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Sample records for active sex steroids

  1. Steroid signaling activation and intracellular localization of sex steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Tiziana; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2010-12-01

    In addition to stimulating gene transcription, sex steroids trigger rapid, non-genomic responses in the extra-nuclear compartment of target cells. These events take place within seconds or minutes after hormone administration and do not require transcriptional activity of sex steroid receptors. Depending on cell systems, activation of extra-nuclear signaling pathways by sex steroids fosters cell cycle progression, prevents apoptosis, leads to epigenetic modifications and increases cell migration through cytoskeleton changes. These findings have raised the question of intracellular localization of sex steroid receptors mediating these responses. During the past years, increasing evidence has shown that classical sex steroid receptors localized in the extra-nuclear compartment or close to membranes of target cells induce these events. The emerging picture is that a process of bidirectional control between signaling activation and sex steroid receptor localization regulates the outcome of hormonal responses in target cells. This mechanism ensures cell cycle progression in estradiol-treated breast cancer cells, and its derangement might occur in progression of human proliferative diseases. These findings will be reviewed here together with unexpected examples of the relationship between sex steroid receptor localization, signaling activation and biological responses in target cells. We apologize to scientists whose reports are not mentioned or extensively discussed owing to space limitations.

  2. Male-to-female transsexuals show sex-atypical hypothalamus activation when smelling odorous steroids.

    PubMed

    Berglund, H; Lindström, P; Dhejne-Helmy, C; Savic, I

    2008-08-01

    One working hypothesis behind transsexuality is that the normal sex differentiation of certain hypothalamic networks is altered. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the pattern of cerebral activation in 12 nonhomosexual male-to-female transsexuals (MFTRs) when smelling 4,16-androstadien-3-one (AND) and estra-1,3,5(10),16-tetraen-3-ol (EST). These steroids are reported to activate the hypothalamic networks in a sex-differentiated way. Like in female controls the hypothalamus in MFTRs activated with AND, whereas smelling of EST engaged the amygdala and piriform cortex. Male controls, on the other hand, activated the hypothalamus with EST. However, when restricting the volume of interest to the hypothalamus activation was detected in MFTR also with EST, and explorative conjunctional analysis revealed that MFTR shared a hypothalamic cluster with women when smelling AND, and with men when smelling EST. Because the EST effect was limited, MFTR differed significantly only from male controls, and only for EST-AIR and EST-AND. These data suggest a pattern of activation away from the biological sex, occupying an intermediate position with predominantly female-like features. Because our MFTRs were nonhomosexual, the results are unlikely to be an effect of sexual practice. Instead, the data implicate that transsexuality may be associated with sex-atypical physiological responses in specific hypothalamic circuits, possibly as a consequence of a variant neuronal differentiation.

  3. [Sex steroids and bone tissue].

    PubMed

    Ribot, C; Tremollieres, F

    1995-01-01

    The precise mechanism of action of sexual steroids in the regulation of bone tissue is still poorly understood. Besides the indirect action via the production of calciotropic hormones, the fact that receptors respond to oestrogens as well as to androgens and progesterone is evidence that sexual steroids have a direct action in regulating bone activity. The anti-osteoclastic action of oestrogens, via the modulation in osteoblastic production of different substances such as interleukin-1 and -6, TGF beta, GM-CSF which inhibit osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity, is well documented. More recently, the direct role in osteoclast inhibition was suggested by the observation that osteoclasts carry oestrogen receptors. Likewise, certain in vivo and in vitro data suggest that oestrogens could also have a positive effect on bone formation regulation. For androgens, currently available data show that in vitro stimulation of bone formation, with increased proliferation and cell differentiation, could be mediated by TGF beta. The role of progesterone is more recently known. In vivo, progesterone increases cell growth and IFGF-II secretion by non-transformed human osteoblasts. The number of potential mechanisms which have already been demonstrated suggest the complexity of sex hormone regulation which leads to the final situation of physiological calcium sparing in the skeleton while maintaining skeletal structure. PMID:7747921

  4. [Steroid receptors and mechanism of action of sex steroids].

    PubMed

    Guiochon-Mantel, A; Milgrom, E

    1999-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors define a large family of proteins. Recently, a new estradiol receptor has been identified. This discovery suggests the existence of a previously unrecognized pathway of estrogen signalling. Moreover, it implies important pharmacological consequences. Receptors activation induces the modulation of transcription of specific genes. Proteins involved in this effect have been identified: coactivators, corepressors and cointegrators. Their mechanism of action have been characterized. They modify histone acetylation of the corresponding promotor. Sex steroid receptors are located in the nucleus. This nuclear localization is in fact a dynamic situation, resulting from a continuous shuttling of the receptor between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Non genomic effects of steroids have also been described. PMID:10542957

  5. Designed modulation of sex steroid signaling inhibits telomerase activity and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vishal; Sharma, Siddharth; Bishnoi, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Vishal; Maikhuri, J.P.; Dwivedi, Anila; Kumar, Atul; Gupta, Gopal

    2014-10-15

    The predominant estrogen-receptor (ER)-β signaling in normal prostate is countered by increased ER-α signaling in prostate cancer (CaP), which in association with androgen-receptor (AR) signaling results in pathogenesis of the disease. However CaP treatments mostly target AR signaling which is initially effective but eventually leads to androgen resistance, hence simultaneous targeting of ERs has been proposed. A novel series of molecules were designed with multiple sex-steroid receptor modulating capabilities by coalescing the pharmacophores of known anti-CaP molecules that act via modulation of ER(α/β) and/or AR, viz. 3,3′diindolylmethane (DIM), mifepristone, toremifene, tamoxifen and raloxifene. N,N-diethyl-4-((2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl) aniline (DIMA) was identified as the most promising structure of this new series. DIMA increased annexin-V labelling, cell-cycle arrest and caspase-3 activity, and decreased expression of AR and prostate specific antigen in LNCaP cells, in vitro. Concurrently, DIMA increased ER-β, p21 and p27 protein levels in LNCaP cells and exhibited ∼ 5 times more selective binding for ER-β than ER-α, in comparison to raloxifene. DIMA exhibited a dose-dependent ER-β agonism and ER-α antagonism in classical gene reporter assay and decreased hTERT (catalytic subunit of telomerase) transcript levels in LNCaP at 3.0 μM (P < 0.05). DIMA also dose-dependently decreased telomerase enzyme activity in prostate cancer cells. It is thus concluded that DIMA acts as a multi-steroid receptor modulator and effectively inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells through ER-β mediated telomerase inhibition, by countering actions of ER-α and AR. Its unique molecular design can serve as a lead structure for generation of potent agents against endocrine malignancies like the CaP.

  6. Implantation: mutual activity of sex steroid hormones and the immune system guarantee the maternal-embryo interaction.

    PubMed

    Gnainsky, Yulia; Dekel, Nava; Granot, Irit

    2014-09-01

    Implantation is strictly dependent on the mutual interaction between a receptive endometrium and the blastocyst. Hence, synchronization between blastocyst development and the acquisition of endometrial receptivity is a prerequisite for the success of this process. This review depicts the cellular and molecular events that coordinate these complex activities. Specifically, the involvement of the sex steroid hormones, estrogen and progesterone, as well as components of the immune system, such as cytokines and specific blood cells, is elaborated. PMID:24959815

  7. Influences of sex steroids on experimental carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lucier, G W; Rumbaugh, R C

    1983-01-01

    Sex steroids can apparently modify hepatic function in at least two ways (Figure 1). First, the liver contains specific receptor proteins for either androgens or oestrogens. Several studies, using effects on the monooxygenase system as an indicator of hormone action, have shown good correlations between the presence of sex-steroid receptors and hepatic response to these hormones. In general, androgens induce the activities of drug biotransformation reactions, whereas oestrogens depress them. Second, the endocrine milieu, during a critical period of early development, apparently programmes the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to release factors which cause certain aspects of liver biochemistry to undergo sex differentiation. Selected components of the cytochrome P-450 system exhibit sex differences, and these differences are imprinted by neonatal androgens and are initiated and maintained by the pituitary gland. Corresponding to sex differentiation of the hepatic monooxygenase system are significant sex differences in responses to hepatocarcinogens such as N-2-fluorenylacetamide and N-hydroxy-N-2-fluorenylacetamide. Higher incidences of hepatocellular carcinomas in males appear to result from exposure to neonatal androgens.

  8. Sex steroids and their receptors in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Mara B; Scott, Alexander P; Li, Weiming

    2008-01-01

    The use of steroids and their receptors as ligand-gated transcription factors is thought to be an important step in vertebrate evolution. The lamprey is the earliest-evolving vertebrate to date in which sex steroids and their receptors have been demonstrated to have hormonal roles similar to those found in jawed vertebrates. Sex steroids and their receptors have been examined in several lamprey species, and the majority of studies have focused on the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. While classical steroids appear to be present in lampreys, their function, concentrations, and synthesis have not been determined conclusively. The only classical steroid that is thought to act as a hormone in both males and females is estradiol. Recent research has established that lampreys produce and circulate 15alpha-hydroxylated steroids, and that these steroids respond to upstream stimulation within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In particular, 15alpha-hydroxyprogesterone is highly sensitive and responds in great magnitude to stimulation, and is likely a hormone. Lampreys also appear to use androstenedione, a precursor to vertebrate androgens, as their main androgen, and a receptor for androstenedione has recently been described. Non-classical steroids are prevalent in many aquatic vertebrates, and the non-classical steroids found in the sea lamprey may represent an evolutionary artifact, or alternatively may be a way to avoid endocrine disruption when ingesting the body fluids of host fish. The lamprey will continue to be an interesting model for examining the evolution of steroid hormones, steroid receptors, and steroid function.

  9. Sex Differences and Sex Steroids in Lung Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Elizabeth A.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in the biology of different organ systems and the influence of sex hormones in modulating health and disease are increasingly relevant in clinical and research areas. Although work has focused on sex differences and sex hormones in cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and neuronal systems, there is now increasing clinical evidence for sex differences in incidence, morbidity, and mortality of lung diseases including allergic diseases (such as asthma), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, as well as pulmonary hypertension. Whether such differences are inherent and/or whether sex steroids play a role in modulating these differences is currently under investigation. The purpose of this review is to define sex differences in lung structure/function under normal and specific disease states, with exploration of whether and how sex hormone signaling mechanisms may explain these clinical observations. Focusing on adult age groups, the review addresses the following: 1) inherent sex differences in lung anatomy and physiology; 2) the importance of certain time points in life such as puberty, pregnancy, menopause, and aging; 3) expression and signaling of sex steroid receptors under normal vs. disease states; 4) potential interplay between different sex steroids; 5) the question of whether sex steroids are beneficial or detrimental to the lung; and 6) the potential use of sex steroid signaling as biomarkers and therapeutic avenues in lung diseases. The importance of focusing on sex differences and sex steroids in the lung lies in the increasing incidence of lung diseases in women and the need to address lung diseases across the life span. PMID:22240244

  10. Influence of Triazine Herbicide Exposure on Guppies (Poecilia sphenops) Aromatase Activities, Altered Sex Steroid Concentration and Vitellogenin Induction.

    PubMed

    Vasanth, S; Arul, G; Karthikeyeni, S; Kumar, T S V; Vignesh, V; Manimegalai, M; Bupesh, G; Thirumurugan, R; Subramanian, P

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a herbicide is one the most toxic and sustaining pollutants in aquatic environment. It is detectable in surface water and in underground sources of drinking water. Many studies indicate that atrazine might be a potent endocrine disrupting xenobiotic. There are limited studies have revealed that the effects of atrazine on sex steroids hormones, vitellogenin and induction of aromatase, gonadosomatic index and hepatosomatic index. In this study, juvenile Poecilia sphenops fish was exposed to three different (0.83, 1.25 and 2.5 ppm) concentration of atrazine for 100 d. Changes in plasma and gonadal content and concentrations of sex steroids and vitellogenin protein in poecilia sphenops under laboratory conditions were assessed. The low level of the atrazine show estrogenic effect in males, as determined by a shortage of testosterone induction. Present study suggests that low induction of plasma vitellogenin and aromatase in male fish become suitable biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic chemicals. PMID:26009647

  11. Influence of Triazine Herbicide Exposure on Guppies (Poecilia sphenops) Aromatase Activities, Altered Sex Steroid Concentration and Vitellogenin Induction

    PubMed Central

    Vasanth, S.; Arul, G.; Karthikeyeni, S.; Kumar, T. S. V.; Vignesh, V.; Manimegalai, M.; Bupesh, G.; Thirumurugan, R.; Subramanian, P.

