Science.gov

Sample records for active sensing technology

  1. Passive and Active Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Richard

    A combination of passive and active sensing technologies is proposed as a structural health monitoring solution for several applications. Passive sensing is differentiated from active sensing in that with the former, no energy is intentionally imparted into the structure under test; sensors are deployed in a pure detection mode for collecting data mined for structural health monitoring purposes. In this thesis, passive sensing using embedded fiber Bragg grating optical strain gages was used to detect varying degrees of impact damage using two different classes of features drawn from traditional spectral analysis and auto-regressive time series modeling. The two feature classes were compared in detail through receiver operating curve performance analysis. The passive detection problem was then augmented with an active sensing system using ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs). This thesis considered two main challenges associated with UGW SHM including in-situ wave propagation property determination and thermal corruption of data. Regarding determination of wave propagation properties, of which dispersion characteristics are the most important, a new dispersion curve extraction method called sparse wavenumber analysis (SWA) was experimentally validated. Also, because UGWs are extremely sensitive to ambient temperature changes on the structure, it significantly affects the wave propagation properties by causing large errors in the residual error in the processing of the UGWs from an array. This thesis presented a novel method that compensates for uniform temperature change by considering the magnitude and phase of the signal separately and applying a scalable transformation.

  2. Technology advances in active and passive microwave sensing through 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    As a result of a growing awareness by the remote sensing community of the unique capabilities of passive and active microwave sensors, these instruments are expected to grow in the next decade in numbers, versatility and complexity. The Nimbus-G and Seasat-A Scanning Multichannel Microwave Spectrometer (SMMR), the Seasat-A radar altimeter, scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar represent the first systematic attempt at exploring a wide variety of applications utilizing microwave sensing techniques and are indicators of the directions in which the pertinent technology is likely to evolve. The trend is toward high resolution multi-frequency imagers spanning wide frequency ranges and wide swaths requiring sophisticated receivers, real-time data processors and most importantly, complex antennas.

  3. Advantages and Limitations in using Active Remote Sensing Technology for Disaster Damage Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauhidur Rahman, Muhammad

    2013-04-01

    Following any major natural or man-made disaster, rapid monitoring and assessment of infrastructures and environmental damages are essential for successful rescue and relief operations. While pre- and post-disaster data from passive remote sensing imageries have played a major role in assessing damages on a damage/no damage basis for over four decades, latest advances in active remote sensing technologies such as Radar and Lidar are also becoming quite useful. The goal of this paper is to first explain the basic theories and analytical techniques involved in using active remote sensing data for assessing damages following a major natural disaster. It will then discuss some of the advantages and limitations often faced by researchers and disaster management personnel when using data from these sensors. Finally, it will highlight how data from Lidar and other active sensors were used to assess damages from three recent major disasters.

  4. Technology: Technology and Common Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    The absence of common sense in the world of technology continues to amaze the author. Things that seem so logical to just aren nott for many people. The installation of Voice-over IP (VoIP, with IP standing for Internet Protocol) in many school districts is a good example. Schools have always had trouble with telephones. Many districts don't even…

  5. Technology study of quantum remote sensing imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen; Lin, Xuling; Yang, Song; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    According to remote sensing science and technology development and application requirements, quantum remote sensing is proposed. First on the background of quantum remote sensing, quantum remote sensing theory, information mechanism, imaging experiments and prototype principle prototype research situation, related research at home and abroad are briefly introduced. Then we expounds compress operator of the quantum remote sensing radiation field and the basic principles of single-mode compression operator, quantum quantum light field of remote sensing image compression experiment preparation and optical imaging, the quantum remote sensing imaging principle prototype, Quantum remote sensing spaceborne active imaging technology is brought forward, mainly including quantum remote sensing spaceborne active imaging system composition and working principle, preparation and injection compression light active imaging device and quantum noise amplification device. Finally, the summary of quantum remote sensing research in the past 15 years work and future development are introduced.

  6. Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, M.; Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

    1996-10-24

    This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

  7. Sensing technologies to measure metabolic activities in soil and assess its health conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, Fabrizio; Macagnano, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    (olfactory fingerprint) typical of the analysed air sample. Due to these features, we decided to apply such a sensing technology to the analyses of soil atmospheres, because several processes in soil, both abiotic and biotic, result in gas and/or volatile production and the dynamics of such releases may also be affected by several additional environmental factors, such as soil moisture, temperature, gas exchange rates with outer atmosphere, adsorption/desorption processes, etc. Then, the analysis of soil atmosphere may provide information about global soil conditions (e.g. soil quality and health), according to a holistic approach, where several factors are contemporarily taken into account. At the same time, the use of such a technology, if adequately trained on purpose, can supply information about a single or a pool of processes sharing similar features, which occur in soil over a certain period of time and mostly affecting soil atmosphere. According to these premises and hypotheses, we demonstrated that EN is an useful technology to measure soil microbial activity, through its correlation to specific metabolic activities occurring in soil (i.e. global and specific respiration and some enzyme activities), but also soil microbial biomass. On the basis of such evidences, we also were able to use this technology to assess the quality and health conditions of soil ecosystems in terms of metabolic indices previously identified, according to some metabolic parameters and biomass quantification of microbial populations. In other studies, we also applied EN technology, despite using a different set of sensors in the array, to analyse the atmosphere of soil ecosystems in order to assess their environmental conditions after contamination with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (i.e. semivolatile - SVOCs - organic pollutants). In this case, EN technology resulted capable of distinguishing between contaminated and uncontaminated soils, according to the differences in a list of

  8. MEMS Sensor Technologies for Human Centred Applications in Healthcare, Physical Activities, Safety and Environmental Sensing: A Review on Research Activities in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users’ health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users’ physical activity with inertial measurement unit-based devices, for instance, has also proven to be important in health management of patients affected by chronic diseases, e.g., Parkinson’s disease, many of which are becoming highly prevalent in Italy and in the Western world. This review paper will focus on MEMS sensor technologies developed in Italy in the last three years describing research achievements for healthcare and physical activity, safety and environmental sensing, in addition to smart systems integration. Innovative and smart integrated solutions for sensing devices, pursued and implemented in Italian research centres, will be highlighted, together with specific applications of such technologies. Finally, the paper will depict the future perspective of sensor technologies and corresponding exploitation opportunities, again with a specific focus on Italy. PMID:25808763

  9. MEMS sensor technologies for human centred applications in healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing: a review on research activities in Italy.

    PubMed

    Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users' health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users' physical activity with inertial measurement unit-based devices, for instance, has also proven to be important in health management of patients affected by chronic diseases, e.g., Parkinson's disease, many of which are becoming highly prevalent in Italy and in the Western world. This review paper will focus on MEMS sensor technologies developed in Italy in the last three years describing research achievements for healthcare and physical activity, safety and environmental sensing, in addition to smart systems integration. Innovative and smart integrated solutions for sensing devices, pursued and implemented in Italian research centres, will be highlighted, together with specific applications of such technologies. Finally, the paper will depict the future perspective of sensor technologies and corresponding exploitation opportunities, again with a specific focus on Italy.

  10. Active touch sensing

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Tony J.; Diamond, Mathew E.; Wing, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Active sensing systems are purposive and information-seeking sensory systems. Active sensing usually entails sensor movement, but more fundamentally, it involves control of the sensor apparatus, in whatever manner best suits the task, so as to maximize information gain. In animals, active sensing is perhaps most evident in the modality of touch. In this theme issue, we look at active touch across a broad range of species from insects, terrestrial and marine mammals, through to humans. In addition to analysing natural touch, we also consider how engineering is beginning to exploit physical analogues of these biological systems so as to endow robots with rich tactile sensing capabilities. The different contributions show not only the varieties of active touch—antennae, whiskers and fingertips—but also their commonalities. They explore how active touch sensing has evolved in different animal lineages, how it serves to provide rapid and reliable cues for controlling ongoing behaviour, and even how it can disintegrate when our brains begin to fail. They demonstrate that research on active touch offers a means both to understand this essential and primary sensory modality, and to investigate how animals, including man, combine movement with sensing so as to make sense of, and act effectively in, the world. PMID:21969680

  11. Technology advances in active and passive microwave sensing through 1985. [microwave technology for the Seasat-A and Nimbus-G satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    The capabilities of passive and active microwave sensors are discussed. The Nimbus-G and Seasat-A scanning multichannel microwave spectrometer, the Seasat-A radar altimeter, scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar represent the first systematic attempt at exploring a wide variety of applications utilizing microwave sensing techniques and are indicators of the directions in which the pertinent technology is likely to evolve. The trend is toward high resolution multi-frequency imagers spanning wide frequency ranges and wide swaths requiring sophisticated receivers, real-time data processors and most importantly, complex antennas.

  12. Technology Trends and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, Steve; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The science and application of remote sensing is flourishing in the digital age. Geographical information systems can provide a broad range of information tailored to the specific needs of disaster managers. Recent advances in airborne platforms, sensors and information technologies have come together provide the ability to put geo-registered, multispectral imagery on the web in near real-time. Highlights of a demonstration of NASA's First Response Experiment (FiRE) will be presented.

  13. Technology Advancements for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, M. D.; Nehrir, A. R.; Liu, Z.; Chen, S.; Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.; Choi, Y.; Plant, J.; Yang, M. M.; Browell, E. V.; Harrison, F. W.; Meadows, B.; Dobler, J. T.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes advances in critical lidar technologies and techniques developed as part of the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) system for measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The ACES design demonstrates advancements in: (1) enhanced power-aperture product through the use and operation of multiple co-aligned laser transmitters and a multi-aperture telescope design; (2) high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration operation; and (4) advanced algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument, an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar, was designed for high-altitude aircraft operations and can be directly applied to space instrumentation to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. Specifically, the lidar simultaneously transmits three IM-CW laser beams from the high power EDFAs operating near 1571 nm. The outgoing laser beams are aligned to the field of view of three fiber-coupled 17.8-cm diameter telescopes, and the backscattered light collected by the same three telescopes is sent to the detector/TIA subsystem, which has a bandwidth of 4.9 MHz and operates service-free with a tactical Dewar and cryocooler. The electronic bandwidth is only slightly higher than 1 MHz, effectively limiting the noise level. Two key laser modulation approaches are being tested to significantly mitigate the effects of thin clouds on the retrieved CO2 column amounts. This work provides an over view of these technologies, the modulation approaches, and results from recent test flights.

  14. A Survey on Gas Sensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Cheng, Sitian; Liu, Hong; Hu, Sha; Zhang, Daqiang; Ning, Huansheng

    2012-01-01

    Sensing technology has been widely investigated and utilized for gas detection. Due to the different applicability and inherent limitations of different gas sensing technologies, researchers have been working on different scenarios with enhanced gas sensor calibration. This paper reviews the descriptions, evaluation, comparison and recent developments in existing gas sensing technologies. A classification of sensing technologies is given, based on the variation of electrical and other properties. Detailed introduction to sensing methods based on electrical variation is discussed through further classification according to sensing materials, including metal oxide semiconductors, polymers, carbon nanotubes, and moisture absorbing materials. Methods based on other kinds of variations such as optical, calorimetric, acoustic and gas-chromatographic, are presented in a general way. Several suggestions related to future development are also discussed. Furthermore, this paper focuses on sensitivity and selectivity for performance indicators to compare different sensing technologies, analyzes the factors that influence these two indicators, and lists several corresponding improved approaches. PMID:23012563

  15. Remote sensing education in NASA's technology transfer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Remote sensing is a principal focus of NASA's technology transfer program activity with major attention to remote sensing education the Regional Program and the University Applications Program. Relevant activities over the past five years are reviewed and perspective on future directions is presented.

  16. Indicators of international remote sensing activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The extent of worldwide remote sensing activities, including the use of satellite and high/medium altitude aircraft data was studied. Data were obtained from numerous individuals and organizations with international remote sensing responsibilities. Indicators were selected to evaluate the nature and scope of remote sensing activities in each country. These indicators ranged from attendance at remote sensing workshops and training courses to the establishment of earth resources satellite ground stations and plans for the launch of earth resources satellites. Results indicate that this technology constitutes a rapidly increasing component of environmental, land use, and natural resources investigations in many countries, and most of these countries rely on the LANDSAT satellites for a major portion of their data.

  17. Strain sensing technology for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Dan

    1993-01-01

    This review discusses the status of strain sensing technology for high temperature applications. Technologies covered are those supported by NASA such as required for applications in hypersonic vehicles and engines, advanced subsonic engines, as well as material and structure development. The applications may be at temperatures of 540 C (1000 F) to temperatures in excess of 1400 C (2500 F). The most promising technologies at present are the resistance strain gage and remote sensing schemes. Resistance strain gages discussed include the BCL gage, the LaRC compensated gage, and the PdCr gage. Remote sensing schemes such as laser based speckle strain measurement, phase-shifling interferometry, and x-ray extensometry are discussed. Present status and limitations of these technologies are presented.

  18. Remote Sensing Technologies Mitigate Drought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Ames Research Center has partnered with the California Department of Water Resources to develop satellite-based technologies to mitigate drought conditions. One project aims to help water managers adjust their irrigation to match the biological needs of each crop, and another involves monitoring areas where land is fallow so emergency relief can more quickly aid affected communities.

  19. Advanced sensing technology in environmental field.

    PubMed

    Wakida, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Before the introduction of advanced sensing technology in environmental fields, environmental issues were discussed as several categories, such as local environmental issues in the 1970s, global environmental issues in the 1980s, living environmental issues in the 2000s and environmental stress issues in near future, which are of increasing interest in Japan. Using advanced sensing technologies, such as electrochemical sensors, chemically-sensitive field-effect transistors (ChemFETs) based on micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS) micromachining technology and subsequently electrophoretic separation and microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip using MEMS technology, we have steered several kinds of environmental monitoring projects timely in response to the environmental issues for over the last 25 years. Among the local environmental issues, the global environmental issues and the living environmental issues, some fruits of R&D project will be introduced. Finally, our latest concern of the environmental stress monitoring was discussed and preliminary results were also introduced.

  20. Sensing technologies for precision specialty crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the advances in electronic and information technologies, various sensing systems have been developed for specialty crop production around the world. Accurate information concerning the spatial variability within fields is very important for precision farming of specialty crops. However, this va...

  1. Photonic sensing technology: currents and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillman, W. B., Jr.

    2007-07-01

    Photonic sensing technology and in particular the field of fiber optic sensing, has entered a period of dynamic market growth. Studies of anticipated world demographic shifts and climate change projections suggest areas in which significant opportunities for the use of the technology exist and will continue to grow. In this paper, the general currents and trends in photonic/fiber optic sensor technology will be discussed with a focus upon fiber optic biosensors. In 2004, the fiber optic biosensor market was estimated to be in the 6-8B range, while this year, its value is projected to be in the 7-11B range, an annual growth rate of between 6 and 10% during the period. The market is substantial with continued growth expected over the next 5 years at least. It is large enough and growing fast enough to offer a significant opportunity for penetration by appropriate fiber optic biosensor products.

  2. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  3. Practical applications of remote sensing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Roy A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Land managers increasingly are becoming dependent upon remote sensing and automated analysis techniques for information gathering and synthesis. Remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) techniques provide quick and economical information gathering for large areas. The outputs of remote sensing classification and analysis are most effective when combined with a total natural resources data base within the capabilities of a computerized GIS. Some examples are presented of the successes, as well as the problems, in integrating remote sensing and geographic information systems. The need to exploit remotely sensed data and the potential that geographic information systems offer for managing and analyzing such data continues to grow. New microcomputers with vastly enlarged memory, multi-fold increases in operating speed and storage capacity that was previously available only on mainframe computers are a reality. Improved raster GIS software systems have been developed for these high performance microcomputers. Vector GIS systems previously reserved for mini and mainframe systems are available to operate on these enhanced microcomputers. One of the more exciting areas that is beginning to emerge is the integration of both raster and vector formats on a single computer screen. This technology will allow satellite imagery or digital aerial photography to be presented as a background to a vector display.

  4. Extreme health sensing: the challenges, technologies, and strategies for active health sustainment of military personnel during training and combat missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buller, Mark; Welles, Alexander; Chadwicke Jenkins, Odest; Hoyt, Reed

    2010-04-01

    Military personnel are often asked to accomplish rigorous missions in extremes of climate, terrain, and terrestrial altitude. Personal protective clothing and individual equipment such as body armor or chemical biological suits and excessive equipment loads, exacerbate the physiological strain. Health, over even short mission durations, can easily be compromised. Measuring and acting upon health information can provide a means to dynamically manage both health and mission goals. However, the measurement of health state in austere military environments is challenging; (1) body worn sensors must be of minimal weight and size, consume little power, and be comfortable and unobtrusive enough for prolonged wear; (2) health states are not directly measureable and must be estimated; (3) sensor measurements are prone to noise, artifact, and failure. Given these constraints we examine current successful ambulatory physiological status monitoring technologies, review maturing sensors that may provide key health state insights in the future, and discuss unconventional analytical techniques that optimize health, mission goals, and doctrine from the perspective of thermal work strain assessment and management.

  5. Sensing Human Activity: GPS Tracking

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Stefan; van Schaick, Jeroen; de Bois, Peter; de Haan, Remco

    2009-01-01

    The enhancement of GPS technology enables the use of GPS devices not only as navigation and orientation tools, but also as instruments used to capture travelled routes: as sensors that measure activity on a city scale or the regional scale. TU Delft developed a process and database architecture for collecting data on pedestrian movement in three European city centres, Norwich, Rouen and Koblenz, and in another experiment for collecting activity data of 13 families in Almere (The Netherlands) for one week. The question posed in this paper is: what is the value of GPS as ‘sensor technology’ measuring activities of people? The conclusion is that GPS offers a widely useable instrument to collect invaluable spatial-temporal data on different scales and in different settings adding new layers of knowledge to urban studies, but the use of GPS-technology and deployment of GPS-devices still offers significant challenges for future research. PMID:22574061

  6. Aerosol sensing technologies in the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janisko, Samuel J.; Noll, James D.; Cauda, Emanuele E.

    2011-06-01

    Recent health, safety and environmental regulations are causing an increased demand for monitoring of aerosols in the mining industry. Of particular concern are airborne concentrations of combustible and toxic rock dusts as well as particulate matter generated from diesel engines in underground mines. In response, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has been evaluating a number of real time sensing technologies for potential use in underground mines. In particular, extensive evaluation has been done on filter-based light extinction using elemental carbon (EC) as a surrogate measurement of total diesel particulate matter (DPM) mass concentration as well as mechanical tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) technology for measurement of both DPM and rock dust mass concentrations. Although these technologies are promising in their ability to accurately measure mine aerosols for their respective applications, there are opportunities for design improvements or alternative technologies that may significantly enhance the monitoring of mine aerosols. Such alterations can lead to increases in sensitivity or a reduction in the size and cost of these devices. This paper provides a brief overview of current practices and presents results of NIOSH research in this area. It concludes with a short discussion of future directions in mine aerosol sensing research.

  7. Magnetic sensing technology for molecular analyses

    PubMed Central

    Issadore, D.; Park, Y. I.; Shao, H.; Min, C.; Lee, K.; Liong, M.; Weissleder, R.; Lee, H.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors, based on nanomaterials and miniature electronics, have emerged as a powerful diagnostic platform. Benefiting from the inherently negligible magnetic background of biological objects, magnetic detection is highly selective even in complex biological media. The sensing thus requires minimal sample purification, and yet achieves high signal-to-background contrast. Moreover, magnetic sensors are also well-suited for miniaturization to match the size of biological targets, which enables sensitive detection of rare cells and small amounts of molecular markers. We herein summarize recent advances in magnetic sensing technologies, with an emphasis on clinical applications in point-of-care settings. Key components of sensors, including magnetic nanomaterials, labeling strategies and magnetometry, are reviewed. PMID:24887807

  8. Brazil's remote sensing activities in the Eighties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raupp, M. A.; Pereiradacunha, R.; Novaes, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the remote sensing activities in Brazil have been conducted by the Institute for Space Research (INPE). This report describes briefly INPE's activities in remote sensing in the last years. INPE has been engaged in research (e.g., radiance studies), development (e.g., CCD-scanners, image processing devices) and applications (e.g., crop survey, land use, mineral resources, etc.) of remote sensing. INPE is also responsible for the operation (data reception and processing) of the LANDSATs and meteorological satellites. Data acquisition activities include the development of CCD-Camera to be deployed on board the space shuttle and the construction of a remote sensing satellite.

  9. Advanced laser sensing receiver concepts based on FPA technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P. L.; Petrin, R. R.; Jolin, J. L.; Foy, B. R.; Lowrance, J. L.; Renda, G.

    2002-01-01

    The ultimate performance of any remote sensor is ideally governed by the hardware signal-to-noise capability and allowed signal-averaging time. In real-world scenarios, this may not be realizable and the limiting factors may suggest the need for more advanced capabilities. Moving from passive to active remote sensors offers the advantage of control over the illumination source, the laser. Added capabilities may include polarization discrimination, instantaneous imaging, range resolution, simultaneous multi-spectral measurement, or coherent detection. However, most advanced detection technology has been engineered heavily towards the straightforward passive sensor requirements, measuring an integrated photon flux. The need for focal plane array technology designed specifically for laser sensing has been recognized for some time, but advances have only recently made the engineering possible. This paper will present a few concepts for laser sensing receiver architectures, the driving specifications behind those concepts, and test/modeling results of such designs.

  10. Micro-system inertial sensing technology overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, James Joe

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of Micro-System technology as it applies to inertial sensing. Transduction methods are reviewed with capacitance and piezoresistive being the most often used in COTS Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors. Optical transduction is the most recent transduction method having significant impact on improving sensor resolution. A few other methods are motioned which are in a R&D status to hopefully allow MEMS inertial sensors to become viable as a navigation grade sensor. The accelerometer, gyroscope and gravity gradiometer are the type of inertial sensors which are reviewed in this report. Their method of operation and a sampling of COTS sensors and grade are reviewed as well.

  11. Technology Advancement for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space Using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Kooi, Susan; Choi, Yonghoon; Plant, James; Yang, Melissa; Antill, Charles; Campbell, Joel; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Meadows, Byron; Dobler, Jeremy; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Moore, Berrien; Crowell, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is a newly developed lidar developed at NASA Langley Research Center and funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) that seeks to advance technologies critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The technology advancements targeted include: (1) increasing the power-aperture product to approach ASCENDS mission requirements by implementing multi-aperture telescopes and multiple co-aligned laser transmitters; (2) incorporating high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) developing and incorporating a high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration autonomous operation on Global Hawk aircraft, and (4) advancing algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument architecture is being developed for operation on high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. These technologies are critical towards developing not only spaceborne instruments but also their airborne simulators, with lower platform requirements for size, mass, and power, and with improved instrument performance for the ASCENDS mission. ACES transmits five laser beams: three from commercial EDFAs operating near 1.57 microns, and two from the Exelis oxygen (O2) Raman fiber laser amplifier system operating near 1.26 microns. The three EDFAs are capable of transmitting up to 10 watts average optical output power each and are seeded by compact, low noise, stable, narrow-linewidth laser sources stabilized with respect to a CO2 absorption line using a multi-pass gas absorption cell. The Integrated-Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar approach is used at both wavelengths to independently measure the CO2 and O2 column number

  12. History and future of remote sensing technology and education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    A historical overview of the discovery and development of photography, related sciences, and remote sensing technology is presented. The role of education to date in the development of remote sensing is discussed. The probable future and potential of remote sensing and training is described.

  13. Technology Learning Activities I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Technology Education Association, Reston, VA.

    This guide contains 30 technology learning activities. Activities may contain all or some of the following: an introduction, objectives, materials and equipment, challenges, limitations, notes and investigations, resources and references used, and evaluation ideas. Activity titles are: (1) Occupations in Construction Technology; (2) Designing a…

  14. NASA Laser Remote Sensing Technology Needs for Earth Science in the Next Decade and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trait, David M.; Neff, Jon M.; Valinia, Azita

    2007-01-01

    In late 2005 the NASA Earth Science Technology Office convened a working group to review decadal-term technology needs for Earth science active optical remote sensing objectives. The outcome from this effort is intended to guide future NASA investments in laser remote sensing technologies. This paper summarizes the working group findings and places them in context with the conclusions of the National Research Council assessment of Earth science needs, completed in 2007.

  15. Advanced technologies for remote sensing imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.L.

    1993-06-07

    Generating and returning imagery from great distances has been generally associated with national security activities, with emphasis on reliability of system operation. (While the introduction of such capabilities was usually characterized by high levels of innovation, the evolution of such systems has followed the classical track of proliferation of ``standardized items`` expressing ever more incremental technological advances.) Recent focusing of interest on the use of remote imaging systems for commercial and scientific purposes can be expected to induce comparatively rapid advances along the axes of efficiency and technological sophistication, respectively. This paper reviews the most basic reasons for expecting the next decade of advances to dwarf the impressive accomplishments of the past ten years. The impact of these advances clearly will be felt in all major areas of large-scale human endeavor, commercial, military and scientific.

  16. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  17. Complex vertical layering and mixing of aerosols over the eastern Mediterranean: active and passive remote sensing at the Cyprus University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, R.-E.; Nisantzi, A.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.; Ansmann, A.; Schwarz, A.; Basart, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Aerosols can have a complicated influence on climate conditions, directly as well as indirectly via cloud formation. The southeastern Mediterranean region can be characterized as a cross road of aerosols originating from European, Asian and African continents. Complex vertical aerosol distributions are frequently detected over Cyprus by means of active remote sensing. Observations of such complex aerosol layering and comparison of the measurements with aerosol products of regional and global atmospheric transport models are required to improve our understanding of life cycles of aerosol mixtures and their impact on climate as well as on satellite remote sensing products. In this study, a case of an intense desert dust outbreak from Syria and Saudi Arabia towards the eastern Mediterranean in September 2011 is presented. The observations used in this study were performed with a 532-nm polarization Lidar and a sun/sky AERONET photometer operated at 8 channels from 340 to 1640 nm wavelength. Both instruments belong to remote sensing station of the Cyprus Technical University at Limassol, Cyprus (34°N, 33°E). The lofted dust plume was doped with air masses that crossed sources of biomass burning smoke and anthropogenic pollution. In addition, the shallow marine boundary layer over the Mediterranean Sea and over Limassol became mixed with the anthropogenic haze by sea breeze circulations. The case study demonstrates the potential of combined lidar/photometer observations to deliver detailed vertically resolved information of the aerosol characteristics in terms of particle optical and microphysical properties, separately for the spherical particle fraction as well as for the non-spherical aerosol mode.

  18. Early Childhood: Developing Sense-activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirah, Sue; Dorman, Mildred M.

    1989-01-01

    Described are science activities in which students concentrate on their senses and make discoveries with their eyes, ears, noses, mouths, and hands. Suggested experiments include activities involving cooking, tasting, observing, floating and sinking objects, making rain, and stringed musical instruments. (RT)

  19. Improving estimates of air pollution exposure through ubiquitous sensing technologies.

    PubMed

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Seto, Edmund; Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Mendez, Michelle; Matamala, Jaume; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Jerrett, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Traditional methods of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies often fail to integrate important information on activity patterns, which may lead to bias, loss of statistical power, or both in health effects estimates. Novel sensing technologies integrated with mobile phones offer potential to reduce exposure measurement error. We sought to demonstrate the usability and relevance of the CalFit smartphone technology to track person-level time, geographic location, and physical activity patterns for improved air pollution exposure assessment. We deployed CalFit-equipped smartphones in a free-living population of 36 subjects in Barcelona, Spain. Information obtained on physical activity and geographic location was linked to space-time air pollution mapping. We found that information from CalFit could substantially alter exposure estimates. For instance, on average travel activities accounted for 6% of people's time and 24% of their daily inhaled NO2. Due to the large number of mobile phone users, this technology potentially provides an unobtrusive means of enhancing epidemiologic exposure data at low cost.

  20. Improving estimates of air pollution exposure through ubiquitous sensing technologies

    PubMed Central

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Seto, Edmund; Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Mendez, Michelle; Matamala, Jaume; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Jerrett, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies often fail to integrate important information on activity patterns, which may lead to bias, loss of statistical power or both in health effects estimates. Novel sensing technologies integrated with mobile phones offer potential to reduce exposure measurement error. We sought to demonstrate the usability and relevance of the CalFit smartphone technology to track person-level time, geographic location, and physical activity patterns for improved air pollution exposure assessment. We deployed CalFit-equipped smartphones in a free living-population of 36 subjects in Barcelona, Spain. Information obtained on physical activity and geographic location was linked to space-time air pollution mapping. For instance, we found on average travel activities accounted for 6% of people’s time and 24% of their daily inhaled NO2. Due to the large number of mobile phone users, this technology potentially provides an unobtrusive means of collecting epidemiologic exposure data at low cost. PMID:23416743

  1. Remote Sensing of Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Peter; Rothery, David

    The synoptic coverage offered by satellites provides unparalleled opportunities for monitoring active volcanoes, and opens new avenues of scientific inquiry. Thermal infrared radiation can be used to monitor levels of activity, which is useful for automated eruption detection and for studying the emplacement of lava flows. Satellite radars can observe volcanoes through clouds or at night, and provide high-resolution topographic data. In favorable conditions, radar inteferometery can be used to measure ground deformation associated with eruptive activity on a centimetric scale. Clouds from explosive eruptions present a pressing hazard to aviation; therefore, techniques are being developed to assess eruption cloud height and to discriminate between ash and meterological clouds. The multitude of sensors to be launched on future generations of space platforms promises to greatly enhance volcanological studies, but a satellite dedicated to volcanology is needed to meet requirements of aviation safety and volcano monitoring.

  2. Bringing remote sensing technology to the user community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenlaub, J. C.; Davis, S. M.; Morrison, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The procedures and services available for educating and training potential users of remote sensing technology are discussed along with approaches for achieving an in-house capability for the analysis of remotely sensed data using numerical techniques based on pattern recognition principles. Cost estimates are provided where appropriate.

  3. Remote Sensing Simulation Activities for Earthlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krockover, Gerald H.; Odden, Thomas D.

    1977-01-01

    Suggested are activities using a Polaroid camera to illustrate the capabilities of remote sensing. Reading materials from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are suggested. Methods for (1) finding a camera's focal length, (2) calculating ground dimension photograph simulation, and (3) limiting size using film resolution are…

  4. Symbol Sense Behavior in Digital Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokhove, Christian; Drijvers, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The algebraic expertise that mathematics education is aiming for includes both procedural skills and conceptual understanding. To capture the latter, notions such as symbol sense, gestalt view and visual salience have been developed. We wonder if digital activities can be designed that not only require procedural algebraic skills, but also invite…

  5. Bridge SHM system based on fiber optical sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Fan, Dian; Fu, Jiang-hua; Huang, Xing; Jiang, De-sheng

    2015-09-01

    The latest progress of our lab in recent 10 years on the area of bridge structural health monitoring (SHM) based on optical fiber sensing technology is introduced. Firstly, in the part of sensing technology, optical fiber force test-ring, optical fiber vibration sensor, optical fiber smart cable, optical fiber prestressing loss monitoring method and optical fiber continuous curve mode inspection system are developed, which not only rich the sensor types, but also provides new monitoring means that are needed for the bridge health monitoring system. Secondly, in the optical fiber sensing network and computer system platform, the monitoring system architecture model is designed to effectively meet the integration scale and effect requirement of engineering application, especially the bridge expert system proposed integration of sensing information and informatization manual inspection to realize the mode of multi index intelligence and practical monitoring, diagnosis and evaluation. Finally, the Jingyue bridge monitoring system as the representative, the research on the technology of engineering applications are given.

  6. Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    The enzymatic activity of a protease was electrically detected using nanopore recordings. A peptide substrate was tethered to microscale beads, and cleavage by the enzyme trypsin released a soluble fragment that was electrophoretically driven through the α-hemolysin protein pore, leading to detectable blockades in the ionic current. Owing to its simplicity, this approach to sense enzymatic activity may be applied to other proteases.

  7. Investigation of the application of remote sensing technology to environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Activities and results are reported of a project to investigate the application of remote sensing technology developed for the LACIE, AgRISTARS, Forestry and other NASA remote sensing projects for the environmental monitoring of strip mining, industrial pollution, and acid rain. Following a remote sensing workshop for EPA personnel, the EOD clustering algorithm CLASSY was selected for evaluation by EPA as a possible candidate technology. LANDSAT data acquired for a North Dakota test sight was clustered in order to compare CLASSY with other algorithms.

  8. NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 2: Sensing and data acquisitions panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Advanced technology requirements associated with sensing and data acquisition systems were assessed for future space missions. Sensing and data acquisition system payloads which would benefit from the use of the space shuttle in demonstrating technology readiness are identified. Topics covered include: atmospheric sensing payloads, earth resources sensing payloads, microwave systems sensing payloads, technology development/evaluation payloads, and astronomy/planetary payloads.

  9. The Development and Industrialization Recommendation of Current Aerial Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Z.

    2013-07-01

    At present, the research development and industrialization of aerial remote sensing technology in China are faced with enormous requirements and developing chance. It is the strategic selection for remote sensing technology to perfect the construction of remote sensing technology system, implement the three strategies of science and technology development, standardize and improve the producing ability of remote sensing products, and make the remote sensing technology become a kind of industries. Based on industry economics principle and the characteristics of aerial remote sensing technology, this paper put forward the suggestions on technological development, industrialization, and market competition of aerial remote sensing industrialization.

  10. Advanced Fiber Optic-Based Sensing Technology for Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Ko, William L.; Chan, Patrick; Bakalyar, John

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Dryden in support of Unmanned Aircraft Systems. Examples of current and previous work are presented in the following categories: algorithm development, system development, instrumentation installation, ground R&D, and flight testing. Examples of current research and development activities are provided.

  11. Recent developments in terahertz sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Terahertz technology has found numerous applications for the detection of biological and chemical hazardous agents, medical diagnostics, detection of explosives, providing security in buildings, airports, and other public spaces, shortrange covert communications (in the THz and sub-THz windows), and applications in radio astronomy and space research. The expansion of these applications will depend on the development of efficient electronic terahertz sources and sensitive low-noise terahertz detectors. Schottky diode frequency multipliers have emerged as a viable THz source technology reaching a few THz. High speed three terminal electronic devices (FETs and HBTs) have entered the THz range (with cutoff frequencies and maximum frequencies of operation above 1 THz). A new approach called plasma wave electronics recently demonstrated an efficient terahertz detection in GaAs-based and GaN-based HEMTs and in Si MOS, SOI, FINFETs and in FET arrays. This progress in THz electronic technology has promise for a significant expansion of THz applications.

  12. Optically powered active sensing system for Internet Of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chen; Wang, Jin; Yin, Long; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Jian; Wan, Hongdan

    2014-10-01

    Internet Of Things (IOT) drives a significant increase in the extent and type of sensing technology and equipment. Sensors, instrumentation, control electronics, data logging and transmission units comprising such sensing systems will all require to be powered. Conventionally, electrical powering is supplied by batteries or/and electric power cables. The power supply by batteries usually has a limited lifetime, while the electric power cables are susceptible to electromagnetic interference. In fact, the electromagnetic interference is the key issue limiting the power supply in the strong electromagnetic radiation area and other extreme environments. The novel alternative method of power supply is power over fiber (PoF) technique. As fibers are used as power supply lines instead, the delivery of the power is inherently immune to electromagnetic radiation, and avoids cumbersome shielding of power lines. Such a safer power supply mode would be a promising candidate for applications in IOT. In this work, we built up optically powered active sensing system, supplying uninterrupted power for the remote active sensors and communication modules. Also, we proposed a novel maximum power point tracking technique for photovoltaic power convertors. In our system, the actual output efficiency greater than 40% within 1W laser power. After 1km fiber transmission and opto-electric power conversion, a stable electric power of 210mW was obtained, which is sufficient for operating an active sensing system.

  13. Making Sense of Health Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitzmiller, Rebecca Rutherford

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hospital adoption of health information technology (HIT) systems is promoted as essential to decreasing medical error and their associated 44,000 annual deaths and $17 billion in healthcare costs (Institute of Medicine, 2001; Kohn, Corrigan, & Donaldson, 1999). Leading national healthcare groups, such as the Institute of Medicine,…

  14. REVIEW OF REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGIES AND DATA FOR DOE-EM APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D

    1999-01-01

    Various governmental agencies and private companies throughout the world are involved in remote sensing activities. Remote sensing is a technology used for the purpose of monitoring the earth's environment, keeping track of the earth's resources, and for agricultural vegetation monitoring, among other things. There is a vast number of remote sensing technologies and data already commercially available for different applications (e.g., environmental, agricultural, and so on). Many entities are actively conducting research to generate new technologies and data (e.g., NASA). In addition, some of DOE's offices and programs have engaged in collection and analysis of remote sensing data. It is likely that some of these technologies and data could be useful for characterization and monitoring of EM's sites. Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) has reviewed remote sensing technologies and data that are currently available or in an advanced research state. The review focused on the technologies and data applicable to the environmental field. DOE has over 800 national laboratories and sites dispersed throughout the United States. involved in some current and past remote sensing projects. FIU-HCET personnel have searched governmental agency databases (e.g., DOE, NASA), the Internet, and library resources to obtain information about these technologies and generated a user-friendly database. This review km also produced an inventory and will be available on the Internet and on a CD-ROM that can be distributed to individuals or entities requesting information on remote sensing technologies and data for environmental applications. This database contains information regarding each technology, such as type of sensor, applications, and technical specifications (e.g., resolution). To the best of FIU-HCET's knowledge, a database of this type and with this level of detail does not exist within DOE. With the amount of remote

  15. Remote sensing education and Internet/World Wide Web technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, J.A.; Egbert, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing education is increasingly in demand across academic and professional disciplines. Meanwhile, Internet technology and the World Wide Web (WWW) are being more frequently employed as teaching tools in remote sensing and other disciplines. The current wealth of information on the Internet and World Wide Web must be distilled, nonetheless, to be useful in remote sensing education. An extensive literature base is developing on the WWW as a tool in education and in teaching remote sensing. This literature reveals benefits and limitations of the WWW, and can guide its implementation. Among the most beneficial aspects of the Web are increased access to remote sensing expertise regardless of geographic location, increased access to current material, and access to extensive archives of satellite imagery and aerial photography. As with other teaching innovations, using the WWW/Internet may well mean more work, not less, for teachers, at least at the stage of early adoption. Also, information posted on Web sites is not always accurate. Development stages of this technology range from on-line posting of syllabi and lecture notes to on-line laboratory exercises and animated landscape flyovers and on-line image processing. The advantages of WWW/Internet technology may likely outweigh the costs of implementing it as a teaching tool.

  16. Liquid crystals based sensing platform-technological aspects.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zakir; Qazi, Farah; Ahmed, Muhammad Imran; Usman, Adil; Riaz, Asim; Abbasi, Amna Didar

    2016-11-15

    In bulk phase, liquid crystalline molecules are organized due to non-covalent interactions and due to delicate nature of the present forces; this organization can easily be disrupted by any small external stimuli. This delicate nature of force balance in liquid crystals organization forms the basis of Liquid-crystals based sensing scheme which has been exploited by many researchers for the optical visualization and sensing of many biological interactions as well as detection of number of analytes. In this review, we present not only an overview of the state of the art in liquid crystals based sensing scheme but also highlight its limitations. The approaches described below revolve around possibilities and limitations of key components of such sensing platform including bottom substrates, alignments layers, nature and type of liquid crystals, sensing compartments, various interfaces etc. This review also highlights potential materials to not only improve performance of the sensing scheme but also to bridge the gap between science and technology of liquid crystals based sensing scheme.

  17. Liquid crystals based sensing platform-technological aspects.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zakir; Qazi, Farah; Ahmed, Muhammad Imran; Usman, Adil; Riaz, Asim; Abbasi, Amna Didar

    2016-11-15

    In bulk phase, liquid crystalline molecules are organized due to non-covalent interactions and due to delicate nature of the present forces; this organization can easily be disrupted by any small external stimuli. This delicate nature of force balance in liquid crystals organization forms the basis of Liquid-crystals based sensing scheme which has been exploited by many researchers for the optical visualization and sensing of many biological interactions as well as detection of number of analytes. In this review, we present not only an overview of the state of the art in liquid crystals based sensing scheme but also highlight its limitations. The approaches described below revolve around possibilities and limitations of key components of such sensing platform including bottom substrates, alignments layers, nature and type of liquid crystals, sensing compartments, various interfaces etc. This review also highlights potential materials to not only improve performance of the sensing scheme but also to bridge the gap between science and technology of liquid crystals based sensing scheme. PMID:27162142

  18. Optical Technologies for UV Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, R. A. M.; Osantowski, J. F.; Leviton, D. B.; Saha, T. T.; Content, D. A.; Boucarut, R. A.; Gum, J. S.; Wright, G. A.; Fleetwood, C. M.; Madison, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade significant advances in technology have made possible development of instruments with substantially improved efficiency in the UV spectral region. In the area of optical coatings and materials, the importance of recent developments in chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) mirrors, SiC films, and multilayer coatings in the context of ultraviolet instrumentation design are discussed. For example, the development of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) mirrors, with high ultraviolet (UV) reflectance and low scatter surfaces, provides the opportunity to extend higher spectral/spatial resolution capability into the 50-nm region. Optical coatings for normal incidence diffraction gratings are particularly important for the evolution of efficient extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrographs. SiC films are important for optimizing the spectrograph performance in the 90 nm spectral region. The performance evaluation of the flight optical components for the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) instrument, a spectroscopic instrument to fly aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission, designed to study dynamic processes, temperatures, and densities in the plasma of the upper atmosphere of the Sun in the wavelength range from 50 nm to 160 nm, is discussed. The optical components were evaluated for imaging and scatter in the UV. The performance evaluation of SOHO/CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer) flight gratings tested for spectral resolution and scatter in the DGEF is reviewed and preliminary results on resolution and scatter testing of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) technology development diffraction gratings are presented.

  19. Sensing technologies for semiconductor process applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturralde, Armando

    1995-09-01

    As semiconductor manufacturing technology advances, there exists a need to review improvements in process monitoring and control. Some of these improvements may be possible by investigating and integrating advanced process sensors. Sensors typically provide information to equipment controllers for proper machine operation. Expanding this definition, a sensor could deliver quality information about the semiconductor product being manufactured. Sensors can provide effective manufacturing line operation, reduced cycle times, and improved product quality. Implementing advanced sensors can also reduce process variability, increase process stability, and provide many other benefits applicable to modern semiconductor production operation. In this paper, a review of the current literature on semiconductor process sensor technology is presented. Much of the literature discusses in-situ measurements for film thickness, particles, and/or other conditions which could affect the quality of the product. Instruments such as RGAs (Residual Gas Analyzers), in-situ film thickness monitors represent current and future advanced sensors. Prior to implementing sensors, it would be ideal to reduce the number of process measurements as much as possible to insure sensor effectiveness. It will be ideal to have working cost of ownership model in place to baseline operations and monitor improvements as sensors move into the production line. There are many new sensors available with highly improved performance, accuracy, and even built-in electronics. These sensors can replace or supplement existing equipment sensors to improve performance, reliability, and extend equipment life. With the increasing costs of maintaining capital equipment, successful implementation could mean substantial savings. These and many other implementation issues are also presented.

  20. Active remote sensing of random media

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga, M.; Kong, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical results for the bistatic scattering coefficients and the backscattering cross sections have been derived for active remote sensing of earth terrain with the model of bounded random media which accounts for volume-scattering effects. It is found that as a result of the effect of the second boundary, the horizontally polarized return sigma/sub h/h can be greater than the vertically polarized return sigma/sub v/v, whereas for a half-space random medium sigma/sub v/v is always greater than sigma/sub h/h. We illustrate by matching the theoretical results with experimental data collected from vegetation field.

  1. Latest developments in active remote sensing at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, F.; Forest, R.; Bourliaguet, B.; Cantin, D.; Cottin, P.; Pancrati, O.; Turbide, S.; Lambert-Girard, S.; Cayer, F.; Lemieux, D.; Cormier, J.-F.; Châteauneuf, F.

    2012-09-01

    Remote sensing or stand-off detection using controlled light sources is a well known and often used technique for atmospheric and surface spatial mapping. Today, ground based, vehicle-borne and airborne systems are able to cover large areas with high accuracy and good reliability. This kind of detection based on LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) or active Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technologies, measures optical responses from controlled illumination of targets. Properties that can be recorded include volume back-scattering, surface reflectivity, molecular absorption, induced fluorescence and Raman scattering. The various elastic and inelastic backscattering responses allow the identification or characterization of content of the target volumes or surfaces. INO has developed instrumentations to measure distance to solid targets and monitor particles suspended in the air or in water in real time. Our full waveform LiDAR system is designed for use in numerous applications in environmental or process monitoring such as dust detection systems, aerosol (pesticide) drift monitoring, liquid level sensing or underwater bathymetric LiDARs. Our gated imaging developments are used as aids in visibility enhancement or in remote sensing spectroscopy. Furthermore, when coupled with a spectrograph having a large number of channels, the technique becomes active multispectral/hyperspectral detection or imaging allowing measurement of ultra-violet laser induced fluorescence (UV LIF), time resolved fluorescence (in the ns to ms range) as well as gated Raman spectroscopy. These latter techniques make possible the stand-off detection of bio-aerosols, drugs, explosives as well as the identification of mineral content for geological survey. This paper reviews the latest technology developments in active remote sensing at INO and presents on-going projects conducted to address future applications in environmental monitoring.

  2. Remote sensing application to regional activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahrokhi, F.; Jones, N. L.; Sharber, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Two agencies within the State of Tennessee were identified whereby the transfer of aerospace technology, namely remote sensing, could be applied to their stated problem areas. Their stated problem areas are wetland and land classification and strip mining studies. In both studies, LANDSAT data was analyzed with the UTSI video-input analog/digital automatic analysis and classification facility. In the West Tennessee area three land-use classifications could be distinguished; cropland, wetland, and forest. In the East Tennessee study area, measurements were submitted to statistical tests which verified the significant differences due to natural terrain, stripped areas, various stages of reclamation, water, etc. Classifications for both studies were output in the form of maps of symbols and varying shades of gray.

  3. Dynamics of Active Sensing and perceptual selection.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Charles E; Wilson, Donald A; Radman, Thomas; Scharfman, Helen; Lakatos, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Sensory processing is often regarded as a passive process in which biological receptors like photoreceptors and mechanoreceptors transduce physical energy into a neural code. Recent findings, however, suggest that: first, most sensory processing is active, and largely determined by motor/attentional sampling routines; second, owing to rhythmicity in the motor routine, as well as to its entrainment of ambient rhythms in sensory regions, sensory inflow tends to be rhythmic; third, attentional manipulation of rhythms in sensory pathways is instrumental to perceptual selection. These observations outline the essentials of an Active Sensing paradigm, and argue for increased emphasis on the study of sensory processes as specific to the dynamic motor/attentional context in which inputs are acquired. PMID:20307966

  4. Hierarchical curiosity loops and active sensing.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Goren; Ahissar, Ehud

    2012-08-01

    A curious agent acts so as to optimize its learning about itself and its environment, without external supervision. We present a model of hierarchical curiosity loops for such an autonomous active learning agent, whereby each loop selects the optimal action that maximizes the agent's learning of sensory-motor correlations. The model is based on rewarding the learner's prediction errors in an actor-critic reinforcement learning (RL) paradigm. Hierarchy is achieved by utilizing previously learned motor-sensory mapping, which enables the learning of other mappings, thus increasing the extent and diversity of knowledge and skills. We demonstrate the relevance of this architecture to active sensing using the well-studied vibrissae (whiskers) system, where rodents acquire sensory information by virtue of repeated whisker movements. We show that hierarchical curiosity loops starting from optimally learning the internal models of whisker motion and then extending to object localization result in free-air whisking and object palpation, respectively. PMID:22386787

  5. Dynamics of Active Sensing and Perceptual Selection

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Charles E; Wilson, Donald A.; Radman, Thomas; Scharfman, Helen; Lakatos, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Sensory processing is often regarded as a passive process in which a biological sensors like photo- and mechanoreceptors transducer physical energy into a neural code. Recent findings, however, suggest that: 1) most sensory processing is active, and largely determined by motor/attentional sampling routines, 2) due to rhythmicity in the motor routine, as well as to its entrainment of ambient rhythms in sensory regions, sensory inflow tends to be rhythmic, and 3) attentional manipulation of rhythms in sensory pathways is instrumental to perceptual selection. These observations outline the essentials of an Active Sensing paradigm, and argue for increased emphasis on the study of sensory processes as specific to the dynamic motor/attentional context in which inputs are acquired. PMID:20307966

  6. Remote sensing utilization of developing countries: An appropriate technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conitz, M. W.; Lowe, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The activities of the Agency for international development were discussed. Regional and national training centers were established to create an understanding of the role and impact of remote sensing on the developing process. Workshops, training seminars, and demonstration projects were conducted. Research on application was carried out and financial and technical assistance to build or strengthen a country's capability were granted.

  7. Application of L3 technology to wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulloch, Simon M.

    2004-10-01

    The new L3 Technology CCDs from E2V combine sub-electron read noise with high pixel rates. This makes them ideal candidates for wavefront sensing. ING's NAOMI adaptive optics instrument is currently limited by the readout noise of its wavefront sensor CCDs. Upgrading to L3 detectors has the potential to give a large increase in performance; simulations suggest a 2 magnitude improvement to the guide star limit. At ING we have explored the behaviour of various L3 devices in applications ranging from fast photometry, fast spectroscopy through to wavefront sensing. The investigations have been done using our own cryogenic cameras containing L3 devices coupled to an SDSU controller. An integral Peltier packaged CCD60 has also been purchased specifically for the WFS upgrade. This paper describes the progress we have made to date on the L3 wavefront sensor upgrade and our future plans for its use with a Rayleigh laser beacon.

  8. Sensing the earth's environment from space - User needs and technology opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Results of a number of studies involving industry, universities and government agencies working in concert to identify specific measurement and data needs in the field of satellite remote sensing are discussed. Comparisons are made with existing sensor capabilities and with the trends in the supporting technology. A series of tables is presented describing, among other things, user subcommittees using remote sensing data, atmosphere, ocean, land and cryosphere measurement needs and funded capabilities, and the capability status of such sensors as passive and active microwave sensors, visible and IR radiometers and laser sensors.

  9. Optimized plasmonic nanostructures for improved sensing activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Guillot, Nicolas; Rouxel, Jérémy; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc; Toury, Timothée

    2012-09-10

    The paper outlines the optimization of plasmonic nanostructures in order to improve their sensing properties such as their sensitivity and their ease of manipulation. The key point in this study is the optimization of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties essential to the sensor characteristics, and more especially for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Two aspects were considered in order to optimize the sensing performance: apolar plasmonic nanostructures for non polarization dependent detection and improvements of SERS sensitivity by using a molecular adhesion layer between gold nanostructures and glass. Both issues could be generalized to all plasmon-resonance-based sensing applications.

