensing Facility is that compared to for example satellite based remote sensing more dedicated science experiments can be prepared. This includes for example higher frequent observations in time (e.g., diurnal observations), observations of an object under different observation angles for characterization of BRDF and flexibility in use of camera's and sensors types. In this way, laboratory type of set ups can be tested in a field situation and effects of up-scaling can be tested. In the last years we developed and implemented different camera systems (e.g. a hyperspectral pushbroom system, and multispectral frame cameras) which we operated in projects all

  14. The Surface Contour Radar, a unique remote sensing instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, J. E.; Uliana, E. A.; Walsh, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    A 36 GHz computer controlled airborne Surface Contour Radar (SCR) is described, which was developed by the Naval Research Laboratory and NASA. The system uses pulse-compression techniques and dual frequency carriers spaced far enough apart to be decorrelated on the sea surface. The continuous wave transmitter is biphase modulated, the return signal is autocorrelated, and the code length and clock rate are variable, providing selectable range resolutions of 0.15, 0.30, 0.61 and 1.52 m. The SCR generates a false-color coded elevation map of the sea surface below the aircraft in real time, and can routinely produce ocean directional wave spectra with off-line data processing.

  15. Aquarius and Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Torrusio, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius is an L-band radiometer and scatterometer instrument combination designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The instrument is designed to provide global salinity maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. The science objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This data will promote understanding of ocean circulation and its role in the global water cycle and climate.

  16. [The progress in retrieving land surface temperature based on thermal infrared and microwave remote sensing technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Hua; Li, Xin; Yao, Feng-Mei; Li, Xian-Hua

    2009-08-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important parameter in the study on the exchange of substance and energy between land surface and air for the land surface physics process at regional and global scales. Many applications of satellites remotely sensed data must provide exact and quantificational LST, such as drought, high temperature, forest fire, earthquake, hydrology and the vegetation monitor, and the models of global circulation and regional climate also need LST as input parameter. Therefore, the retrieval of LST using remote sensing technology becomes one of the key tasks in quantificational remote sensing study. Normally, in the spectrum bands, the thermal infrared (TIR, 3-15 microm) and microwave bands (1 mm-1 m) are important for retrieval of the LST. In the present paper, firstly, several methods for estimating the LST on the basis of thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing were synthetically reviewed, i. e., the LST measured with an ground-base infrared thermometer, the LST retrieval from mono-window algorithm (MWA), single-channel algorithm (SCA), split-window techniques (SWT) and multi-channels algorithm(MCA), single-channel & multi-angle algorithm and multi-channels algorithm & multi-angle algorithm, and retrieval method of land surface component temperature using thermal infrared remotely sensed satellite observation. Secondly, the study status of land surface emissivity (epsilon) was presented. Thirdly, in order to retrieve LST for all weather conditions, microwave remotely sensed data, instead of thermal infrared data, have been developed recently, and the LST retrieval method from passive microwave remotely sensed data was also introduced. Finally, the main merits and shortcomings of different kinds of LST retrieval methods were discussed, respectively.

  17. Remote sensing of the Dead Sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehorai, R.; Lensky, I. M.; Lensky, N. G.; Shiff, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique terminal lake located at the lowest place on Earth's surface. It has the highest surface temperature, salinity, and density among Earth's large water bodies, and its level is currently dropping at a rate of ˜1 m/a. Knowledge of the Dead Sea thermal and saline structure is based on meteorological and hydrological measurements from a single site at a time. In this study, we used satellite and in situ data to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of the Dead Sea sea surface temperature (SST) and to explore the causes for these variations. Sequences of almost continuous individual satellite images were transformed into a time series of parameters representing the spatial distribution of SST. Also used were in situ measured bulk SST, wind speed, solar radiation, and water temperature profiles with depth. Analysis of this data set shows strong diurnal and seasonal variations of the surface and vertical temperature field and the meteorological forcing. The temperature field is heterogeneous after noon, when radiation is high and wind speed is low and thermal layering develops. The temperature field is homogeneous during the nighttime, when solar radiation is absent and the high wind speed vertically mixes the upper layer.

  18. Sea surface conditions remotely sensed by upward-looking ADCPs

    SciTech Connect

    Visbeck, M.; Fischer, J.

    1995-02-01

    Surface data obtained from 153-kHz acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) deployed in the Greenland Sea at about 350-m depth during the winter of 1988/89 were investigated under several aspects. First a method is described to improve the instrument depth measurements using the binned backscattered energy profile near the surface. The accuracy of the depth estimates is found to be significantly better than 0.5 m. Further, improvements of wind speed estimates were found by using the ambient noise in the 150-kHz band in favor of the surface backscattered energy as suggested by Schott. Limitations of the ambient sound method at low wind speeds are presented when thermal noise overwhelms the wind-induced noise. Finally, a method to detect the presence of sea ice above ADCP is presented by cross correlating the surface backscatter strength and the magnitudes of all Doppler velocity components. The resulting time series of ice concentration are in overall good agreement with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) estimates but allow for higher temporal resolution. Further, in the vicinity of the ice edge, enhanced high-frequency ambient noise in the 150-kHz band was observed.

  19. Remote sensing of environmental impact of land use activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, C. K.

    1977-01-01

    The capability to monitor land cover, associated in the past with aerial film cameras and radar systems, was discussed in regard to aircraft and spacecraft multispectral scanning sensors. A proposed thematic mapper with greater spectral and spatial resolutions for the fourth LANDSAT is expected to usher in new environmental monitoring capability. In addition, continuing improvements in image classification by supervised and unsupervised computer techniques are being operationally verified for discriminating environmental impacts of human activities on the land. The benefits of employing remote sensing for this discrimination was shown to far outweigh the incremental costs of converting to an aircraft-satellite multistage system.

  20. Characterization of Surface Reflectance Variation Effects on Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes to simulate the effects on remote sensing in visible and infrared wavelengths of variables which affect classification is examined. These variables include detector viewing angle, atmospheric aerosol size distribution, aerosol vertical and horizontal distribution (e.g., finite clouds), the form of the bidirectional ground reflectance function, and horizontal variability of reflectance type and reflectivity (albedo). These simulations are used to characterize the sensitivity of observables (intensity and polarization) to variations in the underlying physical parameters both to improve algorithms for the removal of atmospheric effects and to identify techniques which can improve classification accuracy. It was necessary to revise and validate the simulation codes (CTRANS, ARTRAN, and the Mie scattering code) to improve efficiency and accommodate a new operational environment, and to build the basic software tools for acquisition and off-line manipulation of simulation results. Initial calculations compare cases in which increasing amounts of aerosol are shifted into the stratosphere, maintaining a constant optical depth. In the case of moderate aerosol optical depth, the effect on the spread function is to scale it linearly as would be expected from a single scattering model. Varying the viewing angle appears to provide the same qualitative effect as modifying the vertical optical depth (for Lambertian ground reflectance).

  1. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ta, Chieu Anh Kim; Arnason, John Thor

    2015-12-26

    Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS). As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented.

  2. Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Platforms: Engineered Surface Chemistry and Structure for Optical Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kumeria, Tushar; Santos, Abel; Losic, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical anodization of pure aluminum enables the growth of highly ordered nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) structures. This has made NAA one of the most popular nanomaterials with applications including molecular separation, catalysis, photonics, optoelectronics, sensing, drug delivery, and template synthesis. Over the past decades, the ability to engineer the structure and surface chemistry of NAA and its optical properties has led to the establishment of distinctive photonic structures that can be explored for developing low-cost, portable, rapid-response and highly sensitive sensing devices in combination with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and reflective interference spectroscopy (RIfS) techniques. This review article highlights the recent advances on fabrication, surface modification and structural engineering of NAA and its application and performance as a platform for SPR- and RIfS-based sensing and biosensing devices. PMID:25004150

  3. Nanoporous anodic alumina platforms: engineered surface chemistry and structure for optical sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Kumeria, Tushar; Santos, Abel; Losic, Dusan

    2014-07-07

    Electrochemical anodization of pure aluminum enables the growth of highly ordered nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) structures. This has made NAA one of the most popular nanomaterials with applications including molecular separation, catalysis, photonics, optoelectronics, sensing, drug delivery, and template synthesis. Over the past decades, the ability to engineer the structure and surface chemistry of NAA and its optical properties has led to the establishment of distinctive photonic structures that can be explored for developing low-cost, portable, rapid-response and highly sensitive sensing devices in combination with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and reflective interference spectroscopy (RIfS) techniques. This review article highlights the recent advances on fabrication, surface modification and structural engineering of NAA and its application and performance as a platform for SPR- and RIfS-based sensing and biosensing devices.

  4. Removal of surface-reflected light for the measurement of remote-sensing reflectance from an above-surface platform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zhongping; Ahn, Yu-Hwan; Mobley, Curtis; Arnone, Robert

    2010-12-06

    Using hyperspectral measurements made in the field, we show that the effective sea-surface reflectance ρ (defined as the ratio of the surface-reflected radiance at the specular direction corresponding to the downwelling sky radiance from one direction) varies not only for different measurement scans, but also can differ by a factor of 8 between 400 nm and 800 nm for the same scan. This means that the derived water-leaving radiance (or remote-sensing reflectance) can be highly inaccurate if a spectrally constant ρ value is applied (although errors can be reduced by carefully filtering measured raw data). To remove surface-reflected light in field measurements of remote sensing reflectance, a spectral optimization approach was applied, with results compared with those from remote-sensing models and from direct measurements. The agreement from different determinations suggests that reasonable results for remote sensing reflectance of clear blue water to turbid brown water are obtainable from above-surface measurements, even under conditions of high waves.

  5. Expanding applications for surface-contaminant sensing using the laser interrogation of surface agents (LISA) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Higdon, N. S.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Armstrong, Wayne T.; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III; Christesen, Steven D.; Wong, Anna

    2004-02-01

    Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (LISA) is a UV-Raman technique that provides short-range standoff detection and identification of surface-deposited chemical agents. ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division, is currently developing and expanding the LISA technology under several programs that span a variety of missions for homeland defense. We will present and discuss some of these applications, while putting in perspective the overall evolution undergone by the technique within the last years. These applications include LISA-Recon (now called the Joint Contaminated Surface Detector--JCSD) which was developed under a cost-sharing arrangement with the U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM) for incorporation on the Army"s future reconnaissance vehicles, and designed to demonstrate single-shot on-the-move measurements of chemical contaminants at concentration levels below the Army's requirements. In parallel, LISA-Shipboard is being developed to optimize the sensor technique for detection of surface contaminants in the operational environment of a ship. The most recently started activity is LISA-Inspector that is being developed to provide a transportable sensor in a 'cart-like' configuration.

  6. Remote sensing of the sea surface by millimeterwave SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, H.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Pagels, A.

    2006-09-01

    On several occasions the sea surface has been measured with the mmW radar MEMPHIS in SAR geometry. This research was mainly aimed to investigate the ability of SAR for imaging of disturbances of the water surface at mm-wave radar bands and to gather data on the statistical properties of sea clutter. It can be suspected, that the probability density functions for the reflectivity of sea clutter is as well dependent on the radar wavelength as on resolution, as different scattering processes may significantly contribute. While most of the available millimeterwave data have been collected with a resolution of 75 cm, improvements of the MEMPHIS radar now allow a resolution of about 20 cm. The paper describes the measurement set-up, the evaluation methods and discusses the influence of resolution and radar frequency on sea clutter characteristics as found during the experiments.

  7. Investigating a Quadrant Surface Coil Array for NQR Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-23

    UNCLASSIFIED 1  Abstract—this paper is on the design and fabrication of a surface coil array in a quadrant layout for NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole...coupling and SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio) at standoff distances perpendicular from each coil. Index Terms— Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance, NQR ...Coil Array, probe, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, tuning, decoupling, RLC, mutual coupling, RLC I. INTRODUCTION N Nuclear quadrupole resonance ( NQR

  8. Why surface-truth field study is needed in remote-sensing instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Especially designed field studies are needed in remote sensing technology transfer courses regardless of the field work provided by the students'/trainees' major disciplines because the remote sensing discipline has unique emphases and needs. Modification of existng schedules to include field work provides the equivalent of extending the duration of the program with the added benefit of enhancing learning achievements per actual program day. The process of surface truth field instruction, levels of student capabilities and stages in the development of surface truth field studies are discussed.

  9. Controlling the Sensing Properties of Silicon Nanowires via the Bonds Nearest to the Silicon Nanowire Surface.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Jeffrey Mark; Wang, Bin; Haick, Hossam

    2015-06-03

    Controlling the sensing properties of a silicon nanowire field effect transistor is dependent on the surface chemistry of the silicon nanowire. A standard silicon nanowire has a passive oxide layer (native oxide), which has trap states that cause sensing inaccuracies and desensitize the surface to nonpolar molecules. In this paper, we successfully modified the silicon nanowire surface with different nonoxide C3 alkyl groups, specifically, propyl (Si-CH2-CH2-CH3), propenyl (Si-CH═CH-CH3), and propynyl (Si-C≡C-CH3) modifications. The effect of the near surface bond on the sensor sensitivity and stability was explored by comparing three C3 surface modifications. A reduction of trap-states led to greater sensor stability and accuracy. The propenyl-modified sensor was consistently the most stable and sensitive sensor, among the applied sensors. The propenyl- and propynyl-modified sensors consistently performed with the best accuracy in identifying specific analytes with similar polarity or similar molecular weights. A combination of features from different sensing surfaces led to the best rubric for specific analytes identification. These results indicate that nonoxide sensor surfaces are useful in identifying specific analytes and that a combination of sensors with different surfaces in a cross-reactive array can lead to specific analytes detection.

  10. Performance analysis of higher mode spoof surface plasmon polariton for terahertz sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haizi; Zhong, Shuncong; Tu, Wanli

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) on 1D grooved metal surface for terahertz sensing of refractive index of the filling analyte through a prism-coupling attenuated total reflection setup. From the dispersion relation analysis and the finite element method-based simulation, we revealed that the dispersion curve of SSPP got suppressed as the filling refractive index increased, which cause the coupling resonance frequency redshifting in the reflection spectrum. The simulated results for testing various refractive indexes demonstrated that the incident angle of terahertz radiation has a great effect on the performance of sensing. Smaller incident angle will result in a higher sensitive sensing with a narrower detection range. In the meanwhile, the higher order mode SSPP-based sensing has a higher sensitivity with a narrower detection range. The maximum sensitivity is 2.57 THz/RIU for the second-order mode sensing at 45° internal incident angle. The proposed SSPP-based method has great potential for high sensitive terahertz sensing.

  11. Performance analysis of higher mode spoof surface plasmon polariton for terahertz sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Haizi; Tu, Wanli; Zhong, Shuncong

    2015-04-07

    We investigated the spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) on 1D grooved metal surface for terahertz sensing of refractive index of the filling analyte through a prism-coupling attenuated total reflection setup. From the dispersion relation analysis and the finite element method-based simulation, we revealed that the dispersion curve of SSPP got suppressed as the filling refractive index increased, which cause the coupling resonance frequency redshifting in the reflection spectrum. The simulated results for testing various refractive indexes demonstrated that the incident angle of terahertz radiation has a great effect on the performance of sensing. Smaller incident angle will result in a higher sensitive sensing with a narrower detection range. In the meanwhile, the higher order mode SSPP-based sensing has a higher sensitivity with a narrower detection range. The maximum sensitivity is 2.57 THz/RIU for the second-order mode sensing at 45° internal incident angle. The proposed SSPP-based method has great potential for high sensitive terahertz sensing.

  12. Combining surface reanalysis and remote sensing data for monitoring evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, M.; Tu, K.; Funk, C.; Michaelsen, J.; Williams, Pat; Williams, C.; Ardö, J.; Marie, B.; Cappelaere, B.; Grandcourt, A.; Nickless, A.; Noubellon, Y.; Scholes, R.; Kutsch, W.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact on the world's poor. In the Sahel, a climatically sensitive region where rain-fed agriculture is the primary livelihood, expected decreases in water supply will increase food insecurity. Studies on climate change and the intensification of the water cycle in sub-Saharan Africa are few. This is due in part to poor calibration of modeled actual evapotranspiration (AET), a key input in continental-scale hydrologic models. In this study, a model driven by dynamic canopy AET was combined with the Global Land Data Assimilation System realization of the NOAH Land Surface Model (GNOAH) wet canopy and soil AET for monitoring purposes in sub-Saharan Africa. The performance of the hybrid model was compared against AET from the GNOAH model and dynamic model using eight eddy flux towers representing major biomes of sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest improvements in model performance are at humid sites with dense vegetation, while performance at semi-arid sites is poor, but better than individual models. The reduction in errors using the hybrid model can be attributed to the integration of a dynamic vegetation component with land surface model estimates, improved model parameterization, and reduction of multiplicative effects of uncertain data.

  13. U.S. Geological Survey land remote sensing activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, Doyle G.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Department of the Interior (DOI) were among the earliest to recognize the potential applications of satellite land remote sensing for management of the country's land and water resources…not only as a user but also as a program participant responsible for final data processing, product generation, and data distribution. With guidance from Dr. William T. Pecora, who was the Survey's Director at that time and later Under Secretary of Interior, the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Program was established in 1966 as a focal point for these activities within the Department. Dr. Pecora was among the few who could envision a role for the Survey and the Department as active participants in programs yet to come--like the Landsat, Magsat, Seasat and, most recently, Shuttle Imaging Radar programs.

  14. Soft Active Materials for Actuation, Sensing, and Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Rebecca Krone

    Future generations of robots, electronics, and assistive medical devices will include systems that are soft and elastically deformable, allowing them to adapt their morphology in unstructured environments. This will require soft active materials for actuation, circuitry, and sensing of deformation and contact pressure. The emerging field of soft robotics utilizes these soft active materials to mimic the inherent compliance of natural soft-bodied systems. As the elasticity of robot components increases, the challenges for functionality revert to basic questions of fabrication, materials, and design - whereas such aspects are far more developed for traditional rigid-bodied systems. This thesis will highlight preliminary materials and designs that address the need for soft actuators and sensors, as well as emerging fabrication techniques for manufacturing stretchable circuits and devices based on liquid-embedded elastomers.

  15. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Atmosphere and Surface Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Yang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) are all hyper-spectral satellite sensors with thousands of spectral channels. Top of atmospheric radiance spectra measured by these sensors contain high information content on atmospheric, cloud, and surface properties. Exploring high information content contained in these high spectral resolution spectra is a challenging task due to computation e ort involved in modeling thousands of spectral channels. Usually, only very small fractions (4{10 percent) of the available channels are included in physical retrieval systems or numerical weather forecast (NWP) satellite data assimilations. We will describe a method of simultaneously retrieving atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface properties using all available spectral channels without sacrificing computational speed. The essence of the method is to convert channel radiance spectra into super-channels by an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) transformation. Because the EOFs are orthogonal to each other, about 100 super-channels are adequate to capture the information content of the radiance spectra. A Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) developed at NASA Langley Research Center is used to calculate both the super-channel magnitudes and derivatives with respect to atmospheric profiles and other properties. There is no need to perform EOF transformations to convert super channels back to spectral space at each iteration step for a one-dimensional variational retrieval or a NWP data assimilation system. The PCRTM forward model is also capable of calculating radiative contributions due to multiple-layer clouds. The multiple scattering effects of the clouds are efficiently parameterized. A physical retrieval algorithm then performs an inversion of atmospheric, cloud, and surface properties in super channel domain directly therefore both reducing the

  16. Surface acoustic wave sensing of VOCs in harsh chemical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-06-01

    The measurement of VOC concentrations in harsh chemical and physical environments is a formidable task. A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor has been designed for this purpose and its construction and testing are described in this paper. Included is a detailed description of the design elements specific to operation in 300{degree}C steam and HCl environments including temperature control, gas handling, and signal processing component descriptions. In addition, laboratory temperature stability was studied and a minimum detection limit was defined for operation in industrial environments. Finally, a description of field tests performed on steam reforming equipment at Synthetica Technologies Inc. of Richmond, CA is given including a report on destruction efficiency of CCl{sub 4} in the Synthetica moving bed evaporator. Design improvements based on the field tests are proposed.

  17. Sensing a heart infarction marker with surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Ulrich; Katerkamp, Andreas; Renneberg, Reinhard; Spener, Friedrich; Cammann, Karl

    1995-02-01

    In this study a direct immunosensor for heart-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP) based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPRS) is presented. FABP can be used as a heart infarction marker in clinical diagnostics. The development of a simple and cheap direct optical sensor device is reported in this paper as well as immobilization procedures and optimization of the measuring conditions. The correct working of the SPRS device is controlled by comparing the signals with theoretical calculated values. Two different immunoassay techniques were optimized for a sensitive FABP-analysis. The competitive immunoassay was superior to the sandwich configuration as it had a lower detection limit (100 ng/ml), needed less antibodies and could be carried out in one step.

  18. A Remote Sensing-Based Land Surface Phenology Application for Cropland Monitoring in the Volta River Basin of West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Salam El Vilaly, Mohamed; El Vilaly, Audra; Badiane, Ousmane

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the complex feedbacks between climate, environmental change, and human activities is essential to the development of sustainable agricultural systems. A key aspect of crop production that shows immediate response to climate change is crop phenology, which defines the shape and progress of the growing season and is an integrator of all environmental factors controlling crop production. This research aims to characterize remote sensing-based land surface phenology of cropped areas and compare them to the actual crop growing seasons recorded by farmers: planting, emergences, flowering, fruiting, and harvest date. We use the 2000-2013 MODIS Terra 16-day record of vegetation index to extract 4 phenometrics (Start and Length of Growing Season, Date of Growing Season Peak, and the Growing Season Cumulative Signal). Most of these metrics are simple time-related phenometrics. A spatiotemporal phenological characterization of cropped/managed lands in the basin already shows distinct response patterns and trajectories along climate gradients. This permits us to monitor cropped lands and their responses to disturbances, such as drought, fire, flooding, and human activities. In turn, interviewing farmers in the basin and consulting their phenological records. This study will allow for robust validation of remote sensing LSP algorithms, and more crucially, will help characterize any remote sensing-based metrics that contrast with the actual biological phenophases of monitored crops. In terms of its larger significance, this study demonstrates the fundamental role that remote sensing plays in global agriculture in informing conservation and management practices.

  19. Thin SnOx films for surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometric gas sensing (SPREE)

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Daniel; Beck, Uwe; Lohse, Volkmar; Negendank, Detlef; Kormunda, Martin; Esser, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gas sensors are very important in several fields like gas monitoring, safety and environmental applications. In this approach, a new gas sensing concept is investigated which combines the powerful adsorption probability of metal oxide conductive sensors (MOS) with an optical ellipsometric readout. This concept shows promising results to solve the problems of cross sensitivity of the MOS concept. Results: Undoped tin oxide (SnOx) and iron doped tin oxide (Fe:SnOx) thin add-on films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on the top of the actual surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing gold layer. The films were tested for their sensitivity to several gas species in the surface plasmon resonance enhanced (SPREE) gas measurement. It was found that the undoped tin oxide (SnOx) shows higher sensitivities to propane (C3H8) then to carbon monoxide (CO). By using Fe:SnOx, this relation is inverted. This behavior was explained by a change of the amount of binding sites for CO in the layer due to this iron doping. For hydrogen (H2) no such relation was found but the sensing ability was identical for both layer materials. This observation was related to a different sensing mechanism for H2 which is driven by the diffusion into the layer instead of adsorption on the surface. Conclusion: The gas sensing selectivity can be enhanced by tuning the properties of the thin film overcoating. A relation of the binding sites in the doped and undoped SnOx films and the gas sensing abilities for CO and C3H8 was found. This could open the path for optimized gas sensing devices with different coated SPREE sensors. PMID:28382241

  20. Geographic information systems, remote sensing, and spatial analysis activities in Texas, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, D.K.; Gary, R.H.; Wilson, Z.D.

    2007-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become an important tool for scientific investigation, resource management, and environmental planning. A GIS is a computer-aided system capable of collecting, storing, analyzing, and displaying spatially referenced digital data. GIS technology is particularly useful when analyzing a wide variety of spatial data such as with remote sensing and spatial analysis. Remote sensing involves collecting remotely sensed data, such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, or radar images, and analyzing the data to gather information or investigate trends about the environment or the Earth's surface. Spatial analysis combines remotely sensed, thematic, statistical, quantitative, and geographical data through overlay, modeling, and other analytical techniques to investigate specific research questions. It is the combination of data formats and analysis techniques that has made GIS an essential tool in scientific investigations. This document presents information about the technical capabilities and project activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TWSC) GIS Workgroup from 2002 through 2007.

  1. Frequency Based Volcanic Activity Detection through Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, A. K.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing has proved to offer a useful and relatively inexpensive method for monitoring large areas where field work is logistically unrealistic, and potentially dangerous. Current sensors are able to detect the majority of explosive volcanic activity; those that tend to effect and represent larger scale changes in the volcanic systems, eventually relating to ash producing periods of extended eruptive activity, and effusive activity. As new spaceborne sensors are developed, the ability to detect activity improves so that a system to gauge the frequency of volcanic activity can be used as a useful monitoring tool. Four volcanoes were chosen for development and testing of a method to monitor explosive activity: Stromboli (Italy); Shishaldin and Cleveland (Alaska, USA); and Karymsky (Kamchatka, Russia). Each volcano studied had similar but unique signatures of pre-cursory and eruptive activity. This study has shown that this monitoring tool could be applied to a wide range of volcanoes and still produce useful and robust data. Our method deals specifically with the detection of small scale explosive activity. The method described here could be useful in an operational setting, especially at remote volcanoes that have the potential to impact populations, infrastructure, and the aviation community. A number of important factors will affect the validity of application of this method. They are: (1) the availability of a continuous and continually populated dataset; (2) appropriate and reasonable sensor resolutions; (3) a recorded history of the volcano's previous activity; and, if available, (4) some ground-based monitoring system. We aim to develop the method further to be able to capture and evaluate the frequency of other volcanic processes such as lava flows, phreatomagmatic eruptions and dome growth and collapse. The work shown here has served to illustrate the capability of this method and monitoring tool for use at remote, un-instrumented volcanoes.

  2. Surface Plasmon Resonance based sensing of lysozyme in serum on Micrococcus lysodeikticus-modified graphene oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, Alina; Gáspár, Szilveszter; Gheorghiu, Mihaela; David, Sorin; Dinca, Valentina; Peteu, Serban; Wang, Qian; Li, Musen; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2017-03-15

    Lysozyme is an enzyme found in biological fluids, which is upregulated in leukemia, renal diseases as well as in a number of inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. We present here the development of a novel lysozyme sensing concept based on the use of Micrococcus lysodeikticus whole cells adsorbed on graphene oxide (GO)-coated Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) interfaces. M. lysodeikticus is a typical enzymatic substrate for lysozyme. Unlike previously reported sensors which are based on the detection of lysozyme through bioaffinity interactions, the bioactivity of lysozyme will be used here for sensing purposes. Upon exposure to lysozyme containing serum, the integrity of the bacterial cell wall is affected and the cells detach from the GO based interfaces, causing a characteristic decrease in the SPR signal. This allows sensing the presence of clinically relevant concentrations of lysozyme in undiluted serum samples.

  3. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  4. Micropatterning of Aptamer Beacons to Create Cytokine-Sensing Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tuleuova, Nazgul

    2010-01-01

    Aptamer beacons are DNA or RNA probes that bind proteins or small molecules of interest and emit signal directly upon interaction with the target analyte. This paper describes micropatterning of aptamer beacons for detection of IFN-γ—an important inflammatory cytokine. The beacon consisted of a fluorophore-labeled aptamer strand hybridized with a shorter, quencher-carrying complementary strand. Cytokine molecules were expected to displace quenching strands of the beacon, disrupting FRET effect and resulting in fluorescence signal. The glass substrate was first micropatterned with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwells (35 μm diameter individual wells) so as to define sites for attachment of beacon molecules. PEG microwell arrays were then incubated with avidin followed by biotin-aptamer-fluorophore constructs. Subsequent incubation with quencher-carrying complementary strands resulted in formation of DNA duplex and caused quenching of fluorescence due to FRET effect. When exposed to IFN-γ, microwells changed fluorescence from low (quencher hybridized with fluorophore-carrying strand) to high (quenching strand displaced by cytokine molecules). The fluorescence signal was confined to microwells, was changing in real-time and was dependent on the concentration of IFN-γ. In the future, we plan to co-localize aptamer beacons and cells on micropatterned surfaces in order to monitor in real-time cytokine secretion from immune cells in microwells. PMID:21170394

  5. Soil moisture sensing with aircraft observations of the diurnal range of surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Blanchard, B.; Anderson, A.; Wang, V.

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft observations of the surface temperature were made by measurements of the thermal emission in the 8-14 micrometers band over agricultural fields around Phoenix, Arizona. The diurnal range of these surface temperature measurements were well correlated with the ground measurement of soil moisture in the 0-2 cm layer. The surface temperature observations for vegetated fields were found to be within 1 or 2 C of the ambient air temperature indicating no moisture stress. These results indicate that for clear atmospheric conditions remotely sensed surface temperatures are a reliable indicator of soil moisture conditions and crop status.

  6. Improved photoluminescence and sensing stability of porous silicon nanowires by surface passivation.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; He, Haiping; Sun, Luwei; Ye, Zhizhen

    2014-01-21

    Core-shell structured silicon nanowires (Si NWs) were obtained by coating Si NWs with an HfO2 layer. Enhanced photoluminescence (PL) and a slightly decreased PL lifetime are achieved by HfO2 coating. Furthermore, the sensing stability is strongly improved. The improvement of PL properties is interpreted in terms of surface passivation and the Purcell effect.

  7. [An operational remote sensing algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration based on NOAA PAL dataset].

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying-Yu; He, Yan-Bo; Wang, Jian-Lin; Tian, Guo-Liang

    2009-10-01

    Based on the time series 10-day composite NOAA Pathfinder AVHRR Land (PAL) dataset (8 km x 8 km), and by using land surface energy balance equation and "VI-Ts" (vegetation index-land surface temperature) method, a new algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration (ET) was constructed. This new algorithm did not need the support from meteorological observation data, and all of its parameters and variables were directly inversed or derived from remote sensing data. A widely accepted ET model of remote sensing, i. e., SEBS model, was chosen to validate the new algorithm. The validation test showed that both the ET and its seasonal variation trend estimated by SEBS model and our new algorithm accorded well, suggesting that the ET estimated from the new algorithm was reliable, being able to reflect the actual land surface ET. The new ET algorithm of remote sensing was practical and operational, which offered a new approach to study the spatiotemporal variation of ET in continental scale and global scale based on the long-term time series satellite remote sensing images.

  8. Research on the surface subsidence monitoring technology based on fiber Bragg grating sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinyu; Jiang, Long; Sun, Zengrong; Hu, Binxin; Zhang, Faxiang; Song, Guangdong; Liu, Tongyu; Qi, Junfeng; Zhang, Longping

    2017-03-01

    In order to monitor the process of surface subsidence caused by mining in real time, we reported two types of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors. The principles of the FBG-based displacement sensor and the FBG-based micro-seismic sensor were described. The surface subsidence monitoring system based on the FBG sensing technology was designed. Some factual application of using these FBG-based sensors for subsidence monitoring in iron mines was presented.

  9. Three-dimensional composite metallodielectric nanostructure for enhanced surface plasmon resonance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haiping Matthew; Pang, Lin; Kher, Aditya; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2009-02-01

    The authors simulated, fabricated, and characterized a mushroomlike composite metallodielectric nanostructure that shows improved characteristics for surface plasmon resonance sensing applications with an enhancement in the normal electric field compared to the conventional nanohole structure. A fabrication method is introduced to give controllable linewidth by an oblique metal deposition process. A sensor built with the composite nanostructure was then used to determine the hydrophilicity of its surface by monitoring the resonant wavelength shift and computing the corresponding adsorption thickness.

  10. Investigation of remote sensing to detect near-surface groundwater on irrigated lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryland, D. W.; Schmer, F. A.; Moore, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    The application of remote sensing techniques was studied for detecting areas with high water tables in irrigated agricultural lands. Aerial data were collected by the LANDSAT-1 satellite and aircraft over the Kansas/Bostwick Irrigation District in Republic and Jewell Counties, Kansas. LANDSAT-1 data for May 12 and August 10, 1973, and aircraft flights (midday and predawn) on August 10 and 11, 1973, and June 25 and 26, 1974, were obtained. Surface and water table contour maps and active observation well hydrographs were obtained from the Bureau of Reclamation for use in the analysis. Results of the study reveal that LANDSAT-1 data (May MSS band 6 and August MSS band 7) correlate significantly (0.01 level) with water table depth for 144 active observation wells located throughout the Kansas/Bostwick Irrigation District. However, a map of water table depths of less than 1.83 meters prepared from the LANDSAT-1 data did not compare favorably with a map of seeped lands of less than 1.22 m (4 feet) to the water table. Field evaluation of the map is necessary for a complete analysis. Analysis of three fields on a within or single-field basis for the 1973 LANDSAT-1 data also showed significant correlation results.

  11. Efficient active depth sensing by laser speckle projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuanwu; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo; Liao, Qingmin

    2014-01-01

    An active depth sensing approach by laser speckle projection system is proposed. After capturing the speckle pattern with an infrared digital camera, we extract the pure speckle pattern using a direct-global separation method. Then the pure speckles are represented by Census binary features. By evaluating the matching cost and uniqueness between the real-time image and the reference image, robust correspondences are selected as support points. After that, we build a disparity grid and propose a generative graphical model to compute disparities. An iterative approach is designed to propagate the messages between blocks and update the model. Finally, a dense depth map can be obtained by subpixel interpolation and transformation. The experimental evaluations demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach.

  12. Non-Invasive UWB Sensing of Astronauts' Breathing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Marco; Cerri, Graziano; Chiaraluce, Franco; Eusebi, Lorenzo; Russo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The use of a UWB system for sensing breathing activity of astronauts must account for many critical issues specific to the space environment. The aim of this paper is twofold. The first concerns the definition of design constraints about the pulse amplitude and waveform to transmit, as well as the immunity requirements of the receiver. The second issue concerns the assessment of the procedures and the characteristics of the algorithms to use for signal processing to retrieve the breathing frequency and respiration waveform. The algorithm has to work correctly in the presence of surrounding electromagnetic noise due to other sources in the environment. The highly reflecting walls increase the difficulty of the problem and the hostile scenario has to be accurately characterized. Examples of signal processing techniques able to recover breathing frequency in significant and realistic situations are shown and discussed. PMID:25558995

  13. Non-invasive UWB sensing of astronauts' breathing activity.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Marco; Cerri, Graziano; Chiaraluce, Franco; Eusebi, Lorenzo; Russo, Paola

    2014-12-30

    The use of a UWB system for sensing breathing activity of astronauts must account for many critical issues specific to the space environment. The aim of this paper is twofold. The first concerns the definition of design constraints about the pulse amplitude and waveform to transmit, as well as the immunity requirements of the receiver. The second issue concerns the assessment of the procedures and the characteristics of the algorithms to use for signal processing to retrieve the breathing frequency and respiration waveform. The algorithm has to work correctly in the presence of surrounding electromagnetic noise due to other sources in the environment. The highly reflecting walls increase the difficulty of the problem and the hostile scenario has to be accurately characterized. Examples of signal processing techniques able to recover breathing frequency in significant and realistic situations are shown and discussed.

  14. Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography for Geotechnical Monitoring Using "Large N" Distributed Acoustic Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Lindsey, N.; Martin, E. R.; Wagner, A. M.; Robertson, M.; Bjella, K.; Gelvin, A.; Ulrich, C.; Wu, Y.; Freifeld, B. M.; Daley, T. M.; Dou, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface wave tomography using ambient noise sources has found broad application at the regional scale but has not been adopted fully for geotechnical applications despite the abundance of noise sources in this context. The recent development of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) provides a clear path for inexpensively recording high spatial resolution (< 1m sampling) surface wave data in the context of infrastructure monitoring over significant spatial domains (10s of km). Infrastructure monitoring is particularly crucial in the context of high-latitude installations where a changing global climate can trigger reductions in soil strength due to permafrost thaw. DAS surface wave monitoring systems, particularly those installed in/near transport corridors and coupled to ambient noise inversion algorithms, could be a critical "early warning" system to detect zones of decreased shear strength before failure. We present preliminary ambient noise tomography results from a 1.3 km continuously recording subsurface DAS array used to record traffic noise next to an active road in Fairbanks, AK. The array, depolyed at the Farmer's Loop Permafrost Test Station, was designed as a narrow 2D array and installed via trenching at ~30 cm. We develop a pre-processing and QC approach to analyze the large resulting volume of data, equivalent to a 1300 geophone array sampled at 1 khz. We utilize automated dispersion analysis and a quasi-2D MC inversion to generate a shear wave velocity profile underneath the road in a region of discontinuous permafrost. The results are validated against a high-resolution ERT survey as well as direct-push data on ice content. We also compare vintages of ambient noise DAS data to evaluate the short-term repeatability of the technique in the face of changing noise environments. The resulting dataset demonstrates the utility of using DAS for real-time shear-modulus monitoring in support of critical infrastructure.

  15. Adsorption of ethanol on V2O5 (010) surface for gas-sensing applications: Ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Cui, Mengyang; Ye, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of ethanol on V2O5 (010) surface was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) with a combined generalized gradient approximation (GGA) plus Hubbard U approach to exploit the potential sensing applications. The adsorption configurations were first constructed by considering different orientations of ethanol molecule to V and O sites on the "Hill"- and "Valley"-like regions of corrugated (010) surface. It is found that ethanol molecule can adsorb on whole surface in multiple stable configurations. Nevertheless the molecular adsorption on the "Hill"-like surface is calculated to occur preferentially, and the single coordinated oxygen on "Hill"-like surface (O1(H)) acting as the most energetically favorable adsorption site shows the strongest adsorption ability to ethanol molecule. Surface adsorption of ethanol tunes the electronic structure of V2O5 and cause an n-doping effect. As a consequence, the Fermi levels shift toward the conductive bond increasing the charge carrier concentration of electrons in adsorbed V2O5. The sensitive electronic structure and the multiple stable configurations to ethanol adsorption highlight the high adsorption activity and then the potential of V2O5 (010) surface applied to high sensitive sensor for ethanol vapor detection. Further Mulliken population and Natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations quantify the electron transfer from the adsorbed ethanol to the surface, and correlates the adsorption ability of surface sites with the charge donation and dispersion.

  16. Surface-Activated Coupling Reactions Confined on a Surface.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Liu, Pei Nian; Lin, Nian

    2015-10-20

    Chemical reactions may take place in a pure phase of gas or liquid or at the interface of two phases (gas-solid or liquid-solid). Recently, the emerging field of "surface-confined coupling reactions" has attracted intensive attention. In this process, reactants, intermediates, and products of a coupling reaction are adsorbed on a solid-vacuum or a solid-liquid interface. The solid surface restricts all reaction steps on the interface, in other words, the reaction takes place within a lower-dimensional, for example, two-dimensional, space. Surface atoms that are fixed in the surface and adatoms that move on the surface often activate the surface-confined coupling reactions. The synergy of surface morphology and activity allow some reactions that are inefficient or prohibited in the gas or liquid phase to proceed efficiently when the reactions are confined on a surface. Over the past decade, dozens of well-known "textbook" coupling reactions have been shown to proceed as surface-confined coupling reactions. In most cases, the surface-confined coupling reactions were discovered by trial and error, and the reaction pathways are largely unknown. It is thus highly desirable to unravel the mechanisms, mechanisms of surface activation in particular, of the surface-confined coupling reactions. Because the reactions take place on surfaces, advanced surface science techniques can be applied to study the surface-confined coupling reactions. Among them, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are the two most extensively used experimental tools. The former resolves submolecular structures of individual reactants, intermediates, and products in real space, while the latter monitors the chemical states during the reactions in real time. Combination of the two methods provides unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the reaction pathways. The experimental findings are complemented by theoretical modeling. In particular, density

  17. Geographic information systems, remote sensing, and spatial analysis activities in Texas, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2009-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become an important tool for scientific investigation, resource management, and environmental planning. A GIS is a computer-aided system capable of collecting, storing, analyzing, and displaying spatially referenced digital data. GIS technology is useful for analyzing a wide variety of spatial data. Remote sensing involves collecting remotely sensed data, such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, or radar images, and analyzing the data to gather information or investigate trends about the environment or the Earth's surface. Spatial analysis combines remotely sensed, thematic, statistical, quantitative, and geographical data through overlay, modeling, and other analytical techniques to investigate specific research questions. It is the combination of data formats and analysis techniques that has made GIS an essential tool in scientific investigations. This fact sheet presents information about the technical capabilities and project activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TWSC) GIS Workgroup during 2008 and 2009. After a summary of GIS Workgroup capabilities, brief descriptions of activities by project at the local and national levels are presented. Projects are grouped by the fiscal year (October-September 2008 or 2009) the project ends and include overviews, project images, and Internet links to additional project information and related publications or articles.

  18. Integration of remote sensing based surface information into a three-dimensional microclimate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldens, Wieke; Heiden, Uta; Esch, Thomas; Mueller, Andreas; Dech, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Climate change urges cities to consider the urban climate as part of sustainable planning. Urban microclimate models can provide knowledge on the climate at building block level. However, very detailed information on the area of interest is required. Most microclimate studies therefore make use of assumptions and generalizations to describe the model area. Remote sensing data with area wide coverage provides a means to derive many parameters at the detailed spatial and thematic scale required by urban climate models. This study shows how microclimate simulations for a series of real world urban areas can be supported by using remote sensing data. In an automated process, surface materials, albedo, LAI/LAD and object height have been derived and integrated into the urban microclimate model ENVI-met. Multiple microclimate simulations have been carried out both with the dynamic remote sensing based input data as well as with manual and static input data to analyze the impact of the RS-based surface information and the suitability of the applied data and techniques. A valuable support of the integration of the remote sensing based input data for ENVI-met is the use of an automated processing chain. This saves tedious manual editing and allows for fast and area wide generation of simulation areas. The analysis of the different modes shows the importance of high quality height data, detailed surface material information and albedo.

  19. Active sensing in the categorization of visual patterns

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Scott Cheng-Hsin; Lengyel, Máté; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Interpreting visual scenes typically requires us to accumulate information from multiple locations in a scene. Using a novel gaze-contingent paradigm in a visual categorization task, we show that participants' scan paths follow an active sensing strategy that incorporates information already acquired about the scene and knowledge of the statistical structure of patterns. Intriguingly, categorization performance was markedly improved when locations were revealed to participants by an optimal Bayesian active sensor algorithm. By using a combination of a Bayesian ideal observer and the active sensor algorithm, we estimate that a major portion of this apparent suboptimality of fixation locations arises from prior biases, perceptual noise and inaccuracies in eye movements, and the central process of selecting fixation locations is around 70% efficient in our task. Our results suggest that participants select eye movements with the goal of maximizing information about abstract categories that require the integration of information from multiple locations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12215.001 PMID:26880546

  20. Surface patterning of multilayer graphene by ultraviolet laser irradiation in biomolecule sensing devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tien-Li; Chen, Zhao-Chi

    2015-12-01

    The study presents a direct process for surface patterning of multilayer graphene on the glass substrate as a biosensing device. In contrast to lithography with etching, the proposed process provides simultaneous surface patterning of multilayer graphene through nanosecond laser irradiation. In this study, the multilayer graphene was prepared by a screen printing process. Additionally, the wavelength of the laser beam was 355 nm. To perform the effective laser process with the small heat affected zone, the surface patterns on the sensing devices could be directly fabricated using the laser with optimal control of the pulse overlap at a fluence threshold of 0.63 J/cm2. The unique patterning of the laser-ablated surface exhibits their electrical and hydrophilic characteristics. The hydrophilic surface of graphene-based sensing devices was achieved in the process with the pulse overlap of 90%. Furthermore, the sensing devices for controlling the electrical response of glucose by using glucose oxidase can be used in sensors in commercial medical applications.