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a herbicide is one the most toxic and sustaining pollutants in aquatic environment. It is detectable in surface water and in underground sources of drinking water. Many studies indicate that atrazine might be a potent endocrine disrupting xenobiotic. There are limited studies have revealed that the effects of atrazine on sex steroids hormones, vitellogenin and induction of aromatase, gonadosomatic index and hepatosomatic index. In this study, juvenile Poecilia sphenops fish was exposed to three different (0.83, 1.25 and 2.5 ppm) concentration of atrazine for 100 d. Changes in plasma and gonadal content and concentrations of sex steroids and vitellogenin protein in poecilia sphenops under laboratory conditions were assessed. The low level of the atrazine show estrogenic effect in males, as determined by a shortage of testosterone induction. Present study suggests that low induction of plasma vitellogenin and aromatase in male fish become suitable biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic chemicals. PMID:26009647

  12. Influence of Triazine Herbicide Exposure on Guppies (Poecilia sphenops) Aromatase Activities, Altered Sex Steroid Concentration and Vitellogenin Induction.

    PubMed

    Vasanth, S; Arul, G; Karthikeyeni, S; Kumar, T S V; Vignesh, V; Manimegalai, M; Bupesh, G; Thirumurugan, R; Subramanian, P

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a herbicide is one the most toxic and sustaining pollutants in aquatic environment. It is detectable in surface water and in underground sources of drinking water. Many studies indicate that atrazine might be a potent endocrine disrupting xenobiotic. There are limited studies have revealed that the effects of atrazine on sex steroids hormones, vitellogenin and induction of aromatase, gonadosomatic index and hepatosomatic index. In this study, juvenile Poecilia sphenops fish was exposed to three different (0.83, 1.25 and 2.5 ppm) concentration of atrazine for 100 d. Changes in plasma and gonadal content and concentrations of sex steroids and vitellogenin protein in poecilia sphenops under laboratory conditions were assessed. The low level of the atrazine show estrogenic effect in males, as determined by a shortage of testosterone induction. Present study suggests that low induction of plasma vitellogenin and aromatase in male fish become suitable biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic chemicals.

  13. Sex Steroid Actions in Male Bone

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Michaël R.; Claessens, Frank; Gielen, Evelien; Lagerquist, Marie K.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Börjesson, Anna E.; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    Sex steroids are chief regulators of gender differences in the skeleton, and male gender is one of the strongest protective factors against osteoporotic fractures. This advantage in bone strength relies mainly on greater cortical bone expansion during pubertal peak bone mass acquisition and superior skeletal maintenance during aging. During both these phases, estrogens acting via estrogen receptor-α in osteoblast lineage cells are crucial for male cortical and trabecular bone, as evident from conditional genetic mouse models, epidemiological studies, rare genetic conditions, genome-wide meta-analyses, and recent interventional trials. Genetic mouse models have also demonstrated a direct role for androgens independent of aromatization on trabecular bone via the androgen receptor in osteoblasts and osteocytes, although the target cell for their key effects on periosteal bone formation remains elusive. Low serum estradiol predicts incident fractures, but the highest risk occurs in men with additionally low T and high SHBG. Still, the possible clinical utility of serum sex steroids for fracture prediction is unknown. It is likely that sex steroid actions on male bone metabolism rely also on extraskeletal mechanisms and cross talk with other signaling pathways. We propose that estrogens influence fracture risk in aging men via direct effects on bone, whereas androgens exert an additional antifracture effect mainly via extraskeletal parameters such as muscle mass and propensity to fall. Given the demographic trends of increased longevity and consequent rise of osteoporosis, an increased understanding of how sex steroids influence male bone health remains a high research priority. PMID:25202834

  14. Plasma sex steroid concentrations and gonadal aromatase activities in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Markus; Giesy, John P; Jones, Paul D; Jooste, Alarik M; Carr, James A; Solomon, Keith R; Smith, Ernest E; Van der Kraak, Glen; Kendall, Ronald J; Du Preez, Louis

    2004-08-01

    Adult African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) were collected from a corn-growing region (CGR) and a non-corn-growing region (NCGR) with different exposure profiles for atrazine and related triazines. Physical, chemical, and biological parameters from the catchment areas were also measured. Frogs were surveyed for possible effects of exposure to triazine herbicides on plasma testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) titers, gonadal aromatase activity, and gonad growth (GSI). Concentrations of both T and E2 varied among locations and were correlated to some accessory factors, such as pH, several ions, and metals. Greatest median plasma T concentrations (males: 19 ng/ml; females: 16 ng/ml) occurred in frogs inhabiting NCGR as compared to those from the CGR (males: 4 ng/ml; females: 1 ng/ml). Median E2 concentrations were also greater in frogs collected from the NCGR (males: 3 ng/ml; females: 28 ng/ml) than those in frogs from the CGR (males: 2 ng/ml; females: 5 ng/ml). Because some exposure to agricultural chemicals at both regions occurred, as did simultaneous exposures to multiple chemicals, a regression analysis was employed. Negative correlations were observed between plasma T concentrations and concentrations of atrazine, deisopropylatrazine, deethylatrazine, and tertbuthylazine in females and between T and diaminochlorotriazine in males. Estradiol in females exhibited a significant negative correlation with atrazine and deethylatrazine. No correlations were observed between gonadal aromatase activity or GSI and any of the agricultural chemicals measured. Median aromatase activities in ovaries varied among sampling sites ranging from 7 to >3000 times greater than those in males when measurable. Testicular aromatase activity was below the detection limit of the assay in male frogs at most of the sites. Although exposure to agricultural inputs did not affect aromatase activities, effects of atrazine or coapplied pesticides on sex steroid homeostasis cannot be excluded at

  15. Decreased glutathione S-transferase expression and activity and altered sex steroids in Lake Apopka brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallagher, E.P.; Gross, T.S.; Sheehy, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    A number of freshwater lakes and reclaimed agricultural sites in Central Florida have been the receiving waters for agrochemical and municipal runoff. One of these sites, Lake Apopka, is also a eutrophic system that has been the focus of several case studies reporting altered reproductive activity linked to bioaccumulation of persistent organochlorine chemicals in aquatic species. The present study was initiated to determine if brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) from the north marsh of Lake Apopka (Lake Apopka Marsh) exhibit an altered capacity to detoxify environmental chemicals through hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation as compared with bullheads from a nearby reference site (Lake Woodruff). We also compared plasma sex hormone concentrations (testosterone, 17-?? estradiol, and 11 keto-testosterone) in bullheads from the two sites. Female bullheads from Lake Apopka had 40% lower initial rate GST conjugative activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 50% lower activity towards p-nitrobutyl chloride (NBC), 33% lower activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA), and 43% lower activity toward ??5-androstene-3,17-dione (??5-ADI), as compared with female bullheads from Lake Woodruff. Enzyme kinetic analyses demonstrated that female bullheads from Lake Apopka had lower GST-catalyzed CDNB clearance than did female Lake Woodruff bullheads. Western blotting studies of bullhead liver cytosolic proteins demonstrated that the reduced GST catalytic activities in female Lake Apopka bullheads were accompanied by lower expression of hepatic GST protein. No site differences were observed with respect to GST activities or GST protein expression in male bullheads. Female Lake Apopka bullheads also had elevated concentrations of plasma androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) as compared with females from Lake Woodruff. In contrast, male Lake Apopka bullheads had elevated levels of plasma estrogen but similar levels of androgens as compared with

  16. Sex steroids imprinting and prostatic growth.

    PubMed

    Chung, L W; MacFadden, D K

    1980-01-01

    Sex steroids exposure to rats castrated at birth during the neonatal or prepubertal period permanently modified certain morphologic features of the accessory sex organs in adulthood. Similar treatment of intact rats failed to induce these changes. Hypophysectomy in adulthood did not abolish the neonatally androgen-induced imprinting of the growth response of the rat accessory sex organs in adulthood, which suggests that the effects of neonatal androgen administration are directly on the hormone-responsive target cells and are not mediated via the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  17. The Effects of Sex Steroids on Spatial Performance: A Review and an Experimental Clinical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liben, Lynn S.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Finkelstein, Jordan W.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Kunselman, Susan; Schwab, Jacqueline; Dubas, Judith Semon; Demers, Laurence M.; Lookingbill, Georgia; D'Arcangelo, M. Rose; Krogh, Holleen R.; Kulin, Howard E.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between sex hormones and spatial performance among adolescents treated with sex steroids for delayed puberty. Found that spatial performance varied according to gender but did not vary with levels of actively circulating sex steroids. Reviewed physiological mechanisms, developmental periods, and past empirical work…

  18. DHHC-7 and -21 are palmitoylacyltransferases for sex steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Ali; Razandi, Mahnaz; Deschenes, Robert J; Levin, Ellis R

    2012-01-01

    Classical estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors (ERs, PRs, and ARs) localize outside the nucleus at the plasma membrane of target cells. From the membrane, the receptors signal to activate kinase cascades that are essential for the modulation of transcription and nongenomic functions in many target cells. ER, PR, and AR trafficking to the membrane requires receptor palmitoylation by palmitoylacyltransferase (PAT) protein(s). However, the identity of the steroid receptor PAT(s) is unknown. We identified the DHHC-7 and -21 proteins as conserved PATs for the sex steroid receptors. From DHHC-7 and -21 knockdown studies, the PATs are required for endogenous ER, PR, and AR palmitoylation, membrane trafficking, and rapid signal transduction in cancer cells. Thus the DHHC-7 and -21 proteins are novel targets to selectively inhibit membrane sex steroid receptor localization and function. PMID:22031296

  19. Sex steroids and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Allan, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone levels are lower in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and also predict the onset of these adverse metabolic states. Body composition (body mass index, waist circumference) is an important mediator of this relationship. Sex hormone binding globulin is also inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2DM but the data regarding estrogen are inconsistent. Clinical models of androgen deficiency including Klinefelter's syndrome and androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer confirm the association between androgens and glucose status. Experimental manipulation of the insulin/glucose milieu and suppression of endogenous testicular function suggests the relationship between androgens and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional. Androgen therapy in men without diabetes is not able to differentiate the effect on insulin resistance from that on fat mass, in particular visceral adiposity. Similarly, several small clinical studies have examined the efficacy of exogenous testosterone in men with T2DM, however, the role of androgens, independent of body composition, in modifying insulin resistance is uncertain. PMID:24457840

  20. Sex steroids and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone levels are lower in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and also predict the onset of these adverse metabolic states. Body composition (body mass index, waist circumference) is an important mediator of this relationship. Sex hormone binding globulin is also inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2DM but the data regarding estrogen are inconsistent. Clinical models of androgen deficiency including Klinefelter's syndrome and androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer confirm the association between androgens and glucose status. Experimental manipulation of the insulin/glucose milieu and suppression of endogenous testicular function suggests the relationship between androgens and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional. Androgen therapy in men without diabetes is not able to differentiate the effect on insulin resistance from that on fat mass, in particular visceral adiposity. Similarly, several small clinical studies have examined the efficacy of exogenous testosterone in men with T2DM, however, the role of androgens, independent of body composition, in modifying insulin resistance is uncertain. PMID:24457840

  1. The mechanism of sex determination in vertebrates-are sex steroids the key-factor?

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masahisa

    2010-08-01

    In many vertebrate species, sex is determined at fertilization of zygotes by sex chromosome composition, knows as genotypic sex determination (GSD). But in some species-fish, amphibians and reptiles-sex is determined by environmental factors; in particular by temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in TSD and GSD. How does TSD differ from GSD? As is well known, genes that activated downstream of sex-determining genes are conserved throughout all classes of vertebrates. What is the main factor that determines sex, then? Sex steroids can reverse sex of several species of vertebrate; estrogens induce the male-to-female sex-reversal, whereas androgens do the female-to-male sex-reversal. For such sex-reversal, a functioning sex-determining gene is not required. However, in R. rugosa CYP19 (P450 aromatase) is expressed at high levels in indifferent gonads before phenotypic sex determination, and the gene is also active in the bipotential gonad of females before sex determination. Thus, we may predict that an unknown factor, a common transcription factor locates on the X and/or W chromosome, intervenes directly or indirectly in the transcriptional up-regulation of the CYP19 gene for feminization in species of vertebrates with both TSD and GSD. Similarly, an unknown factor on the Z and/or Y chromosome probably intervenes directly or indirectly in the regulation of androgen biosynthesis for masculinization. In both cases, a sex-determining gene is not always necessary for sex determination. Taken together, sex steroids may be the key-factor for sex determination in some species of vertebrates.

  2. SEASONAL VARIATION IN PLASMA SEX STEROID CONCENTRATION IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variation in plasma sex steroid concentrations is common in mature vertebrates, and is occasionally seen in juvenile animals. In this study, we examine the seasonal pattern of sex hormone concentration in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and make...

  3. [Effect of female sex steroids on levels of endogenous ethanol].