  10. Wageningen UR Unmanned Aerial Remote Sensing Facility - Overview of activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, Harm; Keesstra, Saskia; Kooistra, Lammert; Suomalainen, Juha; Mucher, Sander; Kramer, Henk; Franke, Jappe

    2016-04-01

    To support environmental management there is an increasing need for timely, accurate and detailed information on our land. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are increasingly used to monitor agricultural crop development, habitat quality or urban heat efficiency. An important reason is that UAS technology is maturing quickly while the flexible capabilities of UAS fill a gap between satellite based and ground based geo-sensing systems. In 2012, different groups within Wageningen University and Research Centre have established an Unmanned Airborne Remote Sensing Facility. The objective of this facility is threefold: a) To develop innovation in the field of remote sensing science by providing a platform for dedicated and high-quality experiments; b) To support high quality UAS services by providing calibration facilities and disseminating processing procedures to the UAS user community; and c) To promote and test the use of UAS in a broad range of application fields like habitat monitoring, precision agriculture and land degradation assessment. The facility is hosted by the Laboratory of Geo-Information Science and Remote Sensing (GRS) and the Department of Soil Physics and Land Management (SLM) of Wageningen University together with the team Earth Informatics (EI) of Alterra. The added value of the Unmanned Aerial Remote Sensing Facility is that compared to for example satellite based remote sensing more dedicated science experiments can be prepared. This includes for example higher frequent observations in time (e.g., diurnal observations), observations of an object under different observation angles for characterization of BRDF and flexibility in use of camera's and sensors types. In this way, laboratory type of set ups can be tested in a field situation and effects of up-scaling can be tested. In the last years we developed and implemented different camera systems (e.g. a hyperspectral pushbroom system, and multispectral frame cameras) which we operated in projects all

  11. Solid State Laser Technology Development for Atmospheric Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, James C.

    1998-01-01

    NASA atmospheric scientists are currently planning active remote sensing missions that will enable global monitoring of atmospheric ozone, water vapor, aerosols and clouds as well as global wind velocity. The measurements of these elements and parameters are important because of the effects they have on climate change, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, atmospheric transport and, in general, the health of the planet. NASA will make use of Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) and backscatter lidar techniques for active remote sensing of molecular constituents and atmospheric phenomena from advanced high-altitude aircraft and space platforms. This paper provides an overview of NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC's) development of advanced solid state lasers, harmonic generators, and wave mixing techniques aimed at providing the broad range of wavelengths necessary to meet measurement goals of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise.

  12. Remote-sensing technology applied to forest assessment in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David L.

    Remote-sensing technology has been thoroughly evaluated for the analysis of California forest policy. A statewide, 1.6-acre-resolution, digital land-cover data base of Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) classification has been produced. Three major resource regions have been analyzed in detail and one of them geographically integrated with 12 other physical and socioeconomic data layers to model fire and reforestation problems, using a geographic information system (GIS). A study of GIS design criteria has been conducted and the California Department of Forestry, the cooperator in all of these studies, is presently evaluating the alternatives and implementing certain aspects of them.

  13. Functional analysis of polyphenol oxidases by antisense/sense technology.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Stout, Michael J; Attajarusit, Jutharat

    2007-01-01

    that PPO may have a role in the development of plant water stress and potential for photoinhibition and photooxidative damage that may be unrelated to any effects on the Mehler reaction. These results substantiate the defensive role of PPO and suggest that manipulation of PPO activity in specific tissues has the potential to provide broad-spectrum resistance simultaneously to both disease and insect pests, however, effects of PPO on postharvest quality as well as water stress physiology should also be considered. In addition to the functional analysis of tomato PPO, the application of antisense/sense technology to decipher the functions of PPO in other plant species as well as for commercial uses are discussed. PMID:17960074

  14. Sense and avoid technology for Global Hawk and Predator UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCalmont, John F.; Utt, James; Deschenes, Michael; Taylor, Michael J.

    2005-05-01

    The Sensors Directorate at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) along with Defense Research Associates, Inc. (DRA) conducted a flight demonstration of technology that could potentially satisfy the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) requirement for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to sense and avoid local air traffic sufficient to provide an "...equivalent level of safety, comparable to see-and-avoid requirements for manned aircraft". This FAA requirement must be satisfied for autonomous UAV operation within the national airspace. The real-time on-board system passively detects approaching aircraft, both cooperative and non-cooperative, using imaging sensors operating in the visible/near infrared band and a passive moving target indicator algorithm. Detection range requirements for RQ-4 and MQ-9 UAVs were determined based on analysis of flight geometries, avoidance maneuver timelines, system latencies and human pilot performance. Flight data and UAV operating parameters were provided by the system program offices, prime contractors, and flight-test personnel. Flight demonstrations were conducted using a surrogate UAV (Aero Commander) and an intruder aircraft (Beech Bonanza). The system demonstrated target detection ranges out to 3 nautical miles in nose-to-nose scenarios and marginal visual meteorological conditions. (VMC) This paper will describe the sense and avoid requirements definition process and the system concept (sensors, algorithms, processor, and flight rest results) that has demonstrated the potential to satisfy the FAA sense and avoid requirements.

  15. Enabling Smart Workflows over Heterogeneous ID-Sensing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Giner, Pau; Cetina, Carlos; Lacuesta, Raquel; Palacios, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Sensing technologies in mobile devices play a key role in reducing the gap between the physical and the digital world. The use of automatic identification capabilities can improve user participation in business processes where physical elements are involved (Smart Workflows). However, identifying all objects in the user surroundings does not automatically translate into meaningful services to the user. This work introduces Parkour, an architecture that allows the development of services that match the goals of each of the participants in a smart workflow. Parkour is based on a pluggable architecture that can be extended to provide support for new tasks and technologies. In order to facilitate the development of these plug-ins, tools that automate the development process are also provided. Several Parkour-based systems have been developed in order to validate the applicability of the proposal. PMID:23202193

  16. Advances in the development of remote sensing technology for agricultural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, J. E.; Erb, R. B.; Hall, F. G.; Macdonald, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    The application of remote sensing technology to crop forecasting is discussed. The importance of crop forecasts to the world economy and agricultural management is explained, and the development of aerial and spaceborne remote sensing for global crop forecasting by the United States is outlined. The structure, goals and technical aspects of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE) are presented, and main findings on the accuracy, efficiency, applicability and areas for further study of the LACIE procedure are reviewed. The current status of NASA crop forecasting activities in the United States and worldwide is discussed, and the objectives and organization of the newly created Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys through Aerospace Remote Sensing (AgRISTARS) program are presented.

  17. Hybrid Architecture Active Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for performing relatively high-speed wavefront sensing and control to overcome thermal instabilities in a segmented primary mirror telescope [e.g., James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at L2], by using the onboard fine guidance sensor (FGS) to minimize expense and complexity. This FGS performs centroiding on a bright star to feed the information to the pointing and control system. The proposed concept is to beam split the image of the guide star (or use a single defocused guide star image) to perform wavefront sensing using phase retrieval techniques. Using the fine guidance sensor star image for guiding and fine phasing eliminates the need for other, more complex ways of achieving very accurate sensing and control that is needed for UV-optical applications. The phase retrieval occurs nearly constantly, so passive thermal stability over fourteen days is not required. Using the FGS as the sensor, one can feed segment update information to actuators on the primary mirror that can update the primary mirror segment fine phasing with this frequency. Because the thermal time constants of the primary mirror are very slow compared to this duration, the mirror will appear extremely stable during observations (to the level of accuracy of the sensing and control). The sensing can use the same phase retrieval techniques as the JWST by employing an additional beam splitter, and having each channel go through a weak lens (one positive and one negative). The channels can use common or separate detectors. Phase retrieval can be performed onboard. The actuation scheme would include a coarse stage able to achieve initial alignment of several millimeters of range (similar to JWST and can use a JWST heritage sensing approach in the science camera) and a fine stage capable of continual updates.

  18. Active microwave remote sensing of oceans, chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A rationale is developed for the use of active microwave sensing in future aerospace applications programs for the remote sensing of the world's oceans, lakes, and polar regions. Summaries pertaining to applications, local phenomena, and large-scale phenomena are given along with a discussion of orbital errors.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Program Educational Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-13

    Description of educational activities including: EcoCAR2: Plugging In to the Future, EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge, Green Racing, Automotive X Prize, Graduate Technology Automotive Education (GATE), and Hydrogen Education.

  20. Advanced Soil Moisture Network Technologies; Developments in Collecting in situ Measurements for Remote Sensing Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A. R. D.; Akbar, R.; Clewley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) wireless sensor network has been developed to support Calibration and Validation activities (Cal/Val) for large scale soil moisture remote sensing missions (SMAP and AirMOSS). The technology developed here also readily supports small scale hydrological studies by providing sub-kilometer widespread soil moisture observations. An extensive collection of semi-sparse sensor clusters deployed throughout north-central California and southern Arizona provide near real time soil moisture measurements. Such a wireless network architecture, compared to conventional single points measurement profiles, allows for significant and expanded soil moisture sampling. The work presented here aims at discussing and highlighting novel and new technology developments which increase in situ soil moisture measurements' accuracy, reliability, and robustness with reduced data delivery latency. High efficiency and low maintenance custom hardware have been developed and in-field performance has been demonstrated for a period of three years. The SoilSCAPE technology incorporates (a) intelligent sensing to prevent erroneous measurement reporting, (b) on-board short term memory for data redundancy, (c) adaptive scheduling and sampling capabilities to enhance energy efficiency. A rapid streamlined data delivery architecture openly provides distribution of in situ measurements to SMAP and AirMOSS cal/val activities and other interested parties.

  1. Potential of hybrid sensing technology to monitor soil ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, Fabrizio; Macagnano, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    To study and monitor environments, a plethora of sensors in last decades have been proposed and claimed to be as the most specific, sensitive, reliable, durable, affordable or whatever. However, they rarely take into account probable interactions of compounds of interest with other substances (i.e. molecules, matrices, surfaces, etc.) occurring in the environments where the analytes are present (although some corrections due to a few interfering compounds have been sometimes carried out), then, generating misinterpretations of results (e.g. overestimation or underestimation) or incorrect evaluation of effects (e.g. about toxicity and disease diagnoses). Another quite rare evaluation in the detection of analytes in environments concerns the partition of substances of interest into different phases, as well as adsorption/desorption and absorption/release events, thus often leading to misinterpretations of results. That issue is of outmost importance in complex multiphasic environments, such as soil, where these phenomena commonly occur. An improvement in sensor applications to environmental monitoring, as concerns the competition and interference of other compounds in measurements, has been the development of electronic noses. The electronic nose (E-nose) is a sensing technology, where the presence of arrays of several suitable but unspecific sensors for volatiles and gases can deal with this problem, since the different features of sensors, despite overlapping responses to different compounds, are then evaluated in post-measurement data processing analyses (namely multivariate analyses) and integrated into a chemical image reproducing the fingerprint of the sample headspace or atmosphere (i.e. the odour), such as occurs in the olfactory system of mammalians. E-noses in the last decade have been extensively used to monitor volatile and gaseous analytes and odours in several contexts and environments. In the last 5 years, a very few groups have applied this technology

  2. Overview of detector technologies for EO/IR sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Ashok K.; Zeller, John W.; Welser, Roger E.; Puri, Yash R.; Lewis, Jay S.; Dhar, Nibir K.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal

    2016-05-01

    Optical sensing technology is critical for optical communication, defense and security applications. Advances in optoelectronics materials in the UV, Visible and Infrared, using nanostructures, and use of novel materials such as CNT and Graphene have opened doors for new approaches to apply device design methodology that are expected to offer enhanced performance and low cost optical sensors in a wide range of applications. This paper is intended to review recent advancements and present different device architectures and analysis. The chapter will briefly introduce the basics of UV and Infrared detection physics and various wave bands of interest and their characteristics [1, 2] We will cover the UV band (200-400 nm) and address some of the recent advances in nanostructures growth and characterization using ZnO/MgZnO based technologies and their applications. Recent advancements in design and development of CNT and Graphene based detection technologies have shown promise for optical sensor applications. We will present theoretical and experimental results on these device and their potential applications in various bands of interest.

  3. The Application of NASA Remote Sensing Technology to Human Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    With the help of satellites, the Earth's environment can be monitored from a distance. Earth observing satellites and sensors collect data and survey patterns that supply important information about the environment relating to its affect on human health. Combined with ground data, such patterns and remote sensing data can be essential to public health applications. Remote sensing technology is providing information that can help predict factors that affect human health, such as disease, drought, famine, and floods. A number of public health concerns that affect Earth's human population are part of the current National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Applications Plan to provide remotely gathered data to public health decision-makers to aid in forming and implementing policy to protect human health and preserve well-being. These areas of concern are: air quality; water quality; weather and climate change; infectious, zoonotic, and vector-borne disease; sunshine; food resource security; and health risks associated with the built environment. Collaborations within the Earth Science Applications Plan join local, state, national, or global organizations and agencies as partners. These partnerships engage in projects that strive to understand the connection between the environment and health. The important outcome is to put this understanding to use through enhancement of decision support tools that aid policy and management decisions on environmental health risks. Future plans will further employ developed models in formats that are compatible and accessible to all public health organizations.

  4. MORFEO project: use of remote sensing technology for mapping, monitoring and forecasting landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, F.; Candela, L.; Carlà, R.; Fornaro, G.; Lanari, R.; Mondini, A.; Ober, G.; Fiorucci, F.; Zeni, G.

    2009-04-01

    MORFEO, an Italian acronym for Monitoring Landslide Risk exploiting Earth Observation Technology, is a 3-year research and development project of the Italian Space Agency, carried out in the framework of the Italian national earth observation programme. The project primary contract is Carlo Gavazzi Space, a leading enterprise in space technology and remote sensing applications in Italy. The project research team is composed by seven research institutes of the Italian National Research Council, and six university departments. The team has consolidated experience in landslide detection and mapping, landslide hazard assessment and risk evaluation, remote sensing technology (e.g., laser, optical, radar, GPS) for landslide detection, mapping and monitoring. MORFEO aims at the design, development and demonstration of a prototype system that exploits multiple satellite technologies to support the Italian national civil protection offices to manage landslide risk in Italy. Research activities conducted within the MORFEO project consist chiefly in testing, evaluating and improving EO technologies to increase the current capabilities to detect, map, monitor and forecast landslides in Italy. More precisely, the activities include: (i) detection and mapping landslides exploiting medium-resolution to very-high resolution satellite optical images, (ii) landslide monitoring, through the integration of ground based and satellite technologies, including GPS and DInSAR, (iii) landslide susceptibility, hazard and risk modelling using information obtained processing optical and radar data, (iv) vulnerability and damage assessment, exploiting optical and radar sensors, and (v) landslides forecasting, using thresholds, models and remote sensing data. We provide examples of some of the preliminary results obtained in the MOFEO project.

  5. Collision management utilizing CCD and remote sensing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, Harvey E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    With the threat of damage to aerospace systems (space station, shuttle, hypersonic a/c, solar power satellites, loss of life, etc.) from collision with debris (manmade/artificial), there exists an opportunity for the design of a novel system (collision avoidance) to be incorporated into the overall design. While incorporating techniques from ccd and remote sensing technologies, an integrated system utilized in the infrared/visible spectrum for detection, tracking, localization, and maneuvering from doppler shift measurements is achievable. Other analysis such as impact assessment, station keeping, chemical, and optical tracking/fire control solutions are possible through this system. Utilizing modified field programmable gated arrays (software reconfiguring the hardware) the mission and mission effectiveness can be varied. This paper outlines the theoretical operation of a prototype system as it applies to collision avoidance (to be followed up by research).

  6. Crop Identification Technology Assessment for Remote Sensing (CITARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E.; Cary, T. K.; Davis, B. J.; Swain, P. H.

    1975-01-01

    The results of classifications and experiments performed for the Crop Identification Technology Assessment for Remote Sensing (CITARS) project are summarized. Fifteen data sets were classified using two analysis procedures. One procedure used class weights while the other assumed equal probabilities of occurrence for all classes. In addition, 20 data sets were classified using training statistics from another segment or date. The results of both the local and non-local classifications in terms of classification and proportion estimation are presented. Several additional experiments are described which were performed to provide additional understanding of the CITARS results. These experiments investigated alternative analysis procedures, training set selection and size, effects of multitemporal registration, the spectral discriminability of corn, soybeans, and other, and analysis of aircraft multispectral data.

  7. Japanese activities in refrigeration technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Ohtsuka, T.; Ishizaki, Y.

    This paper reviews recent activities in refrigeration technology in Japan. The projects described are stimulated by growing industrial needs or form part of large national projects. The JNR project on the MAGLEV train is currently the most powerful activity and it demands knowledge in all the different disciplines of cryogenics in particular on various scales of refrigeration. Research activities are also directed towards the development of Stirling cycle and magnetic refrigerators for applications in a wider area.

  8. Activities of the Remote Sensing Information Sciences Research Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Botkin, D.; Peuquet, D.; Smith, T.; Star, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Topics on the analysis and processing of remotely sensed data in the areas of vegetation analysis and modelling, georeferenced information systems, machine assisted information extraction from image data, and artificial intelligence are investigated. Discussions on support field data and specific applications of the proposed technologies are also included.

  9. Remote sensing research activities related to academic institutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, V. I.

    1980-01-01

    The role of research in the educational setting is discussed. Curriculum developments for integrating teaching and research are described. Remote sensing technology is used as an example of bridging the gap between research and application. Recommendations are presented for strengthing research groups.

  10. Application of Remote Sensing Technologies for Forest Cover Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agoltsov, Alexander; Sizov, Oleg; Rubtsova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Today we don't have full and reliable information about forests in Russia, so it is impossible to make any well-timed decision for forest management. Update of all this information by means of traditional methods (fieldwork) is a time-consuming and in fact impossible task. Also we do not think that using of the reports without objective information for cameral data actualization is an appropriate method in such situation. So our company uses remote sensing data and technologies to resolve this problem. Nowadays numerous satellites record numerous images every day. Remote sensing data are widespread and accessible, so we can use them as the source of actual and reliable information about current status of the Forest Fund. Furthermore regular monitoring allows extracting the information about the location and intensity of forests' changes like degradation and destruction. First of all we create a georeferenced data set to cover the area of interest with orthomosaic in targeting scale depending on the goals of the project (1:25 000 - 1:10 000). For example, we can do a mosaic from RapidEye (Germany) imagery with GSD = 6.5 m or from WorldView-2 (USA) imagery with GSD = 0.5 m. The next step is to create vector layers to describe the content of images. We use visual and contemporary automatic interpretation techniques. The benefit of such approach that we can extract not only information about forests (like boundary) but also the information about roads, hydrographic objects, power lines and so on. During vectorization except relevant orthomosaic we can use multi-temporal composites of images based on archive of satellite imagery. This helps us not only to detect general changes but detect illegal logging, areas affected by fires, windfalls. Then this information can be used for different products e.g. forest cover statistics, forest cover change statistics, maps of forest management and also we can analyze transport accessibility and economic assessment of forests.

  11. Technology, Mathematics and Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This article describes 11 papers in which the authors report their research on technology as enhancement in the teaching and learning of mathematics, in the context of the application of activity theory for design and/or analysis. There is considerable diversity across the papers in how the authors have interpreted their task and in particular how…

  12. Brain Activities and Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riza, Emel

    2002-01-01

    There are close relationships between brain activities and educational technology. Brain is very important and so complicated part in our bodies. From long time scientists pay attention to that part and did many experiments, but they just reached little information like a drop in the sea. However from time to time they gave us some light to…

  13. Making Sense of Multiple Physical Activity Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B.; LeMasurier, Guy; Franks, B. Don

    2002-01-01

    This digest provides basic information designed to help people determine which of the many physical activity guidelines are most appropriate for use in specific situations. After an introduction, the digest focuses on: "Factors to Consider in Selecting Appropriate Physical Activity Guidelines" (group credibility and purpose, benefits to be…

  14. [Advances in researches on hyperspectral remote sensing forestry information-extracting technology].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Peng, Dao-Li

    2011-09-01

    The hyperspectral remote sensing technology has become one of the leading technologies in forestry remote sensing domain. In the present review paper, the advances in researches on hyperspectral remote sensing technology in forestry information extraction both at home and abroad were reviewed, and the five main research aspects including the hyperspectral classification and recognition of forest tree species, the hyperspectral inversion and extraction of forest ecological physical parameters, the hyperspectral monitoring and diagnosis of forest nutrient element, the forest crown density information extraction and the hyperspectral monitoring of forest disasters were summarized. The unresolved problems of hyperspectral technology in the forestry remote sensing applications were pointed out and the possible ways to solve these problems were expounded. Finally, the application prospect of hyperspectral remote sensing technology in forestry was analyzed.

  15. [Ecosystem services evaluation based on geographic information system and remote sensing technology: a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Shi-Huang; Wang, Hui-Min

    2011-12-01

    Ecosystem services evaluation is a hot topic in current ecosystem management, and has a close link with human beings welfare. This paper summarized the research progress on the evaluation of ecosystem services based on geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technology, which could be reduced to the following three characters, i. e., ecological economics theory is widely applied as a key method in quantifying ecosystem services, GIS and RS technology play a key role in multi-source data acquisition, spatiotemporal analysis, and integrated platform, and ecosystem mechanism model becomes a powerful tool for understanding the relationships between natural phenomena and human activities. Aiming at the present research status and its inadequacies, this paper put forward an "Assembly Line" framework, which was a distributed one with scalable characteristics, and discussed the future development trend of the integration research on ecosystem services evaluation based on GIS and RS technologies.

  16. Interrogating adhesion using fiber Bragg grating sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasberry, Roger D.; Rohr, Garth D.; Miller, William K.; Udd, Eric; Blach, Noah T.; Davis, Ryan A.; Olson, Walter R.; Calkins, David; Roach, Allen R.; Walsh, David S.; McElhanon, James R.

    2015-05-01

    The assurance of the integrity of adhesive bonding at substrate interfaces is paramount to the longevity and sustainability of encapsulated components. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to non-destructively evaluate these materials to determine the adequacy of bonding after manufacturing and then later in service. A particularly difficult problem in this regard is the reliable detection/monitoring of regions of weak bonding that may result from poor adhesion or poor cohesive strength, or degradation in service. One promising and perhaps less explored avenue we have recently begun to investigate for this purpose centers on the use of (chirped) fiber Bragg grating sensing technology. In this scenario, a grating is patterned into a fiber optic such that a (broadband) spectral reflectance is observed. The sensor is highly sensitive to local and uniform changes across the length of the grating. Initial efforts to evaluate this approach for measuring adhesive bonding defects at substrate interfaces are discussed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. An assessment of clinical chemical sensing technology for potential use in space station health maintenance facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A Health Maintenance Facility is currently under development for space station application which will provide capabilities equivalent to those found on Earth. This final report addresses the study of alternate means of diagnosis and evaluation of impaired tissue perfusion in a microgravity environment. Chemical data variables related to the dysfunction and the sensors required to measure these variables are reviewed. A technology survey outlines the ability of existing systems to meet these requirements. How the candidate sensing system was subjected to rigorous testing is explored to determine its suitability. Recommendations for follow-on activities are included that would make the commercial system more appropriate for space station applications.

  18. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 1 - Microwave remote sensing fundamentals and radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The three components of microwave remote sensing (sensor-scene interaction, sensor design, and measurement techniques), and the applications to geoscience are examined. The history of active and passive microwave sensing is reviewed, along with fundamental principles of electromagnetic wave propagation, antennas, and microwave interaction with atmospheric constituents. Radiometric concepts are reviewed, particularly for measurement problems for atmospheric and terrestrial sources of natural radiation. Particular attention is given to the emission by atmospheric gases, clouds, and rain as described by the radiative transfer function. Finally, the operation and performance characteristics of radiometer receivers are discussed, particularly for measurement precision, calibration techniques, and imaging considerations.

  19. A Self-Sensing Active Magnetic Bearing Based on a Direct Current Measurement Approach

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Andries C.; van Schoor, George; du Rand, Carel P.

    2013-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have become a key technology in various industrial applications. Self-sensing AMBs provide an integrated sensorless solution for position estimation, consolidating the sensing and actuating functions into a single electromagnetic transducer. The approach aims to reduce possible hardware failure points, production costs, and system complexity. Despite these advantages, self-sensing methods must address various technical challenges to maximize the performance thereof. This paper presents the direct current measurement (DCM) approach for self-sensing AMBs, denoting the direct measurement of the current ripple component. In AMB systems, switching power amplifiers (PAs) modulate the rotor position information onto the current waveform. Demodulation self-sensing techniques then use bandpass and lowpass filters to estimate the rotor position from the voltage and current signals. However, the additional phase-shift introduced by these filters results in lower stability margins. The DCM approach utilizes a novel PA switching method that directly measures the current ripple to obtain duty-cycle invariant position estimates. Demodulation filters are largely excluded to minimize additional phase-shift in the position estimates. Basic functionality and performance of the proposed self-sensing approach are demonstrated via a transient simulation model as well as a high current (10 A) experimental system. A digital implementation of amplitude modulation self-sensing serves as a comparative estimator. PMID:24030681

  20. A self-sensing active magnetic bearing based on a direct current measurement approach.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Andries C; van Schoor, George; du Rand, Carel P

    2013-09-11

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have become a key technology in various industrial applications. Self-sensing AMBs provide an integrated sensorless solution for position estimation, consolidating the sensing and actuating functions into a single electromagnetic transducer. The approach aims to reduce possible hardware failure points, production costs, and system complexity. Despite these advantages, self-sensing methods must address various technical challenges to maximize the performance thereof. This paper presents the direct current measurement (DCM) approach for self-sensing AMBs, denoting the direct measurement of the current ripple component. In AMB systems, switching power amplifiers (PAs) modulate the rotor position information onto the current waveform. Demodulation self-sensing techniques then use bandpass and lowpass filters to estimate the rotor position from the voltage and current signals. However, the additional phase-shift introduced by these filters results in lower stability margins. The DCM approach utilizes a novel PA switching method that directly measures the current ripple to obtain duty-cycle invariant position estimates. Demodulation filters are largely excluded to minimize additional phase-shift in the position estimates. Basic functionality and performance of the proposed self-sensing approach are demonstrated via a transient simulation model as well as a high current (10 A) experimental system. A digital implementation of amplitude modulation self-sensing serves as a comparative estimator.

  1. Predicting eruptions from precursory activity using remote sensing data hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Ramsey, M. S.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-07-01

    Many volcanoes produce some level of precursory activity prior to an eruption. This activity may or may not be detected depending on the available monitoring technology. In certain cases, precursors such as thermal output can be interpreted to make forecasts about the time and magnitude of the impending eruption. Kamchatka (Russia) provides an ideal natural laboratory to study a wide variety of eruption styles and precursory activity prior to an eruption. At Bezymianny volcano for example, a clear increase in thermal activity commonly occurs before an eruption, which has allowed predictions to be made months ahead of time. Conversely, the eruption of Tolbachik volcano in 2012 produced no discernable thermal precursors before the large scale effusive eruption. However, most volcanoes fall between the extremes of consistently behaved and completely undetectable, which is the case with neighboring Kliuchevskoi volcano. This study tests the effectiveness of using thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing to track volcanic thermal precursors using data from both the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors. It focuses on three large eruptions that produced different levels and durations of effusive and explosive behavior at Kliuchevskoi. Before each of these eruptions, TIR spaceborne sensors detected thermal anomalies (i.e., pixels with brightness temperatures > 2 °C above the background temperature). High-temporal, low-spatial resolution (i.e., ~ hours and 1 km) AVHRR data are ideal for detecting large thermal events occurring over shorter time scales, such as the hot material ejected following strombolian eruptions. In contrast, high-spatial, low-temporal resolution (i.e., days to weeks and 90 m) ASTER data enables the detection of much lower thermal activity; however, activity with a shorter duration will commonly be missed. ASTER and AVHRR data are combined to track low

  2. Non invasive sensing technologies for cultural heritage management and fruition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    monitoring of monuments and sites. In this way, we will be able to improve the appreciation of diagnostics and remote sensing technologies by the end-users. At the conference, we will show and discuss several study cases depicting the deployment of this knowledge chain in realistic conditions regarding the CH management. References Leucci G., Masini N., Persico R., Soldovieri F. 2011. GPR and sonic tomography for structural restoration: the case of the cathedral of Tricarico, Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, 8 (3), 76-92, doi:10.1088/1742-2132/8/3/S08 Masini N., Soldovieri F. 2011. Editorial: Integrated non-invasive sensing techniques and geophysical methods for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, 8 (3), 1-2, doi:10.1088/1742-2132/8/3/E01 Masini N., Persico R., Rizzo E., Calia A., Giannotta M.T., Quarta G., Pagliuca A. 2010, Integrated Techniques for Analysis and Monitoring of Historical Monuments: the case of S.Giovanni al Sepolcro in Brindisi (Southern Italy), Near Surface Geophysics, 8(5), 423-432, doi:10.3997/1873-0604.2010012

  3. NASA's Future Active Remote Sensing Missing for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Jonathan B.

    2000-01-01

    Since the beginning of space remote sensing of the earth, there has been a natural progression widening the range of electromagnetic radiation used to sense the earth, and slowly, steadily increasing the spatial, spectral, and radiometric resolution of the measurements. There has also been a somewhat slower trend toward active measurements across the electromagnetic spectrum, motivated in part by increased resolution, but also by the ability to make new measurements. Active microwave instruments have been used to measure ocean topography, to study the land surface. and to study rainfall from space. Future NASA active microwave missions may add detail to the topographical studies, sense soil moisture, and better characterize the cryosphere. Only recently have active optical instruments been flown in space by NASA; however, there are currently several missions in development which will sense the earth with lasers and many more conceptual active optical missions which address the priorities of NASA's earth science program. Missions are under development to investigate the structure of the terrestrial vegetation canopy, to characterize the earth's ice caps, and to study clouds and aerosols. Future NASA missions may measure tropospheric vector winds and make vastly improved measurements of the chemical components of the earth's atmosphere.

  4. Browsing Image Collections with Representations of Common-Sense Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Andrew S.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a methodology for creating networks of subject terms by manually representing a large number of common-sense activities that are broadly related to image subject terms. Application of this methodology to the Library of Congress Thesaurus for Graphic Materials produced 768 representations that supported users of a prototype browsing-based…

  5. New trends and applications of optical fiber sensing technologies at the NEL-FOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghong; Huang, Chujia; Yuan, Yinquan; Ding, Liyun; Zhou, Ciming

    2015-07-01

    This paper reviews the recent development of optical fiber sensors at the National Engineering Laboratory for Optic Fiber Sensing Technologies (NEL-FOST) at Wuhan University of Technology. Integration of optical fiber with sensitive thin films will new possibilities for industry application, such as optical fiber hydrogen sensors based on Pt-doped WO3 coatings, fiber humidity sensors with porous oxide coating and high-temperature sapphire fiber sensors based on multilayer coating on fiber tip. Ultra-weak FBG array with thousand of FBGs with on-line draw tower technology will enable FBG sensing network with large capacity, also improved sensing performance and mechanical stability.

  6. Active Wave Propagation and Sensing in Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Martin, William N.; Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Ferguson, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    Health monitoring of aerospace structures can be done using an active interrogation approach with diagnostic Lamb waves. Piezoelectric patches are often used to generate the waves, and it is helpful to understand how these waves propagate through a structure. To give a basic understanding of the actual physical process of wave propagation, a model is developed to simulate asymmetric wave propagation in a panel and to produce a movie of the wave motion. The waves can be generated using piezoceramic patches of any size or shape. The propagation, reflection, and interference of the waves are represented in the model. Measuring the wave propagation is the second important aspect of damage detection. Continuous sensors are useful for measuring waves because of the distributed nature of the sensor and the wave. Two sensor designs are modeled, and their effectiveness in measuring acoustic waves is studied. The simulation model developed is useful to understand wave propagation and to optimize the type of sensors that might be used for health monitoring of plate-like structures.

  7. Neural sensing of electrical activity with stretchable microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhe; Graudejus, Oliver; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Wagner, Sigurd; Morrison, Barclay

    2009-01-01

    Sensing neural activity within mechanically active tissues poses particular hurdles because most electrodes are much stiffer than biological tissues. As the tissue deforms, the rigid electrodes may damage the surrounding tissue. The problem is exacerbated when sensing neural activity in experimental models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) which is caused by the rapid and large deformation of brain tissue. We have developed a stretchable microelectrode array (SMEA) that can withstand large elastic deformations (>5% biaxial strain) while continuing to function. The SMEA were fabricated from thin metal conductors patterned on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and encapsulated with a photo-patternable silicone. SMEA were used to record spontaneous activity from brain slice cultures, as well as evoked activity after stimulating through SMEA electrodes. Slices of brain tissue were grown on SMEA in long-term culture and then mechanically injured with our well-characterized in vitro injury model by stretching the SMEA and the adherent culture, which was confirmed by image analysis. Because brain tissue was grown on the substrate-integrated SMEA, post-injury changes in electrophysiological function were normalized to pre-injury function since the SMEA deformed with the tissue and remained in place during mechanical stimulation. The combination of our injury model and SMEA could help elucidate mechanisms responsible for post-traumatic neuronal dysfunction in the quest for TBI therapies. The SMEA may have additional sensing applications in other mechanically active tissues such as peripheral nerve and heart. PMID:19964344

  8. Remote Sensing and Information Technology for Large Farms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John E.; Ramsay, Jimmie A.

    2003-01-01

    A method of applying remote sensing (RS) and information-management technology to help large farms produce at maximum efficiency is undergoing development. The novelty of the method does not lie in the concept of precision agriculture, which involves variation of seeding, of application of chemicals, and of irrigation according to the spatially and temporally local variations in the growth stages and health of crops and in the chemical and physical conditions of soils. The novelty also does not lie in the use of RS data registered with other data in a geographic information system (GIS) to guide the use of precise agricultural techniques. Instead, the novelty lies in a systematic approach to overcoming obstacles that, heretofore, have impeded the timely distribution of reliable, relevant, and sufficient GIS data to support day-to-day, acre-to-acre decisions concerning the application of precise agricultural techniques to increase production and decrease cost. The development and promotion of the method are inspired in part by a vision of equipping farm machinery to accept GIS (including RS) data and using the data for automated or semi-automated implementation of precise agricultural techniques. Primary examples of relevant GIS data include information on plant stress, soil moisture, and effects of applied chemicals, all derived by automated computational analysis of measurements taken by one or more airborne spectroradiometers. Proper management and timeliness of the large amount of GIS information are of paramount concern in agriculture. Information on stresses and changes in crops is especially perishable and important to farmers. The need for timeliness and management of information is satisfied by use of computing hardware and software capable of (1) rapid geo-rectification and other processing of RS data, (2) packaging the output data in the form of GIS plots, and (3) making the data available to farmers and other subscribers by Internet password access. It

  9. Remote Sensing and Information Technology for Large Farms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John E.; Ramsay, Jimmie A.

    2002-01-01

    A method of applying of remote sensing (RS) and information management technology to help large farms produce at maximum efficiency is undergoing development. The novelty of the method does not lie in the concept of "precision agriculture," which involves variation of seeding, of application of chemicals, and of irrigation according to the spatially and temporally local variations in the growth stages and health of crops and in the chemical and physical conditions of soils. The novelty also does not lie in the use of RS data registered with other data in a geographic information system (GIS) to guide the use of precise agricultural techniques. Instead, the novelty lies in a systematic approach to overcoming obstacles that, heretofore, have impeded the timely distribution of reliable, relevant, and sufficient GIS data to support day-to-day, acre-to-acre decisions concerning the application of precise agricultural techniques to increase production and decrease cost. The development and promotion of the method are inspired in part by a vision of equipping farm machinery to accept GIS (including RS) data and using the data for automated or semiautomated implementation of precise agricultural techniques. Primary examples of relevant GIS data include information on plant stress, soil moisture, and effects of applied chemicals, all derived by automated computational analysis of measurements taken by one or more airborne spectroradiometers. Proper management and timeliness of the large amount of GIS information are of paramount concern in agriculture. Information on stresses and changes in crops is especially perishable and important to farmers. The need for timeliness and management of information is satisfied by use of computing hardware and software capable of (1) rapid georectification and other processing of RS data, (2) packaging the output data in the form of GIS plots, and (3) making the data available to farmers and other subscribers by Internet password access

  10. Identification of sewage leaks by active remote-sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Basson, Uri

    2016-04-01

    The increasing length of sewage pipelines, and concomitant risk of leaks due to urban and industrial growth and development is exposing the surrounding land to contamination risk and environmental harm. It is therefore important to locate such leaks in a timely manner, to minimize the damage. Advances in active remote sensing Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Frequency Domain Electromagnetic (FDEM) technologies was used to identify leaking potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. This study focused on the development of these electromagnetic methods to replace conventional acoustic methods for the identification of leaks along sewage pipes. Electromagnetic methods provide an additional advantage in that they allow mapping of the fluid-transport system in the subsurface. Leak-detection systems using GPR and FDEM are not limited to large amounts of water, but enable detecting leaks of tens of liters per hour, because they can locate increases in environmental moisture content of only a few percentage along the pipes. The importance and uniqueness of this research lies in the development of practical tools to provide a snapshot and monitoring of the spatial changes in soil moisture content up to depths of about 3-4 m, in open and paved areas, at relatively low cost, in real time or close to real time. Spatial measurements performed using GPR and FDEM systems allow monitoring many tens of thousands of measurement points per hectare, thus providing a picture of the spatial situation along pipelines and the surrounding. The main purpose of this study was to develop a method for detecting sewage leaks using the above-proposed geophysical methods, since their contaminants can severely affect public health. We focused on identifying, locating and characterizing such leaks in sewage pipes in residential and industrial areas.

  11. [Application of high resolution remote sensing technology in research of schistosomiasis surveillance].

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing-bo; Zhang, Li-juan; Wang, Qiang; Lu, Yan-xin; Li, Shi-zhu

    2015-10-01

    Schistosomiasis is closely related to environmental factors, the changes of environmental factors, such as vegetation, temperature, hydrology and soil, could impact the transmission of the disease. The environmental factors associated with schistosomiasis could be extracted by remote sensing technology quickly and precisely, and be applied to monitor the schistosomiasis transmission. The studies on high resolution remote sensing technology applied in the research of schistosomiasis are reviewed in this paper.

  12. Sensing performance of electrically conductive fabrics and dielectric electro active polymers for parachutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favini, Eric; Niezrecki, Christopher; Manohar, Sanjeev K.; Willis, David; Chen, Julie; Niemi, Eugene; Desabrais, Kenneth; Charette, Christine

    2011-04-01

    This paper quantifies the sensing capabilities of novel smart materials in an effort to improve the performance, better understand the physics, and enhance the safety of parachutes. Based upon a recent review of actuation technologies for parachute applications, it was surmised that the actuators reviewed could not be used to effectively alter the drag or lift (i.e. geometry, porosity, or air vent openings) of a parachute during flight. However, several materials showed potential for sensing applications within a parachute, specifically electrically conductive fabrics and dielectric electro-active polymers. This paper introduces several new conductive fabrics and provides an evaluation of the sensing performance of these smart materials based upon test results using mechanical testing and digital image correlation for comparison.

  13. NASA Remote Sensing Technologies for Improved Integrated Water Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, D. L.; Doorn, B.; Searby, N. D.; Entin, J. K.; Lee, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation will emphasize NASA's water research, applications, and capacity building activities using satellites and models to contribute to water issues including water availability, transboundary water, flooding and droughts for improved Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). NASA's free and open exchange of Earth data observations and products helps engage and improve integrated observation networks and enables national and multi-national regional water cycle research and applications that are especially useful in data sparse regions of most developing countries. NASA satellite and modeling products provide a huge volume of valuable data extending back over 50 years across a broad range of spatial (local to global) and temporal (hourly to decadal) scales and include many products that are available in near real time (see earthdata.nasa.gov). To further accomplish these objectives NASA works to actively partner with public and private groups (e.g. federal agencies, universities, NGO's, and industry) in the U.S. and international community to ensure the broadest use of its satellites and related information and products and to collaborate with regional end users who know the regions and their needs best. Key objectives of this talk will highlight NASA's Water Resources and Capacity Building Programs with their objective to discover and demonstrate innovative uses and practical benefits of NASA's advanced system technologies for improved water management in national and international applications. The event will help demonstrate the strong partnering and the use of satellite data to provide synoptic and repetitive spatial coverage helping water managers' deal with complex issues. The presentation will also demonstrate how NASA is a major contributor to water tasks and activities in GEOSS (Global Earth Observing System of Systems) and GEO (Group on Earth Observations).

  14. Cholinergic signals in mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Emmanuel; Kremer, Yves; Crochet, Sylvain; Petersen, Carl C H

    2014-12-11

    Internal brain states affect sensory perception, cognition, and learning. Many neocortical areas exhibit changes in the pattern and synchrony of neuronal activity during quiet versus active behaviors. Active behaviors are typically associated with desynchronized cortical dynamics. Increased thalamic firing contributes importantly to desynchronize mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing. However, a whisking-related cortical state change persists after thalamic inactivation, which is mediated at least in part by acetylcholine, as we show here by using whole-cell recordings, local pharmacology, axonal calcium imaging, and optogenetic stimulation. During whisking, we find prominent cholinergic signals in the barrel cortex, which suppress spontaneous cortical activity. The desynchronized state of barrel cortex during whisking is therefore driven by at least two distinct signals with opposing functions: increased thalamic activity driving glutamatergic excitation of the cortex and increased cholinergic input suppressing spontaneous cortical activity.

  15. Performance Based Education. Technology Activity Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L., Ed.

    These Technology Activity Modules are designed to serve as an implementation resource for technology education teachers as they integrate technology education with Missouri's Academic Performance Standards and provide a source of activities and activity ideas that can be used to integrate and reinforce learning across the curriculum. The modules…

  16. Crop identification technology assessment for remote sensing (CITARS). Volume 6: Data processing at the laboratory for applications of remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E.; Cary, T. K.; Davis, B. J.; Swain, P. H.

    1975-01-01

    The results of classifications and experiments for the crop identification technology assessment for remote sensing are summarized. Using two analysis procedures, 15 data sets were classified. One procedure used class weights while the other assumed equal probabilities of occurrence for all classes. Additionally, 20 data sets were classified using training statistics from another segment or date. The classification and proportion estimation results of the local and nonlocal classifications are reported. Data also describe several other experiments to provide additional understanding of the results of the crop identification technology assessment for remote sensing. These experiments investigated alternative analysis procedures, training set selection and size, effects of multitemporal registration, spectral discriminability of corn, soybeans, and other, and analyses of aircraft multispectral data.

  17. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  18. The Science and Technology in Future Remote Sensing Space Missions of Alenia Aerospazio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angino, G.; Borgarelli, L.

    1999-12-01

    The Space Division of Alenia Aerospazio, a Finmeccanica company, is the major Italian space industry. It has, in seven plants, design facilities and laboratories for advanced technological research that are amongst the most modern and well equipped in Europe. With the co-ordinated companies Alenia Aerospazio is one of Europe's largest space industries. In the field of Remote Sensing, i.e. the acquisition of information about objects without being in physical contact with them, the Space Division has proven their capability to manage all of the techniques from space (ranging from active instruments as Synthetic Aperture Radar, Radar Altimeter, Scatterometer, etc… to passive ones as radiometer) in different programs with the main international industries and agencies. Space techniques both for Monitoring/Observation (i.e. operational applications) and Exploration (i.e. research for science demonstration) according to the most recent indication from international committees constitute guidelines. The first is devoted to market for giving innovation, added-value to services and, globally, enhancement of quality of life. The second has the basic purpose of pursuing the scientific knowledge. Advanced technology allows to design for multi-functions instruments (easy in configuration, adaptable to impredictable environment), to synthesise, apparently, opposite concepts (see for instance different requirement from military and civil applications). Space Division of Alenia Aerospazio has knowledge and capability to face the challenge of new millennium in space missions sector. In this paper, it will be described main remote sensing missions in which Space Division is involved both in terms of science and technology definition. Two main segments can be defined: Earth and interplanetary missions. To the first belong: ENVISAT (Earth surface), LIGHTSAR (Earth imaging), CRYOSAT (Earth ice) and to the second: CASSINI (study of Titan and icy satellites), MARS EXPRESS (detection

  19. Active sensing without efference copy: referent control of perception.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Anatol G

    2016-09-01

    Although action and perception are different behaviors, they are likely to be interrelated, as implied by the notions of perception-action coupling and active sensing. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the nervous system directly preprograms motor commands required for actions and uses a copy of them called efference copy (EC) to also influence our senses. This review offers a critical analysis of the EC concept by identifying its limitations. An alternative to the EC concept is based on the experimentally confirmed notion that sensory signals from receptors are perceived relative to referent signals specified by the brain. These referents also underlie the control of motor actions by predetermining where, in the spatial domain, muscles can work without preprogramming how they should work in terms of motor commands or EC. This approach helps solve several problems of action and explain several sensory experiences, including position sense and the sense that the world remains stationary despite changes in its retinal image during eye or body motion (visual space constancy). The phantom limb phenomenon and other kinesthetic illusions are also explained within this framework. PMID:27306668

  20. Trends and future of fiber Bragg grating sensing technologies: tailored draw tower gratings (DTGs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, E.; Hartung, A.; Hoh, D.; Chojetzki, C.; Schuster, K.; Bierlich, J.; Rothhardt, M.

    2014-05-01

    Today fiber Bragg gratings are commonly used in sensing technology as well as in telecommunications. Numerous requirements must be satisfied for their application as a sensor such as the number of sensors per system, the measurement resolution and repeatability, the sensor reusability as well as the sensor costs. In addition current challenges need to be met in the near future for sensing fibers to keep and extend their marketability such as the suitability for sterilization, hydrogen darkening or the separation of strain and temperature (or pressure and temperature). In this contribution we will give an outlook about trends and future of the fiber Bragg gratings in sensing technologies. Specifically, we will discuss how the use of draw tower grating technology enables the production of tailored Bragg grating sensing fibers, and we will present a method of separating strain and temperature by the use of a single Bragg grating only, avoiding the need for additional sensors to realize the commonly applied temperature compensation.

  1. Characteristics of self-sensing actuation for active control

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, P.; Redmond, J.; Smith, D.

    1996-12-31

    The benefits of a collocated sensor actuator pair are well known within the controls community. Generally speaking, collocation offers the use of simple control algorithms with reduced instabilities due to spillover. One method for achieving collocation is the implementation of a ``sentuator`` in which a piezoelectric element functions simultaneously as both a sensor and an actuator. Past work in utilizing a sentuator has primarily been limited to piezoelectric films and patches mounted to flexible structures. Additional papers have provided information and methodology for dealing with the non-linear aspects of a piezoceramic sentuator. The need arises for methods of self-sensing when performing active vibration control of very stiff structures. A method for understanding and using self-sensing lead zirconate titanate stacks for active vibration control is presented. This paper specifically provides a basic understanding of self-sensing methods as applied to stiff structures for the purposes of control. The discussion of the methodology is followed by a simple example in which active vibration control is applied to a model of a boring bar with embedded PZT stacks.

  2. The Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). Part 3: A systematic approach to the practical application of remote-sensing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. D.; Dideriksen, R. I.

    1975-01-01

    The application of remote sensing technology by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is examined. The activities of the USDA Remote-Sensing User Requirement Task Force which include cataloging USDA requirements for earth resources data, determining those requirements that would return maximum benefits by using remote sensing technology and developing a plan for acquiring, processing, analyzing, and distributing data to satisfy those requirements are described. Emphasis is placed on the large area crop inventory experiment and its relationship to the task force.

  3. Malaria Modeling using Remote Sensing and GIS Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Malaria has been with the human race since the ancient time. In spite of the advances of biomedical research and the completion of genomic mapping of Plasmodium falciparum, the exact mechanisms of how the various strains of parasites evade the human immune system and how they have adapted and become resistant to multiple drugs remain elusive. Perhaps because of these reasons, effective vaccines against malaria are still not available. Worldwide, approximately one to three millions deaths are attributed to malaria annually. With the increased availability of remotely sensed data, researchers in medical entomology, epidemiology and ecology have started to associate environmental and ecological variables with malaria transmission. In several studies, it has been shown that transmission correlates well with certain environmental and ecological parameters, and that remote sensing can be used to measure these determinants. In a NASA project, we have taken a holistic approach to examine how remote sensing and GIs can contribute to vector and malaria controls. To gain a better understanding of the interactions among the possible promoting factors, we have been developing a habitat model, a transmission model, and a risk prediction model, all using remote sensing data as input. Our objectives are: 1) To identify the potential breeding sites of major vector species and the locations for larvicide and insecticide applications in order to reduce costs, lessen the chance of developing pesticide resistance, and minimize the damage to the environment; 2) To develop a malaria transmission model characterizing the interactions among hosts, vectors, parasites, landcover and environment in order to identify the key factors that sustain or intensify malaria transmission, and 3) To develop a risk model to predict the occurrence of malaria and its transmission intensity using epidemiological data and satellite-derived or ground-measured environmental and meteorological data.

  4. Health Occupations. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This packet of technology learning activity (TLA) materials on health occupations for students in grades 6-10 consists of a technology education overview, information on use, and instructor's and student's sections. The overview discusses the technology education program and materials. Components of the instructor's and student's sections are…

  5. Electronic Publishing. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This packet of technology learning activity (TLA) materials on electronic publishing for students in grades 6-10 consists of a technology education overview, information on use, and the instructor's and student's sections. The overview discusses the technology education program and materials. Components of the instructor and student sections are…

  6. Measuring thermal budgets of active volcanoes by satellite remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L.; Francis, P. W.; Rothery, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Thematic Mapper measurements of the total radiant energy flux Q at Lascar volcano in north Chile for December 1984 are reported. The results are consistent with the earlier suggestion that a lava lake is the source of a reported thermal budget anomaly, and with values for 1985-1986 that are much lower, suggesting that fumarolic activity was then a more likely heat source. The results show that satellite remote sensing may be used to monitor the activity of a volcano quantitatively, in a way not possible by conventional ground studies, and may provide a method for predicting eruptions.

  7. SENSE IT: Student Enabled Network of Sensors for the Environment using Innovative Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotaling, L. A.; Stolkin, R.; Kirkey, W.; Bonner, J. S.; Lowes, S.; Lin, P.; Ojo, T.

    2010-12-01

    SENSE IT is a project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) which strives to enrich science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education by providing teacher professional development and classroom projects in which high school students build from first principles, program, test and deploy sensors for water quality monitoring. Sensor development is a broad and interdisciplinary area, providing motivating scenarios in which to teach a multitude of STEM subjects, from mathematics and physics to biology and environmental science, while engaging students with hands on problems that reinforce conventional classroom learning by re-presenting theory as practical tools for building real-life working devices. The SENSE IT program is currently developing and implementing a set of high school educational modules which teach environmental science and basic engineering through the lens of fundamental STEM principles, at the same time introducing students to a new set of technologies that are increasingly important in the world of environmental research. Specifically, the project provides students with the opportunity to learn the engineering design process through the design, construction, programming and testing of a student-implemented water monitoring network in the Hudson and St. Lawrence Rivers in New York. These educational modules are aligned to state and national technology and science content standards and are designed to be compatible with standard classroom curricula to support a variety of core science, technology and mathematics classroom material. For example, while designing, programming and calibrating the sensors, the students are led through a series of tasks in which they must use core mathematics and physics theory to solve the real problems of making their sensors work. In later modules, students can explore environmental science and environmental engineering curricula while deploying and monitoring their sensors in local rivers. This

  8. Geographic information systems, remote sensing, and spatial analysis activities in Texas, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, D.K.; Gary, R.H.; Wilson, Z.D.