  1. Solution of the equation of radiative transfer for remote sensing over nonuniform surface reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    An understanding of radiative transfer in the earth's atmosphere is a necessity for the remote sensing of surface reflectivity from satellites and aircraft. The range of the adjacency effect, which represents the effect of bright areas on the radiance above dark areas, is the main parameter that distinguishes atmospheric radiative transfer over a nonuniform surface from that over a uniform one. A radiative transfer model which expresses this range correctly is, therefore, critical for developing remote sensing methods for the case of an atmosphere over a nonuniform surface. The present investigation is concerned with the development of a new approximate solution of the radiative transfer (RT) equation. The solution is not limited to nonabsorbing atmospheres, but it will still be limited to nadir observations. The results compare favorably with Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I.; Abdel Bar, Fatma M.; El-Mahdy, Areej M.; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1–V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  3. Using remotely-sensed multispectral imagery to build age models for alluvial fan surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Mason, Philippa J.; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.; Lewis, James

    2016-04-01

    Accurate exposure age models are essential for much geomorphological field research, and generally depend on laboratory analyses such as radiocarbon, cosmogenic nuclide, or luminescence techniques. These approaches continue to revolutionise geomorphology, however they cannot be deployed remotely or in situ in the field. Therefore other methods are still needed for producing preliminary age models, performing relative dating of surfaces, or selecting sampling sites for the laboratory analyses above. With the widespread availability of detailed multispectral imagery, a promising approach is to use remotely-sensed data to discriminate surfaces with different ages. Here, we use new Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) multispectral imagery to characterise the reflectance of 35 alluvial fan surfaces in the semi-arid Owens Valley, California. Alluvial fans are useful landforms to date, as they are widely used to study the effects of tectonics, climate and sediment transport processes on source-to-sink sedimentation. Our target fan surfaces have all been mapped in detail in the field, and have well-constrained exposure ages ranging from modern to ~ 125 ka measured using a high density of 10Be cosmogenic nuclide samples. Despite all having similar granitic compositions, the spectral properties of these surfaces vary systematically with their exposure ages. Older surfaces demonstrate a predictable shift in reflectance across the visible and short-wave infrared spectrum. Simple calculations, such as the brightness ratios of different wavelengths, generate sensitive power law relationships with exposure age that depend on post-depositional alteration processes affecting these surfaces. We investigate what these processes might be in this dryland location, and evaluate the potential for using remotely-sensed multispectral imagery for developing surface age models. The ability to remotely sense relative exposure ages has useful implications for preliminary mapping, selecting

  4. How and why do root apices sense light under the soil surface?

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Mei; Yokawa, Ken; Wan, Yinglang; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    Light can penetrate several centimeters below the soil surface. Growth, development and behavior of plant roots are markedly affected by light despite their underground lifestyle. Early studies provided contrasting information on the spatial and temporal distribution of light-sensing cells in the apical region of root apex and discussed the physiological roles of plant hormones in root responses to light. Recent biological and microscopic advances have improved our understanding of the processes involved in the sensing and transduction of light signals, resulting in subsequent physiological and behavioral responses in growing root apices. Here, we review current knowledge of cellular distributions of photoreceptors and their signal transduction pathways in diverse root tissues and root apex zones. We are discussing also the roles of auxin transporters in roots exposed to light, as well as interactions of light signal perceptions with sensing of other environmental factors relevant to plant roots. PMID:26442084

  5. Long-term surface EMG monitoring using K-means clustering and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present an advanced K-means clustering algorithm based on Compressed Sensing theory (CS) in combination with the K-Singular Value Decomposition (K-SVD) method for Clustering of long-term recording of surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The long-term monitoring of sEMG signals aims at recording of the electrical activity produced by muscles which are very useful procedure for treatment and diagnostic purposes as well as for detection of various pathologies. The proposed algorithm is examined for three scenarios of sEMG signals including healthy person (sEMG-Healthy), a patient with myopathy (sEMG-Myopathy), and a patient with neuropathy (sEMG-Neuropathr), respectively. The proposed algorithm can easily scan large sEMG datasets of long-term sEMG recording. We test the proposed algorithm with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Correlation Coefficient (LCC) dimensionality reduction methods. Then, the output of the proposed algorithm is fed to K-Nearest Neighbours (K-NN) and Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) classifiers in order to calclute the clustering performance. The proposed algorithm achieves a classification accuracy of 99.22%. This ability allows reducing 17% of Average Classification Error (ACE), 9% of Training Error (TE), and 18% of Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). The proposed algorithm also reduces 14% clustering energy consumption compared to the existing K-Means clustering algorithm.

  6. Temporal Signatures of Taste Quality Driven by Active Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chengsan; Hill, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Animals actively acquire sensory information from the outside world, with rodents sniffing to smell and whisking to feel. Licking, a rapid motor sequence used for gustation, serves as the primary means of controlling stimulus access to taste receptors in the mouth. Using a novel taste-quality discrimination task in head-restrained mice, we measured and compared reaction times to four basic taste qualities (salt, sour, sweet, and bitter) and found that certain taste qualities are perceived inherently faster than others, driven by the precise biomechanics of licking and functional organization of the peripheral gustatory system. The minimum time required for accurate perception was strongly dependent on taste quality, ranging from the sensory-motor limits of a single lick (salt, ∼100 ms) to several sampling cycles (bitter, >500 ms). Further, disruption of sensory input from the anterior tongue significantly impaired the speed of perception of some taste qualities, with little effect on others. Overall, our results show that active sensing may play an important role in shaping the timing of taste-quality representations and perception in the gustatory system. PMID:24872546

  7. Active contour segmentation for hyperspectral oil spill remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-ping; Chang, Ming; An, Ju-bai; Huang, Jian; Lin, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Oil spills could occur in many conditions, which results in pollution of the natural resources, marine environment and economic health of the area. Whenever we need to identify oil spill, confirm the location or get the shape and acreage of oil spill, we have to get the edge information of oil slick images firstly. Hyperspectral remote sensing imaging is now widely used to detect oil spill. Active Contour Models (ACMs) is a widely used image segmentation method that utilizes the geometric information of objects within images. Region based models are less sensitive to noise and give good performance for images with weak edges or without edges. One of the popular Region based ACMs, active contours without edges Models, is implemented by Chan-Vese. The model has the property of global segmentation to segment all the objects within an image irrespective of the initial contour. In this paper, we propose an improved CV model, which can perform well in the oil spill hyper-spectral image segmentation. The energy function embeds spectral and spatial information, introduces the vector edge stopping function, and constructs a novel length term. Results of the improved model on airborne hyperspectral oil spill images show that it improves the ability of distinguishing between oil spills and sea water, as well as the capability of noise reduction.

  8. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  9. A study of surface and surface-volume scattering for discrete random medium in microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syahali, Syabeela Bt

    In the study of microwave remote sensing and wave propagation in a medium, it is interesting and important to model and calculate the interaction of the electromagnetic wave with the medium, as the backscattering returns from the medium will be recorded and processed to produce satellite radar images and the wave attenuation while propagating in the medium will affect the microwave and mobile communications. Traditionally, theoretical modelling of this problem assumes that the scatterers are interacting with the wave independently. However, in real nature, the coherence effect of these interactions due to the close-spacing of the scatterers cannot be ignored, especially in the case of an electrically dense medium. Traditional theoretical modelling also assumes that wave-interface effects are only due to single scattering on the surface. This is also less accurate since multiple scattering can also contribute to the effect, especially for rough surfaces. It is also assumed that the surface-volume interaction is only due to first order surface-volume scattering. However, second order surface-volume scattering is also important and should not be ignored. Therefore, a good and reliable theoretical model for wave scattering in the natural earth terrain should be developed for the use in microwave remote sensing, communications and satellite-based natural resource monitoring. In this research, the backscattering model for an electrically dense medium is developed. This model incorporates the coherent effects due to the close-spacing of the scatterers. Improvement is done by considering the multiple surface scattering effect, together with the single surface scattering effect on the surface scattering formulation based on the existing integral equation model (IEM) for both the top and the bottom surfaces of the layer of the model. The backscattering model is also improved by considering up to second order surface-volume scattering. Its effect on surface, surface

  10. Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of Substances Isolated from Wild Berry Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abudoleh, Suha M.; Mahasneh, Adel M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Quorum Sensing (QS) is a mechanism used by bacteria to determine their physiological activities and coordinate gene expression based on cell to cell signaling. Many bacterial physiological functions are under the regulation of quorum sensing such as virulence, luminescence, motility, sporulation and biofilm formation. The aim of the present study was to isolate and characterize Quorum Sensing Inhibitory (QSI) substances from epiphytic bacteria residing on wild berries surfaces. Methods: Fifty nine bacterial isolates out of 600 screened bacteria were successfully isolated. These bacteria were obtained from berry surfaces of different plants in the wild forests of Ajloun-Jordan. Screening for QSI activity using Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 monitor strain, resulted in isolating 6 isolates exhibiting QSI activity only, 11 isolates with QSI and antibacterial activity, and 42 isolates with antibacterial activity only. Three potential isolates S 130, S 153, and S 664, were gram positive rods and spore formers, catalase positive and oxidase negative. These were chosen for further testing and characterization. Results: Different solvent extraction of the QSI substances based on polarity indicated that the activity of S 130 was in the butanol extract, S 153 activity in both chloroform and butanol; and for S 664, the activity was detected in the hexane extract. The chloroform extract of S 153 and hexane extract of S 664 were proteinaceous in nature while QSI substances of the butanol extract of S 130 and S 153 were non-proteinaceous. All the tested QSI substances showed a marked thermal stability when subjected at several time intervals to 70°C, with the highest stability observed for the butanol extract of S 153. Assessing the QSI substances using violacein quantification assay revealed varying degrees of activity depending upon the extracting solvent, type of the producer bacteria and the concentration of the substances. Conclusion: This study

  11. Retrieval of surface temperature by remote sensing. [of earth surface using brightness temperature of air pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    A simple procedure and computer program were developed for retrieving the surface temperature from the measurement of upwelling infrared radiance in a single spectral region in the atmosphere. The program evaluates the total upwelling radiance at any altitude in the region of the CO fundamental band (2070-2220 1/cm) for several values of surface temperature. Actual surface temperature is inferred by interpolation of the measured upwelling radiance between the computed values of radiance for the same altitude. Sensitivity calculations were made to determine the effect of uncertainty in various surface, atmospheric and experimental parameters on the inferred value of surface temperature. It is found that the uncertainties in water vapor concentration and surface emittance are the most important factors affecting the accuracy of the inferred value of surface temperature.

  12. A cell-surface-anchored ratiometric fluorescent probe for extracellular pH sensing.

    PubMed

    Ke, Guoliang; Zhu, Zhi; Wang, Wei; Zou, Yuan; Guan, Zhichao; Jia, Shasha; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Xuemeng; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2014-09-10

    Accurate sensing of the extracellular pH is a very important yet challenging task in biological and clinical applications. This paper describes the development of an amphiphilic lipid-DNA molecule as a simple yet useful cell-surface-anchored ratiometric fluorescent probe for extracellular pH sensing. The lipid-DNA probe, which consists of a hydrophobic diacyllipid tail and a hydrophilic DNA strand, is modified with two fluorescent dyes; one is pH-sensitive as pH indicator and the other is pH-insensitive as an internal reference. The lipid-DNA probe showed sensitive and reversible response to pH change in the range of 6.0-8.0, which is suitable for most extracellular studies. In addition, based on simple hydrophobic interactions with the cell membrane, the lipid-DNA probe can be easily anchored on the cell surface with negligible cytotoxicity, excellent stability, and unique ratiometric readout, thus ensuring its accurate sensing of extracellular pH. Finally, this lipid-DNA-based ratiometric pH indicator was successfully used for extracellular pH sensing of cells in 3D culture environment, demonstrating the potential applications of the sensor in biological and medical studies.

  13. All-metal meta-surfaces for narrowband light absorption and high performance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengqi; Liu, Guiqiang; Fu, Guolan; Liu, Xiaoshan; Huang, Zhenping; Gu, Gang

    2016-11-01

    We report an experimental scheme for high performance sensing by an all-metal meta-surface (AMMS) platform. A dual-band resonant absorption spectrum with a bandwidth down to a single-digit nanometer level and an absorbance up to 89% is achieved due to the surface lattice resonances supported by the resonators array and their hybridization coupling with the particle plasmon resonances. The sensing application in the analysis of the sodium chloride solution has been demonstrated, where remarkable changes from a spectral ‘dark state’ to ‘bright state’ and vice versa are observed. Sensing performance factors of the figure of merit exceeding 50 and the spectral intensity change related FoM* up to 1075 are simultaneously achieved. The corresponding detection limit is as low as 8.849  ×  10-6 RIU. These features make such an AMMS-based sensor a promising route for efficient bio-chemical sensing, etc.

  14. Determination of Land Surface Temperature and Soil Moisture From Trmm/tmi Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, J.; Su, Z.

    An analytical algorithm for determination of land surface temperature and soil mois- ture from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Microwave Imager (TRMM/TMI) re- mote sensing data is developed in this study. Error analyses illustrate that uncer- tainty of the involved parameters will not give serious errors in determination of land surface temperature and soil Fresnel reflectivity. With the proposed algorithm and TRMM/TMI remote sensing data collected during Global Energy and Water Experi- ment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment in Tibet (GAME/Tibet) Intensive Obser- vation Period (IOP'98) field campaign in 1998, the regional and temporal distributions of the land surface temperature and volumetric soil moisture are estimated over the central Tibetan plateau area. To validate the proposed method, the ground measured surface temperature and soil volumetric moisture are compared to TRMM/TMI de- rived land surface temperature and soil Fresnel reflectivity respectively. The result shows that estimated surface temperature is in good agreement with ground mea- surements, their difference and correlation coefficient are 0.52+-2.41 K and 0.81. A quasi-linear relationship exists between the estimated Fresnel reflectivity and ground measured volumetric soil moisture with a correlation coefficient 0.82. The land sur- face characteristics can also be clearly identified from the regional distribution of the estimated land surface temperature, the mountainous area and water bodies give a very lower surface temperature while the river basin shows a higher surface temper- ature compared to the mountainous area. The southeastern part of the selected area has lower soil moisture, while the river basin exhibits high soil moisture values. It is therefore concluded that the proposed method is successful for the retrieval of land surface temperature and soil moisture using TRMM/TMI data. Keywords: TRMM/TMI, brightness temperature, land surface emperature, soil mois- ture and Tibetan

  15. Predicting eruptions from precursory activity using remote sensing data hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Ramsey, M. S.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-07-01

    Many volcanoes produce some level of precursory activity prior to an eruption. This activity may or may not be detected depending on the available monitoring technology. In certain cases, precursors such as thermal output can be interpreted to make forecasts about the time and magnitude of the impending eruption. Kamchatka (Russia) provides an ideal natural laboratory to study a wide variety of eruption styles and precursory activity prior to an eruption. At Bezymianny volcano for example, a clear increase in thermal activity commonly occurs before an eruption, which has allowed predictions to be made months ahead of time. Conversely, the eruption of Tolbachik volcano in 2012 produced no discernable thermal precursors before the large scale effusive eruption. However, most volcanoes fall between the extremes of consistently behaved and completely undetectable, which is the case with neighboring Kliuchevskoi volcano. This study tests the effectiveness of using thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing to track volcanic thermal precursors using data from both the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors. It focuses on three large eruptions that produced different levels and durations of effusive and explosive behavior at Kliuchevskoi. Before each of these eruptions, TIR spaceborne sensors detected thermal anomalies (i.e., pixels with brightness temperatures > 2 °C above the background temperature). High-temporal, low-spatial resolution (i.e., ~ hours and 1 km) AVHRR data are ideal for detecting large thermal events occurring over shorter time scales, such as the hot material ejected following strombolian eruptions. In contrast, high-spatial, low-temporal resolution (i.e., days to weeks and 90 m) ASTER data enables the detection of much lower thermal activity; however, activity with a shorter duration will commonly be missed. ASTER and AVHRR data are combined to track low

  16. Surface soil moisture retrievals from remote sensing: Current status, products & future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, George P.; Ireland, Gareth; Barrett, Brian

    Advances in Earth Observation (EO) technology, particularly over the last two decades, have shown that soil moisture content (SMC) can be measured to some degree or other by all regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a variety of techniques have been proposed to facilitate this purpose. In this review we provide a synthesis of the efforts made during the last 20 years or so towards the estimation of surface SMC exploiting EO imagery, with a particular emphasis on retrievals from microwave sensors. Rather than replicating previous overview works, we provide a comprehensive and critical exploration of all the major approaches employed for retrieving SMC in a range of different global ecosystems. In this framework, we consider the newest techniques developed within optical and thermal infrared remote sensing, active and passive microwave domains, as well as assimilation or synergistic approaches. Future trends and prospects of EO for the accurate determination of SMC from space are subject to key challenges, some of which are identified and discussed within. It is evident from this review that there is potential for more accurate estimation of SMC exploiting EO technology, particularly so, by exploring the use of synergistic approaches between a variety of EO instruments. Given the importance of SMC in Earth's land surface interactions and to a large range of applications, one can appreciate that its accurate estimation is critical in addressing key scientific and practical challenges in today's world such as food security, sustainable planning and management of water resources. The launch of new, more sophisticated satellites strengthens the development of innovative research approaches and scientific inventions that will result in a range of pioneering and ground-breaking advancements in the retrievals of soil moisture from space.

  17. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (A QSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-12-09

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10.

  18. Frost grain size metamorphism - Implications for remote sensing of planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Fanale, F. P.; Zent, A. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effective grain size of a material on a planetary surface affects the strength of absorption features observed in the reflectance of a particulate surface. In the case of a planetary surface containing volatile ices, the absorption characteristics can change in connection with processes leading to a change in the grain size of the material. The present investigation is concerned with an evaluation regarding the occurrence of such processes and the implications for remote sensing applications. It is found that quantitative modeling of the kinetics of grain growth and destruction by thermal and nonthermal processes can provide a means to reconcile apparent optical paths in the volatile portions of planetary surfaces with the physical history of those surfaces. Attention is also given to conditions in the case of the Pluto/Triton system, Uranus and Saturnian satellites, and the Galilean system.

  19. Studying groundwater and surface water interactions using airborne remote sensing in Heihe River basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Hu, Y.; Zheng, C.

    2015-05-01

    Managing surface water and groundwater as a unified system is important for water resource exploitation and aquatic ecosystem conservation. The unified approach to water management needs accurate characterization of surface water and groundwater interactions. Temperature is a natural tracer for identifying surface water and groundwater interactions, and the use of remote sensing techniques facilitates basin-scale temperature measurement. This study focuses on the Heihe River basin, the second largest inland river basin in the arid and semi-arid northwest of China where surface water and groundwater undergoes dynamic exchanges. The spatially continuous river-surface temperature of the midstream section of the Heihe River was obtained by using an airborne pushbroom hyperspectral thermal sensor system. By using the hot spot analysis toolkit in the ArcGIS software, abnormally cold water zones were identified as indicators of the spatial pattern of groundwater discharge to the river.

  20. LANDSAT Remote Sensing: Observations of an Appalachian mountaintop surface coal mining and reclamation operation. [kentucky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The potential benefits of using LANDSAT remote sensing data by state agencies as an aide in monitoring surface coal mining operations are reviewed. A mountaintop surface mine in eastern Kentucky was surveyed over a 5 year period using satellite multispectral scanner data that were classified by computer analyses. The analyses were guided by aerial photography and by ground surveys of the surface mines procured in 1976. The application of the LANDSAT data indicates that: (1) computer classification of the various landcover categories provides information for monitoring the progress of surface mining and reclamation operations; (2) successive yearly changes in barren and revegetated areas can be qualitatively assessed for surface mines of 100 acres or more of disrupted area; (3) barren areas consisting of limestone and shale mixtures may be recognized, and revegetated areas in various stages of growth may be identified against the hilly forest background.

  1. Wavelet and Fractal Analysis of Remotely Sensed Surface Temperature with Applications to Estimation of Surface Sensible Heat Flux Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schieldge, John

    2000-01-01

    Wavelet and fractal analyses have been used successfully to analyze one-dimensional data sets such as time series of financial, physical, and biological parameters. These techniques have been applied to two-dimensional problems in some instances, including the analysis of remote sensing imagery. In this respect, these techniques have not been widely used by the remote sensing community, and their overall capabilities as analytical tools for use on satellite and aircraft data sets is not well known. Wavelet and fractal analyses have the potential to provide fresh insight into the characterization of surface properties such as temperature and emissivity distributions, and surface processes such as the heat and water vapor exchange between the surface and the lower atmosphere. In particular, the variation of sensible heat flux density as a function of the change In scale of surface properties Is difficult to estimate, but - in general - wavelets and fractals have proved useful in determining the way a parameter varies with changes in scale. We present the results of a limited study on the relationship between spatial variations in surface temperature distribution and sensible heat flux distribution as determined by separate wavelet and fractal analyses. We analyzed aircraft imagery obtained in the thermal infrared (IR) bands from the multispectral TIMS and hyperspectral MASTER airborne sensors. The thermal IR data allows us to estimate the surface kinetic temperature distribution for a number of sites in the Midwestern and Southwestern United States (viz., San Pedro River Basin, Arizona; El Reno, Oklahoma; Jornada, New Mexico). The ground spatial resolution of the aircraft data varied from 5 to 15 meters. All sites were instrumented with meteorological and hydrological equipment including surface layer flux measuring stations such as Bowen Ratio systems and sonic anemometers. The ground and aircraft data sets provided the inputs for the wavelet and fractal analyses

  2. Sensing with prism-based near-infrared surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy on nanohole array platforms.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Laurel L; Boyne, Devon; Booksh, Karl S

    2014-04-01

    Nanohole arrays exhibit unique surface plasmon resonance (SPR) characteristics according to hole periodicity, diameter, and excitation wavelength (λ(SPR)). This contribution investigates the SPR characteristics and surface sensitivity of various nanohole arrays with the aim of tuning the parameters for optimal sensing capability. Both the Bragg surface plasmons (SPs) arising from diffraction by the periodic holes and the traditional propagating SPs are characterized with emphasis on sensing capability of the propagating SPs. Several trends in bulk sensitivity and penetration depth were established, and the surface sensitivity was calculated from bulk sensitivity and penetration depth of the SPs for different analyte thicknesses. Increased accuracy and precision in penetration depth values were achieved by incorporating adsorbate effects on substrate permittivity. The optimal nanohole array conditions for highest surface sensitivity were determined (820 nm periodicity, 0.27 diameter/periodicity, and λ(SPR) = 1550 nm), which demonstrated an increase in surface sensitivity for the 10 nm analyte over continuous gold films at their optimal λ(SPR) (1300 nm) and conventional visible λ(SPR) (700 nm).

  3. Characterization of Aerosols and Atmospheric Parameters From Space-Borne and Surface-Based Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Ocean color and temperature exhibit strong gradients. White capping and sun glint (which are highly wind speed dependent) cause further ocean color...aircraft altitude causing spectral brightness shift due to changes in aerosol and molecular scattering, and repeat the sequence. The method for remote...sensing of smoke or sulfates over vegetated (dark) regions by Kaufman et al. (1997) is extended to include dust over the desert ( bright surface). Now

  4. Natural polysaccharides as active biomaterials in nanostructured films for sensing.

    PubMed

    Eiras, Carla; Santos, Amanda C; Zampa, Maysa F; de Brito, Ana Cristina Facundo; Leopoldo Constantino, Carlos J; Zucolotto, Valtencir; dos Santos, José R

    2010-01-01

    The search for natural, biocompatible and degradable materials amenable to be used in biomedical/analytical applications has attracted attention, either from the environmental or medical point of view. Examples are the polysaccharides extracted from natural gums, which have found applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries as stabilizers or thickening agent. In a previous paper, however, it was shown that a Brazilian natural gum, chicha (Sterculia striata), is suitable for application as building block for nanostructured film fabrication in conjunction with phthalocyanines. The films displayed electroactivity and could be used in sensing. In the present paper, we introduce the use of two different natural gums, viz., angico (Anadenanthera colubrina) and caraia (Sterculia urens), as active biomaterials to be used to modification layers, in the form of nanostructured thin films, including the study of dopamine detection. The multilayer films were assembled in conjunction with nickel tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (NiTsPC) and displayed good chemical and electrochemical stability, allowing their use as transducer elements in sensors for detection of specific neurotransmitters. It is suggested here that nanoscale manipulation of new biodegradable natural polymers opens up a variety of new opportunities for the use of these materials in advanced biomedical and analytical devices.

  5. Realistic Instrumentation Platform for Active and Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Gebru, Alem; Jayaweera, Hiran; Svanberg, Sune

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of a novel versatile optical platform for active and passive remote sensing of environmental parameters. Applications include assessment of vegetation status and water quality. The system is also adapted for ecological studies, such as identification of flying insects including agricultural pests. The system is based on two mid-size amateur astronomy telescopes, continuous-wave diode lasers at different wavelengths ranging from violet to the near infrared, and detector facilities including quadrant photodiodes, two-dimensional and line scan charge-coupled device cameras, and a compact digital spectrometer. Application examples include remote Ramanlaser-induced fluorescence monitoring of water quality at 120 m distance, and insect identification at kilometer ranges using the recorded wing beat frequency and its spectrum of overtones. Because of the low cost this developmental platform is very suitable for advanced research projects in developing countries and has, in fact, been multiplied during hands-on workshops and is now being used by a number of groups at African universities.

  6. Active Sensing with Fabry-Perot Infrared Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jin; Gosangi, Rakesh; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    2011-09-01

    In this article, we describe an active-sensing framework for infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The goal is to generate a sequence of wavelengths that best discriminates among chemicals. Unlike feature-selection strategies, the sequence is selected on-the-fly as the device acquires data. The framework models the problem as a Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP), which is solved by a greedy myopic algorithm. In previous work [1], we had applied this framework to temperature-modulated metal oxide sensor. Here, we adapt the framework to a tunable IR sensor based on Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPI). FPIs provide a low-cost alternative to traditional Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), though at the expense of a narrower effective range and lower spectral resolution. Here, we first test whether the framework can scale up to large problems consisting 27 chemicals with 60 dimensions; our previous work on metal oxide sensors employed three chemicals and 7 dimensions. For this purpose, FPI spectra are simulated from FTIR. Then we validate the framework experimentally on 3 chemicals using a prototype instrument based on FPIs. These preliminary results are encouraging and indicate that the framework is able to solve classification problems of reasonable size.

  7. Bioinspired active whisker sensor for robotic vibrissal tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2014-12-01

    A whisker transducer (WT) inspired by rat’s vibrissal tactile perception is proposed based on a transduction matrix model characterizing the electro-mechanical transduction process in both forward and backward directions. It is capable of acting as an actuator to sweep the whisker and simultaneously as a sensor to sense the force, motion, and mechanical impedance at whisker tip. Its validity is confirmed by numerical simulation using a finite element model. A prototype is then fabricated and its transduction matrix is determined by parameter identification. The calibrated WT can accurately sense mechanical impedance which is directly related to stiffness, mass and damping. Subsequent vibrissal tactile sensing of sandpaper texture reveals that the real part of mechanical impedance sensed by WT is correlated with sandpaper roughness. Texture discrimination is successfully achieved by inputting the real part to a k-means clustering algorithm. The mechanical impedance sensing ability as well as other features of the WT such as simultaneous-actuation-and-sensing makes it a good solution to robotic tactile sensing.

  8. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  9. The Application of Aperture Synthesis to the Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Sea surface salinity is measured optimally at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum in order to maximize radiometric sensitivity to changes in salinity. Long wavelengths (e.g. L-band) mean large antennas in space, and because of the technological challenge associated with putting large scanning antennas in orbit, no system currently exists to measure salinity. Aperture synthesis is an interferometric technique to make deployment of large antenna apertures in space feasible. It uses pairs of small antennas and signal processing to achieve the resolution of a single large aperture. Aperture synthesis has been demonstrated successfully for remote sensing by the aircraft prototype radiometer, ESTAR. ESTAR is an L-band instrument which employs aperture synthesis in the cross track dimension. Recent measurements with ESTAR of the fresh water outflow from the Delaware River are in good agreement (about 1 psu) with shipboard thermosalinograph measurements. Synthetic aperture radiometers are currently being developed for remote sensing from space. HYDROSTAR is an instrument for remote sensing from space based on the design of ESTAR. It employs aperture synthesis in one dimension and is being proposed as a pathfinder instrument to make global maps of soil moisture and sea surface salinity and to demonstrate the feasibility of aperture synthesis for remote sensing from space. Instruments which use remote sensing in two dimensions are currently being developed by the European Space Agency. These instruments include additional channels (frequencies and polarizations) and may be able to achieve radiometric sensitivity and spatial resolution to meet the diverse needs of the coastal zone and open ocean oceanographic communities.

  10. Predictive Analysis of Landslide Activity Using Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuzon, N.; Regan, J.; Slesnick, C.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides are historically one of the most damaging geohazard phenomena in terms of death tolls and socio-economic losses. Therefore, understanding the underlying causes of landslides and how environmental phenomena affect their frequency and severity is of critical importance. Of specific importance for mitigating future damage is increasing our understanding of how climate change will affect landslide severity, occurrence rates, and damage. We are developing data driven models aimed at predicting landslide activity. The models learn multi-dimensional weather and geophysical patterns associated with historical landslides and estimate location-dependent probabilities for landslides under current or future weather and geophysical conditions. Our approach uses machine learning algorithms capable of determining non-linear associations between dependent variables and landslide occurrence without requiring detailed knowledge of geomorphology. Our primary goal in year one of the project is to evaluate the predictive capabilities of data mining models in application to landslide activity, and to analyze if the approach will discover previously unknown variables and/or relationships important to landslide occurrence, frequency or severity. The models include remote sensing and ground-based data, including weather, landcover, slope, elevation and drainage information as well as urbanization data. The historical landslide dataset we used to build our preliminary models was compiled from City of Seattle landslide files, United States Geological Survey reports, newspaper articles, and a verified subset of the Seattle Landslide Database that consists of all reported landslides within Seattle, WA, between 1948 and 1999. Most of the landslides analyzed to-date are shallow. Using statistical analysis and unsupervised clustering methods we have thus far identified subsets of weather conditions that lead to a significantly higher landslide probability, and have developed

  11. Thermal infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subjects of infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications is reviewed with respect to the basic physical concepts involved at the Earth's surface and up through the atmosphere, as well as the historical development of satellite systems which produce such data at increasingly greater spatial resolution. With this general background in hand, the growth of a variety of specific renewable resource applications using the developing thermal infrared technology are discussed, including data from HCMM investigators. Recommendations are made for continued growth in this field of applications.

  12. High performing phase-based surface plasmon resonance sensing from metallic nanohole arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Z. L.; Wong, S. L.; Ong, H. C.; Wu, S. Y.; Ho, H. P.

    2014-04-28

    We show the spectral figure-of-merit (FOM) from nanohole arrays can be larger than 1900/RIU by phase-based surface plasmon resonance. By using temporal coupled mode theory, we find the p-s polarization phase jump is the sharpest when both the absorption and radiative decay rates of surface plasmon polaritons are matched, yielding an extremely small spectral differential phase linewidth and thus superior FOM. The result is supported by numerical simulation and experiment. As a demonstration, we show the phase detection outperforms the conventional spectral counterpart significantly by sensing the binding of bovine serum albumin antibodies under identical condition.

  13. Impact of the Sun on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-25

    The sun is a sufficiently strong source of radiation at L-band to be an important source of interference for radiometers on future satellite missions such as SMOS, Aquarius, and Hydros designed to monitor soil moisture and sea surface salinity. Radiation from the sun can impact passive remote sensing systems in several ways, including line-of-sight radiation that comes directly from the sun and enters through antenna side lobes and radiation that is reflected from the surface to the radiometer. Examples are presented in the case

  14. A framework for nowcasting and forecasting of rainfall-triggered landslide activity using remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Stanley, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing data offers the unique perspective to provide situational awareness of hydrometeorological hazards over large areas in a way that is impossible to achieve with in situ data. Recent work has shown that rainfall-triggered landslides, while typically local hazards that occupy small spatial areas, can be approximated over regional or global scales in near real-time. This work presents a regional and global approach to approximating potential landslide activity using the landslide hazard assessment for situational awareness (LHASA) model. This system couples remote sensing data, including Global Precipitation Measurement rainfall data, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and other surface variables to estimate where and when landslide activity may be likely. This system also evaluates the effectiveness of quantitative precipitation estimates from the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 to provide a 24 forecast of potential landslide activity. Preliminary results of the LHASA model and implications for are presented for a regional version of this system in Central America as well as a prototype global approach.

  15. Characterization of Deep Tunneling Activity through Remote-Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Best, P. J. Etzler, and J. D. Bloom

    1997-10-01

    This work is a case study demonstrating the uses of multispectral and multi-temporal imagery to characterize deep tunneling activity. A drainage tunnel excavation in Quincy, MA is the case locality. Data used are aerial photographs (digitized) and Daedalus 3600 MSS image data that were collected in July and October of 1994. Analysis of the data includes thermal characterization, spectral characterization, multi-temporal analysis, and volume estimation using digital DEM generation. The results demonstrate the type of information that could be generated by multispectral, multi-temporal data if the study locality were a clandestine excavation site with restricted surface access.

  16. Study on removal of phase lines in welding pool surface shape sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiqing; Liu, Nansheng; Hu, Xian; Ai, Xiaopu; Wei, Sheng; Liu, Xiaorui

    2009-11-01

    In recent years, arc welding pool surface shape sensing becomes a hot spot in the field of welding automation. In order to restore the pool surface shape, we first need to photograph the pool surface, and then extract useful information from the acquired images. In arc welding surface shape sensing system based on structured light projection, the raster images obtained by charge-coupled device (CCD) are seriously affected by strong arc and spatter, etc. resulting in errors of phase unwrapping, and thus seriously affecting the surface shape recovery. To address phase lines of unwrapping errors, this paper presents a two-neighborhood method. First we analyzed the characteristics of phase lines in the phase diagram, then by comparison of phase diagrams or phase difference diagrams processed before and after, the effectiveness of two-neighborhood method was confirmed, finally this method was applied to the actual pool phase diagram processing, experimental results also confirmed this two-neighborhood method is feasible in removal of phase lines.

  17. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ray G.; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S.

    2012-08-01

    Estimates of consumptive use of surface water by agriculture are vital for assessing food security, managing water rights, and evaluating anthropogenic impacts on regional hydrology. However, reliable, current, and public data on consumptive use can be difficult to obtain, particularly in international and less developed basins. We combine remotely-sensed precipitation and satellite observations of evapotranspiration and groundwater depletion to estimate surface water consumption by irrigated agriculture in California's Central Valley for the 2004-09 water years. We validated our technique against measured consumption data determined from streamflow observations and water export data in the Central Valley. Mean satellite-derived surface water consumption was 291.0 ± 32.4 mm/year while measured surface water consumption was 308.1 ± 6.5 mm/year. The results show the potential for remotely-sensed hydrologic data to independently observe irrigated agriculture's surface water consumption in contested or unmonitored basins. Improvements in the precision and spatial resolution of satellite precipitation, evapotranspiration and gravimetric groundwater observations are needed to reduce the uncertainty in this method and to allow its use on smaller basins and at shorter time scales.

  18. ESA activities in the use of microwaves for the remote sensing of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccoll, D.

    1984-01-01

    The program of activities under way in the European Space Agency (ESA) directed towards Remote Sensing of the oceans and troposphere is discussed. The initial project is the launch of a satellite named ERS-1 with a primary payload of microwave values in theee C- and Ku-bands. This payload is discussed in depth. The secondary payload includes precision location experiments and an instrument to measure sea surface temperature, which are described. The important topic of calibration is extensively discussed, and a review of activities directed towards improvements to the instruments for future satellites is presented. Some discussion of the impact of the instrument payload on the spacecraft design follows and the commitment of ESA to the provision of a service of value to the ultimate user is emphasized.

  19. Active Thermal Extraction and Temperature Sensing of Near-field Thermal Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, D.; Kim, T.; Minnich, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an active thermal extraction (ATX) scheme that enables thermally populated surface phonon polaritons to escape into the far-field. The concept is based on a fluorescence upconversion process that also occurs in laser cooling of solids (LCS). Here, we present a generalized analysis of our scheme using the theoretical framework for LCS. We show that both LCS and ATX can be described with the same mathematical formalism by replacing the electron-phonon coupling parameter in LCS with the electron-photon coupling parameter in ATX. Using this framework, we compare the ideal efficiency and power extracted for the two schemes and examine the parasitic loss mechanisms. This work advances the application of ATX to manipulate near-field thermal radiation for applications such as temperature sensing and active radiative cooling. PMID:27595609

  20. Surface profile and stress field evaluation using digital gradient sensing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, C.; Sundaram, B. M.; Huang, L.; Tippur, H. V.

    2016-09-01

    Shape and surface topography evaluation from measured orthogonal slope/gradient data is of considerable engineering significance since many full-field optical sensors and interferometers readily output such a data accurately. This has applications ranging from metrology of optical and electronic elements (lenses, silicon wafers, thin film coatings), surface profile estimation, wave front and shape reconstruction, to name a few. In this context, a new methodology for surface profile and stress field determination based on a recently introduced non-contact, full-field optical method called digital gradient sensing (DGS) capable of measuring small angular deflections of light rays coupled with a robust finite-difference-based least-squares integration (HFLI) scheme in the Southwell configuration is advanced here. The method is demonstrated by evaluating (a) surface profiles of mechanically warped silicon wafers and (b) stress gradients near growing cracks in planar phase objects.

  1. Surface Profile and Stress Field Evaluation using Digital Gradient Sensing Method

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, C.; Sundaram, B. M.; Huang, L.; ...

    2016-08-09

    Shape and surface topography evaluation from measured orthogonal slope/gradient data is of considerable engineering significance since many full-field optical sensors and interferometers readily output accurate data of that kind. This has applications ranging from metrology of optical and electronic elements (lenses, silicon wafers, thin film coatings), surface profile estimation, wave front and shape reconstruction, to name a few. In this context, a new methodology for surface profile and stress field determination based on a recently introduced non-contact, full-field optical method called digital gradient sensing (DGS) capable of measuring small angular deflections of light rays coupled with a robust finite-difference-based least-squaresmore » integration (HFLI) scheme in the Southwell configuration is advanced here. The method is demonstrated by evaluating (a) surface profiles of mechanically warped silicon wafers and (b) stress gradients near growing cracks in planar phase objects.« less

  2. Surface Profile and Stress Field Evaluation using Digital Gradient Sensing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, C.; Sundaram, B. M.; Huang, L.; Tippur, H. V.

    2016-08-09

    Shape and surface topography evaluation from measured orthogonal slope/gradient data is of considerable engineering significance since many full-field optical sensors and interferometers readily output accurate data of that kind. This has applications ranging from metrology of optical and electronic elements (lenses, silicon wafers, thin film coatings), surface profile estimation, wave front and shape reconstruction, to name a few. In this context, a new methodology for surface profile and stress field determination based on a recently introduced non-contact, full-field optical method called digital gradient sensing (DGS) capable of measuring small angular deflections of light rays coupled with a robust finite-difference-based least-squares integration (HFLI) scheme in the Southwell configuration is advanced here. The method is demonstrated by evaluating (a) surface profiles of mechanically warped silicon wafers and (b) stress gradients near growing cracks in planar phase objects.

  3. A simple thermal model of the earth's surface for geologic mapping by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal inertia of the earth's surface can be used in geologic mapping as a complement to surface reflectance data as provided by Landsat. Thermal inertia cannot be determined directly but must be inferred from radiation temperature measurements (by thermal IR sensors) made at various times in the diurnal cycle, combined with a model of the surface heating processes. A model is developed which differs from those created previously for this purpose, because it includes sensible and latent heating. Tests of this model using field data indicate that it accurately determines the surface heating. When the model is used with field measurements of meteorological variables and is combined with remotely sensed temperature data, a thermal inertia image can be produced.

  4. The Challenge of Active Optical Sensing from Extreme Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    A review of the history and current state of atmospheric sensing lidar from Earth orbit was conducted and it was found that space based earth remote sensing is still in its infancy with only one limited success extended duration autonomous mission to date. An analysis of the basic requirements for some candidate geo-synchronous lidar concepts was completed and it was concluded that significant basic work is required in all areas of lidar development.

  5. [Research on symmetrical optical waveguide based surface plasmon resonance sensing with spectral interrogation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-long; Liu, Le; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Peng-fei; Guo, Ji-hua; Ma, Hui; He, Yong-hong

    2015-02-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors with spectral interrogation can adopt fiber to transmit light signals, thus leaving the sensing part separated, which is very convenient for miniaturization, remote-sensing and on-site analysis. Symmetrical optical waveguide (SOW) SPR has the same refractive index of the-two buffer media layers adjacent to the metal film, resulting in longer propagation distance, deeper penetration depth and better performance compared to conventional SPR In the present paper, we developed a symmetrical optical, waveguide (SOW) SPR sensor with wavelength interrogation. In the system, MgF2-Au-MgF2 film was used as SOW module for glucose sensing, and a fiber based light source and detection was used in the spectral interrogation. In the experiment, a refractive index resolution of 2.8 x 10(-7) RIU in fluid protocol was acquired. This technique provides advantages of high resolution and could have potential use in compact design, on-site analysis and remote sensing.

  6. The Evaluation of an Integrated Land Surface - Groundwater Model Through Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinussa, R.; Liu, Y.; Ajami, H.; Evans, J. P.; McCabe, M. F.; Sharma, A.

    2015-12-01

    Integrated land surface-groundwater models simulate the variability of water dynamics and land surface fluxes in both time and space while explicitly incorporating the role of groundwater dynamics in soil moisture distribution. The ParFlow.CLM modelling platform is an integrated hydrologic model and was used here for simulating land surface and groundwater dynamics over the Baldry sub-catchment in Australia at hourly time intervals. Baldry is located in the central west of New South Wales, has an ephemeral creek and is located in a temperate climate class with hot summers. Here, a multi-criteria evaluation strategy was employed using a range of observed catchment responses, including surface energy fluxes and states of land surface temperature, soil moisture and groundwater level for the period from 2005-2010. Particularly, the use of remotely sensed soil moisture and land surface temperature products obtained from downscaled microwave observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) were explored to test the feasibility of these products for model evaluation at the catchment scale. Results suggest high agreement between the temporal dynamics of the model simulations and remotely sensed surface soil moisture and land surface temperature products, with correlation coefficient values of 0.79 and 0.92 respectively. Model comparisons with observed daily groundwater levels show satisfactory model performance (correlation coefficient > 0.5) considering the simple conceptual geological model developed for the study site. Our analyses indicate that the depth to the water table (DTWT) has an important role in controlling evaporation rates and top layer soil moisture distributions in the catchment. The relationship between evaporation rates and DTWT distribution for the six years of simulations shows increased sensitivity during dryer periods. Our results highlight that soil moisture distributions obtained from a physically

  7. Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guendogdu; Vorreiter; Seume

    2010-01-01

    Active Flow Control increases the permissible aerodynamic loading. Curved surface near the trailing edge ("Coanda surface"): a) increases turning -> higher pressure ratio. b) controls boundary layer separation -> increased surge margin. Objective: Reduce the number of vanes or compressor stages. Constraints: 1. In a real compressor, the vane must still function entirely without blowing. 2. Maintain the flow exit angle of the reference stator despite the resulting increase in stator loading.

  8. Technique for surface oxidation of activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Golden, T.C.

    1987-10-27

    A method of activating a carbon adsorbent is described, which comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mild oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidizing carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent. In a process for the removal of water or carbon dioxide from a gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide of the type wherein the gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide is contacted with a solid phase adsorbent under pressure-swing adsorption or thermal-swing adsorption processing conditions, the improvement is described comprising utilizing an adsorbent produced by the activation of a carbon adsorbent. The activation comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mold oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidized carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent.