    PubMed

    Garber, M R; Kovalenko, A E

    1988-01-01

    The authors presented the results of a study of the effect of female sex steroids on the level of endogenous ethanol. The time course of endogenous ethanol during the menstrual cycle was investigated. The concentration of endogenous ethanol was compared in the groups of women receiving and not receiving hormonal contraceptives. An increase in sex steroids during the menstrual cycle was accompanied by a decrease in the level of endogenous ethanol. The use of hormonal contraceptives caused an increase in the background concentration of endogenous ethanol. A possible effect of endogenous and exogenous female sex steroids on different levels of regulation of ethanol metabolism was assumed.

  4. Sex differences in sleep: impact of biological sex and sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Mong, Jessica A; Cusmano, Danielle M

    2016-02-19

    Men and women sleep differently. While much is known about the mechanisms that drive sleep, the reason for these sex differences in sleep behaviour is unknown and understudied. Historically, women and female animals are underrepresented in studies of sleep and its disorders. Nevertheless, there is a growing recognition of sex disparities in sleep and rhythm disorders. Women typically report poorer quality and more disrupted sleep across various stages of life. Findings from clinical and basic research studies strongly implicate a role for sex steroids in sleep modulation. Understanding how neuroendocrine mediators and sex differences influence sleep is central to advancing our understanding of sleep-related disorders. The investigation into sex differences and sex steroid modulation of sleep is in its infancy. Identifying the mechanisms underlying sex and gender differences in sleep will provide valuable insights leading to tailored therapeutics that benefit each sex. The goal of this review is to discuss our current understanding of how biological sex and sex steroids influence sleep behaviour from both the clinical and pre-clinical perspective. PMID:26833831

  5. Sex steroid-related candidate genes in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Westberg, Lars; Eriksson, Elias

    2008-07-01

    Sex steroids readily pass the blood-brain barrier, and receptors for them are abundant in brain areas important for the regulation of emotions, cognition and behaviour. Animal experiments have revealed both important early effects of these hormones on brain development and their ongoing influence on brain morphology and neurotransmission in the adult organism. The important effects of sex steroids on human behaviour are illustrated by, for example, the effect of reduced levels of these hormones on sexual drive and conditions such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder, perimenopausal dysphoria, postpartum depression, postpartum psychosis, dysphoria induced by oral contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and anabolic steroid-induced aggression. The fact that men and women (as groups) differ with respect to the prevalence of several psychiatric disorders, certain aspects of cognitive function and certain personality traits may possibly also reflect an influence of sex steroids on human behaviour. The heritability of most behavioural traits, including personality, cognitive abilities and susceptibility to psychiatric illness, is considerable, but as yet, only few genes of definite importance in this context have been identified. Given the important role of sex steroids for brain function, it is unfortunate that relatively few studies so far have addressed the possible influence of sex steroid-related genes on interindividual differences with respect to personality, cognition and susceptibility to psychiatric disorders. To facilitate further research in this area, this review provides information on several such genes and summarizes what is currently known with respect to their possible influence on brain function.

  6. The Endocannabinoid System and Sex Steroid Hormone-Dependent Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Anthony H.; Marczylo, Timothy H.; Willets, Jonathon M.; Konje, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    The “endocannabinoid system (ECS)” comprises the endocannabinoids, the enzymes that regulate their synthesis and degradation, the prototypical cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), some noncannabinoid receptors, and an, as yet, uncharacterised transport system. Recent evidence suggests that both cannabinoid receptors are present in sex steroid hormone-dependent cancer tissues and potentially play an important role in those malignancies. Sex steroid hormones regulate the endocannabinoid system and the endocannabinoids prevent tumour development through putative protective mechanisms that prevent cell growth and migration, suggesting an important role for endocannabinoids in the regulation of sex hormone-dependent tumours and metastasis. Here, the role of the endocannabinoid system in sex steroid hormone-dependent cancers is described and the potential for novel therapies assessed. PMID:24369462

  7. Effects of atrazine on CYP19 gene expression and aromatase activity in testes and on plasma sex steroid concentrations of male African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Hecker, Markus; Park, June-Woo; Murphy, Margaret B; Jones, Paul D; Solomon, Keith R; Van Der Kraak, Glen; Carr, James A; Smith, Ernest E; du Preez, Louis; Kendall, Ronald J; Giesy, John P

    2005-08-01

    Some investigators have suggested that the triazine herbicide atrazine can cause demasculinization of male amphibians via upregulation of the enzyme aromatase. Male adult African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) were exposed to three nominal concentrations of atrazine (1, 25, or 250 microg atrazine/l) for 36 days, and testicular aromatase activity and CYP19 gene expression, as well as concentrations of the plasma sex steroids testosterone (T) and 17beta-estradiol (E2), and gonad size (GSI) were measured. There were no effects on any of the parameters measured, with the exception of plasma T concentrations. Plasma T concentrations in X. laevis exposed to the greatest concentration of atrazine were significantly less (p = 0.034) than those in untreated frogs. Both CYP19 gene expression and aromatase activities were low regardless of treatment, and neither parameter correlated with the other. We conclude that aromatase enzyme activity and gene expression were at basal levels in X. laevis from all treatments, and that the tested concentrations of atrazine did not interfere with steroidogenesis through an aromatase-mediated mechanism of action.

  8. Modulatory Effects of Sex Steroids Progesterone and Estradiol on Odorant Evoked Responses in Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the sex steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol on physiology and behavior during menstrual cycles and pregnancy is well known. Several studies indicate that olfactory performance changes with cyclically fluctuating steroid hormone levels in females. Knowledge of the exact mechanisms behind how female sex steroids modulate olfactory signaling is limited. A number of different known genomic and non-genomic actions that are mediated by progesterone and estradiol via interactions with different receptors may be responsible for this modulation. Next generation sequencing-based RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the murine olfactory epithelium (OE) and olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) revealed the expression of several membrane progestin receptors and the estradiol receptor Gpr30. These receptors are known to mediate rapid non-genomic effects through interactions with G proteins. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining results provide evidence for progestin and estradiol receptors in the ORNs. These data support the hypothesis that steroid hormones are capable of modulating the odorant-evoked activity of ORNs. Here, we validated this hypothesis through the investigation of steroid hormone effects by submerged electro-olfactogram and whole cell patch-clamp recordings of ORNs. For the first time, we demonstrate that the sex steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol decrease odorant-evoked signals in the OE and ORNs of mice at low nanomolar concentrations. Thus, both of these sex steroids can rapidly modulate the odor responsiveness of ORNs through membrane progestin receptors and the estradiol receptor Gpr30. PMID:27494699

  9. Association between sex steroids and cognition in elderly men

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Erin S.; Wang, Patty Y.; Janowsky, Jeri S.; Neiss, Michelle B.; Fink, Howard A.; Yaffe, Kristine; Marshall, Lynn M.; Lapidus, Jodi A.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Examine the association of cognitive function with sex steroid and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels among elderly men. Design Prospective cohort study, The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS), consisting of 5995 US community dwelling men 65 years or older. Patients 1602 men chosen randomly from MrOS cohort for sex steroid level measurements by Mass Spectrometry (MS) at baseline. 2623 MrOS participants with sex steroids measured using RIA were also examined. Measurements Baseline and follow-up (4.5 years later) performance on two cognitive tests: Trails B (executive function and motor speed) and 3MS (global cognitive function). Baseline total testosterone and estradiol were measured by MS. Free testosterone (free-T) and free estradiol (free-E) were calculated. SHBG was measured by radioimmunoassay. Data were analyzed using linear regression. Results Baseline free-T and free-E levels were not associated with cognitive performance or change in cognition, following adjustment for age, education, race, health status and alcohol use. Baseline SHBG levels were inversely associated with follow-up trails B (p=0.03) and 3MS performance (p=0.02). Higher SHBG was associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline. Total sex steroid levels were not associated with cognitive performance. Conclusions Despite large numbers of participants and rigorous sex steroid measurements, we did not observe an association between cognition and either testosterone or estradiol levels. We conclude that endogenous sex steroids in the normal range are not related to executive function or global cognitive function in elderly men. High SHBG deserves further examination as a risk factor for cognitive decline. PMID:19744108

  10. Sex steroids and growth hormone interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; de Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; Guerra, Borja; Díaz, Mario; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    GH and sex hormones are critical regulators of body growth and composition, somatic development, intermediate metabolism, and sexual dimorphism. Deficiencies in GH- or sex hormone-dependent signaling and the influence of sex hormones on GH biology may have a dramatic impact on liver physiology during somatic development and in adulthood. Effects of sex hormones on the liver may be direct, through hepatic receptors, or indirect by modulating endocrine, metabolic, and gender-differentiated functions of GH. Sex hormones can modulate GH actions by acting centrally, regulating pituitary GH secretion, and peripherally, by modulating GH signaling pathways. The endocrine and/or metabolic consequences of long-term exposure to sex hormone-related compounds and their influence on the GH-liver axis are largely unknown. A better understanding of these interactions in physiological and pathological states will contribute to preserve health and to improve clinical management of patients with growth, developmental, and metabolic disorders.

  11. Developmental synergism of steroidal estrogens in sex determination.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, J M; Willingham, E; Osborn, C T; Rhen, T; Crews, D

    1999-01-01

    Gonadal sex in the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta, is determined by incubation temperature during embryonic development. Evidence suggests that temperature determines sex by influencing steroid hormone metabolism and/or sensitivity: steroidogenic enzyme inhibitors or exogenous sex steroid hormones and their man-made analogs override (or enhance) temperature effects on sex determination. Specifically, nonaromatizable androgens and aromatase inhibitors induce testis differentiation at female-producing temperatures, whereas aromatizable androgens and estrogens induce ovary differentiation at male-producing temperatures. Moreover, natural estrogens and temperature synergize to produce more females than would be expected if estrogens and temperature had purely additive effects on sex determination. In this study, we use sex reversal of turtle embryos incubated at a male-producing temperature to examine synergism among steroidal estrogens: estrone, 17ss-estradiol, and estriol. A low dose of 17ss-estradiol (200 ng) showed significant synergism when administered with a single low dose of estriol (10 ng). Likewise, a single low dose of estrone (250 ng) had a synergistic effect when combined with the same low dose of estriol (10 ng). We conclude that the weak natural estrogens estrone and 17ss-estradiol synergize with a low dose of the more potent estriol to reverse gonadal sex during the critical period of sexual differentiation. These results suggest that weak environmental estrogens may also synergize with stronger natural estrogens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9924002

  12. Sex steroid hormones and circulating IgE levels.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Mathur, R S; Goust, J M; Williamson, H O; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The possible influence of sex steroid hormones on circulating IgE levels in general and IgE anti-Candida antibodies in particular was studied by quantification of plasma levels of progesterone, estradiol and IgE (total and anti-Candida-specific) in females during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, and during pregnancy. IgE levels during the follicular and luteal phases were not significantly different, although the mean values for the luteal phase were slightly lower. This trend was apparent in daily samples from two normal females during one menstrual cycle. During pregnancy, when the levels of circulating sex steroids were high, IgE levels were only slightly higher than in the follicular and luteal phases. In men and in gonadal dysgenetics, circulating progesterone levels were similar to those of women during the follicular phase (i.e., lower than in the luteal phase or in pregnancy), but the IgE levels were not different. The apparently low levels of IgE during the luteal phase may therefore be due to physiological factors other than fluctuations in the sex steroid hormones. From the present studies, it is apparent that sex steroid hormones have little or no effect on humoral IgE levels, in marked contrast to previously described correlations for other immunoglobulins, especially anti-Candida antibodies. PMID:606452

  13. Sex hormone binding globulin and corticosteroid binding globulin as major effectors of steroid action.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jack D; Jirikowski, Gustav F

    2014-03-01

    Contrary to the long-held postulate of steroid-hormone binding globulin action, these protein carriers of steroids are major players in steroid actions in the body. This manuscript will focus on our work with sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) and demonstrate how they are actively involved in the uptake, intracellular transport, and possibly release of steroids from cells. This manuscript will also discuss our own findings that the steroid estradiol is taken up into the cell, as demonstrated by uptake of fluorescence labeled estradiol into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and into the cytoplasm where it may have multiple actions that do not seem to involve the cell nucleus. This manuscript will focus mainly on events in two compartments of the cell, the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm.

  14. Sex steroids and variants of gender identity.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F L

    2013-09-01

    This article summarizes for the practicing endocrinologist the current literature on the psychobiology of the development of gender identity and its variants in individuals with disorders of sex development (DSD) or with non-DSD transgenderism. Gender reassignment remains the treatment of choice for strong and persistent gender dysphoria in both categories, but more research is needed on the short-term and long-term effects of puberty-suppressing medications and cross-sex hormones on brain and behavior.