    2007-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become an important tool for scientific investigation, resource management, and environmental planning. A GIS is a computer-aided system capable of collecting, storing, analyzing, and displaying spatially referenced digital data. GIS technology is particularly useful when analyzing a wide variety of spatial data such as with remote sensing and spatial analysis. Remote sensing involves collecting remotely sensed data, such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, or radar images, and analyzing the data to gather information or investigate trends about the environment or the Earth's surface. Spatial analysis combines remotely sensed, thematic, statistical, quantitative, and geographical data through overlay, modeling, and other analytical techniques to investigate specific research questions. It is the combination of data formats and analysis techniques that has made GIS an essential tool in scientific investigations. This document presents information about the technical capabilities and project activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TWSC) GIS Workgroup from 2002 through 2007.

  9. Remote sensing technologies for Space Missions in the second half of the nineties' decade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, M. M.; Rubin, B.

    1985-01-01

    The remote sensing research and technology to be used in the development of future NASA missions are discussed, with consideration given to earth sciences, planetary sciences, solar physics, and astrophysics. The remote sensing missions planned in the four application areas, their payload packages, and the particular instruments that will make up these packages are described. The advanced technologies to be used include systems and devices that address the detection of radiation in the radio, microwave, millimeter wave, submillimeter wave, IR, visible, UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray parts of the spectrum, including supporting technologies, such as optics, liquid cryogen transfer systems, and 'smart' sensors.

  10. Intracellular sensing of complement C3 activates cell autonomous immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Jerry C.H.; Bidgood, Susanna R.; McEwan, William A.; James, Leo C.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens traverse multiple barriers during infection including cell membranes. Here we show that during this transition pathogens carry covalently attached complement C3 into the cell, triggering immediate signalling and effector responses. Sensing of C3 in the cytosol activates MAVS-dependent signalling cascades and induces proinflammatory cytokine secretion. C3 also flags viruses for rapid proteasomal degradation, thereby preventing their replication. This system can detect both viral and bacterial pathogens but is antagonized by enteroviruses, such as rhinovirus and poliovirus, which cleave C3 using their 3C protease. The antiviral Rupintrivir inhibits 3C protease and prevents C3 cleavage, rendering enteroviruses susceptible to intracellular complement sensing. Thus, complement C3 allows cells to detect and disable pathogens that have invaded the cytosol. PMID:25190799

  11. Using Technology to Create a Sense of Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Chris; Davis, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Chris Davis and Jennifer Davis embrace the teaching environment of their science and technology magnet school. Using their students? skills in Web development, PowerPoint, Photoshop, and other technologies, the authors create lessons that help students ?make connections with one another and with the community.?

  12. Sensing the World around Us. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a variety of sensors--specifically those of the NASA Mars Pathfinder Lander--and identifies other kinds of sensor technologies used in the industrial and scientific world. Suggests that using sensors to solve technological problems is limited only by one's creativity and imagination. (JOW)

  13. Lasers. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the materials required for presenting an 8-day competency-based technology learning activity (TLA) designed to introduce students in grades 6-10 to advances and career opportunities in the field of laser technology. The guide uses a series of hands-on exploratory experiences into which activities to help students develop…

  14. Remote sensing in agriculture. [using Earth Resources Technology Satellite photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, S. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Some examples are presented of the use of remote sensing in cultivated crops, forestry, and range management. Areas of concern include: the determination of crop areas and types, prediction of yield, and detection of disease; the determination of forest areas and types, timber volume estimation, detection of insect and disease attack, and forest fires; and the determination of range conditions and inventory, and livestock inventory. Articles in the literature are summarized and specific examples of work being performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center are given. Primarily, aerial photographs and photo-like ERTS images are considered.

  15. NASA programs in technology transfer and their relation to remote sensing education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Technology transfer to users is a central feature of NASA programs. In each major area of responsibility, a variety of mechanisms was established to provide for this transfer of operational capability to the proper end user, be it a Federal agency, industry, or other public sector users. In addition, the Technology Utilization program was established to cut across all program areas and to make available a wealth of 'spinoff' technology (i.e., secondary applications of space technology to ground-based use). The transfer of remote sensing technology, particularly to state and local users, presents some real challenges in application and education for NASA and the university community. The agency's approach to the transfer of remote sensing technology and the current and potential role of universities in the process are considered.

  16. A Study on Software-based Sensing Technology for Multiple Object Control in AR Video

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sungmo; Song, Jae-gu; Hwang, Dae-Joon; Ahn, Jae Young; Kim, Seoksoo

    2010-01-01

    Researches on Augmented Reality (AR) have recently received attention. With these, the Machine-to-Machine (M2M) market has started to be active and there are numerous efforts to apply this to real life in all sectors of society. To date, the M2M market has applied the existing marker-based AR technology in entertainment, business and other industries. With the existing marker-based AR technology, a designated object can only be loaded on the screen from one marker and a marker has to be added to load on the screen the same object again. This situation creates a problem where the relevant marker’should be extracted and printed in screen so that loading of the multiple objects is enabled. However, since the distance between markers will not be measured in the process of detecting and copying markers, the markers can be overlapped and thus the objects would not be augmented. To solve this problem, a circle having the longest radius needs to be created from a focal point of a marker to be copied, so that no object is copied within the confines of the circle. In this paper, software-based sensing technology for multiple object detection and loading using PPHT has been developed and overlapping marker control according to multiple object control has been studied using the Bresenham and Mean Shift algorithms. PMID:22163444

  17. A study on software-based sensing technology for multiple object control in AR video.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungmo; Song, Jae-Gu; Hwang, Dae-Joon; Ahn, Jae Young; Kim, Seoksoo

    2010-01-01

    Researches on Augmented Reality (AR) have recently received attention. With these, the Machine-to-Machine (M2M) market has started to be active and there are numerous efforts to apply this to real life in all sectors of society. To date, the M2M market has applied the existing marker-based AR technology in entertainment, business and other industries. With the existing marker-based AR technology, a designated object can only be loaded on the screen from one marker and a marker has to be added to load on the screen the same object again. This situation creates a problem where the relevant marker'should be extracted and printed in screen so that loading of the multiple objects is enabled. However, since the distance between markers will not be measured in the process of detecting and copying markers, the markers can be overlapped and thus the objects would not be augmented. To solve this problem, a circle having the longest radius needs to be created from a focal point of a marker to be copied, so that no object is copied within the confines of the circle. In this paper, software-based sensing technology for multiple object detection and loading using PPHT has been developed and overlapping marker control according to multiple object control has been studied using the Bresenham and Mean Shift algorithms.

  18. Novel in situ chemical sensing technologies for deep sub-ice exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadham, J.; Beaton, A.; Mowlem, M. C.; Liz, B.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Telling, J.; Hawkings, J.; Tranter, M.

    2015-12-01

    A dramatic development in subglacial science in recent decades has been the considerable international effort aimed at improving understanding of the hidden subglacial aquatic environments (SAEs) beneath ice sheets. These include a diverse range of lakes, rivers, shallow and deep sediments. Technology challenges associated with the exploration of these environments are substantial because of their remote nature, extreme conditions and the requirement for sterile/clean access and sampling. While two Antarctic subglacial lakes have now been penetrated (Subglacial Lakes Vostok and Whillans), significant challenges remain for a) the clean access and sampling of deeper SAEs, such as deep sediments in lakes and sedimentary basins, and also b) for in situ monitoring of physical, chemical and biological conditions in SAEs. The scientific arguments for deep drilling into subglacial environments are compelling. Data providing clues to glaciation history and past climate are likely to be locked up in these deeper sedimentary strata. They are also likely oases for microbial life, which is actively involved in biogeochemical cycling processes, such as methane hydrate formation within deep sedimentary basins. This talk aims to give an overview of the current challenges and technology solutions for the exploration of SAEs, with a particular focus on in situ sensing technologies. It also presents recent results from the NERC funded programme, DELVE (DEveLopment and Validation of in situ chemical sensors for icy Ecosystems).

  19. Combination of multispectral remote sensing, variable rate technology and environmental modeling for citrus pest management.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Chang, Ni-Bin; Yang, Chenghai; Srilakshmi, Kanth R

    2008-01-01

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of south Texas is an agriculturally rich area supporting intensive production of vegetables, fruits, grain sorghum, and cotton. Modern agricultural practices involve the combined use of irrigation with the application of large amounts of agrochemicals to maximize crop yields. Intensive agricultural activities in past decades might have caused potential contamination of soil, surface water, and groundwater due to leaching of pesticides in the vadose zone. In an effort to promote precision farming in citrus production, this paper aims at developing an airborne multispectral technique for identifying tree health problems in a citrus grove that can be combined with variable rate technology (VRT) for required pesticide application and environmental modeling for assessment of pollution prevention. An unsupervised linear unmixing method was applied to classify the image for the grove and quantify the symptom severity for appropriate infection control. The PRZM-3 model was used to estimate environmental impacts that contribute to nonpoint source pollution with and without the use of multispectral remote sensing and VRT. Research findings using site-specific environmental assessment clearly indicate that combination of remote sensing and VRT may result in benefit to the environment by reducing the nonpoint source pollution by 92.15%. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of precision farming for citrus production in the nexus of industrial ecology and agricultural sustainability.

  20. A technology review of time-of-flight photon counting for advanced remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-04-01

    Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) has made tremendous progress during the past ten years enabling improved performance in precision time-of-flight (TOF) rangefinding and lidar. In this review the development and performance of several ranging systems is presented that use TCSPC for accurate ranging and range profiling over distances up to 17km. A range resolution of a few millimetres is routinely achieved over distances of several kilometres. These systems include single wavelength devices operating in the visible; multi-wavelength systems covering the visible and near infra-red; the use of electronic gating to reduce in-band solar background and, most recently, operation at high repetition rates without range aliasing- typically 10MHz over several kilometres. These systems operate at very low optical power (<100μW). The technique therefore has potential for eye-safe lidar monitoring of the environment and obvious military, security and surveillance sensing applications. The review will highlight the theoretical principles of photon counting and progress made in developing absolute ranging techniques that enable high repetition rate data acquisition that avoids range aliasing. Technology trends in TCSPC rangefinding are merging with those of quantum cryptography and its future application to revolutionary quantum imaging provides diverse and exciting research into secure covert sensing, ultra-low power active imaging and quantum rangefinding.

  1. Submillimeter-Wave Radiometer Technology for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P.

    2000-01-01

    Recent innovations in ultra-high frequency, semiconductor device/component technology have enabled both traditional and new applications for space-borne millimeter- and submillimeter-wave heterodyne radiometer instruments.

  2. Volcanology 2020: How will thermal remote sensing of volcanic surface activity evolve over the next decade?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Michael S.; Harris, Andrew J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Volcanological remote sensing spans numerous techniques, wavelength regions, data collection strategies, targets, and applications. Attempting to foresee and predict the growth vectors in this broad and rapidly developing field is therefore exceedingly difficult. However, we attempted to make such predictions at both the American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting session entitled Volcanology 2010: How will the science and practice of volcanology change in the coming decade? held in December 2000 and the follow-up session 10 years later, Looking backward and forward: Volcanology in 2010 and 2020. In this summary paper, we assess how well we did with our predictions for specific facets of volcano remote sensing in 2000 the advances made over the most recent decade, and attempt a new look ahead to the next decade. In completing this review, we only consider the subset of the field focused on thermal infrared remote sensing of surface activity using ground-based and space-based technology and the subsequent research results. This review keeps to the original scope of both AGU presentations, and therefore does not address the entire field of volcanological remote sensing, which uses technologies in other wavelength regions (e.g., ultraviolet, radar, etc.) or the study of volcanic processes other than the those associated with surface (mostly effusive) activity. Therefore we do not consider remote sensing of ash/gas plumes, for example. In 2000, we had looked forward to a "golden age" in volcanological remote sensing, with a variety of new orbital missions both planned and recently launched. In addition, exciting field-based sensors such as hand-held thermal cameras were also becoming available and being quickly adopted by volcanologists for both monitoring and research applications. All of our predictions in 2000 came true, but at a pace far quicker than we predicted. Relative to the 2000-2010 timeframe, the coming decade will see far fewer new orbital instruments with

  3. Applications of ecological concepts and remote sensing technologies in archaeological site reconnaissance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. Frank; Sever, Thomas L.; Lee, C. Daniel

    1991-01-01

    The concept of integrating ecological perspectives on early man's settlement patterns with advanced remote sensing technologies shows promise for predictive site modeling. Early work with aerial imagery and ecosystem analysis is discussed with respect to the development of a major project in Maya archaeology supported by NASA and the National Geographic Society with technical support from the Mississippi State Remote Sensing Center. A preliminary site reconnaissance model will be developed for testing during the 1991 field season.

  4. Geographic information systems, remote sensing, and spatial analysis activities in Texas, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2009-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become an important tool for scientific investigation, resource management, and environmental planning. A GIS is a computer-aided system capable of collecting, storing, analyzing, and displaying spatially referenced digital data. GIS technology is useful for analyzing a wide variety of spatial data. Remote sensing involves collecting remotely sensed data, such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, or radar images, and analyzing the data to gather information or investigate trends about the environment or the Earth's surface. Spatial analysis combines remotely sensed, thematic, statistical, quantitative, and geographical data through overlay, modeling, and other analytical techniques to investigate specific research questions. It is the combination of data formats and analysis techniques that has made GIS an essential tool in scientific investigations. This fact sheet presents information about the technical capabilities and project activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TWSC) GIS Workgroup during 2008 and 2009. After a summary of GIS Workgroup capabilities, brief descriptions of activities by project at the local and national levels are presented. Projects are grouped by the fiscal year (October-September 2008 or 2009) the project ends and include overviews, project images, and Internet links to additional project information and related publications or articles.

  5. Active microwave remote sensing of earth/land, chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Geoscience applications of active microwave remote sensing systems are examined. Major application areas for the system include: (1) exploration of petroleum, mineral, and ground water resources, (2) mapping surface and structural features, (3) terrain analysis, both morphometric and genetic, (4) application in civil works, and (5) application in the areas of earthquake prediction and crustal movements. Although the success of radar surveys has not been widely publicized, they have been used as a prime reconnaissance data base for mineral exploration and land-use evaluation in areas where photography cannot be obtained.

  6. Remote sensing of environmental impact of land use activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, C. K.

    1977-01-01

    The capability to monitor land cover, associated in the past with aerial film cameras and radar systems, was discussed in regard to aircraft and spacecraft multispectral scanning sensors. A proposed thematic mapper with greater spectral and spatial resolutions for the fourth LANDSAT is expected to usher in new environmental monitoring capability. In addition, continuing improvements in image classification by supervised and unsupervised computer techniques are being operationally verified for discriminating environmental impacts of human activities on the land. The benefits of employing remote sensing for this discrimination was shown to far outweigh the incremental costs of converting to an aircraft-satellite multistage system.

  7. Active Chemical Sensing With Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosangi, Rakesh; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    2009-05-01

    We present an active-perception strategy to optimize the temperature program of metal-oxide sensors in real time, as the sensor reacts with its environment. We model the problem as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP), where actions correspond to measurements at particular temperatures, and the agent is to find a temperature sequence that minimizes the Bayes risk. We validate the method on a binary classification problem with a simulated sensor. Our results show that the method provides a balance between classification rate and sensing costs.

  8. Active microwave remote sensing of an anisotropic random medium layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A two-layer anisotropic random medium model has been developed to study the active remote sensing of the earth. The dyadic Green's function for a two-layer anisotropic medium is developed and used in conjunction with the first-order Born approximation to calculate the backscattering coefficients. It is shown that strong cross-polarization occurs in the single scattering process and is indispensable in the interpretation of radar measurements of sea ice at different frequencies, polarizations, and viewing angles. The effects of anisotropy on the angular responses of backscattering coefficients are also illustrated.

  9. Strategy change in vibrissal active sensing during rat locomotion.

    PubMed

    Arkley, Kendra; Grant, Robyn A; Mitchinson, Ben; Prescott, Tony J

    2014-07-01

    During exploration, rats and other small mammals make rhythmic back-and-forth sweeps of their long facial whiskers (macrovibrissae) [1-3]. These "whisking" movements are modulated by head movement [4] and by vibrissal sensory input [5, 6] and hence are often considered "active" in the Gibsonian sense of being purposive and information seeking [7, 8]. An important hallmark of active sensing is the modification of the control strategy according to context [9]. Using a task in which rats were trained to run circuits for food, we tested the hypothesis that whisker control, as measured by high-speed videography, changes with contextual variables such as environment familiarity, risk of collision, and availability of visual cues. In novel environments, functionally blind rats moved at slow speeds and performed broad whisker sweeps. With greater familiarity, however, they moved more rapidly, protracted their whiskers further, and showed decreased whisking amplitude. These findings indicate a strategy change from using the vibrissae to explore nearby surfaces to using them primarily for "look ahead." In environments with increased risk of collision, functionally blind animals moved more slowly but protracted their whiskers further. Sighted animals also showed changes in whisker control strategy with increased familiarity, but these changes were different to those of the functionally blind strain. Sighted animals also changed their vibrissal behavior when visual cues were subsequently removed (by being placed in darkness). These contextual influences provide strong evidence of active control and demonstrate that the vibrissal system provides an accessible model of purposive behavior in mammals.

  10. Imaging spectrometer technologies for advanced Earth remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Kuperfman, P.; Salazar, R. P.; Sigurdson, K. B.

    1982-01-01

    A major requirement of multispectral imaging systems for advanced Earth remote sensing is the provision for greater spectral resolution and more versatile spectral band selection. The imaging spectrometer instrument concept provides this versatility by the combination of pushbroom imaging and spectrally dispersing optics using area array detectors in the focal plane. The shuttle imaging spectrometer concept achieves 10- and 20-meter ground instantaneous fields of view with 20-nanometer spectral resolution from Earth Orbit. Onboard processing allows the selection of spectral bands during flight; this, in turn, permits the sensor parameters to be tailored to the experiment objectives. Advances in optical design, infrared detector arrays, and focal plane cooling indicate the feasibility of the instrument concept and support the practicability of a validation flight experiment for the shuttle in the late 1980s.

  11. A Tagless Indoor Localization System Based on Capacitive Sensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Ramezani Akhmareh, Alireza; Lazarescu, Mihai Teodor; Bin Tariq, Osama; Lavagno, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Accurate indoor person localization is essential for several services, such as assisted living. We introduce a tagless indoor person localization system based on capacitive sensing and localization algorithms that can determine the location with less than 0.2 m average error in a 3 m × 3 m room and has recall and precision better than 70%. We also discuss the effects of various noise types on the measurements and ways to reduce them using filters suitable for on-sensor implementation to lower communication energy consumption. We also compare the performance of several standard localization algorithms in terms of localization error, recall, precision, and accuracy of detection of the movement trajectory. PMID:27618049

  12. A Tagless Indoor Localization System Based on Capacitive Sensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani Akhmareh, Alireza; Lazarescu, Mihai Teodor; Bin Tariq, Osama; Lavagno, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Accurate indoor person localization is essential for several services, such as assisted living. We introduce a tagless indoor person localization system based on capacitive sensing and localization algorithms that can determine the location with less than 0.2 m average error in a 3 m × 3 m room and has recall and precision better than 70%. We also discuss the effects of various noise types on the measurements and ways to reduce them using filters suitable for on-sensor implementation to lower communication energy consumption. We also compare the performance of several standard localization algorithms in terms of localization error, recall, precision, and accuracy of detection of the movement trajectory. PMID:27618049

  13. Active one-class classification of remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhigang; Sun, Zhichao

    2008-12-01

    In many remote sensing image classification applications, interest focuses on a specific land-cover class. In these cases, one-class classification (OCC) approach is appropriate, because one classifier can be trained with samples of target class and just few or no samples of classes that are not of interest are required. However, it is always hard to build a training sample set effectively to represent the target class completely. In this paper, an active learning is introduced for OCC based on support vector data description (SVDD). In active SVDD learning, a SVDD classifier is started with a small size of training samples and an expert is asked to label supplementary training data by asking only for the labels of the most informative, unlabeled examples. Thus, it is possible to build a training sample set effectively to represent the target class completely. The effectiveness of active SVDD is proved by preliminary experiments.

  14. CARER: Efficient Dynamic Sensing for Continuous Activity Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Au, Lawrence K.; Bui, Alex A.T.; Batalin, Maxim A.; Xu, Xiaoyu; Kaiser, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in wireless health sensor systems has triggered rapidly expanding research in continuous activity monitoring for chronic disease management or promotion and assessment of physical rehabilitation. Wireless motion sensing is increasingly important in treatments where remote collection of sensor measurements can provide an in-field objective evaluation of physical activity patterns. The well-known challenge of limited operating lifetime of energy-constrained wireless health sensor systems continues to present a primary limitation for these applications. This paper introduces CARER, a software system that supports a novel algorithm that exploits knowledge of context and dynamically schedules sensor measurement episodes within an energy consumption budget while ensuring classification accuracy. The sensor selection algorithm in the CARER system is based on Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP). The parameters for the POMDP algorithm can be obtained through standard maximum likelihood estimation. Sensor data are also collected from multiple locations of the subjects body, providing estimation of an individual's daily activity patterns. PMID:22254783

  15. Anionic activators for differential sensing with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Javier; Matile, Stefan

    2011-02-01

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of small peptides with one to three negative charges and one to three hydrazides as key components of membrane-based synthetic sensing systems are reported. Their spontaneous reaction with hydrophobic aldehydes or ketones gives rapid access to small collections of amphiphilic anions. These anionic amphiphiles can activate polycations as anion transporters in lipid-bilayer membranes. Odorants are used as representative hydrophobic aldehydes and ketones, and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as polycationic transporters in fluorogenic vesicles. Different activities obtained with different counterion activators are used to generate multidimensional patterns that can be recognized by principal component and hierarchical cluster analysis to extract unique "fingerprints" for individual analytes (including enantiomers, cis-trans isomers or perfumes as illustrative analyte mixtures). Comparison of the peptide activators reveals that carboxylates perform better than phosphonates. Gemini-like activators containing two carboxylates and two hydrophobic hydrazone tails are best, whereas excessive charges and tails give weaker activities. This result differs from cationic activators of polyanionic transporters such as DNA, which worked best with octopus amphiphiles with one cationic head and four hydrophobic tentacles.

  16. Application of database technology to red tide remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Xiuhua; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yi; Zhang, Hongliang

    2003-05-01

    The red tide spectrum database is the basis and prerequisite for red tide hyperspectral remote sensing, a technical support for the field investigation on red tide and the main technical measure for red tide data management and application. The data in the database mentioned in this paper come mainly from the red tide mesocosm experiment, and include the simultaneously collected biological, chemical, hydrographic and meteorological data besides the spectrum data of red tide dominant species. The database has not only the conventional functions for data query, retrieval and plotting, but also the algorithmic functions for the ground object spectrum data processing in the Visual FoxPro system environment and the biological information extraction using the ground object spectrum data. This system is not only an effective application system for detecting the red tide organism, identifying the red tide dominant species and analyzing the characteristic amount of red tide organism, but also a powerful tool for the marine environmental protection and the red tide disaster reduction in the future.

  17. Low cost sensing technology for type 2 diabetes monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarswat, Prashant; Free, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Alpha-hydroxybutyrate (2-hydroxybutyrate or α-HB) is becoming more widely recognized as an important metabolic biomarker that has been shown to be highly correlated with prediabetes and other metabolic diseases. In 2012 there were 86 million Americans with prediabetes, many of whom are not aware they have prediabetes, but could be diagnosed and treated to prevent type 2 diabetes if a simple, low-cost, convenient test were available. We have developed new, low-cost, accurate α-HB detection methods that can be used for the detection and monitoring of diseases such as prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, β-cell dysfunction, and early hyperglycemia. The new sensing method utilizes a diol recognition moiety, additives and a photoinitiator to detect α-HB at levels near 1 micro g/l in the presence of serum compounds such as lactic acid, sodium pyruvate, and glucose. The objective of this research is to improve the understanding of the interactions that enhance α-HB detection to enable additional improvements in α-HB detection as well as improvements in other biosensor applications.

  18. Selected Technology Lab Activities Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    These materials supplement state guides for junior high or middle school technology education programs. The materials show instructors how to implement 81 hours of new technology-related activities into existing programs. Introductory materials include a rationale, philosophy, and goals for technology education. Areas of instruction are as…

  19. Building Technologies Program Key Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-15

    The Building Technologies Program (BTP) employs a balanced approach to making buildings more energy efficient. The three pillars of our program, research and development (R&D), market stimulation, and building and equipment standards, help meet our strategic vision.

  20. U.S. Geological Survey land remote sensing activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, Doyle G.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Department of the Interior (DOI) were among the earliest to recognize the potential applications of satellite land remote sensing for management of the country's land and water resources…not only as a user but also as a program participant responsible for final data processing, product generation, and data distribution. With guidance from Dr. William T. Pecora, who was the Survey's Director at that time and later Under Secretary of Interior, the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Program was established in 1966 as a focal point for these activities within the Department. Dr. Pecora was among the few who could envision a role for the Survey and the Department as active participants in programs yet to come--like the Landsat, Magsat, Seasat and, most recently, Shuttle Imaging Radar programs.

  1. Terahertz active photonic crystals for condensed gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Benz, Alexander; Deutsch, Christoph; Brandstetter, Martin; Andrews, Aaron M; Klang, Pavel; Detz, Hermann; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2011-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) spectral region, covering frequencies from 1 to 10 THz, is highly interesting for chemical sensing. The energy of rotational and vibrational transitions of molecules lies within this frequency range. Therefore, chemical fingerprints can be derived, allowing for a simple detection scheme. Here, we present an optical sensor based on active photonic crystals (PhCs), i.e., the pillars are fabricated directly from an active THz quantum-cascade laser medium. The individual pillars are pumped electrically leading to laser emission at cryogenic temperatures. There is no need to couple light into the resonant structure because the PhC itself is used as the light source. An injected gas changes the resonance condition of the PhC and thereby the laser emission frequency. We achieve an experimental frequency shift of 10(-3) times the center lasing frequency. The minimum detectable refractive index change is 1.6 × 10(-5) RIU.

  2. Stratospheric platforms: a novel technological support for Earth observation and remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovis, Fabio; Lo Presti, Letizia; Magli, Enrico; Mulassano, Paolo; Olmo, Gabriella

    2001-12-01

    The international community agrees that the new technology based on the use of Unmanned Air Vehicles High Altitude Very long Endurance (UAV-HAVE) could play an important role for the development of remote sensing and telecommunication applications. A UAV-HAVE vehicle can be described as a low- cost flying infrastructure (compared with satellites) optimized for long endurance operations at an altitude of about 20 km. Due to such features, its role is similar to satellites, with the major advantages of being less expensive, more flexible, movable on demand, and suitable for a larger class of applications. According to this background, Politecnico di Torino is involved as coordinator in an important project named HeliNet, that represent one of the main activities in Europe in the field of stratospheric platforms, and is concerned with the development of a network of UAV-HAVE aircraft. A key point of this project is the feasibility study for the provision of several services, namely traffic monitoring, environmental surveillance, broadband communications and navigation. This paper reports preliminary results on the HeliNet imaging system and its remote sensing applications. In fact, many environmental surveillance services (e.g. regional public services for agriculture, hydrology, fire protection, and more) require very high-resolution imaging, and can be offered at a lower cost if operated by a shared platform. The philosophy behind the HeliNet project seems to be particularly suitable to manage such missions. In particular, we present a system- level study of possible imaging payloads to be mounted on- board of a stratospheric platform to collect Earth observation data. Firstly, we address optical payloads such as multispectral and/or hyperspectral ones, which are a very short-term objective of the project. Secondly, as an example of mid-term on-board payload, we examine the possibility to carry on the platform a light-SAR system. For both types of payload, we show

  3. Research on fast Fourier transforms algorithm of huge remote sensing image technology with GPU and partitioning technology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Li, Xue-You; Li, Jia-Guo; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Li; Yang, Jan; Du, Quan-Ye

    2014-02-01

    Fast Fourier transforms (FFT) is a basic approach to remote sensing image processing. With the improvement of capacity of remote sensing image capture with the features of hyperspectrum, high spatial resolution and high temporal resolution, how to use FFT technology to efficiently process huge remote sensing image becomes the critical step and research hot spot of current image processing technology. FFT algorithm, one of the basic algorithms of image processing, can be used for stripe noise removal, image compression, image registration, etc. in processing remote sensing image. CUFFT function library is the FFT algorithm library based on CPU and FFTW. FFTW is a FFT algorithm developed based on CPU in PC platform, and is currently the fastest CPU based FFT algorithm function library. However there is a common problem that once the available memory or memory is less than the capacity of image, there will be out of memory or memory overflow when using the above two methods to realize image FFT arithmetic. To address this problem, a CPU and partitioning technology based Huge Remote Fast Fourier Transform (HRFFT) algorithm is proposed in this paper. By improving the FFT algorithm in CUFFT function library, the problem of out of memory and memory overflow is solved. Moreover, this method is proved rational by experiment combined with the CCD image of HJ-1A satellite. When applied to practical image processing, it improves effect of the image processing, speeds up the processing, which saves the time of computation and achieves sound result.

  4. Use of remote sensing technology for inventorying and planning utilization of land resources in South Dakota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A comprehensive land use planning process model is being developed in Meade County, South Dakota, using remote sensing technology. The proper role of remote sensing in the land use planning process is being determined by interaction of remote sensing specialists with local land use planners. The data that were collected by remote sensing techniques are as follows: (1) level I land use data interpreted at a scale of 1:250,000 from false color enlargement prints of ERTS-1 color composite transparencies; (2) detailed land use data interpreted at a scale of 1:24,000 from enlargement color prints of high altitude RB-57 photography; and (3) general soils map interpreted at a scale of 1:250,000 from false color enlargement prints of ERTS-1 color composite transparencies. In addition to use of imagery as an interpretation aid, the utility of using photographs as base maps was demonstrated.

  5. New Active Remote-sensing Capabilities: Laser Ablation Spectrometer and Lidar Atmospheric Species Profile Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, R. J.; Bergstralh, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: With the anticipated development of high-capacity fission power and electric propulsion for deep-space missions, it will become possible to propose experiments that demand higher power than current technologies (e.g. radioisotope power sources) provide. Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), the first mission in the Project Prometheus program, will explore the icy moons of Jupiter with a suite of high-capability experiments that take advantage of the high power levels (and indirectly, the high data rates) that fission power affords. This abstract describes two high-capability active-remote-sensing experiments that will be logical candidates for subsequent Prometheus-class missions.

  6. An overview of remote sensing technology transfer in Canada and the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strome, W. M.; Lauer, D. T.

    1977-01-01

    To realize the maximum potential benefits of remote sensing, the technology must be applied by personnel responsible for the management of natural resources and the environment. In Canada and the United States, these managers are often in local offices and are not those responsible for the development of systems to acquire, preprocess, and disseminate remotely sensed data, nor those leading the research and development of techniques for analysis of the data. However, the latter organizations have recognized that the technology they develop must be transferred to the management agencies if the technology is to be useful to society. Problems of motivation and communication associated with the technology transfer process, and some of the methods employed by Federal, State, Provincial, and local agencies, academic institutions, and private organizations to overcome these problems are explored.

  7. Novel in situ chemical sensing technologies for icy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadham, Jemma; Mowlem, Matthew; Beaton, Alex; Bagshaw, Elizabeth; Lamarche-Gagnon, Guillaume; Telling, Jon; Hawkings, Jon; Tranter, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    A dramatic development in subglacial science in recent decades has been the considerable international effort aimed at improving understanding of the hidden subglacial aquatic environments beneath ice sheets. These include a diverse range of lakes, rivers, shallow and deep sediments. Technology challenges associated with the exploration of these and other icy environments are substantial because of their remote nature, extreme conditions and the requirement for sterile/clean access and sampling. In situ sensors provide an alternative to sample recovery and return for monitoring in situ conditions and are available for many analytes, but they are frequently unsuitable for deployment in icy environments. Low temperatures, freeze-thaw cycles, remote locations, low concentration and low ionic strength meltwaters challenge technologies designed for non cryospheric systems. The UK NERC- funded DELVE programme (DeEveLopment and Validation of in situ chemical sensors for icy Ecosystems) was launched with the goal of developing and testing the first suite of geochemical sensors for icy ecosystems, with a focus on redox sensitive species and dissolved nutrients. All sensors were subject to testing at low temperatures, including freeze-thaw cycling, and the response to low concentration and low ionic strength was quantified. Here we report high resolution, continuous data derived from a suite of biogeochemical sensors which were deployed to a large proglacial river draining the Greenland Ice Sheet during the 2015 melt season. These data show that these sensors have strong potential for more challenging deployment to the basal regions of ice sheets.

  8. Frequency Based Volcanic Activity Detection through Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, A. K.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing has proved to offer a useful and relatively inexpensive method for monitoring large areas where field work is logistically unrealistic, and potentially dangerous. Current sensors are able to detect the majority of explosive volcanic activity; those that tend to effect and represent larger scale changes in the volcanic systems, eventually relating to ash producing periods of extended eruptive activity, and effusive activity. As new spaceborne sensors are developed, the ability to detect activity improves so that a system to gauge the frequency of volcanic activity can be used as a useful monitoring tool. Four volcanoes were chosen for development and testing of a method to monitor explosive activity: Stromboli (Italy); Shishaldin and Cleveland (Alaska, USA); and Karymsky (Kamchatka, Russia). Each volcano studied had similar but unique signatures of pre-cursory and eruptive activity. This study has shown that this monitoring tool could be applied to a wide range of volcanoes and still produce useful and robust data. Our method deals specifically with the detection of small scale explosive activity. The method described here could be useful in an operational setting, especially at remote volcanoes that have the potential to impact populations, infrastructure, and the aviation community. A number of important factors will affect the validity of application of this method. They are: (1) the availability of a continuous and continually populated dataset; (2) appropriate and reasonable sensor resolutions; (3) a recorded history of the volcano's previous activity; and, if available, (4) some ground-based monitoring system. We aim to develop the method further to be able to capture and evaluate the frequency of other volcanic processes such as lava flows, phreatomagmatic eruptions and dome growth and collapse. The work shown here has served to illustrate the capability of this method and monitoring tool for use at remote, un-instrumented volcanoes.

  9. Archiving and Managing Remote Sensing Data using State of the Art Storage Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, B.; Chandrasekhara Reddy, C.; Kishore, S. V. S. R. K.

    2014-11-01

    Integrated Multi-mission Ground Segment for Earth Observation Satellites (IMGEOS) was established with an objective to eliminate human interaction to the maximum extent. All emergency data products will be delivered within an hour of acquisition through FTP delivery. All other standard data products will be delivered through FTP within a day. The IMGEOS activity was envisaged to reengineer the entire chain of operations at the ground segment facilities of NRSC at Shadnagar and Balanagar campuses to adopt an integrated multi-mission approach. To achieve this, the Information Technology Infrastructure was consolidated by implementing virtualized tiered storage and network computing infrastructure in a newly built Data Centre at Shadnagar Campus. One important activity that influences all other activities in the integrated multi-mission approach is the design of appropriate storage and network architecture for realizing all the envisaged operations in a highly streamlined, reliable and secure environment. Storage was consolidated based on the major factors like accessibility, long term data protection, availability, manageability and scalability. The broad operational activities are reception of satellite data, quick look, generation of browse, production of standard and valueadded data products, production chain management, data quality evaluation, quality control and product dissemination. For each of these activities, there are numerous other detailed sub-activities and pre-requisite tasks that need to be implemented to support the above operations. The IMGEOS architecture has taken care of choosing the right technology for the given data sizes, their movement and long-term lossless retention policies. Operational costs of the solution are kept to the minimum possible. Scalability of the solution is also ensured. The main function of the storage is to receive and store the acquired satellite data, facilitate high speed availability of the data for further

  10. The transfer of remote sensing technology in the developing nations: An observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abiodun, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    The cooperation and assistance of industrialized nations and the United Nations and its agencies in promoting the transfer of remote sensing technology in developing nations was discussed. Training programs, workshops, and seminars as well as on-going globally scattered demonstration projects were evaluated and it was suggested that emphasis should shift from centralized training to scheduled regional training programs, resulting in larger local participation and on-the-spot application of the technology to solve local problems.

  11. Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; Dave Watson; Steve Purdy

    2005-10-01

    The high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multi-sensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 30% lower than a comparable wired system for

  12. Measurement of Oil and Natural Gas Well Pad Enclosed Combustor Emissions Using Optical Remote Sensing Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Research and Development (ORD) and EPA Region 8 are collaborating under the EPA’s Regional Applied Research Effort (RARE) program to evaluate ground-based remote sensing technologies that could be used to characterize emis...

  13. Current Issues and Trends in Multidimensional Sensing Technologies for Digital Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Noriko; Ohki, Hidehiro; Kato, Kunihito; Koshimizu, Hiroyasu; Sagawa, Ryusuke; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Manabu

    Multidimensional sensing (MDS) technologies have numerous applications in the field of digital media, including the development of audio and visual equipment for human-computer interaction (HCI) and manufacture of data storage devices; furthermore, MDS finds applications in the fields of medicine and marketing, i.e., in e-marketing and the development of diagnosis equipment.

  14. Assessment of Remote Sensing Technologies for Location of Hydrogen and Helium Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellar, R. Glenn; Wang, Danli

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this initial phase of this research effort is to: 1) Evaluate remote sensing technologies for location of leaks of gaseous molecular hydrogen (H2) and gaseous helium (He) in air, for space transportation applications; and 2) Develop a diffusion model that predicts concentration of H2 or He gas as a function of leak rate and distance from the leak.

  15. Land Desertification Monitoring on Tibetan Plateau Using Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Zou, X.; Liu, H.

    2012-12-01

    As one of the serious ecological environmental problems of the Tibetan plateau, desertification has critically hampered the economic and social development in Tibet, so it is imperative to monitoring the desertification in Tibet area. Due to its 200 thousand km2 vast area and steep terrain, this paper uses multi-source remote sensing image to survey the current situation of land desertification in Tibetan plateau, and study dynamic desertification change on the 10 km2 land between Namucuo lake and Selincuo lake. Data of the 250 meters time-series MODIS-NDVI images, 30 m resolution Landsat TM images and 90 m SRTM DEM data were used. Through the analysis of the relationship between MODIS-NDVI, vegetation growth characteristics and vegetation vertical distribution, this paper chooses the MODIS-NDVI time series data and principal component analysis of the first band (PC1), vegetation coverage(VC), DEM and its derived slope data as indicators for desertification monitoring. Visual interpretation based on 30 m TM image is also used to classify each type of desertification. Using the high temporal resolution data, we can quickly obtain desertification hot spot areas then accurately distinguish each degree of desertification with high spatial resolution images. The results are: (1) The desertification area in Tibetan plateau in 2008 is 218,286 km2, which is 18.91% of the total area, and mainly distributed in the Ali region, next by Nagqu and Xigaze. The severe desertification land area is 8,866 km2 ( 4.06% of the desertified land), of which the mobile dune area is 3224 km2, heavy saline area is 5641 km2. Moderate desertified land area is 110,915 km2( 50.81% of the desertified land), of which semi-fixed sand dune area is 10,075 km2 and the bare sand area is 100,839 km2. Mild desertified land area is 98,504 km2 ( 45.12% of the desertified land), of which the fixed dune area is 4,177 km2 and the half bare gravel area is 94,326 km2. (2) By using GIS spatial analysis, westudied

  16. Structural Engineering. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide provides technology learning activities designed to prepare students in grades 6-10 to work in the world of the future. The 8-day course provides exploratory, hands-on learning activities and information that can enhance the education of students of all types in an integrated curriculum that provides practical applications of…

  17. Photography. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide provides technology learning activities designed to prepare students in grades 6-10 to work in the world of the future. The 8-day course provides exploratory, hands-on learning activities and information that can enhance the education of students of all types in an integrated curriculum that provides practical applications of…

  18. Estimating Active Layer Thickness from Remotely Sensed Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Zhang, T.; Wahr, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    We estimate active layer thickness (ALT) from remotely sensed surface subsidence during thawing seasons derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements. Ground ice takes up more volume than ground water, so as the soil thaws in summer and the active layer deepens, the ground subsides. The volume of melted ground water during the summer thaw determines seasonal subsidence. ALT is defined as the maximum thaw depth at the end of a thawing season. By using InSAR to measure surface subsidence between the start and end of summer season, one can estimate the depth of thaw over a large area (typically 100 km by 100 km). We developed an ALT retrieval algorithm integrating InSAR-derived surface subsidence, observed soil texture, organic matter content, and moisture content. We validated this algorithm in the continuous permafrost area on the North Slope of Alaska. Based on InSAR measurements using ERS-1/2 SAR data, our estimated values match in situ measurements of ALT within 1--10 cm at Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites within the study area. The active layer plays a key role in land surface processes in cold regions. Current measurements of ALT using mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, or inferred from temperature measurements are of high quality, but limited in spatial coverage. Using InSAR to estimate ALT greatly expands the spatial coverage of ALT observations.

  19. Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; David S. Watson; Steve Purdy

    2006-04-30

    Although advanced lighting control systems offer significant energy savings, the high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output, in addition to 0-24 Volt and 0-10 Volt inputs. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multisensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including open and closed-loop daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the

  20. Non-invasive UWB sensing of astronauts' breathing activity.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Marco; Cerri, Graziano; Chiaraluce, Franco; Eusebi, Lorenzo; Russo, Paola

    2014-12-30

    The use of a UWB system for sensing breathing activity of astronauts must account for many critical issues specific to the space environment. The aim of this paper is twofold. The first concerns the definition of design constraints about the pulse amplitude and waveform to transmit, as well as the immunity requirements of the receiver. The second issue concerns the assessment of the procedures and the characteristics of the algorithms to use for signal processing to retrieve the breathing frequency and respiration waveform. The algorithm has to work correctly in the presence of surrounding electromagnetic noise due to other sources in the environment. The highly reflecting walls increase the difficulty of the problem and the hostile scenario has to be accurately characterized. Examples of signal processing techniques able to recover breathing frequency in significant and realistic situations are shown and discussed.

  1. Non-Invasive UWB Sensing of Astronauts' Breathing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Marco; Cerri, Graziano; Chiaraluce, Franco; Eusebi, Lorenzo; Russo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The use of a UWB system for sensing breathing activity of astronauts must account for many critical issues specific to the space environment. The aim of this paper is twofold. The first concerns the definition of design constraints about the pulse amplitude and waveform to transmit, as well as the immunity requirements of the receiver. The second issue concerns the assessment of the procedures and the characteristics of the algorithms to use for signal processing to retrieve the breathing frequency and respiration waveform. The algorithm has to work correctly in the presence of surrounding electromagnetic noise due to other sources in the environment. The highly reflecting walls increase the difficulty of the problem and the hostile scenario has to be accurately characterized. Examples of signal processing techniques able to recover breathing frequency in significant and realistic situations are shown and discussed. PMID:25558995

  2. Efficient active depth sensing by laser speckle projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuanwu; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo; Liao, Qingmin

    2014-01-01

    An active depth sensing approach by laser speckle projection system is proposed. After capturing the speckle pattern with an infrared digital camera, we extract the pure speckle pattern using a direct-global separation method. Then the pure speckles are represented by Census binary features. By evaluating the matching cost and uniqueness between the real-time image and the reference image, robust correspondences are selected as support points. After that, we build a disparity grid and propose a generative graphical model to compute disparities. An iterative approach is designed to propagate the messages between blocks and update the model. Finally, a dense depth map can be obtained by subpixel interpolation and transformation. The experimental evaluations demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach.

  3. EDITORIAL: The 4th International Conference on Sensing Technology (ICST 2010) The 4th International Conference on Sensing Technology (ICST 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay Ekuakille, Aimé; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C.

    2011-12-01

    Sensor systems are one the most requested topics in the field of engineering. The importance of sensors, their technologies and their applications is self-evident through their impact on daily life. The features of sensors can still be improved and this is a matter of increasing research in the international scientific community. Several papers have been selected and reviewed to constitute a recipe for understanding advances in the area of sensors. Although they are few in number, the papers accepted for publication in this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology reflect current trends in the related areas, that is to say, resistive chemical sensing, new transducers, and applications in robotics, in olfaction and in image processing. In addition to these topics, the concept of the functionalization of nanotubes is also of great interest, as is the subject of nanowires. We thank the authors of this special feature for their contributions with dedicated papers in the areas of sensors and sensor systems. We also thank MST for hosting this special feature in order to give further expression to authors from ICST2010, the International Conference on Sensing Technology that took place in Lecce (Italy) in 2010.

  4. Remote Sensing of In-Flight Icing Conditions: Operational, Meteorological, and Technological Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryerson, Charles C.

    2000-01-01

    Remote-sensing systems that map aircraft icing conditions in the flight path from airports or aircraft would allow icing to be avoided and exited. Icing remote-sensing system development requires consideration of the operational environment, the meteorological environment, and the technology available. Operationally, pilots need unambiguous cockpit icing displays for risk management decision-making. Human factors, aircraft integration, integration of remotely sensed icing information into the weather system infrastructures, and avoid-and-exit issues need resolution. Cost, maintenance, power, weight, and space concern manufacturers, operators, and regulators. An icing remote-sensing system detects cloud and precipitation liquid water, drop size, and temperature. An algorithm is needed to convert these conditions into icing potential estimates for cockpit display. Specification development requires that magnitudes of cloud microphysical conditions and their spatial and temporal variability be understood at multiple scales. The core of an icing remote-sensing system is the technology that senses icing microphysical conditions. Radar and microwave radiometers penetrate clouds and can estimate liquid water and drop size. Retrieval development is needed; differential attenuation and neural network assessment of multiple-band radar returns are most promising to date. Airport-based radar or radiometers are the most viable near-term technologies. A radiometer that profiles cloud liquid water, and experimental techniques to use radiometers horizontally, are promising. The most critical operational research needs are to assess cockpit and aircraft system integration, develop avoid-and-exit protocols, assess human factors, and integrate remote-sensing information into weather and air traffic control infrastructures. Improved spatial characterization of cloud and precipitation liquid-water content, drop-size spectra, and temperature are needed, as well as an algorithm to

  5. Quantum plasmonics for next-generation optical and sensing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaied, Modjtaba; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2015-12-01

    Classical plasmonics has mostly focused on structures characterized by large dimension, for which the quantummechanical effects have nearly no impact. However, recent advances in technology, especially on miniaturized plasmonics devices at nanoscale, have made it possible to imagine experimental applications of plasmons where the quantum nature of free charge carriers play an important role. Therefore, it is necessary to use quantum mechanics to model the transport of charge carriers in solid state plasma nanostructures. Here, a non-local quantum model of permittivity is presented by applying the Wigner equation with collision term in the kinetic theory of solid state plasmas where the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the electron-lattice collisions. The surface plasmon resonance of ultra-small nanoparticles is investigated using this non-local quantum permittivity and its dispersion relation is obtained. The successful application of this theory in ultra-small plasmonics structures such as surface plasmon polariton waveguides, doped semiconductors, graphene, the metamaterials composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, and the quantum droplets is anticipated.

  6. Evaluation of pressure sensing concepts: A technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.L.; Thacker, L.H.

    1993-09-01

    Advanced distributed control systems for electric power plants will require more accurate and reliable pressure gauges than those now installed. Future developments in power plant control systems are expected to use digital/optical networks rather than the analog/electric data transmission used in existing plants. Many pressure transmitters now installed use oil filling to separate process fluids from the gauge mechanism and are subject to insidious failures when the oil leaks. Testing and maintenance of pressure channels occupy a disproportionately large amount of effort to restore their accuracy and verify their operability. These and similar concerns have prompted an assessment of a broad spectrum of sensor technologies to aid in selecting the most likely candidates for adaptation to power plant applications. Ten representative conventional and thirty innovational pressure sensors are described and compared. Particular emphasis is focused on two categories: Silicon-integrated pressure sensors and fiber-optic sensors, and both of these categories are discussed in detail. Additional attractive concepts include variable reluctance gauges and resonant structure gauges that may not require oil buffering from the process fluid.

  7. Detecting Patterns of a Technological Intelligence in Remotely Sensed Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotto, M. J.

    A statistical classification approach for detecting artificial patterns in satellite imagery such as those produced by a technological intelligence, and its application to the search for non-natural features of possible extraterrestrial origin on planetary surfaces is presented. Statistics of natural terrestrial backgrounds (fractal textures, drainage patterns, tectonic features, etc.) and artificial features (e.g., roads, cities, vehicles, archaeological ruins) are computed over a set of terrestrial training images. Images are represented by measurements of their fractal dimension, fractal model fit, anisotropy, and rectilinearity. The likelihood ratio (conditional probability of a measurement given it is artificial divided by the conditional probability of a measurement given it is natural) is used as an index for assessing the artificiality of an unknown image relative to the training set. A classification accuracy of 85% is achieved over a training set of terrestrial images. The statistics of the training set are then extended to assess a number of enigmatic lunar and planetary features. Results suggest that certain areas on our moon and on Mars appear to be artificial by comparison with terrestrial features.

  8. Empowering Prospective Teachers to Become Active Sense-Makers: Multimodal Modeling of the Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mi Song

    2015-10-01

    Situating science concepts in concrete and authentic contexts, using information and communications technologies, including multimodal modeling tools, is important for promoting the development of higher-order thinking skills in learners. However, teachers often struggle to integrate emergent multimodal models into a technology-rich informal learning environment. Our design-based research co-designs and develops engaging, immersive, and interactive informal learning activities called "Embodied Modeling-Mediated Activities" (EMMA) to support not only Singaporean learners' deep learning of astronomy but also the capacity of teachers. As part of the research on EMMA, this case study describes two prospective teachers' co-design processes involving multimodal models for teaching and learning the concept of the seasons in a technology-rich informal learning setting. Our study uncovers four prominent themes emerging from our data concerning the contextualized nature of learning and teaching involving multimodal models in informal learning contexts: (1) promoting communication and emerging questions, (2) offering affordances through limitations, (3) explaining one concept involving multiple concepts, and (4) integrating teaching and learning experiences. This study has an implication for the development of a pedagogical framework for teaching and learning in technology-enhanced learning environments—that is empowering teachers to become active sense-makers using multimodal models.

  9. Active sensing in the categorization of visual patterns

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Scott Cheng-Hsin; Lengyel, Máté; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Interpreting visual scenes typically requires us to accumulate information from multiple locations in a scene. Using a novel gaze-contingent paradigm in a visual categorization task, we show that participants' scan paths follow an active sensing strategy that incorporates information already acquired about the scene and knowledge of the statistical structure of patterns. Intriguingly, categorization performance was markedly improved when locations were revealed to participants by an optimal Bayesian active sensor algorithm. By using a combination of a Bayesian ideal observer and the active sensor algorithm, we estimate that a major portion of this apparent suboptimality of fixation locations arises from prior biases, perceptual noise and inaccuracies in eye movements, and the central process of selecting fixation locations is around 70% efficient in our task. Our results suggest that participants select eye movements with the goal of maximizing information about abstract categories that require the integration of information from multiple locations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12215.001 PMID:26880546

  10. Remote sensing for active volcano monitoring in Barren Island, India

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, A.; Reddy, C.S.S.; Srivastav, S.K. )

    1993-08-01

    The Barren Island Volcano, situated in the Andaman Sea of the Bay of Bengal, erupted recently (March, 1991) after a prolonged period of quiescence of about 188 years. This resumed activity coincides with similar outbreaks in the Philippines and Japan, which are located in an identical tectonic environment. This study addresses (1) remote sensing temporal monitoring of the volcanic activity, (2) detecting hot lava and measuring its pixel-integrated and subpixel temperatures, and (3) the importance of SWIR bands for high temperature volcanic feature detection. Seven sets of TM data acquired continuously from 3 March 1991 to 8 July 1991 have been analyzed. It is concluded that detectable pre-eruption warming took place around 25 March 1991 and volcanic activity started on 1 April 1991. It is observed that high temperature features, such as an erupting volcano, can register emitted thermal radiance in SWIR bands. Calculation of pixel-integrated and sub-pixel temperatures related to volcanic vents has been made, using the dual-band method. 6 refs.