  9. Optical Activity of Anisotropic Achiral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, T.; Kauranen, M.; Van Rompaey, Y.; Persoons, A. |

    1996-08-01

    Anisotropic achiral surfaces respond differently to left- and right-hand circularly polarized light. This occurs when the orientation of the surface with respect to an otherwise achiral experimental setup makes the total geometry chiral. Such optical activity is demonstrated in second-harmonic generation from an anisotropic thin molecular film. The circular-difference response reverses sign as the handedness of the geometry is reversed and vanishes when the setup possesses a mirror plane. The results are explained within the electric-dipole-allowed second-order surface nonlinearity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Active Surfaces and Interfaces of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming

    A variety of intriguing surface patterns have been observed on developing natural systems, ranging from corrugated surface of white blood cells at nanometer scales to wrinkled dog skins at millimeter scales. To mimetically harness functionalities of natural morphologies, artificial transformative skin systems by using soft active materials have been rationally designed to generate versatile patterns for a variety of engineering applications. The study of the mechanics and design of these dynamic surface patterns on soft active materials are both physically interesting and technologically important. This dissertation starts with studying abundant surface patterns in Nature by constructing a unified phase diagram of surface instabilities on soft materials with minimum numbers of physical parameters. Guided by this integrated phase diagram, an electroactive system is designed to investigate a variety of electrically-induced surface instabilities of elastomers, including electro-creasing, electro-cratering, electro-wrinkling and electro-cavitation. Combing experimental, theoretical and computational methods, the initiation, evolution and transition of these instabilities are analyzed. To apply these dynamic surface instabilities to serving engineering and biology, new techniques of Dynamic Electrostatic Lithography and electroactive anti-biofouling are demonstrated.

  11. Identification of sewage leaks by active remote-sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Basson, Uri

    2016-04-01

    The increasing length of sewage pipelines, and concomitant risk of leaks due to urban and industrial growth and development is exposing the surrounding land to contamination risk and environmental harm. It is therefore important to locate such leaks in a timely manner, to minimize the damage. Advances in active remote sensing Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Frequency Domain Electromagnetic (FDEM) technologies was used to identify leaking potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. This study focused on the development of these electromagnetic methods to replace conventional acoustic methods for the identification of leaks along sewage pipes. Electromagnetic methods provide an additional advantage in that they allow mapping of the fluid-transport system in the subsurface. Leak-detection systems using GPR and FDEM are not limited to large amounts of water, but enable detecting leaks of tens of liters per hour, because they can locate increases in environmental moisture content of only a few percentage along the pipes. The importance and uniqueness of this research lies in the development of practical tools to provide a snapshot and monitoring of the spatial changes in soil moisture content up to depths of about 3-4 m, in open and paved areas, at relatively low cost, in real time or close to real time. Spatial measurements performed using GPR and FDEM systems allow monitoring many tens of thousands of measurement points per hectare, thus providing a picture of the spatial situation along pipelines and the surrounding. The main purpose of this study was to develop a method for detecting sewage leaks using the above-proposed geophysical methods, since their contaminants can severely affect public health. We focused on identifying, locating and characterizing such leaks in sewage pipes in residential and industrial areas.

  12. ZnO Functionalization of Surface Pre-treated Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Methane Sensing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bare carbon nanotubes (CNTs) cannot be used to sense most gases due to poor bonding between the chemically inert graphitic surface and the different compounds CNTs are exposed to. Consequently, for gas sensing applications, functionalization of CNTs with reactive compounds is req...

  13. Impact of Remotely Sensed Land Surface States on Variability in Atmospheric Forcing and Fluxes Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer Schemes used for operational land surface flux mapping from remotely sensed data typically use high resolution remote sensed data, but coarser atmospheric inputs, either specified by a model or taken from a nearby weather station. While the role of spatially varia...

  14. Comparing land surface phenology derived from satellite and GPS network microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew O.; Kimball, John S.; Small, Eric E.; Larson, Kristine M.

    2014-08-01

    The land surface phenology (LSP) start of season (SOS) metric signals the seasonal onset of vegetation activity, including canopy growth and associated increases in land-atmosphere water, energy and carbon (CO2) exchanges influencing weather and climate variability. The vegetation optical depth (VOD) parameter determined from satellite passive microwave remote sensing provides for global LSP monitoring that is sensitive to changes in vegetation canopy water content and biomass, and insensitive to atmosphere and solar illumination constraints. Direct field measures of canopy water content and biomass changes desired for LSP validation are generally lacking due to the prohibitive costs of maintaining regional monitoring networks. Alternatively, a normalized microwave reflectance index (NMRI) derived from GPS base station measurements is sensitive to daily vegetation water content changes and may provide for effective microwave LSP validation. We compared multiyear (2007-2011) NMRI and satellite VOD records at over 300 GPS sites in North America, and their derived SOS metrics for a subset of 24 homogenous land cover sites to investigate VOD and NMRI correspondence, and potential NMRI utility for LSP validation. Significant correlations ( P < 0.05) were found at 276 of 305 sites (90.5 %), with generally favorable correspondence in the resulting SOS metrics ( r 2 = 0.73, P < 0.001, RMSE = 36.8 days). This study is the first attempt to compare satellite microwave LSP metrics to a GPS network derived reflectance index and highlights both the utility and limitations of the NMRI data for LSP validation, including spatial scale discrepancies between local NMRI measurements and relatively coarse satellite VOD retrievals.

  15. Comparing land surface phenology derived from satellite and GPS network microwave remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew O; Kimball, John S; Small, Eric E; Larson, Kristine M

    2014-08-01

    The land surface phenology (LSP) start of season (SOS) metric signals the seasonal onset of vegetation activity, including canopy growth and associated increases in land-atmosphere water, energy and carbon (CO2) exchanges influencing weather and climate variability. The vegetation optical depth (VOD) parameter determined from satellite passive microwave remote sensing provides for global LSP monitoring that is sensitive to changes in vegetation canopy water content and biomass, and insensitive to atmosphere and solar illumination constraints. Direct field measures of canopy water content and biomass changes desired for LSP validation are generally lacking due to the prohibitive costs of maintaining regional monitoring networks. Alternatively, a normalized microwave reflectance index (NMRI) derived from GPS base station measurements is sensitive to daily vegetation water content changes and may provide for effective microwave LSP validation. We compared multiyear (2007-2011) NMRI and satellite VOD records at over 300 GPS sites in North America, and their derived SOS metrics for a subset of 24 homogenous land cover sites to investigate VOD and NMRI correspondence, and potential NMRI utility for LSP validation. Significant correlations (P<0.05) were found at 276 of 305 sites (90.5 %), with generally favorable correspondence in the resulting SOS metrics (r (2)=0.73, P<0.001, RMSE=36.8 days). This study is the first attempt to compare satellite microwave LSP metrics to a GPS network derived reflectance index and highlights both the utility and limitations of the NMRI data for LSP validation, including spatial scale discrepancies between local NMRI measurements and relatively coarse satellite VOD retrievals.

  16. Effective Low-Power Wearable Wireless Surface EMG Sensor Design Based on Analog-Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is a non-invasive measurement process that does not involve tools and instruments to break the skin or physically enter the body to investigate and evaluate the muscular activities produced by skeletal muscles. The main drawbacks of existing sEMG systems are: (1) they are not able to provide real-time monitoring; (2) they suffer from long processing time and low speed; (3) they are not effective for wireless healthcare systems because they consume huge power. In this work, we present an analog-based Compressed Sensing (CS) architecture, which consists of three novel algorithms for design and implementation of wearable wireless sEMG bio-sensor. At the transmitter side, two new algorithms are presented in order to apply the analog-CS theory before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). At the receiver side, a robust reconstruction algorithm based on a combination of ℓ1-ℓ1-optimization and Block Sparse Bayesian Learning (BSBL) framework is presented to reconstruct the original bio-signals from the compressed bio-signals. The proposed architecture allows reducing the sampling rate to 25% of Nyquist Rate (NR). In addition, the proposed architecture reduces the power consumption to 40%, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD) to 24%, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) to 2%, and the computation time from 22 s to 9.01 s, which provide good background for establishing wearable wireless healthcare systems. The proposed architecture achieves robust performance in low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for the reconstruction process. PMID:25526357

  17. Effective low-power wearable wireless surface EMG sensor design based on analog-compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2014-12-17

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is a non-invasive measurement process that does not involve tools and instruments to break the skin or physically enter the body to investigate and evaluate the muscular activities produced by skeletal muscles. The main drawbacks of existing sEMG systems are: (1) they are not able to provide real-time monitoring; (2) they suffer from long processing time and low speed; (3) they are not effective for wireless healthcare systems because they consume huge power. In this work, we present an analog-based Compressed Sensing (CS) architecture, which consists of three novel algorithms for design and implementation of wearable wireless sEMG bio-sensor. At the transmitter side, two new algorithms are presented in order to apply the analog-CS theory before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). At the receiver side, a robust reconstruction algorithm based on a combination of ℓ1-ℓ1-optimization and Block Sparse Bayesian Learning (BSBL) framework is presented to reconstruct the original bio-signals from the compressed bio-signals. The proposed architecture allows reducing the sampling rate to 25% of Nyquist Rate (NR). In addition, the proposed architecture reduces the power consumption to 40%, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD) to 24%, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) to 2%, and the computation time from 22 s to 9.01 s, which provide good background for establishing wearable wireless healthcare systems. The proposed architecture achieves robust performance in low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for the reconstruction process.

  18. Remote sensing of Earth terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Progress report on remote sensing of Earth terrain covering the period from Jan. to June 1993 is presented. Areas of research include: radiative transfer model for active and passive remote sensing of vegetation canopy; polarimetric thermal emission from rough ocean surfaces; polarimetric passive remote sensing of ocean wind vectors; polarimetric thermal emission from periodic water surfaces; layer model with tandom spheriodal scatterers for remote sensing of vegetation canopy; application of theoretical models to active and passive remote sensing of saline ice; radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest; scattering of electromagnetic waves from a dense medium consisting of correlated mie scatterers with size distributions and applications to dry snow; variance of phase fluctuations of waves propagating through a random medium; polarimetric signatures of a canopy of dielectric cylinders based on first and second order vector radiative transfer theory; branching model for vegetation; polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces; composite volume and surface scattering model; and radar image classification.

  19. Multidimensional Modeling of Atmospheric Effects and Surface Heterogeneities on Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstl, S. A. W.; Simmer, C.; Zardecki, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to establish a modeling capability that allows a quantitative determination of atmospheric effects on remote sensing including the effects of surface heterogeneities. This includes an improved understanding of aerosol and haze effects in connection with structural, angular, and spatial surface heterogeneities. One important objective of the research is the possible identification of intrinsic surface or canopy characteristics that might be invariant to atmospheric perturbations so that they could be used for scene identification. Conversely, an equally important objective is to find a correction algorithm for atmospheric effects in satellite-sensed surface reflectances. The technical approach is centered around a systematic model and code development effort based on existing, highly advanced computer codes that were originally developed for nuclear radiation shielding applications. Computational techniques for the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation are adapted on the basis of the discrete-ordinates finite-element method which proved highly successful for one and two-dimensional radiative transfer problems with fully resolved angular representation of the radiation field.

  20. Comparison of two different surfaces for 3d model abstraction in support of remote sensing simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Paul A; Ranken, Doug M

    2010-01-01

    A method for abstracting a 3D model by shrinking a triangular mesh, defined upon a best fitting ellipsoid surrounding the model, onto the model's surface has been previously described. This ''shrinkwrap'' process enables a semi-regular mesh to be defined upon an object's surface. This creates a useful data structure for conducting remote sensing simulations and image processing. However, using a best fitting ellipsoid having a graticule-based tessellation to seed the shrinkwrap process suffers from a mesh which is too dense at the poles. To achieve a more regular mesh, the use of a best fitting, subdivided icosahedron was tested. By subdividing each of the twenty facets of the icosahedron into regular triangles of a predetermined size, arbitrarily dense, highly-regular starting meshes can be created. Comparisons of the meshes resulting from these two seed surfaces are described. Use of a best fitting icosahedron-based mesh as the seed surface in the shrinkwrap process is preferable to using a best fitting ellipsoid. The impacts to remote sensing simulations, specifically generation of synthetic imagery, is illustrated.

  1. Mid-infrared surface transmitting and detecting quantum cascade device for gas-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Harrer, Andreas; Szedlak, Rolf; Schwarz, Benedikt; Moser, Harald; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Lendl, Bernhard; Strasser, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    We present a bi-functional surface emitting and surface detecting mid-infrared device applicable for gas-sensing. A distributed feedback ring quantum cascade laser is monolithically integrated with a detector structured from a bi-functional material for same frequency lasing and detection. The emitted single mode radiation is collimated, back reflected by a flat mirror and detected by the detector element of the sensor. The surface operation mode combined with the low divergence emission of the ring quantum cascade laser enables for long analyte interaction regions spatially separated from the sample surface. The device enables for sensing of gaseous analytes which requires a relatively long interaction region. Our design is suitable for 2D array integration with multiple emission and detection frequencies. Proof of principle measurements with isobutane (2-methylpropane) and propane as gaseous analytes were conducted. Detectable concentration values of 0–70% for propane and 0–90% for isobutane were reached at a laser operation wavelength of 6.5 μm utilizing a 10 cm gas cell in double pass configuration. PMID:26887891

  2. Spatial Distribution and Pattern Persistence of Surface Soil Moisture and Temperature Over Prairie from Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Daoyi; Engman, Edwin T.; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1997-01-01

    Images remotely sensed aboard aircraft during FIFE, namely, PBMR (microwave) soil moisture and NS001 thermal infrared surface temperature, were mapped on the same coordinate system covering the 20 km x 20 km experimental site. For both kinds of image data, the frequency distributions were close to symmetric, and the area average compared reasonably well with the ground based measurements. For any image on any given day, the correlation between the remotely sensed values and collocated ground based measurements over the area was usually high in the case of NS001 surface temperature but low in the case of PBMR soil moisture. On the other hand, at any given flux station the correlation between the PBMR and gravimetric soil moisture over all available days was usually high. The correlation pixel by pixel between images of PBMR on different days was generally high. The preservation of the spatial patterns of soil moisture was also evaluated by considering the correlation station by station between ground-based soil moisture measurements on different days; no persistence of spatial pattern was apparent during wet periods, but a definite pattern gradually established itself toward the end of each drying episode. The spatial patterns of surface temperature revealed by NS001 were not preserved even within a single day. The cross-correlations among the two kinds of images and the vegetation index NDVI were normally poor. This suggests that different processes of vegetation growth, and of the near-surface soil water and energy budgets.

  3. Lunar Prospector: a Preliminary Surface Remote Sensing Resource Assessment for the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardon, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The potential existence of lunar volatiles is a scientific discovery that could distinctly change the direction of pathways of inner solar system human expansion. With a dedicated germanium gamma ray spectrometer launched in the early 1990's, surface water concentrations of 0.7 percent could be detected immediately upon full lunar polar orbit operations. The expense of lunar base construction and operation would be dramatically reduced over a scenario with no lunar volatile resources. Global surface mineral distribution could be mapped out and integrated into a GIS database for lunar base site selection. Extensive surface lunar mapping would also result in the utilization of archived Apollo images. A variety of remote sensing systems and their parameters have been proposed for use in the detection of these lunar ice masses. The detection or nondetection of subsurface and surface ice masses in lunar polar crater floors could dramatically direct the development pathways that the human race might follow in its radiation from the Earth to habitable locales in the inner terran solar system. Potential sources of lunar volatiles are described. The use of remote sensing to detect lunar volatiles is addressed.

  4. The utility of surface temperature measurements for the remote sensing of surface soil water status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out on an Avondale loam soil indicated that the thermal inertia concept of soil water content detection is reasonably sound. The volumetric water contents of surface soil layers between 2 and 4 cm thick were found to be linear functions of the amplitude of the diurnal surface soil temperature wave for clear day-night periods. They were also found to be linear functions of the daily maximum value of the surface soil-air-temperature differential. Tests on three additional soils ranging from sandy loam to clay indicated that the relations determined for Avondale loam could not be accurately applied to these other soil types. When the moisture characteristic curves of each soil were used to transform water contents into pressure potentials, however, it was found that soil water pressure potential could be determined without prior knowledge of soil type, and thus its value as a potential soil water status survey tool was significantly enhanced.

  5. Quorum Sensing Inhibitory Activity of Giganteone A from Myristica cinnamomea King against Escherichia coli Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sivasothy, Yasodha; Krishnan, Thiba; Chan, Kok-Gan; Abdul Wahab, Siti Mariam; Othman, Muhamad Aqmal; Litaudon, Marc; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-03-21

    Malabaricones A-C (1-3) and giganteone A (4) were isolated from the bark of Myristica cinnamomea King. Their structures were elucidated and characterized by means of NMR and MS spectral analyses. These isolates were evaluated for their anti-quorum sensing activity using quorum sensing biosensors, namely Escherichia coli [pSB401] and Escherichia coli [pSB1075], whereby the potential of giganteone A (4) as a suitable anti-quorum sensing agent was demonstrated.

  6. Optical sensing of analytes in aqueous solutions with a multiple surface-plasmon-polariton-wave platform

    PubMed Central

    Swiontek, Stephen E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2013-01-01

    The commonly used optical sensor based on surface plasmon-polariton wave phenomenon can sense just one chemical, because only one SPP wave can be guided by the interface of a metal and a dielectric material contained in the sensor. Multiple analytes could be detected and/or the sensing reliability for a single analyte could be enhanced, if multiple SPP-wave modes could be excited on a single metal/dielectric interface. For that to happen, the partnering dielectric material must be periodically non-homogeneous. Using a chiral sculptured thin film (CSTF) as that material in a SPP-wave platform, we show that the angular locations of multiple SPP-wave modes shift when the void regions of the CSTF are infiltrated with a fluid. The sensitivities realized in the proof-of-concept experiments are comparable to state-of-research values. PMID:23474988

  7. Slotted surface coil with reduced g-factor for SENSE imaging.

    PubMed

    Ocegueda, K; Rodriguez, A O

    2006-01-01

    A new coil design inspired on the slot-and-hole magnetron tube is proposed for SENSE imaging. To investigate its g-factor behaviour: an SNR formula was derived using the quasi-static approach, and combined with the ultimate g-factor formula to compute the ultimate-factor-g-vs-depth plots. A g-factor expression was derived for the circular coil using the same approach for comparison purposes. SNR-vs-depth profiles of an 4-slot coil showed an important improvement over the circular coil. The 4-slot coil g-factor can be up to 58.32% lower than that of a single circular-shaped coil. This improvement makes the slotted surface coil a good choice for SENSE imaging.

  8. Reflectance spectroscopy - Quantitative analysis techniques for remote sensing applications. [in planetary surface geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Roush, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    The empirical methods and scattering theories that are important for solving remote sensing problems are among the methods for remotely sensed reflectance data analysis presently compared. In the case of the photon mean optical path length concept's implications for reflectance spectra modeling, it is shown that the mean optical path length in a particulate surface is in roughly inverse proportion to the square root of the absorption coefficient. Absorption bands, which are Gaussian in shape when plotted as true absorptance vs photon energy, are also Gaussians in apparent absorptance, although they have a smaller intensity. An apparent continuum in a reflectance spectrum is modeled as a mathematical function that is used to isolate a particular absorption feature for analysis, and it is noted that this continuum should be removed by dividing it into the reflectance spectrum.

  9. Remote sensing algorithm for surface evapotranspiration considering landscape and statistical effects on mixed pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing Peng, Zhi; Xin, Xiaozhou; Jiao, Jin Jun; Zhou, Ti; Liu, Qinhuo

    2016-11-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) plays an important role in surface-atmosphere interactions and can be monitored using remote sensing data. However, surface heterogeneity, including the inhomogeneity of landscapes and surface variables, significantly affects the accuracy of ET estimated from satellite data. The objective of this study is to assess and reduce the uncertainties resulting from surface heterogeneity in remotely sensed ET using Chinese HJ-1B satellite data, which is of 30 m spatial resolution in VIS/NIR bands and 300 m spatial resolution in the thermal-infrared (TIR) band. A temperature-sharpening and flux aggregation scheme (TSFA) was developed to obtain accurate heat fluxes from the HJ-1B satellite data. The IPUS (input parameter upscaling) and TRFA (temperature resampling and flux aggregation) methods were used to compare with the TSFA in this study. The three methods represent three typical schemes used to handle mixed pixels from the simplest to the most complex. IPUS handles all surface variables at coarse resolution of 300 m in this study, TSFA handles them at 30 m resolution, and TRFA handles them at 30 and 300 m resolution, which depends on the actual spatial resolution. Analyzing and comparing the three methods can help us to get a better understanding of spatial-scale errors in remote sensing of surface heat fluxes. In situ data collected during HiWATER-MUSOEXE (Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration over heterogeneous land surfaces of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research) were used to validate and analyze the methods. ET estimated by TSFA exhibited the best agreement with in situ observations, and the footprint validation results showed that the R2, MBE, and RMSE values of the sensible heat flux (H) were 0.61, 0.90, and 50.99 W m-2, respectively, and those for the latent heat flux (LE) were 0.82, -20.54, and 71.24 W m-2, respectively. IPUS yielded the largest errors in ET estimation. The RMSE of LE between the

  10. An investigation of satellite sounding products for the remote sensing of the surface energy balance and soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diak, George R.

    1989-01-01

    Improved techniques for the remote sensing of the land surface energy balance (SEB) and soil moisture would greatly improve prediction of climate and weather as well as be of benefit to agriculture, hydrology and many associated fields. Most of the satellite remote sensing methods which were researched to date rely upon satellite-measured infrared surface temperatures or their time changes as a remote sensing signal. Optimistically, only four or five levels of information (wet to dry) in surface heating/evaporation are discernable by surface temperature methods and a good understanding of atmospheric conditions is necessary to bring them to this accuracy level. Skin temperature methods were researched as well as begun work on several new methods for the remote sensing of the SEB, some elements of which are applicable to current and retrospective data sources and some which will rely on instrumentation from the Earth Observing System (EOS) program in the 1990s.

  11. Impact of the Sun on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M; Abraham, Saji; Wentz, F; Lagerloef, G S

    2005-01-01

    The sun is a sufficiently strong source of radiation at L-band to be an important source of interference for radiometers on future satellite missions such as SMOS, Aquarius, and Hydros designed to monitor soil moisture and sea surface salinity. Radiation from the sun can impact passive remote sensing systems in several ways, including line-of-sight radiation that comes directly from the sun and enters through antenna side lobes and radiation that is reflected from the surface to the radiometer. Examples are presented in the case of Aquarius, a pushbroom radiometer with three beams designed to monitor sea surface salinity. Near solar minimum, solar contamination is not a problem unless the sun enters near the main beam. But near solar maximum, contamination from the sun equivalent to a change of salinity on the order of 0.1 psu can occur even when the signal enters in sidelobes far from the main beam.

  12. Improved Prediction of Quasi-Global Vegetation Conditions Using Remotely-Sensed Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John; Crow, Wade

    2012-01-01

    The added value of satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals for agricultural drought monitoring is assessed by calculating the lagged rank correlation between remotely-sensed vegetation indices (VI) and soil moisture estimates obtained both before and after the assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals derived from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) into a soil water balance model. Higher soil moisture/VI lag correlations imply an enhanced ability to predict future vegetation conditions using estimates of current soil moisture. Results demonstrate that the assimilation of AMSR-E surface soil moisture retrievals substantially improve the performance of a global drought monitoring system - particularly in sparsely-instrumented areas of the world where high-quality rainfall observations are unavailable.

  13. Active and Passive Sensing from Geosynchronous and Libration Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Raymond, Carol; Hildebrand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The development of the LEO (EOS) missions has led the way to new technologies and new science discoveries. However, LEO measurements alone cannot cost effectively produce high time resolution measurements needed to move the science to the next level. Both GEO and the Lagrange points, L1 and L2, provide vantage points that will allow higher time resolution measurements. GEO is currently being exploited by weather satellites, but the sensors currently operating at GEO do not provide the spatial or spectral resolution needed for atmospheric trace gas, ocean or land surface measurements. It is also may be possible to place active sensors in geostationary orbit. It seems clear, that the next era in earth observation and discovery will be opened by sensor systems operating beyond near earth orbit.

  14. Quorum Sensing Activity in Pandoraea pnomenusa RB38

    PubMed Central

    Ee, Robson; Lim, Yan-Lue; Kin, Lin-Xin; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Strain RB38 was recovered from a former dumping area in Malaysia. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and genomic analysis identified strain RB-38 as Pandoraea pnomenusa. Various biosensors confirmed its quorum sensing properties. High resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis was subsequently used to characterize the N-acyl homoserine lactone production profile of P. pnomenusa strain RB38, which validated that this isolate produced N-octanoyl homoserine lactone as a quorum sensing molecule. This is the first report of the production of N-octanoyl homoserine lactone by P. pnomenusa strain RB38. PMID:24919016

  15. U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LAND REMOTE SENSING ACTIVITIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, Doyle G.

    1983-01-01

    USGS uses all types of remotely sensed data, in combination with other sources of data, to support geologic analyses, hydrologic assessments, land cover mapping, image mapping, and applications research. Survey scientists use all types of remotely sensed data with ground verifications and digital topographic and cartographic data. A considerable amount of research is being done by Survey scientists on developing automated geographic information systems that can handle a wide variety of digital data. The Survey is also investigating the use of microprocessor computer systems for accessing, displaying, and analyzing digital data.

  16. Loss of FliL Alters Proteus mirabilis Surface Sensing and Temperature-Dependent Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a dimorphic motile bacterium well known for its flagellum-dependent swarming motility over surfaces. In liquid, P. mirabilis cells are 1.5- to 2.0-μm swimmer cells with 4 to 6 flagella. When P. mirabilis encounters a solid surface, where flagellar rotation is limited, swimmer cells differentiate into elongated (10- to 80-μm), highly flagellated swarmer cells. In order for P. mirabilis to swarm, it first needs to detect a surface. The ubiquitous but functionally enigmatic flagellar basal body protein FliL is involved in P. mirabilis surface sensing. Previous studies have suggested that FliL is essential for swarming through its involvement in viscosity-dependent monitoring of flagellar rotation. In this study, we constructed and characterized ΔfliL mutants of P. mirabilis and Escherichia coli. Unexpectedly and unlike other fliL mutants, both P. mirabilis and E. coli ΔfliL cells swarm (Swr+). Further analysis revealed that P. mirabilis ΔfliL cells also exhibit an alteration in their ability to sense a surface: e.g., ΔfliL P. mirabilis cells swarm precociously over surfaces with low viscosity that normally impede wild-type swarming. Precocious swarming is due to an increase in the number of elongated swarmer cells in the population. Loss of fliL also results in an inhibition of swarming at <30°C. E. coli ΔfliL cells also exhibit temperature-sensitive swarming. These results suggest an involvement of FliL in the energetics and function of the flagellar motor. PMID:25331431

  17. Bactericidal activity of biomimetic diamond nanocone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Leanne E; Yang, Yang; Yuen, Muk-Fung; Zhang, Wenjun; Nobbs, Angela H; Su, Bo

    2016-03-17

    The formation of biofilms on implant surfaces and the subsequent development of medical device-associated infections are difficult to resolve and can cause considerable morbidity to the patient. Over the past decade, there has been growing recognition that physical cues, such as surface topography, can regulate biological responses and possess bactericidal activity. In this study, diamond nanocone-patterned surfaces, representing biomimetic analogs of the naturally bactericidal cicada fly wing, were fabricated using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, followed by bias-assisted reactive ion etching. Two structurally distinct nanocone surfaces were produced, characterized, and the bactericidal ability examined. The sharp diamond nanocone features were found to have bactericidal capabilities with the surface possessing the more varying cone dimension, nonuniform array, and decreased density, showing enhanced bactericidal ability over the more uniform, highly dense nanocone surface. Future research will focus on using the fabrication process to tailor surface nanotopographies on clinically relevant materials that promote both effective killing of a broader range of microorganisms and the desired mammalian cell response. This study serves to introduce a technology that may launch a new and innovative direction in the design of biomaterials with capacity to reduce the risk of medical device-associated infections.

  18. Probing Spatial Proximity of Supported Lipid Bilayers to Silica Surfaces by Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ferhan, Abdul Rahim; Jackman, Joshua A; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2017-04-04

    On account of high surface sensitivity, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors have proven widely useful for studying lipid membrane configurations at solid-liquid interfaces. Key measurement capabilities include distinguishing adsorbed vesicles from supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) as well as profiling the extent of deformation among adsorbed vesicles. Such capabilities rely on detecting geometrical changes in lipid membrane configuration on a length scale that is comparable to the decay length of the LSPR-induced electromagnetic field enhancement (∼5-20 nm). Herein, we report that LSPR sensors are also capable of probing nanoscale (∼1 nm) variations in the distance between SLBs and underlying silica-coated surfaces. By tuning the electrostatic properties of lipid membranes, we could modulate the bilayer-substrate interaction and corresponding separation distance, as verified by simultaneous LSPR and quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) measurements. Theoretical calculations of the expected variation in the LSPR measurement response agree well with experimental results and support that the LSPR measurement response is sensitive to subtle variations in the bilayer-substrate separation distance.

  19. Aerosol Optical Retrieval and Surface Reflectance from Airborne Remote Sensing Data over Land

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550nm (τ550) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ550 with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ550 and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ550 retrieved by Module A (r2 = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r2 ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness. PMID:22163558

  20. ZnO/Au-based surface plasmon resonance for CO2 gas sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryadi, Ratno; Mayasari, Rina Dewi

    2016-01-01

    We fabricate surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device using a modified ZnO/Au-Kretschmann configuration to investigate the possibility of using ZnO for CO2 gas sensing at room temperature. Here, nanostructured ZnO/Au layer was deposited on the flat surface of the prism and then gas chamber was placed on the ZnO/Au surface to observe the gas response. The ZnO structures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. We found that ZnO structures have two types of nanostructures, i.e., individual nanorods and flower-like structures, which have hexagonal crystal structure. The ZnO nanorod has a diameter ranged from 200 to 300 nm and length ranged from 3 to 5 μm. The effect of gas response is demonstrated by a shift of SPR spectra and a change in light reflectance. It is found that the adsorption of gas molecules on the ZnO nanorods produces the shift of SPR angle to the lower light incident angle. A consistent sensing behavior over repetitive circles is also demonstrated.

  1. Narrow groove plasmonic nano-gratings for surface plasmon resonance sensing.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Anuj; Canva, Michael; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2011-01-17

    We present a novel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) configuration based on narrow groove (sub-15 nm) plasmonic nano-gratings such that normally incident radiation can be coupled into surface plasmons without the use of prism-coupling based total internal reflection, as in the classical Kretschmann configuration. This eliminates the angular dependence requirements of SPR-based sensing and allows development of robust miniaturized SPR sensors. Simulations based on Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) were carried out to numerically calculate the reflectance - from different gold and silver nano-grating structures - as a function of the localized refractive index of the media around the SPR nano-gratings as well as the incident radiation wavelength and angle of incidence. Our calculations indicate substantially higher differential reflectance signals, on localized change of refractive index in the narrow groove plasmonic gratings, as compared to those obtained from conventional SPR-based sensing systems. Furthermore, these calculations allow determination of the optimal nano-grating geometric parameters - i. e. nanoline periodicity, spacing between the nanolines, as well as the height of the nanolines in the nano-grating - for highest sensitivity to localized change of refractive index, as would occur due to binding of a biomolecule target to a functionalized nano-grating surface.

  2. Aerosol optical retrieval and surface reflectance from airborne remote sensing data over land.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm (τ(550)) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ(550) with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ(550) and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ(550) retrieved by Module A (r(2) = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r(2) ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness.

  3. Modeling urban growth effects on surface runoff with the integration of remote sensing and GIS.

    PubMed

    Weng, Q

    2001-12-01

    A methodology is developed to relate urban growth studies to distributed hydrological modeling using an integrated approach of remote sensing and GIS. This linkage is possible because both studies share land-use and land-cover data. Landsat Thematic Mapper data are utilized to detect urban land-cover changes. GIS analyses are then conducted to examine the changing spatial patterns of urban growth. The integration of remote sensing and GIS is applied to automate the estimation of surface runoff based on the Soil Conservation Service model. Impacts of urban growth on surface runoff and the rainfall-runoff relationship are examined by linking the two modeling results with spatial analysis techniques. This methodology is applied to the Zhujiang Delta of southern China, where dramatic urban growth has occurred over the past two decades, and the rampant urban growth has created severe problems in water resources management. The results revealed a notably uneven spatial pattern of urban growth and an increase of 8.10 mm in annual runoff depth during the 1989-1997 period. An area that experienced more urban growth had a greater potential for increasing annual surface runoff. Highly urbanized areas were more prone to flooding. Urbanization lowered potential maximum storage, and thus increased runoff coefficient values.

  4. Novel applications of multiple-point geostatistics in remote sensing, geophysics, climate science and surface hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariethoz, G.; Jha, S. K.; McCabe, M. F.; Evans, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in multiple-point geostatistics (MPS) offer new possibilities in remote sensing, surface hydrology and climate modeling. MPS is an ensemble of tools for the characterization of spatial phenomena. Its most prominent characteristic is the use of training images for defining what type of spatial patterns are deemed to result from the processes under study. In the last decade, MPS have been increasingly used to characterize 3D subsurface structures consisting of geological facies, with application primarily to reservoir engineering, hydrogeology and mining. Although the methods show good results, a consistent difficulty relates to finding appropriate training images to describe largely unknown geological formations. Despite this issue, the growing interest in MPS triggered a series of different methodological advances, leading to improved computational performance and increased flexibility. With these recent improvements, the scientific community now has unprecedented numerical tools that allow dealing with a wide range of problems outside the realm of subsurface applications. These include the simulation of continuous variables as well as complex non-linear ensembles of multivariate properties. It is found that these new tools are ideal to address a number of issues in scientific fields related to surface modeling of environmental systems and geophysical data. Shifting focus and investigating the application of MPS to surface hydrology results in a wealth of training images that are readily available, thanks to global networks of remote sensing measurements. This presentation will delineate recent results in this direction, including MPS applications to the stochastic downscaling of climate models, the completion of partially informed remote sensing images and the processing of geophysical data. A major advantage is the use of satellite images taken at regular intervals, which can be used to inform both the spatial and temporal variability of

  5. Mechanotransductive surfaces for reversible biocatalysis activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Damien; Vogt, Cédric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ball, Vincent; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Lavalle, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Fibronectin, like other proteins involved in mechanotransduction, has the ability to exhibit recognition sites under mechanical stretch. Such cryptic sites are buried inside the protein structure in the native fold and become exposed under an applied force, thereby activating specific signalling pathways. Here, we report the design of new active polymeric nanoassembled surfaces that show some similarities to these cryptic sites. These nanoassemblies consist of a first polyelectrolyte multilayer stratum loaded with enzymes and capped with a second polyelectrolyte multilayer acting as a mechanically sensitive nanobarrier. The biocatalytic activity of the film is switched on/off reversibly by mechanical stretching, which exposes enzymes through the capping barrier, similarly to mechanisms involved in proteins during mechanotransduction. This first example of a new class of biologically inspired surfaces should have great potential in the design of various devices aimed to trigger and modulate chemical reactions by mechanical action with applications in the field of microfluidic devices or mechanically controlled biopatches for example.

  6. Remote sensing of the lunar surface using low energy ions from the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Nishino, Masaki N.; Uemura, Kota; Kawamura, Mariko; Tsunakawa, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    Interaction between the solar wind and a solar system object varies largely according to the object's properties, such as the existence of a global intrinsic magnetic field and/or thick atmosphere. It is well known that the Moon has neither global intrinsic magnetic field nor thick atmosphere. Different from the Earth's case where the intrinsic global magnetic field prevents the solar wind from penetrating into the magnetosphere, solar wind directly impacts the lunar surface. In the Earth's magnetosphere, where the Moon stays for 3 ~ 4 days every month, hot plasma-sheet plasmas in the Earth's magnetosphere (instead of the solar wind) can impact the lunar surface. On the other hand, the ions generated or reflected / scattered at the lunar surface are accelerated by the solar wind / magnetotail convection electric field and are detected by ion detectors on the spacecraft orbiting around the Moon. Since these ions have information about the lunar surface structure / composition, they can be used for remote sensing of the lunar surface. Solar wind protons reflected / backscattered at the lunar surface is one of the ion populations observed on the dayside of the Moon. The solar wind protons that impact the lunar surface are mostly scattered backward inside a scattering cone with ± 40deg. whose center axis is opposite to the incidence direction of the solar wind. It is also found that the energy decrease of the backscattered solar wind is most significant along the axis of the scattering cone. In order to investigate the global distribution of the backscattered solar wind protons, we have made a backscattered proton intensity map. Since the magnetic anomalies magnetically reflect the incident solar wind ions, we have made the backscattered proton intensity map by masking the major magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface. The backscattered proton intensity map shows that the relatively intense backscattering was observed on the lunar maria regions. It indicates that the

  7. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of nonspherical particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to calculate the scattering by a layer of randomly positioned and oriented nonspherical particles. The scattering amplitude functions of each individual particle are calculated with Waterman's T matrix method, which utilizes vector spherical wave functions for expansion of incident, scattered, and surface fields. The orientation of the particles is described by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. A rotation matrix is used to relate the T matrix of the principal frame to that of the natural frame of the particle. The extinction matrix and phase matrix of the radiative transfer equations are expressed in terms of the T matrix elements. The extinction matrix for nonspherical particles is generally nondiagonal. There are only two attenuation rates in a specified direction of propagation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative method to first order in albedo. Numerical results are illustrated as functions of incidence angle and frequency with applications to active remote sensing.

  8. Sense of Cohesion among Community Activists Engaging in Volunteer Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Drorit; Itzhaky, Haya; Zanbar, Lea; Schwartz, Chaya

    2012-01-01

    The present article attempts to shed light on the direct and indirect contribution of personal resources and community indices to Sense of Cohesion among activists engaging in community volunteer work. The sample comprised 481 activists. Based on social systems theory, three levels of variables were examined: (1) inputs, which included personal…

  9. Activities of the Remote Sensing Information Sciences Research Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Botkin, D.; Peuquet, D.; Smith, T.; Star, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Topics on the analysis and processing of remotely sensed data in the areas of vegetation analysis and modelling, georeferenced information systems, machine assisted information extraction from image data, and artificial intelligence are investigated. Discussions on support field data and specific applications of the proposed technologies are also included.

  10. Remote sensing research activities related to academic institutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, V. I.

    1980-01-01

    The role of research in the educational setting is discussed. Curriculum developments for integrating teaching and research are described. Remote sensing technology is used as an example of bridging the gap between research and application. Recommendations are presented for strengthing research groups.

  11. Probabilistic approach for sensing performances of localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heejin; Lee, Wonju; Hwang, Taewon; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-07-01

    We analyze sensing performances of localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors based on the overlap between target distribution and local field intensity produced by silver nanoislands in three detection models of non-specific, non-colocalized, and colocalized detection. The behavior of biomolecules was modeled to follow a probabilistic model using Poisson distribution. The results have found that the colocalized detection achieves the highest overlap signature with the smallest uncertainty and can enhance the limit of detection by more than 10000 times compared to conventional non-specific detection.

  12. Earth-based remote sensing of planetary surfaces and atmospheres at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two reasons for remote sensing from the Earth are given: (1) space exploration, particularly below the surfaces or underneath cloud layers, is limited to only a very few planets; and (2) a program of regular monitoring, currently impractical with a limited number of space probes, is required. Reflected solar and nonthermal radiation are discussed. Relativistic electrons, trapped in large magnetospheres on Saturn and Jupiter, are discussed. These electrons produce synchrotron radiation and also interact with the ionosphere to produce bursts of low frequency emission. Because most objects are black-bodies, continuum radiometry is emphasized. Spectroscopic techniques and the measurement of nonthermal emission are also discussed.

  13. Angle modulated surface plasmon resonance spectrometer for refractive index sensing with enhanced detection resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinlei; Chen, Ke; Li, Li; Peng, Wei; Yu, Qingxu

    2017-01-01

    We design and manufacture an angle modulated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrometer with high detection resolution for refractive index sensing. The presented SPR spectrometer is based on a five-layer Kretchmann configuration. To enhance the sensitivity and resolution of the SPR spectrometer, we introduce a reference beam into the system, which has improved the stability of the system by nearly one order of magnitude. Numerical simulation and experimental study are presented and the results show that a sensitivity of 85 degrees/RIU (refractive index unit) and a good repeatability (standard deviation=3.7×10-6 RIU) have been achieved.

  14. Modified FIR thermometry for surface temperature sensing by using high power laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Zhang, Xinlu; Zhang, Zhilin; Zhong, Hujiang; Chen, Yujin; Zhao, Enming; Vasilescu, Steven; Liu, Lu

    2017-01-23

    The FIR (fluorescence intensity ratio) technique for optical thermometry has attracted considerable attention over recent years due to its high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. However, it is thought that a heating effect induced by incident light may lead to temperature overestimations, which in turn impedes the reliability of this technique for applications which require high levels of accuracy. To further improve the FIR technique, this paper presents a modified calibration expression, which is suitable for surface temperature sensing, based on the temperature distribution (calculated through COMSOL software). In addition, this modified method is verified by the experimental data.

  15. Nanosecond laser textured superhydrophobic metallic surfaces and their chemical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Duong V.; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates superhydrophobic behavior on nanosecond laser patterned copper and brass surfaces. Compared with ultrafast laser systems previously used for such texturing, infrared nanosecond fiber lasers offer a lower cost and more robust system combined with potentially much higher processing rates. The wettability of the textured surfaces develops from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity over time when exposed to ambient conditions. The change in the wetting property is attributed to the partial deoxidation of oxides on the surface induced during laser texturing. Textures exhibiting steady state contact angles of up to ∼152° with contact angle hysteresis of around 3-4° have been achieved. Interestingly, the superhydrobobic surfaces have the self-cleaning ability and have potential for chemical sensing applications. The principle of these novel chemical sensors is based on the change in contact angle with the concentration of methanol in a solution. To demonstrate the principle of operation of such a sensor, it is found that the contact angle of methanol solution on the superhydrophobic surfaces exponentially decays with increasing concentration. A significant reduction, of 128°, in contact angle on superhydrophobic brass is observed, which is one order of magnitude greater than that for the untreated surface (12°), when percent composition of methanol reaches to 28%.

  16. Surface charge sensing by altering the phase transition in VO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. E-mail: rahimes@stanford.edu; Nishi, Y.; Esfandyarpour, R. E-mail: rahimes@stanford.edu; Davis, R.

    2014-08-21

    Detection of surface charges has various applications in medicine, electronics, biotechnology, etc. The source of surface charge induction may range from simple charge-polarized molecules like water to complicated proteins. It was recently discovered that surface charge accumulation can alter the temperature at which VO{sub 2} undergoes a Mott transition. Here, we deposited polar molecules onto the surface of two-terminal thin-film VO{sub 2} lateral devices and monitored the joule-heating-driven Mott transition, or conductance switching. We observed that the power required to induce the conductance switching reduced upon treatment with polar molecules and, using in-situ blackbody-emission direct measurement of local temperature, we show that this reduction in power was accompanied by reduction in the Mott transition temperature. Further evidence suggested that this effect has specificity to the nature of the species used to induce surface charges. Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we also show that there is no detectable change in oxidation state of vanadium or structural phase in the bulk of the 40 nm VO{sub 2} thin-film even as the phase transition temperature is reduced by up to 20 K by the polar molecules. The ability to alter the phase transition parameters by depositing polar molecules suggests a potential application in sensing surface charges of different origins and this set of results also highlights interesting aspects of the phase transition in VO{sub 2}.

  17. Interactions of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides with Gold Nanorod Surfaces Investigated by Refractometric Sensing.