  15. Sex steroids and brain structure in pubertal boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Peper, Jiska S; Brouwer, Rachel M; Schnack, Hugo G; van Baal, G Caroline; van Leeuwen, Marieke; van den Berg, Stéphanie M; Delemarre-Van de Waal, Henriëtte A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2009-04-01

    Sex steroids exert important organizational effects on brain structure. Early in life, they are involved in brain sexual differentiation. During puberty, sex steroid levels increase considerably. However, to which extent sex steroid production is involved in structural brain development during human puberty remains unknown. The relationship between pubertal rises in testosterone and estradiol levels and brain structure was assessed in 37 boys and 41 girls (10-15 years). Global brain volumes were measured using volumetric-MRI. Regional gray and white matter were quantified with voxel-based morphometry (VBM), a technique which measures relative concentrations ('density') of gray and white matter after individual global differences in size and shape of brains have been removed. Results showed that, corrected for age, global gray matter volume was negatively associated with estradiol levels in girls, and positively with testosterone levels in boys. Regionally, a higher estradiol level in girls was associated with decreases within prefrontal, parietal and middle temporal areas (corrected for age), and with increases in middle frontal-, inferior temporal- and middle occipital gyri. In boys, estradiol and testosterone levels were not related to regional brain structures, nor were testosterone levels in girls. Pubertal sex steroid levels could not explain regional sex differences in regional gray matter density. Boys were significantly younger than girls, which may explain part of the results. In conclusion, in girls, with the progression of puberty, gray matter development is at least in part directly associated with increased levels of estradiol, whereas in boys, who are in a less advanced pubertal stage, such steroid-related development could not (yet) be found. We suggest that in pubertal girls, estradiol may be implicated in neuronal changes in the cerebral cortex during this important period of brain development.

  16. Effects of atrazine on metamorphosis, growth, laryngeal and gonadal development, aromatase activity, and sex steroid concentrations in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Coady, Katherine K; Murphy, Margaret B; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Hecker, Markus; Jones, Paul D; Carr, James A; Solomon, Keith R; Smith, Ernest E; Van Der Kraak, Glen; Kendall, Ronald J; Giesy, John P

    2005-10-01

    African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) were exposed to one of eight nominal waterborne concentrations including 0, 0.1, 1.0, 10, or 25 microg/L atrazine, 0.005% ethanol (EtOH), or 0.1mg/L estradiol (E2) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) containing 0.005% EtOH. Frogs were exposed from 72 h posthatch until 2--3 months postmetamorphosis via a 3-day static renewal exposure regimen. Atrazine at concentrations between 0.1 and 25 microg/L did not significantly affect mortality, growth, gonad development, laryngeal muscle size, or aromatase activity in juvenile X. laevis. Male frogs exposed to 1.0 microg/L atrazine had lower E2 levels compared to controls, but this response was not consistent among other concentrations of atrazine. Male and female frogs exposed to DHT had larger laryngeal dilator muscle areas compared to controls. E2-exposed female frogs had decreased gonadal aromatase activity, and E2-exposed male frogs had statistically greater plasma concentrations of E2 compared to controls.

  17. Sex steroid levels temporarily increase in response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Lennartsson, Anna-Karin; Kushnir, Mark M; Bergquist, Jonas; Billig, Håkan; Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that acute psychosocial stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). However, the effect of acute psychosocial stress on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and levels of sex steroids are less known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute psychosocial stress on serum concentrations of sex steroids in healthy men and women. Twenty men and 19 women (age 30-50 years) underwent Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a tool for investigating psychobiological stress responses in a laboratory setting. Blood samples were collected before, directly after the stress test, and after 30 min of recovery. Concentrations of androgens were measured with high specificity LC-MS/MS method; concentrations of cortisol, estradiol and sex hormone-binding globulin were determined using immunoassays. In both men and women we observed significantly elevated levels of testosterone, estradiol, androstenedione and sex hormone binding globulin along with significantly increased adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum cortisol, heart rate, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) as a response to the stressor. Thus, even though the HPG axis and the production of sex steroids may be inhibited during prolonged periods of stress, the sex steroid levels may increase in the initial phase of acute psychosocial stress.

  18. Parasites and steroid hormones: corticosteroid and sex steroid synthesis, their role in the parasite physiology and development

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Marta C.; Jiménez, Pedro; Miranda-Brito, Carolina; Valdez, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    In many cases parasites display highly complex life cycles that include the penetration and permanence of the larva or adults within host organs, but even in those that only have one host, reciprocal, intricate interactions occur. Evidence indicates that steroid hormones have an influence on the development and course of parasitic infections. The host gender's susceptibility to infection, and the related differences in the immune response are good examples of the host-parasite interplay. However, the capacity of these organisms to synthesize their own steroidogenic hormones still has more questions than answers. It is now well-known that many parasites synthesize ecdysteroids, but limited information is available on sex steroid and corticosteroid synthesis. This review intends to summarize some of the existing information in the field. In most, but not all parasitosis the host's hormonal environment determines the susceptibility, the course, and severity of parasite infections. In most cases the infection disturbs the host environment, and activates immune responses that end up affecting the endocrine system. Furthermore, sex steroids and corticosteroids may also directly modify the parasite reproduction and molting. Available information indicates that parasites synthesize some steroid hormones, such as ecdysteroids and sex steroids, and the presence and activity of related enzymes have been demonstrated. More recently, the synthesis of corticosteroid-like compounds has been shown in Taenia solium cysticerci and tapeworms, and in Taenia crassiceps WFU cysticerci. In-depth knowledge of the parasite's endocrine properties will contribute to understand their reproduction and reciprocal interactions with the host, and may also help designing tools to combat the infection in some clinical situations. PMID:26175665

  19. Parasites and steroid hormones: corticosteroid and sex steroid synthesis, their role in the parasite physiology and development.

    PubMed

    Romano, Marta C; Jiménez, Pedro; Miranda-Brito, Carolina; Valdez, Ricardo A

    2015-01-01

    In many cases parasites display highly complex life cycles that include the penetration and permanence of the larva or adults within host organs, but even in those that only have one host, reciprocal, intricate interactions occur. Evidence indicates that steroid hormones have an influence on the development and course of parasitic infections. The host gender's susceptibility to infection, and the related differences in the immune response are good examples of the host-parasite interplay. However, the capacity of these organisms to synthesize their own steroidogenic hormones still has more questions than answers. It is now well-known that many parasites synthesize ecdysteroids, but limited information is available on sex steroid and corticosteroid synthesis. This review intends to summarize some of the existing information in the field. In most, but not all parasitosis the host's hormonal environment determines the susceptibility, the course, and severity of parasite infections. In most cases the infection disturbs the host environment, and activates immune responses that end up affecting the endocrine system. Furthermore, sex steroids and corticosteroids may also directly modify the parasite reproduction and molting. Available information indicates that parasites synthesize some steroid hormones, such as ecdysteroids and sex steroids, and the presence and activity of related enzymes have been demonstrated. More recently, the synthesis of corticosteroid-like compounds has been shown in Taenia solium cysticerci and tapeworms, and in Taenia crassiceps WFU cysticerci. In-depth knowledge of the parasite's endocrine properties will contribute to understand their reproduction and reciprocal interactions with the host, and may also help designing tools to combat the infection in some clinical situations.

  20. Survey of receiving-water environmental impacts associated with discharges from pulp mills; 2: Gonad size, liver size, hepatic erod activity and plasma sex steroid levels in white sucker

    SciTech Connect

    Munkittrick, K.R.; Servos, M.R. . Great Lakes Lab. for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences); Van Der Kraak, G.J.; McMaster, M.E. . Dept. of Zoology); Portt, C.B. ); Heuvel, M.R. van den . Dept. of Biology)

    1994-07-01

    Fish collected from the receiving areas of 12 Canadian pulp mills were examined, including sites receiving effluent from kraft mills using chlorine as well as sulfite mills. Field collections included sampling of receiving water for chemistry and toxicity testing, and sampling of local fish for organ weights, hepatic MFO (ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, EROD) activity, plasma steroid levels, and levels of liver dioxins. The main objectives of this study were to determine whether the discharge of effluent from pulp mills to sites other than Jackfish Bay was associated with physiological or biochemical disruptions in wild fish, whether there was any correlation between waste treatment and the presence of biological responses in wild fish, and whether there was any association between the use of chlorine as a bleaching agent and these responses. Although white sucker collected near bleached-kraft mills exhibited the highest EROD induction and dioxin levels, elevated enzyme activity was observed in fish from sites that did not use chlorine, and depressions in plasma sex steroid levels was not correlated with the level of EROD activity. The absence of chlorine bleaching or the presence of secondary treatment did not eliminate responses in fish, including decreased circulating levels of sex steroids, decreased gonadal size, and increase liver size. This survey has shown that (a) induction of hepatic EROD enzymes and depressions of plasma sex steroid levels during gonadal growth are found downstream of several pulp mills; (b) these changes are seen at some mills without chlorine bleaching and at mills that have secondary treatment; (c) substantial dilutions of nontoxic effluent do not appear to remove these responses; (d) the dominant factor determining the presence or absence of responses appeared to be dilution level; and (e) lab toxicity tests on invertebrates, rainbow trout, and fat-head minnows could not predict the presence of these responses in wild fish.

  1. Yolk steroid hormones and sex determination in reptiles with TSD.

    PubMed

    Elf, P K

    2003-07-01

    In reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), the temperature at which the eggs are incubated determines the sex of the offspring. The molecular switch responsible for determining sex in these species has not yet been elucidated. We have examined the dynamics of yolk steroid hormones during embryonic development in the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina, and the alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, and have found that yolk estradiol (E(2)) responds differentially to incubation temperature in both of these reptiles. Based upon recently reported roles for E(2) in modulation of steroidogenic factor 1, a transcription factor known to be significant in the sex differentiation process, we hypothesize that yolk E(2) is a link between temperature and the gene expression pathway responsible for sex determination and differentiation in at least some of these species. Here we review the evidence that supports our hypothesis. PMID:12849957

  2. Taenia solium tapeworms synthesize corticosteroids and sex steroids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Valdez, R A; Jiménez, P; Fernández Presas, A M; Aguilar, L; Willms, K; Romano, M C

    2014-09-01

    Cysticercosis is a disease caused by the larval stage of Taenia solium cestodes that belongs to the family Taeniidae that affects a number of hosts including humans. Taeniids tapeworms are hermaphroditic organisms that have reproductive units called proglottids that gradually mature to develop testis and ovaries. Cysticerci, the larval stage of these parasites synthesize steroids. To our knowledge there is no information about the capacity of T. solium tapeworms to metabolize progesterone or other precursors to steroid hormones. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to investigate if T. solium tapeworms were able to transform steroid precursors to corticosteroids and sex steroids. T. solium tapeworms were recovered from the intestine of golden hamsters that had been orally infected with cysticerci. The worms were cultured in the presence of tritiated progesterone or androstenedione. At the end of the experiments the culture media were analyzed by thin layer chromatography. The experiments described here showed that small amounts of testosterone were synthesized from (3)H-progesterone by complete or segmented tapeworms whereas the incubation of segmented tapeworms with (3)H-androstenedione, instead of (3)H-progesterone, improved their capacity to synthesize testosterone. In addition, the incubation of the parasites with (3)H-progesterone yielded corticosteroids, mainly deoxicorticosterone (DOC) and 11-deoxicortisol. In summary, the results described here, demonstrate that T. solium tapeworms synthesize corticosteroid and sex steroid like metabolites. The capacity of T. solium tapeworms to synthesize steroid hormones may contribute to the physiological functions of the parasite and also to their interaction with the host.

  3. Steroid hormones, receptors, and perceptual and cognitive sex differences in the visual system.

    PubMed

    Handa, Robert J; McGivern, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    The actions of gonadal steroid hormones induce morphological sex differences in many tissues in the body, including brain. These occur either during development to organize tissues in a sex-specific pattern and/or in adulthood to activate specific cellular pathways. Cellular and morphological changes in the brain, induced by androgens and estrogens, underlie behavioral sex differences in both reproductive and non-reproductive behaviors, including visual perception. A growing body of evidence indicates that some sex differences related to visual perception arise as the result of the organizational actions of gonadal steroid hormones on cerebral cortical pathways involved in visual processing of objects and movement. This review addresses the influence of gonadal steroids on structural, biochemical and morphological changes in tissues in the brain and body. These effects are extended to consider how gonadal hormone effects may contribute to cognitive sex differences across species that are related to processing within the dorsal and ventral visual streams for motion and objects, respectively. Lastly, this review considers the question of how cognitive sex differences related to processing of movement and objects in humans may be reflective of two types of cognitive style that are only superficially related to gender.

  4. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John; Klaver, Peter; O'Gorman, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women.