  11. CASA activities in antenna technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decastronodal, M.

    1984-09-01

    The technology required to manufacture molded solid reflectors from composite materials for spaceborne applications is outlined. An 11 to 14 GHz circular polarization double offset reflector with 2.3 x 3.1 m aperture was designed. The reflector dish is a CFRP covered aluminum honeycomb core sandwich, interfacing through 12 fixation points with the truss support structure. The design is also used as a basis for Olympus TVB1 satellite reflectors. Materials selection and surface coatings for reflectors in the 100 to 300 GHz range are discussed.

  12. Field demonstration and transition of SCAPS direct push VOC in-situ sensing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Davis

    1999-11-03

    This project demonstrated two in-situ volatile organic compound (VOC) samplers in combination with the direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometer (DSITMS). The technologies chosen were the Vadose Sparge and the Membrane Interface Probe (MIP) sensing systems. Tests at two demonstration sites showed the newer VOC technologies capable of providing in situ contaminant measurements at two to four times the rate of the previously demonstrated Hydrosparge sensor. The results of this project provide initial results supporting the utility of these new technologies to provide rapid site characterization of VOC contaminants in the subsurface.

  13. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I.; Abdel Bar, Fatma M.; El-Mahdy, Areej M.; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1–V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  14. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I; Abdel Bar, Fatma M; El-Mahdy, Areej M; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1-V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  15. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I; Abdel Bar, Fatma M; El-Mahdy, Areej M; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1-V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  16. Temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology with fiber optic hybrid Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Lu, Lin; Liu, Shuo; Jin, Wei; Han, Zonghu; Cao, Yaohui

    2016-05-01

    The transmission spectrum characteristic of two-segment polarization maintaining fibers Sagnac interferometer was investigated and simulated in detail and a temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology was proposed. An experimental hybrid Sagnac interferometer was built and the solid core polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber was taken as the sensing probe. The side pressure sensitive coefficients and the temperature crosstalk drift were measured and compared. The experimental results show that the side pressure sensitive coefficient was ~0.2877 nm/N and the temperature drift was less than 0.1 pm/°C.

  17. Introductory Industrial Technology II. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.

    This guide contains 29 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grade 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced, equipment/supplies,…

  18. Introductory Industrial Technology I. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.; And Others

    This guide contains 36 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grades 7 and 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced,…

  19. High accuracy laboratory spectroscopy to support active greenhouse gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D. A.; Bielska, K.; Cygan, A.; Havey, D. K.; Okumura, M.; Miller, C. E.; Lisak, D.; Hodges, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Recent carbon dioxide (CO2) remote sensing missions have set precision targets as demanding as 0.25% (1 ppm) in order to elucidate carbon sources and sinks [1]. These ambitious measurement targets will require the most precise body of spectroscopic reference data ever assembled. Active sensing missions will be especially susceptible to subtle line shape effects as the narrow bandwidth of these measurements will greatly limit the number of spectral transitions which are employed in retrievals. In order to assist these remote sensing missions we have employed frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FS-CRDS) [2], a high-resolution, ultrasensitive laboratory technique, to measure precise line shape parameters for transitions of O2, CO2, and other atmospherically-relevant species within the near-infrared. These measurements have led to new HITRAN-style line lists for both 16O2 [3] and rare isotopologue [4] transitions in the A-band. In addition, we have performed detailed line shape studies of CO2 transitions near 1.6 μm under a variety of broadening conditions [5]. We will address recent measurements in these bands as well as highlight recent instrumental improvements to the FS-CRDS spectrometer. These improvements include the use of the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, a high bandwidth servo which enables measurements to be made at rates greater than 10 kHz [6]. In addition, an optical frequency comb will be utilized as a frequency reference, which should allow for transition frequencies to be measured with uncertainties below 10 kHz (3×10-7 cm-1). [1] C. E. Miller, D. Crisp, P. L. DeCola, S. C. Olsen, et al., J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos. 112, D10314 (2007). [2] J. T. Hodges, H. P. Layer, W. W. Miller, G. E. Scace, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 849-863 (2004). [3] D. A. Long, D. K. Havey, M. Okumura, C. E. Miller, et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 111, 2021-2036 (2010). [4] D. A. Long, D. K. Havey, S. S. Yu, M. Okumura, et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc

  20. Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, Thomas N; Ammerman, Curtt N; Park, Gyu Hae; Farinholt, Kevin M; Farrar, Charles R; Atterbury, Marie K

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

  1. Classroom Activities in Communication: Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This curriculum supplement was designed to correlate directly with "A Guide to Curriculum Planning in Technology Education," published by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. It is also a companion book to three other classroom activity compilations, one in each of the other three major systems of technology--construction,…

  2. Classroom Activities in Transportation: Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This curriculum supplement was designed to correlate directly with "A Guide to Curriculum Planning in Technology Education," published by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. It is also a companion book to three other classroom activity compilations, one in each of the other three major systems of technology--manufacturing,…

  3. Recent Developments in Active and Passive Distributed Temperature Sensing for Soil Moisture Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Dong, J.; Hoes, O.; Van De Giesen, N.; Sayde, C.; Ochsner, T. E.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will review recent developments in both active and passive Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) for soil moisture monitoring. DTS involves using fiber-optic cables to measure temperature at sub-meter resolution along cables up to several kilometers in length. Soil thermal properties depend on soil moisture. Hence, temperature variations either in response to externally-applied heating (active) or the response to net radiation (passive) can be monitored and used to infer soil moisture. DTS occupies a unique measurement niche, potentially providing soil moisture information at sub-meter resolution over extents on the order of km at sub-daily time steps. It complements observations from point sensors to other innovative measurement techniques like cosmic ray neutron detection methods and GPS reflectometry. DTS is being developed as a tool for the validation of soil moisture observations from remote sensing and for hydrological field investigations. Here, we will discuss both technological and theoretical advances in active and passive DTS for soil moisture monitoring. We will present data from new installations in the Netherlands and the USA to illustrate recent developments. In particular, we will focus on the value of combining temperature observations from DTS with physical models using data assimilation. In addition to yielding improved soil moisture and temperature profile estimates, recent research has shown the potential to also derive information on the soil thermal and hydraulic properties. We will conclude by outlining the current challenges, with particular emphasis on combining active and passive DTS.

  4. Temporal signatures of taste quality driven by active sensing.

    PubMed

    Graham, Dustin M; Sun, Chengsan; Hill, David L

    2014-05-28

    Animals actively acquire sensory information from the outside world, with rodents sniffing to smell and whisking to feel. Licking, a rapid motor sequence used for gustation, serves as the primary means of controlling stimulus access to taste receptors in the mouth. Using a novel taste-quality discrimination task in head-restrained mice, we measured and compared reaction times to four basic taste qualities (salt, sour, sweet, and bitter) and found that certain taste qualities are perceived inherently faster than others, driven by the precise biomechanics of licking and functional organization of the peripheral gustatory system. The minimum time required for accurate perception was strongly dependent on taste quality, ranging from the sensory-motor limits of a single lick (salt, ∼100 ms) to several sampling cycles (bitter, >500 ms). Further, disruption of sensory input from the anterior tongue significantly impaired the speed of perception of some taste qualities, with little effect on others. Overall, our results show that active sensing may play an important role in shaping the timing of taste-quality representations and perception in the gustatory system.

  5. Optical oxygen sensing systems for drug discovery applications: Respirometric Screening Technology (RST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Hynes, James; Fernandes, Richard

    2005-11-01

    Quenched-fluorescence oxygen sensing allows non-chemical, reversible, real-time monitoring of molecular oxygen and rates of oxygen consumption in biological samples. Using this approach we have developed Respirometric Screening Technology (RST); a platform which facilitates the convenient analysis of cellular oxygen uptake. This in turn allows the investigation of compounds and processes which affect respiratory activity. The RST platform employs soluble phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probes, which may be assessed in standard microtitter plates on a fluorescence plate reader. New formats of RST assays and time-resolved fluorescence detection instrumentation developed by Luxcel provide improvements in assay sensitivity, miniaturization and overall performance. RST has a diverse range of applications in drug discovery area including high throughput analysis of mitochondrial function; studies of mechanisms of toxicity and apoptosis; cell and animal based screening of compound libraries and environmental samples; and, sterility testing. RST has been successfully validated with a range of practical targets and adopted by several leading pharmaceutical companies.

  6. Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructure Using Optical Fiber Sensing Technology: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Ye, X. W.; Su, Y. H.; Han, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure. PMID:25133250

  7. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using optical fiber sensing technology: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ye, X W; Su, Y H; Han, J P

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure.

  8. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using optical fiber sensing technology: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ye, X W; Su, Y H; Han, J P

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure. PMID:25133250

  9. Structural health management technologies for inflatable/deployable structures: Integrating sensing and self-healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; Vozoff, Max; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Studor, George F.; Lyons, Frankel; Keller, Michael W.; Beiermann, Brett; White, Scott R.; Sottos, Nancy R.; Curry, Mark A.; Banks, David L.; Brocato, Robert; Zhou, Lisong; Jung, Soyoun; Jackson, Thomas N.; Champaigne, Kevin

    2011-04-01

    Inflatable/deployable structures are under consideration as habitats for future Lunar surface science operations. The use of non-traditional structural materials combined with the need to maintain a safe working environment for extended periods in a harsh environment has led to the consideration of an integrated structural health management system for future habitats, to ensure their integrity. This article describes recent efforts to develop prototype sensing technologies and new self-healing materials that address the unique requirements of habitats comprised mainly of soft goods. A new approach to detecting impact damage is discussed, using addressable flexible capacitive sensing elements and thin film electronics in a matrixed array. Also, the use of passive wireless sensor tags for distributed sensing is discussed, wherein the need for on-board power through batteries or hardwired interconnects is eliminated. Finally, the development of a novel, microencapuslated self-healing elastomer with applications for inflatable/deployable habitats is reviewed.

  10. A Three-Dimensional Microdisplacement Sensing System Based on MEMS Bulk-Silicon Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junjie; Lei, Lihua; Chen, Xin; Cai, Xiaoyu; Li, Yuan; Han, Tao

    2014-01-01

    For the dimensional measurement and characterization of microsized and nanosized components, a three-dimensional microdisplacement sensing system was developed using the piezoresistive effect in silicon. The sensor was fabricated using microelectromechanical system bulk-silicon technology, and it was validated using the finite element method. A precise data acquisition circuit with an accuracy of 20 μV was designed to obtain weak voltage signals. By calibration, the sensing system was shown to have a sensitivity of 17.29 mV/μm and 4.59 mV/μm in the axial and lateral directions, respectively; the nonlinearity in these directions was 0.8% and 1.0% full scale, respectively. A full range of 4.6 μm was achieved in the axial direction. Results of a resolution test indicated that the sensing system had a resolution of 5 nm in the axial direction and 10 nm in the lateral direction. PMID:25360581

  11. Wildfire monitoring via the integration of remote sensing with innovative information technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontoes, C.; Papoutsis, I.; Michail, D.; Herekakis, Th.; Koubarakis, M.; Kyzirakos, K.; Karpathiotakis, M.; Nikolaou, C.; Sioutis, M.; Garbis, G.; Vassos, S.; Keramitsoglou, I.; Kersten, M.; Manegold, S.; Pirk, H.

    2012-04-01

    In the Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing of the National Observatory of Athens (ISARS/NOA) volumes of Earth Observation images of different spectral and spatial resolutions are being processed on a systematic basis to derive thematic products that cover a wide spectrum of applications during and after wildfire crisis, from fire detection and fire-front propagation monitoring, to damage assessment in the inflicted areas. The processed satellite imagery is combined with auxiliary geo-information layers, including land use/land cover, administrative boundaries, road and rail network, points of interest, and meteorological data to generate and validate added-value fire-related products. The service portfolio has become available to institutional End Users with a mandate to act on natural disasters and that have activated Emergency Support Services at a European level in the framework of the operational GMES projects SAFER and LinkER. Towards the goal of delivering integrated services for fire monitoring and management, ISARS/NOA employs observational capacities which include the operation of MSG/SEVIRI and NOAA/AVHRR receiving stations, NOA's in-situ monitoring networks for capturing meteorological parameters to generate weather forecasts, and datasets originating from the European Space Agency and third party satellite operators. The qualified operational activity of ISARS/NOA in the domain of wildfires management is highly enhanced by the integration of state-of-the-art Information Technologies that have become available in the framework of the TELEIOS (EC/ICT) project. TELEIOS aims at the development of fully automatic processing chains reliant on a) the effective storing and management of the large amount of EO and GIS data, b) the post-processing refinement of the fire products using semantics, and c) the creation of thematic maps and added-value services. The first objective is achieved with the use of advanced Array Database technologies, such

  12. Distributed Acoustic Sensing Technology in a Magmatic Geothermal Field - First Results From a Survey in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinsch, Thomas; Jousset, Philippe; Henninges, Jan; Blanck, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    Seismic methods are particularly suited for investigating the Earth's subsurface. Compared to surface-measurements , wellbore measurements can be used to acquire more detailed information about rock properties and possible fluid pathways within a geothermal reservoir. For high temperature geothermal wells, however, ambient temperatures are often far above the operating temperature range of conventional geophones. One way to overcome this limitation is the application of fiber optic sensor systems, where only the passive optical fiber is subjected to downhole conditions. Their applicability is thus determined by the operating temperature range of the optical fiber. Choosing appropriate fibers, such sensor systems can be operated at temperatures far above 200°C. Along an optical fiber, the distributed acoustic sensing technology (DAS) can be used to acquire acoustic signals with a high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous experiments have shown that the DAS technology is well suited for active seismic measurements. Within the framework of the EC funded project IMAGE, a fiber optic cable was deployed in a newly drilled geothermal well (RN-34) within the Reykjanes geothermal field, Iceland. Additionally, a >15 km fiber optic cable, already available at the surface, was connected to a DAS read-out unit. Acoustic data was acquired continuously for 9 days. Hammer shots were performed at the wellhead as well as along the surface cable in order to locate individual acoustic traces and calibrate the spatial distribution of the acoustic information. During the monitoring period both signals from on- and offshore explosive sources and natural seismic events could be recorded. We compare the fiber optic data to conventional seismic records from a dense seismic network deployed on the Reykjanes in the course of the IMAGE project. Here, first results from the seismic survey will be presented.

  13. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (A QSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10. PMID:26647822

  14. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (AQSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Aamdal Scheie, Anne; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10. PMID:26647822

  15. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (A QSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-12-09

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10.

  16. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuja Syed, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    The 1st International Conference on Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies (ICSICCST-2013), took place in Karachi, Pakistan, from 24-26 June 2013. It was organized by Indus University, Karachi, in collaboration with HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi. More than 80 abstracts were submitted to the conference and were double blind-reviewed by an international scientific committee. The topics of the Conference were: Video, Image & Voice Sensing Sensing for Industry, Environment, and Health Automation and Controls Laser Sensors and Systems Displays for Innovative Applications Emerging Technologies Unmanned, Robotic, and Layered Systems Sensing for Defense, Homeland Security, and Law Enforcement The title of the conference, 'Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies' is very apt in capturing the main issues facing the industry of Pakistan and the world. We believe the sensing industry, particularly in Pakistan, is currently at a critical juncture of its development. The future of the industry will depend on how the industry players choose to respond to the challenge of global competition and opportunities arising from strong growth in the Asian region for which we are pleased to note that the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues with an international perspective. This will certainly assist industry players to make informed decisions in shaping the future of the industry. The conference gathered qualified researchers from developed countries like USA, UK, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, China, South Korea and Malaysia etc whose expertise resulting from the research can be drawn upon to build an exploitable area of new technology that has potential Defense, Homeland Security, and Military applicability. More than 250 researchers/students attended the event and made the event great success as the turnout was 100%. An exceptional line-up of speakers spoke at the occasion. We want

  17. Optical gesture sensing and depth mapping technologies for head-mounted displays: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Lee, Johnny

    2013-05-01

    Head Mounted Displays (HMDs), and especially see-through HMDs have gained renewed interest in recent time, and for the first time outside the traditional military and defense realm, due to several high profile consumer electronics companies presenting their products to hit market. Consumer electronics HMDs have quite different requirements and constrains as their military counterparts. Voice comments are the de-facto interface for such devices, but when the voice recognition does not work (not connection to the cloud for example), trackpad and gesture sensing technologies have to be used to communicate information to the device. We review in this paper the various technologies developed today integrating optical gesture sensing in a small footprint, as well as the various related 3d depth mapping sensors.

  18. Preliminary Findings of Inflight Icing Field Test to Support Icing Remote Sensing Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael; Reehorst, Andrew; Serke, Dave

    2015-01-01

    NASA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research have developed an icing remote sensing technology that has demonstrated skill at detecting and classifying icing hazards in a vertical column above an instrumented ground station. This technology has recently been extended to provide volumetric coverage surrounding an airport. Building on the existing vertical pointing system, the new method for providing volumetric coverage will utilize a vertical pointing cloud radar, a multifrequency microwave radiometer with azimuth and elevation pointing, and a NEXRAD radar. The new terminal area icing remote sensing system processes the data streams from these instruments to derive temperature, liquid water content, and cloud droplet size for each examined point in space. These data are then combined to ultimately provide icing hazard classification along defined approach paths into an airport.

  19. Realistic Instrumentation Platform for Active and Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Gebru, Alem; Jayaweera, Hiran; Svanberg, Sune

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of a novel versatile optical platform for active and passive remote sensing of environmental parameters. Applications include assessment of vegetation status and water quality. The system is also adapted for ecological studies, such as identification of flying insects including agricultural pests. The system is based on two mid-size amateur astronomy telescopes, continuous-wave diode lasers at different wavelengths ranging from violet to the near infrared, and detector facilities including quadrant photodiodes, two-dimensional and line scan charge-coupled device cameras, and a compact digital spectrometer. Application examples include remote Ramanlaser-induced fluorescence monitoring of water quality at 120 m distance, and insect identification at kilometer ranges using the recorded wing beat frequency and its spectrum of overtones. Because of the low cost this developmental platform is very suitable for advanced research projects in developing countries and has, in fact, been multiplied during hands-on workshops and is now being used by a number of groups at African universities.

  20. Realistic Instrumentation Platform for Active and Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Gebru, Alem; Jayaweera, Hiran; Svanberg, Sune

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of a novel versatile optical platform for active and passive remote sensing of environmental parameters. Applications include assessment of vegetation status and water quality. The system is also adapted for ecological studies, such as identification of flying insects including agricultural pests. The system is based on two mid-size amateur astronomy telescopes, continuous-wave diode lasers at different wavelengths ranging from violet to the near infrared, and detector facilities including quadrant photodiodes, two-dimensional and line scan charge-coupled device cameras, and a compact digital spectrometer. Application examples include remote Ramanlaser-induced fluorescence monitoring of water quality at 120 m distance, and insect identification at kilometer ranges using the recorded wing beat frequency and its spectrum of overtones. Because of the low cost this developmental platform is very suitable for advanced research projects in developing countries and has, in fact, been multiplied during hands-on workshops and is now being used by a number of groups at African universities. PMID:26772187

  1. RoboResource Technology Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keck, Tom, Comp.; Frye, Ellen, Ed.

    Preparing students to be successful in a rapidly changing world means showing them how to use the tools of technology and how to integrate those tools into all areas of learning. This booklet is divided into three sections: Design Activities, Experiments, and Resources. The design activities ask students to collaborate on design projects. In these…

  2. Bioinspired active whisker sensor for robotic vibrissal tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2014-12-01

    A whisker transducer (WT) inspired by rat’s vibrissal tactile perception is proposed based on a transduction matrix model characterizing the electro-mechanical transduction process in both forward and backward directions. It is capable of acting as an actuator to sweep the whisker and simultaneously as a sensor to sense the force, motion, and mechanical impedance at whisker tip. Its validity is confirmed by numerical simulation using a finite element model. A prototype is then fabricated and its transduction matrix is determined by parameter identification. The calibrated WT can accurately sense mechanical impedance which is directly related to stiffness, mass and damping. Subsequent vibrissal tactile sensing of sandpaper texture reveals that the real part of mechanical impedance sensed by WT is correlated with sandpaper roughness. Texture discrimination is successfully achieved by inputting the real part to a k-means clustering algorithm. The mechanical impedance sensing ability as well as other features of the WT such as simultaneous-actuation-and-sensing makes it a good solution to robotic tactile sensing.

  3. Predictive Analysis of Landslide Activity Using Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuzon, N.; Regan, J.; Slesnick, C.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides are historically one of the most damaging geohazard phenomena in terms of death tolls and socio-economic losses. Therefore, understanding the underlying causes of landslides and how environmental phenomena affect their frequency and severity is of critical importance. Of specific importance for mitigating future damage is increasing our understanding of how climate change will affect landslide severity, occurrence rates, and damage. We are developing data driven models aimed at predicting landslide activity. The models learn multi-dimensional weather and geophysical patterns associated with historical landslides and estimate location-dependent probabilities for landslides under current or future weather and geophysical conditions. Our approach uses machine learning algorithms capable of determining non-linear associations between dependent variables and landslide occurrence without requiring detailed knowledge of geomorphology. Our primary goal in year one of the project is to evaluate the predictive capabilities of data mining models in application to landslide activity, and to analyze if the approach will discover previously unknown variables and/or relationships important to landslide occurrence, frequency or severity. The models include remote sensing and ground-based data, including weather, landcover, slope, elevation and drainage information as well as urbanization data. The historical landslide dataset we used to build our preliminary models was compiled from City of Seattle landslide files, United States Geological Survey reports, newspaper articles, and a verified subset of the Seattle Landslide Database that consists of all reported landslides within Seattle, WA, between 1948 and 1999. Most of the landslides analyzed to-date are shallow. Using statistical analysis and unsupervised clustering methods we have thus far identified subsets of weather conditions that lead to a significantly higher landslide probability, and have developed

  4. Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hyperspectral remote sensing monitoring key technology in coastal wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    The coastal wetland, a transitional zone between terrestrial ecosystems and marine ecosystems, is the type of great value to ecosystem services. For the recent 3 decades, area of the coastal wetland is decreasing and the ecological function is gradually degraded with the rapid development of economy, which restricts the sustainable development of economy and society in the coastal areas of China in turn. It is a major demand of the national reality to carry out the monitoring of coastal wetlands, to master the distribution and dynamic change. UAV, namely unmanned aerial vehicle, is a new platform for remote sensing. Compared with the traditional satellite and manned aerial remote sensing, it has the advantage of flexible implementation, no cloud cover, strong initiative and low cost. Image-spectrum merging is one character of high spectral remote sensing. At the same time of imaging, the spectral curve of each pixel is obtained, which is suitable for quantitative remote sensing, fine classification and target detection. Aimed at the frontier and hotspot of remote sensing monitoring technology, and faced the demand of the coastal wetland monitoring, this paper used UAV and the new remote sensor of high spectral imaging instrument to carry out the analysis of the key technologies of monitoring coastal wetlands by UAV on the basis of the current situation in overseas and domestic and the analysis of developing trend. According to the characteristic of airborne hyperspectral data on UAV, that is "three high and one many", the key technology research that should develop are promoted as follows: 1) the atmosphere correction of the UAV hyperspectral in coastal wetlands under the circumstance of complex underlying surface and variable geometry, 2) the best observation scale and scale transformation method of the UAV platform while monitoring the coastal wetland features, 3) the classification and detection method of typical features with high precision from multi scale

  5. Standardized Low-Power Wireless Communication Technologies for Distributed Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Vilajosana, Xavier; Tuset-Peiro, Pere; Vazquez-Gallego, Francisco; Alonso-Zarate, Jesus; Alonso, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Recent standardization efforts on low-power wireless communication technologies, including time-slotted channel hopping (TSCH) and DASH7 Alliance Mode (D7AM), are starting to change industrial sensing applications, enabling networks to scale up to thousands of nodes whilst achieving high reliability. Past technologies, such as ZigBee, rooted in IEEE 802.15.4, and ISO 18000-7, rooted in frame-slotted ALOHA (FSA), are based on contention medium access control (MAC) layers and have very poor performance in dense networks, thus preventing the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm from really taking off. Industrial sensing applications, such as those being deployed in oil refineries, have stringent requirements on data reliability and are being built using new standards. Despite the benefits of these new technologies, industrial shifts are not happening due to the enormous technology development and adoption costs and the fact that new standards are not well-known and completely understood. In this article, we provide a deep analysis of TSCH and D7AM, outlining operational and implementation details with the aim of facilitating the adoption of these technologies to sensor application developers. PMID:24518893

  6. Standardized low-power wireless communication technologies for distributed sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Vilajosana, Xavier; Tuset-Peiro, Pere; Vazquez-Gallego, Francisco; Alonso-Zarate, Jesus; Alonso, Luis

    2014-02-10

    Recent standardization efforts on low-power wireless communication technologies, including time-slotted channel hopping (TSCH) and DASH7 Alliance Mode (D7AM), are starting to change industrial sensing applications, enabling networks to scale up to thousands of nodes whilst achieving high reliability. Past technologies, such as ZigBee, rooted in IEEE 802.15.4, and ISO 18000-7, rooted in frame-slotted ALOHA (FSA), are based on contention medium access control (MAC) layers and have very poor performance in dense networks, thus preventing the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm from really taking off. Industrial sensing applications, such as those being deployed in oil refineries, have stringent requirements on data reliability and are being built using new standards. Despite the benefits of these new technologies, industrial shifts are not happening due to the enormous technology development and adoption costs and the fact that new standards are not well-known and completely understood. In this article, we provide a deep analysis of TSCH and D7AM, outlining operational and implementation details with the aim of facilitating the adoption of these technologies to sensor application developers.

  7. Standardized low-power wireless communication technologies for distributed sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Vilajosana, Xavier; Tuset-Peiro, Pere; Vazquez-Gallego, Francisco; Alonso-Zarate, Jesus; Alonso, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Recent standardization efforts on low-power wireless communication technologies, including time-slotted channel hopping (TSCH) and DASH7 Alliance Mode (D7AM), are starting to change industrial sensing applications, enabling networks to scale up to thousands of nodes whilst achieving high reliability. Past technologies, such as ZigBee, rooted in IEEE 802.15.4, and ISO 18000-7, rooted in frame-slotted ALOHA (FSA), are based on contention medium access control (MAC) layers and have very poor performance in dense networks, thus preventing the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm from really taking off. Industrial sensing applications, such as those being deployed in oil refineries, have stringent requirements on data reliability and are being built using new standards. Despite the benefits of these new technologies, industrial shifts are not happening due to the enormous technology development and adoption costs and the fact that new standards are not well-known and completely understood. In this article, we provide a deep analysis of TSCH and D7AM, outlining operational and implementation details with the aim of facilitating the adoption of these technologies to sensor application developers. PMID:24518893

  8. Challenges of Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Education and Technology Transfer in a Fast Developing Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, F.; Chen, L.-C.

    2014-04-01

    During the past decade, Taiwan has experienced an unusual and fast growing in the industry of mapping, remote sensing, spatial information and related markets. A successful space program and dozens of advanced airborne and ground-based remote sensing instruments as well as mobile mapping systems have been implemented and put into operation to support the vast demands of geospatial data acquisition. Moreover, in addition to the government agencies and research institutes, there are also tens of companies in the private sector providing geo-spatial data and services. However, the fast developing industry is also posing a great challenge to the education sector in Taiwan, especially the higher education for geo-spatial information. Facing this fast developing industry, the demands of skilled professionals and new technologies in order to address diversified needs are indubitably high. Consequently, while delighting in the expanding and prospering benefitted from the fast growing industry, how to fulfill these demands has become a challenge for the remote sensing and spatial information disciplines in the higher education institutes in Taiwan. This paper provides a brief insight into the status of the remote sensing and spatial information industry in Taiwan as well as the challenges of the education and technology transfer to support the increasing demands and to ensure the continuous development of the industry. In addition to the report of the current status of the remote sensing and spatial information related courses and programs in the colleges and universities, current and potential threatening issues and possible resolutions are also discussed in different points of view.

  9. Study on an oxygen sensing rhenium(I) complex with enlarged sensing/active area: fabrication, photophysical parameters and molecular oxygen sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guiying; Lu, Mang; Huang, Can; Wang, Yaoqiong; Ge, Shuping

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we synthesize a novel 1,10-phenanthroline-derived (Phen-derived) diamine ligand of benzo[f][1,10]phenanthroline-6,7-dicarbonitrile (Phen-CN) with enlarged conjugation planar and its corresponding Re(I) complex of Re(CO)3Cl(Phen-CN), hoping to achieve an optical sensor owing large sensing/active area. Its geometric and electronic structures are investigated, which suggests that the effective sensing/active area of Re(CO)3Cl(Phen-CN) is enlarged by the successful formation of conjugation planar. The promising photophysical parameters of Re(CO)3Cl(Phen-CN), including large sensing/active area and long excited state lifetime, make it a potential probe for oxygen detection. By doping Re(CO)3Cl(Phen-CN) into a polymer matrix of poly(vinylpyrrolidone), oxygen sensing performances of the resulted composite materials are investigated. Finally, a high sensitivity of 17.1 is realized, with short response/recovery time of 9s/32s.

  10. Label-free screening of single biomolecules through resistive pulse sensing technology for precision medicine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrer, S.; Kim, S. C.; Schieber, C.; Kannam, S.; Gunn, N.; Moore, S.; Scott, D.; Bathgate, R.; Skafidas, S.; Wagner, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    Employing integrated nano- and microfluidic circuits for detecting and characterizing biological compounds through resistive pulse sensing technology is a vibrant area of research at the interface of biotechnology and nanotechnology. Resistive pulse sensing platforms can be customized to study virtually any particle of choice which can be threaded through a fluidic channel and enable label-free single-particle interrogation with the primary read-out signal being an electric current fingerprint. The ability to perform label-free molecular screening with single-molecule and even single binding site resolution makes resistive pulse sensing technology a powerful tool for analyzing the smallest units of biological systems and how they interact with each other on a molecular level. This task is at the core of experimental systems biology and in particular ‘omics research which in combination with next-generation DNA-sequencing and next-generation drug discovery and design forms the foundation of a novel disruptive medical paradigm commonly referred to as personalized medicine or precision medicine. DNA-sequencing has approached the 1000-Dollar-Genome milestone allowing for decoding a complete human genome with unmatched speed and at low cost. Increased sequencing efficiency yields massive amounts of genomic data. Analyzing this data in combination with medical and biometric health data eventually enables understanding the pathways from individual genes to physiological functions. Access to this information triggers fundamental questions for doctors and patients alike: what are the chances of an outbreak for a specific disease? Can individual risks be managed and if so how? Which drugs are available and how should they be applied? Could a new drug be tailored to an individual’s genetic predisposition fast and in an affordable way? In order to provide answers and real-life value to patients, the rapid evolvement of novel computing approaches for analyzing big data in

  11. Earth remote sensing as an effective tool for the development of advanced innovative educational technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorova, Vera; Mayorov, Kirill

    2009-11-01

    Current educational system is facing a contradiction between the fundamentality of engineering education and the necessity of applied learning extension, which requires new methods of training to combine both academic and practical knowledge in balance. As a result there are a number of innovations being developed and implemented into the process of education aimed at optimizing the quality of the entire educational system. Among a wide range of innovative educational technologies there is an especially important subset of educational technologies which involve learning through hands-on scientific and technical projects. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of educational technologies based on small satellites development as well as the usage of Earth remote sensing data acquired from these satellites. The increase in public attention to the education through Earth remote sensing is based on the concern that although there is a great progress in the development of new methods of Earth imagery and remote sensing data acquisition there is still a big question remaining open on practical applications of this kind of data. It is important to develop the new way of thinking for the new generation of people so they understand that they are the masters of their own planet and they are responsible for its state. They should desire and should be able to use a powerful set of tools based on modern and perspective Earth remote sensing. For example NASA sponsors "Classroom of the Future" project. The Universities Space Research Association in United States provides a mechanism through which US universities can cooperate effectively with one another, with the government, and with other organizations to further space science and technology, and to promote education in these areas. It also aims at understanding the Earth as a system and promoting the role of humankind in the destiny of their own planet. The Association has founded a Journal of Earth System

  12. The Challenge of Active Optical Sensing from Extreme Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    A review of the history and current state of atmospheric sensing lidar from Earth orbit was conducted and it was found that space based earth remote sensing is still in its infancy with only one limited success extended duration autonomous mission to date. An analysis of the basic requirements for some candidate geo-synchronous lidar concepts was completed and it was concluded that significant basic work is required in all areas of lidar development.

  13. Non-Invasive Microbial Metabolic Activity Sensing at Single Cell Level by Perfusion of Calcein Acetoxymethyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Christina E. M.; Singh, Abhijeet; Helfrich, Stefan; Grünberger, Alexander; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast microscopy cannot give sufficient information on bacterial metabolic activity, or if a cell is dead, it has the fate to die or it is in a viable but non-growing state. Thus, a reliable sensing of the metabolic activity helps to distinguish different categories of viability. We present a non-invasive instantaneous sensing method using a fluorogenic substrate for online monitoring of esterase activity and calcein efflux changes in growing wild type bacteria. The fluorescent conversion product of calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CAM) and its efflux indicates the metabolic activity of cells grown under different conditions at real-time. The dynamic conversion of CAM and the active efflux of fluorescent calcein were analyzed by combining microfluidic single cell cultivation technology and fluorescence time lapse microscopy. Thus, an instantaneous and non-invasive sensing method for apparent esterase activity was created without the requirement of genetic modification or harmful procedures. The metabolic activity sensing method consisting of esterase activity and calcein secretion was demonstrated in two applications. Firstly, growing colonies of our model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum were confronted with intermittent nutrient starvation by interrupting the supply of iron and carbon, respectively. Secondly, bacteria were exposed for one hour to fatal concentrations of antibiotics. Bacteria could be distinguished in growing and non-growing cells with metabolic activity as well as non-growing and non-fluorescent cells with no detectable esterase activity. Microfluidic single cell cultivation combined with high temporal resolution time-lapse microscopy facilitated monitoring metabolic activity of stressed cells and analyzing their descendants in the subsequent recovery phase. Results clearly show that the combination of CAM with a sampling free microfluidic approach is a powerful tool to gain insights in the metabolic activity of growing and non

  14. Does Active Learning through an Antisense Jigsaw Make Sense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetharaman, Mahadevan; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2003-12-01

    Three journal articles on nucleic acid antisense modification strategies were assigned to 12 students as part of an active learning "jigsaw" exercise for a graduate-level chemistry course on nucleic acids. Each student was required to read one of the three articles. This assignment was preceded by an hour-long lecture on the basic concepts in antisense antigene technology. On the day of the jigsaw, the students with the same article (three groups of four students) discussed their article briefly, and then formed four new groups where no one had read the same article. Each student spent about five minutes teaching his or her article to the other group members, using specific questions provided to guide the discussion. This exercise laid the foundation for bringing the discussion to the entire class, where most of the students actively participated. To test the students' comprehension of the reading materials, a problem set was designed that required not only an understanding of the three articles, but also application of the concepts learned. The effectiveness of this active learning strategy and its applicability to other topics are discussed in this article.

  15. SansEC Sensing Technology - A New Tool for Designing Space Systems and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents concepts for using the NASA developed SansEC sensing technology for reconfiguring/modifying many space subsystems to add to their original function the ability to be sensors/sensor arrays without the addition of the electrical circuitry typically used for sensors. Each sensor is a self-resonating planar pattern of electrically conductive material that is an open-circuit single component without electrical connections. The sensors are wirelessly powered using external oscillating magnetic fields and when electrically excited respond with their own magnetic fields whose frequency, amplitude and bandwidth can be correlated with the magnitude of multiple unrelated physical quantities. These sensors have been demonstrated for numerous measurements required for spacecraft and inflatable/expandable structures. SansEC sensors are damage resilient and simple to fabricate. Thin films of conductive material can be used to create sensor arrays that function as sensing skins. Each sensor on the skin can be tailored for a science or engineering measurement. Additionally, each sensor has an inherent damage detection capability. These sensing skins can be used to redesign inflatable habitat multi-layer insulation to provide additional functions of environmental measurement and micrometeorite/orbital debris damage detections. The sensing skins can be deposited on planetary exploratory vehicles to increase the number of measurements with negligible weight increase.

  16. Aircraft target onboard detecting technology via Circular Information Matching method for remote sensing satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Huachao; Zhou, Quan; Li, Li

    2015-10-01

    Image information onboard processing is one o f important technology to rapidly achieve intelligence for remote sensing satellites. As a typical target, aircraft onboard detection has been getting more attention. In this paper, we propose an efficient method of aircraft detection for remote sensing satellite onboard processing. According to the feature of aircraft performance in remote sensing image, the detection algorithm consists of two steps: First Salient Object Detection (SOD) is employed to reduce the amount of calculation on large remote sensing image. SOD uses Gabor filtering and a simple binary test between pixels in a filtered image. White points are connected as regions. Plane candidate regions are screened from white regions by area, length and width of connected region. Next a new algorithm, called Circumferential Information Matching method, is used to detect aircraft on candidate regions. The results of tests show circumference curve around the plane center is stable shape, so the candidate region can be accurately detecting with this feature. In order to rotation invariant, we use circle matched filter to detect target. And discrete fast Fourier transform (DFFT) is used to accelerate and reduce calculation. Experiments show the detection accuracy rate of proposed algorithm is 90% with less than 0.5s processing time. In addition, the calculation of the proposed method through quantitative anglicized is very small. Experimental results and theoretical analysis show that the proposed method is reasonable and highly-efficient.

  17. Advanced optical sensing and processing technologies for the distributed control of large flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. M.; Fraser, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to examine state-of-the-art optical sensing and processing technology applied to control the motion of flexible spacecraft. Proposed large flexible space systems, such an optical telescopes and antennas, will require control over vast surfaces. Most likely distributed control will be necessary involving many sensors to accurately measure the surface. A similarly large number of actuators must act upon the system. The used technical approach included reviewing proposed NASA missions to assess system needs and requirements. A candidate mission was chosen as a baseline study spacecraft for comparison of conventional and optical control components. Control system requirements of the baseline system were used for designing both a control system containing current off-the-shelf components and a system utilizing electro-optical devices for sensing and processing. State-of-the-art surveys of conventional sensor, actuator, and processor technologies were performed. A technology development plan is presented that presents a logical, effective way to develop and integrate advancing technologies.

  18. Active and Passive Sensing from Geosynchronous and Libration Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Raymond, Carol; Hildebrand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The development of the LEO (EOS) missions has led the way to new technologies and new science discoveries. However, LEO measurements alone cannot cost effectively produce high time resolution measurements needed to move the science to the next level. Both GEO and the Lagrange points, L1 and L2, provide vantage points that will allow higher time resolution measurements. GEO is currently being exploited by weather satellites, but the sensors currently operating at GEO do not provide the spatial or spectral resolution needed for atmospheric trace gas, ocean or land surface measurements. It is also may be possible to place active sensors in geostationary orbit. It seems clear, that the next era in earth observation and discovery will be opened by sensor systems operating beyond near earth orbit.

  19. Editorial: Should We Develop a Sense of Urgency in Science and Technology Development?

    SciTech Connect

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2011-07-01

    In his book A Sense of Urgency, John P. Kotter describes how organizations must develop the right sense of urgency as an enabler for organizational changes necessary to compete in today’s global economy. A surfeit of complacency promotes institutional inertia that solely relies on past accomplishments, people *hoping* that the tomorrow will be an extrapolation of the today. However, the reality is that the marketplace around us changes drastically at an ever-increasing rate of change. Only x number of Fortune 500 companies are still on the list who were there five years ago . Transferring the sense of urgency from a business setting to the nation’s energy and energy security area is critical, Peter Ogden et al. wrote in a 2008 article in the journal Issues Online in Science and Technology. In the article, Ending the Inertia on Energy Policy. A new Strategy to Spur Energy Innovation, he writes, the United States must undergo an innovation revolution. The rate at which the United States is able to develop and deploy new energy technologies will, to a great extent, determine the ultimate speed and cost of the economic transformation

  20. Strategic plan for the utilization of remote sensing technologies in the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.D.; Doll, W.E.; Durfee, R.C.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Conder, S.R.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1994-03-01

    The objectives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program are to apply state-of-the-art remote sensing and geophysical technologies and to manage routine and remotely-sensed examinations of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), and their adjacent off-site areas. Repeated multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery, gamma, and photographic surveys will allow monitoring of the degradation that might occur in waste containment vessels and monitoring (at a later stage in the remediation life cycle) of improvements from restoration efforts and cleanup. These technologies, in combination with geophysical surveys, will provide an effective means for identifying unknown waste sites and contaminant transport pathways. All of the data will be maintained in a data base that will be accessible to site managers in the ER Program. The complete analysis of collected data will provide site-specific data to the ER Program for characterizing and monitoring ER Program hazardous waste sites.

  1. Strategic plan for the utilization of remote sensing technologies in the environmental restoration program

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.D.; Doll, W.E.; Durfee, R.C.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Conder, S.R.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The objectives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program are to apply state-of-the-art remote sensing and geophysical technologies and to manage routine and remotely-sensed examinations of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), and their adjacent off-site areas. Repeated multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery, gamma, and photographic surveys will allow monitoring of the degradation that might occur in waste containment vessels and monitoring (at a later stage in the remediation life cycle) of improvements from restoration efforts and cleanup. These technologies, in combination with geophysical surveys, will provide an effective means for identifying unknown waste sites and contaminant transport pathways. All of the data will be maintained in a data base that will be accessible to site managers in the ER Program. The complete analysis of collected data will provide site-specific data to the ER Program for characterizing and monitoring ER Program hazardous waste sites.

  2. Remote Sensing and the Kyoto Protocol: A Review of Available and Future Technology for Monitoring Treaty Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Rosenquist, A.; Milne, A. K.; Dobson, M. C.; Qi, J.

    2000-01-01

    An International workshop was held to address how remote sensing technology could be used to support the environmental monitoring requirements of the Kyoto Protocol. An overview of the issues addressed and the findings of the workshop are discussed.

  3. Remote sensing applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The activities of the Mississippi Remote Sensing Center are described in addition to technology transfer and information dissemination, remote sensing topics such as timber identification, water quality, flood prevention, land use, erosion control, animal habitats, and environmental impact studies are also discussed.

  4. Quorum Sensing Inhibitory Activity of Giganteone A from Myristica cinnamomea King against Escherichia coli Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sivasothy, Yasodha; Krishnan, Thiba; Chan, Kok-Gan; Abdul Wahab, Siti Mariam; Othman, Muhamad Aqmal; Litaudon, Marc; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-03-21

    Malabaricones A-C (1-3) and giganteone A (4) were isolated from the bark of Myristica cinnamomea King. Their structures were elucidated and characterized by means of NMR and MS spectral analyses. These isolates were evaluated for their anti-quorum sensing activity using quorum sensing biosensors, namely Escherichia coli [pSB401] and Escherichia coli [pSB1075], whereby the potential of giganteone A (4) as a suitable anti-quorum sensing agent was demonstrated.

  5. Structures and materials technology needs for communications and remote sensing spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronet, M. J.; Jensen, G. A.; Hoskins, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents trade studies conducted from the perspective of a small spacecraft developer to determine and quantify the structures and structural materials technology development needs for future commercial and NASA small spacecraft to be launched in the period 1999 to 2005. Emphasis is placed on small satellites weighing less than 1800 pounds for two focus low-Earth orbit missions: commercial communications and remote sensing. The focus missions are characterized in terms of orbit, spacecraft size, performance, and design drivers. Small spacecraft program personnel were interviewed to determine their technology needs, and the results are summarized. A systems-analysis approach for quantifying the benefits of inserting advanced state-of-the-art technologies into a current reference, state-of-the-practice small spacecraft design is developed and presented. This approach is employed in a set of abbreviated trade studies to quantify the payoffs of using a subset of 11 advanced technologies selected from the interview results The 11 technology development opportunities are then ranked based on their relative payoff. Based on the strong potential for significant benefits, recommendations are made to pursue development of 8 and the 11 technologies. Other important technology development areas identified are recommended for further study.

  6. Using LiDAR technology in forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Akay, Abdullah Emin; Oğuz, Hakan; Karas, Ismail Rakip; Aruga, Kazuhiro

    2009-04-01

    Managing natural resources in wide-scale areas can be highly time and resource consuming task which requires significant amount of data collection in the field and reduction of the data in the office to provide the necessary information. High performance LiDAR remote sensing technology has recently become an effective tool for use in applications of natural resources. In the field of forestry, the LiDAR measurements of the forested areas can provide high-quality data on three-dimensional characterizations of forest structures. Besides, LiDAR data can be used to provide very high quality and accurate Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for the forested areas. This study presents the progress and opportunities of using LiDAR remote sensing technology in various forestry applications. The results indicate that LiDAR based forest structure data and high-resolution DEMs can be used in wide-scale forestry activities such as stand characterizations, forest inventory and management, fire behaviour modeling, and forest operations. PMID:18365761

  7. Positive and Transformative Technologies for Active Ageing.

    PubMed

    Riva, Giuseppe; Villani, Daniela; Cipresso, Pietro; Repetto, Claudia; Triberti, Stefano; Di Lernia, Daniele; Chirico, Alice; Serino, Silvia; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Due to advances in treatment and people's living longer, chronic diseases are becoming more common among our population. This is a leading contributor to the increasing burden on our current healthcare system. To reduce this burden and sufficiently meet the needs of this growing segment of the population, healthcare organizations must encourage the elderly to take a more active role in caring for their own health and well-being. Technology may offer a solution to this shortcoming. "Positive Technology" focuses on the use of technology for improving the quality of our personal experience, and it suggests specific strategies for modifying/improving each of the different dimensions involved - Emotional Quality (affect regulation); Engagement/Actualization (presence and flow); Connectdness (collective intentions and networked flow) - and for generating motivation and engagement in the process. "Transformative Technology" are technologically-mediated experiences that support positive, enduring transformation of the self-world. The transformative content is delivered through a set of experiential affordances, which are stimuli designed to elicit emotional and cognitive involvement in the designed experience: (i) emotional affordances; (ii) epistemic affordances. The paper discusses discuss the possible role of positive and transormative technologies for healthy living and active ageing by presenting different practical applications of this approach recently developed by our team. PMID:27046597

  8. Modelling Rift Valley fever (RVF) disease vector habitats using active and passive remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosia, Vincent G.; Linthicum, K. G.; Bailey, C. L.; Sebesta, P.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Ames Ecosystem Science and Technology Branch and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases are conducting research to detect Rift Valley fever (RVF) vector habitats in eastern Africa using active and passive remote-sensing. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) calculated from Landsat TM and SPOT data is used to characterize the vegetation common to the Aedes mosquito. Relationships have been found between the highest NDVI and the 'dambo' habitat areas near Riuru, Kenya on both wet and dry data. High NDVI values, when combined with the vegetation classifications, are clearly related to the areas of vector habitats. SAR data have been proposed for use during the rainy season when optical systems are of minimal use and the short frequency and duration of the optimum RVF mosquito habitat conditions necessitate rapid evaluation of the vegetation/moisture conditions; only then can disease potential be stemmed and eradication efforts initiated.

  9. Canadian Activities in Space Debris Mitigation Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikanpour, Darius; Jiang, Xin Xiang; Goroshin, Samuel; Haddad, Emile; Kruzelecky, Roman; Hoa, Suong; Merle, Philippe; Kleiman, Jacob; Gendron, Stephane; Higgins, Andrew; Jamroz, Wes

    The space environment, and in particular the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), is becoming increasingly populated with space debris which include fragments of dysfunctional spacecraft parts and materials traveling at speeds up to 15 km per second. These pose an escalating potential threat to LEO spacecraft, the international space station, and manned missions. This paper presents the Canadian activities to address the concerns over space debris in terms of debris mitigation measures and technologies; these include novel spacecraft demise technologies to safely decommission the spacecraft at the end of the mission, integrated self-healing material technologies for spacecraft structures to facilitate self-repair and help maintain the spacecraft structural and thermal performance, hypervelocity ground test capability to predict the impact of space debris on spacecraft performance, and ways of raising awareness within the space community through participation in targeted Science and Technology conferences and international forums.

  10. Atmospheric studies related to aerospace activities and remote sensing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sze, N. D.; Isaacs, R. G.; Ko, M.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1981-01-01

    Parallel investigations were conducted relating to: the sensitivity of 1-D photochemical model simulated column ozone perturbations due to a projected fleet of 1000 aircraft cruising 7 hours per day at altitudes of 15-16 and 18-19 km to uncertainties in kinetic rate constant data determining modeled OH concentrations and eddy diffusivity profile parameterization and a comparison of the inherent strengths and weaknesses of Eulerian and Langrangian averaging processes in the development of multidimensional models and investigation of approaches to applying the Generalized Lagrangian Mean (GLM) formalism to zonal-mean models. The role of multiple scattering and Earth curvature in the evaluation of diurnally dependent photodissociation rates and trace species variations was examined.

  11. U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LAND REMOTE SENSING ACTIVITIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, Doyle G.

    1983-01-01

    USGS uses all types of remotely sensed data, in combination with other sources of data, to support geologic analyses, hydrologic assessments, land cover mapping, image mapping, and applications research. Survey scientists use all types of remotely sensed data with ground verifications and digital topographic and cartographic data. A considerable amount of research is being done by Survey scientists on developing automated geographic information systems that can handle a wide variety of digital data. The Survey is also investigating the use of microprocessor computer systems for accessing, displaying, and analyzing digital data.

  12. Recent activities of the Priroda State Remote Sensing Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, J.L.; Bond, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    At present the Priroda State Remote Sensing Center is the largest entity in the USSR responsible for the receipt and processing of space imagery. Besides the aforementioned consulting and training functions, Priroda, upon user request: a) processes multispectral, band-specific, and other remote sensing imagery and supplies a broad range of primary and derivative information in the form of image copies [prints and transparencies] and digital products; and b) cooperates with other GUGK bodies in the compilation of thematic map series on diverse topics. -from Authors

  13. Halogen bonding-enhanced electrochemical halide anion sensing by redox-active ferrocene receptors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The first examples of halogen bonding redox-active ferrocene receptors and their anion electrochemical sensing properties are reported. Halogen bonding was found to significantly amplify the magnitude of the receptor's metallocene redox-couple's voltammetric responses for halide sensing compared to their hydrogen bonding analogues in both acetonitrile and aqueous-acetonitrile solvent media.

  14. Halogen bonding-enhanced electrochemical halide anion sensing by redox-active ferrocene receptors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The first examples of halogen bonding redox-active ferrocene receptors and their anion electrochemical sensing properties are reported. Halogen bonding was found to significantly amplify the magnitude of the receptor's metallocene redox-couple's voltammetric responses for halide sensing compared to their hydrogen bonding analogues in both acetonitrile and aqueous-acetonitrile solvent media. PMID:26289779

  15. Active Remote Sensing of Natural Resources: Course Notes. Science Series No. 5. Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Eugene L.