    PubMed

    Abadeer, Nardine S; Fülöp, Gergő; Chen, Si; Käll, Mikael; Murphy, Catherine J

    2015-11-11

    The interface between nanoparticles and bacterial surfaces is of great interest for applications in nanomedicine and food safety. Here, we demonstrate that interactions between gold nanorods and bacterial surface molecules are governed by the nanoparticle surface coating. Polymer-coated gold nanorod substrates are exposed to lipopolysaccharides extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, and attachment is monitored using localized surface plasmon resonance refractometric sensing. The number of lipopolysaccharide molecules attached per nanorod is calculated from the shift in the plasmon maximum, which results from the change in refractive index after analyte binding. Colloidal gold nanorods in water are also incubated with lipopolysaccharides to demonstrate the effect of lipopolysaccharide concentration on plasmon shift, ζ-potential, and association constant. Both gold nanorod surface charge and surface chemistry affect gold nanorod-lipopolysaccharide interactions. In general, anionic lipopolysaccharides was found to attach more effectively to cationic gold nanorods than to neutral or anionic gold nanorods. Some variation in lipopolysaccharide attachment is also observed between the three strains studied, demonstrating the potential complexity of bacteria-nanoparticle interactions.

  18. On-chip temperature-compensated Love mode surface acoustic wave device for gravimetric sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Flewitt, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Love mode surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors have been recognized as one of the most sensitive devices for gravimetric sensors in liquid environments such as bio sensors. Device operation is based upon measuring changes in the transmitted (S21) frequency and phase of the first-order Love wave resonance associated with the device upon on attachment of mass. However, temperature variations also cause a change in the first order S21 parameters. In this work, shallow grooved reflectors and a "dotted" single phase unidirectional interdigitated transducer (D-SPUDT) have been added to the basic SAW structure, which promote unidirectional Love wave propagation from the device's input interdigitated transducers. Not only does this enhance the first-order S21 signal but also it allows propagation of a third-order Love wave. The attenuation coefficient of the third-order wave is sufficiently great that, whilst there is a clear reflected S11 signal, the third-order wave does not propagate into the gravimetric sensing area of the device. As a result, whilst the third-order S11 signal is affected by temperature changes, it is unaffected by mass attachment in the sensing area. It is shown that this signal can be used to remove temperature effects from the first-order S21 signal in real time. This allows gravimetric sensing to take place in an environment without the need for any other temperature measurement or temperature control; this is a particular requirement of gravimetric biosensors.

  19. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  20. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  1. Biological processes and optical measurements near the sea surface: Some issues relevant to remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, John J.; Lewis, Marlon R.

    1995-01-01

    The advent of remote sensing, the develpmemt of new optical instrumentation, and the associated advances in hydrological optics have transformed oceanography; it is now feasible to describe ocean-scale biogeochemical dynamcis from satellite observations, verified and complemented by measurements from optical sensors on profilers, moorings, and drifters. Only near-surface observations are common to both remote sensing and in situ observation, so it is critical to understand processes in the upper euphotic zone. Unfortunately, the biological principles that must be used to interpret optical variability near the sea surface are weaker than we would like, because relatively few experiments and analyses have examined bio-optical relationships under high irradiance characteristic of the upper optical depth. Special consideration of this stratum is justified, because there is good evidence that bio-optical relationships are altered near the surface; (1) the fluorescence yield from chlorophyll declines, leading to bias in the estimation of pigment from fluorometry; (2) the modeled relationship between solar-stimulated fluorecence and photosynthesis seems to deviate significantly from that presented for the lower euphotic zone; and (3) carbon-specific and cellular attenuation cross sections of phytoplankton change substantially during exposures to bright light. Even the measurement of primary productivity is problematic near the sea surface, because vertical mixing is not simulated and artifactual inhibition of photosynthesis can result. These problems can be addressed by focusing more sampling effort, experimental simulation, and analytical consideration on the upper optical depth, and by shortening timescales for the measurement of marine photosynthesis. Special efforts to study near-surface processes are justified, because new bio-optical algorithms will require quantitaitve descriptions of the responses of phytoplankton to bright light.

  2. Air-surface exchange of H2O, CO2, and O3 at a tallgrass prairie in relation to remotely sensed vegetation indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, W.; Wesely, M. L.; Cook, D. R.; Hart, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Parameters derived from eddy correlation measurements of the air-surface exchange rates of H2O, CO2, and O3 over a tallgrass prairie are examined in terms of their relationships with spectral reflectance data remotely sensed from aircraft and satellites during the four 1987 intensive field campaigns of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The surface conductances were strongly modulated by photosynthetically active radiation received at the surface when the grass was green and well watered; mesophyll resistances were large for CO2 but negligible for H2O and O3.

  3. Activation of the MAP Kinase Cascade by Exogenous Calcium-Sensing Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, Susan A.; Wright, Jay W.; Lee, Fred; Mcneil, Scott; Bilderback, Tim R.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-02-01

    In Rat-1 fibroblasts and ovarian surface epithelial cells, extracellular calcium induces a proliferative response which appears to be mediated by the G-protein coupled Calcium-sensing Receptor (CaR), as expression of the non-functional CaR-R795W mutant inhibits both thymidine incorporation and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in response to calcium. In this report we utilized CaR-transfected HEK293 cells to demonstrate that functional CaR is necessary and sufficient for calcium-induced ERK activation. CaR-dependent ERK activation was blocked by co-expression of the Ras dominant-negative mutant, Ras N17, and by exposure to the phosphatidyl inositol 3' kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. In contrast to Rat-1 fibroblasts, CaR-mediated in vitro kinase activity of ERK2 was unaffected by tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin in CaR-transfected HEK293 cells. These results suggest that usage of distinct pathways downstream of the CaR varies in a cell-type specific manner, suggesting a potential mechanism by which activation of the CaR could couple to distinct calcium-dependent responses.

  4. Fourier plane colorimetric sensing using broadband imaging of surface plasmons and application to biosensing

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, P.; Krishnan, A.

    2015-12-21

    We demonstrate an optical technique for refractive index and thickness sensing of sub-wavelength-thick dielectric analytes. The technique utilizes the broadband, multimode, directional leakage radiation arising from the excitation of hybrid mode surface plasmons (SP) on low aspect ratio periodic plasmonic substrates with period ≈λ. The approach requires relaxed fabrication tolerances compared to extra ordinary transmission-based sensing techniques, wherein minor shifts in the fabricated dimensions result in a very large change from the designed resonant wavelength. We show that refractive index perturbations due to about 10-nm-thick dielectric can be captured optically by the usage of carefully designed plasmonic substrates, a halogen lamp source, free-space optical components, polarizers, and a low-end, consumer-grade charge coupled device camera. The plasmonic substrates were designed for converting the signature of hybrid mode SP excitation into a transmission peak by utilizing a thin homogeneous metal layer sandwiched between the periodic plasmonic structures and the substrate. The resonance is highly sensitive to the refractive index and thickness of the analyte superstrate. The excitation of hybrid mode SP results in a polarization rotation of 90° of the leaked radiation at resonant wavelength. In order to eliminate the problem of image registration (i.e., placing the same feature in the same pixel of the image, for comparison before and after a change in refractive index) for sensing, we perform the color analysis in the Fourier plane. The change in color of the bright emitted spot with highest momentum, corresponding to the leakage of fundamental SP mode, was used to measure the changes in refractive index, whereas the number and color of spots of lower momenta, corresponding to higher-order Fabry Perot modes, was used to measure the variation in thickness. We further show that the Fourier plane analysis can also be used to sense the index of thicker

  5. Fourier plane colorimetric sensing using broadband imaging of surface plasmons and application to biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, P.; Krishnan, A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate an optical technique for refractive index and thickness sensing of sub-wavelength-thick dielectric analytes. The technique utilizes the broadband, multimode, directional leakage radiation arising from the excitation of hybrid mode surface plasmons (SP) on low aspect ratio periodic plasmonic substrates with period ≈λ. The approach requires relaxed fabrication tolerances compared to extra ordinary transmission-based sensing techniques, wherein minor shifts in the fabricated dimensions result in a very large change from the designed resonant wavelength. We show that refractive index perturbations due to about 10-nm-thick dielectric can be captured optically by the usage of carefully designed plasmonic substrates, a halogen lamp source, free-space optical components, polarizers, and a low-end, consumer-grade charge coupled device camera. The plasmonic substrates were designed for converting the signature of hybrid mode SP excitation into a transmission peak by utilizing a thin homogeneous metal layer sandwiched between the periodic plasmonic structures and the substrate. The resonance is highly sensitive to the refractive index and thickness of the analyte superstrate. The excitation of hybrid mode SP results in a polarization rotation of 90° of the leaked radiation at resonant wavelength. In order to eliminate the problem of image registration (i.e., placing the same feature in the same pixel of the image, for comparison before and after a change in refractive index) for sensing, we perform the color analysis in the Fourier plane. The change in color of the bright emitted spot with highest momentum, corresponding to the leakage of fundamental SP mode, was used to measure the changes in refractive index, whereas the number and color of spots of lower momenta, corresponding to higher-order Fabry Perot modes, was used to measure the variation in thickness. We further show that the Fourier plane analysis can also be used to sense the index of thicker

  6. Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 2a (ASIC2a) Promotes Surface Trafficking of ASIC2b via Heteromeric Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dong-Il; Bae, Yeonju; Park, Jae-Yong; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-activated cation channels that play important roles as typical proton sensors during pathophysiological conditions and normal synaptic activities. Among the ASIC subunits, ASIC2a and ASIC2b are alternative splicing products from the same gene, ACCN1. It has been shown that ASIC2 isoforms have differential subcellular distribution: ASIC2a targets the cell surface by itself, while ASIC2b resides in the ER. However, the underlying mechanism for this differential subcellular localization remained to be further elucidated. By constructing ASIC2 chimeras, we found that the first transmembrane (TM1) domain and the proximal post-TM1 domain (17 amino acids) of ASIC2a are critical for membrane targeting of the proteins. We also observed that replacement of corresponding residues in ASIC2b by those of ASIC2a conferred proton-sensitivity as well as surface expression to ASIC2b. We finally confirmed that ASIC2b is delivered to the cell surface from the ER by forming heteromers with ASIC2a, and that the N-terminal region of ASIC2a is additionally required for the ASIC2a-dependent membrane targeting of ASIC2b. Together, our study supports an important role of ASIC2a in membrane targeting of ASIC2b. PMID:27477936

  7. Active-Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Martian Permafrost and Subsurface Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raizer, V.; Linkin, V. M.; Ozorovich, Y. R.; Smythe, W. D.; Zoubkov, B.; Babkin, F.

    2000-01-01

    The investigation of permafrost formation global distribution and their appearance in h less than or equal 1 m thick subsurface layer would be investigated successfully by employment of active-passive microwave remote sensing techniques.

  8. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  9. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and ...

  10. Simultaneous optical sensing of multiple fluids via spatially multiplexed surface-multiplasmonic-resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiontek, Stephen E.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-09-01

    Multiple surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves are guided by the interface of a metal and a chiral sculptured thin film (STF) at a single wavelength. Spatially multiplexed 4-quadrant chips comprising a lanthanum-fluoride chiral STF embedded with a silver-nanoparticle layer were deposited atop an aluminum-coated glass substrate, each quadrant functioning as an autonomous sensor. The void regions of the chiral STF in each quadrant were in filtrated with sucrose solutions of increasing molarity and deployed in a prism-coupled surface-multi-plasmonics-resonance- imaging (SMPRI) machine. The angular locations of the SPP-wave modes shift as the molarity of the fluid increases, thus demonstrating simultaneous sensing of fluids via SMPRI.

  11. Acetone gas sensing mechanism on zinc oxide surfaces: A first principles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghian Lemraski, M.; Nadimi, E.

    2017-03-01

    Semiconducting metal oxide gas sensors have attracted growing interest as a result of their outstanding performance in the bio and industrial applications. Nevertheless, the sensing mechanism is yet not totally understood. In this study, we extensively investigate the adsorption mechanism of acetone molecule on ZnO-based thin film sensors by performing ab initio density functional theory calculations and employing quantum molecular dynamic simulations. Since the sensitivity of a metal oxide sensor is exceedingly depends on molecular oxygen exposure and operating temperature, we explore the competitive adsorption of acetone and oxygen molecule on the most stable orientation of ZnO surface (10 1 ̅ 0) at different temperatures. Results indicate that at elevated temperatures acetone gains required thermal energy to remove preadsorbed oxygen molecule from the surface in a competitive process. We will show that this competition is responsible for the resistive switching behavior in the ZnO-based gas sensors.

  12. Acoustic Plate Mode sensing in liquids based on free and electrically shorted plate surfaces.

    PubMed

    Anisimkin, V I; Caliendo, C; Verona, E

    2016-05-01

    The sensing behavior to liquids for Acoustic Plate Modes (APMs) propagating along 64°Y, 90°X LiNbO3 plate was investigated vs. two electric boundary conditions. The changes in the APMs phase velocity and attenuation were measured upon exposure to different liquids wetting one of the surfaces of the plate, either free or electrically shorted by a thin conductive Al layer. The experimental data confirm that the presence of a metallic layer covering one of the plate surfaces affects the viscosity and temperature sensitivity of the device. The differences between the sensor response for various liquids, with free or metalized faces, are interpreted in terms of the APM polarization.

  13. Hybrid architecture active wavefront sensing and control system, and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D. (Inventor); Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor); Hyde, Tristram T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    According to various embodiments, provided herein is an optical system and method that can be configured to perform image analysis. The optical system can comprise a telescope assembly and one or more hybrid instruments. The one or more hybrid instruments can be configured to receive image data from the telescope assembly and perform a fine guidance operation and a wavefront sensing operation, simultaneously, on the image data received from the telescope assembly.

  14. Asphaltenes as a surface active agent

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, E.Y.; Shields, M.B.; Storm, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Asphaltene represents the heavy-end materials of the crude oil, conventionally defined via solvent solubility (either heptane or pentane). Chemically, it consists of polynuclear aromatics with the H/C ratio close to unity. Additionally, it contains a great deal of heteroatoms, such as sulfur, nitrogen, nickel, vanadium, etc. Several experiments have revealed the surface activity of asphaltenes in some selected solvents through measurements of their rheology or critical micelle concentrations in these solvents. The asphaltene micelles were found thermodynamically reversible. In a two phase asphaltene/water system, asphaltenes appear to vary their surface activities depending upon the polarity of the aqueous phase. Our recent experiment further showed that asphaltene/water/toluene may form, water-in-oil emulsion under certain conditions.

  15. Continuous Compressed Sensing for Surface Dynamical Processes with Helium Atom Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alex; Tamtögl, Anton; Calvo-Almazán, Irene; Hansen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques are used to measure and reconstruct surface dynamical processes with a helium spin-echo spectrometer for the first time. Helium atom scattering is a well established method for examining the surface structure and dynamics of materials at atomic sized resolution and the spin-echo technique opens up the possibility of compressing the data acquisition process. CS methods demonstrating the compressibility of spin-echo spectra are presented for several measurements. Recent developments on structured multilevel sampling that are empirically and theoretically shown to substantially improve upon the state of the art CS techniques are implemented. In addition, wavelet based CS approximations, founded on a new continuous CS approach, are used to construct continuous spectra. In order to measure both surface diffusion and surface phonons, which appear usually on different energy scales, standard CS techniques are not sufficient. However, the new continuous CS wavelet approach allows simultaneous analysis of surface phonons and molecular diffusion while reducing acquisition times substantially. The developed methodology is not exclusive to Helium atom scattering and can also be applied to other scattering frameworks such as neutron spin-echo and Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27301423

  16. Spatio-Temporal Relationship Between Surface Temperature and NDVI Using Remotely Sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Yasser; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Kabiri, Keivan

    2016-07-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a significant factor to analyze the global climate changes, and LULC (Land use/Land cover) changes, as well as urban thermal behavior. Land surface temperature exhibit the surface atmosphere in relation with energy flux between earth and atmosphere. This paper intended to examine the evaluation of LST and assessment of relationship between LST and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with associated different LULC. Al- Hawizeh wetland located in the Iraq-Iran border was selected as a study area. Two Landsat satellite thermal infrared (TIR) images of October 26, 1998, thematic mapper (TM), and October 26, 2002 enhanced thematic mapper (ETM+) were used. Both images were corrected geometrically and atmospherically before carried out any analysis. NDVI was estimated from reflectance values of the visible band (band 3, Red) and the near infrared band (band 4, VNIR). Maximum likelihood classifier (MLC) was applied to determine the different LULC. Plank equation was utilized to extract land surface temperature over the study region. The results provide information about the spatial distribution of LST over different LULC during mentioned date. The highest mean temperature was observed over the rangeland and the lowest mean temperature was found in water bodies. The results of regression analysis exhibited that the LST and NDVI has an inverse correlation except for water bodies. The negative correlation coefficient was observed over vegetation (-0.733, R2=0.66). Keywords-component; Land Surface Temperature, Remote Sensing, Al-Havizeh wetland, Regression Analysis, NDVI, GIS

  17. Continuous Compressed Sensing for Surface Dynamical Processes with Helium Atom Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alex; Tamtögl, Anton; Calvo-Almazán, Irene; Hansen, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques are used to measure and reconstruct surface dynamical processes with a helium spin-echo spectrometer for the first time. Helium atom scattering is a well established method for examining the surface structure and dynamics of materials at atomic sized resolution and the spin-echo technique opens up the possibility of compressing the data acquisition process. CS methods demonstrating the compressibility of spin-echo spectra are presented for several measurements. Recent developments on structured multilevel sampling that are empirically and theoretically shown to substantially improve upon the state of the art CS techniques are implemented. In addition, wavelet based CS approximations, founded on a new continuous CS approach, are used to construct continuous spectra. In order to measure both surface diffusion and surface phonons, which appear usually on different energy scales, standard CS techniques are not sufficient. However, the new continuous CS wavelet approach allows simultaneous analysis of surface phonons and molecular diffusion while reducing acquisition times substantially. The developed methodology is not exclusive to Helium atom scattering and can also be applied to other scattering frameworks such as neutron spin-echo and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Continuous Compressed Sensing for Surface Dynamical Processes with Helium Atom Scattering.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex; Tamtögl, Anton; Calvo-Almazán, Irene; Hansen, Anders

    2016-06-15

    Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques are used to measure and reconstruct surface dynamical processes with a helium spin-echo spectrometer for the first time. Helium atom scattering is a well established method for examining the surface structure and dynamics of materials at atomic sized resolution and the spin-echo technique opens up the possibility of compressing the data acquisition process. CS methods demonstrating the compressibility of spin-echo spectra are presented for several measurements. Recent developments on structured multilevel sampling that are empirically and theoretically shown to substantially improve upon the state of the art CS techniques are implemented. In addition, wavelet based CS approximations, founded on a new continuous CS approach, are used to construct continuous spectra. In order to measure both surface diffusion and surface phonons, which appear usually on different energy scales, standard CS techniques are not sufficient. However, the new continuous CS wavelet approach allows simultaneous analysis of surface phonons and molecular diffusion while reducing acquisition times substantially. The developed methodology is not exclusive to Helium atom scattering and can also be applied to other scattering frameworks such as neutron spin-echo and Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Surface-sediment dynamics in a dust source from thermal infrared remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katra, I.; Lancaster, N.

    2007-12-01

    Characteristics of surface sediments are significant factors in modeling dust entrainment and wind erosion, and it is of interest to monitor them using remote sensing in source areas at high spatial and temporal resolution. A time-series of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data were acquired for Soda Playa (CA), a modern depositional environment associated with dust emission. Analysis of the multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images indicates that the type and distribution of the surface sediments can be mapped by linear spectral unmixing techniques. Image-based spectral endmembers extracted from the ASTER five-band surface emissivity data were used to drive fraction images. The spectral-mixture analysis reveals that the mosaic-like pattern of the main sediment types - silica-rich, clay-rich, and salt-rich, changes in time as a consequence of interactions between hydrologic and geomorphic processes in the playa environment. The results highlight the dynamic response of the playa-surface to wind erosion, and suggest that this technique is useful for continuously detecting dust emission potential in sources characterized by a small extension and a complex surface.

  20. Using Remote Sensing Platforms to Estimate Near-Surface Soil Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. G.; Shaw, J. N.; Rickman, D.; Mask, P. L.; Wersinger, J. M.; Luvall, J.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of near-surface soil properties via remote sensing (RS) could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction, fertilization regimes, and allocation of agrochemicals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and near surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor (ATLAS) multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil water content, soil organic carbon (SOC), particle size distribution (PSD), and citrate dithionite extractable iron (Fed) content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured at sampling. Results showed RS data acquired from lands with less than 4 % surface soil water content best approximated near-surface soil properties at the Coastal Plain site where loamy sand textured surfaces were predominant. Utilizing a combination of band ratios in stepwise regression, Fed (r2 = 0.61), SOC (r2 = 0.36), sand (r2 = 0.52), and clay (r2 = 0.76) were related to RS data at the Coastal Plain site. In contrast, the more clayey Ridge and Valley soils had r-squares of 0.50, 0.36, 0.17, and 0.57. for Fed, SOC, sand and clay, respectively. Use of estimated eEmissivity did not generally improve estimates of near-surface soil attributes.

  1. Surface Plasmon Scattering in Exposed Core Optical Fiber for Enhanced Resolution Refractive Index Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Klantsataya, Elizaveta; François, Alexandre; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Hoffmann, Peter; Monro, Tanya M.

    2015-01-01

    Refractometric sensors based on optical excitation of surface plasmons on the side of an optical fiber is an established sensing architecture that has enabled laboratory demonstrations of cost effective portable devices for biological and chemical applications. Here we report a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) configuration realized in an Exposed Core Microstructured Optical Fiber (ECF) capable of optimizing both sensitivity and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of fabrication of a rough metal coating suitable for spectral interrogation of scattered plasmonic wave using chemical electroless plating technique on a 10 μm diameter exposed core of the ECF. Performance of the sensor in terms of its refractive index sensitivity and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of SPR response is compared to that achieved with an unstructured bare core fiber with 140 μm core diameter. The experimental improvement in FWHM, and therefore the detection limit, is found to be a factor of two (75 nm for ECF in comparison to 150 nm for the large core fiber). Refractive index sensitivity of 1800 nm/RIU was achieved for both fibers in the sensing range of aqueous environment (1.33–1.37) suitable for biosensing applications. PMID:26426022

  2. Surface Plasmon Scattering in Exposed Core Optical Fiber for Enhanced Resolution Refractive Index Sensing.

    PubMed

    Klantsataya, Elizaveta; François, Alexandre; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Hoffmann, Peter; Monro, Tanya M

    2015-09-29

    Refractometric sensors based on optical excitation of surface plasmons on the side of an optical fiber is an established sensing architecture that has enabled laboratory demonstrations of cost effective portable devices for biological and chemical applications. Here we report a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) configuration realized in an Exposed Core Microstructured Optical Fiber (ECF) capable of optimizing both sensitivity and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of fabrication of a rough metal coating suitable for spectral interrogation of scattered plasmonic wave using chemical electroless plating technique on a 10 μm diameter exposed core of the ECF. Performance of the sensor in terms of its refractive index sensitivity and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of SPR response is compared to that achieved with an unstructured bare core fiber with 140 μm core diameter. The experimental improvement in FWHM, and therefore the detection limit, is found to be a factor of two (75 nm for ECF in comparison to 150 nm for the large core fiber). Refractive index sensitivity of 1800 nm/RIU was achieved for both fibers in the sensing range of aqueous environment (1.33-1.37) suitable for biosensing applications.

  3. Moderate Resolution Remote Sensing of Surface Moisture Conditions in Urbanizing Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum, D. E.; Band, L. E.; Moody, A.; Xiao, J.

    2009-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of land surface conditions provides the potential to develop an important set of tools to study detailed space/time patterns of hydrologic storage and flux. Previous work has concentrated on using combinations of thermal and optical remote sensing information to estimate moisture status resulting from the interaction of land cover and meteorological forcing. We make use of a Temperature-Vegetation Dryness Index (TVDI), calculated using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery to investigate 2002 growing season soil moisture and evaporative flux patterns in two Piedmont Climate Divisions in the mid-Atlantic United States. An antecedent precipitation index (API) was derived from NEXRAD Doppler radar imagery for the same time period and locations. Variables describing the fraction of each pixel occupied by land use classes were produced using MODIS land cover data. Linear models of TVDI as a function of API and the land use variables were constructed. Adjusted R2 values for most models were between 0.5 and 0.7. Both the API variable and the ensemble of LULC variables are significant contributors to the models' fit, demonstrating that TVDI is a function of both precipitation and land use patterns. Field samples of soil moisture were available at three locations (suburban, forested, agricultural) within the study climate divisions, and these sampled values also correlated well with TVDI values for the same locations, demonstrating that TVDI can be a useful indicator of surface moisture status at locations where these land uses are present.

  4. Improving iterative surface energy balance convergence for remote sensing based flux calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungel, Ramesh; Allen, Richard G.; Trezza, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A modification of the iterative procedure of the surface energy balance was purposed to expedite the convergence of Monin-Obukhov stability correction utilized by the remote sensing based flux calculation. This was demonstrated using ground-based weather stations as well as the gridded weather data (North American Regional Reanalysis) and remote sensing based (Landsat 5, 7) images. The study was conducted for different land-use classes in southern Idaho and northern California for multiple satellite overpasses. The convergence behavior of a selected Landsat pixel as well as all of the Landsat pixels within the area of interest was analyzed. Modified version needed multiple times less iteration compared to the current iterative technique. At the time of low wind speed (˜1.3 m/s), the current iterative technique was not able to find a solution of surface energy balance for all of the Landsat pixels, while the modified version was able to achieve it in a few iterations. The study will facilitate many operational evapotranspiration models to avoid the nonconvergence in low wind speeds, which helps to increase the accuracy of flux calculations.

  5. The Exploration of Mars: Crew Surface Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhosri, Wisuwat; Cojanis, Philip; Gupta, Madhu; Khopkar, Manasi; Kiely, Aaron; Myers, Michael; Oxnevad, Knut; Sengupta, Anita; Sexton, Adam; Shaw, Don

    1999-01-01

    Surface activities of the first Mars mission crew, as suggested in phase I of the NASA HEDS reference mission, are discussed in this paper. The HEDS reference mission calls for a two phased approach. In phase I, humans supported by robotic systems will explore the Martian surface, collect and analyze geologic, geophysical, and meteorological data, search for potential permanent base sites, and conduct technology verification experiments. In phase II, a Mars base site will be selected, and the building of a permanent human base will be initiated. In this report two complementary architectures are portrayed. First, a permanent base for 3-6 people consisting of an ISRU unit, two nuclear power systems, a green house, and inflatable habitats and laboratories, built inside adobe structures. Second, a reusable, and resupplyable methane propelled very long range type traverse vehicle capable of collecting and analyzing data, and repairing and deploying scientific payloads during its planned 150 days 4800 km traverse. The very long range traverse vehicle will carry smaller rovers, crawlers, blimps, and an air drill capable of quickly reaching depths beyond 100m. The report presents a global vision of human activities on the surface of Mars at a programmatic level. It consists of several vignettes called "concept architectures" We speculate that these activities will facilitate a phase I Mars exploration architecture.

  6. Monitoring of Vibrio harveyi quorum sensing activity in real time during infection of brine shrimp larvae.

    PubMed

    Defoirdt, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, has been linked to the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, in vitro experiments have shown that many bacterial pathogens regulate the expression of virulence genes by this cell-to-cell communication process. Moreover, signal molecules have been detected in samples retrieved from infected hosts and quorum sensing disruption has been reported to result in reduced virulence in different host-pathogen systems. However, data on in vivo quorum sensing activity of pathogens during infection of a host are currently lacking. We previously reported that quorum sensing regulates the virulence of Vibrio harveyi in a standardised model system with gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) larvae. Here, we monitored quorum sensing activity in Vibrio harveyi during infection of the shrimp, using bioluminescence as a read-out. We found that wild-type Vibrio harveyi shows a strong increase in quorum sensing activity early during infection. In this respect, the bacteria behave remarkably similar in different larvae, despite the fact that only half of them survive the infection. Interestingly, when expressed per bacterial cell, Vibrio harveyi showed around 200-fold higher maximal quorum sensing-regulated bioluminescence when associated with larvae than in the culture water. Finally, the in vivo quorum sensing activity of mutants defective in the production of one of the three signal molecules is consistent with their virulence, with no detectable in vivo quorum sensing activity in AI-2- and CAI-1-deficient mutants. These results indicate that AI-2 and CAI-1 are the dominant signals during infection of brine shrimp.

  7. Investigating Land Surface Phenology Derived from Satellite and GPS Network Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. O.; Kimball, J. S.; Small, E. E.; Larson, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    The land surface phenology (LSP) start of season (SOS) metric signals the seasonal onset of vegetation activity, including canopy growth and associated increases in land-atmosphere water, energy and carbon (CO2) exchanges influencing weather and climate variability. The Vegetation Optical Depth (VOD) parameter determined from satellite passive microwave remote sensing provides for global LSP monitoring that is sensitive to changes in vegetation canopy water content and biomass, and insensitive to atmosphere and solar illumination constraints. Direct field measures of canopy water content and biomass changes desired for LSP validation are generally lacking due to prohibitive costs of maintaining regional monitoring networks. Alternatively, a Normalized Microwave Reflectance Index (NMRI) derived from GPS base station measurements is sensitive to daily vegetation water content changes and may provide for effective microwave LSP validation as a relatively high spatial (1000m2) and temporal resolution vegetation phenology measure. We compared NMRI (1.2 and 1.5 GHz) and satellite microwave (AMSR-E sensor) 18.7 GHz frequency VOD records (2007 to 2011) at over 300 GPS sites in North America and their derived SOS metrics for a subset of 24 homogenous land cover sites. Significant correlations were found at 276 of 305 sites, with generally favorable correspondence in the resulting SOS metrics. We also investigated the temporal dynamics of nine NMRI sites within a single 25km resolution VOD pixel and with corresponding 250m MODIS NDVI measures of the three dominant land covers within the pixel to assess the spatial scale discrepancies between these high, moderate, and coarse resolution retrievals. This study is the first attempt to compare satellite microwave LSP metrics to a GPS network derived reflectance index and highlights both the utility and limitations of the NMRI data for LSP validation. Integration of GPS base stations and the NMRI into current phenology observation

  8. Evidence of the self-heating effect on surface reactivity and gas sensing of metal oxide nanowire chemiresistors.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Dmitriev, Serghei; Button, Bradley; Cothren, Joshua; Sysoev, Victor; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2008-09-03

    The effect of Joule self-heating of the semiconducting metal oxide nanowire (here (and below unless specified), due to the generality of the effect, we use the term 'nanowire' without specification as to whether the nanobelt or other class of quasi-1D nanostructure is considered) conductometric gas sensor on its surface reactivity and kinetics is demonstrated. Due to small thermal capacitance and hampered thermal losses from the nanowire to its surroundings, the sensor was able to operate without a heater, consuming only a few microwatts of power. These results demonstrate the importance of the self-heating effect in nanowire electronics and its potential use in chemical and bio-sensing, where the ultra-small size of the active element and minimal power consumption are crucial.

  9. Electromagnetic Land Surface Classification by Integration of Optical and Radar Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jin; Gu, Wei; Kim, Jeong Woo; Wang, Xin C.; Lim, Gye Jae; Lee, Dong Cheon

    2010-05-01

    Remotely sensed images, such as optical and radar (Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)) images have been playing important roles to retrieve crucial physical and chemical information on the land surface. With noticeable improvements of spatial, temporal, spectral, and radiometric resolutions of these satellite observations as well as with recent remarkable technical advances, it has been possible to observe and classify the land surface more accurately. By integration of satellite multi-spectral high-resolution optical and polarized radar images of central Alberta near Saskatchewan border, we present a non-hierarchical electromagnetic land surface classification method. We first adapt a conventional supervised land surface classification method using a commercial software ER-Mapper and also implement a Principal Component Analysis method (PCA) to the optical image to extract artificial facilities, such as access road and borehole site that are too small not to be recognized in the classification by any commercial software. The 11 electromagnetic (EM) properties suggested by Döttling and Wiesbeck (1999) on the basis of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Level I and II land use classes are then assigned to the classified surfaces to produce hierarchical EM (e.g., dielectric constant, permittivity, etc) land classification maps. To further classify the hierarchical EM surface map, especially for dielectric constant, we calculate surface roughness with SRTM-3 Digital Elevation Model and at-sensor temperature from thermal band of Landsat-5. We also calculate backscattering coefficients and depolarization ratio from the polarimetric properties of the ALOS PALSAR images. Using these estimated values, we compute intrinsic weighting factors by Dubois (1995) model for less vegetated (NDVI <0.55) land area and Ulaby (1986) model for open water area. By multiplying these weight factors to the hierarchical EM surface, we generate a non-hierarchical higher-resolution EM surface map

  10. Multiscale controls on water surface roughness and implications for remote sensing of rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overstreet, B. T.; Legleiter, C. J.; Harrison, L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Ryan, J.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing has emerged as a viable and efficient tool for studying river systems and facilitating their rehabilitation. While many remote sensing applications utilize spectral information from the substrate and water column, light reflected from the water surface is often a significant component of the total at-sensor radiance. As water surface roughness (WSR) increases, a greater proportion of surface facets become oriented so as to reflect, rather than transmit, light. As a result, WSR exerts a primary control on the amount of surface reflected light measured by a remote sensor. WSR in rivers is a function of flow hydraulics, channel form, slope, bed roughness, and wind. While the relative influence of each of these components on WSR changes with scale, understanding these relationships could lead to methods for obtaining hydraulic information from image-derived metrics of WSR (i.e., surface reflectance). We collected field data on flow depth and velocity using an acoustic Doppler current profiler and simultaneously measured WSR using a custom built ultrasonic distance sensor on a diverse set of rivers ranging from a 15 m wide supraglacial river on the Greenland Ice Sheet to 100 m wide gravel-bed rivers in Wyoming and Oregon. Simultaneous multi- and hyperspectral image data sets indicate that image-derived surface reflectance is strongly correlated with WSR. Temporally distributed point measurements of flow depth, velocity, and WSR on the supraglacial river capture a threefold range in discharge (6 m3/s to 17 m3/s) and indicate that flow velocity is a primary control on WSR in smaller channels, even in the absence of sediment-induced bed roughness. Spatially distributed field measurements from large gravel-bed rivers suggests that spatial variability of WSR in the thalweg corresponds with geomorphic facies while WSR along the channel margins is more significantly influenced by grain size, relative submergence, and bank geometry. These findings suggest that

  11. Modeling spatial surface energy fluxes of agricultural and riparian vegetation using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, Hatim Mohammed Eisa

    Modeling of surface energy fluxes and evapotranspiration (ET ) requires the understanding of the interaction between land and atmosphere as well as the appropriate representation of the associated spatial and temporal variability and heterogeneity. This dissertation provides new methodology showing how to rationally and properly incorporate surface features characteristics/properties, including the leaf area index, fraction of cover, vegetation height, and temperature, using different representations as well as identify the related effects on energy balance flux estimates including ET. The main research objectives were addressed in Chapters 2 through 4 with each presented in a separate paper format with Chapter 1 presenting an introduction and Chapter 5 providing summary and recommendations. Chapter 2 discusses a new approach of incorporating temporal and spatial variability of surface features. We coupled a remote sensing-based energy balance model with a traditional water balance method to provide improved estimates of ET. This approach was tested over rainfed agricultural fields ˜ 10 km by 30 km in Ames, Iowa. Before coupling, we modified the water balance method by incorporating a remote sensing-based estimate for one of its parameters to ameliorate its performance on a spatial basis. Promising results were obtained with indications of improved estimates of ET and soil moisture in the root zone. The effects of surface features heterogeneity on measurements of turbulence were investigated in Chapter 3. Scintillometer-based measurements/estimates of sensible heat flux (H) were obtained over the riparian zone of the Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), California. Surface roughness including canopy height (hc), roughness length, and zero-plane displacement height were incorporated in different ways, to improve estimates of H. High resolution, 1-m maps of ground surface digital elevation model and canopy height, hc, were derived from airborne LiDAR sensor data

  12. Regulation of airway surface liquid volume and mucus transport by active ion transport.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mucus clearance is an important component of the lung's innate defense against disease, and the ability of the airways to clear mucus is strongly dependent on the volume of liquid on airway surfaces. Whether airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is maintained by passive surface forces or by active ion transport is controversial yet crucial to the understanding of how this system operates in both health and disease. In support of active ion transport being the major determinant of ASL volume, we have demonstrated that normal airway epithelia sense and autoregulate ASL height (volume) by adjusting the rates of Na+ absorption and Cl- secretion to maintain mucus transport.

  13. Drought monitoring with remote sensing based land surface phenology applications and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Vilaly, Mohamed Abd salam M.

    Droughts are a recurrent part of our climate, and are still considered to be one of the most complex and least understood of all natural hazards in terms of their impact on the environment. In recent years drought has become more common and more severe across the world. For more than a decade, the US southwest has faced extensive and persistent drought conditions that have impacted vegetation communities and local water resources. The focus of this work is achieving a better understanding of the impact of drought on the lands of the Hopi Tribe and Navajo Nation, situated in the Northeastern corner of Arizona. This research explores the application of remote sensing data and geospatial tools in two studies to monitor drought impacts on vegetation productivity. In both studies we used land surface phenometrics as the data tool. In a third related study, I have compared satellite-derived land surface phenology (LSP) to field observations of crop stages at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to achieve a better understanding of the temporal sensitivity of satellite derived phenology of vegetation and understand their accuracy as a tool for monitoring change. The first study explores long-term vegetation productivity responses to drought. The paper develops a framework for drought monitoring and assessment by integrating land cover, climate, and topographical data with LSP. The objective of the framework is to detect long-term vegetation changes and trends in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) related productivity. The second study examines the major driving forces of vegetation dynamics in order to provide valuable spatial information related to inter-annual variability in vegetation productivity for mitigating drought impacts. The third study tests the accuracy of remote sensing-derived LSP by comparing them to the actual seasonal phases of crop growth. This provides a way to compare and validate the various LSP algorithms, and more crucially, helps to

  14. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, S.K.; Meliker, J.R.; Goovaerts, P.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, geographic information systems (GIS) have increasingly been used for reconstructing individual-level exposures to environmental contaminants in epidemiological research. Remotely sensed data can be useful in creating space-time models of environmental measures. The primary advantage of using remotely sensed data is that it allows for study at the local scale (e.g., residential level) without requiring expensive, time-consuming monitoring campaigns. The purpose of our study was to identify how land surface remotely sensed data are currently being used to study the relationship between cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessment applications. We present the results of a comprehensive literature review of epidemiological research where remotely sensed imagery or land cover maps derived from remotely sensed imagery were applied. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the most commonly used imagery data (aerial photographs and Landsat satellite imagery) and land cover maps.

  15. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    MAXWELL, SUSAN K.; MELIKER, JAYMIE R.; GOOVAERTS, PIERRE

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, geographic information systems (GIS) have increasingly been used for reconstructing individual-level exposures to environmental contaminants in epidemiological research. Remotely sensed data can be useful in creating space-time models of environmental measures. The primary advantage of using remotely sensed data is that it allows for study at the local scale (e.g., residential level) without requiring expensive, time-consuming monitoring campaigns. The purpose of our study was to identify how land surface remotely sensed data are currently being used to study the relationship between cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessment applications. We present the results of a comprehensive literature review of epidemiological research where remotely sensed imagery or land cover maps derived from remotely sensed imagery were applied. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the most commonly used imagery data (aerial photographs and Landsat satellite imagery) and land cover maps. PMID:19240763

  16. The Object of Activity: Making Sense of the Sense-Maker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaptelinin, Victor

    2005-01-01

    The concept of "the object of activity" plays a key role in research based on activity theory. However, the usefulness of this concept is somewhat undermined by the fact that a number of problems related to its meaning and its contexts of use remain unsolved. This article is an attempt to address some of these problems. The article focuses on 3…

  17. A tactile vision substitution system for the study of active sensing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Brian; Hsieh, Cheng-Han; Yu, Sung-Nien; Ahissar, Ehud; Arieli, Amos; Zilbershtain-Kra, Yael

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a tactile vision substitution system (TVSS) for the study of active sensing. Two algorithms, namely image processing and trajectory tracking, were developed to enhance the capability of conventional TVSS. Image processing techniques were applied to reduce the artifacts and extract important features from the active camera and effectively converted the information into tactile stimuli with much lower resolution. A fixed camera was used to record the movement of the active camera. A trajectory tracking algorithm was developed to analyze the active sensing strategy of the TVSS users to explore the environment. The image processing subsystem showed advantageous improvement in extracting object's features for superior recognition. The trajectory tracking subsystem, on the other hand, enabled accurately locating the portion of the scene pointed by the active camera and providing profound information for the study of active sensing strategy applied by TVSS users.

  18. Tropospheric aerosols remote sensing over the water surface of Penang Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, S. A.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.; Lim, H. S.; Wong, C. J.; Salleh, N. Mohd.

    2006-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols play an important role in climate change. Aerosols are typically studied over deep clear water, due to the relatively constant reflectance of water and the ability to easily separate surface and atmospheric contributions on the satellite signal. A methodology based on multi-spectral approach was employed to map tropospheric aerosols concentrations over the water areas surrounding Penang Island. The aim of this study was to estimate the pollutants concentrations using remote sensing techniques. In this study, we attempted to derive AOT (Aerosol Optical Thickness) values from the sky transmittance measurements in the visible spectrum. The transmittance values were measured at the sea surface using a handheld spectroradiometer. The correspond PM10 readings were taken simultaneously during the transmittance measurements acquisition of the imageries using a Dust Trak meter. The PCI Geomatica version 9.1 digital image processing software was used in all image-processing analyses. The results produced a linear relationship between PM10 and AOT values over the water surface of Penang Island. Finally, The PM10 concentration map over the water surface of Penang Island was generated using Kriging interpolation technique. This study has indicated the potential use of a handheld spectroradiometer for air quality study.

  19. Self-assembled large-area annular cavity arrays with tunable cylindrical surface plasmons for sensing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming; Shen, Tianyi; Zhou, Jing

    2015-02-24

    Surface plasmons that propagate along cylindrical metal/dielectric interfaces in annular apertures in metal films, called cylindrical surface plasmons (CSPs), exhibit attractive optical characteristics. However, it is challenging to fabricate these nanocoaxial structures. Here, we demonstrate a practical low-cost route to manufacture highly ordered, large-area annular cavity arrays (ACAs) that can support CSPs with great tunability. By employing a sol-gel coassembly method, reactive ion etching and metal sputtering techniques, regular, highly ordered ACAs in square-centimeter-scale with a gap width tunable in the range of several to hundreds of nanometers have been produced with good reproducibility. Ag ACAs with a gap width of 12 nm and a gap height of 635 nm are demonstrated. By finite-difference time-domain simulation, we confirm that the pronounced dips in the reflectance spectra of ACAs are attributable to CSP resonances excited in the annular gaps. By adjusting etching time and Ag film thickness, the CSP dips can be tuned to sweep the entire optical range of 360 to 1800 nm without changing sphere size, which makes them a promising candidate for forming integrated plasmonic sensing arrays. The high tunability of the CSP resonant frequencies together with strong electric field enhancement in the cavities make the ACAs promising candidates for surface plasmon sensors and SERS substrates, as, for example, they have been used in liquid refractive index (RI) sensing, demonstrating a sensitivity of 1505 nm/RIU and a figure of merit of 9. One of the CSP dips of ACAs with a certain geometry size is angle- (0-70 degrees) and polarization-independent and can be used as a narrow-band absorber. Furthermore, the nano annular cavity arrays can be used to construct solar cells, nanolasers and nanoparticle plasmonic tweezers.

  20. Young Scientists Explore the Five Senses. Book 4--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of the five senses. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each…

  1. Smart active multiwave sensing with zero background amplitude modulated probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.J.; Young, R.A.; Jelsma, L.

    1994-07-01

    Recently, a new approach to multi-wavelength remote sensing has been proposed based on the generation and detection of spectral ``pickets`` synthesized from the frequency filtered bandwidth of a modelocked laser. Using linear array liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) technology for spectral filtering permits real time grey scale control of individual picket amplitudes and phases, making it possible to independently modulate picket characteristics in the kHz to MHz regime. Due to the versatility of this approach, a whole suite of spectroscopies based on detection techniques that are similar to conventional sideband spectroscopies can be implemented. These techniques not only inherit the S/N advantages of their conventional counterparts, they can also be easily extended to simultaneous multi-wavelength operation using frequency multiplex techniques and configured for real time adaptive data acquisition. We report the laboratory demonstration and theoretical development of a new class of zero background AM modulated spectroscopic probes for differential absorption measurements. Preliminary detection sensitivities on the order of 10{sup {minus}6} can be inferred from our measurements. Application of this technique to realistic remote sensing scenarios, advantages over other modulation and direct detection approaches, as well as the present limitations and theoretical limits to detection sensitivity will be discussed.