  5. Sex Steroid Modulation of Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.; Monroe, Scott E.; Burnett, David A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids influence very low density hepatic lipoprotein triglyceride production has not been fully elucidated. In previous studies we showed that [14C]oleate utilization and incorporation into triglycerides were greater in hepatocyte suspensions from adult female rats than from males. The sex differences were not related to activities of the enzymes of triglyceride biosynthesis, whereas fatty acid binding protein (FABP) concentration in liver cytosol was greater in females. These findings suggested that sex differences in lipoprotein could reflect a sex steroid influence on the availability of fatty acids for hepatocellular triglyceride biosynthesis. In the present studies, sex steroid effects on hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization and FABP concentration were investigated directly. Hepatocytes from immature (30-d-old) rats exhibited no sex differences in [14C]oleate utilization. With maturation, total [14C]oleate utilization and triglyceride biosynthesis increased moderately in female cells and decreased markedly in male cells; the profound sex differences in adults were maximal by age 60 d. Fatty acid oxidation was little affected. Rats were castrated at age 30 d, and received estradiol, testosterone, or no hormone until age 60 d, when hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization was studied. Castration virtually eliminated maturational changes and blunted the sex differences in adults. Estradiol or testosterone largely reproduced the appropriate adult pattern of [14C]oleate utilization regardless of the genotypic sex of the treated animal. In immature females and males, total cytosolic FABP concentrations were similar. In 60-d-old animals, there was a striking correlation among all groups (females, males, castrates, and hormone-treated) between mean cytosolic FABP concentration on the one hand, and mean total [14C]oleate utilization (r = 0.91) and incorporation into triglycerides (r = 0.94) on the other. In 30-d-old animals rates of [14C

  6. Plasma adrenal and gonadal sex steroids in human pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, J R; Forest, M G; De Peretti, E; Sempé, M; Collu, R; Bertrand, J

    1976-03-01

    Plasma free dehydroepiandrosterone (DHA), androstenedione (delta), testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estrone (E1), and estradiol (E2) were measured by radioimmunoassay in 55 boys and 54 girls 3.5 to 16.3 years of age. Plasma DHA increased significantly between 6 and 8 years of age in girls and between 8 and 10 years of age in boys. A further significant increase was noted between 10 and 12 years of age in both sexes. Delta rose significantly between 8 and 10 years of age in girls and between 10 and 12 years in boys. In contrast, no significant increase in T, DHT, or E1, was noted prior to 12 years of age in both sexes. However, E2 showed a significant increase between 10 and 12 years of age in girls. This early rise in the course of pubertal development of the two sex steroids predominantly of adrenal origin, DHA and delta, and its occurence 1 to 2 years earlier in girls than in boys, as does puberty itself, suggest a possible role for these steroids in the mechanisms involved in triggering the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis at puberty.

  7. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin and Sex Steroids Among Premenopausal Women in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Stentz, Frankie B.; Murphy, Mary Beth; Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: It is unknown whether intensive lifestyle modification (ILS) or metformin changes sex steroids among premenopausal women without a history of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Objectives: We examined 1-year intervention impact on sex steroids (estradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione [A4]) and SHBG and differences by race/ethnicity. Participants: A subgroup of Diabetes Prevention Program participants who were premenopausal, not using estrogen, without a history of PCOS or irregular menses, and who reported non-Hispanic white (NHW), Hispanic, or African-American race/ethnicity (n = 301). Interventions: Randomization arms were 1) ILS with the goals of weight reduction of 7% of initial weight and 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity exercise, 2) metformin 850 mg twice a day, or 3) placebo. Results: Neither intervention changed sex steroids compared to placebo. ILS, but not metformin, increased median SHBG by 3.1 nmol/L (∼11%) compared to decreases of 1.1 nmol/L in the placebo arm (P < .05). This comparison remained significant after adjustment for changes in covariates including waist circumference. However, associations with glucose were not significant. Median baseline A4 was lower in Hispanics compared to NHWs (5.7 nmol/L vs 6.5 nmol/L, P < .05) and increases in A4 were greater in Hispanics compared to NHWs (3.0 nmol/ vs 1.2 nmol/L, P < .05), and these differences did not differ significantly by intervention arm. No other racial/ethnic differences were significant. Conclusions: Among premenopausal glucose-intolerant women, no intervention changed sex steroids. ILS increased SHBG, although associations with glucose were not significant. SHBG and sex steroids were similar by race/ethnicity, with the possible exception of lower baseline A4 levels in Hispanics compared to NHWs. PMID:23709655

  8. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Karman, Bethany N. Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S. Craig, Zelieann R. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-05-15

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 h to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1–100 nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, and expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10 μM) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 3–4 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. -- Highlights: ►TCDD disrupts sex steroid hormone levels, but not growth of antral follicles. ►Pregnenolone co-treatment by-passes TCDD-induced steroid hormone disruption. ►TCDD affects steroid hormone levels through an AHR pathway in antral follicles.

  9. Sex and season influence gonadal steroid biosynthetic pathways, end-product production and steroid conjugation in blotched blue-tongued lizards (Tiliqua nigrolutea).

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ashley; Jones, Susan M; Davies, Noel W

    2003-11-01

    We examined differences in gonadal steroid production and biosynthetic pathway activity with changing reproductive condition and between sexes in the scincid lizard, Tiliqua nigrolutea. We observed clear seasonal and sexual variation in the production of androgens and steroid conjugates, but detected no 17beta-estradiol or 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone produced by the gonads. An alternative steroid, more polar than estradiol, was detected: an investigation of this steroid is reported separately [Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 129 (2002) 114]. There were seasonal and sex-related differences in steroid biosynthetic pathway activity. The Delta5 pathway metabolite, dehydroepiandrosterone, was detected only in males, and only from incubations using regressed testicular tissue. There was also a seasonal difference between the sexes in rates of progesterone accumulation, although the absence of corresponding elevated plasma concentrations suggests that the role of progesterone switches from a directly acting hormone to a precursor for others during the reproductive cycle in females. These results suggest that within the traditional view that vertebrate biosynthetic pathway activity and end-products are phylogenetically conserved, there is likely to be considerably species- and/or genus-specific variation.

  10. Sex steroid modulation of cortisol secretion in sheep.

    PubMed

    van Lier, E; Carriquiry, M; Meikle, A

    2014-06-01

    There is strong evidence that the gonads modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. To investigate these sex differences at the adrenal glands of sheep we compared the cortisol response to ACTH (experiment 1) and measured the relative expression of oestrogen receptor alpha (ERS1), androgen receptor (AR), melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) and steroid acute regulatory protein (STAR) mRNA in adrenal glands (experiment 2) of gonadectomised rams and ewes either with or without sex steroid replacement. In experiment 1 six castrated adult rams and four ovariectomised adult ewes were used in two ACTH trials. On each trial blood samples were taken every 15 min for 4 h through an indwelling jugular catheter and each animal received 0.5 mg of an ACTH analogue i.v., immediately after the sample at 1 h from the beginning of the trial. Four days after the first trial the males received 100 mg of Testosterone Cyclopentilpropionate (TC) i.m. and the females received 2.5 mg of Oestradiol Benzoate (EB) i.m. At 72 h after TC or EB administration the second trial was performed. In experiment 2 the adrenal glands were obtained from gonadectomised adult rams (n=8) and adult ewes (n=8). Four rams received 100 mg of TC i.m. and four females received 0.5 mg of EB i.m. Blood samples were taken at 0, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h relative to steroid replacement and the animals were thereafter slaughtered. Cortisol, testosterone and 17β-oestradiol were determined by radioimmunoanalysis. The transcripts of ERS1, AR, MC2R and STAR were determined by real-time reverse transcription PCR in adrenal tissue. Cortisol secretion was higher in female sheep than in male sheep, and higher in EB-treated than non-treated ewes. No difference in cortisol secretion was observed between TC-treated and non-treated rams. Gonadectomised rams treated with TC presented greater AR mRNA and MC2R mRNA expression than males without the steroid replacement. Gonadectomised ewes treated with EB tended to present lower AR m

  11. Sex steroids and connectivity in the human brain: a review of neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Peper, Jiska S; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Mandl, René C W; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; van Honk, Jack

    2011-09-01

    Our brain operates by the way of interconnected networks. Connections between brain regions have been extensively studied at a functional and structural level, and impaired connectivity has been postulated as an important pathophysiological mechanism underlying several neuropsychiatric disorders. Yet the neurobiological mechanisms contributing to the development of functional and structural brain connections remain to be poorly understood. Interestingly, animal research has convincingly shown that sex steroid hormones (estrogens, progesterone and testosterone) are critically involved in myelination, forming the basis of white matter connectivity in the central nervous system. To get insights, we reviewed studies into the relation between sex steroid hormones, white matter and functional connectivity in the human brain, measured with neuroimaging. Results suggest that sex hormones organize structural connections, and activate the brain areas they connect. These processes could underlie a better integration of structural and functional communication between brain regions with age. Specifically, ovarian hormones (estradiol and progesterone) may enhance both cortico-cortical and subcortico-cortical functional connectivity, whereas androgens (testosterone) may decrease subcortico-cortical functional connectivity but increase functional connectivity between subcortical brain areas. Therefore, when examining healthy brain development and aging or when investigating possible biological mechanisms of 'brain connectivity' diseases, the contribution of sex steroids should not be ignored.

  12. No sex difference in yolk steroid concentrations of avian eggs at laying.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Kevin M; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth; Schwabl, Hubert

    2005-09-22

    Yolk steroids of maternal origin have been proposed to influence genetic sex determination in birds, based on sex differences in yolk steroid concentrations of peafowl eggs incubated for 10 days. More recent reports dispute this proposal, as yolk steroids in eggs incubated for 3 days do not show such sex differences. To date, research examining this phenomenon has only analysed incubated eggs, although sex in avian species is determined before incubation begins. This may be a serious methodological flaw because incubation probably affects yolk steroid concentrations. Therefore, we investigated sex differences in yolk steroid concentrations of unincubated avian eggs. We withdrew yolk for steroid analysis from fresh, unincubated Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) eggs by biopsy, and then incubated those eggs for 10 days, after which we harvested the embryonic material for genetic sexing and the incubated yolk for further steroid analysis. We found no sex differences in fresh Japanese quail eggs; however, sex differences were apparent in yolk steroids by day 10 of incubation, when female eggs had significantly more oestrogen in relation to androgen than male eggs. Concentrations of all yolk androgens decreased dramatically between laying and day 10 of incubation, whereas oestradiol (E2) concentrations increased marginally. Thus, yolk concentrations of androgens and E2 do not appear critical for avian sex determination.

  13. No sex difference in yolk steroid concentrations of avian eggs at laying.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Kevin M; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth; Schwabl, Hubert

    2005-09-22

    Yolk steroids of maternal origin have been proposed to influence genetic sex determination in birds, based on sex differences in yolk steroid concentrations of peafowl eggs incubated for 10 days. More recent reports dispute this proposal, as yolk steroids in eggs incubated for 3 days do not show such sex differences. To date, research examining this phenomenon has only analysed incubated eggs, although sex in avian species is determined before incubation begins. This may be a serious methodological flaw because incubation probably affects yolk steroid concentrations. Therefore, we investigated sex differences in yolk steroid concentrations of unincubated avian eggs. We withdrew yolk for steroid analysis from fresh, unincubated Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) eggs by biopsy, and then incubated those eggs for 10 days, after which we harvested the embryonic material for genetic sexing and the incubated yolk for further steroid analysis. We found no sex differences in fresh Japanese quail eggs; however, sex differences were apparent in yolk steroids by day 10 of incubation, when female eggs had significantly more oestrogen in relation to androgen than male eggs. Concentrations of all yolk androgens decreased dramatically between laying and day 10 of incubation, whereas oestradiol (E2) concentrations increased marginally. Thus, yolk concentrations of androgens and E2 do not appear critical for avian sex determination. PMID:17148197

  14. Immunoreactivity for sex steroid hormone receptors in pulmonary hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Rosai, Juan; Viale, Giuseppe

    2006-07-01

    Sex steroid hormone [ie, estrogen (ER), progesterone (PgR), and androgen (AR)] receptors have been identified previously in normal salivary glands and, more variably, in salivary gland and salivary gland-type tumors. No data are available, however, on their expression in pulmonary hamartoma, a benign biphasic tumor consisting of reactive epithelial cells and neoplastic fibromyxoid stroma, cartilage and fat, which shares some morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genotypic features to pleomorphic adenoma of major salivary glands. Thirty pulmonary hamartomas (15 in male patients and 15 in age-matched female patients), were evaluated for ER, PgR, and AR immunoreactivity, and also for mesenchymal, epithelial, and myoepithelial markers, in the fibromyxoid, epithelial, and chondroid components. ER immunoreactivity was encountered in 90% of hamartomas, PgRs in 90%, and ARs in 53% (P<0.001), but not in normal lung tissues. ARs were confined to males (P<0.001), with a marginal prevalence in the fibromyxoid component (P=0.067). PgRs and ERs were instead present in both sex, with the former being restricted to the fibromyxoid stromal component (P<0.001) and the latter preferentially located in epithelial cells (P=0.107). In most cases, fibromyxoid stroma and spindle cells surrounding the chondroid foci displayed simultaneous immunoreactivity for ERs, PgRs, and ARs, along with immunoreactivity for vimentin, S-100 protein, glial fibrillary acid protein, smooth muscle actin, and calponin but lack of staining for cytokeratins. This profile is consistent with an incomplete myoepithelial differentiation of the receptor-expressing mesenchymal cells. In conclusion, sex steroid hormone receptor expression is a nonrandom event in pulmonary hamartoma, and may be related to the development and growth of this tumor.