    Presented is a portion of a research project which developed materials for teaching remote sensing of natural resources on an interdisciplinary basis at the graduate level. This volume contains notes developed for a course in active remote sensing. It is concerned with those methods or systems which generate the electromagnetic energy…

  16. Research on remote sensing assessment technology for porphyry copper in south of Arequipa province of Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rihong; Li, Zhizhong; Cheng, Xiufa; Zhao, Yuling

    2014-05-01

    been carried out by using man-machine interactive remote sensing interpretation technology, and then in connection with the metallogenic geological characteristics, the mine indicating information such as ore-controlling structure, source rocks and ore-hosted rocks of PCD were achieved in the study area. Finally, a comprehensive assessment for mineral exploration by remote sensing in the study area is accomplished and five favorable area for mineral exploration by remote sensing is delineated, based on the remote sensing mine-indicating information such as linear and circular-shaped ore-controlling structures, source rocks and ore-hosted rocks, argillic-and phyllic- altered and propylitization altered minerals assemblages.

  17. Research and practice of intelligent sensing technologies in civil structural health monitoring in the mainland of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jinping

    2006-03-01

    Intelligent sensing technologies have developed rapidly recent years, which meet the requirement of structural health monitoring (SHM). A number of types of intelligent sensing technologies have been developed in the mainland of China, such as optical fiber sensing technology, piezoelectric sensing technology, self-sensing smart materials, wireless sensors and sensor networks, CCD, GPS and so on. In this paper, various optical fiber sensors are introduced, including optical fiber sensors, six kinds of optical fiber Bragg grating (OFBG)-based sensors, fiber reinforced bars embedded with OFBG sensors (FRP-OFBG), OFBG-based smart cables, OFBG-based weighbridge, PVDF-based strain gauge and crack meter, shape memory alloy-based displacement transducer, self-sensing cement-based strain gauge, wireless accelerometers and sensor networks, wireless strain sensors and sensor networks, and GPS. The performance of various sensors mentioned above is also experimentally investigated, in particular sensing property, durability, fatigue and corrosion resistant performance. Additionally, applications of the sensors have also been carried out in the mainland of China. The full implementation of sensors in SHM systems for offshore platforms, long-span bridges, large-span domes, tall buildings and so on are also introduced in this paper.

  18. Malabaricone C from Myristica cinnamomea exhibits anti-quorum sensing activity.

    PubMed

    Chong, Yee Meng; Yin, Wai Fong; Ho, Chia Yong; Mustafa, Mohamad Rais; Hadi, A Hamid A; Awang, Khalijah; Narrima, Putri; Koh, Chong-Lek; Appleton, David R; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2011-10-28

    A methanol-soluble extract of the bark of Myristica cinnamomea was found to exhibit anti-quorum sensing activity, and subsequent bioassay-guided isolation led to the identification of the active compound malabaricone C (1). Compound 1 inhibited violacein production by Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 when grown in the presence of a cognate signaling molecule, N-3-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone. Furthermore, 1 inhibited the quorum sensing-regulated pyocyanin production and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. These results suggest that the anti-quorum sensing activity of 1 and related molecules should be investigated further.

  19. Sense of Cohesion among Community Activists Engaging in Volunteer Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Drorit; Itzhaky, Haya; Zanbar, Lea; Schwartz, Chaya

    2012-01-01

    The present article attempts to shed light on the direct and indirect contribution of personal resources and community indices to Sense of Cohesion among activists engaging in community volunteer work. The sample comprised 481 activists. Based on social systems theory, three levels of variables were examined: (1) inputs, which included personal…

  20. NASA's Microgravity Technology Report: Summary of Activities 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Dan

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the 1997 NASA Microgravity Technology Report is to update the Microgravity Research Program's technology development policy and to present and assess current technology related activities and requirements identified within its research and technology disciplines.

  1. Technology development activities supporting tank waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, W.F.; Beeman, G.H.

    1994-06-01

    This document summarizes work being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The specific work activities are organized by the following categories: safety, characterization, retrieval, barriers, pretreatment, low-level waste, and high-level waste. In most cases, the activities presented here were identified as supporting tank remediation by EM-50 integrated program or integrated demonstration lead staff and the selections were further refined by contractor staff. Data sheets were prepared from DOE-HQ guidance to the field issued in September 1993. Activities were included if a significant portion of the work described provides technology potentially needed by TWRS; consequently, not all parts of each description necessarily support tank remediation.

  2. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-15

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements.

  3. Natural resources evaluation by the use of remote sensing and GIS technology for agricultural development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Viet, C.; Nguyen Phuong, M.

    1993-11-01

    A multilevel Geographic Information System based on Remote Sensing and GIS-Technology is established to assess erosion susceptibility and select suitable land for soil conservation and regional planning, management. A cross analysis between the thematic maps and field data is done to examine the relationship between natural condition and land suitability for agriculture. The Land resources evaluation models are affective for understanding the cultivation possibility and can be used as a regional project to be applied in various Vietnam regions for agricultural development.

  4. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  5. Wavefront Sensing and Control Technology for Submillimeter and Far-Infrared Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The NGST wavefront sensing and control system will be developed to TRL6 over the next few years, including testing in a cryogenic vacuum environment with traceable hardware. Doing this in the far-infrared and submillimeter is probably easier, as some aspects of the problem scale with wavelength, and the telescope is likely to have a more stable environment; however, detectors may present small complications. Since this is a new system approach, it warrants a new look. For instance, a large space telescope based on the DART membrane mirror design requires a new actuation approach. Other mirror and actuation technologies may prove useful as well.

  6. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  7. Hybrid architecture active wavefront sensing and control system, and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D. (Inventor); Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor); Hyde, Tristram T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    According to various embodiments, provided herein is an optical system and method that can be configured to perform image analysis. The optical system can comprise a telescope assembly and one or more hybrid instruments. The one or more hybrid instruments can be configured to receive image data from the telescope assembly and perform a fine guidance operation and a wavefront sensing operation, simultaneously, on the image data received from the telescope assembly.

  8. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  9. Technical assistance and the transfer of remote sensing technology. [for economic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R.

    1977-01-01

    The transfer of technology from industrialized countries to the third world is a very complicated process and one that requires a great deal of research and development. The political and social obstacles to this transfer are generally greater than the technical obstacles, but technical assistance programs have neither the competence nor the inclination to deal with these factors adequately. Funding for technical assistance in remote sensing is now expanding rapidly, and there is a growing need for institutions to study and promote the effective use of this technology for economic development. The United Nations, the Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Bank, the United States Agency for International Development and the Canadian technical assistance agencies take different approaches to the problem and deal with the political pressures in different ways.

  10. Cost benefit assessment of NASA remote sensing technology transferred to the State of Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, D. L.; Zimmer, R. P.; Wilkins, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The benefits involved in the transfer of NASA remote sensing technology to eight Georgia state agencies are identified in quantifiable and qualitative terms, and a value for these benefits is computed by means of an effectiveness analysis. The benefits of the transfer are evaluated by contrasting a baseline scenario without Landsat and an alternative scenario with Landsat. The net present value of the Landsat technology being transferred is estimated at 9.5 million dollars. The estimated value of the transfer is most sensitive to discount rate, the cost of photo acquisition, and the cost of data digitalization. It is estimated that, if the budget is constrained, Landsat could provide data products roughly seven times more frequently than would otherwise be possible.

  11. Draw tower fiber Bragg gratings and their use in sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, E.; Mörbitz, J.; Chojetzki, C.; Becker, M.; Brückner, S.; Schuster, K.; Rothhardt, M.; Bartelt, H.

    2011-06-01

    The idea of fabricating fiber Bragg gratings already during the drawing of a fiber dates back almost 20 years. The application of a transverse holographic writing method on a draw tower offers a promising solution for a highly effective Bragg grating production. Because of the high technology requirements it took more than 10 years to develop the method into a reliable process. During the last five years the improvements in the technical development enables cost effective industrial production of draw tower gratings (1DTG®). In this paper we report about new possibilities of the improved process with respect to the grating type (type I gratings, type II gratings), the coating type (2ORMOCER®, metals) and the fiber type and diameter (125μm, 80μm and below). Furthermore, we present examples for the application of draw tower fiber Bragg gratings in sensing technologies for medical applications.

  12. Integrated pressure-sensing microsystem by CMOS IC technology for barometal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minxin; Huang, Qing-An

    2001-10-01

    Most currently integrated silicon microsystems available for pressure sensing are based on preprocessing before CMOS IC technology. These microsystems are generally very sensitive to parasitism effect and not available for IC-compatible process. This limits the accuracy of the microsystem and batch-fabrication. Calibration cost is also increased. To overcome these problems, a new generation of pressure microsystems without preprocessing CMOS IC technology has been proposed. This pressure-sensing system consists of a miniature silicon capacitive sensor, fabricated with silicon-silicon bonding technique, and a detection integrated circuit. Only the standard layers of CMOS process are used to build the system and only several photolithography steps are necessary to achieve the micromachined structure in postprocessing, so a high long-term stability could be assured. The entire system converts absolute pressure changes, in the pressure range useful for barometal applications, to frequency changes. A reference capacitor is used in the system and a (delta) C model is applied to cancel out temperature dependence and to compensate non-linearity. The pressure range of the sensor is from 0.5 bar to 1.5bar and the temperature varies between -25 degree(s)C and -60 degree(s)C. A sensitivity of 50Hz/Torr could be achieved.

  13. Micro-resonators based on integrated polymer technology for optical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Pauline; Lemaitre, Jonathan; Guendouz, Mohammed; Lorrain, Nathalie; Poffo, Luiz; Gadonna, Michel; Bosc, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    Research on sensors has experienced a noticeable development over the last decades especially in label free optical biosensors. However, compact sensors without markers for rapid, reliable and inexpensive detection of various substances induce a significant research of new technological solutions. The context of this work is the development of a sensor based on easily integrated and inexpensive micro-resonator (MR) component in integrated optics, highly sensitive and selective mainly in the areas of health and food. In this work, we take advantage of our previous studies on filters based on micro-resonators (MR) to experiment a new couple of polymers in the objective to use MR as a sensing function. MRs have been fabricated by processing SU8 polymer as core and PMATRIFE polymer as cladding layer of the waveguide. The refractive index contrast reaches 0.16 @ 1550 nm. Sub-micronic ring waveguides gaps from 0.5 to 1 μm have been successfully achieved with UV (i-line) photolithography. This work confirms our forecasts, published earlier, about the resolution that can be achieved. First results show a good extinction coefficient of ~17 dB, a quality factor around 104 and a finesse of 12. These results are in concordance with the theoretical study and they allow us to validate our technology with this couple of polymers. Work is going on with others lower cladding materials that will be used to further increase refractive index contrast for sensing applications.

  14. Study and design of a liquid level meter based on fiber optic sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongdong; Wang, Yutian; Hou, Peiguo; Wang, Yanju

    2005-02-01

    At present, many floater-type measurement equipments whose readings are recorded by manpower are still in use in petrol-chemical industries. With regard to their low efficiency, great errors and their improbability in realization in automation management and remote control, in this instance, a new liquid-level meter system using the advanced fiber-optic sensing technology based on the floater-type level meter is developed. In principle, it measures the liquid level of the oil tank by using the principle of force balance, captures and transmits the light signals by means of the fiber-optic sensing technology, adjusts the light signals from continuous impulse signals to the discontinuous by the light-code disc, then converts light impulses into voltage impulses by photoelectric elements. In configuration, it adopts a twin light source and a twin optical-channel, utilizes twin fiber detectors to record the size of the liquid level and judge the direction of the liquid level respectively. Moreover, the measuring system has been tested practically in a chemical plant, the results indicate that the measuring errors are Less than or equal to +/-6mm, relative errors are <2% when its measuring range is within 0 and 1000mm.It is proved that the various indexes of the system satisfies the demand of the industries and the capability is credible.

  15. Integrated Urban Water Quality Management: Wireless Technologies and Embedded Networked Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondzo, M.; Arnold, W.; Novak, P.; Hozalski, R.; Jindal, N.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this presentation is to outline initial steps towards developing deployable field-based wireless networks for sensing various contaminants in urban environments. A small observational network to measure parameters including water temperature, precipitation, pressure, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), nitrate, total suspended sediments, and particle residence time will be elaborated. The proposed fast response sensors will be combined into an adaptive networked sensing system for use in urban environments. The data will provide a new tool to study the structure and dynamics of physical, chemical, and microbiological processes over a range of scales in the field. The characterization of both nonlinear drivers (e.g., energy dissipation rate, PAR, temperature) and responses (total suspended solids, and therefore concentration of hydrophobic contaminants) across a range of scales in an urban and sub-urban environment is an urgent research priority in order to facilitate better decision-making with respect to best management practices, land use, and water and wastewater treatment.

  16. Remote sensing technologies applied to the irrigation water management on a golf course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedras, Celestina; Lança, Rui; Martins, Fernando; Soares, Cristina; Guerrero, Carlos; Paixão, Helena

    2015-04-01

    An adequate irrigation water management in a golf course is a complex task that depends upon climate (multiple microclimates) and land cover (where crops differ in morphology, physiology, plant density, sensitivity to water stress, etc.). These factors change both in time and space on a landscape. A direct measurement provides localized values of the evapotranspiration and climate conditions. Therefore this is not a practical or economical methodology for large-scale use due to spatial and temporal variability of vegetation, soils, and irrigation management strategies. Remote sensing technology combines large scale with ground measurement of vegetation indexes. These indexes are mathematical combinations of different spectral bands mostly in the visible and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. They represent the measures of vegetation activity that vary not only with the seasonal variability of green foliage, but also across space, thus they are suitable for detecting spatial landscape variability. The spectral vegetation indexes may enhance irrigation management through the information contained in spectral reflectance data. This study was carried out on the 18th fairway of the Royal Golf Course, Vale do Lobo, Portugal, and it aims to establish the relationship between direct measurements and vegetation indexes. For that it is required (1) to characterize the soil and climatic conditions, (2) to assessment of the irrigation system, (3) to estimate the evapotranspiration (4) and to calculate the vegetation indices. The vegetation indices were determined with basis on spectral bands red, green and blue, RGB, and near Infrared, NIR, obtained from the analysis of images acquired from a unpiloted aerial vehicle, UAV, platform. The measurements of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) were obtained from two meteorological stations located in the study area. The landscape evapotranspiration, ETL, was determined in the fairway with multiple microclimates

  17. The Object of Activity: Making Sense of the Sense-Maker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaptelinin, Victor

    2005-01-01

    The concept of "the object of activity" plays a key role in research based on activity theory. However, the usefulness of this concept is somewhat undermined by the fact that a number of problems related to its meaning and its contexts of use remain unsolved. This article is an attempt to address some of these problems. The article focuses on 3…

  18. A New Way of Sensing: Need-Based Activation of Antibiotic Resistance by a Flux-Sensing Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Georg; Dintner, Sebastian; Treichel, Nicole Simone; Radeck, Jara; Gerland, Ulrich; Gebhard, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sensing of and responding to environmental changes are of vital importance for microbial cells. Consequently, bacteria have evolved a plethora of signaling systems that usually sense biochemical cues either via direct ligand binding acting as “concentration sensors” or by responding to downstream effects on bacterial physiology, such as structural damage to the cell. Here, we describe a novel, alternative signaling mechanism that effectively implements a “flux sensor” to regulate antibiotic resistance. It relies on a sensory complex consisting of a histidine kinase and an ABC transporter, in which the transporter fulfills the dual role of both the sensor of the antibiotic and the mediator of resistance against it. Combining systems biological modeling with in vivo experimentation, we show that these systems in fact respond to changes in activity of individual resistance transporters rather than to changes in the antibiotic concentration. Our model shows that the cell thereby adjusts the rate of de novo transporter synthesis to precisely the level needed for protection. Such a flux-sensing mechanism may serve as a cost-efficient produce-to-demand strategy, controlling a widely conserved class of antibiotic resistance systems. PMID:26199330

  19. A tactile vision substitution system for the study of active sensing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Brian; Hsieh, Cheng-Han; Yu, Sung-Nien; Ahissar, Ehud; Arieli, Amos; Zilbershtain-Kra, Yael

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a tactile vision substitution system (TVSS) for the study of active sensing. Two algorithms, namely image processing and trajectory tracking, were developed to enhance the capability of conventional TVSS. Image processing techniques were applied to reduce the artifacts and extract important features from the active camera and effectively converted the information into tactile stimuli with much lower resolution. A fixed camera was used to record the movement of the active camera. A trajectory tracking algorithm was developed to analyze the active sensing strategy of the TVSS users to explore the environment. The image processing subsystem showed advantageous improvement in extracting object's features for superior recognition. The trajectory tracking subsystem, on the other hand, enabled accurately locating the portion of the scene pointed by the active camera and providing profound information for the study of active sensing strategy applied by TVSS users.

  20. Convoy Active Safety Technologies Warfighter Experiment I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenherr, Edward; Theisen, Bernard L.; Animashaun, Asisat; Davis, James, Jr.; Day, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. Warfigher Experiment I, held at A.P. Hill, VA in the fall of 2007, tested the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail the Warfigher Experiment's methodology, analysis, results and conclusions.

  1. Guidance manual for conducting technology demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, Robert L.; Morris, Michael I.; Singh, Suman P.N.

    1991-12-01

    This demonstration guidance manual has been prepared to assist Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), staff in conducting demonstrations. It is prepared in checklist style to facilitate its use and assumes that Energy Systems personnel have project management responsibility. In addition to a detailed step-by-step listing of procedural considerations, a general checklist, logic flow diagram, and several examples of necessary plans are included to assist the user in developing an understanding of the many complex activities required to manage technology demonstrations. Demonstrations are pilot-scale applications of often innovative technologies to determine the commercial viability of the technologies to perform their designed function. Demonstrations are generally conducted on well-defined problems for which existing technologies or processes are less than satisfactory in terms of effectiveness, cost, and/or regulatory compliance. Critically important issues in demonstration management include, but are not limited to, such factors as communications with line and matrix management and with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Systems staff responsible for management oversight, budgetary and schedule requirements, regulatory compliance, and safety.

  2. Young Scientists Explore the Five Senses. Book 4--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of the five senses. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each…

  3. Implementation of Active Teaching Methods and Emerging Topics in Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmatin Fras, M.; Grigillo, D.

    2016-06-01

    Fast technological developments in photogrammetry and remote sensing areas demand quick and steady changes in the education programme and its realization. The university teachers and assistants are faced with ensuring the learning materials, data and software for practical lessons, as well as project proposals for student's team work and bachelor or master thesis. In this paper the emerging topics that already have a considerable impact in the practice are treated mostly from the educational aspect. These relatively new topics that are considered in this paper are unmanned aerial systems for spatial data collection, terrestrial and aerial laser scanning, mobile mapping systems, and novelties in satellite remote sensing. The focus is given to practical implementation of these topics into the teaching and learning programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation at the University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, and experiences gained by the authors so far. Together with the technological advances, the teaching approaches must be modernized as well. Classical approaches of teaching, where a lecturer gives lecture ex cathedra and students are only listeners, are not effective enough. The didactics science of teaching has developed and proved in the practice many useful approaches that can better motivate students for more active learning. We can use different methods of team work like pro et contra debate, buzzing groups, press conference, moderated discussion etc. An experimental study on active teaching methods in the class of students of the Master programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation has been made and the results are presented. After using some new teaching methods in the class, the students were asked to answer two types of a questionnaire. First questionnaire was the standard form developed by Noel Entwistle, an educational psychologist who developed the Approaches to Studying Inventory (ASI) for identifying deep and surface approaches to

  4. Repository Technology Program activities, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, J.L. Jr.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Thorpe, R.K.; Knapp, R.B.

    1989-07-01

    Our technical activities in FY 1988 included instrument selection and evaluation, calculational work, and simulator development. Near the end of the fiscal year, we began preparing several topical reports to document our results. This fiscal year, we continued developing three-dimensional numerical simulators to model coupled hydrologic-and mechanical-rock mass responses and, thus, to provide representative numerical tools for understanding and calculating these in situ processes. We also began scoping calculations in the second half of FY 1988 to evaluate ERE design criteria, but this work was redirected late in the year when the DOE/AECL Subsidiary Agreement was set aside. Our work in developing and evaluating experimental techniques focused on total pressure measurements, moisture content measurement, and tracer detection instrumentation for sealing experiments and for rock-mass-response field tests. At the end of the fiscal year, we completed a review of measurement technology for instrumenting migration/sorption tests to help define the technological requirements in these areas. By the end of FY 1988, we had completed a review of the existing codes for simulating reactive transport; we are using the results of this review to help formulate plans for future activities in this area. The following sections describe the major RTP tasks and activities at LLNL in more detail, and they include our FY 1988 accomplishments in these areas. 8 refs., 22 figs.

  5. Quorum sensing activity of Hafnia alvei isolated from packed food.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jia-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism adopted by bacteria to regulate expression of genes according to population density. N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are a type of QS signalling molecules commonly found in Gram-negative bacteria which have been reported to play a role in microbial spoilage of foods and pathogenesis. In this study, we isolated an AHL-producing Hafnia alvei strain (FB1) from spherical fish pastes. Analysis via high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) on extracts from the spent supernatant of H. alvei FB1 revealed the existence of two short chain AHLs: N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxo- octanoyl) homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8-HSL). To our knowledge, this is the first report of the production of AHLs, especially 3-oxo-C8-HSL, by H. alvei.

  6. Quorum Sensing Activity of Hafnia alvei Isolated from Packed Food

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jia-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism adopted by bacteria to regulate expression of genes according to population density. N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are a type of QS signalling molecules commonly found in Gram-negative bacteria which have been reported to play a role in microbial spoilage of foods and pathogenesis. In this study, we isolated an AHL-producing Hafnia alvei strain (FB1) from spherical fish pastes. Analysis via high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) on extracts from the spent supernatant of H. alvei FB1 revealed the existence of two short chain AHLs: N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxo- octanoyl) homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8-HSL). To our knowledge, this is the first report of the production of AHLs, especially 3-oxo-C8-HSL, by H. alvei. PMID:24736131

  7. Quorum sensing activity of Hafnia alvei isolated from packed food.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jia-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism adopted by bacteria to regulate expression of genes according to population density. N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are a type of QS signalling molecules commonly found in Gram-negative bacteria which have been reported to play a role in microbial spoilage of foods and pathogenesis. In this study, we isolated an AHL-producing Hafnia alvei strain (FB1) from spherical fish pastes. Analysis via high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) on extracts from the spent supernatant of H. alvei FB1 revealed the existence of two short chain AHLs: N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxo- octanoyl) homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8-HSL). To our knowledge, this is the first report of the production of AHLs, especially 3-oxo-C8-HSL, by H. alvei. PMID:24736131

  8. Beyond Monitoring: A Brief Review of the Use of Remote Sensing Technology for Assessing Dryland Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington-Allen, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Drylands cover 41% of the terrestrial surface and provide > $1 trillion in ecosystem services to one-third of the global population, yet are not well studied with estimates of degradation ranging from 10 - 80%. Here I will present an abbreviated history of the use of remote sensing (RS) to monitor Dryland degradation, review contemporary applications, and provide guidance for future directions. These early monitoring attempts (and some recent efforts) assumed the social model of "Tragedy of the Commons" and the ecological model of "the Balance of Nature". These assumptions justified a monitoring approach rather than an assessment, where land degradation was understood to be primarily a function of human action through livestock grazing management. The perceived linear impact of grazing on grassland biomass led to the early development of a remote sensing-based proxy of vegetation response: the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Many RS studies of Drylands are biased towards the NDVI or variants, whereas the contemporary view of Drylands as complex systems has led to a new synthesis of approaches from ecological modeling, ecohydrology, landscape ecology, and remote sensing that now explicitly confront both multiple drivers that include land-use policy, droughts & floods, fire, and responses that include increased soil erosion and changes in soil quality, landscape composition, pattern, and structure. However, problems still abound including 1) a consensus on the definition of Drylands, 2) the need for time series of drivers to conduct assessments, 3) a lack of understanding of below-ground biomass dynamics, 4) improved mapping of grassland, shrubland, and savanna dryland cover types and their 3D structure. There are new technologies in Dryland RS including multi-frequency ground penetrating radar (GPR), RADAR, IFSAR, LIDAR, and MISR that may lead to the development of new indicators to address these issues.

  9. Using Remote Sensing Technology as a Tool for Educational Outreach and for Studying Global Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benko, T. M.; Czajkowski, K. P.; Struble, J.; Zhao, L.

    2001-12-01

    Geographic and scientific educations of primary and secondary school children have become topics of concern in Ohio and in the United States. One step towards improving a student's education is to render continuous, outstanding opportunities for teachers to become more knowledgeable by utilizing current technologies. The University of Toledo hosted a one-week, NASA and OhioView sponsored workshop entitled, Observing Earth's Systems from Space, for teachers from grades 5-12 during July 2000 and July 2001. Forty-nine teachers from Ohio, Michigan, and Pennsylvania with Earth Science, Social Studies, and Physics backgrounds attended. Each participant acquired new ideas, plenty of educational materials, and posters of satellite imagery to be used as aids in teaching remote sensing. The teachers received training on weather observing techniques, Global Warming issues, and basic remote sensing knowledge and analytical skills through: 1) presentations given by research scientists and community professionals, 2) integration of the learned material into practical, hands-on lesson plans, and 3) participation in a learning adventure, where their students collected real-time cloud and snow data at their respective schools while university research scientists gathered corresponding satellite imagery. A web-page was developed to continuously and globally share the data and results: www.utoledogis.org. The students entered their data on the web which eventually was sent to the research scientists. The data collected from the students have successfully assisted in the delineation of clouds and snow in satellite imagery and in the validation of cloud/snow remote sensing algorithms. The raw data and the corresponding satellite images are displayed on the web-page with the delineation of clouds and snow depicted. The participation in an actual, long-term research project has added another worthwhile dimension to the learning process for both the teachers and their students.

  10. The apparent quorum-sensing inhibitory activity of pyrogallol is a side effect of peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Defoirdt, Tom; Pande, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro; Baruah, Kartik; Bossier, Peter

    2013-06-01

    There currently is more and more interest in the use of natural products, such as tea polyphenols, as therapeutic agents. The polyphenol compound pyrogallol has been reported before to inhibit quorum-sensing-regulated bioluminescence in Vibrio harveyi. Here, we report that the addition of 10 mg · liter(-1) pyrogallol protects both brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) and giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) larvae from pathogenic Vibrio harveyi, whereas the compound showed relatively low toxicity (therapeutic index of 10). We further demonstrate that the apparent quorum-sensing-disrupting activity is a side effect of the peroxide-producing activity of this compound rather than true quorum-sensing inhibition. Our results emphasize that verification of minor toxic effects by using sensitive methods and the use of appropriate controls are essential when characterizing compounds as being able to disrupt quorum sensing. PMID:23545532

  11. Monitoring of the mercury mining site Almadén implementing remote sensing technologies.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Thomas; Rico, Celia; Rodríguez-Rastrero, Manuel; José Sierra, María; Javier Díaz-Puente, Fco; Pelayo, Marta; Millán, Rocio

    2013-08-01

    The Almadén area in Spain has a long history of mercury mining with prolonged human-induced activities that are related to mineral extraction and metallurgical processes before the closure of the mines and a more recent post period dominated by projects that reclaim the mine dumps and tailings and recuperating the entire mining area. Furthermore, socio-economic alternatives such as crop cultivation, livestock breeding and tourism are increasing in the area. Up till now, only scattered information on these activities is available from specific studies. However, improved acquisition systems using satellite borne data in the last decades opens up new possibilities to periodically study an area of interest. Therefore, comparing the influence of these activities on the environment and monitoring their impact on the ecosystem vastly improves decision making for the public policy makers to implement appropriate land management measures and control environmental degradation. The objective of this work is to monitor environmental changes affected by human-induced activities within the Almadén area occurring before, during and after the mine closure over a period of nearly three decades. To achieve this, data from numerous sources at different spatial scales and time periods are implemented into a methodology based on advanced remote sensing techniques. This includes field spectroradiometry measurements, laboratory analyses and satellite borne data of different surface covers to detect land cover and use changes throughout the mining area. Finally, monitoring results show that the distribution of areas affected by mercury mining is rapidly diminishing since activities ceased and that rehabilitated mining areas form a new landscape. This refers to mine tailings that have been sealed and revegetated as well as an open pit mine that has been converted to an "artificial" lake surface. Implementing a methodology based on remote sensing techniques that integrate data from

  12. Assessment of fiber optic sensors and other advanced sensing technologies for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1996-03-01

    As a result of problems such as calibration drift in nuclear plant pressure sensors and the recent oil loss syndrome in some models of Rosemount pressure transmitters, the nuclear industry has become interested in fiber optic pressure sensors. Fiber optic sensing technologies have been considered for the development of advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) systems for the next generation of reactors and in older plants which are retrofitted with new I&C systems. This paper presents the results of a six-month Phase I study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. This initial Phase I study has recently been granted a two-year extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The next phase will evaluate fiber optic pressure sensors in specific nuclear plant applications in addition to other advanced methods for monitoring critical nuclear plant equipment.

  13. The application of the unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing technology in the FAST project construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Boqin

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) remote sensing application in Five-hundred-meter aperture spherical telescope (FAST) project is to dynamically record the construction process with high resolution image, monitor the environmental impact, and provide services for local environmental protection and the reserve immigrants. This paper introduces the use of UAV remote sensing system and the course design and implementation for the FAST site. Through the analysis of the time series data, we found that: (1) since the year 2012, the project has been widely carried out; (2) till 2013, the internal project begun to take shape;(3) engineering excavation scope was kept stable in 2014, and the initial scale of the FAST engineering construction has emerged as in the meantime, the vegetation recovery went well on the bare soil area; (4) in 2015, none environmental problems caused by engineering construction and other engineering geological disaster were found in the work area through the image interpretation of UAV images. This paper also suggested that the UAV technology need some improvements to fulfill the requirements of surveying and mapping specification., including a new data acquisition and processing measures assigned with the background of highly diverse elevation, usage of telephoto camera, hierarchical photography with different flying height, and adjustment with terrain using the joint empty three settlement method.

  14. [Application of hyper-spectral remote sensing technology in environmental protection].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Qiao; Yao, Yun-Jun; Wang, Zhong-Ting; You, Dai-An

    2013-12-01

    Hyper-spectral remote sensing (RS) technology has been widely used in environmental protection. The present work introduces its recent application in the RS monitoring of pollution gas, green-house gas, algal bloom, water quality of catch water environment, safety of drinking water sources, biodiversity, vegetation classification, soil pollution, and so on. Finally, issues such as scarce hyper-spectral satellites, the limits of data processing and information extract are related. Some proposals are also presented, including developing subsequent satellites of HJ-1 satellite with differential optical absorption spectroscopy, greenhouse gas spectroscopy and hyper-spectral imager, strengthening the study of hyper-spectral data processing and information extraction, and promoting the construction of environmental application system.

  15. Development of Si(1-x)Ge(x) technology for microwave sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, Rafael A.; Taub, Susan R.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Young, Paul E.; Simons, Rainee N.; Rosenfeld, David

    1993-01-01

    The progress for the first year of the work done under the Director's Discretionary Fund (DDF) research project entitled, 'Development of Si(1-x)Ge(x) Technology for Microwave Sensing Applications.' This project includes basic material characterization studies of silicon-germanium (SiGe), device processing on both silicon (Si) and SiGe substrates, and microwave characterization of transmission lines on silicon substrates. The material characterization studies consisted of ellipsometric and magneto-transport measurements and theoretical calculations of the SiGe band-structure. The device fabrication efforts consisted of establishing SiGe device processing capabilities in the Lewis cleanroom. The characterization of microwave transmission lines included studying the losses of various coplanar transmission lines and the development of transitions on silicon. Each part of the project is discussed individually and the findings for each part are presented. Future directions are also discussed.

  16. Magnetic Field Sensors Based on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) Technology: Applications in Electrical Current Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reig, Candid; Cubells-Beltran, María-Dolores; Muñoz, Diego Ramírez

    2009-01-01

    The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics can be understood as a global recognition to the rapid development of the Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR), from both the physics and engineering points of view. Behind the utilization of GMR structures as read heads for massive storage magnetic hard disks, important applications as solid state magnetic sensors have emerged. Low cost, compatibility with standard CMOS technologies and high sensitivity are common advantages of these sensors. This way, they have been successfully applied in a lot different environments. In this work, we are trying to collect the Spanish contributions to the progress of the research related to the GMR based sensors covering, among other subjects, the applications, the sensor design, the modelling and the electronic interfaces, focusing on electrical current sensing applications. PMID:22408486

  17. Next force sensing technology for robots: multi-axis resonant sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano-Cano, Davinson; Grossard, Mathieu; Hubert, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a novel resonant multi-axis force sensor with applications in robotics. A resonant force sensor is characterized by the use of a frequency output signal to estimate the applied forces, instead of using its amplitude as it is often the case for the other existing technologies used in robotics. The advantages of resonant force sensing for robotics are discussed, especially for the safety requirements in the collaborative field. We extend our analysis to show the main similarities and differences between more classical sensors (based on strain gages for instance) and resonant ones, with a focus on their design. More specifically, we detail the way the design of the sensitive element, which essentially transduces the applied forces into frequencies, plays a major role on its performances.

  18. Application of fiber optic temperature and strain sensing technology to gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Shannon M; Madden, Megan Elwood; Rawn, Claudia J; Szymcek, Phillip; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrates may have a significant influence on global carbon cycles due to their large carbon storage capacity in the form of greenhouse gases and their sensitivity to small perturbations in local conditions. Characterizing existing gas hydrate and the formation of new hydrate within sediment systems and their response to small changes in temperature and pressure is imperative to understanding how this dynamic system functions. Fiber optic sensing technology offers a way to measure precisely temperature and strain in harsh environments such as the seafloor. Recent large-scale experiments using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Seafloor Process Simulator were designed to evaluate the potential of fiber optic sensors to study the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in 4-D within natural sediments. Results indicate that the fiber optic sensors are so sensitive to experimental perturbations (e.g. refrigeration cycles) that small changes due to hydrate formation or dissociation can be overshadowed.

  19. Bridge Displacement Monitoring Method Based on Laser Projection-Sensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Liu, Hao; Yu, Yan; Xu, Xiaodong; Hu, Weitong; Li, Mingchu; Ou, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Bridge displacement is the most basic evaluation index of the health status of a bridge structure. The existing measurement methods for bridge displacement basically fail to realize long-term and real-time dynamic monitoring of bridge structures, because of the low degree of automation and the insufficient precision, causing bottlenecks and restriction. To solve this problem, we proposed a bridge displacement monitoring system based on laser projection-sensing technology. First, the laser spot recognition method was studied. Second, the software for the displacement monitoring system was developed. Finally, a series of experiments using this system were conducted, and the results show that such a system has high measurement accuracy and speed. We aim to develop a low-cost, high-accuracy and long-term monitoring method for bridge displacement based on these preliminary efforts. PMID:25871716

  20. Research on distributed strain separation technology of fiber Brillouin sensing system combining an electric power optical fiber cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yuqing; Chen, Xi; Li, Jihui; Tong, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin-based optical fiber sensing system has been taken more and more attentions in power transmission line in recent years. However, there exists a temperature cross sensitivity problem in sensing system. Hence, researching on strain separation technology of fiber brillouin sensing system is an urgent requirement in its practical area. In this paper, a real-time online distributed strain separation calculation technology of fiber Brillouin sensing combining an electric power optical fiber cable is proposed. The technology is mainly composed of the Brillouin temperature-strain distributed measurement system and the Raman temperature distributed measurement system. In this technology, the electric power optical fiber cable is a special optical phase conductor (OPPC); the Brillouin sensing system uses the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) method. The optical unit of the OPPC includes single-mode and multimode fibers which can be used as sensing channel for Brillouin sensing system and Raman sensing system respectively. In the system networking aspect, the data processor of fiber Brillouin sensing system works as the host processor and the data processor of fiber Raman sensing system works as the auxiliary processor. And the auxiliary processor transfers the data to the host processor via the Ethernet interface. In the experiment, the BOTDA monitoring system and the Raman monitoring system work on the same optical unit of the OPPC simultaneously; In the data processing aspect, the auxiliary processor of Raman transfers the temperature data to the host processor of Brillouin via the Ethernet interface, and then the host processor of Brillouin uses the temperature data combining itself strain-temperature data to achieve the high sampling rate and high-precision strain separation via data decoupling calculation. The data decoupling calculation is achieved through the interpolation, filtering, feature point alignment, and the singular point prediction

  1. Integration of environmental simulation models with satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies: case studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steyaert, Louis T.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Reed, Bradley C.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental modelers are testing and evaluating a prototype land cover characteristics database for the conterminous United States developed by the EROS Data Center of the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Nebraska Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. This database was developed from multi temporal, 1-kilometer advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data for 1990 and various ancillary data sets such as elevation, ecological regions, and selected climatic normals. Several case studies using this database were analyzed to illustrate the integration of satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies with land-atmosphere interactions models at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. The case studies are representative of contemporary environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management, and environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management and environmental risk assessment. The case studies feature land surface parameterizations for atmospheric mesoscale and global climate models; biogenic-hydrocarbons emissions models; distributed parameter watershed and other hydrological models; and various ecological models such as ecosystem, dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, ecotone variability, and equilibrium vegetation models. The case studies demonstrate the important of multi temporal AVHRR data to develop to develop and maintain a flexible, near-realtime land cover characteristics database. Moreover, such a flexible database is needed to derive various vegetation classification schemes, to aggregate data for nested models, to develop remote sensing algorithms, and to provide data on dynamic landscape characteristics. The case studies illustrate how such a database supports research on spatial heterogeneity, land use, sensitivity analysis, and scaling issues

  2. Sharing Technology-Based Activity Ideas with Others.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how to share technology-based lessons with other teachers. Includes an outline for documenting activity suggestions and offers recommendations for preparing print resources for colleagues. Includes essential elements of a published technology-based activity. (JOW)

  3. Sensing network for electromagnetic fields generated by seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Bambakidis, Gust; Ternovskiy, Igor V.

    2014-06-01

    The sensors network is becoming prolific and play now increasingly more important role in acquiring and processing information. Cyber-Physical Systems are focusing on investigation of integrated systems that includes sensing, networking, and computations. The physics of the seismic measurement and electromagnetic field measurement requires special consideration how to design electromagnetic field measurement networks for both research and detection earthquakes and explosions along with the seismic measurement networks. In addition, the electromagnetic sensor network itself could be designed and deployed, as a research tool with great deal of flexibility, the placement of the measuring nodes must be design based on systematic analysis of the seismic-electromagnetic interaction. In this article, we review the observations of the co-seismic electromagnetic field generated by earthquakes and man-made sources such as vibrations and explosions. The theoretical investigation allows the distribution of sensor nodes to be optimized and could be used to support existing geological networks. The placement of sensor nodes have to be determined based on physics of electromagnetic field distribution above the ground level. The results of theoretical investigations of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena are considered in Section I. First, we compare the relative contribution of various types of mechano-electromagnetic mechanisms and then analyze in detail the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by piezomagnetic and electrokinetic effects.

  4. Characteristics of active spectral sensor for plant sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination conditions critically affect sensor response. Active spectral sensors minimize the illumination effects by producing their ...

  5. Sensing land pollution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, L. W.

    1971-01-01

    Land pollution is described in numerous ways by various societies. Pollutants of land are material by-products of human activity and range from environmentally ineffective to positively toxic. The pollution of land by man is centuries old and correlates directly with economy, technology and population. In order to remotely sense land pollution, standards or thresholds must be established. Examples of the potential for sensing land pollution and quality are presented. The technological capabilities for remotely sensed land quality is far advanced over the judgment on how to use the sensed data. Until authoritative and directive decisions on land pollution policy are made, sensing of pollutants will be a random, local and academic affair.

  6. Head-mounted active noise control system with virtual sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Nobuhiro; Kajikawa, Yoshinobu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we apply a virtual sensing technique to a head-mounted active noise control (ANC) system we have already proposed. The proposed ANC system can reduce narrowband noise while improving the noise reduction ability at the desired locations. A head-mounted ANC system based on an adaptive feedback structure can reduce noise with periodicity or narrowband components. However, since quiet zones are formed only at the locations of error microphones, an adequate noise reduction cannot be achieved at the locations where error microphones cannot be placed such as near the eardrums. A solution to this problem is to apply a virtual sensing technique. A virtual sensing ANC system can achieve higher noise reduction at the desired locations by measuring the system models from physical sensors to virtual sensors, which will be used in the online operation of the virtual sensing ANC algorithm. Hence, we attempt to achieve the maximum noise reduction near the eardrums by applying the virtual sensing technique to the head-mounted ANC system. However, it is impossible to place the microphone near the eardrums. Therefore, the system models from physical sensors to virtual sensors are estimated using the Head And Torso Simulator (HATS) instead of human ears. Some simulation, experimental, and subjective assessment results demonstrate that the head-mounted ANC system with virtual sensing is superior to that without virtual sensing in terms of the noise reduction ability at the desired locations.

  7. Active microwave sensing of the atmosphere, chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The use of active microwave systems to study atmospheric phenomena is studied. Atmospheric pollution, weather prediction, climate and weather modification, weather danger and disaster warning, and atmospheric processes and interactions are covered.

  8. Using GIS technology to integrate remote sensing and field work data with templates

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, G. ); Ellis, J.M.; Davis, H.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Field work for major projects is becoming more dependent upon contractors who have a variety of training, experience and methodology Contractor gaps in data collected, inconsistent methodology and terminology and out-of-context observations are minimized by using digital templates and remote sensing support. The digital templates utilize off-the-shelf PC software and portable hardware. Some field data can be customized to easily correlate with well logs utilizing computer-aided drafting (CAD) technology. Processed satellite images are georeferenced to a specific map projection, utilizing ground control points determined with Global Positioning System (GPS). Geographical Information System (GIS) technology is being evaluated as an integration tool to make complex tables of field data, CAD base maps, interpretation maps, and images more useful to Earth Scientists. The GIS enables users to: (1) examine their field data, maps, and images in a PC-based environment. (2) better understand spatial relationships between field observations, images and geologic maps. (3) interactively query field data while viewing associated images and maps. (4) ultimately improve database usage, database quality, and geological interpretations. The geologic interpretation of georeferenced images and field work in the Rio Blanco license of Colombia resulted in (1) an improved geologic map with better definition of source-reservoir rock from the hangingwall to the footwall of the main thrust and (2) better surface controlled balanced crossed-sections that led to play definition and to improve seismic planning/field parameters design for refining seismic acquisition.

  9. Using GIS technology to integrate remote sensing and field work data with templates

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, G.; Ellis, J.M.; Davis, H.H.

    1996-12-31

    Field work for major projects is becoming more dependent upon contractors who have a variety of training, experience and methodology Contractor gaps in data collected, inconsistent methodology and terminology and out-of-context observations are minimized by using digital templates and remote sensing support. The digital templates utilize off-the-shelf PC software and portable hardware. Some field data can be customized to easily correlate with well logs utilizing computer-aided drafting (CAD) technology. Processed satellite images are georeferenced to a specific map projection, utilizing ground control points determined with Global Positioning System (GPS). Geographical Information System (GIS) technology is being evaluated as an integration tool to make complex tables of field data, CAD base maps, interpretation maps, and images more useful to Earth Scientists. The GIS enables users to: (1) examine their field data, maps, and images in a PC-based environment. (2) better understand spatial relationships between field observations, images and geologic maps. (3) interactively query field data while viewing associated images and maps. (4) ultimately improve database usage, database quality, and geological interpretations. The geologic interpretation of georeferenced images and field work in the Rio Blanco license of Colombia resulted in (1) an improved geologic map with better definition of source-reservoir rock from the hangingwall to the footwall of the main thrust and (2) better surface controlled balanced crossed-sections that led to play definition and to improve seismic planning/field parameters design for refining seismic acquisition.

  10. Locating railroad track bed subsurface defects utilizing nondestructive remote sensing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, R.J.; Forister, L.M.; Weil, G.J.

    1994-12-31

    The railroad is a vital transportation link with tracks traversing thousands of miles throughout the United States. When this link fails, the resultant damage costs millions of dollars. Track failure, attributed to moisture trails and erosion voids in the rock ballast and subsoils that support the tracks, slowly deteriorate the railbed to a critical point in which iron rail shifts occur. All railroad lines experience failures on a regular basis, but the recent Flood of `93, that inundated thousands of square miles of land and hundreds of miles of railroad tracks in the midwestern United States, brought a new impetus to quickly locate and repair these hidden subsurface defect areas. This paper illustrates a new technology combination of nondestructive, remote sensing Computer Enhanced Infrared Thermography and Ground Penetrating Radar that was used to detect buried moisture trails and erosion voids of railroad track beds. This technology combination is described in theory and by discussion of a case study based upon a successful project, conducted immediately following the flood, for Burlington Northern Railroad.

  11. Recent development of terahertz wave sensing and imaging science, technology, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.-C.

    2006-03-01

    Recent advances in THz science and technology make it one of the most promising research areas in the 21st century for sensing and imaging, as well as in other interdisciplinary fields. We believe new T-ray capabilities will impact a range of interdisciplinary fields and industrial companies, including: communications, imaging, medical diagnosis, health monitoring, environmental control, and chemical and biological identification. While microwave and X-ray imaging modalities produce density pictures, T-ray imaging provides spectroscopic information within the THz frequency range. The unique rotational and vibrational responses of materials within the THz range provide information that is generally absent in optical, X-ray and NMR images. A THz wave can easily penetrate and inspect the insides of most dielectric materials, which are opaque to visible light and low contrast to X-rays, making T-rays a useful complementary imaging source in this context. Recent developments of THz wave technologies allow us to coherently control a THz wave (phase, amplitude, and directionality). I present its impacts the physics understanding and industrial applications. Examples of imaging a long distance target (>100 meters), large scale industrial samples (>m2), or a small scale semiconductor device (a few nanometer) will be presented.

  12. Modular, Reconfigurable, and Rapid Response Space Systems: The Remote Sensing Advanced Technology Microsatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Andary, Jim; Oberright, John; So, Maria; Wegner, Peter; Hauser, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Modular, Reconfigurable, and Rapid-response (MR(sup 2)) space systems represent a paradigm shift in the way space assets of all sizes are designed, manufactured, integrated, tested, and flown. This paper will describe the MR(sup 2) paradigm in detail, and will include guidelines for its implementation. The Remote Sensing Advanced Technology microsatellite (RSAT) is a proposed flight system test-bed used for developing and implementing principles and best practices for MR(sup 2) spacecraft, and their supporting infrastructure. The initial goal of this test-bed application is to produce a lightweight (approx. 100 kg), production-minded, cost-effective, and scalable remote sensing micro-satellite capable of high performance and broad applicability. Such applications range from future distributed space systems, to sensor-webs, and rapid-response satellite systems. Architectures will be explored that strike a balance between modularity and integration while preserving the MR(sup 2) paradigm. Modularity versus integration has always been a point of contention when approaching a design: whereas one-of-a-kind missions may require close integration resulting in performance optimization, multiple and flexible application spacecraft benefit &om modularity, resulting in maximum flexibility. The process of building spacecraft rapidly (< 7 days), requires a concerted and methodical look at system integration and test processes and pitfalls. Although the concept of modularity is not new and was first developed in the 1970s by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (Multi-Mission Modular Spacecraft), it was never modernized and was eventually abandoned. Such concepts as the Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) became the preferred method for acquiring satellites. Notwithstanding, over the past 30 years technology has advanced considerably, and the time is ripe to reconsider modularity in its own right, as enabler of R(sup 2), and as a key element of transformational systems. The

  13. Zinc activates damage-sensing TRPA1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongzhen; Bandell, Michael; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhu, Michael X.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential biological trace element. It is required for the structure or function of over 300 proteins, and is increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. However, high concentrations of zinc have cytotoxic effects, and overexposure to zinc can cause pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that zinc excites nociceptive somatosensory neurons and causes nociception in mice through TRPA1, a cation channel previously shown to mediate the pungency of wasabi and cinnamon through cysteine-modification. Zinc activates TRPA1 through a novel mechanism that requires zinc influx through TRPA1 channels and subsequent activation via specific intracellular cysteine and histidine residues. TRPA1 is highly sensitive to intracellular zinc, as low nanomolar concentrations activate TRPA1 and modulate its sensitivity. These findings identify TRPA1 as a major target for the sensory effects of zinc, and support an emerging role for zinc as a signaling molecule that can modulate sensory transmission. PMID:19202543

  14. Passive and active imaging at 94 GHz for environmental remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, David G.; Robertson, Duncan A.; Cassidy, Scott L.; Odbert, Henry M.; James, Mike R.; Pinkerton, Harry; Wadge, Geoff

    2013-05-01

    We report on the use of the All-weather Volcano Topography Imaging Sensor (AVTIS) 94 GHz dual mode radar/radiometric imager for environmental monitoring. The FMCW radar yields 3D maps of the terrain whilst the passive radiometer records brightness temperature maps of the scene. AVTIS is a low power portable instrument and has been used operationally to survey terrain at ranges up to 6 km. AVTIS was originally developed for the ground-based measurement of active volcanoes and has been used successfully to measure the Arenal Volcano in Costa Rica and the Soufrière Hills Volcano on Montserrat. However, additional environmental remote sensing applications are emerging for this technology and we will present details of how the instrument is used to perform terrain mapping and thermal surveys of outdoor scenes. The extraction of digital elevation maps is the primary function of the AVTIS radar mode. We review this process covering range drift compensation, radar cross section (RCS) histogram analysis and thresholding, and georeferencing to GPS. Additionally, we will present how careful calibration enables RCS imaging of terrain and the extraction of the intrinsic reflectivity of the terrain material (normalized RCS, or sigma-nought) which can potentially be used to classify terrain types. We have validated the passive mode imagery against infrared thermal imagery and they show good agreement once the differences in spatial resolution are accounted for. This comparison also reveals differences in propagation due to obscurants (steam, gas, ash) in the two wavebands.

  15. Integration of modern remote sensing technologies for faster utility mapping and data extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, Aleksandar; Govedarica, Miro; Vrtunski, Milan; Petrovacki, Dusan

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of the application of modern remote sensing technologies in current research shows a significant increase in interest in fast and efficient detection of underground installations. The most important reasons of the said application are preventing damage during excavation works, as well as the formation of the cadastre of underground utilities suitable for operating and maintaining of such resources. Given the wide area of application in the detection of underground installations, ground penetrating radar scanning technology (GPR), in this instance, is used as prevalent method for the purpose of the acquisition radargram of pipelines and the comparison with the results of the acquisition of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle - UAV drone Aibot X6 equipped with Optris PI Lightweight Kit (which consists of a miniaturized lightweight PC and a weight-optimized PI450 Optris LW infrared camera). The aim of the research presented in the this paper is to analyze the benefits of integrating a mobile system capable of very fast, reliable and relatively inexpensive detection of heating pipelines using thermal imaging aerial inspection and GPR technology for control sampling of radargrams on specific locations of routes in order to achieve following: a simple identification of the characteristics of heating pipelines, prevention and registration of damage, as well as automated data extraction. The results of integrated application of the above-mentioned remote sensing technologies have shown that, within 10min of planned flight, it is possible to detect and georeference routes of heating pipelines in the area of 50.000m2 by application of thermal imaging inspection that assigns an adequate temperature value to each pixel in an image. The experiment showed that the registration is also possible in the case of pre-insulated and conventionally insulated heating pipes, and the difference in temperature measurements above the routes and the environment was up to 4 degrees. It should be

  16. Dynamical quorum sensing and clustering dynamics in a population of spatially distributed active rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2013-02-01

    A model of clustering dynamics is proposed for a population of spatially distributed active rotators. A transition from excitable to oscillatory dynamics is induced by the increase of the local density of active rotators. It is interpreted as dynamical quorum sensing. In the oscillation regime, phase waves propagate without decay, which generates an effectively long-range interaction in the clustering dynamics. The clustering process becomes facilitated and only one dominant cluster appears rapidly as a result of the dynamical quorum sensing. An exact localized solution is found to a simplified model equation, and the competitive dynamics between two localized states is studied numerically.