  2. Detecting moisture status of pecan orchards and the potential of remotely-sensed surface reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Yahia Abdelrahman

    Demand for New Mexico's limited water resources coupled with periodic drought has increased the need to schedule irrigation of pecan orchards based on tree water status. The overall goal of this research was to develop advanced tree water status sensing techniques to optimize irrigation scheduling of pecan orchards. To achieve this goal, I conducted three studies in the La Mancha and Leyendecker orchards, both mature pecan orchards located in the Mesilla Valley, New Mexico. In the first study, I screened leaf-level physiological changes that occurred during cyclic irrigation to determine parameters that best represented changes in plant moisture status. Then, I linked plant physiological changes to remotely-sensed surface reflectance data derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+). In the second study, I assessed the impact of water deficits that developed during the flood irrigation dry-down cycles on photosynthesis (A) and gas exchange and established preliminary water deficit thresholds of midday stem water potential (Psi smd) critical to A and gas exchange of pecans. In a third study, I investigated whether hyperspectral data obtained from a handheld spectroradiometer and multispectral remotely-sensed data derived from Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) could detect moisture status in pecans during cyclic flood irrigations. I conducted the first study simultaneously in both orchards. Leaf-level physiological responses and remotely-sensed surface reflectance data were collected from trees that were either well watered or in water deficit. Midday stem water potential was the best leaf-level physiological response to detect moisture status in pecans. Multiple linear regression between Psismd and vegetation indices revealed a significant relationship (R 2 = 0.54) in both orchards. Accordingly, I concluded that remotely-sensed multispectral data form Landsat TMETM+ holds promise for detecting the moisture

  3. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (+/-5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  4. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (plus or minus 5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  5. Mapping Surface Cover Parameters Using Aggregation Rules and Remotely Sensed Cover Classes. Version 1.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arain, Altaf M.; Shuttleworth, W. James; Yang, Z-Liang; Michaud, Jene; Dolman, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    A coupled model, which combines the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) with an advanced atmospheric boundary-layer model, was used to validate hypothetical aggregation rules for BATS-specific surface cover parameters. The model was initialized and tested with observations from the Anglo-Brazilian Amazonian Climate Observational Study and used to simulate surface fluxes for rain forest and pasture mixes at a site near Manaus in Brazil. The aggregation rules are shown to estimate parameters which give area-average surface fluxes similar to those calculated with explicit representation of forest and pasture patches for a range of meteorological and surface conditions relevant to this site, but the agreement deteriorates somewhat when there are large patch-to-patch differences in soil moisture. The aggregation rules, validated as above, were then applied to remotely sensed 1 km land cover data set to obtain grid-average values of BATS vegetation parameters for 2.8 deg x 2.8 deg and 1 deg x 1 deg grids within the conterminous United States. There are significant differences in key vegetation parameters (aerodynamic roughness length, albedo, leaf area index, and stomatal resistance) when aggregate parameters are compared to parameters for the single, dominant cover within the grid. However, the surface energy fluxes calculated by stand-alone BATS with the 2-year forcing, data from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) CDROM were reasonably similar using aggregate-vegetation parameters and dominant-cover parameters, but there were some significant differences, particularly in the western USA.

  6. Motility of active fluid drops on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoromskaia, Diana; Alexander, Gareth P.

    2015-12-01

    Drops of active liquid crystal have recently shown the ability to self-propel, which was associated with topological defects in the orientation of active filaments [Sanchez et al., Nature 491, 431 (2013), 10.1038/nature11591]. Here, we study the onset and different aspects of motility of a three-dimensional drop of active fluid on a planar surface. We analyze theoretically how motility is affected by orientation profiles with defects of various types and locations, by the shape of the drop, and by surface friction at the substrate. In the scope of a thin drop approximation, we derive exact expressions for the flow in the drop that is generated by a given orientation profile. The flow has a natural decomposition into terms that depend entirely on the geometrical properties of the orientation profile, i.e., its bend and splay, and a term coupling the orientation to the shape of the drop. We find that asymmetric splay or bend generates a directed bulk flow and enables the drop to move, with maximal speeds achieved when the splay or bend is induced by a topological defect in the interior of the drop. In motile drops the direction and speed of self-propulsion is controlled by friction at the substrate.

  7. Remote-sensing based technique to account for sub-grid scale variability of land surface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosson, William L.; Laymon, Charles A.

    1995-01-01

    A method has been presented for the representation of sub-grid scale variability of surface properties within a land surface processes model. The method uses remotely-sensed data to directly or indirectly estimate probability density functions (PDF's) or key surface variables. Application of this technique in a coupled land surface-atmosphere model requires only grid-scale values of the variables of interest, obtained from low-resolution satellite imagery or surface/remote sensing data assimilation. The PDF's of each controlling surface property are superimposed on the respective grid-scale values to simulate sub-grid scale heterogeneity. Sensitivity studies will be carried out to ascertain the relative importance of the heterogeneity of several variables, and the degree to which non-linear property-process interactions impact large-scale fluxes.

  8. Study of vegetation impact on the ground surface temperature using remote sensing data with different spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Yury; Heim, Birgit; Leibman, Marina

    2013-04-01

    Permafrost mapping and modeling is based on the understanding of the main controls affecting permafrost parameters: ground temperature, active-layer thickness, cryogenic processes. In the Tundra zone, remote sensing can provide necessary information on spatial distribution of surficial parameters represented by vegetation type and coverage. In this work we will consider shrub complexes, as far as they serve as an entrapment for snow and consequently affect the active layer depth. A case study was undertaken at central Yamal at the research station Vaskiny Dachi. In summer 2011 a 1.5 km long transect crossing main geomorphologic units of central Yamal was established and subject to multipurpose field study. Detailed description of vegetation and numeric parameters characterizing tundra complexes was followed by active-layer measurements. The main optical satellite data base is a high-spatial resolution GeoEye-1 acquisition with 0.5 m ground sampling distance acquired at the 15th August in 2009 (NGA license, University Alaska Fairbanks, NASA LCLUC Yamal). Spectral analyses were performed to extract surface class - shrub-dominant communities. Spectral discrimination of surface waters was done using a threshold value in the near infrared band 4. Various spectral analyses were tested to separate shrubs-dominated areas. Processed were 4 Principal Component (PC) (Schowengerdt, 2007) bands, including masking of surface waters. The lower PC bands contain the subordinate information that can often not be extracted using standard classification methods. PC bands 2 and 3 were interpreted to contain information on 'greenness' and 'moisture and structure', respectively. At this stage, the shrubs were manually digitized guided by the structure information in PC band 3. The communities sorted out in vector format were used for the following analysis. For the analysis of the shrub impact on permafrost, interpretation results were compared with a map of the surface temperature and

  9. Development of a tree classifier for discrimination of surface mine activity from Landsat digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. L.; Miller, W. F.; Quattrochi, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    In a cooperative project with the Geological Survey of Alabama, the Mississippi State Remote Sensing Applications Program has developed a single purpose, decision-tree classifier using band-ratioing techniques to discriminate various stages of surface mining activity. The tree classifier has four levels and employs only two channels in classification at each level. An accurate computation of the amount of disturbed land resulting from the mining activity can be made as a product of the classification output. The utilization of Landsat data provides a cost-efficient, rapid, and accurate means of monitoring surface mining activities.

  10. Exploiting Surface Albedos Products to Bridge the Gap Between Remote Sensing Information and Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinty, Bernard; Andredakis, Ioannis; Clerici, Marco; Kaminski, Thomas; Taberner, Malcolm; Stephen, Plummer

    2011-01-01

    We present results from the application of an inversion method conducted using MODIS derived broadband visible and near-infrared surface albedo products. This contribution is an extension of earlier efforts to optimally retrieve land surface fluxes and associated two- stream model parameters based on the Joint Research Centre Two-stream Inversion Package (JRC-TIP). The discussion focuses on products (based on the mean and one-sigma values of the Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs)) obtained during the summer and winter and highlight specific issues related to snowy conditions. This paper discusses the retrieved model parameters including the effective Leaf Area Index (LAI), the background brightness and the scattering efficiency of the vegetation elements. The spatial and seasonal changes exhibited by these parameters agree with common knowledge and underscore the richness of the high quality surface albedo data sets. At the same time, the opportunity to generate global maps of new products, such as the background albedo, underscores the advantages of using state of the art algorithmic approaches capable of fully exploiting accurate satellite remote sensing datasets. The detailed analyses of the retrieval uncertainties highlight the central role and contribution of the LAI, the main process parameter to interpret radiation transfer observations over vegetated surfaces. The posterior covariance matrix of the uncertainties is further exploited to quantify the knowledge gain from the ingestion of MODIS surface albedo products. The estimation of the radiation fluxes that are absorbed, transmitted and scattered by the vegetation layer and its background is achieved on the basis of the retrieved PDFs of the model parameters. The propagation of uncertainties from the observations to the model parameters is achieved via the Hessian of the cost function and yields a covariance matrix of posterior parameter uncertainties. This matrix is propagated to the radiation

  11. Calmodulin Regulates Ca2+-sensing Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling and Its Cell Surface Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun; Zhou, Yubin; Wong, Hing-Cheung; Castiblanco, Adriana; Chen, Yanyi; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a member of family C of the GPCRs responsible for sensing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o) levels, maintaining extracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and transducing Ca2+ signaling from the extracellular milieu to the intracellular environment. In the present study, we have demonstrated a Ca2+-dependent, stoichiometric interaction between CaM and a CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) located within the C terminus of CaSR (residues 871–898). Our studies suggest a wrapping around 1–14-like mode of interaction that involves global conformational changes in both lobes of CaM with concomitant formation of a helical structure in the CaMBD. More importantly, the Ca2+-dependent association between CaM and the C terminus of CaSR is critical for maintaining proper responsiveness of intracellular Ca2+ responses to changes in extracellular Ca2+ and regulating cell surface expression of the receptor. PMID:20826781

  12. Multiple plant surface signals are sensed by different mechanisms in the rice blast fungus for appressorium formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wende; Zhou, Xiaoying; Li, Guotian; Li, Lei; Kong, Lingan; Wang, Chenfang; Zhang, Haifeng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2011-01-20

    Surface recognition and penetration are among the most critical plant infection processes in foliar pathogens. In Magnaporthe oryzae, the Pmk1 MAP kinase regulates appressorium formation and penetration. Its orthologs also are known to be required for various plant infection processes in other phytopathogenic fungi. Although a number of upstream components of this important pathway have been characterized, the upstream sensors for surface signals have not been well characterized. Pmk1 is orthologous to Kss1 in yeast that functions downstream from Msb2 and Sho1 for filamentous growth. Because of the conserved nature of the Pmk1 and Kss1 pathways and reduced expression of MoMSB2 in the pmk1 mutant, in this study we functionally characterized the MoMSB2 and MoSHO1 genes. Whereas the Momsb2 mutant was significantly reduced in appressorium formation and virulence, the Mosho1 mutant was only slightly reduced. The Mosho1 Momsb2 double mutant rarely formed appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces, had a reduced Pmk1 phosphorylation level, and was nonresponsive to cutin monomers. However, it still formed appressoria and caused rare, restricted lesions on rice leaves. On artificial hydrophilic surfaces, leaf surface waxes and primary alcohols-but not paraffin waxes and alkanes- stimulated appressorium formation in the Mosho1 Momsb2 mutant, but more efficiently in the Momsb2 mutant. Furthermore, expression of a dominant active MST7 allele partially suppressed the defects of the Momsb2 mutant. These results indicate that, besides surface hydrophobicity and cutin monomers, primary alcohols, a major component of epicuticular leaf waxes in grasses, are recognized by M. oryzae as signals for appressorium formation. Our data also suggest that MoMsb2 and MoSho1 may have overlapping functions in recognizing various surface signals for Pmk1 activation and appressorium formation. While MoMsb2 is critical for sensing surface hydrophobicity and cutin monomers, MoSho1 may play a

  13. Application of remote sensing to thermal pollution analysis. [satellite sea surface temperature measurement assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiser, H. W.; Lee, S. S.; Veziroglu, T. N.; Sengupta, S.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical model development program for near-field thermal plume discharge and far field general circulation in coastal regions is being carried on at the University of Miami Clean Energy Research Institute. The objective of the program is to develop a generalized, three-dimensional, predictive model for thermal pollution studies. Two regions of specific application of the model are the power plants sites at the Biscayne Bay and Hutchinson Island area along the Florida coastline. Remote sensing from aircraft as well as satellites are used in parallel with in situ measurements to provide information needed for the development and verification of the mathematical model. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to identify problems and limitations of the presently available satellite data and to develop methods for enhancing and enlarging thermal infrared displays for mesoscale sea surface temperature measurements.

  14. An Evaluation of Fractal Surface Measurement Methods for Characterizing Landscape Complexity from Remote-Sensing Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Qiu, Hong-Lie; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Emerson, Charles W.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rapid increase in digital data volumes from new and existing sensors necessitates the need for efficient analytical tools for extracting information. We developed an integrated software package called ICAMS (Image Characterization and Modeling System) to provide specialized spatial analytical functions for interpreting remote sensing data. This paper evaluates the three fractal dimension measurement methods: isarithm, variogram, and triangular prism, along with the spatial autocorrelation measurement methods Moran's I and Geary's C, that have been implemented in ICAMS. A modified triangular prism method was proposed and implemented. Results from analyzing 25 simulated surfaces having known fractal dimensions show that both the isarithm and triangular prism methods can accurately measure a range of fractal surfaces. The triangular prism method is most accurate at estimating the fractal dimension of higher spatial complexity, but it is sensitive to contrast stretching. The variogram method is a comparatively poor estimator for all of the surfaces, particularly those with higher fractal dimensions. Similar to the fractal techniques, the spatial autocorrelation techniques are found to be useful to measure complex images but not images with low dimensionality. These fractal measurement methods can be applied directly to unclassified images and could serve as a tool for change detection and data mining.

  15. Directional Surface Plasmon Coupled Luminescence for Analytical Sensing Applications: Which Metal, What Wavelength, What Observation Angle?

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of luminescent species in the near-field to both induce and couple to surface plasmons has been known for many years, with highly directional emission from films (Surface Plasmon Coupled Luminescence, SPCL) facilitating the development of sensitive near-field assay sensing platforms, to name but just one application. Because of the near-field nature of the effect, only luminescent species (fluorescence, chemiluminescence and phosphorescence) within a few hundred nanometers from the surface play a role in coupling, which in terms of biosensing, provides for limited penetration into optically dense media, such as in whole blood. Another attractive feature is the highly polarized and angular dependent emission which allows both fixed angle and wavelength dependent emission angles to be realized at high polarization ratios. In this paper, a generic procedure based on theoretical Fresnel calculations, which outlines the step-by-step selection of an appropriate metal for SPCL applications is presented. It is also shown that 11 different metals have differing properties in different spectral regions and offer either fixed angle or wavelength-dependent angular shifts in emission. In addition, it is shown that both chemiluminescence and phosphorescence can also be observed in a highly directional manner similar to coupled fluorescence. PMID:19601619

  16. Documenting Biophysical Activities on Land Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobron, N.; Pinty, B.; Melin, F.; Taberner, M.; Verstraete, M. M.; Widlowski, J.

    2002-12-01

    The biophysical activities on land surfaces have been documented from spectral measurements made in space for decades. These estimates often were derived from the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, which is simple to compute but very sensitive to perturbations and prone to yield misleading or erroneous results. Advances in the understanding of radiation transfer and availability of higher performance instruments have lead to the development of a new generation of geophysical products poised to provide reliable, accurate information on the state and evolution of terrestrial environments. Specifically, a series of optimized algorithms have been developed to estimate the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) for various instruments. Such an approach allows the synergistic use of FAPAR products derived from different sensors and the construction of global FAPAR time series independent from the life time of these specific sensors. The outline of the methodology will be summarized and the results from an application conducted with SeaWiFS data will be presented.

  17. On the sensitivity of numerical weather prediction to remotely sensed marine surface wind data: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cane, Mark A.; Cardone, Vincent J.; Halem, Milton; Halberstam, Isidore

    1981-09-01

    A series of observing system simulation experiments has been performed to assess the potential impact of marine surface wind data on numerical weather prediction. Care was taken to duplicate the spatial coverage and error characteristics of conventional surface, radiosonde, ship, and aircraft reports. These observations, suitably degraded to account for instrument and sampling errors, were used in a conventional analysis-forecast cycle. A series of five 72-hour forecasts were then made by using the analyzed fields as initial conditions. The forecast error growth was found to be similar to that in operational numerical forecasts. Further experiments simulated the time-continuous assimilation of remotely sensed marine surface wind or temperature sounding data in addition to the conventional data. The wind data were fabricated directly for model grid points intercepted by a Seasat-1 scatterometer (SASS) swath and were placed in the lowest active level (945 mbar) of the model. The temperature sounding experiment assimilated error-free data fabricated along actual Nimbus orbits. Forecasts were made from the resulting analysis fields, and the impact of the simulated satellite data was assessed by comparing these forecast errors with those of the control forecasts. When error-free winds were assimilated by using a localized successive correction method (SCM), the impacts in extratropical regions proved to be substantial, especially in lower tropospheric quantities such as surface pressure. In contrast, a less sophisticated assimilation method resulted in negligible impact. The assimilation of error-free sounder data (again by the SCM) gave impacts comparable to the wind data, suggesting that surface wind data alone may be as valuable as temperature soundings for numerical weather prediction. The effects of nominal SASS errors (±2 m/s in magnitude, ±20° in direction) on the impacts derived from wind data were found to be small.

  18. Using Remote Sensing Data to Evaluate Surface Soil Properties in Alabama Ultisols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dana G.; Shaw, Joey N.; Rickman, Doug; Mask, Paul L.; Luvall, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of surface soil properties via remote sensing could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction and allocation of agrochemicals for precision management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High-resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil organic carbon, particle size distribution, and citrate dithionite extractable iron content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured during sampling. Two methods of analysis were evaluated: 1) multiple linear regression using common spectral band ratios, and 2) partial least squares regression. Our data show that thermal infrared spectra are highly, linearly related to soil organic carbon, sand and clay content. Soil organic carbon content was the most difficult to quantify in these highly weathered systems, where soil organic carbon was generally less than 1.2%. Estimates of sand and clay content were best using partial least squares regression at the Valley site, explaining 42-59% of the variability. In the Coastal Plain, sandy surfaces prone to crusting limited estimates of sand and clay content via partial least squares and regression with common band ratios. Estimates of iron oxide content were a function of mineralogy and best accomplished using specific band ratios, with regression explaining 36-65% of the variability at the Valley and Coastal Plain sites, respectively.

  19. Sensing (un)binding events via surface plasmons: effects of resonator geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Claudio, Virginia; Käll, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    The resonance conditions of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) can be perturbed in any number ways making plasmon nanoresonators viable tools in detection of e.g. phase changes, pH, gasses, and single molecules. Precise measurement via LSPR of molecular concentrations hinge on the ability to confidently count the number of molecules attached to a metal resonator and ideally to track binding and unbinding events in real-time. These two requirements make it necessary to rigorously quantify relations between the number of bound molecules and response of plasmonic sensors. This endeavor is hindered on the one hand by a spatially varying response of a given plasmonic nanosensor. On the other hand movement of molecules is determined by stochastic effects (Brownian motion) as well as deterministic flow, if present, in microfluidic channels. The combination of molecular dynamics and the electromagnetic response of the LSPR yield an uncertainty which is little understood and whose effect is often disregarded in quantitative sensing experiments. Using a combination of electromagnetic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the plasmon resonance peak shift of various metal nanosensors (disk, cone, rod, dimer) and stochastic diffusion-reaction simulations of biomolecular interactions on a sensor surface we clarify the interplay between position dependent binding probability and inhomogeneous sensitivity distribution. We show, how the statistical characteristics of the total signal upon molecular binding are determined. The proposed methodology is, in general, applicable to any sensor and any transduction mechanism, although the specifics of implementation will vary depending on circumstances. In this work we focus on elucidating how the interplay between electromagnetic and stochastic effects impacts the feasibility of employing particular shapes of plasmonic sensors for real-time monitoring of individual binding reactions or sensing low concentrations

  20. Surface-area-controlled synthesis of porous TiO2 thin films for gas-sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Young; Kim, Ho-Hyoung; Rana, Dolly; Jamwal, Deepika; Katoch, Akash

    2017-03-03

    Surface-area-controlled porous TiO2 thin films were prepared via a simple sol-gel chemical route, and their gas-sensing properties were thoroughly investigated in the presence of typical oxidizing NO2 gas. The surface area of TiO2 thin films was controlled by developing porous TiO2 networked by means of controlling the TiO2-to-TTIP (titanium isopropoxide, C12H28O4Ti) molar ratio, where TiO2 nanoparticles of size ∼20 nm were used. The sensor's response was found to depend on the surface area of the TiO2 thin films. The porous TiO2 thin-film sensor with greater surface area was more sensitive than those of TiO2 thin films with lesser surface area. The improved sensing ability was ascribed to the porous network formed within the thin films by TiO2 sol. Our results show that surface area is a key parameter for obtaining superior gas-sensing performance; this provides important guidelines for preparing and using porous thin films for gas-sensing applications.

  1. Surface-area-controlled synthesis of porous TiO2 thin films for gas-sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Young; Kim, Ho-hyoung; Rana, Dolly; Jamwal, Deepika; Katoch, Akash

    2017-03-01

    Surface-area-controlled porous TiO2 thin films were prepared via a simple sol–gel chemical route, and their gas-sensing properties were thoroughly investigated in the presence of typical oxidizing NO2 gas. The surface area of TiO2 thin films was controlled by developing porous TiO2 networked by means of controlling the TiO2-to-TTIP (titanium isopropoxide, C12H28O4Ti) molar ratio, where TiO2 nanoparticles of size ∼20 nm were used. The sensor’s response was found to depend on the surface area of the TiO2 thin films. The porous TiO2 thin-film sensor with greater surface area was more sensitive than those of TiO2 thin films with lesser surface area. The improved sensing ability was ascribed to the porous network formed within the thin films by TiO2 sol. Our results show that surface area is a key parameter for obtaining superior gas-sensing performance; this provides important guidelines for preparing and using porous thin films for gas-sensing applications.

  2. Lake Storage Measurements For Water Resources Management: Combining Remotely Sensed Water Levels and Surface Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakenridge, G. R.; Birkett, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Presently operating satellite-based radar altimeters have the ability to monitor variations in surface water height for large lakes and reservoirs, and future sensors will expand observational capabilities to many smaller water bodies. Such remote sensing provides objective, independent information where in situ data are lacking or access is restricted. A USDA/NASA (http://www.pecad.fas.usda.gov/cropexplorer/global_reservoir/) program is performing operational altimetric monitoring of the largest lakes and reservoirs around the world using data from the NASA/CNES, NRL, and ESA missions. Public lake-level products from the Global Reservoir and Lake Monitor (GRLM) are a combination of archived and near real time information. The USDA/FAS utilizes the products for assessing international irrigation potential and for crop production estimates; other end-users study climate trends, observe anthropogenic effects, and/or are are involved in other water resources management and regional water security issues. At the same time, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (http://floodobservatory.colorado.edu/), its NASA GSFC partners (http://oas.gsfc.nasa.gov/floodmap/home.html), and associated MODIS data and automated processing algorithms are providing public access to a growing GIS record of the Earth's changing surface water extent, including changes related to floods and droughts. The Observatory's web site also provide both archival and near real time information, and is based mainly on the highest spatial resolution (250 m) MODIS bands. Therefore, it is now possible to provide on an international basis reservoir and lake storage change measurements entirely from remote sensing, on a frequently updating basis. The volume change values are based on standard numerical procedures used for many decades for analysis of coeval lake area and height data. We provide first results of this combination, including prototype displays for public access and data retrieval of water storage

  3. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Sea Surface Microlayer and their Effect on Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, N.; Vella, K.; Tartar, A.; Matt, S.; Shivji, M.; Perrie, W. A.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar remote sensing captures various fine-scale features on the ocean surface such as coastal discharges, oil pollution, vessel traffic, algal blooms and sea slicks. Although numerous factors potentially affect the synthetic aperture radar imaging process, the influence of biogenic and anthropogenic surfactants has been suggested as one of the primary parameters, especially under relatively low wind conditions. Surfactants have a tendency to dampen the short gravity-capillary ocean waves causing the sea surface to smoothen, thus allowing the radar to detect areas of surfactants. Surfactants are found in sea slicks, which are the accumulation of organic material shaped as elongated bands on the ocean's surface. Sea slicks are often observable with the naked eye due to their glassy appearance and can also be seen on synthetic aperture radar images as dark scars. While the sources of surfactants can vary, some are known to be of marine bacteria origin. Countless numbers of marine bacteria are present in the oceanic environment, and their biogeochemical contributions cannot be overlooked. Not only does marine-bacteria produce surfactants, but they also play an important role in the transformation of surfactants. In this study, we profiled the surfactant-associated bacteria composition within the biogenic thin layer of the ocean surface more commonly referred as the sea surface microlayer. Bacterial samples were collected from the sea surface microlayer for comparative analysis from both within and outside of sea slick areas as well as the underlying subsurface water. The bacterial microlayer sampling coincided with synthetic aperture radar satellite, RADARSAT-2, overpasses to demonstrate the simultaneous in-situ measurements during a satellite image capture. The sea surface microlayer sampling method was designed to enable aseptic bacterial sampling. A 47 mm polycarbonate membrane was utilized at each sampling site to obtain a snapshot of the

  4. Remote Sensing of Potential Biosignatures from Rocky, Liquid, or Icy (Exo)Planetary Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Poch, Olivier; Frey, Joachim; Roditi, Isabel; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Thomas, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    To detect signs of life by remote sensing on objects of our Solar System and on exoplanets, the characterization of light scattered by surface life material could complement possible clues given by the atmospheric composition. We reviewed the reflectance spectra of a broad selection of major biomolecules that constitute terrestrial carbon-based life from 0.4 to 2.4 μm, and we discuss their detectability through atmospheric spectral windows. Biomolecule features in the near-infrared (0.8-2.4 μm) will likely be obscured by water spectral features and some atmospheric gases. The visible range (0.4-0.8 μm), including the strong spectral features of pigments, is the most favorable. We investigated the detectability of a pigmented microorganism (Deinococcus radiodurans) when mixed with silica sand, liquid water, and water-ice particles representative of diverse surfaces of potentially habitable worlds. We measured the visible to near-infrared reflectance spectra (0.4-2.4 μm) and the visible phase curves (at 0.45 and 0.75 μm) of the mixtures to assess how the surface medium and the viewing geometry affect the detectability of the microorganisms. The results show that ice appears to be the most favorable medium for the detection of pigments. Water ice is bright and featureless from 0.4 to 0.8 μm, allowing the absorption of any pigment present in the ice to be well noticeable. We found that the visible phase curve of water ice is the most strongly affected by the presence of pigments, with variations of the spectral slope by more than a factor of 3 with phase angles. Finally, we show that the sublimation of the ice results in the concentration of the biological material onto the surface and the consequent increase of its signal. These results have applications to the search for life on icy worlds, such as Europa or Enceladus. Key Words: Remote sensing-Biosignatures-Reflectance spectroscopy-Exoplanets-Spectroscopic biosignatures-Pigments. Astrobiology 17

  5. Assessment of Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity for Some Ornamental and Medicinal Plants Native to Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Ahmed A.; Shaaban, Mona I.; Hashish, Nadia E.; Amer, Mohamed A.; Lahloub, Mohamed-Farid

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of some plant extracts on the bacterial communication system, expressed as quorum sensing (QS) activity. Quorum sensing has a directly proportional effect on the amount of certain compounds, such as pigments, produced by the bacteria. Alcohol extracts of 23 ornamental and medicinal plants were tested for anti-QS activity by the Chromobacterium violaceum assay using the agar cup diffusion method. The screening revealed the anti-QS activity of six plants; namely the leaves of Adhatoda vasica Nees, Bauhinia purpurea L., Lantana camara L., Myoporum laetum G. Forst.; the fruits of Piper longum L.; and the aerial parts of Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg. PMID:23641343

  6. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor with cinacalcet increases serum gastrin levels in healthy older subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acidity is postulated to enhance calcium absorption since calcium is better dissolved at low pH. Extracellular calcium stimulates gastrin and gastric acid secretion in humans. Ex vivo studies indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), which is expressed on the surface of human G cells...

  7. A Novel Fiber Bragg Grating Based Sensing Methodology for Direct Measurement of Surface Strain on Body Muscles during Physical Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Arudi Subbarao, Guru; Subbaramajois Narasipur, Omkar; Kalegowda, Anand; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2012-07-01

    The present work proposes a new sensing methodology, which uses Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) to measure in vivo the surface strain and strain rate on calf muscles while performing certain exercises. Two simple exercises, namely ankle dorsi-flexion and ankle plantar-flexion, have been considered and the strain induced on the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle while performing these exercises has been monitored. The real time strain generated has been recorded and the results are compared with those obtained using a commercial Color Doppler Ultrasound (CDU) system. It is found that the proposed sensing methodology is promising for surface strain measurements in biomechanical applications.

  8. The senses of active and passive forces at the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2015-07-01

    The traditional view of the neural basis for the sense of muscle force is that it is generated at least in part within the brain. Recently it has been proposed that force sensations do not arise entirely centrally and that there is a contribution from peripheral receptors within the contracting muscle. Evidence comes from experiments on thumb flexor and elbow flexor muscles. Here we have studied the sense of force in plantar flexor muscles of the human ankle, looking for further evidence for such a mechanism. The active angle-torque curve was measured for muscles of both legs, and for each muscle, ankle angles were identified on the ascending and descending limbs of the curve where active forces were similar. In a plantar flexion force matching task, subjects were asked to match the force in one foot, generated on the ascending limb of the curve, with force in the other foot, generated on the descending limb. It was hypothesised that despite active forces being similar, the sensation generated in the more stretched muscle should be greater because of the contribution from its peripheral stretch receptors, leading to an overestimation of the force in the stretched muscle. It was found that provided that the comparison was between active forces, there was no difference in the forces generated by the two legs, supporting the central hypothesis for the sense of force. When total forces were matched, including a component of passive force due to muscle stretch, subjects seemed to ignore the passive component. Yet subjects had an acute sense of passive force, provided that the muscles remained relaxed. It was concluded that subjects had two senses, a sense of active force, generated centrally, and a sense of passive force, or perhaps muscle stretch, generated within the muscle itself.

  9. Highly Conserved Salt Bridge Stabilizes Rigid Signal Patch at Extracellular Loop Critical for Surface Expression of Acid-sensing Ion Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Yu, Ye; Cheng, Jin; Liu, Yan; Liu, Di-Shi; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Michael X.; Wang, Rui; Xu, Tian-Le

    2012-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are non-selective cation channels activated by extracellular acidosis associated with many physiological and pathological conditions. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms that govern cell surface expression of ASICs, therefore, is critical for better understanding of the cell signaling under acidosis conditions. In this study, we examined the role of a highly conserved salt bridge residing at the extracellular loop of rat ASIC3 (Asp107-Arg153) and human ASIC1a (Asp107-Arg160) channels. Comprehensive mutagenesis and electrophysiological recordings revealed that the salt bridge is essential for functional expression of ASICs in a pH sensing-independent manner. Surface biotinylation and immunolabeling of an extracellular epitope indicated that mutations, including even minor alterations, at the salt bridge impaired cell surface expression of ASICs. Molecular dynamics simulations, normal mode analysis, and further mutagenesis studies suggested a high stability and structural constrain of the salt bridge, which serves to separate an adjacent structurally rigid signal patch, important for surface expression, from a flexible gating domain. Thus, we provide the first evidence of structural requirement that involves a stabilizing salt bridge and an exposed rigid signal patch at the destined extracellular loop for normal surface expression of ASICs. These findings will allow evaluation of new strategies aimed at preventing excessive excitability and neuronal injury associated with tissue acidosis and ASIC activation. PMID:22399291

  10. Does Titan have an Active Surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R.

    2009-12-01

    ammonia, a compound expected in Titan’s interior. This, combined with the previous evidence from VIMS and RADAR images, creates a strong case for Titan having a presently active surface, possibly due to cryovolcanism. Cassini encountered Titan at very close range on 2008-11-19-13:58 and again on 2008-12-05-12:38. These epochs are called T47 and T48. Comparison of earlier lower resolution data (T5) with the recent T47 and T48 data reveal changes of the surface reflectance and morphology in the Hotei region. This is the first evidence from VIMS that confirms the RADAR report that Hotei Reggio has morphology consistent with volcanic terrain. It has not escaped our attention that ammonia, in association with methane and nitrogen, the principal species of Titan’s atmosphere, closely replicates the environment at the time that live first emerged on earth. If Titan is currently active then these results raise the following questions: What is the full extent of current geologic activity? What are the ongoing processes? Are Titan’s chemical processes today supporting a prebiotic chemistry similar to that under which life evolved on Earth? This work done at JPL under contract with NASA. Refs: [1]R. M. Nelson et al., Icarus 199 (2009) 429-441. [2]R. M. Nelson et al., GRL, VOL. 36, L04202, doi:10.1029/2008GL036206, 2009. [3]S. D. Wall GRL, VOL. 36, L04203, doi:10.1029/2008GL036415, 2009

  11. Head-mounted active noise control system with virtual sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Nobuhiro; Kajikawa, Yoshinobu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we apply a virtual sensing technique to a head-mounted active noise control (ANC) system we have already proposed. The proposed ANC system can reduce narrowband noise while improving the noise reduction ability at the desired locations. A head-mounted ANC system based on an adaptive feedback structure can reduce noise with periodicity or narrowband components. However, since quiet zones are formed only at the locations of error microphones, an adequate noise reduction cannot be achieved at the locations where error microphones cannot be placed such as near the eardrums. A solution to this problem is to apply a virtual sensing technique. A virtual sensing ANC system can achieve higher noise reduction at the desired locations by measuring the system models from physical sensors to virtual sensors, which will be used in the online operation of the virtual sensing ANC algorithm. Hence, we attempt to achieve the maximum noise reduction near the eardrums by applying the virtual sensing technique to the head-mounted ANC system. However, it is impossible to place the microphone near the eardrums. Therefore, the system models from physical sensors to virtual sensors are estimated using the Head And Torso Simulator (HATS) instead of human ears. Some simulation, experimental, and subjective assessment results demonstrate that the head-mounted ANC system with virtual sensing is superior to that without virtual sensing in terms of the noise reduction ability at the desired locations.

  12. A self-sensing active magnetic bearing based on a direct current measurement approach.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Andries C; van Schoor, George; du Rand, Carel P

    2013-09-11

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have become a key technology in various industrial applications. Self-sensing AMBs provide an integrated sensorless solution for position estimation, consolidating the sensing and actuating functions into a single electromagnetic transducer. The approach aims to reduce possible hardware failure points, production costs, and system complexity. Despite these advantages, self-sensing methods must address various technical challenges to maximize the performance thereof. This paper presents the direct current measurement (DCM) approach for self-sensing AMBs, denoting the direct measurement of the current ripple component. In AMB systems, switching power amplifiers (PAs) modulate the rotor position information onto the current waveform. Demodulation self-sensing techniques then use bandpass and lowpass filters to estimate the rotor position from the voltage and current signals. However, the additional phase-shift introduced by these filters results in lower stability margins. The DCM approach utilizes a novel PA switching method that directly measures the current ripple to obtain duty-cycle invariant position estimates. Demodulation filters are largely excluded to minimize additional phase-shift in the position estimates. Basic functionality and performance of the proposed self-sensing approach are demonstrated via a transient simulation model as well as a high current (10 A) experimental system. A digital implementation of amplitude modulation self-sensing serves as a comparative estimator.

  13. Sensing network for electromagnetic fields generated by seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Bambakidis, Gust; Ternovskiy, Igor V.

    2014-06-01

    The sensors network is becoming prolific and play now increasingly more important role in acquiring and processing information. Cyber-Physical Systems are focusing on investigation of integrated systems that includes sensing, networking, and computations. The physics of the seismic measurement and electromagnetic field measurement requires special consideration how to design electromagnetic field measurement networks for both research and detection earthquakes and explosions along with the seismic measurement networks. In addition, the electromagnetic sensor network itself could be designed and deployed, as a research tool with great deal of flexibility, the placement of the measuring nodes must be design based on systematic analysis of the seismic-electromagnetic interaction. In this article, we review the observations of the co-seismic electromagnetic field generated by earthquakes and man-made sources such as vibrations and explosions. The theoretical investigation allows the distribution of sensor nodes to be optimized and could be used to support existing geological networks. The placement of sensor nodes have to be determined based on physics of electromagnetic field distribution above the ground level. The results of theoretical investigations of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena are considered in Section I. First, we compare the relative contribution of various types of mechano-electromagnetic mechanisms and then analyze in detail the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by piezomagnetic and electrokinetic effects.

  14. GeoComplexity and scale: surface processes and remote sensing of geosystems. GeoComplexity and scale: surface processes and remote sensing of geosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jan-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the role of scaling in different planetary surface processes within our Solar System is one of the fundamental goals of planetary and solid earth scientific research. There has been a revolution in planetary surface observations over the past decade for the Earth, Mars and the Moon, especially in 3D imaging of surface shape (from the planetary scale down to resolutions of 75cm). I will examine three areas that I have been active in over the last 25 years giving examples of newly processed global datasets ripe for scaling analysis: topography, BRDF/albedo and imaging. For understanding scaling in terrestrial land surface topography we now have global 30m digital elevation models (DEMs) from different types of sensors (InSAR and stereo-optical) along with laser altimeter data to provide global reference models (to better than 1m in cross-over areas) and airborne laser altimeter data over small areas at resolutions better than 1m and height accuracies better than 10-15cm. We also have an increasing number of sub-surface observations from long wavelength SAR in arid regions, which will allow us to look at the true surface rather than the one buried by sand. We also still have a major limitation of these DEMs in that they represent an unknown observable surface with C-band InSAR DEMs representing being somewhere near the top of the canopy and X-band InSAR and stereo near the top of the canopy but only P-band representing the true understorey surface. I will present some of the recent highlights of topography on Mars including 3D modelling of surface shape from the ESA Mars Express HRSC (High Resolution Stereo Camera), see [1], [2] at 30-100m grid-spacing; and then co-registered to HRSC using a resolution cascade of 20m DTMs from NASA MRO stereo-CTX and 0.75m digital terrain models (as there is no land cover on Mars) DTMs from MRO stereo-HiRISE [3]. Comparable DTMs now exist for the Moon from 100m up to 1m. I will show examples of these DEM/DTM datasets

  15. Characteristics of active spectral sensor for plant sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination conditions critically affect sensor response. Active spectral sensors minimize the illumination effects by producing their ...

  16. Remote Sensing of Potential Biosignatures from Rocky, Liquid, or Icy (Exo)Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, Olivier; Frey, Joachim; Roditi, Isabel; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Thomas, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    To detect signs of life by remote sensing on objects of our Solar System and on exoplanets, the characterization of light scattered by surface life material could complement possible clues given by the atmospheric composition. We reviewed the reflectance spectra of a broad selection of major biomolecules that constitute terrestrial carbon-based life from 0.4 to 2.4 μm, and we discuss their detectability through atmospheric spectral windows. Biomolecule features in the near-infrared (0.8-2.4 μm) will likely be obscured by water spectral features and some atmospheric gases. The visible range (0.4-0.8 μm), including the strong spectral features of pigments, is the most favorable. We investigated the detectability of a pigmented microorganism (Deinococcus radiodurans) when mixed with silica sand, liquid water, and water-ice particles representative of diverse surfaces of potentially habitable worlds. We measured the visible to near-infrared reflectance spectra (0.4-2.4 μm) and the visible phase curves (at 0.45 and 0.75 μm) of the mixtures to assess how the surface medium and the viewing geometry affect the detectability of the microorganisms. The results show that ice appears to be the most favorable medium for the detection of pigments. Water ice is bright and featureless from 0.4 to 0.8 μm, allowing the absorption of any pigment present in the ice to be well noticeable. We found that the visible phase curve of water ice is the most strongly affected by the presence of pigments, with variations of the spectral slope by more than a factor of 3 with phase angles. Finally, we show that the sublimation of the ice results in the concentration of the biological material onto the surface and the consequent increase of its signal. These results have applications to the search for life on icy worlds, such as Europa or Enceladus.

  17. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  18. Daily sea surface salinity variability in the tropical Pacific Ocean derived from satellite remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Portabella, Marcos; Martinez, Justino; Hoareau, Nina

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a multifractal data fusion algorithm is used to obtain daily sea surface salinity (SSS) maps from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Level 2 (L2) data. The L2 SSS retrievals are obtained from the brightness temperature reconstructions at different polarizations and incidence angles along the satellite swath. SMOS L2 data have a spatial resolution of about 43 km and accuracy between 0.6 to 1.7 (in the practical salinity scale). The main goal of the data fusion algorithm is to use the reliable information of the OSTIA sea surface temperature (SST) daily fields to increase the spatial and temporal resolution of the SMOS L2 SSS data. Our SMOS dataset consists of the European Space Agency (ESA) L2 v620 reprocessed data from January 2010 to May 2015, and of the latest L2 operational data (near real-time) version after May 2015. Salinity anomalies are constructed by removing the five-year average of the L2 salinity data as a function of the geographical position, the overpass orientation (ascending or descending), and the across-track distance to the center of the swath. The SMOS-based climatologies evidence the existence of strong systematic artifacts, especially near the coast and, as such, they allow retrieving some of the systematic errors present in the original L2 data. The 0.05-degree, daily SST product from OSTIA is used as a template in our scalar fusion algorithm to generate 0.05 degree, daily SSS maps. The resulting SSS maps are less noisy and better define the main geophysical structures as compared to the standard high-level SSS products. Differences against near-surface Argo salinity measurements are reduced by 40% with respect to the standard products. In order to assess the significance of the extrapolation to the time domain, data from the Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array are used. The results indicate that the small time-scale variability present in the mooring data are not completely reproduced by remote sensing, although data

  19. The contribution of Remote Sensing to the Indian Land Surface Processes Experiment (LASPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.; Vijayan, D.; Prasad, T.

    During the conduct of the Indian Land Surface Processes (LSP) Experiment (LASPEX) in Sabarmati river basin, tower based measurements for wind, temperature and humidity fields were collected over 5 locations with primary and intensive ground based observations at Anand, Gujarat. Remote sensing component consisted of (a) ground based measurements of spectral radiances in 3 nm bandwidth (hyperspectral) in visible through near IR region; in blue, green, red and near IR bands of IRS LISS and LANDSAT TM; leaf area index (LAI); crop and air temperatures over Anand site; (b) crop distribution information in Anand -Kandha - Derol region to relate with satellite based measurements in 36,72,188 and 1100 m spatial resolutions. Fourth order polynomial fit was observed between LAI and spectral vegetation indices for wheat. By convolving respective filter functions with 3 nm bandwidth measurements, NDVI for bandwidths corresponding to TM and AVHRR were found to be correlated with r' in 0.96 - 0.99 range, and higher value observed for AVHRR NDVI was related to additional 725 - 760 nm bandwidth in AVHRR near IR band. Hyperspectral index defined by (R77 7-R747 )/R 673 , Rrefers to reflectance in wavelength centered at , was useful in discriminating low evapotranspiration (ET) chickpea and high ET wheat. Using hyperspectral data, 650-673 nm and 760-830 nm were found as optimum spectral region for computing NDVI; and relationships between LAI and various pigment indices and red-edge indices were studied. Using 1100 m resolution A VHRR data, the relationship between NDVI and roughness parameter (computed from tower based measurements) in direct as well as fractal based mode had been developed. The surface temperature over the region was obtained using split thermal window algorithm and NDVI as surrogate parameter to define relative contribution of emissivity for soil and crop components in the pixel. Sensible heat flux, computed using AVHRR data based roughness parameter and surface

  20. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of quorum sensing peptides and Peptide analogues against oral biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    LoVetri, Karen; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance is a major incentive for the investigation of novel ways to treat or prevent infections. Much effort has been put into the discovery of peptides in nature accompanied by manipulation of natural peptides to improve activity and decrease toxicity. The ever increasing knowledge about bacteria and the discovery of quorum sensing have presented itself as another mechanism to disrupt the infection process. We have shown that the natural quorum sensing (QS) peptide, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), used by the caries causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans when used in higher than normally present concentrations can actually contribute to cell death in S. mutans. Using an analogue of this quorum sensing peptide (KBI-3221), we have shown it to be beneficial at decreasing biofilm of various Streptococcus species. This chapter looks at a number of assay methods to test the inhibitory effects of quorum sensing peptides and their analogues on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria.