  15. New insights into the role of sex steroid hormones in pregnancy: possible therapeutic approach by sex steroid hormones for the treatment of both preeclampsia and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, S; Mizutani, E

    2015-03-01

    Fetal peptide hormones are essential for the development of fetus, which increase in accordance with pregnancy term. Concentration of these hormones within the feto-placental unit is normally higher than that of maternal circulation. Since these hormones are biologically active, the leakage of these hormones into the maternal circulation is regulated by degradation activity by placental aminopeptidases, in order to maintain the balance between carriage of pregnancy and onset of labor.Because the concentration of these hormones, being regulated by the amount of endogenous production and by physiological degradation by enzymes in the blood and tissue, the balance between production and degradation is a definitive element for maintaining normal gestation and term delivery.The changes of the balance between fetal angiotensin II (A-II) and vasopressin (AVP) andA-II and AVP degrading enzymes, between aminopeptidase A (APA) and placental leucine aminopeptidase( P-LAP) - in the placenta and maternal blood due to fetal stress such as hypoxia - are the provable causes of preeclampsia or preterm labor.Induction of APA and P-LAP by estradiol benzoate (E2) and progesterone (P) from placenta has been demonstrated. They are involved in the regulation of fetal peptide hormones via placental aminopeptidases in homeostasis of pregnancy.Recently it was shown that both APA and P-LAP could be potentially safe and effective drugs for preeclampsia and preterm labor. The authors' proposed sex steroid treatment with dose increasing manner by gestational week (sex steroid treatment) for severe preeclampsia and preterm labor could be candidates replacing conventional treatments. In light of lacking safe and effective medication, the proposed sex steroid treatment is worthwhile for the prospective controlled studies for the treatment of both preeclampsia and preterm labor.

  16. Relationship of plasma sex steroid concentrations in female fathead minnows to reproductive success and population status.

    PubMed

    Ankley, Gerald T; Miller, David H; Jensen, Kathleen M; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Martinović, Dalma

    2008-06-01

    Concentration and/or production of sex steroids such as 17beta-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) in fish have commonly been measured in field studies concerned with endocrine-active chemicals. There is a reasonable mechanistic basis for using E2 or T as biomarkers, as chemicals can alter steroid production through both direct and indirect effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. There is uncertainty, however, as to what changes in steroid status may mean relative to apical endpoints, such as reproduction, that directly affect population status. In this study, we analyzed data from fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction studies in which decreases in fecundity were associated with depressed steroid production as a result of chemical exposure. Although the chemicals acted on the HPG axis through different mechanisms, reproductive effects appeared to be expressed through a common pathway, depression of vitellogenin production in females. Plasma concentrations of E2 or T in the females were significantly, positively correlated with fecundity. Linear regression models describing the relationship between E2 or T concentrations and relative fecundity were linked to a population model to predict population trajectories of fathead minnows exposed to chemicals that inhibit steroid production. For example, a population existing at carrying capacity and exposed to a chemical stressor(s) that causes a 50% decrease in E2 production was predicted to exhibit a 92% decrease in population size over a 5-year period. Results of our analysis illustrate a conceptual framework whereby a commonly measured biomarker, sex steroid status, could be linked to individual- and population-level effects in fish.

  17. Antifungal Activity of C-27 Steroidal Saponins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chong-Ren; Zhang, Ying; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Li, Xing-Cong

    2006-01-01

    As part of our search for new antifungal agents from natural resources, 22 C-27 steroidal saponins and 6 steroidal sapogenins isolated from several monocotyledonous plants were tested for their antifungal activity against the opportunistic pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results showed that the antifungal activity of the steroidal saponins was associated with their aglycone moieties and the number and structure of monosaccharide units in their sugar chains. Within the 10 active saponins, four tigogenin saponins (compounds 1 to 4) with a sugar moiety of four or five monosaccharide units exhibited significant activity against C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, comparable to the positive control amphotericin B. The antifungal potency of these compounds was not associated with cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. This suggests that the C-27 steroidal saponins may be considered potential antifungal leads for further preclinical study. PMID:16641439

  18. All sex steroids are made intracellularly in peripheral tissues by the mechanisms of intracrinology after menopause.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Fernand

    2015-01-01

    Following the arrest of estradiol secretion by the ovaries at menopause, all estrogens and all androgens in postmenopausal women are made locally in peripheral target tissues according to the physiological mechanisms of intracrinology. The locally made sex steroids exert their action and are inactivated intracellularly without biologically significant release of the active sex steroids in the circulation. The level of expression of the steroid-forming and steroid-inactivating enzymes is specific to each cell type in each tissue, thus permitting to each cell/tissue to synthesize a small amount of androgens and/or estrogens in order to meet the local physiological needs without affecting the other tissues of the organism. Achieved after 500 million years of evolution, combination of the arrest of ovarian estrogen secretion, the availability of high circulating levels of DHEA and the expression of the peripheral sex steroid-forming enzymes have permitted the appearance of menopause with a continuing access to intratissular sex steroids for the individual cells/tissues without systemic exposure to circulating estradiol. In fact, one essential condition of menopause is to maintain serum estradiol at biologically inactive (substhreshold) concentrations, thus avoiding stimulation of the endometrium and risk of endometrial cancer. Measurement of the low levels of serum estrogens and androgens in postmenopausal women absolutely requires the use of MS/MS-based technology in order to obtain reliable accurate, specific and precise assays. While the activity of the series of steroidogenic enzymes can vary, the serum levels of DHEA show large individual variations going from barely detectable to practically normal "premenopausal" values, thus explaining the absence of menopausal symptoms in about 25% of women. It should be added that the intracrine system has no feedback elements to adjust the serum levels of DHEA, thus meaning that women with low DHEA activity will not be

  19. Glucose transporters in sex steroid hormone related cancer.

    PubMed

    Nualart, Francisco; Los Angeles García, Maríade; Medina, Rodolfo A; Owen, Gareth I

    2009-10-01

    Cancer cells, as with most mammalian cells, depend on a continuous supply of glucose; not only as a precursor of glycoproteins, triglycerides and glycogen, but also as an important source of energy. This review concentrates on GLUT transporter expression in both normal and cancerous classical sex-steroid hormone tissues (i.e. breast, uterus, ovary, testis and prostate, among others). Given the importance of estrogen, progesterone and androgens in carcinogenesis, as well as in survival and propagation of these cancers, this review also highlights the current literature on hormone regulation of glucose transporters and on the role of hypoxia in their expression. Given the recent explosion of information on the newer GLUT6-12 family members, a brief overview on their function and general expression has been included. Finally, an insight into the use of glucose transporters as markers of cancer progression and clinical outcome is also discussed.

  20. New steroid derivative with hypoglycemic activity

    PubMed Central

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Bety, Sarabia-Alcocer

    2014-01-01

    Data indicates that some steroid derivatives may induce changes on glucose levels; nevertheless, data are very confusing. Therefore, more pharmacological data are needed to characterize the activity induced by the steroid derivatives on glucose levels. The aim of this study was to synthesize a new steroid derivative for evaluate its hypoglycemic activity. The effects of steroid derivative on glucose concentration were evaluated in a diabetic animal model using glibenclamide and metformin as controls. In addition, the pregnenolone-dihydrotestosterone conjugate was bound to Tc-99m using radioimmunoassay methods, to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the steroid derivative over time. The results showed that the pregnenolone-dihydrotestosterone conjugate induces changes on the glucose levels in similar form than glibenclamide. Other data showed that the biodistribution of Tc-99m-steroid derivativein brain was higher in comparison with spleen, stomach, intestine liver and kidney. In conclusion, the pregnenolone-dihydrotestosterone conjugate exerts hypoglycemic activity and this phenomenon could depend of its physicochemical properties which could be related to the degree of lipophilicity of the steroidderivative. PMID:25550906

  1. Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Steroids KidsHealth > For Kids > Steroids Print A A A ... a good idea to avoid them. What Are Steroids? "Steroids" has more than one meaning. Your body ...

  2. Metabolic profiling of cholesterol and sex steroid hormones to monitor urological diseases.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju-Yeun; Choi, Man Ho; Kim, Jayoung

    2016-10-01

    Cholesterol and sex steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens play a critical role in the development and progression of urological diseases such as prostate cancer. This disease remains the most commonly diagnosed malignant tumor in men and is the leading cause of death from different cancers. Attempts to understand the role of cholesterol and steroid metabolism in urological diseases have been ongoing for many years, but despite this, our mechanistic and translational understanding remains elusive. In order to further evaluate the problem, we have taken an interest in metabolomics; a discipline dedicated to the systematic study of biologically active metabolites in cells, tissues, hair and biofluids. Recently, we provided evidence that a quantitative measurement of cholesterol and sex steroid metabolites can be successfully achieved using hair of human and mouse models. The overall goal of this short review article is to introduce current metabolomic technologies for the quantitative biomarker assay development and also to provide new insight into understanding the underlying mechanisms that trigger the pathological condition. Furthermore, this review will place a particular emphasis on how to prepare biospecimens (e.g., hair fiber), quantify molecular profiles and assess their clinical significance in various urological diseases. PMID:27580660

  3. Metabolic profiling of cholesterol and sex steroid hormones to monitor urological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ju-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol and sex steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens play a critical role in the development and progression of urological diseases such as prostate cancer. This disease remains the most commonly diagnosed malignant tumor in men and is the leading cause of death from different cancers. Attempts to understand the role of cholesterol and steroid metabolism in urological diseases have been ongoing for many years, but despite this, our mechanistic and translational understanding remains elusive. In order to further evaluate the problem, we have taken an interest in metabolomics; a discipline dedicated to the systematic study of biologically active metabolites in cells, tissues, hair and biofluids. Recently, we provided evidence that a quantitative measurement of cholesterol and sex steroid metabolites can be successfully achieved using hair of human and mouse models. The overall goal of this short review article is to introduce current metabolomic technologies for the quantitative biomarker assay development and also to provide new insight into understanding the underlying mechanisms that trigger the pathological condition. Furthermore, this review will place a particular emphasis on how to prepare biospecimens (e.g., hair fiber), quantify molecular profiles and assess their clinical significance in various urological diseases. PMID:27580660

  4. Sex steroid hormones regulate constitutive expression of Cyp2e1 in female mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jie; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    CYP2E1 is of paramount toxicological significance because it metabolically activates a large number of low-molecular-weight toxicants and carcinogens. In this context, factors that interfere with Cyp2e1 regulation may critically affect xenobiotic toxicity and carcinogenicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of female steroid hormones in the regulation of CYP2E1, as estrogens and progesterone are the bases of contraceptives and hormonal replacement therapy in menopausal women. Interestingly, a fluctuation in the hepatic expression pattern of Cyp2e1 was revealed in the different phases of the estrous cycle of female mice, with higher Cyp2e1 expression at estrus (E) and lower at methestrus (ME), highly correlated with that in plasma gonadal hormone levels. Depletion of sex steroids by ovariectomy repressed Cyp2e1 expression to levels similar to those detected in males and cyclic females at ME. Hormonal supplementation brought Cyp2e1 expression back to levels detected at E. The role of progesterone appeared to be more prominent than that of 17β-estradiol. Progesterone-induced Cyp2e1 upregulation could be attributed to inactivation of the insulin/PI3K/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway. Tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen, repressed Cyp2e1 expression potentially via activation of the PI3K/Akt/FOXO1 and GH/STAT5b-linked pathways. The sex steroid hormone-related changes in hepatic Cyp2e1 expression were highly correlated with those observed in Hnf-1α, β-catenin, and Srebp-1c. In conclusion, female steroid hormones are clearly involved in the regulation of CYP2E1, thus affecting the metabolism of a plethora of toxicants and carcinogenic agents, conditions that may trigger several pathologies or exacerbate the outcomes of various pathophysiological states. PMID:23548611

  5. Do mollusks use vertebrate sex steroids as reproductive hormones? II. Critical review of the evidence that steroids have biological effects.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexander P

    2013-02-01

    In assessing the evidence as to whether vertebrate sex steroids (e.g. testosterone, estradiol, progesterone) have hormonal actions in mollusks, ca. 85% of research papers report at least one biological effect; and 18 out of 21 review papers (published between 1970 and 2012) express a positive view. However, just under half of the research studies can be rejected on the grounds that they did not actually test steroids, but compounds or mixtures that were only presumed to behave as steroids (or modulators of steroids) on the basis of their effects in vertebrates (e.g. Bisphenol-A, nonylphenol and sewage treatment effluents). Of the remaining 55 papers, some can be criticized for having no statistical analysis; some for using only a single dose of steroid; others for having irregular dose-response curves; 40 out of the 55 for not replicating the treatments; and 50 out of 55 for having no within-study repetition. Furthermore, most studies had very low effect sizes in comparison to fish-based bioassays for steroids (i.e. they had a very weak 'signal-to-noise' ratio). When these facts are combined with the fact that none of the studies were conducted with rigorous randomization or 'blinding' procedures (implying the possibility of 'operator bias') one must conclude that there is no indisputable bioassay evidence that vertebrate sex steroids have endocrinological or reproductive roles in mollusks. The only observation that has been independently validated is the ability of estradiol to trigger rapid (1-5 min) lysosomal membrane breakdown in hemocytes of Mytilus spp. This is a typical 'inflammatory' response, however, and is not proof that estradiol is a hormone - especially when taken in conjunction with the evidence (discussed in a previous review) that mollusks have neither the enzymes necessary to synthesize vertebrate steroids nor nuclear receptors with which to respond to them.