  17. End-to-end remote sensing at the Science and Technology Laboratory of John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Patrick; Rickman, Douglas; Smith, Eric

    1991-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory (STL) of Stennis Space Center (SSC) was developing an expertise in remote sensing for more than a decade. Capabilities at SSC/STL include all major areas of the field. STL includes the Sensor Development Laboratory (SDL), Image Processing Center, a Learjet 23 flight platform, and on-staff scientific investigators.

  18. EVALUATION OF A FORMER LANDFILL SITE IN FORT COLLINS, COLORADO USING GROUND-BASED OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details a measurement campaign conducted using the Radial Plume Mapping (RPM) method and optical remote sensing technologies to characterize fugitive emissions. This work was funded by EPA′s Monitoring and Measurement for the 21st Century Initiative, or 21M2. The si...

  19. Making Sense of Total VET Activity: An Initial Market Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2016

    2016-01-01

    Following the successful first national publication of total vocational education and training (VET) activity and presentation of various informative data products, NCVER has continued to undertake further analysis of the submitted data. This paper is the first in a suite of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) authored…

  20. Making Sense of Participation in Cultural Activities for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultgren, Frances; Johansson, Barbro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper investigates participatory practices in library activities for young children and their care-givers in a specific cultural context. Method: Using an ethnographic approach data were collected through participant observations of songtimes for babies and toddlers, and interviews and group interviews with staff and…

  1. On the haptic nature of the active electric sense of fish.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Angel A; Aguilera, Pedro A; Carolina Pereira, Ana; Rodríguez-Cattáneo, Alejo

    2013-11-01

    Electroreception is a sensory modality present in chondrichthyes, actinopterygii, amphibians, and mammalian monotremes. The study of this non-intuitive sensory modality has provided insights for better understanding of sensory systems in general and inspired the development of innovative artificial devices. Here we review evidence obtained from the analysis of electrosensory images, neurophysiological data from the recording of unitary activity in the electrosensory lobe, and psychophysical data from analysis of novelty responses provoked in well-defined stimulus conditions, which all confirm that active electroreception has a short range, and that the influence of exploratory movements on object identification is strong. In active electric images two components can be identified: a "global" image profile depending on the volume, shape and global impedance of an object and a "texture" component depending on its surface attributes. There is a short range of the active electric sense and the progressive "blurring" of object image with distance. Consequently, the lack of precision regarding object location, considered together, challenge the current view of this sense as serving long range electrolocation and the commonly used metaphor of "electric vision". In fact, the active electric sense shares more commonalities with human active touch than with teleceptive senses as vision or audition. Taking into account that other skin exteroceptors and proprioception may be congruently stimulated during fish exploratory movements we propose that electric, mechanoceptive and proprioceptive sensory modalities found in electric fish could be considered together as a single haptic sensory system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012.

  2. Sensing technology for pressure, flow, viscosity and moisture content monitoring in autoclave environments

    SciTech Connect

    Beadles, J.R.; Spellman, G.P.

    1992-03-01

    This report is an evaluation of sensor technology for continuously determining pressure, flow, viscosity, and moisture content of the resin in fiber composite laminates that are being cured in an autoclave. An effort has been made to identify the individuals and firms active in research and manufacture of such sensors. Monitoring technologies of interest include dielectric, fiber optic, strain gage, capacitive, ultrasonic, piezoelectric, nuclear magnetic resonance, resistance change, vibration, tracer/fluorescent particle analysis, and anemometer. The focus is on sensors that produce real-time data; techniques that rely on indirect correlations and modeling for estimates of effects are discussed only briefly.

  3. Active resonant subwavelength grating devices for high speed spectroscopic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, A. V.; Kemme, S. A.; Boye, R. R.; Peters, D. W.; Ihlefeld, J. F.; Briggs, R. D.; Wendt, J. R.; Marshall, L. H.; Carter, T. R.; Samora, S.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we describe progress towards a multi-color spectrometer and radiometer based upon an active resonant subwavelength grating (RSG). This active RSG component acts as a tunable high-speed optical filter that allows device miniaturization and ruggedization not realizable using current sensors with conventional bulk optics. Furthermore, the geometrical characteristics of the device allow for inherently high speed operation. Because of the small critical dimensions of the RSG devices, the fabrication of these sensors can prove challenging. However, we utilize the state-of-the-art capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to realize these subwavelength grating devices. This work also leverages previous work on passive RSG devices with greater than 98% efficiency and ~1nm FWHM. Rigorous coupled wave analysis has been utilized to design RSG devices with PLZT, PMN-PT and BaTiO3 electrooptic thin films on sapphire substrates. The simulated interdigitated electrode configuration achieves field strengths around 3×107 V/m. This translates to an increase in the refractive index of 0.05 with a 40V bias potential resulting in a 90% contrast of the modulated optical signal. We have fabricated several active RSG devices on selected electro-optic materials and we discuss the latest experimental results on these devices with variable electrostatic bias and a tunable wavelength source around 1.5μm. Finally, we present the proposed data acquisition hardware and system integration plans.

  4. Active sensing associated with spatial learning reveals memory-based attention in an electric fish.

    PubMed

    Jun, James J; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Active sensing behaviors reveal what an animal is attending to and how it changes with learning. Gymnotus sp, a gymnotiform weakly electric fish, generates an electric organ discharge (EOD) as discrete pulses to actively sense its surroundings. We monitored freely behaving gymnotid fish in a large dark "maze" and extracted their trajectories and EOD pulse pattern and rate while they learned to find food with electrically detectable landmarks as cues. After training, they more rapidly found food using shorter, more stereotyped trajectories and spent more time near the food location. We observed three forms of active sensing: sustained high EOD rates per unit distance (sampling density), transient large increases in EOD rate (E-scans) and stereotyped scanning movements (B-scans) were initially strong at landmarks and food, but, after learning, intensified only at the food location. During probe (no food) trials, after learning, the fish's search area and intense active sampling was still centered on the missing food location, but now also increased near landmarks. We hypothesize that active sensing is a behavioral manifestation of attention and essential for spatial learning; the fish use spatial memory of landmarks and path integration to reach the expected food location and confine their attention to this region. PMID:26961107

  5. Developmental Cryogenic Active Telescope Testbed, a Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Claudia M.; Davila, Pamela S.; Redding, David C.; Morell, Armando; Lowman, Andrew E.; Wilson, Mark E.; Young, Eric W.; Pacini, Linda K.; Coulter, Dan R.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the technology validation strategy of the next generation space telescope (NGST), a system testbed is being developed at GSFC, in partnership with JPL and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which will include all of the component functions envisioned in an NGST active optical system. The system will include an actively controlled, segmented primary mirror, actively controlled secondary, deformable, and fast steering mirrors, wavefront sensing optics, wavefront control algorithms, a telescope simulator module, and an interferometric wavefront sensor for use in comparing final obtained wavefronts from different tests. The developmental. cryogenic active telescope testbed (DCATT) will be implemented in three phases. Phase 1 will focus on operating the testbed at ambient temperature. During Phase 2, a cryocapable segmented telescope will be developed and cooled to cryogenic temperature to investigate the impact on the ability to correct the wavefront and stabilize the image. In Phase 3, it is planned to incorporate industry developed flight-like components, such as figure controlled mirror segments, cryogenic, low hold power actuators, or different wavefront sensing and control hardware or software. A very important element of the program is the development and subsequent validation of the integrated multidisciplinary models. The Phase 1 testbed objectives, plans, configuration, and design will be discussed.

  6. NASA's Microgravity Technology Report, 1996: Summary of Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierk, Isabella

    1996-01-01

    This report covers technology development and technology transfer activities within the Microgravity Science Research Programs during FY 1996. It also describes the recent major tasks under the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program and identifies current technology requirements. This document is consistent with NASA,s Enteprise for the Human Exploration and development of Space (HEDS) Strategic Plan. This annual update reflects changes in the Microgravity Science Research Program's new technology activities and requirements. Appendix A. FY 1996 Advanced Technology Development. Program and Project Descriptions. Appendix B. Technology Development.

  7. Characterization of Deep Tunneling Activity through Remote-Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Best, P. J. Etzler, and J. D. Bloom

    1997-10-01

    This work is a case study demonstrating the uses of multispectral and multi-temporal imagery to characterize deep tunneling activity. A drainage tunnel excavation in Quincy, MA is the case locality. Data used are aerial photographs (digitized) and Daedalus 3600 MSS image data that were collected in July and October of 1994. Analysis of the data includes thermal characterization, spectral characterization, multi-temporal analysis, and volume estimation using digital DEM generation. The results demonstrate the type of information that could be generated by multispectral, multi-temporal data if the study locality were a clandestine excavation site with restricted surface access.

  8. Passive and active EO sensing of small surface vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove; Berglund, Folke; Allard, Lars; Öhgren, Johan; Larsson, Hâkan; Amselem, Elias; Gustafsson, Frank; Repasi, Endre; Lutzmann, Peter; Göhler, Benjamin; Hammer, Marcus; McEwen, Kennedy; McEwan, Ken

    2015-10-01

    The detection and classification of small surface targets at long ranges is a growing need for naval security. This paper will present an overview of a measurement campaign which took place in the Baltic Sea in November 2014. The purpose was to test active and passive EO sensors (10 different types) for the detection, tracking and identification of small sea targets. The passive sensors were covering the visual, SWIR, MWIR and LWIR regions. Active sensors operating at 1.5 μm collected data in 1D, 2D and 3D modes. Supplementary sensors included a weather station, a scintillometer, as well as sensors for positioning and attitude determination of the boats. Three boats in the class 4-9 meters were used as targets. After registration of the boats at close range they were sent out to 5-7 km distance from the sensor site. At the different ranges the target boats were directed to have different aspect angles relative to the direction of observation. Staff from IOSB Fraunhofer in Germany and from Selex (through DSTL) in UK took part in the tests beside FOI who was arranging the trials. A summary of the trial and examples of data and imagery will be presented.

  9. Dielectric elastomer vibrissal system for active tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, Andrew T.; Pearson, Martin J.; Pipe, Anthony G.; Welsby, Jason; Rossiter, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    Rodents are able to dexterously navigate confined and unlit environments by extracting spatial and textural information with their whiskers (or vibrissae). Vibrissal-based active touch is suited to a variety of applications where vision is occluded, such as search-and-rescue operations in collapsed buildings. In this paper, a compact dielectric elastomer vibrissal system (DEVS) is described that mimics the vibrissal follicle-sinus complex (FSC) found in rodents. Like the vibrissal FSC, the DEVS encapsulates all sensitive mechanoreceptors at the root of a passive whisker within an antagonistic muscular system. Typically, rats actively whisk arrays of macro-vibrissae with amplitudes of up to +/-25°. It is demonstrated that these properties can be replicated by exploiting the characteristic large actuation strains and passive compliance of dielectric elastomers. A prototype DEVS is developed using VHB 4905 and embedded strain gauges bonded to the root of a tapered whisker. The DEVS is demonstrated to produce a maximum rotational output of +/-22.8°. An electro-mechanical model of the DEVS is derived, which incorporates a hyperelastic material model and Euler- Bernoulli beam equations. The model is shown to predict experimental measurements of whisking stroke amplitude and whisker deflection.

  10. FSA future directions: FSA technology activities in FY86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The silicon material, advanced silicon sheet, device research, and process research activities are explained. There will be no new initiatives. Many activities are targeted for completion and the emphasis will then be on technology transfer. Industrial development of the fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) deposition technology is proceeding. Technology transfer and industry funding of sheet development are continuing.

  11. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity: Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This bibliography is divided into three parts and covers: (1) overall economic impact of technological progress and its measurement; (2) technological progress and commercialization of communications satellites; and (3) knowledge additions and earth links from space crew systems.

  12. Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of the Traditional Chinese Herb, Phyllanthus amarus

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Kumutha; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of quorum sensing in Proteobacteria and its function in regulating virulence determinants makes it an attractive alternative towards attenuation of bacterial pathogens. In this study, crude extracts of Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn, a traditional Chinese herb, were screened for their anti-quorum sensing properties through a series of bioassays. Only the methanolic extract of P. amarus exhibited anti-quorum sensing activity, whereby it interrupted the ability of Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26 to response towards exogenously supplied N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone and the extract reduced bioluminescence in E. coli [pSB401] and E. coli [pSB1075]. In addition to this, methanolic extract of P. amarus significantly inhibited selected quorum sensing-regulated virulence determinants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. Increasing concentrations of the methanolic extracts of P. amarus reduced swarming motility, pyocyanin production and P. aeruginosa PA01 lecA∷lux expression. Our data suggest that P. amarus could be useful for attenuating pathogens and hence, more local traditional herbs should be screened for its anti-quorum sensing properties as their active compounds may serve as promising anti-pathogenic drugs. PMID:24169540

  13. Interactive Change Detection Using High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Active Learning with Gaussian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Hui; Yu, Huai; Huang, Pingping; Yang, Wen

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  14. Passive and active EO sensing close to the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove; Persson, Rolf; Berglund, Folke; Öhgren, Johan; Gustafsson, Frank

    2014-10-01

    The present paper investigates the use of an eye-safe laser rangefinder at 1.5 μm and TV/IR imaging to obtain information on atmospheric properties at various paths close to the sea surface. On one day active/passive imaging NIR and SWIR systems were also used. The paper will describe the experimental equipment and the results from measurements of atmospheric backscatter as well as TV and IR images of test targets along a 1.8 km path close to the Baltic Sea. The site also contained a weather station and a scintillometer for logging weather and turbulence parameters. Results correlating the lidar attenuation with the imaging performance will be given and compared with models.

  15. Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

    2012-03-01

    This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

  16. Assessing Landscape-Scale Soil Moisture Distribution Using Auxiliary Sensing Technologies and Multivariate Geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrum, C.; Castrignanò, A.; Mueller, T.; Zourarakis, D.; Zhu, J.

    2013-12-01

    It is important to assess soil moisture to develop strategies to better manage its availability and use. At the landscape scale, soil moisture distribution derives from an integration of hydrologic, pedologic and geomorphic processes that cause soil moisture variability (SMV) to be time, space, and scale-dependent. Traditional methods to assess SMV at this scale are often costly, labor intensive, and invasive, which can lead to inadequate sampling density and spatial coverage. Fusing traditional sampling techniques with georeferenced auxiliary sensing technologies, such as geoelectric sensing and LiDAR, provide an alternative approach. Because geoelectric and LiDAR measurements are sensitive to soil properties and terrain features that affect soil moisture variation, they are often employed as auxiliary measures to support less dense direct sampling. Georeferenced proximal sensing acquires rapid, real-time, high resolution data over large spatial extents that is enriched with spatial, temporal and scale-dependent information. Data fusion becomes important when proximal sensing is used in tandem with more sparse direct sampling. Multicollocated factorial cokriging (MFC) is one technique of multivariate geostatistics to fuse multiple data sources collected at different sampling scales to study the spatial characteristics of environmental properties. With MFC sparse soil observations are supported by more densely sampled auxiliary attributes to produce more consistent spatial descriptions of scale-dependent parameters affecting SMV. This study uses high resolution geoelectric and LiDAR data as auxiliary measures to support direct soil sampling (n=127) over a 40 hectare Central Kentucky (USA) landscape. Shallow and deep apparent electrical resistivity (ERa) were measured using a Veris 3100 in tandem with soil moisture sampling on three separate dates with ascending soil moisture contents ranging from plant wilting point to field capacity. Terrain features were produced

  17. More than Activities: Using a "Sense of Place" to Enrich Student Experience in Adventure Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leather, Mark; Nicholls, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in recent years in the significance of a sense of place in the literature of outdoor adventure education. In the UK relationships between outdoor education and the environment still appear largely focused on the science of the natural environment and the activity in question. In this paper, we present empirical…

  18. Active Teaching Strategies for a Sense of Salience: End-of-Life Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared active teaching strategies with passive lecture by evaluating cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning outcomes, while highlighting end-of-life communication in nursing education. The problem addressed was twofold: First, passive lecture prevents transfer to situational decision-making, or a sense of salience (Benner,…

  19. Aerial Vehicle Surveys of other Planetary Atmospheres and Surfaces: Imaging, Remote-sensing, and Autonomy Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Gregory; Ippolito, Corey; Alena, Rick

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the anticipated imaging and remote-sensing technology requirements for aerial vehicle survey missions to other planetary bodies in our Solar system that can support in-atmosphere flight. In the not too distant future such planetary aerial vehicle (a.k.a. aerial explorers) exploration missions will become feasible. Imaging and remote-sensing observations will be a key objective for these missions. Accordingly, it is imperative that optimal solutions in terms of imaging acquisition and real-time autonomous analysis of image data sets be developed for such vehicles.

  20. The use of distributed temperature sensing technology for monitoring wildland fire intensity and distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, C. G.; Cram, D.; Hatch, C. E.; Tyler, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) technology offers a viable alternative for accurately measuring wildland fire intensity and distribution in real time applications. We conducted an experiment to test the use of DTS as an alternative technology to monitor prescribed fire temperatures in real time and across a broad spatial scale. The custom fiber-optic cable consisted of three fiber optic lines buffered by polyamide, copper, and polyvinyl chloride, respectively, each armored in a stainless steel tube backfilled with Nitrogen gas. The 150 m long cable was deployed in three different 20 by 26 m experimental plots of short-grass rangeland in central New Mexico. Cable was arranged to maximize coverage of the experimental plots and allow cross-comparison between two main parallel straight-line sections approximately 8 m apart. A DTS system recorded fire temperatures every three seconds and integrated every one meter. A series of five thermocouples attached to a datalogger were placed at selected locations along the cable and also recorded temperature data every three seconds on each fiber. Results indicate that in general there is good agreement between thermocouple-measured and DTS-measured temperatures. A close match in temperature between DTS and thermocouples was particularly observed during the rising limb but not so much during the decline. The metal armoring of the fiber-optic cable remained hot longer than the thermocouples after the flames had passed. The relatively short-duration, high-intensity, prescribed burn fire in each plot resulted in temperatures reaching up to 450 degrees Celsius. In addition, DTS data allow for illustration of the irregular nature of flame speed and travel path across the rangeland grasses, a phenomenon that was impossible to quantify without the use of this tool. This study adds to the understanding of using DTS as a new alternative tool for better characterizing wildland fire intensity, distribution and travel patterns, and

  1. Summary of fiscal year 1994 near-infrared spectroscopy moisture sensing activities

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, F.R.; Johnson, R.E.; Philipp, B.L.; Duncan, J.B.; Schutzenhofer, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the work to develop and deploy near-infrared (NIR) moisture sensing technology for application to the Hanford Site`s high-level nuclear waste materials. This work is jointly supported by the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) EM-50 Office of Technology Development Support and the EM-30 Tank Waste Safety and Tank Waste Remediation Systems Programs. A basic NIR system was developed at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) with support from DOE`s EM-50 Office. The application of this technology to Hanford`s high-level wastes (HLW). Including deployment, is supported by DOE`s EM-30 Systems Programs. The need to know the moisture content in HLW is driven by concerns for the safety of underground storage tanks that contain or are suspected of containing ferrocyanide and organic types of materials. The NIR technology has application for both ex situ (hot cell core measurements) and in situ waste tank moisture sensing. The cold test/calibration data in this report was generated as part of the total life cycle development path being followed in the development and deployment of the NIR technology at the Hanford Site.

  2. Yellow River Icicle Hazard Dynamic Monitoring Using UAV Aerial Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. B.; Wang, G. H.; Tang, X. M.; Li, C. H.

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring the response of Yellow River icicle hazard change requires accurate and repeatable topographic surveys. A new method based on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) aerial remote sensing technology is proposed for real-time data processing in Yellow River icicle hazard dynamic monitoring. The monitoring area is located in the Yellow River ice intensive care area in southern BaoTou of Inner Mongolia autonomous region. Monitoring time is from the 20th February to 30th March in 2013. Using the proposed video data processing method, automatic extraction covering area of 7.8 km2 of video key frame image 1832 frames took 34.786 seconds. The stitching and correcting time was 122.34 seconds and the accuracy was better than 0.5 m. Through the comparison of precise processing of sequence video stitching image, the method determines the change of the Yellow River ice and locates accurate positioning of ice bar, improving the traditional visual method by more than 100 times. The results provide accurate aid decision information for the Yellow River ice prevention headquarters. Finally, the effect of dam break is repeatedly monitored and ice break five meter accuracy is calculated through accurate monitoring and evaluation analysis.

  3. Advanced IR sensing technology research in the city of Tomsk, USSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, Vladimir P.; Ivanov, A. I.; Isakov, A. V.; Reino, V. V.; Shiryaev, Vladimir V.; Tsvyk, Ruvim S.

    1990-03-01

    Some large scientific organisations in the city of Tomsk, Siberia, USSR are involved into the researchings on the advanced IR sensing technology. They are Polytechnic Institute founded in 1896, Uriiversity of Tomsk founded in 1888, Institute of Atmosphere's Optics, Academy of Sciences arid Institute of Automatized Control Systems and Radio electronics. Main fields are as follows: 1) thermal (IR) nondestructive testing of materials, machines and systems; 2) optoelectronics; 3) laser optics, transmission of infrared through the atmosphere and investigation of energy distribution in laser beams. Researching equipment includes Western and Russian industrial thermovisers, lasers, personal computers, IR detectors etc and some borne-made devices and components. There are optical arid JR detectors Lndustry in Tomsk that allows i.e produce spheric and aspheric mirrors and lenses, JR filters, cadmium-mercury-teilur and indium anlymonide T1 receivers arid to develop the scanning and measuring devices on the base mentioned above. Seine projects to develop the specific Tomsk thermoviser so far have nOt come true so the main accent was made onto the computerized thermographic systems suitable for solution of particular scientific problems.

  4. An insight into space and remote sensing technologies concerning agriculture and landscape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuca, Branka; Barazzetti, Luigi; Brumana, Raffaella; Previtali, Mattia

    2015-06-01

    Remote sensing and space technologies are increasingly called to offer innovative solutions for current challenges induced by climatic and global change. One of the main priorities of the European Space Policy regards the economic independence of the old continent in this sector. In terms of research and innovation this inevitably leads to numerous attempts in having independent market of services that would tackle specific needs of the citizens. Agriculture, for example, is one of the sectors majorly subsidized by European funds on national, regional and local level, with the aim to foster a more productive and sustainable development. Due to a large territorial scale at which agricultural phenomena are observed, and thus the spatial resolution required, it is also one of the main sectors that has been monitored from space over the past 30 years. In fact, one of the main missions of USA Landsat satellites was to provide a continuous and systematic overview of the globe for the purposes of an effective monitoring of the environment. This paper represents an overview of the ongoing initiatives in Space research done for the field of agriculture and landscape monitoring. In particular, the paper looks into the future possibilities that will be offered by full, open and free-of-charge data arriving from ongoing Copernicus missions and the contribution of Sentinel satellites to the agricultural sector.

  5. A chipless sensor tag-based RFID technology for cyber-oriented environmental sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sudhir; Agarwal, Mangilal; Phoha, Vir V.; Varahramyan, Kody

    2009-05-01

    A chipless sensor tag-based radio frequency identification (RFID) technology that allows wireless collection of information from the environment, and the monitoring and accessing of the given information through cyberspace is presented. The developed system consists of a cyber enabled RFID reader and passive chipless RFID sensor tags. The reader is comprised of an analog part that wirelessly communicates with the sensor tags, and a single board computer (SBC) part. Each passive chipless sensor tag consists of a microstrip antenna and a sensor. The sensor information is amplitude modulated in the backscattered signal of the tag. The analog reader part receives the backscattered signal and feeds it to the SBC, which computes the sensor information into a 96 bit serialized global trade item number (SGTIN-96) electronic product code (EPC). Moreover, the SBC makes the information available on a cyberspace-accessible secure user interface. The reported system has been applied for temperature sensing, where the change in temperature at the tag ranging from 27°C to 140°C resulted in a 28% amplitude change at the analog part of the reader. The temperature at the tag has been monitored by accessing the reader through cyberspace using a web-based user interfaces developed for the SBC.

  6. Fiber Optic Sensing Technology for Detecting Gas Hydrate Formation and Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rawn, Claudia J; Leeman, John R; Ulrich, Shannon M; Alford, Jonathan E; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Madden, Megan Elwood

    2011-01-01

    A fiber optic-based distributed sensing system (DSS) has been integrated with a large volume (72 L) pressure vessel providing high spatial resolution, time resolved, 3-D measurement of hybrid temperature-strain (TS) values within experimental sediment gas hydrate systems. Areas of gas hydrate formation (exothermic) and decomposition (endothermic) can be characterized through this proxy by time series analysis of discrete data points collected along the length of optical fibers placed within a sediment system. Data is visualized as a 'movie' of TS values along the length of each fiber over time. Experiments conducted in the Seafloor Processing Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory show clear indications of hydrate formation and dissociation events at expected P-T conditions given the thermodynamics of the CH4-H2O system. The high spatial resolution achieved with fiber optic technology makes the DSS a useful tool for visualizing time resolved formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in large-scale sediment experiments.

  7. Scope for biological sensing technologies in meat production and export in northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, M. S.; Qureshi, I. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan is rich in livestock resources, including 14.84 million sheep and goats (valued at US1.60 billion) and a 27% share of the national poultry sector (having an investment of US2.00 billion), and produces 834 billion kg meat. These huge assets have the potential to support the provincial economy through income generation, self employment and production of certified high-quality food items for the domestic and international Halal Food Market. A model has been developed for analyzing the gaps in the status of health, productivity, nutrition, fertility and management aspects of local farming. Improved practices would be introduced to combat the losses. The model will comprise a farming network linked to farmers' welfare centre, a central lab and an expert group. A strong sensing technology network would be introduced for data transfer and quality control of the inputs and products. The farmers will e-tag their animals for the purpose of traceability, online history and biodata. The data will be maintained in remote and central servers. A communication system would be developed utilizing mobile phones for the prices, demands and availability status of inputs and produce at local and international markets. A mobile money transfer system will be introduced to exchange, save and borrow small amounts of capital as well as take out short-term insurance policies.

  8. Remote sensing, GIS, and GPS technologies for assessment potentialities of sustainable eco-agriculture development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Albena V.; Tsvetkovski, Mitko M.

    2004-02-01

    The problem of ecological agriculture production is a question of present interest all over the world. For the past few years in Bulgaria were performed a number of reforms associated with utilization and management of agricultural and forest areas. Contemporary the problem cover eco-monitoring, specification of the trends and rehabilitation criteria determination on the basis of satellite technologies. The recent work presents a methodic for determination of suitable areas for sustainable ecoagriculture development. The main item in this methodic is test area definition based on remote sensing basis. It is proposed "point-polygon" method for correlation links between test point objects and certain test polygon. The test point objects are defined by GPS techniques. This approach enables complex quantitative assessment of the region with minimum resources consumption. For precise results obtaining is performed interpretatation of multispectral and panchromatic aerophoto and satellite images of different time periods, it is specified crop phenology and field check. Data are integrated in GIS for more efficient monitoring of the characteristics of the region of interest. The methodologies developed during these investigations can be applied to other regions, and have potential for providing modelers with extended data sets of independently derived agriculture data and monitoring studies.

  9. Study on the urban heat island effect based on quantitative remote sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yunju; Tong, Chengzhuo; Cheng, Penggen; Chen, Xiaoyong; Zhou, Mengyu

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the effect of urban heat island (UHI) is increasingly obvious with moving forward in further urbanization process, which has become one of the prominent issues of environment. The image data of Nanchang city supplied by Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) in September 2006 is used in this paper, and the land surface temperature (LST) over the same period has been retrieved by using a mono-window algorithm based on remote sensing technology. The classification of LST is subsequently fulfilled by the method of proper density cutting. Characteristics of intensity and spatial distribution of UHI effect in Nanchang, as well as its relationships with land use type and vegetation coverage degree (VCD) are discussed in detail. The result shows that the phenomena of UHI are significantly presented in urban area with an inhomogeneous distribution, and the degree of influence of UHI depends on types of land uses. The intensity of UHI effect has a significant negative linear correlation with normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). It is deduced that suitably optimizing land use types and raising VCR are obvious and effective ways to reduce UHI.

  10. Monitoring abandoned dreg fields of high-speed railway construction with UAV remote sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhiliang; Wang, Yangchun; Lin, Yi; Du, Xiaolin

    2015-12-01

    High-speed railway construction will produce a large amount of abandoned dregs, so it is necessary to build enough dreg deposition fields along the railway. The task of the department of soil and water conservation is to monitor the construction and usage of abandoned dreg fields according to the design in the whole process of railway construction. As long linear construction projects, many high-speed railways go through regions of complex terrain, which poses great difficulties to monitoring current status of abandoned dreg fields. With the advantages of low cost, flexible launch and landing, safety, under-cloud-flying, hyperspatial image resolution, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are very suitable for obtaining remote sensing imagery along the railway. One segment of the high-speed railway from Chongqing to Wanzhou and its neighborhood was chosen as the study area to demonstrate key technologies and specific procedures of monitoring abandoned dreg fields using the UAV system. The UAV system and its components are introduced along with the flight trajectories, acquired UAV imagery, and attitude data. Image preprocessing and generation of DEM and DOM are described in detail followed by image-based measurement accuracy assessment and abandoned dreg field status investigation on the resulting DOM and DEM. Results prove the feasibility and effectiveness of applying the fixed wing UAV system to rapidly monitoring the construction and usage of abandoned dreg fields

  11. Super-resolution technologies for all-weather sense and avoidance (SAA) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan Rockee; Li, Zhengzheng; Wang, Shang; Pan, Yu; Suarez, Hernan

    2011-06-01

    The sense and avoidance (SAA) and due-regard radar systems have strict requirements on size, weight and power (SWaP) and target localization accuracies. Also, the multi-mission capabilities with both weather and hard targets are critical to the survivability of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in the next generation national airspace. The aperture limitations of the aircraft sensor installation, however, have prevented large antennas/arrays to be used. The tradeoffs among frequencies, resolutions and detection range/accuracies have not been fully addressed. Innovative concepts of overcoming the aperture limitation by using a special type of super-resolution technology are introduced. The first technique is based on a combination of thinned antenna array, an extension to the traditional Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) technique, and applying a two-dimensional sidelobe mitigation technique. To overcome the degradation of MUSIC-type of approach due to coherent radar signals, a special waveform optimization procedure is used. The techniques for mitigating artifacts due to "thinned" array are also introduced. Simulated results of super-resolution techniques are discussed and evaluated, and the capability of separating multiple targets within aperture-constrained beamwidth is demonstrated. Moreover, the potential capabilities of autonomous weather hazard avoidance are also analyzed.

  12. Electrochemical strategy for sensing DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang Lin; Zhou, Long Yin; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2013-03-20

    The present work demonstrates a novel signal-off electrochemical method for the determination of DNA methylation and the assay of methyltransferase activity using the electroactive complex [Ru(NH3)6](3+) (RuHex) as a signal transducer. The assay exploits the electrostatic interactions between RuHex and DNA strands. Thiolated single strand DNA1 was firstly self-assembled on a gold electrode via Au-S bonding, followed by hybridization with single strand DNA2 to form double strand DNA containing specific recognition sequence of DNA adenine methylation MTase and methylation-responsive restriction endonuclease Dpn I. The double strand DNA may adsorb lots of electrochemical species ([Ru(NH3)6](3+)) via the electrostatic interaction, thus resulting in a high electrochemical signal. In the presence of DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase and S-adenosyl-l-methionine, the formed double strand DNA was methylated by DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase, then the double strand DNA can be cleaved by methylation-responsive restriction endonuclease Dpn I, leading to the dissociation of a large amount of signaling probes from the electrode. As a result, the adsorption amount of RuHex reduced, resulting in a decrease in electrochemical signal. Thus, a sensitive electrochemical method for detection of DNA methylation is proposed. The proposed method yielded a linear response to concentration of Dam MTase ranging from 0.25 to 10UmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.18UmL(-1) (S/N=3), which might promise this method as a good candidate for monitoring DNA methylation in the future. PMID:23473252

  13. Comparative study of active and passive sensing with AE and PWAS transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Yu, Jianguo; Ziehl, Paul; Zhao, Liuxian

    2012-04-01

    Monitoring of fatigue cracking in bridges using a combined passive and active scheme has been approached by the authors. Passive Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring has shown to be able to detect crack growth behavior by picking up the stress waves resulting from the breathing of cracks while active ultrasonic pulsing can quantitatively assess structural integrity by sensing out an interrogating pulse and receive the structural reflections from the discontinuity. In this paper, we present a comparative study of active and passive sensing with two types of transducers: (a) AE transducers, and (b) embeddable piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS). The study was performed experimentally on steel plates. Both pristine and damaged (notched) conditions were considered. For active sensing, pitchcatch configuration was examined in which one transducer was the transmitter and another transducer acted as the receiver. The ping signal was generated by the AE hardware/software package AEwin. For passive sensing, 0.5-mm lead breaks were executed both on top and on the edge of the plate. The comparative nature of the study was achieved by having the AE and PWAS transducers placed on the same location but on the opposite sides of the plate. The paper presents the main findings of this study in terms of (a) signal strength; (b) signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio; (c) waveform clarity; (d) waveform Fourier spectrum contents and bandwidth; (e) capability to detect and localize AE source; (f) capability to detect and localize damage. The paper performs a critical discussion of the two sensing methodologies, conventional AE transducers vs. PWAS transducers.

  14. Active Microwave Remote Sensing Observations of Weddell Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Since July 1991, the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites have acquired radar data of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. The Active Microwave Instrument on board ERS has two modes; SAR and Scatterometer. Two receiving stations enable direct downlink and recording of high bit-rate, high resolution SAR image data of this region. When not in an imaging mode, when direct SAR downlink is not possible, or when a receiving station is inoperable, the latter mode allows normalized radar cross-section data to be acquired. These low bit-rate ERS scatterometer data are tape recorded, downlinked and processed off-line. Recent advances in image generation from Scatterometer backscatter measurements enable complementary medium-scale resolution images to be made during periods when SAR images cannot be acquired. Together, these combined C-band microwave image data have for the first time enabled uninterrupted night and day coverage of the Weddell Sea region at both high (25 m) and medium-scale (-20 km) resolutions. C-band ERS-1 radar data are analyzed in conjunction with field data from two simultaneous field experiments in 1992. Satellite radar signature data are compared with shipborne radar data to extract a regional and seasonal signature database for recognition of ice types in the images. Performance of automated sea-ice tracking algorithms is tested on Antarctic data to evaluate their success. Examples demonstrate that both winter and summer ice can be effectively tracked. The kinematics of the main ice zones within the Weddell Sea are illustrated, together with the complementary time-dependencies in their radar signatures. Time-series of satellite images are used to illustrate the development of the Weddell Sea ice cover from its austral summer minimum (February) to its winter maximum (September). The combination of time-dependent microwave signatures and ice dynamics tracking enable various drift regimes to be defined which relate closely to the circulation of the

  15. Radar activities of the DFVLR Institute for Radio Frequency Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keydel, W.

    1983-01-01

    Aerospace research and the respective applications microwave tasks with respect to remote sensing, position finding and communication are discussed. The radar activities are directed at point targets, area targets and volume targets; they center around signature research for earth and ocean remote sensing, target recognition, reconnaissance and camouflage and imaging and area observation radar techniques (SAR and SLAR). The radar activities cover a frequency range from 1 GHz up to 94 GHz. The radar program is oriented to four possible application levels: ground, air, shuttle orbits and satellite orbits. Ground based studies and measurements, airborne scatterometers and imaging radars, a space shuttle radar, the MRSE, and follow on experiments are considered.

  16. Demonstration of Technologies for Remote and in Situ Sensing of Atmospheric Methane Abundances - a Controlled Release Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, A. D.; Thorpe, A. K.; Christensen, L. E.; Dinardo, S.; Frankenberg, C.; Rahn, T. A.; Dubey, M.

    2013-12-01

    TES), retrievals which interrogate spectral features in the 7.5 to 8.5 μm region. Here we discuss preliminary results from the JPL activities during the RMOTC controlled release experiment, including capabilities of airborne sensors for total columnar atmospheric methane detection and comparison to results from ground measurements and dispersion models. Potential application areas for these remote sensing technologies include assessment of anthropogenic and natural methane sources over wide spatial scales that represent significant unconstrained factors to the global methane budget.

  17. Activities of Asian Students and Young Scientists on Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, H.; Lo, C.-Y.; Cho, K.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports a history and future prospects of the activities by Asian students and young scientists on photogrammetry and remote sensing. For future growths of academic fields, active communications among students and young scientists are indispensable. In some countries and regions in Asia, local communities are already established by youths and playing important roles of building networks among various schools and institutes. The networks are expected to evolve innovative cooperations after the youths achieve their professions. Although local communities are getting solid growth, Asian youths had had little opportunities to make contacts with youths of other countries and regions. To promote youth activities among Asian regions, in 2007, Asian Association on Remote Sensing (AARS) started a series of programs involving students and young scientists within the annual conferences, the Asian Conference on Remote Sensing (ACRS). The programs have provided opportunities and motivations to create networks among students and young scientists. As a result of the achievements, the number of youth interested and involved in the programs is on growing. In addition, through the events held in Asian region by ISPRS Student Consortium (ISPRSSC) and WG VI/5, the Asian youths have built friendly partnership with ISPRSSC. Currently, many Asian youth are keeping contacts with ACRS friends via internet even when they are away from ACRS. To keep and expand the network, they are planning to establish an Asian youth organization on remote sensing. This paper describes about the proposals and future prospects on the Asian youth organization.

  18. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy.

  19. Multisensor fusion remote sensing technology for assessing multitemporal responses in ecohydrological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkeasorn, Ammarin

    ) satellite imagery as previously developed was used. Eight commonly used vegetation indices were calculated from the reflectance obtained from Landsat 5 TM satellite images. The vegetation indices were individually used to classify vegetation cover in association with genetic programming algorithm. The soil moisture and vegetation indices were integrated into Landsat TM images based on a pre-pixel channel approach for riparian classification. Two different classification algorithms were used including genetic programming, and a combination of ISODATA and maximum likelihood supervised classification. The white box feature of genetic programming revealed the comparative advantage of all input parameters. The GP algorithm yielded more than 90% accuracy, based on unseen ground data, using vegetation index and Landsat reflectance band 1, 2, 3, and 4. The detection of changes in the buffer zone was proved to be technically feasible with high accuracy. Overall, the development of the RICAL algorithm may lead to the formulation of more effective management strategies for the handling of non-point source pollution control, bird habitat monitoring, and grazing and live stock management in the future. Geo-environmental information amassed in this study includes soil permeability, surface temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, leaf area index (LAI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). With the aid of a remote sensing-based GIP analysis, only five locations out of more than 800 candidate sites were selected by the spatial analysis, and then confirmed by a field investigation. The methodology developed in this remote sensing-based GIP analysis will significantly advance the state-of-the-art technology in optimum arrangement/distribution of water sensor platforms for maximum sensing coverage and information-extraction capacity. To more efficiently use the limited amount of water or to resourcefully provide adequate time for flood warning, the results have led us to seek

  20. Application of fiber Bragg grating sensing technology in long-distance detection of temperature in weapon depots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianguo; Zhang, ZhiLi; Zhao, Bing; Fu, Zhulin

    2010-10-01

    Incessantly long-term real-time detection of temperature is demanded in weapon depots, where the weapon equipment is stored in, to realize the self-regulation of temperature. Long-Distance intellectualized control can be actualized by setting sensor-net which is composed by several temperature sensors to simultaneously detect multi-point and multi- parameter. The temperature sensors based on Fiber Bragg Grating Technology are more suitable for long-term detection for their preponderance in high sensitivity, small volume, anti-jamming and so on. The temperature sensing system, which is composed by several Fiber Bragg Grating sensors in one light-cable, can accomplish Quasi-Distributed measurement and is suitable for multi-point and multi- parameter detection. Basal principle of Fiber Bragg Grating sensing technology is expounded in the article, with a sensing system applied to the long-distance detection of temperature in the depots is designed based on F-P Scanning Method. Besides, DSP and FPGA are adopted pre-treat the transformed data from AD such as filter and determine threshold. The main modules of this demodulation system such as 1550nm exact photoelectric detection module and trigonal wave voltage scan module are designed in this paper to realize demodulation. Proved by the analysis of the testing data, the Fiber Bragg Grating temperature sensing system, whose testing precision achieved the design purpose, has advantages of real-time measure and long-term stability. The system, which provides guarantee to realize the auto-control of temperature, can be generalized and will provide favorable foundation for the broad using of Fiber Bragg Grating sensing technology in the army.

  1. Sense of Community in a Blended Technology Integration Course: A Design-Based Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, J. Buckley; West, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    This design-based research study explored whether "sense of community" was maintained while flexibility in the course was increased through an adoption of a unique blended learning model. Data collected in this study show a significant drop in the sense of connectedness score from a mean of 50.8 out of 66 to a mean of 39.68 in the first…

  2. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The findings are reported of research into the relationships between technological progress and economic development, with emphasis on several ways in which NASA research and development has aided in the accumulation and commercial application of new or improved scientific and technological knowledge.

  3. Spatiotemporal analysis of soil moisture in using active and passive remotely sensed data and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Soil moisture plays a vital role in ecosystem, biological processes, climate, weather and agriculture. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) improves data by combining the advantages and avoiding the limitation of passive microwave remote sensing (low resolution), and active microwave (challenge of soil moisture retrieval). This study will advance the knowledge of the application of soil moisture by using the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) data as well as data collected at Walnut Gulch Arizona in August 2015 during SMAPVEX15. Specifically, we will analyze the 5m radar data from Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) to study spatial variability within the PALS radiometer pixel. SMAPVEX12/15 and SMAP data will also be analyzed to evaluate disaggregation algorithms. The analytical findings will provide valuable information for policy-makers to initiate and adjust protocols and regulations for protecting land resources and improving environmental conditions. Keywords: soil moisture, Remote Sensing (RS), spatial statistic

  4. On the haptic nature of the active electric sense of fish.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Angel A; Aguilera, Pedro A; Carolina Pereira, Ana; Rodríguez-Cattáneo, Alejo

    2013-11-01

    Electroreception is a sensory modality present in chondrichthyes, actinopterygii, amphibians, and mammalian monotremes. The study of this non-intuitive sensory modality has provided insights for better understanding of sensory systems in general and inspired the development of innovative artificial devices. Here we review evidence obtained from the analysis of electrosensory images, neurophysiological data from the recording of unitary activity in the electrosensory lobe, and psychophysical data from analysis of novelty responses provoked in well-defined stimulus conditions, which all confirm that active electroreception has a short range, and that the influence of exploratory movements on object identification is strong. In active electric images two components can be identified: a "global" image profile depending on the volume, shape and global impedance of an object and a "texture" component depending on its surface attributes. There is a short range of the active electric sense and the progressive "blurring" of object image with distance. Consequently, the lack of precision regarding object location, considered together, challenge the current view of this sense as serving long range electrolocation and the commonly used metaphor of "electric vision". In fact, the active electric sense shares more commonalities with human active touch than with teleceptive senses as vision or audition. Taking into account that other skin exteroceptors and proprioception may be congruently stimulated during fish exploratory movements we propose that electric, mechanoceptive and proprioceptive sensory modalities found in electric fish could be considered together as a single haptic sensory system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012. PMID:23727613

  5. Nano-Bio-Technology and Sensing Chips: New Systems for Detection in Personalized Therapies and Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    Further advances in molecular medicine and cell biology also require new electrochemical systems to detect disease biomarkers and therapeutic compounds. Microelectronic technology offers powerful circuits and systems to develop innovative and miniaturized biochips for sensing at the molecular level. However, microelectronic biochips proposed in the literature often do not show the right specificity, sensitivity, and reliability required by biomedical applications. Nanotechnology offers new materials and solutions to improve the surface properties of sensing probes. The aim of the present paper is to review the most recent progress in Nano-Bio-Technology in the area of the development of new electrochemical systems for molecular detection in personalized therapy and cell culture monitoring. PMID:22315554

  6. The development of ShortWatch, a novel overtemperature or mechanical damage sensing technology for wires or cables. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Ken; Morris, Jack; Wong, C.P.; Luo, Shijian

    2001-09-07

    'ShortWatch' is a patented technology which for the first time offers electrical wire/cable products providing real-time, 'in-situ' (1) condition monitoring that warns of insulation damage before an electrical fault occurs, (2) assessment of the ability to perform in a Design Basis event, (3) distributed sensor warning of overtemperature, and (4) insulation leakage measurement capability providing arc sensing and a reliable tool for wire age prediction.

  7. Super-sensing technology: industrial applications and future challenges of electrical tomography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kent Hsin-Yu; Qiu, Chang-Hua; Primrose, Ken

    2016-06-28

    Electrical tomography is a relatively new imaging technique that can image the distribution of the passive electrical properties of an object. Since electrical tomography technology was proposed in the 1980s, the technique has evolved rapidly because of its low cost, easy scale-up and non-invasive features. The technique itself can be sensitive to all passive electrical properties, such as conductivity, permittivity and permeability. Hence, it has a huge potential to be applied in many applications. Owing to its ill-posed nature and low image resolution, electrical tomography attracts more attention in industrial fields than biomedical fields. In the past decades, there have been many research developments and industrial implementations of electrical tomography; nevertheless, the awareness of this technology in industrial sectors is still one of the biggest limitations for technology implementation. In this paper, the authors have summarized several representative applications that use electrical tomography. Some of the current tomography research activities will also be discussed. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  8. Vision based assistive technology for people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As'ari, M. A.; Sheikh, U. U.

    2012-04-01

    The rapid development of intelligent assistive technology for replacing a human caregiver in assisting people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs) promises in the reduction of care cost especially in training and hiring human caregiver. The main problem however, is the various kinds of sensing agents used in such system and is dependent on the intent (types of ADLs) and environment where the activity is performed. In this paper on overview of the potential of computer vision based sensing agent in assistive system and how it can be generalized and be invariant to various kind of ADLs and environment. We find that there exists a gap from the existing vision based human action recognition method in designing such system due to cognitive and physical impairment of people with dementia.

  9. NASA's Spaceliner Investment Area Technology Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goals for the third generation launch system are to significantly reduce cost and improve safety over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Spaceliner Investment Area, third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframes, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations, and range. The ASTP program will mature these technologies through both ground and flight system testing. The Spaceliner Investment Area plans to mature vehicle technologies to reduce the implementation risks for future commercially developed reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The plan is to substantially increase the design and operating margins of the third generation RLV (the Space Shuttle is the first generation) by incorporating advanced technologies in propulsion, materials, structures, thermal protection systems, avionics, and power. Advancements in design tools and better characterization of the operational environment will allow improvements in design margins. Improvements in operational efficiencies will be provided through use of advanced integrated health management, operations, and range technologies. The increase in margins will allow components to operate well below their design points resulting in improved component operating life, reliability, and safety which in turn reduces both maintenance and refurbishment costs. These technologies have the potential of enabling horizontal takeoff by reducing the takeoff weight and achieving the goal of airline-like operation. These factors in conjunction with increased flight rates from an expanding market will result in significant improvements in safety

  10. Reading as Active Sensing: A Computational Model of Gaze Planning in Word Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Marcello; Ognibene, Dimitri; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Pirrelli, Vito

    2010-01-01

    We offer a computational model of gaze planning during reading that consists of two main components: a lexical representation network, acquiring lexical representations from input texts (a subset of the Italian CHILDES database), and a gaze planner, designed to recognize written words by mapping strings of characters onto lexical representations. The model implements an active sensing strategy that selects which characters of the input string are to be fixated, depending on the predictions dynamically made by the lexical representation network. We analyze the developmental trajectory of the system in performing the word recognition task as a function of both increasing lexical competence, and correspondingly increasing lexical prediction ability. We conclude by discussing how our approach can be scaled up in the context of an active sensing strategy applied to a robotic setting. PMID:20577589

  11. Reading as active sensing: a computational model of gaze planning in word recognition.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Marcello; Ognibene, Dimitri; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Pirrelli, Vito

    2010-01-01

    WE OFFER A COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF GAZE PLANNING DURING READING THAT CONSISTS OF TWO MAIN COMPONENTS: a lexical representation network, acquiring lexical representations from input texts (a subset of the Italian CHILDES database), and a gaze planner, designed to recognize written words by mapping strings of characters onto lexical representations. The model implements an active sensing strategy that selects which characters of the input string are to be fixated, depending on the predictions dynamically made by the lexical representation network. We analyze the developmental trajectory of the system in performing the word recognition task as a function of both increasing lexical competence, and correspondingly increasing lexical prediction ability. We conclude by discussing how our approach can be scaled up in the context of an active sensing strategy applied to a robotic setting.

  12. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) Fiber Optic Sensing System (FOSS) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick; Hamory, Phil; Pena, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Attached is a power point presentation created to assist the Tech Transfer Office and the FOSS project team members in responding to inquiries from the public about the capabilities of the Fiber Optic Sensing System.

  13. Orbital remote sensing - Space technology applications in south-east Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malingreau, J.-P.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of remote sensing techniques in the developing countries of southeast Asia is reviewed. The use of the images for monitoring soil, water, and vegetation resources, in order to develop a national policy for conservation of the resources, is described. The remote sensing data are helpful in observing deforestation in southeast Asia; however, excessive cloud coverage does not allow accurate evaluation of the rice crop. The effects of the capabilities of the developing countries to process the data and remote sensing program of industrial countries on the future application of satellite imagery in developing countries are studied. The need for improved data banking and dissemination of the imagery is analyzed. Agreements on proprietary rights due to the improved ground resolution of orbital sensors are required. The designing of remote sensing equipment to meet the requirements of its users is discussed.

  14. Program plan and summary, remote fluvial experimental (REFLEX) series: Research experiments using advanced remote sensing technologies with emphasis on hydrologic transport, and hydrologic-ecologic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wobber, F.J.

    1986-10-01

    This document describes research designed to evaluate advanced remote sensing technologies for environmental research. A series of Remote Fluvial Experiments (REFLEX) - stressing new applications of remote sensing systems and use of advanced digital analysis methods - are described. Program strategy, experiments, research areas, and future initiatives are summarized. The goals of REFLEX are: (1) to apply new and developing aerial and satellite remote sensing technologies - including both advanced sensor systems and digital/optical processing - for interdisciplinary scientific experiments in hydrology and to hydrologic/ecologic interactions; (2) to develop new concepts for processing and analyzing remote sensing data for general scientific application; and (3) to demonstrate innovative analytical technologies that advance the state of the art in applying information from remote sensing systems, for example, supercomputer processing and analysis.