  1. Flexible shrink-induced high surface area electrodes for electrochemiluminescent sensing.

    PubMed

    Pegan, Jonathan D; Ho, Adrienne Y; Bachman, Mark; Khine, Michelle

    2013-11-07

    Photolithographically defined metallic thin film on commodity shrink-wrap is leveraged to create robust electrodes. By thermally shrinking the film, electrodes are reduced by 20× in footprint for improved resolution and conductivity with >600% enhancements in electrochemically active surface area; as electrochemiluminescent sensors, they demonstrate improved limits of detection.

  2. An innovative application of time-domain spectroscopy on localized surface plasmon resonance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng-Chi; Chang, Ying-Feng; Wang, Huai-Yi; Lin, Yu-Xen; Kuo, Chien-Cheng; Annie Ho, Ja-An; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Su, Li-Chen

    2017-03-01

    White-light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is often used to study the surface profiles and properties of thin films because the strength of the technique lies in its ability to provide fast and high resolution measurements. An innovative attempt is made in this paper to apply WLSI as a time-domain spectroscopic system for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing. A WLSI-based spectrometer is constructed with a breadboard of WLSI in combination with a spectral centroid algorithm for noise reduction and performance improvement. Experimentally, the WLSI-based spectrometer exhibits a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.2 × 10‑3 refractive index units (RIU), which is better than that obtained with a conventional UV-Vis spectrometer, by resolving the LSPR peak shift. Finally, the bio-applicability of the proposed spectrometer was investigated using the rs242557 tau gene, an Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease biomarker. The LOD was calculated as 15 pM. These results demonstrate that the proposed WLSI-based spectrometer could become a sensitive time-domain spectroscopic biosensing platform.

  3. Long-range surface plasmons supported by a bilayer metallic structure for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Zekriti, M; Nesterenko, Dmitry V; Sekkat, Z

    2015-03-10

    We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that long-range surface plasmons (LRSPs) are supported by asymmetric structure, consisting of a thin silver/gold bilayer metallic film sandwiched between a magnesium fluoride (i.e., MgF2) buffer layer and a sensing medium (water). The geometrical parameters of the structure are optimized to yield efficient excitation of LRSPs by using transfer matrix method based on Fresnel reflection. The excitation of LRSPs was performed by using a custom-made automated optical setup based on angular interrogation with the precision of 0.01°. We demonstrate that the bimetallic asymmetric structure achieves better minimum reflectivity resolution than monometallic (gold) asymmetric structure. Finally, figures of merit are compared for bimetallic, monometallic, and conventional SPR structures, and we found that the bimetallic asymmetric structure provides a higher figure of merit; e.g., more than double for monometallic LRSP configuration and 8 times as compared to the conventional surface plasmon resonance sensor.

  4. Remote sensing of directional wave spectra using the surface contour radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hines, D. E.; Kenney, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    A unique radio-oceanographic remote sensing instrument was developed. The 36 GHz airborne Surface Contour Radar (SCR) remotely produces a real-time topographical map of the sea surface beneath the aircraft. It can routinely produce ocean directional wave spectra with off-line data processing. The transmitter is a coherent dual-frequency device that uses pulse compression to compensate for the limited available power at Ka band. The radar has selectable pulse widths of 1, 2, 4, and 10 nanoseconds. The transmitting antenna is a 58 lambda horn fed dielectric lens whose axis is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. It illuminates an elliptical mirror which is oriented 45 deg to the lens' longitudinal axis to deflect the beam towards the region beneath the aircraft. The mirror is oscillated in a sinusoidal fashion through mechanical linkages driven to a variable speed motor to scan the transmitter beam (1.2 deg X 1.2 deg) with + or - 16 deg of the perpendicular to the aircraft wings in the plane perpendicular to the aircraft flight direction.

  5. Mapping Surface Soil Organic Carbon for Crop Fields with Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Feng; Kissel, David E.; West, Larry T.; Rickman, Doug; Luvall, J. C.; Adkins, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The organic C concentration of surface soil can be used in agricultural fields to vary crop production inputs. Organic C is often highly spatially variable, so that maps of soil organic C can be used to vary crop production inputs using precision farming technology. The objective of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping soil organic C on three fields, using remotely sensed images of the fields with a bare surface. Enough soil samples covering the range in soil organic C must be taken from each field to develop a satisfactory relationship between soil organic C content and image reflectance values. The number of soil samples analyzed in the three fields varied from 22 to 26. The regression equations differed between fields, but gave highly significant relationships with R2 values of 0.93, 0.95, and 0.89 for the three fields. A comparison of predicted and measured values of soil organic C for an independent set of 2 soil samples taken on one of the fields gave highly satisfactory results, with a comparison equation of % organic C measured + 1.02% organic C predicted, with r2 = 0.87.

  6. An innovative application of time-domain spectroscopy on localized surface plasmon resonance sensing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Chi; Chang, Ying-Feng; Wang, Huai-Yi; Lin, Yu-Xen; Kuo, Chien-Cheng; Annie Ho, Ja-an; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Su, Li-Chen

    2017-01-01

    White-light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is often used to study the surface profiles and properties of thin films because the strength of the technique lies in its ability to provide fast and high resolution measurements. An innovative attempt is made in this paper to apply WLSI as a time-domain spectroscopic system for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing. A WLSI-based spectrometer is constructed with a breadboard of WLSI in combination with a spectral centroid algorithm for noise reduction and performance improvement. Experimentally, the WLSI-based spectrometer exhibits a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.2 × 10−3 refractive index units (RIU), which is better than that obtained with a conventional UV-Vis spectrometer, by resolving the LSPR peak shift. Finally, the bio-applicability of the proposed spectrometer was investigated using the rs242557 tau gene, an Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease biomarker. The LOD was calculated as 15 pM. These results demonstrate that the proposed WLSI-based spectrometer could become a sensitive time-domain spectroscopic biosensing platform. PMID:28281689

  7. An innovative application of time-domain spectroscopy on localized surface plasmon resonance sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Chi; Chang, Ying-Feng; Wang, Huai-Yi; Lin, Yu-Xen; Kuo, Chien-Cheng; Annie Ho, Ja-An; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Su, Li-Chen

    2017-03-10

    White-light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is often used to study the surface profiles and properties of thin films because the strength of the technique lies in its ability to provide fast and high resolution measurements. An innovative attempt is made in this paper to apply WLSI as a time-domain spectroscopic system for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing. A WLSI-based spectrometer is constructed with a breadboard of WLSI in combination with a spectral centroid algorithm for noise reduction and performance improvement. Experimentally, the WLSI-based spectrometer exhibits a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.2 × 10(-3) refractive index units (RIU), which is better than that obtained with a conventional UV-Vis spectrometer, by resolving the LSPR peak shift. Finally, the bio-applicability of the proposed spectrometer was investigated using the rs242557 tau gene, an Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease biomarker. The LOD was calculated as 15 pM. These results demonstrate that the proposed WLSI-based spectrometer could become a sensitive time-domain spectroscopic biosensing platform.

  8. Ionic surface active compounds in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Sukhapan, Jariya; Brimblecombe, Peter

    2002-04-27

    Surfactants in the atmosphere have several potential roles in atmospheric chemistry. They can form films on aqueous surfaces, which lowers the surface tension and possibly delays water evaporation and gaseous transportation across the aqueous interface. They can also increase the solubility of organic compounds in the aqueous phase. Recently, the decrease of surface tension in cloud growing droplets has been suggested as relevant to increases in the number of droplets of smaller size, potentially enhancing cloud albedo. Natural surfactants in the lung aid gas transfer and influence the dissolution rate of aerosol particles, so surfactants in atmospheric aerosols, once inhaled, may interact with pulmonary surfactants. Ambient aerosols were collected from the edge of Norwich, a small city in a largely agricultural region of England, and analysed for surfactants. Methylene blue, a conventional dye for detecting anionic surfactants, has been used as a colorimetric agent. The concentration of surfactants expressed as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) is in the range of 6-170 pmol m(-3)(air). A negative correlation with chloride aerosol indicates that these surfactants are probably not the well-known surfactants derived from marine spray. A more positive correlation with aerosol nitrate and gaseous NOx supports an association with more polluted inland air masses. The surfactants found in aerosols seem to be relatively strong acids, compared with weaker acids such as the long-chain carboxylic acids previously proposed as atmospheric surfactants. Surfactants from the oxidation of organic materials (perhaps vegetation- or soil-derived) seem a likely source of these substances in the atmosphere.

  9. Understanding Monthly Land Surface Relationships at the Continental Scale Using Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, R. D.; Mehra, V.; Kumar, P.; Bajcsy, P.; Tcheng, D.

    2006-12-01

    In the past few decades, remotely sensed Earth observation data has been gathered at rates now on the order of tens of terabytes per day. These collections of data are valuable reserves of "scientific ore." However, mining the ore for useful science has been challenging due to the sheer volume of data, esoteric formats, varying temporal scales, and varying spatial scales. Regardless, the wide geographic and temporal ranges allow investigations at scales inaccessible by other presently existing methods. We developed a technology called GeoLearn to facilitate data preparation and basic exploration so this data can be more readily available for scientific purposes. GeoLearn is used to prepare the data which we examine for relationships between several land surface variables across the entire continental USA during each month in the summer of 2004. We employ two approaches: k-means style clustering and regression tree approaches. Using k-means, we try to identify geographic regions of similarity using only remotely sensed characteristics. The resulting geographic regions often, but not always, correspond to EPA ecoregion boundaries. Using regressions trees, we try to predict a greenness index (EVI) based on other characteristics. In this case, the differing resolutions of the datasets became important. EVI is the most detailed variable we use. Since regression trees are capable of quite detailed approximations, the best naive model turns out to be based on the one or two most detailed explanatory variables. This results in a model which merely uses the explanatory variables as ID numbers rather than identifying any general relationships. We are able to develop alternative models which maintain flexibility without succumbing to the "ID number" problem as easily. These models allow us to identify what variables are most important for determining vegetation greenness at continental scales as well as how those relationships changed throughout the summer of 2004.

  10. Zinc activates damage-sensing TRPA1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongzhen; Bandell, Michael; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhu, Michael X.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential biological trace element. It is required for the structure or function of over 300 proteins, and is increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. However, high concentrations of zinc have cytotoxic effects, and overexposure to zinc can cause pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that zinc excites nociceptive somatosensory neurons and causes nociception in mice through TRPA1, a cation channel previously shown to mediate the pungency of wasabi and cinnamon through cysteine-modification. Zinc activates TRPA1 through a novel mechanism that requires zinc influx through TRPA1 channels and subsequent activation via specific intracellular cysteine and histidine residues. TRPA1 is highly sensitive to intracellular zinc, as low nanomolar concentrations activate TRPA1 and modulate its sensitivity. These findings identify TRPA1 as a major target for the sensory effects of zinc, and support an emerging role for zinc as a signaling molecule that can modulate sensory transmission. PMID:19202543

  11. Dynamical quorum sensing and clustering dynamics in a population of spatially distributed active rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2013-02-01

    A model of clustering dynamics is proposed for a population of spatially distributed active rotators. A transition from excitable to oscillatory dynamics is induced by the increase of the local density of active rotators. It is interpreted as dynamical quorum sensing. In the oscillation regime, phase waves propagate without decay, which generates an effectively long-range interaction in the clustering dynamics. The clustering process becomes facilitated and only one dominant cluster appears rapidly as a result of the dynamical quorum sensing. An exact localized solution is found to a simplified model equation, and the competitive dynamics between two localized states is studied numerically.

  12. Interannual Trends in Southern Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures and Sea Level from Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. A.

    As is shown in last years researches climate changes in Antarctic result in interannual increase trend of surface air temperature and decrease of ice thickness These tendencies are must try in the Southern Ocean hydrological regime For that next remote sensing data AVHRR MCSST data and satellite altimetry data merged data of mission ERS TOPEX Poseidon Jason-1 ENVISAT GFO-1 are used to this task which give information about sea surface temperature SST and sea level anomaly SLA correspondingly According to obtained results SST has positive trend more 0 01 oC yr for 23-yr record 1982-2005 within 300-1000 km northward Antarctic coast However on average for the Southern Ocean SST have negative trend about -0 018 -0 035 oC yr In area of Pacific-Antarctic Ridge and of southern part of Mid Atlantic Ridge decrease rate is more than -0 075 oC yr SLA increases in all area of the Southern Ocean and has average rate about 0 024 -0 026 cm yr for 12-yr record 1993-2005 Around Antarctic SST rate good correspond with the trend analysis of surface air temperature of 8722 0 042 - 0 067oC yr inferred from the satellite 20-yr record Comiso 2000 Nevertheless the observed cooling is intriguing especially since it is compatible with the observed trend in the sea ice cover In the sea ice regions the northernmost positions of the ice edge are shown to be influenced by alternating warm and cold anomalies around the continent This work was partly supported by the Russian Fund of Basic Research Grant 06-05-65061

  13. Method of Stamping Surface-Enhance Raman Spectroscopy for Label-Free, Multiplexed, Molecular Sensing and Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Wei-Chuan (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present disclosure relates the use of a stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS) technique with nanoporous gold disk (NPGD) plasmonic substrates to produce a label-free, multiplexed molecular sensing and imaging technique. A NPGD SERS substrate is stamped onto a surface containing one or more target molecules, followed by SERS measurement of the target molecules located between the surface and SERS substrate. The target molecules may be deposited on the surface, which may be a carrier substrate such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).

  14. Implementation of Active Teaching Methods and Emerging Topics in Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmatin Fras, M.; Grigillo, D.

    2016-06-01

    Fast technological developments in photogrammetry and remote sensing areas demand quick and steady changes in the education programme and its realization. The university teachers and assistants are faced with ensuring the learning materials, data and software for practical lessons, as well as project proposals for student's team work and bachelor or master thesis. In this paper the emerging topics that already have a considerable impact in the practice are treated mostly from the educational aspect. These relatively new topics that are considered in this paper are unmanned aerial systems for spatial data collection, terrestrial and aerial laser scanning, mobile mapping systems, and novelties in satellite remote sensing. The focus is given to practical implementation of these topics into the teaching and learning programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation at the University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, and experiences gained by the authors so far. Together with the technological advances, the teaching approaches must be modernized as well. Classical approaches of teaching, where a lecturer gives lecture ex cathedra and students are only listeners, are not effective enough. The didactics science of teaching has developed and proved in the practice many useful approaches that can better motivate students for more active learning. We can use different methods of team work like pro et contra debate, buzzing groups, press conference, moderated discussion etc. An experimental study on active teaching methods in the class of students of the Master programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation has been made and the results are presented. After using some new teaching methods in the class, the students were asked to answer two types of a questionnaire. First questionnaire was the standard form developed by Noel Entwistle, an educational psychologist who developed the Approaches to Studying Inventory (ASI) for identifying deep and surface approaches to

  15. Surface activity of solid particles with extremely rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-15

    The solid particles are adsorbed at liquid-liquid interfaces and form self-assembled structures when the particles have suitable wettability to both liquids. Here, we show theoretically how the extreme roughness on the particle surface affects their adsorption properties. In our previous work, we discussed the adsorption behavior of the solid particles with microstructured surfaces using the so-called Wenzel model [Y. Nonomura et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006) 13124]. In the present study, the wettability and the adsorbed position of the particles with extremely rough surfaces are studied based on the Cassie-Baxter model. We predict that the adsorbed position and the interfacial energy depend on the interfacial tensions between the solid and liquid phases, the radius of the particle, and the fraction of the particle surface area that is in contact with the external liquid phase. Interestingly, the initial state of the system governs whether the particle is adsorbed at the interface or not. The shape of the particle is also an important factor which governs the adsorbed position. The disk-shaped particle and the spherical particle which is partially covered with the extremely rough surface, i.e. Janus particle, are adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface in an oriented state. We should consider not only the interfacial tensions, but also the surface structure and the particle shape to control the adsorption behavior of the particle.

  16. Surface plasmon amplification and active nonreciprocal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami Keshmarzi, Elham; Tait, R. Niall; Berini, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we review our recent work on active plasmonic structures composed of optically pumped dye molecules infiltrated in a polymer host as the cladding of long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) structures. In particular, concepts for distributed Bragg and distributed feedback (DBR/DFB) lasers, and a spatially non-reciprocal Bragg grating (NRBG) are reviewed. The LRSPP Bragg grating is a fundamental element in these devices which is created by stepping the width of a metal stripe to produce modulation of refractive index. The gain medium in all of these active devices is assumed to be a thin film (~1μm) of polymer (poly (methyl methacrylate)) doped with organic laser dye molecules IR- 140. The gain medium is assumed pumped optically through the top of the devices via 10 ns laser pulses at 810 nm with 500 kW/cm2 power intensity to enable stimulated emission at 880 nm. The maximum material gain coefficient of this medium was measured independently as 68 cm-1.

  17. Making Sense of Total VET Activity: An Initial Market Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2016

    2016-01-01

    Following the successful first national publication of total vocational education and training (VET) activity and presentation of various informative data products, NCVER has continued to undertake further analysis of the submitted data. This paper is the first in a suite of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) authored…

  18. Regional mapping of carbon, water, and energy land-surface fluxes using remotely sensed indicators of canopy light use efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remotely sensed data allow for indirect estimates of key biophysical and biochemical parameters needed for accurate and reliable assessments of land-surface carbon, energy and water fluxes. Biophysical parameters such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), which provides information useful for determining vari...

  19. Experimental validation of a millimeter wave radar technique to remotely sense atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a millimeter wave radar operating on the NASA CV-990 aircraft which validate the technique for remotely sensing atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface are described. Measurements show that the precise millimeter wave observations needed to deduce pressure from space with an accuracy of 1 mb are possible, that sea surface reflection properties agree with theory and that the measured variation of differential absorption with altitude corresponds to that expected from spectroscopic models.

  20. Synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Yang, Kun; Deng, Ming; Liu, Cun

    2014-03-01

    The knowledge of impervious surfaces, especially the magnitude, location, geometry, spatial pattern of impervious surfaces, is significant to urban ecosystem studies, including urban hydrology, urban climate, land use planning and resource management.Impervious surface area (ISA) is considered a key indicator of environmental quality and can be used to address complex urban environmental issues, particularly those related to the health of urban watersheds. ISA is also an indicator of non-point source pollution or polluted runoff. Remote sensing offers a consistent framework for representing spatial patterns and rates of urbanization over time through accurate observations of impervious surface area. Most of the existing methods of extracting impervious surface based on remote sensing concentrate on an urban scale, but the rapid and accurate methods of extracting impervious surfaces in a basin scale are nearly nonexistent in China and abroad. In recent years,with the rapid urbanization especially surrounding the Dianchi water body, the impervious surface coverage rate also grows rapidly and results in severe degradation of basin water environment within Dianchi watershed. In this study, we developed an approach to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin by synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery. Subpixel percent impervious surfaces at Thematic Mapper (TM) images were mapped using the classification and regression tree(CART) algorithm. Sub-pixel impervious surfaces at 30m resolution were mapped in this study area through regression tree models. The estimated ISA results were evaluated through independent ISA reference data derived from high resolution QuickBird. The results prove the suitability of the approach for a widely automated and mapping of impervious surfaces in a basin scale.

  1. A hidden state space modeling approach for improving glacier surface velocity estimates using remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, D.; Schubert, A.; Small, D.; Meier, E.; Lüthi, M. P.; Vieli, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new method for glacier surface velocity (GSV) estimates is proposed here which combines ground- and space-based measurements with hidden state space modeling (HSSM). Examples of such a fusion of physical models with remote sensing (RS) observations were described in (Henke & Meier, Hidden State Space Models for Improved Remote Sensing Applications, ITISE 2014, p. 1242-1255) and are currently adapted for GSV estimation. GSV can be estimated using in situ measurements, RS methods or numerical simulations based on ice-flow models. In situ measurements ensure high accuracy but limited coverage and time consuming field work, while RS methods offer regular observations with high spatial coverage generally not possible with in situ methods. In particular, spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) can obtain useful images independent of daytime and cloud cover. A ground portable radar interferometer (GPRI) is useful for investigating a particular area in more detail than is possible from space, but provides local coverage only. Several processing methods for deriving GSV from radar sensors have been established, including interferometry and offset tracking (Schubert et al, Glacier surface velocity estimation using repeat TerraSAR-X images. ISPRS Journal of P&RS, p. 49-62, 2013). On the other hand, it is also possible to derive glacier parameters from numerical ice-flow modeling alone. Given a well-parameterized model, GSV can in theory be derived and propagated continuously in time. However, uncertainties in the glacier flow dynamics and model errors increase with excessive propagation. All of these methods have been studied independently, but attempts to combine them have only rarely been made. The HSSM we propose recursively estimates the GSV based on 1) a process model making use of temporal and spatial interdependencies between adjacent states, and 2) observations (RS and optional in situ). The in situ and GPRI images currently being processed were acquired in the

  2. Effects of the Antenna Aperture on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; LeVine, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Remote sensing of sea surface salinity with sufficient accuracy to meet the needs of global oceanography is a challenging task. The global variability of the salinity signal in the open ocean is only a few Kelvin even at L-band and an accuracy on the order of 0.1K is desired to study the influence of salinity on ocean circulation and energy exchange with the atmosphere. On the other hand, resolution is not an issue for understanding the dynamics of the open ocean where scales of hundreds of km are not uncommon. This permits remote sensing with large antenna footprints and spatial averaging to reduce noise. However, antennas with large footprints introduce other problems. For example, the angle of incidence and hence the brightness temperature varies over the footprint. Similarly, the polarization of brightness temperature relative to the antenna ports changes. Studies have been conducted using antenna patterns representative of the antenna that will be flown on the Aquarius mission to examine these effects. Aquarius is a pushbroom style radiometer with three beams looking across track away from the sun. The beams are at incidences angles (at the spacecraft) of about 26.5, 34 and 40 degrees each with a half-power beam width of about 5.8 degrees. It is shown that the measured brightness temperature is biased relative to the value at boresight because of changes across the field of view. The bias can be as much as 4K and positive or negative depending on polarization. Polarization mixing because of the variations of the local plane of incidence across the footprint also occur and can result in biased polarimetric measurements. A bias in the third Stokes parameter of as much as 0.4K is possible. Such effects may affect algorithms that use the third Stokes parameter to correct for Faraday rotation. Another issue associated with the antenna is sun glint. This is an issue determined by surface roughness and antenna sidelobes. Examples will be given for the random

  3. Development and Validation of Remote Sensing-Based Surface Inundation Products for Vector-Borne Disease Risk in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; McDonald, K. C.; Ceccato, P.; Schroeder, R.; Podest, E.

    2014-12-01

    The potential impact of climate variability and change on the spread of infectious disease is of increasingly critical concern to public health. Newly-available remote sensing datasets may be combined with predictive modeling to develop new capabilities to mitigate risks of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, and rift valley fever. We have developed improved remote sensing-based products for monitoring water bodies and inundation dynamics that have potential utility for improving risk forecasts of vector-borne disease epidemics. These products include daily and seasonal surface inundation based on the global mappings of inundated area fraction derived at the 25-km scale from active and passive microwave instruments ERS, QuikSCAT, ASCAT, and SSM/I data - the Satellite Water Microwave Product Series (SWAMPS). Focusing on the East African region, we present validation of this product using multi-temporal classification of inundated areas in this region derived from high resolution PALSAR (100m) and Landsat (30m) observations. We assess historical occurrence of malaria in the east African country of Eritrea with respect to the time series SWAMPS datasets, and we aim to construct a framework for use of these new datasets to improve prediction of future malaria risk in this region. This work is supported through funding from the NASA Applied Sciences Program, the NASA Terrestrial Ecology Program, and the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program. This study is also supported and monitored by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under Grant - CREST Grant # NA11SEC4810004. The statements contained within the manuscript/research article are not the opinions of the funding agency or the U.S. government, but reflect the authors' opinions. This work was conducted in part under the framework of the ALOS Kyoto and Carbon Initiative. ALOS PALSAR data were provided by JAXA EORC.

  4. Utilization of Hydrologic Remote Sensing Data in Land Surface Modeling and Data Assimilation: Current Status and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Reichl, Rolf; Harrison, Kenneth; Santanello, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technologies have enabled the monitoring and measurement of the Earth's land surface at an unprecedented scale and frequency. The myriad of these land surface observations must be integrated with the state-of-the-art land surface model forecasts using data assimilation to generate spatially and temporally coherent estimates of environmental conditions. These analyses are of critical importance to real-world applications such as agricultural production, water resources management and flood, drought, weather and climate prediction. This need motivated the development of NASA Land Information System (LIS), which is an expert system encapsulating a suite of modeling, computational and data assimilation tools required to address challenging hydrological problems. LIS integrates the use of several community land surface models, use of ground and satellite based observations, data assimilation and uncertainty estimation techniques and high performance computing and data management tools to enable the assessment and prediction of hydrologic conditions at various spatial and temporal scales of interest. This presentation will focus on describing the results, challenges and lessons learned from the use of remote sensing data for improving land surface modeling, within LIS. More specifically, studies related to the improved estimation of soil moisture, snow and land surface temperature conditions through data assimilation will be discussed. The presentation will also address the characterization of uncertainty in the modeling process through Bayesian remote sensing and computational methods.

  5. Does Active Learning through an Antisense Jigsaw Make Sense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetharaman, Mahadevan; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2003-12-01

    Three journal articles on nucleic acid antisense modification strategies were assigned to 12 students as part of an active learning "jigsaw" exercise for a graduate-level chemistry course on nucleic acids. Each student was required to read one of the three articles. This assignment was preceded by an hour-long lecture on the basic concepts in antisense antigene technology. On the day of the jigsaw, the students with the same article (three groups of four students) discussed their article briefly, and then formed four new groups where no one had read the same article. Each student spent about five minutes teaching his or her article to the other group members, using specific questions provided to guide the discussion. This exercise laid the foundation for bringing the discussion to the entire class, where most of the students actively participated. To test the students' comprehension of the reading materials, a problem set was designed that required not only an understanding of the three articles, but also application of the concepts learned. The effectiveness of this active learning strategy and its applicability to other topics are discussed in this article.

  6. Quantification of fatigue cracking in CT specimens with passive and active piezoelectric sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianguo; Ziehl, Paul; Zarate, Boris; Caicedo, Juan; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Metrovich, Brian; Matta, Fabio

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of fatigue cracks in steel bridges is of interest to bridge owners and agencies. Monitoring of fatigue cracks has been attempted with acoustic emission using either resonant or broadband sensors. One drawback of passive sensing is that the data is limited to that caused by growing cracks. In this work, passive emission was complemented with active sensing (piezoelectric wafer active sensors) for enhanced detection capabilities. Passive and active sensing methods were described for fatigue crack monitoring on specialized compact tension specimens. The characteristics of acoustic emission were obtained to understand the correlation of acoustic emission behavior and crack growth. Crack and noise induced signals were interpreted through Swansong II Filter and waveform-based approaches, which are appropriate for data interpretation of field tests. Upon detection of crack extension, active sensing was activated to measure the crack size. Model updating techniques were employed to minimize the difference between the numerical results and experimental data. The long term objective of this research is to develop an in-service prognostic system to monitor structural health and to assess the remaining fatigue life.

  7. The relationship among sea surface roughness variations, oceanographic analyses, and airborne remote sensing analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oertel, G. F.; Wade, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was studied to determine whether it could image large scale estuaries and oceanic features such as fronts and to explain the electromagnetic interaction between SAR and the individual surface front features. Fronts were observed to occur at the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. The airborne measurements consisted of data collection by SAR onboard an F-4 aircraft and real aperture side looking radar (SLAR) in Mohawk aircraft. A total of 89 transects were flown. Surface roughness and color as well as temperature and salinity were evaluated. Cross-frontal surveys were made. Frontal shear and convergence flow were obtained. Surface active organic materials, it was indicated, are present at the air-sea interface. In all, 2000 analyses were conducted to characterize the spatial and temporal variabilities associated with water mass boundaries.

  8. Geometry sensing through POR1 regulates Rac1 activity controlling early osteoblast differentiation in response to nanofiber diameter.

    PubMed

    Higgins, A M; Banik, B L; Brown, J L

    2015-02-01

    Bone grafting procedures in the United States rely heavily upon autografts and allografts, which are donor-dependent, cause donor site pain, and can transmit disease. Synthetic bone grafts can reduce these risks; however, synthetics lack the bone differentiating (osteoinductive) abilities of auto- and allografts. Achieving innate osteoinductive properties of synthetics through surface modifications is currently under investigation. This study focuses on nanofibers, with emphasis on how fiber diameter and the potential curvature sensor POR1 affect the activation of the signaling molecules Rac1 and Arf1, and leading to expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an osteoinductive marker. Diameters of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 μm were compared against a flat control. The highest level of Rac1 activation was achieved on the smallest fibers (0.1 μm), a trend that was lost in POR1 knockdowns. This supports the hypothesis that on small nanofibers, POR1 favorably binds to highly curved cell membranes, which allows Rac1 to subsequently dissociate and activate. When the curvature is insufficient to bind POR1, POR1 binds to inactive Rac1 and competitively inhibits its activation. Arf1 activation followed an opposite trend, with the largest nanofibers exhibiting the highest activity. This trend reinforces the known interaction between Rac1 and Arf1 through the GIT-PIX complex, an Arf1 GAP and Rac1 GEF, respectively. Large, (1.0 μm), nanofibers demonstrated the highest ALP activity, indicating that ALP expression is inversely dependent on Rac1 activation. Knockdown of POR1 resulted in increased ALP activity across the substrates but without regard to the curvature sensing trend seen previously. Thus, POR1 senses curvature and increases Rac1 activity, which negatively regulates bone differentiation.

  9. Interactive Change Detection Using High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Active Learning with Gaussian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Hui; Yu, Huai; Huang, Pingping; Yang, Wen

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  10. Potential association of dengue hemorrhagic fever incidence and remote senses land surface temperature, Thailand, 1998.

    PubMed

    Nitatpattana, Narong; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Kiyoshi, Honda; Andrianasolo, Haja; Yoksan, Sutee; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Barbazan, Philippe

    2007-05-01

    A pilot study was designed to analyze a potential association between dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) incidence and, temperature computed by satellite. DHF is a mosquito transmitted disease, and water vapor and humidity are known to have a positive effect on mosquito life by increasing survival time and shortening the development cycle. Among other available satellite data, Land Surface Temperature (LST) was chosen as an indicator that combined radiated earth temperature and atmospheric water vapor concentration. Monthly DHF incidence was recorded by province during the 1998 epidemic and obtained as a weekly combined report available from the National Ministry of Public Health. Conversely, LST was calculated using remotely sensed data obtained from thermal infrared sensors of NOAA satellites and computed on a provincial scale. Out of nine selected study provinces, five (58.3%) exhibited an LST with a significant positive correlation with rainfall (p < 0.05). In four out of nineteen surveyed provinces (21.3%), LST showed a significant positive correlation with DHF incidence (p < 0.05). Positive association between LST and DHF incidence was significantly correlated in 75% of the cases during non-epidemic months, while no correlation was found during epidemic months. Non-climatic factors are supposed to be at the origin of this discrepancy between seasonality in climate (LST) and DHF incidence during epidemics.

  11. An efficient compressive sensing based PS-DInSAR method for surface deformation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. T.; Xu, H. P.; Shan, L.; Liu, W.; Chen, G. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Permanent scatterers differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PS-DInSAR) is a technique for detecting surface micro-deformation, with an accuracy at the centimeter to millimeter level. However, its performance is limited by the number of SAR images available (normally more than 20 are needed). Compressive sensing (CS) has been proven to be an effective signal recovery method with only a very limited number of measurements. Applying CS to PS-DInSAR, a novel CS-PS-DInSAR method is proposed to estimate the deformation with fewer SAR images. By analyzing the PS-DInSAR process in detail, first the sparsity representation of deformation velocity difference is obtained; then, the mathematical model of CS-PS-DInSAR is derived and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of the measurement matrix is discussed to validate the proposed CS-PS-DInSAR in theory. The implementation of CS-PS-DInSAR is achieved by employing basis pursuit algorithms to estimate the deformation velocity. With the proposed method, DInSAR deformation estimation can be achieved by a much smaller number of SAR images, as demonstrated by simulation results.

  12. Remote sensing of plasma motion and turbulence near the Alfvén surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Despite a rich nearly-century-long history, Thomson scattering has not been fully exploited as a remote-sensing tool in the corona and nascent solar wind. In particular, stable deep-space coronagraphs such as SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI enable time-dependent, photometric analyses that transcend basic feature tracking and brightness estimation. These techniques offer direct insight into the plasma conditions in the outer corona. In particular, fluctuations in the outer coronal brightness comprise both the familiar inhomogeneous "blobs" of material first tracked quantitatively with SOHO/LASCO, and also a recently-discovered compressive wave field that permits remote probing of the plasma even though individual wave fronts do not stand out visually. I will discuss recent and current measurements of this wave field in the outer corona as a means to probe outer coronal heating and wind acceleration near the transition from corona to heliosphere (known as the Alfvén surface); and present current results from a study of the transition from mostly smooth to mostly turbulent flow in the nascent solar wind.

  13. Integration of remote sensing and surface geophysics in the detection of faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, P. L.; Shuchman, R. A.; Wagner, H.; Ruskey, F.

    1977-01-01

    Remote sensing was included in a comprehensive investigation of the use of geophysical techniques to aid in underground mine placement. The primary objective was to detect faults and slumping, features which, due to structural weakness and excess water, cause construction difficulties and safety hazards in mine construction. Preliminary geologic reconnaissance was performed on a potential site for an underground oil shale mine in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. LANDSAT data, black and white aerial photography and 3 cm radar imagery were obtained. LANDSAT data were primarily used in optical imagery and digital tape forms, both of which were analyzed and enhanced by computer techniques. The aerial photography and radar data offered supplemental information. Surface linears in the test area were located and mapped principally from LANDSAT data. A specific, relatively wide, linear pointed directly toward the test site, but did not extend into it. Density slicing, ratioing, and edge enhancement of the LANDSAT data all indicated the existence of this linear. Radar imagery marginally confirmed the linear, while aerial photography did not confirm it.

  14. Modelling grassland phenology and growth using near-surface remote sensing derived time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufkens, Koen; Chen, Min; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-05-01

    Both the size and the duration of rain events have a significant influence on the phenology and growth of grasslands. This pulse-response nature of grasslands makes quantifying intra and inter-annual variability in grassland growth challenging and large uncertainties remain on which precipitation characteristics have the greatest influence on grassland phenology, growth and ecosystem productivity. Here we present modeled results of soil water content and grassland growth on a daily timestep from 16 grassland sites (40 site years) across arid, temperate and tropical biomes. We build upon a simple threshold-delay concept with provisions for influences of soil temperature and photoperiod on plant growth. Modelled soil water content and grassland growth are based upon limited set of widely available climatic drivers such as daily precipitation, minimum and maximum temperature, to facilitate scaling, and validated against near-surface remote sensing (PhenoCam) data of vegetation greenness. This simple model framework allows us to explore future effects of changes in the size and duration of precipitation events as well as temperature on grassland phenology and growth across different biome types.

  15. Modelling grassland phenology and growth using near-surface remote sensing derived time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufkens, K.; Chen, M.; Richardson, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Both size and the duration of rain events have a significant influence on the phenology and growth of grasslands. This pulse-response nature of grasslands makes quantifying intra and inter-annual variability in grassland growth challenging and large uncertainties remain on which precipitation characteristics have the greatest influence on grassland phenology, growth and ecosystem productivity. Here we present modeled results of soil water content and grassland growth on a daily timestep from 16 grassland sites (40 site years) across arid, temperate and tropical biomes. We build upon a simple threshold-delay concept with provisions for influences of soil temperature and photoperiod on plant growth. Modelled soil water content and grassland growth are based upon limited set of widely available climatic drivers such as daily precipitation, minimum and maximum temperature, to facilitate scaling, and validated against near-surface remote sensing (PhenoCam) data of vegetation greenness. This simple model framework allows us to explore future effects of changes in the size and duration of precipitation events as well as temperature on grassland phenology and growth across different biome types.

  16. Application of remotely sensed data to the detection of sea surface phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Hiroaki; Tsuchiya, Kiyoshi

    Based on the remotely sensed data of airborne-MSS, Landsat-MSS, Landsat-RBV camera and meteorological satellite GMS, sea surface phenomena around Japan were investigated. As to detection of oil slicks and suspended substances, the shorter wave-length in the visible spectrum were recognized as in general effective through the year and the thermal IR data was not so effective in warm season comparing with cold season. For detection of expanding patterns of river effluent and oceanic front, the effectiveness of thermal IR data obtained by timelapse observation were also recognized as fair. It is found that the shorter wavelengths in the visible spectrum are fairly effective in detecting the distribution pattern of water masses in coastal area. The existence of fairly complicated distribution patterns of sea ice in the Sea of Okhotsk was revealed by meteorological staellite GMS data, Landsat-MSS and Landsat-RBV camera data, and Landsat-MSS and Landsat-RBV camera data were concluded as more effective than GMS data in the detection of the distribution pattern of sea ice.

  17. Abiotic surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Vidal, O; Dorel, C; Lejeune, P

    1999-10-01

    To get further information on bacterial surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12, random insertion mutagenesis with Mu dX, a mini-Mu carrying the promoterless lacZ gene, was performed with an ompR234 adherent strain, and a simple screen was developed to assess changes in gene expression in biofilm cells versus planktonic cells. This screen revealed that major changes in the pattern of gene expression occur during biofilm development: the transcription of 38% of the genes was affected within biofilms. Different cell functions were more expressed in sessile bacteria: the OmpC porin, the high-affinity transport system of glycine betaine (encoded by the proU operon), the colanic acid exopolysaccharide (wca locus, formerly called cps), tripeptidase T (pepT), and the nickel high-affinity transport system (nikA). On the other hand, the syntheses of flagellin (fliC) and of a putative protein of 92 amino acids (f92) were both reduced in biofilms. Such a genetic reprogramming of gene expression in biofilms seems to result from changes in multiple environmental physicochemical conditions. In this work, we show that bacteria within biofilms encounter higher-osmolarity conditions, greater oxygen limitation, and higher cell density than in the liquid phase.

  18. Node-pore sensing enables label-free surface-marker profiling of single cells.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Karthik R; Whang, Jeremy C; Hwang, Richard; Hack, James H; Godley, Lucy A; Sohn, Lydia L

    2015-03-03

    Flow cytometry is a ubiquitous, multiparametric method for characterizing cellular populations. However, this method can grow increasingly complex with the number of proteins that need to be screened simultaneously: spectral emission overlap of fluorophores and the subsequent need for compensation, lengthy sample preparation, and multiple control tests that need to be performed separately must all be considered. These factors lead to increased costs, and consequently, flow cytometry is performed in core facilities with a dedicated technician operating the instrument. Here, we describe a low-cost, label-free microfluidic method that can determine the phenotypic profiles of single cells. Our method employs Node-Pore Sensing to measure the transit times of cells as they interact with a series of different antibodies, each corresponding to a specific cell-surface antigen, that have been functionalized in a single microfluidic channel. We demonstrate the capabilities of our method not only by screening two acute promyelocytic leukemia human cells lines (NB4 and AP-1060) for myeloid antigens, CD13, CD14, CD15, and CD33, simultaneously, but also by distinguishing a mixture of cells of similar size—AP-1060 and NALM-1—based on surface markers CD13 and HLA-DR. Furthermore, we show that our method can screen complex subpopulations in clinical samples: we successfully identified the blast population in primary human bone marrow samples from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and screened these cells for CD13, CD34, and HLA-DR. We show that our label-free method is an affordable, highly sensitive, and user-friendly technology that has the potential to transform cellular screening at the benchside.

  19. Assimilation of remotely sensed chlorophyll fluorescence data into the land surface model CLM4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieneke, S.; Ahrends, H. E.; Rascher, U.; Schween, J.; Schickling, A.; Crewell, S.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthesis is the most important exchange process of CO2 between the atmosphere and the land-surface. Therefore, the prediction of vegetation response to environmental conditions like increasing CO2 concentrations or plant stress is crucial for a reliable prediction of climate change. Photosynthesis is a complex physiological process that consists of numerous bio-physical sub-processes and chemical reactions. Spatial and temporal patterns of photosynthesis depend on dynamic plant-specific adaptation strategies to highly variable environmental conditions. Photosynthesis can be estimated using land-surface models, but, while state-of-the-art models often rely on Plant Functional Type (PFT) specific constants, they poorly simulate the dynamic adaptation of the physiological status of plant canopies in space and time. Remotely sensed sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SICF) gives us now the possibility to estimate the diurnal dynamic vitality of the photosynthetic apparatus at both, the leaf and canopy levels. We installed within the framework of the Transregio32 project (www.tr32.de) automated hyperspectral fluorescence sensors at an agricultural site (winter wheat) in the Rur catchment area in West Germany at the end of July 2012. End of August, additional measurements of SIFC on nearby temperate grassland site (riparian meadow) and on a sugar beet field were performed. Spatial covering SICF data of the region were obtained during a measurement campaign using the newly developed air-borne hyperspectral sensor HyPlant on the 23 and 27 August 2012. SIFC data and data provided by eddy covariance measurements will be used to update certain model parameters that are normally set as constants. First model results demonstrate that the assimilation of SIFC into the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4) will result in a more realistic simulation of plant-specific adaptation strategies and therefore in a more realistic simulation of photosynthesis in space and time.

  20. Near-surface remote sensing of spatial and temporal variation in canopy phenology.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew D; Braswell, Bobby H; Hollinger, David Y; Jenkins, Julian P; Ollinger, Scott V

    2009-09-01

    There is a need to document how plant phenology is responding to global change factors, particularly warming trends. "Near-surface" remote sensing, using radiometric instruments or imaging sensors, has great potential to improve phenological monitoring because automated observations can be made at high temporal frequency. Here we build on previous work and show how inexpensive, networked digital cameras ("webcams") can be used to document spatial and temporal variation in the spring and autumn phenology of forest canopies. We use two years of imagery from a deciduous, northern hardwood site, and one year of imagery from a coniferous, boreal transition site. A quantitative signal is obtained by splitting images into separate red, green, and blue color channels and calculating the relative brightness of each channel for "regions of interest" within each image. We put the observed phenological signal in context by relating it to seasonal patterns of gross primary productivity, inferred from eddy covariance measurements of surface-atmosphere CO2 exchange. We show that spring increases, and autumn decreases, in canopy greenness can be detected in both deciduous and coniferous stands. In deciduous stands, an autumn red peak is also observed. The timing and rate of spring development and autumn senescence varies across the canopy, with greater variability in autumn than spring. Interannual variation in phenology can be detected both visually and quantitatively; delayed spring onset in 2007 compared to 2006 is related to a prolonged cold spell from day 85 to day 110. This work lays the foundation for regional- to continental-scale camera-based monitoring of phenology at network observatory sites, e.g., National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) or AmeriFlux.

  1. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with < 1 sec rise time. The simple design and excellent stability of our GO-based SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications. PMID:25425458

  2. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-11-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with < 1 sec rise time. The simple design and excellent stability of our GO-based SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications.

  3. Fast response and high sensitivity ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave humidity sensors using graphene oxide sensing layer.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J K

    2014-11-26

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with < 1 sec rise time. The simple design and excellent stability of our GO-based SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications.