  6. Prognostic role of sex steroid receptors in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Despoina; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Sakellariou, Stratigoula; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitris; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Lazaris, Andreas C; Gounaris, Antonia; Zografos, George C

    2016-01-01

    From the available literature, it is unclear what proportion of pancreatic adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), progesterone receptors (PR), and androgen receptors (AR), and if any of these markers have prognostic significance. We aimed to assess (1) the expression and (2) the correlation of the aforementioned markers with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. During a five-year period, 60 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma underwent surgical resection at a single institution. Immunohistochemical stains of the studied markers were quantified by Image analysis system. ERα expression was positively associated with PR expression. Moreover, ERβ was inversely associated with the presence of metastases, whereas no significant associations implicated AR. As far as the prognostic significance of the studied receptors is concerned, higher ERα expression correlated with poorer survival at the univariate analysis, but the finding dissipated at the multivariate approach. No significant associations with overall survival were noted regarding the other receptors. The role of sex hormone receptors in the survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma seems rather limited. Further prospective studies assessing those receptors should ideally be designed in order to confirm our results and possibly outline additional correlations between other steroid receptors and features of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  7. Prognostic role of sex steroid receptors in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Despoina; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Sakellariou, Stratigoula; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitris; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Lazaris, Andreas C; Gounaris, Antonia; Zografos, George C

    2016-01-01

    From the available literature, it is unclear what proportion of pancreatic adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), progesterone receptors (PR), and androgen receptors (AR), and if any of these markers have prognostic significance. We aimed to assess (1) the expression and (2) the correlation of the aforementioned markers with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. During a five-year period, 60 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma underwent surgical resection at a single institution. Immunohistochemical stains of the studied markers were quantified by Image analysis system. ERα expression was positively associated with PR expression. Moreover, ERβ was inversely associated with the presence of metastases, whereas no significant associations implicated AR. As far as the prognostic significance of the studied receptors is concerned, higher ERα expression correlated with poorer survival at the univariate analysis, but the finding dissipated at the multivariate approach. No significant associations with overall survival were noted regarding the other receptors. The role of sex hormone receptors in the survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma seems rather limited. Further prospective studies assessing those receptors should ideally be designed in order to confirm our results and possibly outline additional correlations between other steroid receptors and features of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26652605

  8. Body Image Dissatisfaction and Distortion, Steroid Use, and Sex Differences in College Age Bodybuilders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Mark Anthony; Phelps, LeAddelle

    2001-01-01

    Compares college age bodybuilders by sex and steroid intake on two variables: body image dissatisfaction and body image distortion. Results reveal only a significant effect for gender on body distortion. No steroid-use differences were apparent for either body image dissatisfaction or body image distortion. Analyses indicate that female…

  9. A model for social control of sex change: interactions of behavior, neuropeptides, glucocorticoids, and sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Perry, Adam N; Grober, Matthew S

    2003-01-01

    The optimal regulation of vertebrate sexual development and reproductive function involves integration of internal physiological signals, indicative of an individual's sexual status and capability for reproduction, with signals from the external environment. While these environmental cues are diverse, and oftentimes species-specific, the induction of sexual readiness is typically carried out through the same basic components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis conserved among vertebrates. Therefore, species exhibiting diverse patterns of reproduction can contribute to the understanding of the general mechanisms underlying the expression of adult sexual phenotypes. The bluehead wrasse, Thalassoma bifasciatum, is a tropical coral reef fish that displays social control of sex change, whereby dominant males inhibit sex change in other members of the social group using aggressive interactions. In many fish species and vertebrates in general, individuals that lose these interactions often experience increased serum glucocorticoids, which can have a subsequent impact on their physiology and behavior. We discuss glucocorticoid regulation of both neuropeptide gene transcription and the major steroid biosynthetic pathways as potential mechanisms involved in the regulation of sex change in the bluehead wrasse. We present a model describing behavioral regulation of sex change in the bluehead wrasse and then describe the potential mechanistic roles of glucocorticoids, gonadal steroids, and neuropeptides in generating the changes predicted by the model. Through the use of alternative model systems it is possible to observe novel interactions among the neuroendocrine axes that regulate major life history events, like reproduction. These insights may then shed light on similar functional mechanisms underlying behavioral regulation of reproduction in all vertebrates.

  10. Sex steroid deficiency-associated bone loss is microbiota dependent and prevented by probiotics.

    PubMed

    Li, Jau-Yi; Chassaing, Benoit; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Vaccaro, Chiara; Luo, Tao; Adams, Jonathan; Darby, Trevor M; Weitzmann, M Neale; Mulle, Jennifer G; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Jones, Rheinallt M; Pacifici, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    A eubiotic microbiota influences many physiological processes in the metazoan host, including development and intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have shown that the intestinal microbiota modulates inflammatory responses caused by sex steroid deficiency, leading to trabecular bone loss. In murine models, sex steroid deficiency increased gut permeability, expanded Th17 cells, and upregulated the osteoclastogenic cytokines TNFα (TNF), RANKL, and IL-17 in the small intestine and the BM. In germ-free (GF) mice, sex steroid deficiency failed to increase osteoclastogenic cytokine production, stimulate bone resorption, and cause trabecular bone loss, demonstrating that the gut microbiota is central in sex steroid deficiency-induced trabecular bone loss. Furthermore, we demonstrated that twice-weekly treatment of sex steroid-deficient mice with the probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or the commercially available probiotic supplement VSL#3 reduces gut permeability, dampens intestinal and BM inflammation, and completely protects against bone loss. In contrast, supplementation with a nonprobiotic strain of E. coli or a mutant LGG was not protective. Together, these data highlight the role that the gut luminal microbiota and increased gut permeability play in triggering inflammatory pathways that are critical for inducing bone loss in sex steroid-deficient mice. Our data further suggest that probiotics that decrease gut permeability have potential as a therapeutic strategy for postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:27111232

  11. Preventing Anabolic Steroid Use: Guidelines and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June; Rauhe, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Information about anabolic steroids should be included in the school health curriculum as early as possible. The paper presents suggestions for planning education programs and offers a variety of activities and strategies appropriate for many age groups, including case studies, story completion, posters, demonstrations, projects, creative writing,…

  12. Sex differences in the brain-an interplay of sex steroid hormones and sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grgurevic, Neza; Majdic, Gregor

    2016-09-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of brain function, many questions remain unanswered. The ultimate goal of studying the brain is to understand the connection between brain structure and function and behavioural outcomes. Since sex differences in brain morphology were first observed, subsequent studies suggest different functional organization of the male and female brains in humans. Sex and gender have been identified as being a significant factor in understanding human physiology, health and disease, and the biological differences between the sexes is not limited to the gonads and secondary sexual characteristics, but also affects the structure and, more crucially, the function of the brain and other organs. Significant variability in brain structures between individuals, in addition to between the sexes, is factor that complicates the study of sex differences in the brain. In this review, we explore the current understanding of sex differences in the brain, mostly focusing on preclinical animal studies. PMID:27433022

  13. Sex differences in the brain-an interplay of sex steroid hormones and sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grgurevic, Neza; Majdic, Gregor

    2016-09-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of brain function, many questions remain unanswered. The ultimate goal of studying the brain is to understand the connection between brain structure and function and behavioural outcomes. Since sex differences in brain morphology were first observed, subsequent studies suggest different functional organization of the male and female brains in humans. Sex and gender have been identified as being a significant factor in understanding human physiology, health and disease, and the biological differences between the sexes is not limited to the gonads and secondary sexual characteristics, but also affects the structure and, more crucially, the function of the brain and other organs. Significant variability in brain structures between individuals, in addition to between the sexes, is factor that complicates the study of sex differences in the brain. In this review, we explore the current understanding of sex differences in the brain, mostly focusing on preclinical animal studies.

  14. Analgesic use and sex steroid hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Margaret A.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Missmer, Stacey A.; Hankinson, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Prior epidemiologic studies suggest that regular use of analgesics may decrease risk of breast and ovarian cancer. We explored possible hormone-mediated mechanisms for these associations by examining the relationship between use of aspirin, non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and acetaminophen and sex steroid hormone concentrations among 740 postmenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study. All women reported their analgesic use in 1988 or 1990 and provided a blood sample in 1989-90. We calculated adjusted geometric mean estrogen and androgen levels for each category of analgesic use, and calculated the p-value for trend with increasing frequency of use. There was no association between days of use per month of aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, or acetaminophen in 1990 and hormone levels (all p-trend≥0.09). However, we observed significant inverse trends between the estimated number of aspirin tablets per month in 1988 and concentrations of estrone (p-trend=0.04) and estrone sulfate (p-trend=0.03). In analyses of total (aspirin and non-aspirin) NSAID use in 1990, women who used NSAIDs at least 15 days per month had significantly lower levels of estradiol compared to women with no NSAID use (p-trend=0.03). Frequency of use of all analgesics (aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen) in 1990 was inversely associated with concentrations of estradiol (p-trend=0.001), free estradiol (p-trend=0.01), estrone sulfate (p-trend=0.03), and the ratio of estradiol to testosterone (p-trend=0.04). Among postmenopausal women, regular users of aspirin and other analgesics may have lower estrogen levels than non-users, which could contribute to a decreased risk of breast or ovarian cancer among analgesic users. PMID:20332258

  15. Effect of sex steroid hormones on the number of serotonergic neurons in rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kunimura, Yuyu; Iwata, Kinuyo; Iijima, Norio; Kobayashi, Makito; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2015-05-01

    Disorders caused by the malfunction of the serotonergic system in the central nervous system show sex-specific prevalence. Many studies have reported a relationship between sex steroid hormones and the brain serotonergic system; however, the interaction between sex steroid hormones and the number of brain neurons expressing serotonin has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we determined whether sex steroid hormones altered the number of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) of adult rat brains. Animals were divided into five groups: ovariectomized (OVX), OVX+low estradiol (E2), OVX+high E2, castrated males, and intact males. Antibodies against 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph), an enzyme for 5-HT synthesis, were used as markers of 5-HT neurons, and the number of 5-HT-immunoreactive (ir) or Tph-ir cells was counted. We detected no significant differences in the number of 5-HT-ir or Tph-ir cells in the DR among the five groups. By contrast, the intensity of 5-HT-ir showed significant sex differences in specific subregions of the DR independent of sex steroid levels, suggesting that the manipulation of sex steroid hormones after maturation does not affect the number and intensive immunostaining of serotonergic neurons in rat brain. Our results suggest that, the sexual dimorphism observed in the serotonergic system is due to factors such as 5-HT synthesis, transportation, and degradation but not to the number of serotonergic neurons.

  16. The influence of sex steroids on adipose tissue growth and function.

    PubMed

    Law, James; Bloor, Ian; Budge, Helen; Symonds, Michael E

    2014-07-01

    Obesity remains a major global health concern. Understanding the metabolic influences of the obesity epidemic in the human population on maintenance of a healthy weight and metabolic profile is still of great significance. The importance and role of white adipose tissue has been long established, particularly with excess adiposity. Brown adipose tissue (BAT), however, has only recently been shown to contribute significantly to the metabolic signature of mammals outside the previously recognised role in small mammals and neonates. BAT's detection in adults has led to a renewed interest and is now considered to be a potential therapeutic target to prevent excess white fat accumulation in obesity, a theory further promoted by the recent discovery of beige fat. Adipose tissue distribution varies significantly between genders. Pre-menopausal females often show enhanced lower and peripheral fat deposition in adiposity deposition compared to the male profile of central and visceral fat accumulation with obesity. This sex disparity is partly attributed to the different effects of sex hormone profiles and interactions on the adipose tissue system. In this review, we explore this intricate relationship and show how modifications in the effects of sex hormones impact on both brown and white adipose tissues. We also discuss the impact of sex hormones on activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and how the three pathways between adiposity, HPA and sex steroids can have a major contribution to the prevention or maintenance of obesity and therefore on overall health.