  15. Developments in remote sensing technology enable more detailed urban flood risk analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denniss, A.; Tewkesbury, A.

    2009-04-01

    digital airborne sensors, both optical and lidar, to produce the input layer for surface water flood modelling. A national flood map product has been created. The new product utilises sophisticated modelling techniques, perfected over many years, which harness graphical processing power. This product will prove particularly valuable for risk assessment decision support within insurance/reinsurance, property/environmental, utilities, risk management and government agencies. However, it is not just the ground elevation that determines the behaviour of surface water. By combining height information (surface and terrain) with high resolution aerial photography and colour infrared imagery, a high definition land cover mapping dataset (LandBase) is being produced, which provides a precise measure of sealed versus non sealed surface. This will allows even more sophisticated modelling of flood scenarios. Thus, the value of airborne survey data can be demonstrated by flood risk analysis down to individual addresses in urban areas. However for some risks, an even more detailed survey may be justified. In order to achieve this, Infoterra is testing new 360˚ mobile lidar technology. Collecting lidar data from a moving vehicle allows each street to be mapped in very high detail, allowing precise information about the location, size and shape of features such as kerbstones, gullies, road camber and building threshold level to be captured quickly and accurately. These data can then be used to model the problem of overland flood risk at the scale of individual properties. Whilst at present it might be impractical to undertake such detailed modelling for all properties, these techniques can certainly be used to improve the flood risk analysis of key locations. This paper will demonstrate how these new high resolution remote sensing techniques can be combined to provide a new resolution of detail to aid urban flood modelling.

  16. Spatial information technologies for remote sensing today and tomorrow; Proceedings of the Ninth Pecora Symposium, Sioux Falls, SD, October 2-4, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Topics discussed at the symposium include hardware, geographic information system (GIS) implementation, processing remotely sensed data, spatial data structures, and NASA programs in remote sensing information systems. Attention is also given GIS applications, advanced techniques, artificial intelligence, graphics, spatial navigation, and classification. Papers are included on the design of computer software for geographic image processing, concepts for a global resource information system, algorithm development for spatial operators, and an application of expert systems technology to remotely sensed image analysis.

  17. Predicting and Mitigating Outbreaks of Vector-Borne Disease Utilizing Satellite Remote Sensing Technology and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Sue; Haynes, John; Kiang, Richard; Brown, Molly; Reisen, William

    2008-01-01

    Satellite earth observations present a unique vantage point of the earth's environment from space which offers a wealth of health applications for the imaginative investigator. The session will present research results of the remote sensing environmental observations of earth and health applications. This session will an overview of many of the NASA public health applications using Remote Sensing Data and will also discuss opportunities to become a research collaborator with NASA.

  18. The study of optical fiber communication technology for space optical remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Yu, Sheng-quan; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Rong-hui; Ma, Jian-hua

    2012-11-01

    The latest trends of Space Optical Remote Sensing are high-resolution, multispectral, and wide swath detecting. High-speed digital image data transmission will be more important for remote sensing. At present, the data output interface of Space Optical Remote Sensing, after performing the image data compression and formatting, transfers the image data to data storage unit of the Spacecraft through LVDS circuit cables. But this method is not recommended for high-speed digital image data transmission. This type of image data transmission, called source synchronization, has the low performance for high-speed digital signal. Besides, it is difficult for cable installing and system testing in limited space of vehicle. To resolve these issues as above, this paper describes a high-speed interconnection device for Space Optical Remote Sensing with Spacecraft. To meet its objectives, this device is comprised of Virtex-5 FPGA with embedded high-speed series and power-efficient transceiver, fiber-optic transceiver module, the unit of fiber-optic connection and single mode optical fiber. The special communication protocol is performed for image data transferring system. The unit of fiber-optic connection with high reliability and flexibility is provided for transferring high-speed serial data with optical fiber. It is evident that this method provides many advantages for Space Optical Remote Sensing: 1. Improving the speed of image data transferring of Space Optical Remote Sensing; 2. Enhancing the reliability and safety of image data transferring; 3. Space Optical Remote Sensing will be reduced significantly in size and in weight; 4. System installing and system testing for Space Optical Remote Sensing will become easier.

  19. Self-sensing ionic electromechanically active actuator with patterned carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruusamäe, Karl; Kaasik, Friedrich; Punning, Andres; Aabloo, Alvo

    2013-04-01

    In comparison to other ionic electromechanically active polymers (ionic EAP), carbon-polymer composite (CPC) actuators are considered especially attractive due to possibility of producing completely metal-free devices. However, mechanical response of ionic EAP-s is, in addition to voltage and frequency, dependent on environmental variables such as humidity and temperature. Therefore, similarly to other EAPs, one of the major challenges lies in achieving controlled actuation of the CPC sample. Due to their size and added complexity, external feedback devices (e.g. laser displacement sensors and video cameras) tend to inhibit the application of micro-scale actuators. Hence, self-sensing EAP actuators - capable for simultaneous actuation and sensing - are often desired. A thin polyvinylidene fluoride-cohexafluoropropylene film with ionic liquid (EMIMBF4) was prepared and masked coincidently on opposite surfaces prior to spray painting carbide-derived carbon electrodes. The purpose of masking was to create different electrically insulated electrodes on the same surface of polymer in order to achieve separate sections for actuator and sensor on one piece of CPC material. Solution of electrode paint consisting of carbide-derived carbon, EMIMBF4 and dimethylacetamide was applied to the polymer film. After removing the masking tape, a completely metal-free CPC actuator with sophisticated electrode geometry was achieved to foster simultaneous sensing and actuation, i.e. self-sensing carbon-polymer actuator was created.

  20. A structural perspective on the mechanisms of quorum sensing activation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lixa, Carolina; Mujo, Amanda; Anobom, Cristiane D; Pinheiro, Anderson S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to synchronize the population behavior in order to regulate gene expression through a cell-to-cell communication mechanism called quorum sensing. This phenomenon involves the production, detection and the response to extracellular signaling molecules named autoinducers, which directly or indirectly regulate gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. Quorum sensing may control a wide range of biological processes in bacteria, such as bioluminescence, virulence factor production, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. The autoinducers are recognized by specific receptors that can either be membrane-bound histidine kinase receptors, which work by activating cognate cytoplasmic response regulators, or cytoplasmic receptors acting as transcription factors. In this review, we focused on the cytosolic quorum sensing regulators whose three-dimensional structures helped elucidate their mechanisms of action. Structural studies of quorum sensing receptors may enable the rational design of inhibitor molecules. Ultimately, this approach may represent an effective alternative to treat infections where classical antimicrobial therapy fails to overcome the microorganism virulence.

  1. NASA's Spaceliner 100 Investment Area Technology Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goals for the third generation launch system are to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Spaceliner100 Investment Area, third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframes, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), launch systems, and operations and range. The ASTP program will mature these technologies through ground system testing. Flight testing where required, will be advocated on a case by case basis.

  2. Crack identification for reinforced concrete using PZT based smart rebar active sensing diagnostic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, N. N.; Wu, F.

    2016-04-01

    An active sensing diagnostic system using PZT based smart rebar for SHM of RC structure has been currently under investigation. Previous test results showed that the system could detect the de-bond of concrete from reinforcement, and the diagnostic signals were increased exponentially with the de-bonding size. Previous study also showed that the smart rebar could function well like regular reinforcement to undertake tension stresses. In this study, a smart rebar network has been used to detect the crack damage of concrete based on guided waves. Experimental test has been carried out for the study. In the test, concrete beams with 2 reinforcements have been built. 8 sets of PZT elements were mounted onto the reinforcement bars in an optimized way to form an active sensing diagnostic system. A 90 kHz 5-cycle Hanning-windowed tone burst was used as input. Multiple cracks have been generated on the concrete structures. Through the guided bulk waves propagating in the structures from actuators and sensors mounted from different bars, crack damage could be detected clearly. Cases for both single and multiple cracks were tested. Different crack depths from the surface and different crack numbers have been studied. Test result shows that the amplitude of sensor output signals is deceased linearly with a propagating crack, and is decreased exponentially with increased crack numbers. From the study, the active sensing diagnostic system using PZT based smart rebar network shows a promising way to provide concrete crack damage information through the "talk" among sensors.

  3. Development of an integrated software solution for piezoelectric active-sensing in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Laura D.; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R.

    2007-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach of integrating data interrogation algorithms of active sensing methods for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications, including Lamb wave propagation, impedance method, and sensor-diagnostics, is presented. Contrary to most active-sensing SHM techniques, which utilize only a single signal processing method for damage identification, a suite of signal processing algorithms are employed and grouped into one package to improve the damage detection capability. A MatLab-based user interface called H.O.P.S. (Health Of Plate Structures) was created, which allows the analyst to configure the data acquisition system and display the results from each damage identification algorithm for side-by-side comparison. This side-by-side comparison of results simplifies the task of identifying the relative effectiveness and sensitivity of each algorithm. By grouping a suite of algorithms into one package, this study contributes to and enhances the visibility and interpretation of the active-sensing methods related to damage identification in a structure.

  4. Designing Technology Activities that Teach Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Eli M.; Higashi, Ross; Shoop, Robin; Schunn, Christian D.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past three years, the authors have conducted research in middle and high school classrooms in an effort to improve the effectiveness of robotics to teach science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education--their focus has been on math. The authors have found that subtle changes in the design and setup of the lesson make a…

  5. Conversational sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  6. Extravehicular Activity Technology Development Status and Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Westheimer, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of NASA s current EVA technology effort is to further develop technologies that will be used to demonstrate a robust EVA system that has application for a variety of future missions including microgravity and surface EVA. Overall the objectives will be to reduce system mass, reduce consumables and maintenance, increase EVA hardware robustness and life, increase crew member efficiency and autonomy, and enable rapid vehicle egress and ingress. Over the past several years, NASA realized a tremendous increase in EVA system development as part of the Exploration Technology Development Program and the Constellation Program. The evident demand for efficient and reliable EVA technologies, particularly regenerable technologies was apparent under these former programs and will continue to be needed as future mission opportunities arise. The technological need for EVA in space has been realized over the last several decades by the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station (ISS) programs. EVAs were critical to the success of these programs. Now with the ISS extension to 2028 in conjunction with a current forecasted need of at least eight EVAs per year, the EVA hardware life and limited availability of the Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) will eventually become a critical issue. The current EMU has successfully served EVA demands by performing critical operations to assemble the ISS and provide repairs of satellites such as the Hubble Space Telescope. However, as the life of ISS and the vision for future mission opportunities are realized, a new EVA systems capability will be needed and the current architectures and technologies under development offer significant improvements over the current flight systems. In addition to ISS, potential mission applications include EVAs for missions to Near Earth Objects (NEO), Phobos, or future surface missions. Surface missions could include either exploration of the Moon or Mars. Providing an

  7. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ta, Chieu Anh Kim; Arnason, John Thor

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS). As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented. PMID:26712734

  8. Personalized foot orthoses with embedded temperature sensing: Proof of concept and relationship with activity.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Scott; Munguia, Javier; Pallari, Jari; Dalgarno, Kenneth; Steultjens, Martijn; Woodburn, James

    2014-01-01

    Plantar foot surface temperature has been identified as a clinically relevant physiological variable. Embedding sensors in foot orthoses (FOs) may allow long term monitoring of these temperatures, with compliance via the detection of periods of activity being a potential clinical utilization. This study aimed to test novel designs for FOs with embedded sensing that were produced via additive manufacturing and determine if foot temperature measurements could be used to detect periods of increased activity. FOs with embedded temperature sensors were developed and tested in 10 healthy participants over four day wear periods. Activity monitoring was used to estimate energy expenditure during testing. A threshold-based algorithm was developed to identify time periods of high activity from foot temperature data. Group differences in estimated energy expenditure between time periods below and above the threshold were significant in both the training and validation sets (p<0.001). Significant differences were also seen at individual participant level (p<0.001 in all cases). These results demonstrate the feasibility of using FOs with embedded sensing to monitor plantar surface foot temperatures during normal daily activities and for extended periods and show that periods of increased activity can be identified using foot temperature data. PMID:23981438

  9. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ta, Chieu Anh Kim; Arnason, John Thor

    2015-12-26

    Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS). As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented.

  10. Multisensor fusion remote sensing technology for assessing multitemporal responses in ecohydrological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkeasorn, Ammarin

    ) satellite imagery as previously developed was used. Eight commonly used vegetation indices were calculated from the reflectance obtained from Landsat 5 TM satellite images. The vegetation indices were individually used to classify vegetation cover in association with genetic programming algorithm. The soil moisture and vegetation indices were integrated into Landsat TM images based on a pre-pixel channel approach for riparian classification. Two different classification algorithms were used including genetic programming, and a combination of ISODATA and maximum likelihood supervised classification. The white box feature of genetic programming revealed the comparative advantage of all input parameters. The GP algorithm yielded more than 90% accuracy, based on unseen ground data, using vegetation index and Landsat reflectance band 1, 2, 3, and 4. The detection of changes in the buffer zone was proved to be technically feasible with high accuracy. Overall, the development of the RICAL algorithm may lead to the formulation of more effective management strategies for the handling of non-point source pollution control, bird habitat monitoring, and grazing and live stock management in the future. Geo-environmental information amassed in this study includes soil permeability, surface temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, leaf area index (LAI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). With the aid of a remote sensing-based GIP analysis, only five locations out of more than 800 candidate sites were selected by the spatial analysis, and then confirmed by a field investigation. The methodology developed in this remote sensing-based GIP analysis will significantly advance the state-of-the-art technology in optimum arrangement/distribution of water sensor platforms for maximum sensing coverage and information-extraction capacity. To more efficiently use the limited amount of water or to resourcefully provide adequate time for flood warning, the results have led us to seek

  11. MLS student active learning within a "cloud" technology program.

    PubMed

    Tille, Patricia M; Hall, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009, the MLS program in a large public university serving a geographically large, sparsely populated state instituted an initiative for the integration of technology enhanced teaching and learning within the curriculum. This paper is intended to provide an introduction to the system requirements and sample instructional exercises used to create an active learning technology-based classroom. Discussion includes the following: 1.) define active learning and the essential components, 2.) summarize teaching methods, technology and exercises utilized within a "cloud" technology program, 3.) describe a "cloud" enhanced classroom and programming 4.) identify active learning tools and exercises that can be implemented into laboratory science programs, and 5.) describe the evaluation and assessment of curriculum changes and student outcomes. The integration of technology in the MLS program is a continual process and is intended to provide student-driven active learning experiences.

  12. Synthesis and quorum sensing inhibitory activity of key phenolic compounds of ginger and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N Vijendra; Murthy, Pushpa S; Manjunatha, J R; Bettadaiah, B K

    2014-09-15

    Phenolic components of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) viz. [6]-gingerol, [6]-shogaol and zingerone exhibited quorum sensing inhibitory activity (QSI) against Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The inhibitory activity of all the compounds was studied by zone inhibition, pyocyanin, and violacein assay. All the compounds displayed good inhibition at 500ppm. [6]-Azashogaol, a new derivative of [6]-shogaol has been synthesized by Beckmann rearrangement of its oxime in the presence of ZnCl2. The structure elucidation of this new derivative was carried out by 1D ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) and 2D-NMR (COSY, HSQC and NOESY) spectral studies. This compound showed good QSI activity against P. aeruginosa. An isoxazoline derivative of [6]-gingerol was prepared and it exhibited good QSI activity. Present study illustrated that, the phenolic compounds of ginger and their derivatives form a class of compounds with promising QSI activity. PMID:24767081

  13. Quorum sensing activity of Aeromonas caviae strain YL12, a bacterium isolated from compost.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-04-22

    Quorum sensing is a well-studied cell-to-cell communication method that involves a cell-density dependent regulation of genes expression mediated by signalling molecules. In this study, a bacterium isolated from a plant material compost pile was found to possess quorum sensing activity based on bioassay screening. Isolate YL12 was identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and molecular typing using rpoD gene which identified the isolate as Aeromonas caviae. High resolution tandem mass spectrometry was subsequently employed to identify the N-acyl homoserine lactone profile of Aeromonas caviae YL12 and confirmed that this isolate produced two short chain N-acyl homoserine lactones, namely C4-HSL and C6, and the production was observed to be cell density-dependent. Using the thin layer chromatography (TLC) bioassay, both AHLs were found to activate C. violaceum CV026, whereas only C6-HSL was revealed to induce bioluminescence expression of E. coli [pSB401]. The data presented in this study will be the leading steps in understanding the role of quorum sensing in Aeromonas caviae strain YL12.

  14. The application of remote sensing technology to the solution of problems in the management of resources in Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    In an effort to bridge the gap between the research community and the user agencies, this investigation was designed to take the remote sensing technology and products of that technology to the user agencies and to assist them in the use of this technology. The first semi-annual report summarizes the progress which has been made in the following specific projects: (1) pilot study for land use inventory of the Great Lakes Watershed; (2) resource inventory of Marion County (Indianapolis), Indiana; (3) resource inventory of 8 central Indiana counties for the Indiana Heartland Coordinating Commission; (4) applications within the Indiana Department of Natural Resources; (5) applications within the Indiana Department of Commerce; and (6) applications within the USDA Soil Conservation Service.

  15. Induced Voltage Linear Extraction Method Using an Active Kelvin Bridge for Disturbing Force Self-Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an induced voltage linear extraction method for disturbing force self-sensing in the application of giant magnetostrictive actuators (GMAs). In this method, a Kelvin bridge combined with an active device is constructed instead of a conventional Wheatstone bridge for extraction of the induced voltage, and an additional GMA is adopted as a reference actuator in the self-sensing circuit in order to balance the circuit bridge. The linear fitting of the measurement data is done according to the linear relationship between the disturbing forces and the integral of the induced voltage. The experimental results confirm the good performance of the proposed method, and the self-sensitivity of the disturbing forces is better than 2.0 (mV·s)/N. PMID:27213399

  16. An evaluation of remote sensing technologies for the detection of fugitive contamination at selected Superfund hazardous waste sites in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2014-01-01

    This evaluation was conducted to assess the potential for using both traditional remote sensing, such as aerial imagery, and emerging remote sensing technology, such as hyperspectral imaging, as tools for postclosure monitoring of selected hazardous waste sites. Sixteen deleted Superfund (SF) National Priorities List (NPL) sites in Pennsylvania were imaged with a Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Airborne Real-Time Cueing Hyperspectral Enhanced Reconnaissance (ARCHER) sensor between 2009 and 2012. Deleted sites are those sites that have been remediated and removed from the NPL. The imagery was processed to radiance and atmospherically corrected to relative reflectance with standard software routines using the Environment for Visualizing Imagery (ENVI, ITT–VIS, Boulder, Colorado) software. Standard routines for anomaly detection, endmember collection, vegetation stress, and spectral analysis were applied.

  17. Validity of PALMS GPS Scoring of Active and Passive Travel Compared to SenseCam

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jordan A.; Jankowska, Marta M.; Meseck, Kristin; Godbole, Suneeta; Natarajan, Loki; Raab, Fredric; Demchak, Barry; Patrick, Kevin; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess validity of the Personal Activity Location Measurement System (PALMS) for deriving time spent walking/running, bicycling, and in vehicle, using SenseCam as the comparison. Methods 40 adult cyclists wore a Qstarz BT-Q1000XT GPS data logger and SenseCam (camera worn around neck capturing multiple images every minute) for a mean of 4 days. PALMS used distance and speed between GPS points to classify whether each minute was part of a trip (yes/no), and if so, the trip mode (walking/running, bicycling, in vehicle). SenseCam images were annotated to create the same classifications (i.e., trip yes/no and mode). 2×2 contingency tables and confusion matrices were calculated at the minute-level for PALMS vs. SenseCam classifications. Mixed-effects linear regression models estimated agreement (mean differences and intraclass correlations [ICCs]) between PALMS and SenseCam with regards to minutes/day in each mode. Results Minute-level sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value were ≥88%, and positive predictive value was ≥75% for non mode-specific trip detection. 72–80% of outdoor walking/running minutes, 73% of bicycling minutes, and 74–76% of in-vehicle minutes were correctly classified by PALMS. For minutes/day, PALMS had a mean bias (i.e., amount of over or under estimation) of 2.4–3.1 minutes (11–15%) for walking/running, 2.3–2.9 minutes (7–9%) for bicycling, and 4.3–5 minutes (15–17%) for vehicle time. ICCs were ≥.80 for all modes. Conclusions PALMS has validity for processing GPS data to objectively measure time walking/running, bicycling, and in vehicle in population studies. Assessing travel patterns is one of many valuable applications of GPS in physical activity research that can improve our understanding of the determinants and health outcomes of active transportation as well as its impact on physical activity. PMID:25010407

  18. Quorum Sensing Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships of β-Keto Esters.

    PubMed

    Forschner-Dancause, Stephanie; Poulin, Emily; Meschwitz, Susan

    2016-07-25

    Traditional therapeutics to treat bacterial infections have given rise to multi-drug resistant pathogens, which pose a major threat to human and animal health. In several pathogens, quorum sensing (QS)-a cell-cell communication system in bacteria-controls the expression of genes responsible for pathogenesis, thus representing a novel target in the fight against bacterial infections. Based on the structure of the autoinducers responsible for QS activity and other QS inhibitors, we hypothesize that β-keto esters with aryl functionality could possess anti-QS activity. A panel of nineteen β-keto ester analogs was tested for the inhibition of bioluminescence (a QS-controlled phenotype) in the marine pathogen Vibrio harveyi. Initial screening demonstrated the need of a phenyl ring at the C-3 position for antagonistic activity. Further additions to the phenyl ring with 4-substituted halo groups or a 3- or 4-substituted methoxy group resulted in the most active compounds with IC50 values ranging from 23 µM to 53 µM. The compounds additionally inhibit green fluorescent protein production by E. coli JB525. Evidence is presented that aryl β-keto esters may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with N-acyl homoserine lactones for receptor binding. Expansion of the β-keto ester panel will enable us to obtain more insight into the structure-activity relationships needed to allow for the development of novel anti-virulence agents.

  19. Quorum Sensing Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships of β-Keto Esters.

    PubMed

    Forschner-Dancause, Stephanie; Poulin, Emily; Meschwitz, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional therapeutics to treat bacterial infections have given rise to multi-drug resistant pathogens, which pose a major threat to human and animal health. In several pathogens, quorum sensing (QS)-a cell-cell communication system in bacteria-controls the expression of genes responsible for pathogenesis, thus representing a novel target in the fight against bacterial infections. Based on the structure of the autoinducers responsible for QS activity and other QS inhibitors, we hypothesize that β-keto esters with aryl functionality could possess anti-QS activity. A panel of nineteen β-keto ester analogs was tested for the inhibition of bioluminescence (a QS-controlled phenotype) in the marine pathogen Vibrio harveyi. Initial screening demonstrated the need of a phenyl ring at the C-3 position for antagonistic activity. Further additions to the phenyl ring with 4-substituted halo groups or a 3- or 4-substituted methoxy group resulted in the most active compounds with IC50 values ranging from 23 µM to 53 µM. The compounds additionally inhibit green fluorescent protein production by E. coli JB525. Evidence is presented that aryl β-keto esters may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with N-acyl homoserine lactones for receptor binding. Expansion of the β-keto ester panel will enable us to obtain more insight into the structure-activity relationships needed to allow for the development of novel anti-virulence agents. PMID:27463706

  20. Research on spectral resource optimization and self-healing technology of hybrid optical fiber sensing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Sang, Mei; Ge, Chunfeng; Chen, Guanghui; Liu, Tiegen

    2015-08-01

    We propose an optical-fiber-sensing-network (OFSN) to allow hybrid fiber sensors working in the same network and it achieves self-healing function. The discrete and distributed optical fiber sensors can be connected in sub-layers of the network. WDM-OTDM technique is introduced to convert multi-wavelengths of light source into a specific arranged wavelength in each sub-layer. Thus every sub-layer can share the system spectrum resources, and sensing signals of each sub-layer are transmitted together in the backbone network. To achieve self-healing function, double-ring structure is adopted in the backbone network. Node microprocessor program is designed to make switching to the protect fiber when working fiber is broken. The experimental backbone setup of the network demonstrates the practical reliability and intelligence of the optical sensing network.

  1. Advanced Technology Development for Active Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N., III; Nishida, Toshikazu; Kurdila, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives include: (1) Develop electro-mechanical/acoustic models of a Helmholtz resonator possessing a compliant diaphragm coupled to a piezoelectric device; (2) Design and fabricate the energy reclamation module and active Helmholtz resonator; (3) Develop and build appropriate energy reclamation/storage circuit; (4) Develop and fabricate appropriate piezoelectric shunt circuit to tune the compliance of the active Helmholtz resonator via a variable capacitor; (5) Quantify energy reclamation module efficiency in a grazing-flow plane wave tube possessing known acoustic energy input; and (6) Quantify actively tuned Helmholtz resonator performance in grazing-flow plane wave tube for a white-noise input

  2. Fiber optic chemical sensor (FOCS{reg_sign}) technology for the detection of hydrocarbons in air and dissolved in water: PetroSense{reg_sign} Portable Hydrocarbon Analyzer (PHA 100) and the PetroSense{reg_sign} CMS 5000

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, D.P.; Himka, R.; Klainer, S.; Arrasate, M.; Leclerc, R.

    1995-12-31

    The PetroSense{reg_sign} Portable Hydrocarbon Analyzer (PHA 100) and the PetroSense{reg_sign} CMS 5000 for continuous monitoring, are instruments which can detect the presence of hydrocarbons dissolved in water as well as detect hydrocarbons in the air. They allow the user to obtain real time, in situ data on hydrocarbon levels present. They can also measure the progress of any remediation that is occurring. The technology used by these instruments is described in this paper.

  3. Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

    2010-01-06

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

  4. The application test system: An approach to technology transfer. [USDA aerospace and remote sensing information requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaronson, A. C.; Buelow, K.; David, F. C.; Packard, R. L.; Ravet, F. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The latest satellite and computer processing and analysis technologies were tested and evaluated in terms of their application feasibility. Technologies evaluated include those developed, tested, and evaluated by the LACIE, as well as candidate technologies developed by the research community and private industry. The implementation of the applications test system and the technology transfer experience between the LACIE and the applications test system is discussed highlighting the approach, the achievements, and the shortcomings.

  5. EVALUATION OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS USING GROUND-BASED OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed and evaluated a method for characterizing fugitive emissions from large area sources. The method, known as radial plume mapping (RPM) uses multiple-beam, scanning, optical remote sensing (ORS) instrumentation such as open-path Fourier transform infrared spectro...

  6. Comparison of Remote Sensing Technologies for Determination of Soil Organic Carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon sequestration is an important component of global carbon balance in the context of ameliorating the effects of carbon dioxide emissions. Remote sensing methods based upon hyperspectral quantification of soil reflectance can provide rapid and cost-effective assessment of soil properties i...

  7. Synergistic effect and antiquorum sensing activity of Nymphaea tetragona (water lily) extract.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Akil; Park, Ji-Yong; Kim, Jin-Yoon; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is a common and widely distributed food borne disease where Salmonella typhimurium is one of the most important etiologic agents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of Nymphaea tetragona alone and in combination with antibiotics against S. typhimurium. It also aimed to assess the plant for quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) activity and to identify the bioactive compounds. The antibacterial activities of the extract were assessed using broth microdilution method. Disk agar diffusion method was employed to determine the QSI and bioactive compounds were identified by GC-MS analysis. Ethyl acetate fraction of N. tetragona extract (EFNTE) demonstrated good antimicrobial activity (MIC 781 μg/mL) against 4 strains out of 5. FIC index ranged from 0.375 to 1.031 between EFNTE/tylosin and 0.515 to 1.250 between EFNTE/streptomycin against S. typhimurium. Among all extracts, EFNTE and butanol fraction more significantly inhibited pigment production of C. violaceum. Polyphenols were identified as major compound of EFNTE and butanol fraction. These results indicate that combination among N. tetragona extract and antibiotics could be useful to combat drug-resistance Salmonella infections and polyphenols are promising new components from N. tetragona that warrant further investigation as a candidate anti-Salmonella agent and quorum sensing inhibitor.

  8. Synergistic effect and antiquorum sensing activity of Nymphaea tetragona (water lily) extract.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Akil; Park, Ji-Yong; Kim, Jin-Yoon; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is a common and widely distributed food borne disease where Salmonella typhimurium is one of the most important etiologic agents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of Nymphaea tetragona alone and in combination with antibiotics against S. typhimurium. It also aimed to assess the plant for quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) activity and to identify the bioactive compounds. The antibacterial activities of the extract were assessed using broth microdilution method. Disk agar diffusion method was employed to determine the QSI and bioactive compounds were identified by GC-MS analysis. Ethyl acetate fraction of N. tetragona extract (EFNTE) demonstrated good antimicrobial activity (MIC 781 μg/mL) against 4 strains out of 5. FIC index ranged from 0.375 to 1.031 between EFNTE/tylosin and 0.515 to 1.250 between EFNTE/streptomycin against S. typhimurium. Among all extracts, EFNTE and butanol fraction more significantly inhibited pigment production of C. violaceum. Polyphenols were identified as major compound of EFNTE and butanol fraction. These results indicate that combination among N. tetragona extract and antibiotics could be useful to combat drug-resistance Salmonella infections and polyphenols are promising new components from N. tetragona that warrant further investigation as a candidate anti-Salmonella agent and quorum sensing inhibitor. PMID:24895589

  9. Synergistic Effect and Antiquorum Sensing Activity of Nymphaea tetragona (Water Lily) Extract

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Akil; Park, Ji-Yong; Kim, Jin-Yoon; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is a common and widely distributed food borne disease where Salmonella typhimurium is one of the most important etiologic agents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of Nymphaea tetragona alone and in combination with antibiotics against S. typhimurium. It also aimed to assess the plant for quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) activity and to identify the bioactive compounds. The antibacterial activities of the extract were assessed using broth microdilution method. Disk agar diffusion method was employed to determine the QSI and bioactive compounds were identified by GC-MS analysis. Ethyl acetate fraction of N. tetragona extract (EFNTE) demonstrated good antimicrobial activity (MIC 781 μg/mL) against 4 strains out of 5. FIC index ranged from 0.375 to 1.031 between EFNTE/tylosin and 0.515 to 1.250 between EFNTE/streptomycin against S. typhimurium. Among all extracts, EFNTE and butanol fraction more significantly inhibited pigment production of C. violaceum. Polyphenols were identified as major compound of EFNTE and butanol fraction. These results indicate that combination among N. tetragona extract and antibiotics could be useful to combat drug-resistance Salmonella infections and polyphenols are promising new components from N. tetragona that warrant further investigation as a candidate anti-Salmonella agent and quorum sensing inhibitor. PMID:24895589

  10. Making Sense of Young People, Education and Digital Technology: The Role of Sociological Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selwyn, Neil

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the contribution of sociological theory to the academic study of young people, education and digital technology. First it discusses the shortcomings of the technological and socially determinist views of technology and education that prevail in current academic and policy discussions. Against this background the paper outlines…

  11. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity. Part 1: Overall economic impact of technological progress: Its measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Investigations were performed at the national economic level to explore the aggregate effects of technological progress on economic growth. Inadequacies in existing marco-economic yardsticks forced the study to focus on the cost savings effects achieved through technological progress. The central questions discussed in this report cover: (1) role of technological progress in economic growth, (2) factors determining the rate of economic growth due to technological progress; (3) quantitative measurements of relationships between technological progress, its determinants, and subsequent economic growth; and (4) effects of research and development activities of the space program. For Part 2, see N72-32174.

  12. Making Sense of Mobile- and Web-Based Wellness Information Technology: Cross-Generational Study

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Kalpana; Connelly, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Background A recent trend in personal health and wellness management is the development of computerized applications or information and communication technologies (ICTs) that support behavioral change, aid the management of chronic conditions, or help an individual manage their wellness and engage in a healthier lifestyle. Objective To understand how individuals across 3 generations (young, middle-aged, and older) think about the design and use of collaborative health and wellness management technologies and what roles these could take in their lives. Methods Face-to-face semistructured interviews, paper prototype systems, and video skits were used to assess how individuals from 3 age cohorts (young: 18-25 years; middle-aged: 35-50 years; and older: ≥65 years) conceptualize the role that health and wellness computing could take in their lives. Results A total of 21 participants in the 3 age cohorts took part (young: n=7; middle-aged: n=7; and older: n=7). Young adults expected to be able to actively manage the presentation of their health-related information. Middle-aged adults had more nuanced expectations that reflect their engagement with work and other life activities. Older adults questioned the sharing of health information with a larger audience, although they saw the value in 1-way sharing between family members or providing aggregated information. Conclusions Our findings inform our suggestions for improving the design of future collaborative health and wellness applications that target specific age groups. We recommend that collaborative ICT health applications targeting young adults should integrate with existing social networking sites, whereas those targeting middle-aged and older adults should support small social networks that rely on intimate personal relationships. Systems that target middle-aged adults should support episodic needs, such as time-sensitive, perhaps intermittent, goal setting. They should also have a low barrier to entry, allowing

  13. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  14. Achievements of the DOT-NASA Joint Program on Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Technologies: Application to Multimodal Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report presents three-year accomplishments from the national program on Commercial Remote Sensing and Geospatial Technology (CRSGT) application to transportation, administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The joint program was authorized under Section 5113 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21). This is the first national program of its type focusing on transportation applications of emerging commercial remote sensing technologies. U.S. DOT's Research and Special Programs Administration manages the program in coordination with NASA's Earth Science Enterprise's application programs. The program focuses on applications of CRSGT products and systems for providing smarter and more efficient transportation operations and services. The program is performed in partnership with four major National Consortia for Remote Sensing in Transportation (NCRST). Each consortium focuses on research and development of products in one of the four priority areas for transportation application, and includes technical application and demonstration projects carried out in partnership with industries and service providers in their respective areas. The report identifies products and accomplishments from each of the four consortia in meeting the goal of providing smarter and more efficient transportation services. The products and results emerging from the program are being implemented in transportation operations and services through state and local agencies. The Environmental Assessment and Application Consortium (NCRST-E) provides leadership for developing and deploying cost effective environmental and transportation planning services, and integrates CRSGT advances for achieving smarter and cost effective corridor planning. The Infrastructure Management Consortium (NCRST-I) provides leadership in technologies that achieve smarter and cheaper ways of managing

  15. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  16. Toward a typology of technology users: how older people experience technology's potential for active aging.

    PubMed

    Gjevjon, Edith Roth; Oderud, Tone; Wensaas, Gro H; Moen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines an emerging typology of older users of information and communication technology (ICT) to facilitate active aging. Through inductive data analysis from focus groups, iterative workshops, and personal interviews, we suggest three types of technology users. These types are "the Excluded," "the Entertained," and "the Networker." Clearly, ICT offers several benefits to those who are enthusiastic and frequent users, exemplified as the Entertained and the Networker. Hence, our findings support the notion of technology as a tool to maintain or increase an older person's engagement and activity level. Conversely, for those reluctant, uninterested, or incapable of using ICT, such potentials are limited and imply fewer opportunities for participation in activities.

  17. Langley Research Center contributions in advancing active control technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active control technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. Some of the contributions of the Langley Research Center in advancing active control technology are described. Contributions are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  18. Crowdsourcing, citizen sensing and Sensor Web technologies for public and environmental health surveillance and crisis management: trends, OGC standards and application examples

    SciTech Connect

    Kamel Boulos, Maged; Resch, Bernd; Crowley, David N.; Breslin, John G.; Sohn, Gunho; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Jeziersk, Eduardo; Slayer Chuang, Kuo Yu

    2011-12-21

    The PIE Activity Awareness Environment is designed to be an adaptive data triage and decision support tool that allows role and activity based situation awareness through a dynamic, trainable filtering system. This paper discusses the process and methodology involved in the application as well as some of its capabilities. 'Wikification of GIS by the masses' is a phrase-term first coined by Kamel Boulos in 2005, two years earlier than Goodchild's term 'Volunteered Geographic Information'. Six years later (2005-2011), OpenStreetMap and Google Earth (GE) are now full-fledged, crowdsourced 'Wikipedias of the Earth' par excellence, with millions of users contributing their own layers to GE, attaching photos, videos, notes and even 3-D (three dimensional) models to locations in GE. From using Twitter in participatory sensing and bicycle-mounted sensors in pervasive environmental sensing, to creating a 100,000-sensor geo-mashup using Semantic Web technology, to the 3-D visualisation of indoor and outdoor surveillance data in real-time and the development of next-generation, collaborative natural user interfaces that will power the spatially-enabled public health and emergency situation rooms of the future, where sensor data and citizen reports can be triaged and acted upon in real-time by distributed teams of professionals, this paper offers a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of the overlapping domains of the Sensor Web, citizen sensing and 'human-in-the-loop sensing' in the era of the Mobile and Social Web, and the roles these domains can play in environmental and public health surveillance and crisis/disaster informatics. We provide an in-depth review of the key issues and trends in these areas, the challenges faced when reasoning and making decisions with real-time crowdsourced data (such as issues of information overload, 'noise', misinformation, bias and trust), the core technologies and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards involved (Sensor Web Enablement

  19. Technology to promote and increase physical activity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Nina C

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is firmly recommended as part of a multifaceted approach to heart failure (HF) self-management. Unfortunately, research indicates that most patients are less likely to engage in and adhere to such activities. The widespread use of information and communication technology tools and resources offers an innovative and potentially beneficial avenue for increasing physical activity levels in HF patients. This article presents specific ways in which advances in information and communication technologies, including Internet- and mobile-based communications, social media platforms, and self-monitoring health devices, can serve as a means to broadly promote increasing levels of physical activity to improve health outcomes in the HF population.

  20. Long distance active hyperspectral sensing using high-power near-infrared supercontinuum light source.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Albert; Kääriäinen, Teemu; Parviainen, Tomi; Buchter, Scott; Heiliö, Miika; Laurila, Toni

    2014-03-24

    A hyperspectral remote sensing instrument employing a novel near-infrared supercontinuum light source has been developed for active illumination and identification of targets. The supercontinuum is generated in a standard normal dispersion multi-mode fiber and has 16 W total optical output power covering 1000 nm to 2300 nm spectral range. A commercial 256-channel infrared spectrometer was used for broadband infrared detection. The feasibility of the presented hyperspectral measurement approach was investigated both indoors and in the field. Reflection spectra from several diffusive targets were successfully measured and a measurement range of 1.5 km was demonstrated.

  1. Preliminary methods for wearable neuro-vascular assessment with non-invasive, active sensing.

    PubMed

    Carek, Andrew M; Töreyin, Hakan; Hersek, Sinan; Inan, Omer T

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a non-invasive and active sensing scheme that is ultimately aimed to be integrated in a wearable system for neuro-vascular health assessment is presented with preliminary results. With this system, vascular tone is modulated by local heating and cooling of the palm, and the resulting changes in local hemodynamics are monitored via impedance plethysmography (IPG) and photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors interfaced with custom analog electronics. Proof-of-concept measurements were conducted on three subjects using hot packs/ice bags to modulate the palmar skin temperature. From ensemble averaged and smoothed versions of pulsatile IPG and PPG signals, the effects of local changes in skin temperature on a series of parameters associated with neuro-vascular mechanisms (heart rate, blood volume, blood flow rate, blood volume pulse inflection point area ratio, and local pulse transit time) have been observed. The promising experimental results suggest that, with different active temperature modulation schemes (consisting of heating/cooling cycles covering different temperature ranges at different rates), it would be possible to enhance the depth and specificity of the information associated with neuro-vascular health by using biosensors that can fit inside a wearable device (such as a sleeve). This study sets the foundation for future studies on designing and testing such a wearable neuro-vascular health assessment system employing active sensing. PMID:26736951

  2. Anti-quorum sensing activity of essential oils from Colombian plants.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Colorado, Beatriz; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Stashenko, Elena E; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Kunze, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils from Colombian plants were characterised by GC-MS, and assayed for anti-quorum sensing activity in bacteria sensor strains. Two major chemotypes were found for Lippia alba, the limonene-carvone and the citral (geranial-neral). For other species, the main components included α-pinene (Ocotea sp.), β-pinene (Swinglea glutinosa), cineol (Elettaria cardamomun), α-zingiberene (Zingiber officinale) and pulegone (Minthostachys mollis). Several essential oils presented promising inhibitory properties for the short chain AHL quorum sensing (QS) system, in Escherichia coli containing the biosensor plasmid pJBA132, in particular Lippia alba. Moderate activity as anti-QS using the same plasmid, were also found for selected constituents of essential oils studied here, such as citral, carvone and α-pinene, although solely at the highest tested concentration (250 µg mL(-1)). Only citral presented some activity for the long chain AHL QS system, in Pseudomonas putida containing the plasmid pRK-C12. In short, essential oils from Colombian flora have promising properties as QS modulators. PMID:21936639

  3. A Host-Produced Autoinducer-2 Mimic Activates Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Anisa S; Valastyan, Julie S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-04-13

    Host-microbial symbioses are vital to health; nonetheless, little is known about the role crosskingdom signaling plays in these relationships. In a process called quorum sensing, bacteria communicate with one another using extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. One autoinducer, AI-2, is proposed to promote interspecies bacterial communication, including in the mammalian gut. We show that mammalian epithelia produce an AI-2 mimic activity in response to bacteria or tight-junction disruption. This AI-2 mimic is detected by the bacterial AI-2 receptor, LuxP/LsrB, and can activate quorum-sensing-controlled gene expression, including in the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. AI-2 mimic activity is induced when epithelia are directly or indirectly exposed to bacteria, suggesting that a secreted bacterial component(s) stimulates its production. Mutagenesis revealed genes required for bacteria to both detect and stimulate production of the AI-2 mimic. These findings uncover a potential role for the mammalian AI-2 mimic in fostering crosskingdom signaling and host-bacterial symbioses.

  4. A framework for nowcasting and forecasting of rainfall-triggered landslide activity using remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Stanley, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing data offers the unique perspective to provide situational awareness of hydrometeorological hazards over large areas in a way that is impossible to achieve with in situ data. Recent work has shown that rainfall-triggered landslides, while typically local hazards that occupy small spatial areas, can be approximated over regional or global scales in near real-time. This work presents a regional and global approach to approximating potential landslide activity using the landslide hazard assessment for situational awareness (LHASA) model. This system couples remote sensing data, including Global Precipitation Measurement rainfall data, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and other surface variables to estimate where and when landslide activity may be likely. This system also evaluates the effectiveness of quantitative precipitation estimates from the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 to provide a 24 forecast of potential landslide activity. Preliminary results of the LHASA model and implications for are presented for a regional version of this system in Central America as well as a prototype global approach.

  5. Discrimination of active and inactive sand from remote sensing - Kelso dunes, Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paisley, Elizabeth C. I.; Lancaster, Nicholas; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Landsat TM images, field data, and laboratoray reflectance spectra were examined for the Kelso dunes, Mojave Desert, California to assess the use of visible and near-infrared (VNIR) remote sensing data to discriminate aeolian sand populations on the basis of spectral brightness. Results show that areas of inactive sand have a larger percentage of dark, fine-grained materials compared to those composed of active sand, which contain less dark fines and a higher percentage of quartz sand-size grains. Both areas are spectrally distinct in the VNIR, suggesting that VNIR spectral data can be used to discriminate active and inactive sand populations in the Mojave Desert. Analysis of laboratory spectra was complicated by the presence of magnetite in the active sands, which decreases their laboratory reflectance values to those of inactive sands. For this application, comparison of TM and laboratory spectra suggests that less than 35 percent vegetation cover does not influence the TM spectra.

  6. Antimicrobial and quorum sensing inhibitory activities of the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana.

    PubMed

    Asfour, Hani Z

    2016-07-01

    A prenylated xanthone, α-mangostin was separated from the alcoholic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp. Its structure was established by different spectroscopic analysis. The total methanolic extract (TME) and different fractions of G. mangostana pericarp as well as α-mangostin were assessed for their antimicrobial and quorum sensing inhibitory effects (QSI). The TME, CHCl3 fraction, and α-mangostin exhibited strong activity against all tested strains. While, EtOAc, n-BuOH, and aqueous fractions showed moderate activity against some of the tested organisms. In addition TME, CHCl3, EtOAc, and α-mangostin showed promising QSI, while n-BuOH and aqueous fractions showed moderate activity. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for TME, CHCl3 fractions, and α-mangostin was also assessed. PMID:27592485

  7. Electrochemical Sensing, Photocatalytic and Biological Activities of ZnO Nanoparticles: Synthesis via Green Chemistry Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, L. S. Reddy; Archana, B.; Lingaraju, K.; Kavitha, C.; Suresh, D.; Nagabhushana, H.; Nagaraju, G.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have successfully synthesized ZnO nanoparticles (Nps) via solution combustion method using sugarcane juice as the novel fuel. The structure and morphology of the synthesized ZnO Nps have been analyzed using various analytical tools. The synthesized ZnO Nps exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue dye, indicating that the ZnO Nps are potential photocatalytic semiconductor materials. The synthesized ZnO Nps also show good electrochemical sensing of dopamine. ZnO Nps exhibit significant bactericidal activity against Klebsiella aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Eschesichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, the ZnO Nps show good antioxidant activity by potentially scavenging 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals. The above studies clearly demonstrate versatile applications of ZnO synthesized by simple eco-friendly route.

  8. Application of space remote sensing technology to living marine resources in coastal zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a compilation of new Landsat satellite remote sensing techniques for treatment of Coastal Zone Living Marine Resource problems. The techniques have been developed over the past three to five years using optimized digital analysis procedures and evaluated in limited coastal areas of the United States. However, most of the techniques are directly applicable to other areas of the world, particularly in those areas where Landsat satellite data are available. Each technique presented herein has been documented and published separately as a NASA report within the last three years. The data required to substantiate the conclusion that 'significant new space remote sensing techniques are now available for the treatment of Coastal Zone Living Marine Resource problems' are contained within these reports and are referenced herein.

  9. Modulation of BK channel activities by calcium-sensing receptor in rat bronchopulmonary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Vysotskaya, Zhanna V; Moss, Charles R; Gilbert, Carolyn A; Gabriel, Sabry A; Gu, Qihai

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the expression of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels and to explore the possible modulation of BK channel activities by calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) in rat bronchopulmonary sensory neurons. The expression of BK channels was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Results from whole-cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that activation of CaSR with its agonist spermine or NPS R-568 showed a dual regulating effect on BK channel activities: it potentiated BK currents in cells exhibiting low baseline BK activity while slightly inhibited BK currents in cells with high baseline BK activity. Blocking CaSR with its antagonist NPS 2143 significantly inhibited BK currents. Our results further showed that the modulation of BK currents by CaSR activation or blockade was completely abolished when the intracellular Ca(2+) was chelated by BAPTA-AM. In summary, our data suggest that CaSR plays an integrative role in bronchopulmonary afferent signaling, at least partially through the regulation of BK channel activities.

  10. Antibacterial and quorum sensing regulatory activities of some traditional Eastern-European medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Tolmacheva, Anna A; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Deryabin, Dmitry G

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to screen extracts of twenty Eastern European medicinal plants, using wild-type and reporter Chromobacterium violaceum bioassays, for novel components that target bacterial cells and their quorum sensing (QS) communication systems. Three types of activity and their combinations were revealed: (i) direct antimicrobial growth-inhibitory activity, (ii) non-specific and specific pro-QS activities, (iii) anti-QS activity. Among seven plant extracts showing direct growth-inhibitory activity, the strongest effect was shown by Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (bearberry) leaves. Many plants stimulated violacein production by wild-type C. violaceum ATCC 31532 in a non-specific manner, and only the herb Bidens tripartita (three-lobe beggarticks) contained compounds that mimic acyl-homoserine lactone and operated as a QS agonist. Anti-QS activity was found in eleven plants including Quercus robur (oak) cortex, Betula verrucosa (birch) buds and Eucalyptus viminalis (Manna Gum) leaves. Subsequent statistical analysis showed differences between antimicrobial and anti-QS activities, whereas both activities were defined by phylogenetic position of medical resource plant. Finally, extract from Quercus robur cortex revealed at least two fractions, showing different anti-QS mechanisms. These data confirm that multicomponent anti-infectious mechanisms are used by plants, which may be useful for drug development.

  11. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  12. Remote sensing utility in a disaster struck urban environment. [technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, M.; Holguin, A.

    1975-01-01

    Standard operating procedures, utilizing remote sensing, are outlined for public health assistance during natural disaster relief operations. A manual to aid decision making for public health authorities is included. Flow charts which show the procedures that need to be implemented during a natural disaster are also included. Emphasis is placed on a preventive approach to the effects of disasters, and specifically to post-disaster problems that relate to public health concerns during the emergency phase of relief.

  13. Recent Technology of Sensing, Monitoring, Diagnosis, and Maintenance for Aged Electric Power and Energy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi

    This paper deals with the recent topics related to sensing, monitoring, and diagnosis for electric power equipment. Moreover the risk management for such equipments has been an object of study in many terms such as economical, technical aspects, safety and rest, CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) etc. The relationship between the function of the economic engineering and the maintenance strategy for electric power system are reviewed.

  14. Assessment of remote sensing technologies to discover and characterize waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-11

    This report presents details about waste management practices that are being developed using remote sensing techniques to characterize DOE waste sites. Once the sites and problems have been located and characterized and an achievable restoration and remediation program have been established, efforts to reclaim the environment will begin. Special problems to be considered are: concentrated waste forms in tanks and pits; soil and ground water contamination; ground safety hazards for workers; and requirement for long-term monitoring.

  15. Assessment of remote sensing technologies to discover and characterize waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-11

    This report presents details about waste management practices that are being developed using remote sensing techniques to characterize DOE waste sites. Once sites and problems have been located and an achievable restoration and remediation program have been established, efforts to reclaim the environment will begin. Special problems to be considered are: concentrated wastes in tanks and pits; soil and ground water contamination; ground safety hazards for workers; and requirements for long-term monitoring.

  16. Realizing the full potential of Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT) Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A.; Liu, L.; Parsekian, A.; Jafarov, E. E.; Panda, S. K.; Zebker, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT) product uses the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to measure ground subsidence, active layer thickness (ALT), and thermokarst activity in permafrost regions. ReSALT supports research for the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) field campaign in Alaska and northwest Canada and is a precursor for a potential Nasa-Isro Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) product. ALT is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost and thermokarst activity is one of the key drivers of change in permafrost regions. The ReSALT product currently includes 1) long-term subsidence trends resulting from the melting and subsequent drainage of excess ground ice in permafrost-affected soils, 2) seasonal subsidence resulting from the expansion of soil water into ice as the active layer freezes and thaws, and 3) ALT estimated from the seasonal subsidence assuming a vertical profile of water within the soil column. ReSALT includes uncertainties for all parameters and is validated against in situ measurements from the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) network, Ground Penetrating Radar and mechanical probe measurements. We present high resolution ReSALT products on the North Slope of Alaska: Prudhoe Bay, Barrow, Toolik Lake, Happy Valley, and the Anaktuvuk fire zone. We believe that the ReSALT product could be expanded to include maps of individual thermokarst features identified as spatial anomalies in the subsidence trends, with quantified expansion rates. We illustrate the technique with multiple examples of thermokarst features on the North Slope of Alaska. Knowing the locations and expansion rates for individual features allows us to evaluate risks to human infrastructure. Our results highlight the untapped potential of the InSAR technique to remotely sense ALT and thermokarst dynamics over large areas of the Arctic.