  4. Optical multi-frequency swept sensing for wide-field vibration measurement of interior surfaces in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Nin, F.; Hibino, H.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Multifrequency sensing technique adopting the wide field heterodyne detection technique is demonstrated for interior surface vibration measurements in thick biological tissue. These arrangements allow obtaining not only 3D tomographic images but also various vibration parameters such as spatial amplitude, phase, and frequency, with high temporal and transverse resolutions over a wide field. The axial resolution and the accuracy of vibration amplitude measurement were estimated to be 2.5 μm and 3 nm, respectively. This wide-field tomographic sensing method can be applied for measuring microdynamics of a variety of biological samples, thus contributing to the progress in life sciences research.

  5. Active Planning, Sensing and Recognition Using a Resource-Constrained Discriminant POMDP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-28

    ADDRESS. William Marsh Rice University 6100 Main St., MS-16 Houston, TX 77005 -1827 ABSTRACT Active Planning, Sensing and Recognition Using a...Urbana, IL 61801 ‡Dept. of Computer Science, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 §U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 {wang308, zwang119

  6. More than Activities: Using a "Sense of Place" to Enrich Student Experience in Adventure Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leather, Mark; Nicholls, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in recent years in the significance of a sense of place in the literature of outdoor adventure education. In the UK relationships between outdoor education and the environment still appear largely focused on the science of the natural environment and the activity in question. In this paper, we present empirical…

  7. Active Teaching Strategies for a Sense of Salience: End-of-Life Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared active teaching strategies with passive lecture by evaluating cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning outcomes, while highlighting end-of-life communication in nursing education. The problem addressed was twofold: First, passive lecture prevents transfer to situational decision-making, or a sense of salience (Benner,…

  8. Mapping land water and energy balance relations through conditional sampling of remote sensing estimates of atmospheric forcing and surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop and apply a mapping estimation capability for key unknown parameters that link the surface water and energy balance equations. The method is applied to the Gourma region in West Africa. The accuracy of the estimation method at point scale was previously examined using flux tower data. In this study, the capability is scaled to be applicable with remotely sensed data products and hence allow mapping. Parameters of the system are estimated through a process that links atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface states, and unknown parameters. Based on conditional averaging of land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively, a single objective function is posed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to parameters to identify evapotranspiration and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. This calibration-free method is applied to the mesoscale region of Gourma in West Africa using multiplatform remote sensing data. The retrievals are verified against tower-flux field site data and physiographic characteristics of the region. The focus is to find the functional form of the evaporative fraction dependence on soil moisture, a key closure function for surface and subsurface heat and moisture dynamics, using remote sensing data.

  9. Graphene-Based Long-Period Fiber Grating Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor for High-Sensitivity Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Nong, Jinpeng; Zhang, Guiwen; Tang, Linlong; Jiang, Xiao; Chen, Na; Luo, Suqin; Lan, Guilian; Zhu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A graphene-based long-period fiber grating (LPFG) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is proposed. A monolayer of graphene is coated onto the Ag film surface of the LPFG SPR sensor, which increases the intensity of the evanescent field on the surface of the fiber and thereby enhances the interaction between the SPR wave and molecules. Such features significantly improve the sensitivity of the sensor. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of the graphene-based LPFG SPR sensor can reach 0.344 nm%−1 for methane, which is improved 2.96 and 1.31 times with respect to the traditional LPFG sensor and Ag-coated LPFG SPR sensor, respectively. Meanwhile, the graphene-based LPFG SPR sensor exhibits excellent response characteristics and repeatability. Such a SPR sensing scheme offers a promising platform to achieve high sensitivity for gas-sensing applications. PMID:28025483

  10. Calculation of basin-scale surface fluxes by combining remotely sensed data and atmospheric properties in a semiarid landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, W. P.; Hipps, L. E.; Humes, K. S.

    1995-02-01

    Optical remote sensing data collected during the Monsoon '90 experiment in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in southern Arizona were used to estimate basin-scale surface temperature, net radiation ( R n) and soil heat flux ( G). These were combined with several atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) models to allow computation of basin-scale surface fluxes of sensible ( H) and latent heat ( LE). The calculated fluxes were compared to averages from a network of surface flux stations. One ABL model calculated H using a bulk similarity approach for wind and temperature with remotely sensed surface temperature as the lower boundary condition. With basin-scale estimates of R n and G, LE was solved as a residual. The other ABL model applied atmospheric profiles from a series of soundings in the conservation equations of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer to compute H and LE directly. By combining these H values with R n and G, calculation of LE by residual also was performed. The ABL-derived H values differed from the averages from the surface network by roughly 20 and 30% for the bulk similarity and conservation approaches, respectively. For LE, these same differences were around 10 and 70%. The disparity was reduced to nearly 30% for the conservation approach when LE was solved as a residual. Days with significant spatial variation in surface soil moisture and/or cloud cover were associated with most of the disagreement between the ABL-derived and surface-based values. This was particularly true for conservation estimates of LE. The bulk similarity method appeared less sensitive non-ideal environmental conditions. This may in part be due to the use of remotely sensed information, which provided a lower boundary value of surface temperature and estimates of R n and G over the study area, thereby allowing for residual calculations of LE. Such information clearly has utility for assessing the surface energy and water balance at basin scale.

  11. Sensitivity of Active Remotely Sensed Total Column Observations to Atmospheric State Estimation Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, S.; Rayner, P. J.; Moore, B.

    2013-12-01

    The proposed Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission will retrieve total column CO2 using a laser-based measurement. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) approach utilizes the difference in absorption between neighboring spectral lines to effectively determine the difference in absorption due to CO2. The actual measured quantity is equivalent to the differential absorption, defined by Δτ = ∫ q(p) Δξ(p) dp / g m, where m is the molar mass of air and Δξ is the differential absorption cross section. The main use of the measurement is the characterization of sources and sinks using atmospheric inverse methods. Changes in surface pressure or Δξ can change Δτ independent of sources and sinks and are, thus "nuisance variables". Δξ is strongly dependent on variations in temperature (T) and water vapor (w), which are usually taken from numerical models as estimates of the local atmospheric state. The authors seek to determine observable that contains the most information on the model column of CO2, which will provide the best estimates of sources and sinks in a transport model inversion. Three candidate observables are the differential optical depth on a CO2 line, the ratio of this to the differential optical depth on an O2 line, the weighting function averaged column CO2. Each of these observables will have different sensitivities to surface pressure and spectroscopy by virtue of the functional form that defines them. For example, the O2 measurement should be less sensitive to surface pressure fluctuations due to the near constancy of O2 in the atmosphere. The information contained in the observation about the model state is encapsulated in the quantity HTR-1H, where R is the observation error covariance and H is the Jacobian of the observation operator with respect to the model mixing ratio of CO2. We can decompose the error variance for a particular observation into contributions from the surface pressure errors

  12. Models to support active sensing of biological aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Chaudhry, Zahra; Boggs, Nathan T.; Brown, David M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic backscatter LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) is a promising approach for stand-off detection of biological aerosol clouds. Comprehensive models that explain the scattering behavior from the aerosol cloud are needed to understand and predict the scattering signatures of biological aerosols under varying atmospheric conditions and against different aerosol backgrounds. Elastic signatures are dependent on many parameters of the aerosol cloud, with two major components being the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosols. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has been in a unique position to measure the size distributions of released biological simulant clouds using a wide assortment of aerosol characterization systems that are available on the commercial market. In conjunction with the size distribution measurements, JHU/APL has also been making a dedicated effort to properly measure the refractive indices of the released materials using a thin-film absorption technique and laboratory characterization of the released materials. Intimate knowledge of the size distributions and refractive indices of the biological aerosols provides JHU/APL with powerful tools to build elastic scattering models, with the purpose of understanding, and ultimately, predicting the active signatures of biological clouds.

  13. Remote sensing of impervious surface growth: A framework for quantifying urban expansion and re-densification mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahtahmassebi, Amir Reza; Song, Jie; Zheng, Qing; Blackburn, George Alan; Wang, Ke; Huang, Ling Yan; Pan, Yi; Moore, Nathan; Shahtahmassebi, Golnaz; Sadrabadi Haghighi, Reza; Deng, Jing Song

    2016-04-01

    A substantial body of literature has accumulated on the topic of using remotely sensed data to map impervious surfaces which are widely recognized as an important indicator of urbanization. However, the remote sensing of impervious surface growth has not been successfully addressed. This study proposes a new framework for deriving and summarizing urban expansion and re-densification using time series of impervious surface fractions (ISFs) derived from remotely sensed imagery. This approach integrates multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA), analysis of regression residuals, spatial statistics (Getis_Ord) and urban growth theories; hence, the framework is abbreviated as MRGU. The performance of MRGU was compared with commonly used change detection techniques in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach. The results suggested that the ISF regression residuals were optimal for detecting impervious surface changes while Getis_Ord was effective for mapping hotspot regions in the regression residuals image. Moreover, the MRGU outputs agreed with the mechanisms proposed in several existing urban growth theories, but importantly the outputs enable the refinement of such models by explicitly accounting for the spatial distribution of both expansion and re-densification mechanisms. Based on Landsat data, the MRGU is somewhat restricted in its ability to measure re-densification in the urban core but this may be improved through the use of higher spatial resolution satellite imagery. The paper ends with an assessment of the present gaps in remote sensing of impervious surface growth and suggests some solutions. The application of impervious surface fractions in urban change detection is a stimulating new research idea which is driving future research with new models and algorithms.

  14. Microbial growth and quorum sensing antagonist activities of herbal plants extracts.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussaini, Reema; Mahasneh, Adel M

    2009-09-03

    Antimicrobial and antiquorum sensing (AQS) activities of fourteen ethanolic extracts of different parts of eight plants were screened against four Gram-positive, five Gram-negative bacteria and four fungi. Depending on the plant part extract used and the test microorganism, variable activities were recorded at 3 mg per disc. Among the Grampositive bacteria tested, for example, activities of Laurus nobilis bark extract ranged between a 9.5 mm inhibition zone against Bacillus subtilis up to a 25 mm one against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus fumigatus were the most susceptible among bacteria and fungi tested towards other plant parts. Of interest is the tangible antifungal activity of a Tecoma capensis flower extract, which is reported for the first time. However, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC's) for both bacteria and fungi were relatively high (0.5-3.0 mg). As for antiquorum sensing activity against Chromobacterium violaceum, superior activity (>17 mm QS inhibition) was associated with Sonchus oleraceus and Laurus nobilis extracts and weak to good activity (8-17 mm) was recorded for other plants. In conclusion, results indicate the potential of these plant extracts in treating microbial infections through cell growth inhibition or quorum sensing antagonism, which is reported for the first time, thus validating their medicinal use.

  15. Applications of remote sensing and GIS in surface hydrology: Snow cover, soil moisture and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei

    Studies on surface hydrology can generally be classified into two categories, observation for different components of surface water, and modeling their dynamic movements. This study only focuses on observation part of surface water components: snow cover, soil moisture, and precipitation. Moreover, instead of discussion on the detailed algorithm and instrument technique behind each component, this dissertation pours efforts on analysis of the standard remotely sensed products and their applications under different settings. First in Chapter 2, validation of MODIS Terra 8-day maximum snow cover composite (MOD10A2) in the Northern Xinjiang, China, from 2000-2006, shows that the 8-day MODIS/Terra product has high agreements with in situ measurements as the in situ snow depth is larger or equal to 4 cm, while the agreement is low for the patchy snow as the in situ snow depth less than 4 cm. According to the in situ observation, this chapter develops an empirical algorithm to separate the cloud-covered pixels into snow and no snow. Continued long-term production of MODIS-type snow cover product is critical to assess water resources of the study area, as well as other larger scale global environment monitoring. Terra and Aqua satellites carry the same MODIS instrument and provide two parallel MODIS daily snow cover products at different time (local time 10:30 am and 1:30 pm, respectively). Chapter 3 develops an algorithm and automated scripts to combine the daily MODIS Terra (MOD10A1) and Aqua (MYD10A1) snow cover products, and to automatically generate multi-day Terra-Aqua snow cover image composites, with flexible starting and ending dates and a user-defined cloud cover threshold. Chapter 4 systematically compares the difference between MODIS Terra and Aqua snow cover products within a hydrologic year of 2003-2004, validates the MODIS Terra and Aqua snow cover products using in situ measurements in Northern Xinjiang, and compares the accuracy among the standard MODIS

  16. What more have we learned from thermal infrared remote sensing of active volcanoes other than they are hot? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, M.

    2009-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing has been used for decades to detect changes in the heat output of active and reawakening volcanoes. The data from these thermally anomalous pixels are commonly used either as a monitoring tool or to calculate parameters such as effusion rate and eruptive style. First and second generation TIR data have been limited in the number of spectral channels and/or the spatial resolution. Two spectral channels with only one km spatial resolution has been the norm and therefore the number of science applications is limited to very large or very hot events. The one TIR channel of the Landsat ETM+ instrument improved the spatial resolution to 60 m, but it was not until the launch of ASTER in late 1999 that orbital TIR spectral resolution increased to five channels at 90 m per pixel. For the first time, the ability existed to capture multispectral emitted radiance from volcanic surfaces, which has allowed the extraction of emissivity as well as temperature. Over the past decade ASTER TIR emissivity data have been examined for a variety of volcanic processes including lava flow emplacement at Kilauea and Kluichevskoi, silicic lava dome composition at Sheveluch, Bezymianny and Mt. St. Helens, low temperature fumaroles emissions at Cerro Negro, and textural changes on the pyroclastic flow deposits at Merapi, Sheveluch and Bezymianny. Thermal-temporal changes at the 90 m scale are still an important monitoring tool for active volcanoes using ASTER TIR data. However, the ability to extract physical parameters such as micron-scale roughness and bulk mineralogy has added tremendously to the science derived from the TIR region. This new information has also presented complications such as the effects of sub-pixel thermal heterogeneities and amorphous glass on the emissivity spectra. If better understood, these complications can provide new insights into the physical state of the volcanic surfaces. Therefore, new data processing algorithms

  17. Influence of the morphology on the platinum electrode surface activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Andreas; Steiger, Beat; Scherer, Günther G.; Wokaun, Alexander

    Polycrystalline Pt electrodes with different surface characteristics were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.5 M H 2SO 4. Plane electrodes showed a decrease in electrochemically active surface area while cycling in the hydrogen underpotential region (H upd), in contrast, electrodes roughened by intensive pre-cycling exhibited a stable value for the electrochemically active surface.

  18. Active Microwave Remote Sensing Observations of Weddell Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Since July 1991, the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites have acquired radar data of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. The Active Microwave Instrument on board ERS has two modes; SAR and Scatterometer. Two receiving stations enable direct downlink and recording of high bit-rate, high resolution SAR image data of this region. When not in an imaging mode, when direct SAR downlink is not possible, or when a receiving station is inoperable, the latter mode allows normalized radar cross-section data to be acquired. These low bit-rate ERS scatterometer data are tape recorded, downlinked and processed off-line. Recent advances in image generation from Scatterometer backscatter measurements enable complementary medium-scale resolution images to be made during periods when SAR images cannot be acquired. Together, these combined C-band microwave image data have for the first time enabled uninterrupted night and day coverage of the Weddell Sea region at both high (25 m) and medium-scale (-20 km) resolutions. C-band ERS-1 radar data are analyzed in conjunction with field data from two simultaneous field experiments in 1992. Satellite radar signature data are compared with shipborne radar data to extract a regional and seasonal signature database for recognition of ice types in the images. Performance of automated sea-ice tracking algorithms is tested on Antarctic data to evaluate their success. Examples demonstrate that both winter and summer ice can be effectively tracked. The kinematics of the main ice zones within the Weddell Sea are illustrated, together with the complementary time-dependencies in their radar signatures. Time-series of satellite images are used to illustrate the development of the Weddell Sea ice cover from its austral summer minimum (February) to its winter maximum (September). The combination of time-dependent microwave signatures and ice dynamics tracking enable various drift regimes to be defined which relate closely to the circulation of the

  19. Sensing performance of electrically conductive fabrics and dielectric electro active polymers for parachutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favini, Eric; Niezrecki, Christopher; Manohar, Sanjeev K.; Willis, David; Chen, Julie; Niemi, Eugene; Desabrais, Kenneth; Charette, Christine

    2011-04-01

    This paper quantifies the sensing capabilities of novel smart materials in an effort to improve the performance, better understand the physics, and enhance the safety of parachutes. Based upon a recent review of actuation technologies for parachute applications, it was surmised that the actuators reviewed could not be used to effectively alter the drag or lift (i.e. geometry, porosity, or air vent openings) of a parachute during flight. However, several materials showed potential for sensing applications within a parachute, specifically electrically conductive fabrics and dielectric electro-active polymers. This paper introduces several new conductive fabrics and provides an evaluation of the sensing performance of these smart materials based upon test results using mechanical testing and digital image correlation for comparison.

  20. Development of a surface-wave imaging system for geotechnical applications based on distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) and ambient noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Daley, T. M.; Freifeld, B. M.; Tang, D. G.; Zhang, R.; Wagner, A. M.; Dou, S.; Lindsey, N.; Bjella, K.; Pevzner, R.

    2014-12-01

    Distributed fiber-optic sensing methods have been used since the 1980's for continuous monitoring of near-surface soil properties, typically exploiting Raman scattering to measure temperature (DTS) or stimulated Brillouin scattering to measure strain (DSS). Recent advances in high speed measurement of Rayleigh scattering has enabled distributed recording of seismic waves over long sections of fiber; this approach, referred to as distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) has the potential to allow nearly continuous monitoring of near-surface mechanical properties, a crucial target for geotechnical management of infrastructure dependent on soil strength. We present initial results from our effort to build a real-time soil property monitoring system based on DAS; our approach employs seismic interferometry and dispersion analysis of ambient noise generated by infrastructure to provide a continuously updated model of shear modulus. Our preliminary results include an in-depth investigation of DAS fiber response in the context of active sources; this component of our study verifies classical models for the azimuthal response of straight fibers to propagating surface waves. We also explore the "noisescape" of linear infrastructure and show a usable seismic signal band of 8-40 hz at a series of sites, primarily consisting of Rayleigh waves. Finally, we present preliminary results from a DAS monitoring array installed at the Richmond Field Station near a heavily used road and compare interferometric processing of the acquired data to that generated by surface deployment of geophones.

  1. DNA Sensing using Nano-crystalline Surface Enhanced Al2O3 Nanopore Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, B. M.; Shah, A.B.; Zuo, J.M.; Bashir, R.

    2013-01-01

    A new solid-state, Al2O3 nanopore sensor with enhanced surface properties for the real-time detection and analysis of individual DNA molecules is reported. Nanopore formation using electron beam based decomposition transformed the local nanostructure and morphology of the pore from an amorphous, stoichiometric structure (O to Al ratio of 1.5) to a hetero-phase crystalline network, deficient in O (O to Al ratio of ~0.6). Direct metallization of the pore region was observed during irradiation, thereby permitting the potential fabrication of nano-scale metallic contacts in the pore region with potential application to nanopore-based DNA sequencing. Dose dependent phase transformations to purely γ and/or α-phase nanocrystallites were also observed during pore formation allowing for surface charge engineering at the nanopore/fluid interface. DNA transport studies revealed an order of magnitude reduction in translocation velocities relative to alternate solid-state architectures, accredited to high surface charge density and the nucleation of charged nanocrystalline domains. The unique surface properties of Al2O3 nanopore sensors makes them ideal for the detection and analysis of ssDNA, dsDNA, RNA secondary structures and small proteins. These nano-scale sensors may also serve as a useful tool in studying the mechanisms driving biological processes including DNA-protein interactions and enzyme activity at the single molecule level. PMID:23335871

  2. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy.

  3. Does dystonic muscle activity affect sense of effort in cervical dystonia?

    PubMed Central

    Carment, Loïc; Maier, Marc A.; Sangla, Sophie; Guiraud, Vincent; Mesure, Serge; Vidailhet, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background Focal dystonia has been associated with deficient processing of sense of effort cues. However, corresponding studies are lacking in cervical dystonia (CD). We hypothesized that dystonic muscle activity would perturb neck force control based on sense of effort cues. Methods Neck extension force control was investigated in 18 CD patients with different clinical features (7 with and 11 without retrocollis) and in 19 control subjects. Subjects performed force-matching and force-maintaining tasks at 5% and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Three task conditions were tested: i) with visual force feedback, ii) without visual feedback (requiring use of sense of effort), iii) without visual feedback, but with neck extensor muscle vibration (modifying muscle afferent cues). Trapezius muscle activity was recorded using electromyography (EMG). Results CD patients did not differ in task performance from healthy subjects when using visual feedback (ANOVA, p>0.7). In contrast, when relying on sense of effort cues (without visual feedback, 5% MVC), force control was impaired in patients without retrocollis (p = 0.006), but not in patients with retrocollis (p>0.2). Compared to controls, muscle vibration without visual feedback significantly affected performance in patients with retrocollis (p<0.001), but not in patients without retrocollis. Extensor EMG during rest, included as covariate in ANOVA, explained these group differences. Conclusion This study shows that muscle afferent feedback biases sense of effort cues when controlling neck forces in patients with CD. The bias acts on peripheral or central sense of effort cues depending on whether the task involves dystonic muscles. This may explain why patients with retrocollis more accurately matched isometric neck extension forces. This highlights the need to consider clinical features (pattern of dystonic muscles) when evaluating sensorimotor integration in CD. PMID:28192488

  4. The Utility of Remotely-Sensed Land Surface Temperature from Multiple Platforms For Testing Distributed Hydrologic Models over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, T.; Vivoni, E. R.; Gochis, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key parameter in watershed energy and water budgets that is relatively unexplored as a validation metric for distributed hydrologic models. Ground-based or remotely-sensed LST datasets can provide insights into a model's ability in reproducing water and energy fluxes across a large range of terrain, vegetation, soil and meteorological conditions. As a result, spatiotemporal LST observations can serve as a strong constraint for distributed simulations and can augment other available in-situ data. LST fields are particular useful in mountainous areas where temperature varies with terrain properties and time-variable surface conditions. In this study, we collect and process remotely-sensed fields from several satellite platforms - Landsat 5/7, MODIS and ASTER - to capture spatiotemporal LST dynamics at multiple resolutions and with frequent repeat visits. We focus our analysis of these fields over the Sierra Los Locos basin (~100 km2) in Sonora, Mexico, for a period encompassing the Soil Moisture Experiment in 2004 and the North American Monsoon Experiment (SMEX04-NAME). Satellite observations are verified using a limited set of ground data from manual sampling at 30 locations and continuous measurements at 2 sites. First, we utilize the remotely-sensed fields to understand the summer seasonal evolution of LST in the basin in response to the arrival of summer storms and the vigorous ecosystem greening organized along elevation bands. Then, we utilize the ground and remote-sensing datasets to test the distributed predictions of the TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) under conditions accounting static and dynamic vegetation patterns. Basin-averaged and distributed comparisons are carried out for two different terrain products (INEGI aerial photogrammetry and ASTER stereo processing) used to derive the distributed model domain. Results from the comparisons are discussed in light of the utility of remotely-sensed LST

  5. Fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for remote label-free sensing of medical device surface contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Moinuddin; Tan, Xin; Welle, Elissa; Ilev, Ilko

    2013-05-01

    As a potential major source of biochemical contamination, medical device surfaces are of critical safety concerns in the clinical practice and public health. The development of innovative sensing methods for accurate and real-time detection of medical device surface contamination is essential to protect patients from high risk infection. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative fiber-optic Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy based sensing approach for remote, non-contact, and label-free detection of biochemical contaminants in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) region. The sensing probe is designed using mid-IR hollow fibers and FTIR measurements are carried out in reflection mode. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and bacterial endotoxin of different concentrations under thoroughly dry condition are used to evaluate the detection sensitivity. The devised system can identify ≤0.0025% (≤4 × 1011 molecules) BSA and 0.5% (0.5 EU/ml) endotoxin concentration. The developed sensing approach may be applied to detect various pathogens that pose public health threats.

  6. Statistical analysis of land surface temperature-vegetation indexes relationship through thermal remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Sulochana

    2015-11-01

    Vegetation coverage has a significant influence on the land surface temperature (LST) distribution. In the field of urban heat islands (UHIs) based on remote sensing, vegetation indexes are widely used to estimate the LST-vegetation relationship. This paper devises two objectives. The first analyzes the correlation between vegetation parameters/indicators and LST. The subsequent computes the occurrence of vegetation parameter, which defines the distribution of LST (for quantitative analysis of urban heat island) in Kalaburagi (formerly Gulbarga) City. However, estimation work has been done on the valuation of the relationship between different vegetation indexes and LST. In addition to the correlation between LST and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), the normalized difference build-up index (NDBI) is attempted to explore the impacts of the green land to the build-up land on the urban heat island by calculating the evaluation index of sub-urban areas. The results indicated that the effect of urban heat island in Kalaburagi city is mainly located in the sub-urban areas or Rurban area especially in the South-Eastern and North-Western part of the city. The correlation between LST and NDVI, indicates the negative correlation. The NDVI suggests that the green land can weaken the effect on urban heat island, while we perceived the positive correlation between LST and NDBI, which infers that the built-up land can strengthen the effect of urban heat island in our case study. Although satellite data (e.g., Landsat TM thermal bands data) has been applied to test the distribution of urban heat islands, but the method still needs to be refined with in situ measurements of LST in future studies.

  7. Chemically active colloids near osmotic-responsive walls with surface-chemistry gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M. N.; Uspal, W. E.; Dietrich, S.

    2017-04-01

    Chemically active colloids move by creating gradients in the composition of the surrounding solution and by exploiting the differences in their interactions with the various molecular species in solution. If such particles move near boundaries, e.g. the walls of the container confining the suspension, gradients in the composition of the solution are also created along the wall. This give rise to chemi-osmosis (via the interactions of the wall with the molecular species forming the solution), which drives flows coupling back to the colloid and thus influences its motility. Employing an approximate ‘point-particle’ analysis, we show analytically that—owing to this kind of induced active response (chemi-osmosis) of the wall—such chemically active colloids can align with, and follow, gradients in the surface chemistry of the wall. In this sense, these artificial ‘swimmers’ exhibit a primitive form of thigmotaxis with the meaning of sensing the proximity of a (not necessarily discontinuous) physical change in the environment. We show that the alignment with the surface-chemistry gradient is generic for chemically active colloids as long as they exhibit motility in an unbounded fluid, i.e. this phenomenon does not depend on the exact details of the propulsion mechanism. The results are discussed in the context of simple models of chemical activity, corresponding to Janus particles with ‘source’ chemical reactions on one half of the surface and either ‘inert’ or ‘sink’ reactions over the other half.

  8. Spatiotemporal analysis of soil moisture in using active and passive remotely sensed data and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Soil moisture plays a vital role in ecosystem, biological processes, climate, weather and agriculture. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) improves data by combining the advantages and avoiding the limitation of passive microwave remote sensing (low resolution), and active microwave (challenge of soil moisture retrieval). This study will advance the knowledge of the application of soil moisture by using the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) data as well as data collected at Walnut Gulch Arizona in August 2015 during SMAPVEX15. Specifically, we will analyze the 5m radar data from Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) to study spatial variability within the PALS radiometer pixel. SMAPVEX12/15 and SMAP data will also be analyzed to evaluate disaggregation algorithms. The analytical findings will provide valuable information for policy-makers to initiate and adjust protocols and regulations for protecting land resources and improving environmental conditions. Keywords: soil moisture, Remote Sensing (RS), spatial statistic

  9. Dark spot detection for characterization of marine surface slicks using PolSAR remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shashi; Kattamuri, Hari P.; Agarwal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Oceans are considered as the important source for oil reserves and continuous activities like oil extraction and transportation may sometimes cause the accidental release of oil into the sea surface which causes a major threat to the marine ecosystems, economy and human life. The prime focus of this study is to explore the potential of the fully polarimetric SAR data and analyze the different scattering mechanisms for the oil spilled regions. In this study the fully polarized and orthorectified, L band data of UAVSAR airborne sensor is used which is captured on June 22nd 2010, during which the Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred in the Gulf of Mexico. For the detection of oil spill different decomposition techniques such as Freeman, Yamaguchi and H/A/α are studied and classified using Wishart classification. Freeman and Yamaguchi decomposition helped in understanding the type of scattering mechanism taking place in slick covered regions, sea surface and in the presence of ships/rig. A set of polarimetric parameters such as magnitude of correlation coefficient, cross product of co polarized channels, anisotropy, alpha ,entropy and the intensity of the coherency matrix are studied which helped in distinguishing the oil spills, sea surface and the look-alikes. The Wishart classification result of Freeman and Yamaguchi decompositions showed more reliable results in comparison to the K-means classification results obtained through segmentation of combined H/A/α decomposition. The entropy, anisotropy and magnitude of correlation coefficient are dependent on the angle of incidence. At low incidence angle the entropy value of oil spills are similar to that of the sea surface whereas the magnitude of correlation coefficient which is a function of dielectric constant, increases for oil spills at low incidence angle. The polarimetric parameter, intensity of the coherency matrix utilizes the whole coherency matrix by calculating its determinant and proven to provide good

  10. Development of novel series and parallel sensing system based on nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Te-Wei

    With the advance of nanofabrication, the capability of nanoscale metallic structure fabrication opens a whole new study in nanoplasmonics, which is defined as the investigation of photon-electron interaction in the vicinity of nanoscale metallic structures. The strong oscillation of free electrons at the interface between metal and surrounding dielectric material caused by propagating surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enables a variety of new applications in different areas, especially biological sensing techniques. One of the promising biological sensing applications by surface resonance polariton is surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which significantly reinforces the feeble signal of traditional Raman scattering by at least 104 times. It enables highly sensitive and precise molecule identification with the assistance of a SERS substrate. Until now, the design of new SERS substrate fabrication process is still thriving since no dominant design has emerged yet. The ideal process should be able to achieve both a high sensitivity and low cost device in a simple and reliable way. In this thesis two promising approaches for fabricating nanostructured SERS substrate are proposed: thermal dewetting technique and nanoimprint replica technique. These two techniques are demonstrated to show the capability of fabricating high performance SERS substrate in a reliable and cost efficient fashion. In addition, these two techniques have their own unique characteristics and can be integrated with other sensing techniques to build a serial or parallel sensing system. The breakthrough of a combination system with different sensing techniques overcomes the inherent limitations of SERS detection and leverages it to a whole new level of systematic sensing. The development of a sensing platform based on thermal dewetting technique is covered as the first half of this thesis. The process optimization, selection of substrate material

  11. Measurement of Surface Strains from a Composite Hydrofoil using Fibre Bragg Grating Sensing Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    a profiled aluminium capture block. Load was applied near the tip of the foil by a profiled aluminium form board connected to a 280 kN capacity...manufactured using a closed mould resin transfer moulding (RTM) process in a custom-built Aluminium mould. The matrix material was the low viscosity Kinetix...use of a heat-activated film adhesive (Redux 312) [8,9]. The optical fibres were laid into channels formed on the part surface using tape and then

  12. Surface water dynamics in Amazon, Congo, and Lake Chad Wetlands from remote sensing and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Getirana, A.; Jasinski, M. F.

    2013-05-01

    The capability of satellites to understand and monitor surface water dynamics in tropical wetlands is presented by analysis various remote sensing technologies over the Amazon, Congo, and Lake Chad regions. Although different in size and location, all these basins are tropical, representing riparian tropical, swamp tropical and inland Saharan wetlands, respectively. First, yearly flooding in the Logone floodplain is investigated using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Flooding has a direct impact on agricultural, pastoral and fishery systems in the Lake Chad Basin. Since the flooding extent, depth, and duration are highly variable, flood inundation mapping facilitates efficient use of water resources and have more knowledge of the coupled human-natural system in the Logone floodplain. Flood maps are generated from 33 multi-temporal ETM+ images acquired during the period 2006 to 2008. The maximum flooding extent in the study area increases up to ~5.8K km2 in late October 2008. A strong correlation is observed between the flooding extents and water height variations in both the floodplain and the river. Second, interferometric processing of JERS-1 SAR data from the central portions of both Amazon and Congo Wetlands provides centimeter-scale measurements of water level change. The Amazon is marked by a myriad of floodplain channels, but the Congo has comparatively few. Amazon floodplain channels, lakes and pans are well interconnected, whereas the Congo wetlands are expanses with few boundaries or flow routes. The hydraulic processes that build the Amazon floodplain are not similarly apparent in the Congo. Third, we evaluate the potential of large altimetry datasets as a complementary gauging network capable of providing water discharge in ungauged regions. A rating-curve-based methodology is adopted to derive water discharge from altimetric data provided by the Envisat satellite within the Amazon basin. From a global-scale perspective, the stage

  13. An inter-comparison of soil moisture data products from satellite remote sensing and a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li; Hain, Christopher R.; Zhan, Xiwu; Anderson, Martha C.

    2016-06-01

    Significant advances have been achieved in generating soil moisture (SM) products from satellite remote sensing and/or land surface modeling with reasonably good accuracy in recent years. However, the discrepancies among the different SM data products can be considerably large, which hampers their usage in various applications. The bias of one SM product from another is well recognized in the literature. Bias estimation and spatial correction methods have been documented for assimilating satellite SM product into land surface and hydrologic models. Nevertheless, understanding the characteristics of each of these SM data products is required for many applications where the most accurate data products are desirable. This study inter-compares five SM data products from three different sources with each other, and evaluates them against in situ SM measurements over 14-year period from 2000 to 2013. Specifically, three microwave (MW) satellite based data sets provided by ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI) (CCI-merged, -active and -passive products), one thermal infrared (TIR) satellite based product (ALEXI), and the Noah land surface model (LSM) simulations. The in-situ SM measurements are collected from the North American Soil Moisture Database (NASMD), which involves more than 600 ground sites from a variety of networks. They are used to evaluate the accuracies of these five SM data products. In general, each of the five SM products is capable of capturing the dry/wet patterns over the study period. However, the absolute SM values among the five products vary significantly. SM simulations from Noah LSM are more stable relative to the satellite-based products. All TIR and MW satellite based products are relatively noisier than the Noah LSM simulations. Even though MW satellite based SM retrievals have been predominantly used in the past years, SM retrievals of the ALEXI model based on TIR satellite observations demonstrate skills equivalent to all the MW satellite

  14. On the sensitivity of numerical weather prediction to remotely sensed marine surface wind data - A simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, M. A.; Cardone, V. J.; Halem, M.; Halberstam, I.

    1981-01-01

    The reported investigation has the objective to assess the potential impact on numerical weather prediction (NWP) of remotely sensed surface wind data. Other investigations conducted with similar objectives have not been satisfactory in connection with a use of procedures providing an unrealistic distribution of initial errors. In the current study, care has been taken to duplicate the actual distribution of information in the conventional observing system, thus shifting the emphasis from accuracy of the data to the data coverage. It is pointed out that this is an important consideration in assessing satellite observing systems since experience with sounder data has shown that improvements in forecasts due to satellite-derived information is due less to a general error reduction than to the ability to fill data-sparse regions. The reported study concentrates on the evaluation of the observing system simulation experimental design and on the assessment of the potential of remotely sensed marine surface wind data.

  15. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize and unstable wave.

  16. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize an unstable wave.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Socol, Marcela; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-28

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 3} times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Socol, Marcela; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ˜1.3 × 103 times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for in situ measurements of signaling molecules (autoinducers) relevant to bacteria quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Pearman, William F; Lawrence-Snyder, Marion; Angel, S Michael; Decho, Alan W

    2007-12-01

    Autoinducer (AI) molecules are used by quorum sensing (QS) bacteria to communicate information about their environment and are critical to their ability to coordinate certain physiological activities. Studying how these organisms react to environmental stresses could provide insight into methods to control these activities. To this end, we are investigating spectroscopic methods of analysis that allow in situ measurements of these AI molecules under different environmental conditions. We found that for one class of AIs, N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a method capable of performing such measurements in situ. SERS spectra of seven different AHLs with acyl chain lengths from 4 to 12 carbons were collected for the first time using Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized via both citrate and borohydride reduction methods. Strong SERS spectra were obtained in as little as 10 seconds for 80 microM solutions of AI that exhibited the strongest SERS response, whereas 20 seconds was typical for most AI SERS spectra collected during this study. Although all spectra were similar, significant differences were detected in the SERS spectra of C4-AHL and 3-oxo-C6-AHL and more subtle differences were noted between all AHLs. Initial results indicate a detection limit of approximately 10(-6)M for C6-AHL, which is within the limits of biologically relevant concentrations of AI molecules (nM-microM). Based on these results, the SERS method shows promise for monitoring AI molecule concentrations in situ, within biofilms containing QS bacteria. This new capability offers the possibility to "listen in" on chemical communications between bacteria in their natural environment as that environment is stressed.

  20. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    -scatterometer system working at frequencies between 3.0 GHz to 11.0 GHz. The data were acquired over bare soil surfaces with moisture variations due to freezing and thawing and roughness changes due to rain and erosion. The model predictions are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the data. In addition, it was shown that the same ratio when calculated from the data shows almost no dependence on the soil moisture. Finally, a simple technique which combines the backscattering coefficient at HH polarization (active sensing) with the emissivity at H polarization (passive sensing) is suggested for retrieving the soil moisture from bare soil surfaces.

  1. A multi-mode sensing system for corrosion detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Pollock, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    As an emerging technology for in-situ damage detection and nondestructive evaluation, structural health monitoring with active sensors (active SHM) plays as a promising candidate for the pipeline inspection and diagnosis. Piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS), as an active sensing device, can be permanently attached to the structure to interrogate it at will and can operate in propagating wave mode or electromechanical impedance mode. Its small size and low cost (about $10 each) make itself a potential and unique technology for in-situ SHM application. The objective of the research in this paper is to develop a permanently installed in-situ "multi-mode" sensing system for the corrosion monitoring and prediction of critical pipeline systems. Such a system is used during in-service period, recording and monitoring the changes of the pipelines over time, such as corrosion, wall thickness, etc. Having the real-time data available, maintenance strategies based on these data can then be developed to ensure a safe and less expensive operation of the pipeline systems. After a detailed review of PWAS SHM methods, including ultrasonic, impedance, and thickness measurement, we introduce the concept of PWAS-based multi-mode sensing approach for corrosion detection in pipelines. Particularly, we investigate the potential for using PWAS waves for in thickness mode experimentally. Finally, experiments are conducted to verify the corrosion detection ability of the PWAS network in both metallic plate and pipe in a laboratory setting. Results show successful corrosion localization in both tests.

  2. Remote Sensing and Remote Control Activities in Europe and America: Part 2--Remote Sensing Ground Stations in Europe,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Development tasks and products of remote sensing ground stations in Europe are represented by the In-Sec Corporation and the Schlumberger Industries Corporation. The article presents the main products of these two corporations.

  3. Boosting the Quantitative Inorganic Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensing to the Limit: The Case of Nitrite/Nitrate Detection.

    PubMed

    Correa-Duarte, Miguel A; Pazos Perez, Nicolas; Guerrini, Luca; Giannini, Vincenzo; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A

    2015-03-05

    A high-performance ionic-sensing platform has been developed by an interdisciplinary approach, combining the classical colorimetric Griess reaction and new concepts of nanotechnology, such as plasmonic coupling of nanoparticles and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. This approach exploits the advantages of combined SERS/surface-enhanced resonant Raman Scattering (SERRS) by inducing the formation of homogeneous hot spots and a colored complex in resonance with the laser line, to yield detection limits for nitrite down to the subpicomolar level. The performance of this new method was compared with the classical Griess reaction and ionic chromatography showing detection limits about 6 and 3 orders of magnitude lower, respectively.

  4. Optical and Radar Satellite Remote Sensing for Large Area Analysis of Landslide Activity in Southern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessner, S.; Behling, R.; Teshebaeva, K. O.; Motagh, M.; Wetzel, H. U.

    2014-12-01

    The presented work has been investigating the potential of optical and radar satellite remote sensing for the spatio-temporal analysis of landslide activity at a regional scale along the eastern rim of the Fergana Basin representing the area of highest landslide activity in Kyrgyzstan. For this purpose a multi-temporal satellite remote sensing database has been established for a 12.000 km2 study area in Southern Kyrgyzstan containing a multitude of optical data acquired during the last 28 years as well as TerraSAR-X and ALOS-PALSAR acquired since 2007. The optical data have been mainly used for creating a multi-temporal inventory of backdated landslide activity. For this purpose an automated approach for object-oriented multi-temporal landslide detection has been developed which is based on the analysis of temporal NDVI-trajectories complemented by relief information to separate landslide-related surface changes from other land cover changes. Applying the approach to the whole study area using temporal high resolution RapidEye time series data has resulted in the automated detection of 612 landslide objects covering a total area of approx. 7.3 km². Currently, the approach is extended to the whole multi-sensor time-series database for systematic analysis of longer-term landslide occurrence at a regional scale. Radar remote sensing has been focussing on SAR Interferometry (InSAR) to detect landslide related surface deformation. InSAR data were processed by repeat-pass interferometry using the DORIS and SARScape software. To better assess ground deformation related to individual landslide objects, InSAR time-series analysis has been applied using the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method. Analysis of the results in combination with optical data and DEM information has revealed that most of the derived deformations are caused by slow movements in areas of already existing landslides indicating the reactivation of older slope failures. This way, InSAR analysis can

  5. Quorum Sensing in Vibrio fischeri Cell Density-Dependent Activation of Symbiosis-Related Genes in a Marine Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE August 3, 1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quorum Sensing in Vibrio fischeri Cell...of the proposed research is to fully elucidate the mechanism of quorum sensing and response in bacteria by continuing investigations of the most well...Regulation/Marine bacteria/Symbiosis Genes/ Transcriptional activation/ Quorum Sensing 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT u NSN 7540-01-280

  6. SYNOPTIC GLOBAL REMOTE SENSING OF LAND SURFACE VEGETATION: OVERVIEW OF DAILY DATA QUALITY, CHALLENGES, AND OPPORTUNITIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto-Munoz, A.; Didan, K.

    2009-12-01

    Continuous acquisition of global satellite imagery over the years has contributed to the creation of a long data record from AVHRR, MODIS, TM, SPOT VGT, and other sensors. These records account now for 30+ years, and as the archive grows, it becomes an invaluable source of data for many environmental related studies dealing with trends and changes from local to global scale. Synoptic global remote sensing provides a multitude of land surface state variables and serves as a major foundation for global change research. However, these records are inhibited with problems that need to be accounted for in order to understand the limits and improve the science results derived from these records. The presence of clouds, aerosols, spatial gaps, variable viewing geometry, inconsistent atmosphere corrections, multiple reprocessing, and different sensors characteristics, makes it difficult to obtain frequently high quality data everywhere and every time. Moreover, these issues are location and season dependent making it even more difficult to construct the consistent time series required to study change over time. To evaluate these records, we analyzed 30+ years (1981 to 1999 and 2000 to 2009) of daily global land surface measurements (CMG resolution) from AVHRR (N07, N09, N11 and N14) and MODIS (AQUA and TERRA, Collection 5, C5). We stratified the data based on land cover, latitudinal zone, and season and we examined the daily data quality, including cloud persistence, aerosol loads, data gaps, and an index of reliability that measures how likely an observation is acceptable for research. The aim was to generate aggregate maps of cloud distribution, aerosol levels distribution, and data reliability distribution in both time and space. This information was then converted into an uncertainty measure at the pixel level that indicates how suspect or significant a result could potentially be, depending on its location and season and consequently what geographic locations and times

  7. Remote sensing reflectance model of optically active components of turbid waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutser, Tiit; Arst, Helgi

    1994-12-01

    A mathematical model that simulates the spectral curves of remote sensing reflectance is developed. The model is compared to measurements obtained from research vessel or boat in the Baltic Sea and Estonian lakes. The model simulates the effects of light backscattering from water and suspended matter, and the effects of its absorption due to water, phytoplankton, suspended matter and yellow substance. Measured by remote sensing spectral curves are compared by multiple of spectra obtained from model calculations to find the theoretical spectrum which is closest to experimental. It is assumed that in case of coincidence of the spectral curves concentrations of optically active substances in the model correspond to real ones. Preliminary testing of the model demonstrates that this model is useful for estimation of concentration of optically active substances in the waters of the Baltic Sea and Estonian lakes.