  17. Using Multi-modal Sensing for Human Activity Modeling in the Real World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Beverly L.; Consolvo, Sunny; Choudhury, Tanzeem

    Traditionally smart environments have been understood to represent those (often physical) spaces where computation is embedded into the users' surrounding infrastructure, buildings, homes, and workplaces. Users of this "smartness" move in and out of these spaces. Ambient intelligence assumes that users are automatically and seamlessly provided with context-aware, adaptive information, applications and even sensing - though this remains a significant challenge even when limited to these specialized, instrumented locales. Since not all environments are "smart" the experience is not a pervasive one; rather, users move between these intelligent islands of computationally enhanced space while we still aspire to achieve a more ideal anytime, anywhere experience. Two key technological trends are helping to bridge the gap between these smart environments and make the associated experience more persistent and pervasive. Smaller and more computationally sophisticated mobile devices allow sensing, communication, and services to be more directly and continuously experienced by user. Improved infrastructure and the availability of uninterrupted data streams, for instance location-based data, enable new services and applications to persist across environments.

  18. Remotely-Sensed Active Fire Data for Protected Area Management: Eight-Year Patterns in the Manas National Park, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahata, Chihiro; Amin, Rajan; Sarma, Pranjit; Banerjee, Gitanjali; Oliver, William; Fa, John E.

    2010-02-01

    The Terai-Duar savanna and grasslands, which once extended along most of the Himalayan foothills, now only remain in a number of protected areas. Within these localities, grassland burning is a major issue, but data on frequency and distribution of fires are limited. Here, we analysed the incidence of active fires, which only occur during the dry season (Nov.-Mar.), within a significant area of Terai grasslands: the Manas National Park (MNP), India. We obtained locations of 781 fires during the 2000-2008 dry seasons, from the Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS) that delivers global MODIS hotspot/fire locations using remote sensing and GIS technologies. Annual number of fires rose significantly from around 20 at the start of the study period to over 90 after 2002, with most (85%) detected between December and January. Over half of the fires occurred in tall grasslands, but fire density was highest in wetland and riverine vegetation, dry at the time. Most burning took place near rivers, roads and the park boundary, suggesting anthropogenic origins. A kernel density map of all recorded fires indicated three heavily burnt areas in the MNP, all within the tall grasslands. Our study demonstrates, despite some technical caveats linked to fire detection technology, which is improving, that remote fire data can be a practical tool in understanding fire concentration and burning temporal patterns in highly vulnerable habitats, useful in guiding management.

  19. Research of AGC technology in a digital optical fiber sensing system with PGC modulation and demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianfeng; Xiong, Shuidong; Zhang, Yan

    2014-11-01

    The magnitude of light intensity on the photo-to-electric detector fluctuates all the time in an optic fiber sensing system, because of the influence of various factors in the fiber optic sensing system and from the external environment. As a result of the excessive intensity, the electric signal will be overload after the amplifier circuit with constant enlargement factor, and when the light intensity becames too small, it will reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the electric signal. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce an automatic gain control (AGC) module into the system, which can insure the electric signal in a reasonable magnitude. In order to solve the problem of optic intensity fluctuating in the optical fiber sensing system with PGC modulation and demodulation, in this paper, firstly, it is analyzed that the impact of different magnitudes of interferential intensity to the PGC demodulation in theory. Secondly, a reasonable control method is put forward and an AGC module based on the AD602 chip is designed and produced. Finally, it is proved that the optic fiber sensor system with an AGC module has strong ability to resist fluctuation of light intensity within 40dB.

  20. Western Regional Remote Sensing Conference Proceedings, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Diverse applications of LANDSAT data, problem solutions, and operational goals are described by remote sensing users from 14 western states. The proposed FY82 federal budget reductions for technology transfer activities and the planned transition of the operational remote sensing system to NOAA's supervision are also considered.

  1. Multisensor of Remotely Sensed Data for Characterizing Seismotectonic Activities in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Bakar, Rabieahtul; Azahari Razak, Khamarrul; Anuar Jamaludin, Tajul; Tongkul, Felix; Mohamad, Zakaria; Ramli, Zamri; Abd Manap, Mohamad; Rahman, Muhammad Zulkarnain Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Seismically induced events pose serious hazards yet are difficult to predict. Despite remarkable efforts of mapping, monitoring and modelling of such great events at regional or local scales, the understanding of the processes in the Earth's dynamic system remains elusive. Although Malaysia is in a relatively low seismic hazard zone, the current trend and pattern of seismotectonic activities triggered a series of fundamental study to better understand the relationship between the earthquakes, recent tectonics and seismically active fault zones. Several conventional mapping techniques have been intensively used but shown some limitations. Remote sensing is the preferable mean to quantify the seismic activity accurately in a larger area within a short period. Still, only few of such studies have been carried out in this subduction region. Characterization of seismotectonic activities from space in a tropical environment is very challenging given the complexity of its physiographic, climatic, geologic conditions and anthropogenic activities. There are many factors controlling the success rate of the implementation mainly due to the lack of historical earthquakes, geomorphological evidence, and proper identification of regional tectonic patterns. In this study, we aim at providing better insight to extract and characterize seismotectonic activities by integrating passive and active remotely-sensed data, geodetic data, historical records, GIS-based data analysis and in-situ measurements as well quantify them based on field investigation and expert knowledge. It is crucial to perform spatiotemporal analysis of its activities in the most seismically induced region in North-Western Sabah. A comprehensive geodatabase of seismotectonic events are developed and allowed us to analyse the spatiotemporal activities. A novelty of object-based image method for extracting tropical seismically active faults and related seismotectonic features are introduced and evaluated. We aim to

  2. Diagnostic Care: Grade 9. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Level 2. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This Technology Learning Activity (TLA) on exploring diagnostic care careers for Grade 9 is designed for use in eight class periods. It gives students experience in using standard health care equipment to perform basic diagnostic procedures. This teacher's edition begins with an overview of technology education. The second section describes…

  3. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) MITIGATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE: ACTIVITIES OF THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and monitoring technology performance activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. The Center is a public/private partnership between Southern Research Institute and the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development. It...

  4. Therapeutic Care. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series. Level 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This Technology Learning Activity (TLA) for exploring therapeutic care careers is designed for use in eight class periods. It exposes students to the different types of therapeutic care and helps them understand how they can be used to treat and heal. This teacher's edition begins with an overview of technology education. The second section…

  5. Positive Technology for Healthy Living and Active Ageing.

    PubMed

    Riva, Giuseppe; Gaggioli, Andrea; Villani, Daniela; Cipresso, Pietro; Repetto, Claudia; Serino, Silvia; Triberti, Stefano; Brivio, Eleonora; Galimberti, Carlo; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies are widely and rapidly spreading in people's daily lives. But what is the possible role of the mass proliferation of digital devices in supporting healthy living and active ageing? Are they useful in fostering personal growth and individual integration of the elderly, by promoting satisfaction, opportunities for action, and self-expression? Rather, do they enhance automation, impose constraints on personal initiative, and result in compulsive consumption of information? In this chapter, we suggest that possible answers to these questions will be offered by the "Positive Technology" approach, i.e., the scientific and applied approach to using technology so that it improves the quality of our personal experiences through its structuring, augmentation, and/or replacement. First, we suggest that it is possible to use technology to manipulate the quality of experience with the goal of increasing wellness and generating strengths and resilience in individuals, organizations, and society. Then, we classify positive technologies according to their effects on these three features of personal experience - Hedonic: technologies used to induce positive and pleasant experiences; Eudaimonic: technologies used to support individuals in reaching engaging and self-actualizing experiences; Social/Interpersonal: technologies used to support and improve the connectedness between individuals, groups, and organizations. Finally, we discuss the possible role of positive technologies for healthy living and active ageing by presenting different practical applications of this approach.

  6. Current mHealth Technologies for Physical Activity Assessment and Promotion

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Gillian A.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Context Novel mobile assessment and intervention capabilities are changing the face of physical activity (PA) research. A comprehensive systematic review of how mobile technology has been used for measuring PA and promoting PA behavior change is needed. Evidence acquisition Article collection was conducted using six databases from February to June 2012 with search terms related to mobile technology and PA. Articles that described the use of mobile technologies for PA assessment, sedentary behavior assessment, and/or interventions for PA behavior change were included. Articles were screened for inclusion and study information was extracted. Evidence synthesis Analyses were conducted from June to September 2012. Mobile phone–based journals and questionnaires, short message service (SMS) prompts, and on-body PA sensing systems were the mobile technologies most utilized. Results indicate that mobile journals and questionnaires are effective PA self-report measurement tools. Intervention studies that reported successful promotion of PA behavior change employed SMS communication, mobile journaling, or both SMS and mobile journaling. Conclusions mHealth technologies are increasingly being employed to assess and intervene on PA in clinical, epidemiologic, and intervention research. The wide variations in technologies used and outcomes measured limit comparability across studies, and hamper identification of the most promising technologies. Further, the pace of technologic advancement currently outstrips that of scientific inquiry. New adaptive, sequential research designs that take advantage of ongoing technology development are needed. At the same time, scientific norms must shift to accept “smart,” adaptive, iterative, evidence-based assessment and intervention technologies that will, by nature, improve during implementation. PMID:24050427

  7. Real-Time Integrity Monitoring of Stored Geo-Spatial Data Using Forward-Looking Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Harrah, Steven D.; deHaag, Maarten Uijt

    2002-01-01

    Terrain Awareness and Warning Systems (TAWS) and Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data (e.g. terrain, obstacles, and/or features). As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. This lack of a quantifiable integrity level is one of the constraints that has limited certification and operational approval of TAWS/SVS to "advisory-only" systems for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a real-time monitor to bound database integrity by using downward-looking remote sensing technology (i.e. radar altimeters). This paper describes an extension of the integrity monitor concept to include a forward-looking sensor to cover additional classes of terrain database faults and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. An operational concept is presented that combines established feature extraction techniques with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features using principles from classical detection theory. Finally, an implementation is presented that uses existing commercial-off-the-shelf weather radar sensor technology.

  8. Graphic products used in the evaluation of traditional and emerging remote sensing technologies for the detection of fugitive contamination at selected superfund hazardous waste sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the overhead imagery and field sampling results used to prepare U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2011-1050, 'Evaluation of Traditional and Emerging Remote Sensing Technologies for the Detection of Fugitive Contamination at Selected Superfund Hazardous Waste Sites'. These graphic products were used in the evaluation of remote sensing technology in postclosure monitoring of hazardous waste sites and represent an ongoing research effort. Soil sampling results presented here were accomplished with field portable x-ray fluoresence (XRF) technology and are used as screening tools only representing the current conditions of metals and other contaminants at selected Superfund hazardous waste sites.

  9. Active landslide monitoring using remote sensing data, GPS measurements and cameras on board UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Kavoura, Katerina; Depountis, Nikolaos; Argyropoulos, Nikolaos; Koukouvelas, Ioannis; Sabatakakis, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    An active landslide can be monitored using many different methods: Classical geotechnical measurements like inclinometer, topographical survey measurements with total stations or GPS and photogrammetric techniques using airphotos or high resolution satellite images. As the cost of the aerial photo campaign and the acquisition of very high resolution satellite data is quite expensive the use of cameras on board UAV could be an identical solution. Small UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) have started their development as expensive toys but they currently became a very valuable tool in remote sensing monitoring of small areas. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a cheap but effective solution for an active landslide monitoring. We present the first experimental results of the synergistic use of UAV, GPS measurements and remote sensing data. A six-rotor aircraft with a total weight of 6 kg carrying two small cameras has been used. Very accurate digital airphotos, high accuracy DSM, DGPS measurements and the data captured from the UAV are combined and the results are presented in the current study.

  10. Development of Optically Active Nanostructures for Potential Applications in Sensing, Therapeutics and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Padmanabh

    Materials at nanoscale are finding manifold applications in the various fields like sensing, plasmonics, therapeutics, to mention a few. Large amount of development has taken place regarding synthesis and exploring the novel applications of the various types of nanomaterials like organic, inorganic and hybrid of both. Yet, it is believed that the full potential of different nanomaterials is yet to be fully established stimulating researchers to explore more in the field of nanotechnology. Building on the same premise, in the following studies we have developed the nanomaterials in the class of optically active nanoparticles. First part of the study we have successfully designed, synthesized, and characterized Ag-Fe3O4 nanocomposite substrate for potential applications in quantitative Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) measurements. Quantitative SERS-based detection of dopamine was performed successfully. In subsequent study, facile, single-step synthesis of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated lanthanide based NaYF4 (Yb, Er) nanoparticles was developed and their application as potential photodynamic therapy agent was studied using excitations by light in near infra-red and visible region. In the following and last study, synthesis and characterization of the conjugated polymer nanoparticles was attempted successfully. Functionalization of the conjugated nanoparticles, which is a bottleneck for their potential applications, was successfully performed by encapsulating them in the silica nanoparticles, surface of which was then functionalized by amine group. Three types of optically active nanoparticles were developed for potential applications in sensing, therapeutics and imaging.

  11. Composition, anti-quorum sensing and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Lippia alba

    PubMed Central

    Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Barreto-Maya, Ana; Bertel-Sevilla, Angela; Stashenko, Elena E.

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens have the ability to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as signal molecules for quorum sensing (QS). This cell-cell communication system allows them to coordinate gene expression and regulate virulence. Strategies to inhibit QS are promising for the control of infectious diseases or antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) and antibacterial potential of five essential oils isolated from Lippia alba on the Tn-5 mutant of Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria S. aureus ATCC 25923. The anti-QS activity was detected through the inhibition of the QS-controlled violacein pigment production by the sensor bacteria. Results showed that two essential oils from L. alba, one containing the greatest geranial:neral and the other the highest limonene:carvone concentrations, were the most effective QS inhibitors. Both oils also had small effects on cell growth. Moreover, the geranial/neral chemotype oil also produced the maximum zone of growth inhibition against S. aureus ATCC 25923. These data suggest essential oils from L. alba have promising properties as QS modulators, and present antibacterial activity on S. aureus. PMID:25477905

  12. Radiation protection in radiologic technology: Apathy versus active involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, K.H.

    1982-11-01

    The lack of active participation in radiation protection is a serious problem in Radiologic Technology today. Underlying the problem is professional apathy. An overview of the historical changes, as well as various recent developments in radiology, accentuate the importance of necessary changes in technologists' attitudes and activities. 22 references.

  13. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  14. Active Thermal Extraction and Temperature Sensing of Near-field Thermal Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, D.; Kim, T.; Minnich, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an active thermal extraction (ATX) scheme that enables thermally populated surface phonon polaritons to escape into the far-field. The concept is based on a fluorescence upconversion process that also occurs in laser cooling of solids (LCS). Here, we present a generalized analysis of our scheme using the theoretical framework for LCS. We show that both LCS and ATX can be described with the same mathematical formalism by replacing the electron-phonon coupling parameter in LCS with the electron-photon coupling parameter in ATX. Using this framework, we compare the ideal efficiency and power extracted for the two schemes and examine the parasitic loss mechanisms. This work advances the application of ATX to manipulate near-field thermal radiation for applications such as temperature sensing and active radiative cooling. PMID:27595609

  15. Novel error sensing microphone arrays for active control of turbofan rotor/stator tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Bruce E.; Hersh, Alan S.; Rice, Edward J.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2003-10-01

    Active control of turbofan rotor/stator interaction tones is complicated by the simultaneous presence of multiple duct propagation modes. In-duct error sensing microphone arrays that can adequately resolve these modes typically require duct lengths that are incompatible with modern compact engine design. Two alternative approaches have been investigated. For inlet noise, an external linear array of microphones was positioned in the near/far radiation field transition region and weighted to provide error signals resolved either by duct mode or by radiation angle. For the exhaust, radially spaced microphones have been placed on duct bifurcation panels to provide supplemental radial-mode resolution. The concepts were tested in combination with an adaptive segmented liner in a static duct and as part of an active stator-vane system in the ANCF research facility at NASA/Glenn Research Center. [Work sponsored by NASA/Langley Research Center.

  16. Active Thermal Extraction and Temperature Sensing of Near-field Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Kim, T.; Minnich, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, we proposed an active thermal extraction (ATX) scheme that enables thermally populated surface phonon polaritons to escape into the far-field. The concept is based on a fluorescence upconversion process that also occurs in laser cooling of solids (LCS). Here, we present a generalized analysis of our scheme using the theoretical framework for LCS. We show that both LCS and ATX can be described with the same mathematical formalism by replacing the electron-phonon coupling parameter in LCS with the electron-photon coupling parameter in ATX. Using this framework, we compare the ideal efficiency and power extracted for the two schemes and examine the parasitic loss mechanisms. This work advances the application of ATX to manipulate near-field thermal radiation for applications such as temperature sensing and active radiative cooling.

  17. ESA activities in the use of microwaves for the remote sensing of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccoll, D.

    1984-01-01

    The program of activities under way in the European Space Agency (ESA) directed towards Remote Sensing of the oceans and troposphere is discussed. The initial project is the launch of a satellite named ERS-1 with a primary payload of microwave values in theee C- and Ku-bands. This payload is discussed in depth. The secondary payload includes precision location experiments and an instrument to measure sea surface temperature, which are described. The important topic of calibration is extensively discussed, and a review of activities directed towards improvements to the instruments for future satellites is presented. Some discussion of the impact of the instrument payload on the spacecraft design follows and the commitment of ESA to the provision of a service of value to the ultimate user is emphasized.

  18. Active Thermal Extraction and Temperature Sensing of Near-field Thermal Radiation.

    PubMed

    Ding, D; Kim, T; Minnich, A J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an active thermal extraction (ATX) scheme that enables thermally populated surface phonon polaritons to escape into the far-field. The concept is based on a fluorescence upconversion process that also occurs in laser cooling of solids (LCS). Here, we present a generalized analysis of our scheme using the theoretical framework for LCS. We show that both LCS and ATX can be described with the same mathematical formalism by replacing the electron-phonon coupling parameter in LCS with the electron-photon coupling parameter in ATX. Using this framework, we compare the ideal efficiency and power extracted for the two schemes and examine the parasitic loss mechanisms. This work advances the application of ATX to manipulate near-field thermal radiation for applications such as temperature sensing and active radiative cooling. PMID:27595609

  19. Assessment of Remote Sensing Technologies for Location of Hydrogen and Helium Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellar, R. Glenn; Sohn, Yongho; Mathur, Varun; Reardon, Peter

    2001-01-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, a hierarchy of techniques for H2 and He leak location was developed. A total of twelve specific remote sensing techniques were evaluated; the results are summarized. A basic diffusion model was also developed to predict the concentration and distribution of H2 or He resulting from a leak. The objectives of Phase 2 of the project consisted of the following four tasks: Advance Rayleigh Doppler technique from TRL 1 to TRL 2; Plan to advance Rayleigh Doppler technique from TRL 2 to TRL 3; Advance researchers and resources for further advancement; Extend diffusion model.

  20. Social issues and implications of remote sensing applications: Paradigms of technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoos, I. R.

    1980-01-01

    The transfer of technology from one federal agency to another was observed in the case of the move of LANDSAT to NOAA. An array of unanticipated consequences was found that have important impacts on both the process and outcome of the transfer. When the process was studied from viewpoint of the ultimate recipient, a set of expectations and perceptions were found that figure more in a final assessment than do the attributes of the technology being transfered. The question of how to link a technology with a community of potential users was studed in detail.

  1. An emerging new direction in remote sensing for Earth science: the technology of GPS occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Hajj, G. A.; Ao, C.; Dong, D.; Iijima, B. A.; Juarez, M. T.; Kuang, D.; Meehan, T. K.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss recent technology developments that improve science return in the lowest 5 km of the atmosphere, an interesting region that is difficult to sound at high vertical resolution with other techniques from space.

  2. The UF Torsion Pendulum, a LISA Technology Testbed: Sensing System and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilton, Andrew; Shelley, Ryan; Olatunde, Taiwo; Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    The upcoming LISA Pathfinder mission will test the Gravitational Reference Sensor and the Disturbance Reduction System for a future LISA-like space mission. While LISA Pathfinder is expected to show that the technology for LISA exists and meets the LISA requirements, it is likely that LISA Pathfinder will also reveal areas where future improvements can be made and might be necessary. Some of these are already well known (such as the discharging system). After all, the technology for LISA Pathfinder was frozen about 10 years ago or about 30 years before a LISA-like mission will be launched. The case for continued testing and development of the technology is clear. The University of Florida is currently building a torsion pendulum-based test facility to explore new techniques and also to develop a base in the United States for state-of-the-art Gravitational Reference Sensor technologies.

  3. GEOSS, NEW TECHNOLOGY AND THE BIOSPHERE: REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The international Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) initiative combines science, technology and collaboration to improve our understanding and monitoring of the integrated earth system, and to see how humans can be better global environmental stewards. GEOSS inco...

  4. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-micron laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  5. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2016-06-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-μm laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  6. ‘Progressive Development of International Law’ on Remote Sensing Activities: from the View of International Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunaga, Masatoshi

    The objective of this paper is to investigate into the development of international law on remote sensing activities. There is one general United Nations General Assembly Resolution concerning remote sensing activities, but the problems remain to be solved. Considering international cooperation on remote sensing activities, it seems that there is a common direction that data exchange/sharing should be taken place based on ‘non-discriminatory’ principle, ‘free or no more than the cost of reproduction and delivery,’ and ‘best endeavours.’ It is also mentioned that the remote sensing data exchange/sharing on international cooperation have indirectly been engaging in the harmonization among interests of sensing States, developing countries and sensed States. It is assumed that the data exchange/sharing principles have been contributing to the development of customary international law as “limited in the peacetime and for civil use, every State shall enjoy the access in the manner of nondiscriminatory and reasonable cost and time to the data owned by governmental entities substantially.”

  7. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+ homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+ and PO43- ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ ions stabilize the active state, PO43- ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13662.001 PMID:27434672

  8. Activation of the MAP Kinase Cascade by Exogenous Calcium-Sensing Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, Susan A.; Wright, Jay W.; Lee, Fred; Mcneil, Scott; Bilderback, Tim R.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-02-01

    In Rat-1 fibroblasts and ovarian surface epithelial cells, extracellular calcium induces a proliferative response which appears to be mediated by the G-protein coupled Calcium-sensing Receptor (CaR), as expression of the non-functional CaR-R795W mutant inhibits both thymidine incorporation and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in response to calcium. In this report we utilized CaR-transfected HEK293 cells to demonstrate that functional CaR is necessary and sufficient for calcium-induced ERK activation. CaR-dependent ERK activation was blocked by co-expression of the Ras dominant-negative mutant, Ras N17, and by exposure to the phosphatidyl inositol 3' kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. In contrast to Rat-1 fibroblasts, CaR-mediated in vitro kinase activity of ERK2 was unaffected by tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin in CaR-transfected HEK293 cells. These results suggest that usage of distinct pathways downstream of the CaR varies in a cell-type specific manner, suggesting a potential mechanism by which activation of the CaR could couple to distinct calcium-dependent responses.

  9. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-Chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca(2+) ions stabilize the active state, PO4(3-) ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. PMID:27434672

  10. A Bayesian approach to optimal sensor placement for structural health monitoring with application to active sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Eric B.; Todd, Michael D.

    2010-05-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for optimal sensor and/or actuator placement for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Starting from a general formulation of Bayes risk, we derive a global optimality criterion within a detection theory framework. The optimal configuration is then established as the one that minimizes the expected total presence of either type I or type II error during the damage detection process. While the approach is suitable for many sensing/actuation SHM processes, we focus on the example of active sensing using guided ultrasonic waves by implementing an appropriate statistical model of the wave propagation and feature extraction process. This example implements both pulse-echo and pitch-catch actuation schemes and takes into account line-of-site visibility and non-uniform damage probabilities over the monitored structure. The optimization space is searched using a genetic algorithm with a time-varying mutation rate. We provide three actuator/sensor placement test problems and discuss the optimal solutions generated by the algorithm.

  11. Silicon nanowire based biosensing platform for electrochemical sensing of Mebendazole drug activity on breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shashaani, Hani; Faramarzpour, Mahsa; Hassanpour, Morteza; Namdar, Nasser; Alikhani, Alireza; Abdolahad, Mohammad

    2016-11-15

    Electrochemical approaches have played crucial roles in bio sensing because of their Potential in achieving sensitive, specific and low-cost detection of biomolecules and other bio evidences. Engineering the electrochemical sensing interface with nanomaterials tends to new generations of label-free biosensors with improved performances in terms of sensitive area and response signals. Here we applied Silicon Nanowire (SiNW) array electrodes (in an integrated architecture of working, counter and reference electrodes) grown by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system with VLS procedure to electrochemically diagnose the presence of breast cancer cells as well as their response to anticancer drugs. Mebendazole (MBZ), has been used as antitubulin drug. It perturbs the anodic/cathodic response of the cell covered biosensor by releasing Cytochrome C in cytoplasm. Reduction of cytochrome C would change the ionic state of the cells monitored by SiNW biosensor. By applying well direct bioelectrical contacts with cancer cells, SiNWs can detect minor signal transduction and bio recognition events, resulting in precise biosensing. Our device detected the trace of MBZ drugs (with the concentration of 2nM) on electrochemical activity MCF-7 cells. Also, experimented biological analysis such as confocal and Flowcytometry assays confirmed the electrochemical results.

  12. The Use of a Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing Technology for Monitoring Land Use and Soil Carbon Change in the Subtropical Dry Forest Life Zone of Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velez-Rodriguez, Linda L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Aerial photography, one of the first form of remote sensing technology, has long been an invaluable means to monitor activities and conditions at the Earth's surface. Geographic Information Systems or GIS is the use of computers in showing and manipulating spatial data. This report will present the use of geographic information systems and remote sensing technology for monitoring land use and soil carbon change in the subtropical dry forest life zone of Puerto Rico. This research included the south of Puerto Rico that belongs to the subtropical dry forest life zone. The Guanica Commonwealth Forest Biosphere Reserve and the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve are studied in detail, because of their location in the subtropical dry forest life zone. Aerial photography, digital multispectral imagery, soil samples, soil survey maps, field inspections, and differential global positioning system (DGPS) observations were used.

  13. Region-based geometric active contour for classification using hyperspectral remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin

    2011-12-01

    The high spectral resolution of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems greatly enhances the capabilities of discrimination, identification and quantification of objects of different materials from remote sensing images, but they also bring challenges to the processing and analysis of HSI data. One issue is the high computation cost and the curse of dimensionality associated with the high dimensions of HSI data. A second issue is how to effectively utilize the information including spectral and spatial information embedded in HSI data. Geometric Active Contour (GAC) is a widely used image segmentation method that utilizes the geometric information of objects within images. One category of GAC models, the region-based GAC models (RGAC), have good potential for remote sensing image processing because they use both spectral and geometry information in images are robust to initial contour placement. These models have been introduced to target extractions and classifications on remote sensing images. However, there are some restrictions on the applications of the RGAC models on remote sensing. First, the heavy involvement of iterative contour evolutions makes GAC applications time-consuming and inconvenient to use. Second, the current RGAC models must be based on a certain distance metric and the performance of RGAC classifiers are restricted by the performance of the employed distance metrics. According to the key features of the RGAC models analyzed in this dissertation, a classification framework is developed for remote sensing image classifications using the RGAC models. This framework allows the RGAC models to be combined with conventional pixel-based classifiers to promote them to spectral-spatial classifiers and also greatly reduces the iterations of contour evolutions. An extended Chan-Vese (ECV) model is proposed that is able to incorporate the widely used distance metrics in remote sensing image processing. A new type of RGAC model, the edge-oriented RGAC model

  14. Remote sensing: The application of space technology to the survey of the earth and its environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schertler, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Research in the earth sciences and management of both natural and man-made resources has been hindered by the difficulty of obtaining accurate and timely information on regional and global scale. Space surveys with remote sensing instruments are simply another means of attempting to attain the total knowledge of the resources needed for sound planning, development, and conservation. The use of earth orbiting satellites will greatly expand the ability to collect this information. The collection and use of these data and imagery, however, are now an end in itself, but only the means to an end, that of achieving total resource knowledge. Satellite systems will provide a valuable supplement to existing aerial and ground based observation techniques.

  15. Large-scale experimental technology with remote sensing in land surface hydrology and meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Sellers, Piers J.; Hall, Forrest G.

    1988-01-01

    Two field experiments to study atmospheric and land surface processes and their interactions are summarized. The Hydrologic-Atmospheric Pilot Experiment, which tested techniques for measuring evaporation, soil moisture storage, and runoff at scales of about 100 km, was conducted over a 100 X 100 km area in France from mid-1985 to early 1987. The first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Program field experiment was conducted in 1987 to develop and use relationships between current satellite measurements and hydrologic, climatic, and biophysical variables at the earth's surface and to validate these relationships with ground truth. This experiment also validated surface parameterization methods for simulation models that describe surface processes from the scale of vegetation leaves up to scales appropriate to satellite remote sensing.

  16. Advantages of high-frequency Pulse-tube technology and its applications in infrared sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arts, R.; Willems, D.; Mullié, J.; Benschop, T.

    2016-05-01

    The low-frequency pulse-tube cryocooler has been a workhorse for large heat lift applications. However, the highfrequency pulse tube has to date not seen the widespread use in tactical infrared applications that Stirling cryocoolers have had, despite significant advantages in terms of exported vibrations and lifetime. Thales Cryogenics has produced large series of high-frequency pulse-tube cryocoolers for non-infrared applications since 2005. However, the use of Thales pulse-tube cryocoolers for infrared sensing has to date largely been limited to high-end space applications. In this paper, the performances of existing available off-the-shelf pulse-tube cryocoolers are examined versus typical tactical infrared requirements. A comparison is made on efficiency, power density, reliability, and cost. An outlook is given on future developments that could bring the pulse-tube into the mainstream for tactical infrared applications.

  17. Technology assessment of high pulse energy CO(2) lasers for remote sensing from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Brockman, P.; Schryer, D. R.; Miller, I. M.; Bair, C. H.; Sidney, B. D.; Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.; Brown, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    Developments and needs for research to extend the lifetime and optimize the configuration of CO2 laser systems for satellite based on remote sensing of atmospheric wind velocities and trace gases are reviewed. The CO2 laser systems for operational satellite application will require lifetimes which exceed 1 year. Progress in the development of efficient low temperature catalysts and gas mixture modifications for extending the lifetime of high pulse energy closed cycle common and rare isotope CO2 lasers and of sealed CW CO2 lasers is reviewed. Several CO2 laser configurations are under development to meet the requirements including: unstable resonators, master oscillator power amplifiers and telescopic stable resonators, using UV or E-beam preionization. Progress in the systems is reviewed and tradeoffs in the system parameters are discussed.

  18. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  19. NASA Stennis Space Center Test Technology Branch Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a short history of NASA Stennis Space Center's Test Technology Laboratory and briefly describes the variety of engine test technology activities and developmental project initiatives. Theoretical rocket exhaust plume modeling, acoustic monitoring and analysis, hand held fire imaging, heat flux radiometry, thermal imaging and exhaust plume spectroscopy are all examples of current and past test activities that are briefly described. In addition, recent efforts and visions focused on accomodating second, third, and fourth generation flight vehicle engine test requirements are discussed.

  20. Advances in Remote Sensing for Oil Spill Disaster Management: State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology for Oil Spill Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Maya Nand; Levy, Jason; Gao, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Reducing the risk of oil spill disasters is essential for protecting the environment and reducing economic losses. Oil spill surveillance constitutes an important component of oil spill disaster management. Advances in remote sensing technologies can help to identify parties potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. Due to the large number of sensors currently available for oil spill surveillance, there is a need for a comprehensive overview and comparison of existing sensors. Specifically, this paper examines the characteristics and applications of different sensors. A better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of oil spill surveillance sensors will improve the operational use of these sensors for oil spill response and contingency planning. Laser fluorosensors were found to be the best available sensor for oil spill detection since they not only detect and classify oil on all surfaces but also operate in either the day or night. For example, the Scanning Laser Environmental Airborne Fluorosensor (SLEAF) sensor was identified to be a valuable tool for oil spill surveillance. However, no single sensor was able to provide all information required for oil spill contingency planning. Hence, combinations of sensors are currently used for oil spill surveillance. Specifically, satellite sensors are used for preliminary oil spill assessment while airborne sensors are used for detailed oil spill analysis. While satellite remote sensing is not suitable for tactical oil spill planning it can provide a synoptic coverage of the affected area.

  1. An Updating System for the Gridded Population Database of China Based on Remote Sensing, GIS and Spatial Database Technologies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohuan; Huang, Yaohuan; Dong, Pinliang; Jiang, Dong; Liu, Honghui

    2009-01-01

    The spatial distribution of population is closely related to land use and land cover (LULC) patterns on both regional and global scales. Population can be redistributed onto geo-referenced square grids according to this relation. In the past decades, various approaches to monitoring LULC using remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been developed, which makes it possible for efficient updating of geo-referenced population data. A Spatial Population Updating System (SPUS) is developed for updating the gridded population database of China based on remote sensing, GIS and spatial database technologies, with a spatial resolution of 1 km by 1 km. The SPUS can process standard Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS L1B) data integrated with a Pattern Decomposition Method (PDM) and an LULC-Conversion Model to obtain patterns of land use and land cover, and provide input parameters for a Population Spatialization Model (PSM). The PSM embedded in SPUS is used for generating 1 km by 1 km gridded population data in each population distribution region based on natural and socio-economic variables. Validation results from finer township-level census data of Yishui County suggest that the gridded population database produced by the SPUS is reliable.

  2. Molecularly imprinted polymer film interfaced with Surface Acoustic Wave technology as a sensing platform for label-free protein detection.

    PubMed

    Tretjakov, Aleksei; Syritski, Vitali; Reut, Jekaterina; Boroznjak, Roman; Öpik, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-based synthetic receptors integrated with Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensing platform were applied for the first time for label-free protein detection. The ultrathin polymeric films with surface imprints of immunoglobulin G (IgG-MIP) were fabricated onto the multiplexed SAW chips using an electrosynthesis approach. The films were characterized by analyzing the binding kinetics recorded by SAW system. It was revealed that the capability of IgG-MIP to specifically recognize the target protein was greatly influenced by the polymer film thickness that could be easily optimized by the amount of the electrical charge consumed during the electrodeposition. The thickness-optimized IgG-MIPs demonstrated imprinting factors towards IgG in the range of 2.8-4, while their recognition efficiencies were about 4 and 10 times lower toward the interfering proteins, IgA and HSA, respectively. Additionally, IgG-MIP preserved its capability to recognize selectively the template after up to four regeneration cycles. The presented approach of the facile integration of the protein-MIP sensing layer with SAW technology allowed observing the real-time binding events of the target protein at relevant sensitivity levels and can be potentially suitable for cost effective fabrication of a biosensor for analysis of biological samples in multiplexed manner.

  3. Nondestructive sensing technologies using micro-optical elements for applications in the NIR-MIR spectral regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Fritzsch, Uwe; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas; Afanasyeva, Natalia I.

    2001-11-01

    The field of microtechnology is an important industrial and scientific resource for the 21st century. There is a great interest in spectroscopic sensors in the near and middle infrared (NIR-MIR) wavelength regions (1 - 2.5 micrometers ; 2.5 - 4.5 micrometers ; 4 - 6 micrometers ). The potential for cheap and small devices for nondestructive, remote sensing techniques at a molecular level has stimulated the design and development of more compact analyzer systems. Therefore we will try to build analyzers using micro optical components such as micromirrors and embossed micro gratings optimized for the above mentioned spectral ranges. Potentially, infrared sensors can be used for rapid nondestructive diagnostics of surfaces, liquids, gases, polymers and complex biological systems including proteins, blood, cells and cellular debris as well as body tissue. Furthermore, NIR-MIR microsensing spectroscopy will be utilized to monitor the chemical composition of petrochemical products like gasoline and diesel. In addition, miniature analyzers will be used for rapid measuring of food, in particular oil, starch and meat. In this paper we will present an overview of several new approaches for subsurface and surface sensing technologies based on the integration of optical micro devices, the most promising sensors for biomedical, environmental and industrial applications, data processing and evaluation algorithms for classification of the results. Both scientific and industrial applications will be discussed.

  4. Molecularly imprinted polymer film interfaced with Surface Acoustic Wave technology as a sensing platform for label-free protein detection.

    PubMed

    Tretjakov, Aleksei; Syritski, Vitali; Reut, Jekaterina; Boroznjak, Roman; Öpik, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-based synthetic receptors integrated with Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensing platform were applied for the first time for label-free protein detection. The ultrathin polymeric films with surface imprints of immunoglobulin G (IgG-MIP) were fabricated onto the multiplexed SAW chips using an electrosynthesis approach. The films were characterized by analyzing the binding kinetics recorded by SAW system. It was revealed that the capability of IgG-MIP to specifically recognize the target protein was greatly influenced by the polymer film thickness that could be easily optimized by the amount of the electrical charge consumed during the electrodeposition. The thickness-optimized IgG-MIPs demonstrated imprinting factors towards IgG in the range of 2.8-4, while their recognition efficiencies were about 4 and 10 times lower toward the interfering proteins, IgA and HSA, respectively. Additionally, IgG-MIP preserved its capability to recognize selectively the template after up to four regeneration cycles. The presented approach of the facile integration of the protein-MIP sensing layer with SAW technology allowed observing the real-time binding events of the target protein at relevant sensitivity levels and can be potentially suitable for cost effective fabrication of a biosensor for analysis of biological samples in multiplexed manner. PMID:26703269

  5. Application of Risk Analysis Based On Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System Technologies To Control of Malaria In Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njemanze, Philip; Njemanze, Philip; Peters, Constance; Uwaeziozi, Amarachukwu

    More than 1 million Africans die from malaria each year. Remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS) technologies could be applied to study the risk of malaria epidemic. The patient population included 45,140 of persons aged 0-85 years seen at primary health centers in 18 different local government areas (LGAs) of Imo State. Maps of old Imo State were converted to digital form using ARC/INFO GIS software, and the resulting coverages included hydrology, towns, and villages. Remote sensing images from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data set were used to obtain color-coded monthly normalized-difference vegetation index or NDVI. Three groups were distinguished as: group A LGAs using water from natural hydrology and bore-holes, group B - using rain water harvesting from roof tops into surface water reservoirs, and group C - using ground surface catchment of rain water with ground ponds. These stagnant ponds were Anopheles mosquito breeding sites. The NDVI values were used to determine water availability, and were least in January/February each year, and highest in April/May. Probabilistic layer analysis (PLA) was used to determine the Odds Ratio (OR), Relative Risk (RR) and Attributable Risk (AR) for malaria in groups A, B, C. Significant risk for malaria was associated with local water conservation methods in group C, compared to A, (OR = 4.55; RR = 4.46, AR = 77.6

  6. Competence Visualisation: Making Sense of Data from 21st-Century Technologies in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Susan; Wasson, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an open learner model approach to learning analytics to combine the variety of data available from the range of applications and technologies in language learning, for visualisation of language learning competences to learners and teachers in the European language context. Specific examples are provided as illustrations…

  7. Problem Solving in Technology Rich Contexts: Mathematics Sense Making in Out-of-School Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrie, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This investigation describes the way in which a case study participant (aged 7) represented, posed and solved problems in a technology game-based environment. The out-of-school problem-solving context placed numeracy demands on the participant that were more complex and sophisticated than the type of mathematics experiences he encountered in…

  8. Measurement of Oil and Gas Well Pad Enclosed Combustor Emissions Using Optical Remote Sensing Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development and U.S. EPA Region 8 are collaborating to investigate the impact of energy production under the EPA’s Regional Applied Research Effort (RARE) program. As part of this effort, a research study was conducted to evaluate technologies...

  9. Calcium-sensing receptor activation in chronic kidney disease: effects beyond parathyroid hormone control.

    PubMed

    Massy, Ziad A; Hénaut, Lucie; Larsson, Tobias E; Vervloet, Marc G

    2014-11-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is an important complication of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cinacalcet, an allosteric modulator of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) expressed in parathyroid glands, is the only calcimimetic approved to treat SHPT in patients on dialysis. By enhancing CaSR sensitivity for plasma extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)0), cinacalcet reduces serum parathyroid hormone, Ca(2+)0, and serum inorganic phosphorous concentrations, allowing better control of SHPT and CKD-mineral and bone disorders. Of interest, the CaSR also is expressed in a variety of tissues where its activation regulates diverse cellular processes, including secretion, apoptosis, and proliferation. Thus, the existence of potential off-target effects of cinacalcet cannot be neglected. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the potential role(s) of the CaSR expressed in various tissues in CKD-related disorders, independently of parathyroid hormone control.

  10. Estimating the amount of Ship Recycling Activity Using Remote Sensing Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watagawa, M.; Shinoda, T.; Hasegawa, K.

    2016-06-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) was launched for earth observation and there are more than 6 million scenes of archives including coastal areas during period of five years. The wealth of satellite imagery is noticeable for investigating monitoring methods such as ship detection in wide ocean area. Especially, it is useful way to estimate past behaviour from satellite imagery compared to reference data. We collected satellite imagery and analysis breaking process in major ship breaking yards between year 2009 and 2011. Comparing the number of recycling ships by satellite imagery to the world statistics is in good agreement. In this study, Remote Sensing Application has been discussed in order to assess the potential to be used for economic activities such as ship recycling in wide coastal area. It was used to evaluate the performance of ship recycling monitoring by Satellite imagery. Additionally, an approach for recognizing ships by SAR imagery regardless of weather conditions is presented.

  11. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science. PMID:27694937

  12. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science.

  13. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Eitel, Jan U. H.; Keefe, Robert F.; Long, Dan S.; Davis, Anthony S.; Vierling, Lee A.

    2010-01-01

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and do not require spectral reference readings. Besides measuring red (590–670 nm) and near-infrared (>760 nm) reflectance AGORS devices have recently become available that also measure red-edge (730 nm) reflectance. We tested the hypothesis that the additional availability of red-edge reflectance information would improve AGORS of plant stress induced chlorophyll breakdown in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Our results showed that the availability of red-edge reflectance information improved AGORS estimates of stress induced variation in chlorophyll concentration (r2 > 0.73, RMSE < 1.69) when compared to those without (r2 = 0.57, RMSE = 2.11). PMID:22319275

  14. Architecture for persistent surveillance using mast and UAS-based autonomous sensing with bio-inspired technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry

    2014-06-01

    A sophisticated real time architecture for capturing relevant battlefield information of personnel and terrestrial events from a network of mast based imaging and unmanned aerial systems (UAS) with target detection, tracking, classification and visualization is presented. Persistent surveillance of personnel and vehicles is achieved using a unique spatial and temporally invariant motion detection and tracking algorithm for mast based cameras in combination with aerial remote sensing to autonomously monitor unattended ground based sensor networks. UAS autonomous routing is achieved using bio-inspired algorithms that mimic how bacteria locate nutrients in their environment. Results include field test data, performance and lessons learned. The technology also has application to detecting and tracking low observables (manned and UAS), counter MANPADS, airport bird detection and search and rescue operations.

  15. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  16. Sensing with Advanced Computing Technology: Fin Field-Effect Transistors with High-k Gate Stack on Bulk Silicon.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Sara; Scarbolo, Paolo; Wipf, Mathias; Stoop, Ralph L; Bedner, Kristine; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Bazigos, Antonios; Bouvet, Didier; Calame, Michel; Schönenberger, Christian; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2015-05-26

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) form an established technology for sensing applications. However, recent advancements and use of high-performance multigate metal-oxide semiconductor FETs (double-gate, FinFET, trigate, gate-all-around) in computing technology, instead of bulk MOSFETs, raise new opportunities and questions about the most suitable device architectures for sensing integrated circuits. In this work, we propose pH and ion sensors exploiting FinFETs fabricated on bulk silicon by a fully CMOS compatible approach, as an alternative to the widely investigated silicon nanowires on silicon-on-insulator substrates. We also provide an analytical insight of the concept of sensitivity for the electronic integration of sensors. N-channel fully depleted FinFETs with critical dimensions on the order of 20 nm and HfO2 as a high-k gate insulator have been developed and characterized, showing excellent electrical properties, subthreshold swing, SS ∼ 70 mV/dec, and on-to-off current ratio, Ion/Ioff ∼ 10(6), at room temperature. The same FinFET architecture is validated as a highly sensitive, stable, and reproducible pH sensor. An intrinsic sensitivity close to the Nernst limit, S = 57 mV/pH, is achieved. The pH response in terms of output current reaches Sout = 60%. Long-term measurements have been performed over 4.5 days with a resulting drift in time δVth/δt = 0.10 mV/h. Finally, we show the capability to reproduce experimental data with an extended three-dimensional commercial finite element analysis simulator, in both dry and wet environments, which is useful for future advanced sensor design and optimization.

  17. Sensing with Advanced Computing Technology: Fin Field-Effect Transistors with High-k Gate Stack on Bulk Silicon.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Sara; Scarbolo, Paolo; Wipf, Mathias; Stoop, Ralph L; Bedner, Kristine; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Bazigos, Antonios; Bouvet, Didier; Calame, Michel; Schönenberger, Christian; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2015-05-26

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) form an established technology for sensing applications. However, recent advancements and use of high-performance multigate metal-oxide semiconductor FETs (double-gate, FinFET, trigate, gate-all-around) in computing technology, instead of bulk MOSFETs, raise new opportunities and questions about the most suitable device architectures for sensing integrated circuits. In this work, we propose pH and ion sensors exploiting FinFETs fabricated on bulk silicon by a fully CMOS compatible approach, as an alternative to the widely investigated silicon nanowires on silicon-on-insulator substrates. We also provide an analytical insight of the concept of sensitivity for the electronic integration of sensors. N-channel fully depleted FinFETs with critical dimensions on the order of 20 nm and HfO2 as a high-k gate insulator have been developed and characterized, showing excellent electrical properties, subthreshold swing, SS ∼ 70 mV/dec, and on-to-off current ratio, Ion/Ioff ∼ 10(6), at room temperature. The same FinFET architecture is validated as a highly sensitive, stable, and reproducible pH sensor. An intrinsic sensitivity close to the Nernst limit, S = 57 mV/pH, is achieved. The pH response in terms of output current reaches Sout = 60%. Long-term measurements have been performed over 4.5 days with a resulting drift in time δVth/δt = 0.10 mV/h. Finally, we show the capability to reproduce experimental data with an extended three-dimensional commercial finite element analysis simulator, in both dry and wet environments, which is useful for future advanced sensor design and optimization. PMID:25817336

  18. Satellite Sensornet Gateway Technology Infusion Through Rapid Deployments for Environmental Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzel, T.; Silva, F.; Deschon, A.; Ye, W.; Cho, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Satellite Sensornet Gateway (SSG) is an ongoing ESTO Advanced Information Systems Technology project, at the University of Southern California. The major goal of SSG is to develop a turnkey solution for building environmental observation systems based on sensor networks. Our system has been developed through an iterative series of deployment-driven design, build, test, and revise which maximizes technology infusion to the earth scientist. We have designed a robust and flexible sensor network called Sensor Processing and Acquisition Network (SPAN). Our SPAN architecture emphasizes a modular and extensible design, such that core building blocks can be reused to develop different scientific observation systems. To support rapid deployment at remote locations, we employ satellite communications as the backhaul to relay in-situ sensor data to a central database. To easily support various science applications, we have developed a unified sensor integration framework that allows streamlined integration of different sensors to the system. Our system supports heterogeneous sets of sensors, from industry-grade products to research- specific prototypes. To ensure robust operation in harsh environments, we have developed mechanisms to monitor system status and recover from potential failures along with additional remote configuration and QA/QC functions. Here we briefly describe the deployments, the key science missions of the deployments and the role that the SSG technology played in each mission. We first deployed our SSG technology at the James Reserve in February 2007. In a joint deployment with the NEON project, SDSC, and UC Riverside, we set up a meteorological station, using a diverse set of sensors, with the objective of validating our basic technology components in the field. This system is still operational and streaming live sensor data. At Stunt Ranch, a UC Reserve near Malibu, CA, we partnered with UCLA biologist Phillip Rundel in order to study the drought

  19. Activation of calcium-sensing receptor increases TRPC3 expression in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shan-Li; Sun, Ming-Rui; Li, Ting-Ting; Yin, Xin; Xu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Yi-Hua

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) activation stimulates TRP channels. {yields} CaR promoted transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) expression. {yields} Adult rat ventricular myocytes display capacitative calcium entry (CCE), which was operated by TRPCs. {yields} TRPC channels activation induced by CaR activator sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} to evoke cardiomyocytes apoptosis. -- Abstract: Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes, which gate a type of influx of extracellular calcium, the capacitative calcium entry. TRP channels play a role in mediating Ca{sup 2+} overload in the heart. Calcium-sensing receptors (CaR) are also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and promote the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by Ca{sup 2+} overload. However, data about the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart are few. In this study, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of the TRP canonical proteins TRPC1 and TRPC3 in adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Laser scan confocal microscopy was used to detect intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. The results showed that, in adult rat cardiomyocytes, the depletion of Ca{sup 2+} stores in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) by thapsigargin induced a transient increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and the subsequent restoration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} for a few minutes, whereas, the persisting elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365. The stimulation of CaR by its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or spermine also resulted in the same effect and the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. In adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, GdCl{sub 3

  20. Unmanned vehicle technology for networked non-line-of-sight sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Miguel; Pepper, Gary; Mitra, Atindra K.; Hu, Colin; Zein-Sabatto, Saleh; Rogers, Tamara; Selmic, Rastko; Hamdan, Elrasheed; Malkani, Mohan

    2010-04-01

    We discuss the development, design, implementation, and demonstration of a robotic UGV (Unmanned Ground Vehicle) system for networked and non-line-of-sight sensing applications. Our development team is comprised of AFRL Summer Interns, University Faculty, and Personnel from AFRL. The system concept is based on a previously published technique known as "Dual-UAV Tandems for Indirect Operator-Assisted Control" [1]. This architecture is based on simulating a Mini-UAV Helicopter with a building-mounted camera and simulating a low-flying QuadRotor Helicopter with a Robotics UGV. The Robotics UGV is fitted with a custom-designed sensor boom and a surrogate chem/bio (Carbon Monoxide) PCB sensor extracted from a COTS (Commercial-Off-The-Shelf) product. The CO Sensor apparatus is co-designed with the sensor boom and is fitted with a transparent covering for protection and to promote CO (surrogate chem/bio) flow onto the sensor. The philosophy behind this non-line-of-sight system is to relay video of the UGV to an Operator station for purposes of investigating "Indirect Operator-Assisted Control" of the UGV via observation of the relayed EO video at the operator station. This would serve as a sensor fusion, giving the operator visual cues of the chemical under detection, enabling him to position the UGV in areas of higher concentration. We recorded this data, and analyzed the best approach given a test matrix of multiple scenarios, with the goal of determining the feasibility of using this layered sensing approach and the system accuracy in open field tests. For purposes of collecting scientific data with this system, we developed a Test (data collection) Matrix with following three parameters: 1. Chem/Bio detection level with side-looking sensor boom and slowly traversing UGV; 2. Chem/Bio detection level with panning sensor boom and slowly traversing UGV; 3. Chem/Bio detection level with forward-looking sensor boom and operator-assisted steering based on onboard wind vane