  8. Reading as active sensing: a computational model of gaze planning in word recognition.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Marcello; Ognibene, Dimitri; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Pirrelli, Vito

    2010-01-01

    WE OFFER A COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF GAZE PLANNING DURING READING THAT CONSISTS OF TWO MAIN COMPONENTS: a lexical representation network, acquiring lexical representations from input texts (a subset of the Italian CHILDES database), and a gaze planner, designed to recognize written words by mapping strings of characters onto lexical representations. The model implements an active sensing strategy that selects which characters of the input string are to be fixated, depending on the predictions dynamically made by the lexical representation network. We analyze the developmental trajectory of the system in performing the word recognition task as a function of both increasing lexical competence, and correspondingly increasing lexical prediction ability. We conclude by discussing how our approach can be scaled up in the context of an active sensing strategy applied to a robotic setting.

  9. Reading as Active Sensing: A Computational Model of Gaze Planning in Word Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Marcello; Ognibene, Dimitri; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Pirrelli, Vito

    2010-01-01

    We offer a computational model of gaze planning during reading that consists of two main components: a lexical representation network, acquiring lexical representations from input texts (a subset of the Italian CHILDES database), and a gaze planner, designed to recognize written words by mapping strings of characters onto lexical representations. The model implements an active sensing strategy that selects which characters of the input string are to be fixated, depending on the predictions dynamically made by the lexical representation network. We analyze the developmental trajectory of the system in performing the word recognition task as a function of both increasing lexical competence, and correspondingly increasing lexical prediction ability. We conclude by discussing how our approach can be scaled up in the context of an active sensing strategy applied to a robotic setting. PMID:20577589

  10. Summary. [California activities in remote sensing and management of water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    University of California activities in the development of remote sensing techniques and their application in the study of water resources within the state are summarized. It is pointed out that the summary is very lengthy due to fact that NASA had requested a dramatic reorientation of the study. For this reason it was felt that the co-investigators and other participants, need a rather detailed and systematic tabulation of the relevant facts that have been uncovered during the period since the reorientation.

  11. A structural perspective on the mechanisms of quorum sensing activation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lixa, Carolina; Mujo, Amanda; Anobom, Cristiane D; Pinheiro, Anderson S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to synchronize the population behavior in order to regulate gene expression through a cell-to-cell communication mechanism called quorum sensing. This phenomenon involves the production, detection and the response to extracellular signaling molecules named autoinducers, which directly or indirectly regulate gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. Quorum sensing may control a wide range of biological processes in bacteria, such as bioluminescence, virulence factor production, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. The autoinducers are recognized by specific receptors that can either be membrane-bound histidine kinase receptors, which work by activating cognate cytoplasmic response regulators, or cytoplasmic receptors acting as transcription factors. In this review, we focused on the cytosolic quorum sensing regulators whose three-dimensional structures helped elucidate their mechanisms of action. Structural studies of quorum sensing receptors may enable the rational design of inhibitor molecules. Ultimately, this approach may represent an effective alternative to treat infections where classical antimicrobial therapy fails to overcome the microorganism virulence.

  12. Nanopore-based electrical and label-free sensing of enzyme activity in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2015-09-15

    A generic strategy to expand the analytical scope of electrical nanopore sensing is presented. We specifically and electrically detect the activity of a diagnostically relevant hydrolytic enzyme and remove the analytically harmful interference from the biochemically complex sample matrix of blood serum. Our strategy is demonstrated at the example of the renin protease which is involved in regulation of blood pressure. The analysis scheme exploits a new approach to reduce sample complexity while generating a specific read-out signal. Within a single spin-column (i), the protease cleaves a resin-tethered peptide substrate (ii) which is affinity-purified using the same multifunctional resin to remove interfering blood serum components, followed by (iii) detecting the peptide via electrical nanopore recordings. Our approach is beneficial in several ways. First, by eliminating serum components, we overcome limitations of nanopore sensing when challenging samples lead to membrane instability and a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Second, the label-free sensing avoids drawbacks of currently used radiolabel-immunoassays for renin. Finally, the strategy of simultaneous generation and purification of a signal peptide within a multifunctional resin can very likely be expanded to other hydrolytic enzymes dissolved in any analyte matrix and exploited for analytical read-out methods other than nanopore sensing.

  13. DFT study of CO sensing mechanism on hexagonal WO3 (0 0 1) surface: The role of oxygen vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, FengHui; Zhao, Linghuan; Xue, Xu-Yan; Shen, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiangfeng; Chen, Shougang; Wang, Zonghua

    2014-08-01

    In this work, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to study the adsorption of CO on the oxygen deficient hexagonal WO3 (h-WO3) (0 0 1) surface. Two different situations including the O- and WO-terminated h-WO3 (0 0 1) surfaces are considered. The influence of surface defect density is also concerned. Calculations proposed that the oxygen vacancy exert negative effects on the sensing ability of the h-WO3 material. Under relatively higher defect density, the presence of the oxygen vacancy on both of the O and WO-terminated (0 0 1) surfaces all decreases their sensitivity to CO gas to some extent, while they are still sensitive enough to detect CO gas with the charge transfers of 0.498 and 0.129 e, respectively. Whereas, under lower defect density, calculations indicated that the sensitivity of the material can be lowered largely.

  14. Technical Note: Remote sensing of sea surface salinity using the propagation of low-frequency navigation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astin, I.; Feng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    This paper introduces a potential method for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity (SSS) using measured propagation delay of low-frequency Loran-C signals transmitted over an all-seawater path between the Sylt station in Germany and an integrated Loran-C/GPS receiver located in Harwich, UK. The overall delay variations in Loran-C surface waves along the path may be explained by changes in sea surface properties (especially the temperature and salinity), as well as atmospheric dynamics that determine the refractive index of the atmosphere. After removing the atmospheric and sea surface temperature (SST) effects, the residual delay revealed a temporal variation similar to that of SSS data obtained by the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite.

  15. Technical Note: Remote sensing of sea surface salinity using the propagation of low-frequency navigation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astin, I.; Feng, Y.

    2015-09-01

    This paper introduces a potential method for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity (SSS) using the measured propagation delay of low-frequency Loran-C signals transmitted over an all-seawater path between the Sylt station in Germany and an integrated Loran-C/GPS receiver located in Harwich, UK. The overall delay variations in Loran-C surface waves along the path may be explained by changes in sea surface properties (especially the temperature and salinity), as well as atmospheric properties that determine the refractive index of the atmosphere. After removing the atmospheric and sea surface temperature (SST) effects from the measured delay, the residual delay revealed a temporal variation similar to that of SSS data obtained by the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite.

  16. IMPERVIOUS SURFACES AND STREAMFLOW DISCHARGE: A HISTORICAL REMOTE SENSING PERSPECTIVE IN A NORTHERN VIRGINIA SUBWATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impervious surfaces are a leading contributor to non-point-source water pollution in urban watersheds. These surfaces include such features as roads, parking lots, rooftops and driveways. Aerial photography provides a historical vehicle for determining impervious surface growth a...

  17. Requirements for extravehicular activities on the lunar and Martian surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Mariann F.; Schentrup, Susan M.

    1990-01-01

    Basic design reference requirements pertinent to EVA equipment on lunar and martian surfaces are provided. Environmental factors affecting surface EVA are analyzed including gravity, dust, atmospheric conditions, thermal gradients, lightning conditions, and radiation effects, and activities associated with surface EVA are outlined. Environmental and activity effects on EVA equipment are assessed, and emphasis is placed on planetary surface portable life support systems (PLSS), suit development, protection from micrometeoroids, dust, and radiation, food and water supplies, and the extravehicular mobility-unit thermal-control system. Environmental and activity impacts on PLSS design are studied, with focus on base self-sufficiency and reduction in resupply logistics.

  18. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    All flutter suppression systems require sensors to detect the movement of the lifting surface and to activate a control surface according to a synthesized control law. Most of the work performed to date relates to the development of control laws based on predetermined locations of sensors and control surfaces. These locations of sensors and control surfaces are determined either arbitrarily, or by means of a trial and error procedure. The aerodynamic energy concept indicates that the sensors should be located within the activated strip. Furthermore, the best chordwise location of a sensor activating a T.E. control surface is around the 65 percent chord location. The best chordwise location for a sensor activating a L.E. surface is shown to lie upstream of the wing (around 20 percent upstream of the leading edge), or alternatively, two sensors located along the same chord should be used.

  19. Technique for the estimation of surface temperatures from embedded temperature sensing for rapid, high energy surface deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Tyson R.; Schunk, Peter Randall; Roberts, Scott Alan

    2014-07-01

    Temperature histories on the surface of a body that has been subjected to a rapid, highenergy surface deposition process can be di cult to determine, especially if it is impossible to directly observe the surface or attach a temperature sensor to it. In this report, we explore two methods for estimating the temperature history of the surface through the use of a sensor embedded within the body very near to the surface. First, the maximum sensor temperature is directly correlated with the peak surface temperature. However, it is observed that the sensor data is both delayed in time and greatly attenuated in magnitude, making this approach unfeasible. Secondly, we propose an algorithm that involves tting the solution to a one-dimensional instantaneous energy solution problem to both the sensor data and to the results of a one-dimensional CVFEM code. This algorithm is shown to be able to estimate the surface temperature 20 C.

  20. Mathematic modeling of the Earth's surface and the process of remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balter, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that real data from remote sensing of the Earth from outer space are not best suited to the search for optimal procedures with which to process such data. To work out the procedures, it was proposed that data synthesized with the help of mathematical modeling be used. A criterion for simularity to reality was formulated. The basic principles for constructing methods for modeling the data from remote sensing are recommended. A concrete method is formulated for modeling a complete cycle of radiation transformations in remote sensing. A computer program is described which realizes the proposed method. Some results from calculations are presented which show that the method satisfies the requirements imposed on it.

  1. Toward autonomous surface-based infrared remote sensing of polar clouds: cloud-height retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Penny M.; Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.

    2016-08-01

    Polar regions are characterized by their remoteness, making measurements challenging, but an improved knowledge of clouds and radiation is necessary to understand polar climate change. Infrared radiance spectrometers can operate continuously from the surface and have low power requirements relative to active sensors. Here we explore the feasibility of retrieving cloud height with an infrared spectrometer that would be designed for use in remote polar locations. Using a wide variety of simulated spectra of mixed-phase polar clouds at varying instrument resolutions, retrieval accuracy is explored using the CO2 slicing/sorting and the minimum local emissivity variance (MLEV) methods. In the absence of imposed errors and for clouds with optical depths greater than ˜ 0.3, cloud-height retrievals from simulated spectra using CO2 slicing/sorting and MLEV are found to have roughly equivalent high accuracies: at an instrument resolution of 0.5 cm-1, mean biases are found to be ˜ 0.2 km for clouds with bases below 2 and -0.2 km for higher clouds. Accuracy is found to decrease with coarsening resolution and become worse overall for MLEV than for CO2 slicing/sorting; however, the two methods have differing sensitivity to different sources of error, suggesting an approach that combines them. For expected errors in the atmospheric state as well as both instrument noise and bias of 0.2 mW/(m2 sr cm-1), at a resolution of 4 cm-1, average retrieval errors are found to be less than ˜ 0.5 km for cloud bases within 1 km of the surface, increasing to ˜ 1.5 km at 4 km. This sensitivity indicates that a portable, surface-based infrared radiance spectrometer could provide an important complement in remote locations to satellite-based measurements, for which retrievals of low-level cloud are challenging.

  2. Reclaimed surface mine terrestrial pools: Integrating remote sensing, spatial data and field work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazar, Sheila A.

    This study investigated the remote sensing of aboveground biomass in reclaimed surface mine reclamation sites and the carbon (C) storage potential of these sites. The research is structured in three sections. In the first study, the potential for utilizing the tasseled cap (TC) spectral transformation to characterize multi-temporal changes of vegetation growth was investigated within nine reclaimed coal surface mines in Monongalia and Preston Counties, West Virginia. The spectral patterns of TC greenness, brightness and wetness values associated with the minesites were investigated for a multi-temporal series of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, from 1992 to 2007. In general, most of the minesites at the time of mining showed increased brightness, and decreased greenness and wetness, with a reverse of this pattern during reclamation. However, rainfall appears to be a confounding variable, at least for relatively recently reclaimed sites. Spectral change vector analysis (CVA) was found to be effective for summarizing the patterns of change in TC values before and after reclamation. In the second study, field samples were collected from reclaimed grassland minesites and used to estimate biomass and C accumulation. In general, biomass and C increased in the six years following reclamation, and then slowly declined. Three Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, from April, May and September of 2007, were used to assess four vegetation indices (VIs), TC, and red and near infrared radiance for potential for mapping biomass. For the April 3 Landsat image, the vegetation indices were not statistically correlated with field-measured biomass, and nor were the regression models significant. For the May 13 image, TC greenness and EVI were most strongly correlated with biomass, with TC wetness, NDVI, TVI and SAVI all significant at the 0.05 level. A number of regression models that included age since reclamation and spectral indices for May 13 were statistically significant

  3. Chemical and Biological Sensing with a Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Yanina

    Fiber biosensors have emerged as an alternative to other optical sensor platforms which utilize bulkier optical elements. Sensors manufactured using optical fiber offer considerable advantages over traditional platforms, such as simple manufacturing process, small size and possibility for in situ and remote measurements. The possibility to manufacture a compact sensor with very few optical elements and package it into a portable hand-held device makes it particularly useful in many biomedical applications. Such applications generate a growing demand for an improved understanding of how fiber sensors function as well as for sensor optimization techniques so later these devices can suit the needs of the applications they are developed for. Research presented in this thesis is focused on a development of a plasmonic fiber biosensor and its application towards biochemical sensing. The fiber sensor used in this study integrates plasmonics with tilted Bragg grating technology, creating a versatile sensing solution. Plasmonics alone is an established phenomenon that is widely employed in many sensing applications. The Bragg grating is also a well-researched optical component that has been extensively applied in telecommunication. By combining both plasmonics and Bragg gratings, it is possible to design a compact and very sensitive chemical sensor. The presented work focuses on the characterization and optimization of the fiber sensor so later it could be applied in biochemical sensing. It also explores several applications including real-time monitoring of polymer adsorption, detection of thrombin and cellular sensing. All applications are focused on studying processes that are very different in their nature and thus the various strengths of the developed sensing platform were leveraged to suit the requirements of these applications.

  4. Inhibitors for Androgen Receptor Activation Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    new class of chemical therapeutics for treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS X-ray crystallography, high throughput screening, medicinal... treatments because anti-androgen resis- tance usually develops. We conducted functional and x-ray screens to identify compounds that bind the AR surface and...possibility that such compounds could be used for prostate cancer treatment . It is unlikely that natural T3 or Triac concentrations approach levels required

  5. Activation of geminivirus V-sense promoters in roots is restricted to nematode feeding sites.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Carolina; García, Alejandra; Aristizábal, Fabio; Portillo, Mary; Herreros, Esther; Munoz-Martín, M Angeles; Grundler, Florian; Mullineaux, Phillip M; Fenoll, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Obligate sedentary endoparasitic nematodes, such as the root-knot and cyst nematodes, elicit the differentiation of specialized nematode nurse or feeding cells [nematode feeding sites (NFS), giant cells and syncytia, respectively]. During NFS differentiation, marked changes in cell cycle progression occur, partly similar to those induced by some geminiviruses. In this work, we describe the activation of V-sense promoters from the Maize streak virus (MSV) and Wheat dwarf virus (WDV) in NFS formed by root-knot and cyst nematodes. Both promoters were transiently active in microinjection experiments. In tobacco and Arabidopsis transgenic lines carrying promoter-beta-glucuronidase fusions, the MSV V-sense promoter was activated in the vascular tissues of aerial plant parts, primarily leaf and cotyledon phloem tissue and some floral structures. Interestingly, in roots, promoter activation was restricted to syncytia and giant cells tested with four different nematode populations, but undetectable in the rest of the root system. As the activity of the promoter in transgenic rootstocks should be restricted to NFS only, the MSV promoter may have utility in engineering grafted crops for nematode control. Therefore, this study represents a step in the provision of some of the much needed additional data on promoters with restricted activation in NFS useful in biotechnological nematode control strategies.

  6. Spaceborne Microwave Instrument for High Resolution Remote Sensing of the Earth's Surface Using a Large-Aperture Mesh Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E.; Wilson, W.; Yueh, S.; Freeland, R.; Helms, R.; Edelstein, W.; Sadowy, G.; Farra, D.; West, R.; Oxnevad, K.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a two-year study of a large-aperture, lightweight, deployable mesh antenna system for radiometer and radar remote sensing of the Earth from space. The study focused specifically on an instrument to measure ocean salinity and Soil moisture. Measurements of ocean salinity and soil moisture are of critical . importance in improving knowledge and prediction of key ocean and land surface processes, but are not currently obtainable from space. A mission using this instrument would be the first demonstration of deployable mesh antenna technology for remote sensing and could lead to potential applications in other remote sensing disciplines that require high spatial resolution measurements. The study concept features a rotating 6-m-diameter deployable mesh antenna, with radiometer and radar sensors, to measure microwave emission and backscatter from the Earth's surface. The sensors operate at L and S bands, with multiple polarizations and a constant look angle, scanning across a wide swath. The study included detailed analyses of science requirements, reflector and feedhorn design and performance, microwave emissivity measurements of mesh samples, design and test of lightweight radar electronic., launch vehicle accommodations, rotational dynamics simulations, and an analysis of attitude control issues associated with the antenna and spacecraft, The goal of the study was to advance the technology readiness of the overall concept to a level appropriate for an Earth science emission.

  7. Surface polysaccharides and quorum sensing are involved in the attachment and survival of Xanthomonas albilineans on sugarcane leaves.

    PubMed

    Mensi, Imene; Daugrois, Jean-Heinrich; Pieretti, Isabelle; Gargani, Daniel; Fleites, Laura A; Noell, Julie; Bonnot, Francois; Gabriel, Dean W; Rott, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans, the causal agent of sugarcane leaf scald, is a bacterial plant pathogen that is mainly spread by infected cuttings and contaminated harvesting tools. However, some strains of this pathogen are known to be spread by aerial means and are able to colonize the phyllosphere of sugarcane before entering the host plant and causing disease. The objective of this study was to identify the molecular factors involved in the survival or growth of X. albilineans on sugarcane leaves. We developed a bioassay to test for the attachment of X. albilineans on sugarcane leaves using tissue-cultured plantlets grown in vitro. Six mutants of strain XaFL07-1 affected in surface polysaccharide production completely lost their capacity to survive on the sugarcane leaf surface. These mutants produced more biofilm in vitro and accumulated more cellular poly-β-hydroxybutyrate than the wild-type strain. A mutant affected in the production of small molecules (including potential biosurfactants) synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) attached to the sugarcane leaves as well as the wild-type strain. Surprisingly, the attachment of bacteria on sugarcane leaves varied among mutants of the rpf gene cluster involved in bacterial quorum sensing. Therefore, quorum sensing may affect polysaccharide production, or both polysaccharides and quorum sensing may be involved in the survival or growth of X. albilineans on sugarcane leaves.

  8. An intercomparison of available soil moisture estimates from thermal infrared and passive microwave remote sensing and land surface modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, Christopher R.; Crow, Wade T.; Mecikalski, John R.; Anderson, Martha C.; Holmes, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Remotely sensed soil moisture studies have mainly focused on retrievals using active and passive microwave (MW) sensors, which provide measurements that are directly related to soil moisture (SM). MW sensors have obvious advantages such as the ability to retrieve through nonprecipitating cloud cover which provides shorter repeat cycles. However, MW sensors offer coarse spatial resolution and suffer from reduced retrieval skill over moderate to dense vegetation. A unique avenue for filling these information gaps is to exploit the retrieval of SM from thermal infrared (TIR) observations, which can provide SM information under vegetation cover and at significantly higher resolutions than MW. Previously, an intercomparison of TIR-based and MW-based SM has not been investigated in the literature. Here a series of analyses are proposed to study relationships between SM products during a multiyear period (2003-2008) from a passive MW retrieval (AMSR-E), a TIR based model (ALEXI), and a land surface model (Noah) over the continental United States. The three analyses used in this study include (1) a spatial anomaly correlation analysis, (2) a temporal correlation analysis, and (3) a triple collocation error estimation technique. In general, the intercomparison shows that the TIR and MW methods provide complementary information about the current SM state. TIR can provide SM information over moderate to dense vegetation, a large information gap in current MW methods, while serving as an additional independent source of SM information over low to moderate vegetation. The complementary nature of SM information from MW and TIR sensors implies a potential for integration within an advanced SM data assimilation system.

  9. Mechanisms of nutrient sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term nutrient sensing has emerged to describe the molecular mechanisms by which nutrients and their metabolites interact with various cell surface receptors, intracellular signaling proteins, and nuclear receptors and modulate the activity of a complex network of signaling pathways that regulate...

  10. Airborne mapping of earth-atmosphere exchange processes and remote sensing of surface characteristics over heterogeneous areas

    SciTech Connect

    Schuepp, P.H.; Ogunjemiyo, S.; Mitic, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    Given the spatial heterogeneity of much of the biosphere, and the difficulty in establishing representative observation points at the surface, airborne flux observations coupled with airborne and satellite-based remote sensing plays an increasing role in the description of surface-atmosphere exchange processes. Our paper summarizes flux mapping procedures based on low level airborne sampling by the Canadian Twin Otter research aircraft, over three ecosystems with different degrees of spatial heterogeneity (grassland, mixed agricultural land and boreal forest). Observations show that the degree to which flux maps for heat, moisture and trace gases are correlated, among themselves and with maps of radiometrically observable surface features, cannot be generalized. This means that, wherever possible, algorithms for the prediction of surface-atmosphere exchange processes based on remote sensing observations should be developed for - and tested in - each structurally different ecosystem. The flexibility of deployment of aircraft serves well, both for the gathering of data to develop such algorithms, as well as for their testing at scales that integrate over an adequate sample of the various components that constitute a spatially heterogeneous ecosystem. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Synergistic effect of MgO nanoparticles for electrochemical sensing, photocatalytic-dye degradation and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Yadav, L. S.; Lingaraju, K.; Manjunath, K.; Raghu, G. K.; Sudheer Kumar, K. H.; Nagaraju, G.

    2017-02-01

    MgO nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by a simple and eco-friendly route using watermelon juice as a novel fuel. The synthesized MgO NPs have been subjected to detailed characterization using various analytical techniques. The XRD pattern confirms the crystal structure of MgO which is composed of cubic phase of periclase. The FTIR spectrum gave another manifest for the presence of Mg–O bonding at 552 cm‑1. The surface structure, morphology and particle size have been studied using SEM and TEM which show the MgO NPs are in agglomerated form, almost spherical in shape and average size is about 30–50 nm. Finally, the multidimensional studies have been examined by subjecting MgO NPs as a catalyst for the photodegradation of methylene blue dye (one of the most commonly encountered environmental pollutants), antibacterial activities and electrochemical sensing for the detection of hydrazine at trace level concentration.

  12. Amyloid-graphene oxide as immobilization platform of Au nanocatalysts and enzymes for improved glucose-sensing activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaochen; Li, Mingjie; Li, Zehui; Lv, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Li, Chaoxu

    2017-03-15

    Two-dimensional GO nanosheets and one-dimensional lysozyme nanofibrils were hybridized through electrostatic interaction to get a novel amyloid-GO composite, which promised a biocompatible immobilization platform for Au nanocatalysts as well as enzymes. The immobilization platform could load a large and tunable amount of Au NPs while maintaining their high catalytic activity. The immobilized catalysts showed high electrochemical behaviors, being ideal as glucose sensing systems. Furthermore, enzymes could also be immobilized on the residual bare surfaces of amyloid-GO, and served by a colorimetric method for a sensitive and selective analytical glucose-detecting platform. The introduction of amyloid fibrils with super large aspect ratios (>10(3)) on GO nanosheets offers an unprecedented possibility of designing and developing novel biomimetic catalysts for broad applications in biotechnology.

  13. SERS Activity of Silver Nanoparticles Functionalized with A Desferrioxamine B Derived Ligand for FE(III) Binding and Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinetto, P.; Taglietti, A.; Pasotti, L.; Pallavicini, P.; Dacarro, G.; Giulotto, E.; Grandi, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the SERS activity of colloidal silver nanoparticles functionalized with a ligand, derived from the siderophore desferrioxamine B (desferal, DFO), an iron chelator widely used in biological and medical applications. The ligand was equipped with a sulfur-containing moiety to ensure optimal binding with silver surfaces. By means of Raman and SERS effects we monitored the route of material preparation from the modified DFO-S molecule to the colloidal aggregates. The results indicate that the functionalization of the chelating agent does not affect its binding ability towards Fe(III). The resulting functionalized silver nanoparticles are a promising SERS tag for operation in biological environments. The Fe-O stretching signature, arising when DFO-S grafted to silver nanoparticles binds Fe(III), could provide a tool for cation sensing in solution.

  14. SERS activity of Ag decorated nanodiamond and nano-β-SiC, diamond-like-carbon and thermally annealed diamond thin film surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kuntumalla, Mohan Kumar; Srikanth, Vadali Venkata Satya Siva; Ravulapalli, Satyavathi; Gangadharini, Upender; Ojha, Harish; Desai, Narayana Rao; Bansal, Chandrahas

    2015-09-07

    In the recent past surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based bio-sensing has gained prominence owing to the simplicity and efficiency of the SERS technique. Dedicated and continuous research efforts have been made to develop SERS substrates that are not only stable, durable and reproducible but also facilitate real-time bio-sensing. In this context diamond, β-SiC and diamond-like-carbon (DLC) and other related thin films have been promoted as excellent candidates for bio-technological applications including real time bio-sensing. In this work, SERS activities of nanodiamond, nano-β-SiC, DLC, thermally annealed diamond thin film surfaces were examined. DLC and thermally annealed diamond thin films were found to show SERS activity without any metal nanostructures on their surfaces. The observed SERS activities of the considered surfaces are explained in terms of the electromagnetic enhancement mechanism and charge transfer resonance process.

  15. Gold surface supported spherical liposome-gold nano-particle nano-composite for label free DNA sensing.

    PubMed

    Bhuvana, M; Narayanan, J Shankara; Dharuman, V; Teng, W; Hahn, J H; Jayakumar, K

    2013-03-15

    Immobilization of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) liposome-gold nano-particle (DOPE-AuNP) nano-composite covalently on 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) on gold surface is demonstrated for the first time for electrochemical label free DNA sensing. Spherical nature of the DOPE on the MPA monolayer is confirmed by the appearance of sigmoidal voltammetric profile, characteristic behavior of linear diffusion, for the MPA-DOPE in presence of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) and [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) redox probes. The DOPE liposome vesicle fusion is prevented by electroless deposition of AuNP on the hydrophilic amine head groups of the DOPE. Immobilization of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) is made via simple gold-thiol linkage for DNA hybridization sensing in the presence of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-). The sensor discriminates the hybridized (complementary target hybridized), un-hybridized (non-complementary target hybridized) and single base mismatch target hybridized surfaces sensitively and selectively without signal amplification. The lowest target DNA concentration detected is 0.1×10(-12)M. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance (EIS), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques are used for DNA sensing on DOPE-AuNP nano-composite. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV) spectroscopic techniques are used to understand the interactions between the DOPE, AuNP and ssDNA. The results indicate the presence of an intact and well defined spherical DOPE-AuNP nano-composite on the gold surface. The method could be applied for fabrication of the surface based liposome-AuNP-DNA composite for cell transfection studies at reduced reagents and costs.

  16. Quorum Sensing Activity of Aeromonas Caviae Strain YL12, A Bacterium Isolated from Compost

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a well-studied cell-to-cell communication method that involves a cell-density dependent regulation of genes expression mediated by signalling molecules. In this study, a bacterium isolated from a plant material compost pile was found to possess quorum sensing activity based on bioassay screening. Isolate YL12 was identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and molecular typing using rpoD gene which identified the isolate as Aeromonas caviae. High resolution tandem mass spectrometry was subsequently employed to identify the N-acyl homoserine lactone profile of Aeromonas caviae YL12 and confirmed that this isolate produced two short chain N-acyl homoserine lactones, namely C4-HSL and C6, and the production was observed to be cell density-dependent. Using the thin layer chromatography (TLC) bioassay, both AHLs were found to activate C. violaceum CV026, whereas only C6-HSL was revealed to induce bioluminescence expression of E. coli [pSB401]. The data presented in this study will be the leading steps in understanding the role of quorum sensing in Aeromonas caviae strain YL12. PMID:24759107

  17. Sensing element for detection of polar organic vapours on the base of polyaniline-composite - Effect of substrate surface area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejnik, Robert; Gorakh Babar, Dipak; Slobodian, Petr; Matyas, Jiri

    2016-03-01

    Conductive polymer polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by oxidative polymerization of aniline hydrochloride as a source of aniline and ammonium persulfate as an oxidation agent. The polymerization process is relatively easy and cheap. The reaction was carried out in presence of polymer substrate, in our case polyethylene terephthalate (PET) as a representative of smooth surface substrate and polyvinylidenfluoride (PVDF) nanofibers membrane as a representative of porous substrate. Both these substrates were covered by polyaniline (PANI) and used as a sensing element for organic vapors detection. The detection was made by measuring and the record of the change of resistivity during adsorption and desorption of saturated vapors. The result shows that sensitivity decreases with increasing polarity of chosen solvent in order N,N- Dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMAc) and Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The PANI base sensing element on PVDF substrate improves sensitivity, selectivity and it also has good reversibility and repeatability.

  18. A Conceptual Approach to Assimilating Remote Sensing Data to Improve Soil Moisture Profile Estimates in a Surface Flux/Hydrology Model. Part 1; Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosson, William L.; Laymon, Charles A.; Inguva, Ramarao; Schamschula, Marius; Caulfield, John

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the amount of water in the soil is of great importance to many earth science disciplines. Soil moisture is a key variable in controlling the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. Thus, soil moisture information is valuable in a wide range of applications including weather and climate, runoff potential and flood control, early warning of droughts, irrigation, crop yield forecasting, soil erosion, reservoir management, geotechnical engineering, and water quality. Despite the importance of soil moisture information, widespread and continuous measurements of soil moisture are not possible today. Although many earth surface conditions can be measured from satellites, we still cannot adequately measure soil moisture from space. Research in soil moisture remote sensing began in the mid 1970s shortly after the surge in satellite development. Recent advances in remote sensing have shown that soil moisture can be measured, at least qualitatively, by several methods. Quantitative measurements of moisture in the soil surface layer have been most successful using both passive and active microwave remote sensing, although complications arise from surface roughness and vegetation type and density. Early attempts to measure soil moisture from space-borne microwave instruments were hindered by what is now considered sub-optimal wavelengths (shorter than 5 cm) and the coarse spatial resolution of the measurements. L-band frequencies between 1 and 3 GHz (10-30 cm) have been deemed optimal for detection of soil moisture in the upper few centimeters of soil. The Electronically Steered Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR), an aircraft-based instrument operating a 1,4 GHz, has shown great promise for soil moisture determination. Initiatives are underway to develop a similar instrument for space. Existing space-borne synthetic aperture radars (SARS) operating at C- and L-band have also shown some potential to detect surface wetness. The

  19. APOLLO 10: Training for Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts train on a mock-up lunar surface, practicing the procedures they will follow on the real thing, and adjusting to the demands of the workload. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  20. Hyperspectral remote sensing estimation of crop residue cover: Soil mineralogy, surface conditions, and their effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage practices can enhance soil organic carbon content (SOC), improve soil structure, and reduce erosion. However, direct assessment of tillage practice for monitoring SOC change over large regions is difficult. Remote sensing of crop residue cover (CRC) can help assess tillage pra...

  1. Induced Voltage Linear Extraction Method Using an Active Kelvin Bridge for Disturbing Force Self-Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Bo

    2016-05-20

    This paper presents an induced voltage linear extraction method for disturbing force self-sensing in the application of giant magnetostrictive actuators (GMAs). In this method, a Kelvin bridge combined with an active device is constructed instead of a conventional Wheatstone bridge for extraction of the induced voltage, and an additional GMA is adopted as a reference actuator in the self-sensing circuit in order to balance the circuit bridge. The linear fitting of the measurement data is done according to the linear relationship between the disturbing forces and the integral of the induced voltage. The experimental results confirm the good performance of the proposed method, and the self-sensitivity of the disturbing forces is better than 2.0 (mV·s)/N.

  2. Gas sensing properties of Al-doped ZnO for UV-activated CO detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhahri, R.; Hjiri, M.; El Mir, L.; Bonavita, A.; Iannazzo, D.; Latino, M.; Donato, N.; Leonardi, S. G.; Neri, G.

    2016-04-01

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) samples were prepared using a modified sol-gel route and charaterized by means of trasmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analysis. Resistive planar devices based on thick films of AZO deposited on interdigitated alumina substrates were fabricated and investigated as UV light activated CO sensors. CO sensing tests were performed in both dark and illumination condition by exposing the samples to UV radiation (λ  =  400 nm).Under UV light, Al-doped ZnO gas sensors operated at lower temperature than in dark. Furthermore, by photoactivation we also promoted CO sensitivity and made signal recovery of AZO sensors faster. Results demonstrate that Al-doped ZnO might be a promising sensing material for the detection of CO under UV illumination.

  3. Validity of PALMS GPS Scoring of Active and Passive Travel Compared to SenseCam

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jordan A.; Jankowska, Marta M.; Meseck, Kristin; Godbole, Suneeta; Natarajan, Loki; Raab, Fredric; Demchak, Barry; Patrick, Kevin; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess validity of the Personal Activity Location Measurement System (PALMS) for deriving time spent walking/running, bicycling, and in vehicle, using SenseCam as the comparison. Methods 40 adult cyclists wore a Qstarz BT-Q1000XT GPS data logger and SenseCam (camera worn around neck capturing multiple images every minute) for a mean of 4 days. PALMS used distance and speed between GPS points to classify whether each minute was part of a trip (yes/no), and if so, the trip mode (walking/running, bicycling, in vehicle). SenseCam images were annotated to create the same classifications (i.e., trip yes/no and mode). 2×2 contingency tables and confusion matrices were calculated at the minute-level for PALMS vs. SenseCam classifications. Mixed-effects linear regression models estimated agreement (mean differences and intraclass correlations [ICCs]) between PALMS and SenseCam with regards to minutes/day in each mode. Results Minute-level sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value were ≥88%, and positive predictive value was ≥75% for non mode-specific trip detection. 72–80% of outdoor walking/running minutes, 73% of bicycling minutes, and 74–76% of in-vehicle minutes were correctly classified by PALMS. For minutes/day, PALMS had a mean bias (i.e., amount of over or under estimation) of 2.4–3.1 minutes (11–15%) for walking/running, 2.3–2.9 minutes (7–9%) for bicycling, and 4.3–5 minutes (15–17%) for vehicle time. ICCs were ≥.80 for all modes. Conclusions PALMS has validity for processing GPS data to objectively measure time walking/running, bicycling, and in vehicle in population studies. Assessing travel patterns is one of many valuable applications of GPS in physical activity research that can improve our understanding of the determinants and health outcomes of active transportation as well as its impact on physical activity. PMID:25010407

  4. Quorum Sensing Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships of β-Keto Esters.

    PubMed

    Forschner-Dancause, Stephanie; Poulin, Emily; Meschwitz, Susan

    2016-07-25

    Traditional therapeutics to treat bacterial infections have given rise to multi-drug resistant pathogens, which pose a major threat to human and animal health. In several pathogens, quorum sensing (QS)-a cell-cell communication system in bacteria-controls the expression of genes responsible for pathogenesis, thus representing a novel target in the fight against bacterial infections. Based on the structure of the autoinducers responsible for QS activity and other QS inhibitors, we hypothesize that β-keto esters with aryl functionality could possess anti-QS activity. A panel of nineteen β-keto ester analogs was tested for the inhibition of bioluminescence (a QS-controlled phenotype) in the marine pathogen Vibrio harveyi. Initial screening demonstrated the need of a phenyl ring at the C-3 position for antagonistic activity. Further additions to the phenyl ring with 4-substituted halo groups or a 3- or 4-substituted methoxy group resulted in the most active compounds with IC50 values ranging from 23 µM to 53 µM. The compounds additionally inhibit green fluorescent protein production by E. coli JB525. Evidence is presented that aryl β-keto esters may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with N-acyl homoserine lactones for receptor binding. Expansion of the β-keto ester panel will enable us to obtain more insight into the structure-activity relationships needed to allow for the development of novel anti-virulence agents.

  5. Bacterial Secretant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dampens Inflammasome Activation in a Quorum Sensing-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jungmin; Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Sangjun; Cho, Yoeseph; Lee, Eunju; Park, Jong-Hwan; Shin, Ok Sarah; Son, Junghyun; Yoon, Sang Sun; Yu, Je-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Inflammasome signaling can contribute to host innate immune defense against bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, bacterial evasion of host inflammasome activation is still poorly elucidated. Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication mechanism that promotes coordinated adaptation by triggering expression of a wide range of genes. QS is thought to strongly contribute to the virulence of P. aeruginosa, but the molecular impact of bacterial QS on host inflammasome defense is completely unknown. Here, we present evidence that QS-related factors of the bacterial secretant (BS) from P. aeruginosa can dampen host inflammasome signaling in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. We found that BS from QS-defective ΔlasR/rhlR mutant, but not from wild-type (WT) P. aeruginosa, induces robust activation of the NLRC4 inflammasome. P. aeruginosa-released flagellin mediates this inflammasome activation by ΔlasR/rhlR secretant, but QS-regulated bacterial proteases in the WT BS impair extracellular flagellin to attenuate NLRC4 inflammasome activation. P. aeruginosa-secreted proteases also degrade inflammasome components in the extracellular space to inhibit the propagation of inflammasome-mediated responses. Furthermore, QS-regulated virulence factor pyocyanin and QS autoinducer 3-oxo-C12-homoserine lactone directly suppressed NLRC4- and even NLRP3-mediated inflammasome assembly and activation. Taken together, our data indicate that QS system of P. aeruginosa facilitates bacteria to evade host inflammasome-dependent sensing machinery.

  6. Force Sensing Resistor (FSR): a brief overview and the low-cost sensor for active compliance control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadun, A. S.; Jalani, J.; Sukor, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    Force Sensing Resistors (FSR) sensors are devices that allow measuring static and dynamic forces applied to a contact surface. Their range of responses is basically depending on the variation of its electric resistance. In general, Flexiforce and Interlink are two common types of FSR sensors that are available, cheap and easily found in the market. Studies have shown that the FSR sensors are usually applied for robotic grippers and for biomechanical fields. This paper provides a brief overview of the application of the FSR sensors. Subsequently, two different set of experiments are carried out to test the effectiveness of the Flexiforce and Interlink sensors. First, the hardness detector system (Case Study A) and second, the force-position control system (Case Study B). The hardware used for the experiment was developed from low-cost materials. The results revealed that both FSR sensors are sufficient and reliable to provide a good sensing modality particularly for measuring force. Apart from the low-cost sensors, essentially, the FSR sensors are very useful devices that able to provide a good active compliance control, particularly for the grasping robotic hand.

  7. Evaluation of Surface Energy Balance models for mapping evapotranspiration using very high resolution airborne remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, George

    Agriculture is the largest (90%) consumer of all fresh water in the world. The consumptive use of water by vegetation represented by the process evapotranspiration (ET) has a vital role in the dynamics of water, carbon and energy fluxes of the biosphere. Consequently, mapping ET is essential for making water a sustainable resource and also for monitoring ecosystem response to water stress and changing climate. Over the past three decades, numerous thermal remote sensing based ET mapping algorithms were developed and these have brought a significant theoretical and technical advancement in the spatial modeling of ET. Though these algorithms provided a robust, economical, and efficient tool for ET estimations at field and regional scales, yet the uncertainties in flux estimations were large, making evaluation a difficult task. The main objective of this study was to evaluate and improve the performance of widely used remote sensing based energy balance models, namely: the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution and with Internalized Calibration (METRIC), and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS). Data used in this study was collected as part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional field campaign BEAREX (Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote Sensing Experiment) that was conducted during 2007 and 2008 summer cropping seasons at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) in Bushland, Texas. Seventeen high resolution remote sensing images taken from multispectral sensors onboard aircraft and field measurements of the agro-meteorological variables from the campaign were used for model evaluation and improvement. Overall relative error measured in terms of mean absolute percent difference (MAPD) for instantaneous ET (mm h -1) were 22.7%, 23.2%, and 12.6% for SEBAL, METRIC, and SEBS, respectively. SEBAL and METRIC performances for irrigated fields representing higher ET

  8. Toward A National Early Warning System for Forest Disturbances Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Phenology

    SciTech Connect

    HargroveJr., William Walter; Spruce, Joe; Gasser, Gerry; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2009-12-01

    We are using a statistical clustering method for delineating homogeneous ecoregions as a basis for identifying disturbances in forests through time over large areas, up to national and global extents. Such changes can be shown relative to past conditions, or can be predicted relative to present conditions, as with forecasts of future climatic change. This quantitative ecoregion approach can be used to predict destinations for populations whose local environments are forecast to become unsuitable and are forced to migrate as their habitat shifts, and is also useful for predicting the susceptibility of new locations to invasive species like Sudden Oak Death. EFETAC and our sister western center WWETAC, along with our NASA and ORNL collaborators, are designing a new national-scale early warning system for forest threats, called FIRST. Envisioned as a change-detection system, FIRST will identify all land surface cover changes at the MODIS observational scale, and then try to discriminate normal, expected seasonal changes from locations having unusual activity that may represent potential forest threats. As a start, we have developed new national data sets every 16 days from 2002 through 2008, based on land surface phenology, or timing of leaf-out in the spring and brown-down in the fall. Changes in such phenological maps will be shown to contain important information about vegetation health status across the United States. The standard deviation of the duration of fall can be mapped, showing places where length of fall is relatively constant or is variable in length from year to year.

  9. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  10. Surfaces of Fluorinated Pyridinium Block Copolymers with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan,S.; Ward, R.; Hexemer, A.; Sohn, K.; Lee, K.; Angert, E.; Fischer, D.; Kramer, E.; Ober, C.

    2006-01-01

    Polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) copolymers were quaternized with 1-bromohexane and 6-perfluorooctyl-1-bromohexane. Surfaces prepared from these polymers were characterized by contact angle measurements, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The fluorinated pyridinium surfaces showed enhanced antibacterial activity compared to their nonfluorinated counterparts. Even a polymer with a relatively low molecular weight pyridinium block showed high antimicrobial activity. The bactericidal effect was found to be related to the molecular composition and organization in the top 2-3 nm of the surface and increased with increasing hydrophilicity and pyridinium concentration of the surface.

  11. Hemagglutinating activity in phytopathogenic bacteria surface compounds.

    PubMed

    Serra, M T; Castresana, M C; Tejerina, G

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular components of plant pathogenic bacteria were obtained from their culture medium as well as from the whole cells by using NaCl 1 M, pH 6.0; 20% sucrose dissolved in 0.03 M Tris buffer, pH 8.0; or 0.05 M Na2EDTA. All the extracts from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli, Pseudomonas solanacearum, and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, were assayed for hemagglutinating activity on sheep, rabbit and chicken red blood cells (RBCs). The only active extracts were those obtained by NaCl treatment. They agglutinated sheep and rabbit erythrocytes. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica gave rise to the high agglutination titer on rabbit RBCs. These extracts had the lowest polysaccharide/protein ratio. E. carotovora subsp. carotovora extracts showed only a low titer (18.5 units). The agglutinating activity present in NaCl extracts of the bacteria tested was inhibited by different carbohydrates to various extent. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica appeared to be the most sensitive ones while those of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora least sensitive to the presence of sugar. It is suggested that hemagglutinins observed in plant pathogenic bacteria and those in plant host are similar and that both may, in some way, be involved in the plant-parasite relationship.