  17. Sex steroids regulate skin pigmentation through nonclassical membrane-bound receptors

    PubMed Central

    Natale, Christopher A; Duperret, Elizabeth K; Zhang, Junqian; Sadeghi, Rochelle; Dahal, Ankit; O'Brien, Kevin Tyler; Cookson, Rosa; Winkler, Jeffrey D; Ridky, Todd W

    2016-01-01

    The association between pregnancy and altered cutaneous pigmentation has been documented for over two millennia, suggesting that sex hormones play a role in regulating epidermal melanocyte (MC) homeostasis. Here we show that physiologic estrogen (17β-estradiol) and progesterone reciprocally regulate melanin synthesis. This is intriguing given that we also show that normal primary human MCs lack classical estrogen or progesterone receptors (ER or PR). Utilizing both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we establish that sex steroid effects on human pigment synthesis are mediated by the membrane-bound, steroid hormone receptors G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), and progestin and adipoQ receptor 7 (PAQR7). Activity of these receptors was activated or inhibited by synthetic estrogen or progesterone analogs that do not bind to ER or PR. As safe and effective treatment options for skin pigmentation disorders are limited, these specific GPER and PAQR7 ligands may represent a novel class of therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15104.001 PMID:27115344

  18. Female sex steroids and glia cells: Impact on multiple sclerosis lesion formation and fine tuning of the local neurodegenerative cellular network.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Markus; Hochstrasser, Tanja; Schmitz, Christoph; Beyer, Cordian

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease that shows a female-to-male gender prevalence and alleviation of disease activity during late stage pregnancy. In MS-related animal models, sex steroids ameliorate symptoms and protect from demyelination and neuronal damage. Underlying mechanisms of these protective avenues are continuously discovered, in part by using novel transgenic animal models. In this review article, we highlight the regulation of glia cell function by female sex steroids. We specifically focus on the relevance of glia cells for immune cell recruitment into the central nervous system and show how estrogen and progesterone can modulate these cell-cell communication pathways. Since MS is considered to have a strong neurodegenerative component, principal neuroprotective mechanisms, exerted by sex-steroids will be discussed as well. Activation of steroid receptors might not just act as immunosuppressant but at the same time harmonize brain-intrinsic networks to dampen neurodegeneration and, thus, disease progression in MS.

  19. No effect of sex steroids on compensatory muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N. E.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of orchiectomy and/or subcutaneously implanted testosterone propionate (TP) on the hypertrophic response of rat plantaris muscles to functional overload (induced by bilateral removal of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles) are investigated experimentally. Muscle wet weight, metabolic substrate oxidation, and cytosolic androgen-receptor binding are measured, and the results are presented in tables. Eight weeks after surgery, the plantaris muscle weight as a percentage of body weight is found to be about twice that in rats without muscle overload, regardless of the sex-hormone status. Overloading causes decreased ability to oxidize glucose and pyruvate, decreased succinate dehydrogenase specific activity, and no change in the ability to oxidize beta-hydroxybutyrate or in androgen-receptor binding. The oxidative response is unaffected by orchiectomy or TP or both. It is argued that the actions of sex hormones and functional overload are not synergistic.

  20. Is a sex-determining gene(s) necessary for sex-determination in amphibians? Steroid hormones may be the key factor.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians have 2 genetic sex-determining systems, one with male (XX/XY) and one with female (ZZ/ZW) heterogamety. While the ancestral state of sex-determination is thought to be female heterogamety, male and female heterogametic types were probably once interchangeable. The Japanese frog Rana rugosa has both XX/XY and ZZ/ZW systems within a single species in certain local populations. However, steroid hormones can alter the phenotypic sex epigenetically. In R. rugosa, steroidogenic enzyme expression starts before sex-determination in the indifferent gonad, and these enzymes become active in both male and female tadpoles. Androgens are produced in the indifferent gonad of male tadpoles at high levels, whereas estrogens are synthesized in females. In this regard, the observed enhanced expression of the hormone-metabolizing genes, CYP19 in the female gonad and CYP17 in males, may be crucial for sex-determination. Moreover, with FSH known to increase estrogen synthesis in the vertebrate ovary, observed upregulation of FSH receptor (FSHR) expression in the indifferent gonad of female tadpoles is intriguing. These data suggest that steroid hormones could be crucial for sex-determination in R. rugosa, with the consequence that upregulation of CYP19 and FSHR expression is necessary for female and CYP17 for male sex-determination.

  1. Pubertal maturation and sex steroids are related to alcohol use in adolescents.

    PubMed

    de Water, Erik; Braams, Barbara R; Crone, Eveline A; Peper, Jiska S

    2013-02-01

    Adolescents often show risk-taking behavior, including experimentation with alcohol. Previous studies have shown that advanced pubertal maturation is related to increased alcohol use in adolescents, even when controlling for age. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this relation between pubertal maturation and alcohol use. The goal of the present study was twofold. In Experiment 1, we investigated whether advanced pubertal maturation is associated with higher levels of alcohol use, when controlling for age. To this end, questionnaires on pubertal development and alcohol use were administered to a large sample of 797 Dutch adolescents (405 boys) aged 11-16 years. In Experiment 2, we explored whether sex steroids contribute to this relation between pubertal maturation and alcohol use by examining the association between salivary sex steroid levels and alcohol use in 168 adolescents (86 boys). It was found that, when controlling for age, advanced pubertal maturation is related to increased alcohol use in adolescent boys and girls. Controlling for age, higher testosterone and estradiol levels correlated with the onset of alcohol use in boys. In addition, higher estradiol levels were associated with a larger quantity of alcohol use in boys. Correlations between sex steroids and alcohol use were not significant in girls. These findings show that advanced pubertal maturation is related to advanced alcohol use, and that higher sex steroid levels could be one of the underlying mechanisms of this relation in boys. Sex steroids might promote alcohol use by stimulating brain regions implicated in reward processing.

  2. Sex steroid deficiency–associated bone loss is microbiota dependent and prevented by probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jau-Yi; Chassaing, Benoit; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Vaccaro, Chiara; Luo, Tao; Adams, Jonathan; Darby, Trevor M.; Weitzmann, M. Neale; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Jones, Rheinallt M.

    2016-01-01

    A eubiotic microbiota influences many physiological processes in the metazoan host, including development and intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have shown that the intestinal microbiota modulates inflammatory responses caused by sex steroid deficiency, leading to trabecular bone loss. In murine models, sex steroid deficiency increased gut permeability, expanded Th17 cells, and upregulated the osteoclastogenic cytokines TNFα (TNF), RANKL, and IL-17 in the small intestine and the BM. In germ-free (GF) mice, sex steroid deficiency failed to increase osteoclastogenic cytokine production, stimulate bone resorption, and cause trabecular bone loss, demonstrating that the gut microbiota is central in sex steroid deficiency–induced trabecular bone loss. Furthermore, we demonstrated that twice-weekly treatment of sex steroid–deficient mice with the probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or the commercially available probiotic supplement VSL#3 reduces gut permeability, dampens intestinal and BM inflammation, and completely protects against bone loss. In contrast, supplementation with a nonprobiotic strain of E. coli or a mutant LGG was not protective. Together, these data highlight the role that the gut luminal microbiota and increased gut permeability play in triggering inflammatory pathways that are critical for inducing bone loss in sex steroid–deficient mice. Our data further suggest that probiotics that decrease gut permeability have potential as a therapeutic strategy for postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:27111232

  3. Sex steroid regulation of the inflammatory response: sympathoadrenal dependence in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Green, P G; Dahlqvist, S R; Isenberg, W M; Strausbaugh, H J; Miao, F J; Levine, J D

    1999-05-15

    To investigate the role of sex steroids in sex differences in the response of rats to the potent inflammatory mediator bradykinin (BK), we evaluated the effect of sex steroid manipulation on the magnitude of BK-induced synovial plasma extravasation (PE). The magnitude of BK-induced PE is markedly less in females. Ovariectomy of female rats increased BK-induced PE, and administration of 17beta-estradiol to ovariectomized female rats reconstituted the female phenotype. Castration in male rats decreased BK-induced PE, and administration of testosterone or its nonmetabolizable analog dihydrotestosterone reconstituted the male phenotype. The results of these experiments strongly support the role of both male and female sex steroids in sex differences in the inflammatory response. Because the stress axes are sexually dimorphic and are important in the regulation of the inflammatory response, we evaluated the contribution of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and the sympathoadrenal axes to sex differences in BK-induced PE. Neither hypophysectomy nor inhibition of corticosteroid synthesis affected BK-induced PE in female or male rats. Adrenal denervation in females produced the same magnitude increase in BK-induced PE as adrenalectomy or ovariectomy, suggesting that the adrenal medullary factor(s) in females may account for the female sex steroid effect on BK-induced PE. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in female but not male rats, estrogen receptor alpha immunoreactivity is present on medullary but not cortical cells in the adrenal gland. These data suggest that regulation of the inflammatory response by female sex steroids is strongly dependent on the sympathoadrenal axis, possibly by its action on estrogen receptors on adrenal medullary cells.

  4. Responses of sex steroid hormones to different intensities of exercise in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koji; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Katayama, Keisho; Ishida, Koji; Kanao, Yoji; Saito, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that acute exercise elevates sex steroid hormone concentrations in rodents and that sprint exercise increases circulating testosterone in healthy young men. However, the effect of different exercise intensities on sex steroid hormone responses at different levels of physical fitness is still unclear. In this study, we compared circulating sex steroid hormone responses at different exercise intensities in athletes and non-athletes. Eight male endurance athletes and 11 non-athletes performed two 15 min sessions of submaximal exercise at 40 and 70% peak oxygen uptake (V̇(O2peak)), respectively, and exercised at 90% V̇(O2peak) until exhaustion. Venous blood samples were collected during the last minute of each submaximal exercise session and immediately after exhaustion. Acute exercise at 40, 70 and 90% V̇(O2peak) induced significant increases in serum dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and free testosterone concentrations in non-athletes. On the contrary, only 90% V̇O2 peak exercise led to an increase in serum DHEA and free testosterone concentrations in athletes. Serum 5α-dihydrotestosterone concentrations increased with 90% V̇(O2peak) exercise in both athletes and non-athletes. Additionally, serum estradiol concentrations were significantly increased at moderate and high exercise intensities in both athletes and non-athletes. These results indicate that in endurance athletes, serum sex steroid hormone concentrations, especially serum DHEA and 5α-dihydrotestosterone concentrations, increased only with high-intensity exercise, suggesting that different responses of sex steroid hormone secretion are induced by different exercise intensities in individuals with low and high levels of physical fitness. In athletes, therefore, high-intensity exercise may be required to increase circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations.

  5. Signal Transduction Pathway Analysis in Desmoid-type Fibromatosis: TGFβ, COX2 and Sex Steroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mignemi, Nicholas A.; Itani, Doha M.; Fasig, John H.; Keedy, Vicki L.; Hande, Kenneth R.; Whited, Brent W.; Homlar, Kelly C.; Correa, Hernan; Coffin, Cheryl M.; Black, Jennifer O.; Yi, Yajun; Halpern, Jennifer L.; Holt, Ginger E.; Schwartz, Herbert S.; Schoenecker, Jonathan G.; Cates, Justin M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite reports of sex steroid receptor and COX2 expression in desmoid-type fibromatosis, responses to single agent therapy with anti-estrogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are unpredictable. Perhaps combination pharmacotherapy might be more effective in desmoid tumors that co-express these targets. Clearly, a further understanding of the signaling pathways deregulated in desmoid tumors is essential for development of targeted molecular therapy. Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are important regulators of fibroblast proliferation and matrix deposition, but little is known about the TGFβ superfamily in fibromatosis. A tissue microarray representing 27 desmoid tumors was constructed; 14 samples of healing scar and 6 samples of normal fibrous tissue were included for comparison. Expression of selected receptors and activated downstream transcription factors of TGFβ family signaling pathways, β-catenin, sex steroid hormone receptors and COX2 were assessed by immunohistochemistry; patterns of co-expression were explored via correlational statistical analyses. In addition to β-catenin, immunoreactivity for phosphorylated SMAD2/3 (indicative of active TGFβ signaling) and COX2 was significantly increased in desmoid tumors compared to healing scar and quiescent fibrous tissue. Low levels of phosphorylated SMAD1/5/8 were detected in only a minority of cases. TGFβ receptor type 1 and androgen receptor were expressed in both desmoid tumors and scar, but not in fibrous tissue. Estrogen receptor-β was present in all cases studied. TGFβ signaling appears to be activated in desmoid-type fibromatosis and phosphorylated SMAD2/3 and COX2 immunoreactivity may be of diagnostic utility in these tumors. Given the frequency of androgen receptor, estrogen receptor-β and COX2 co-expression in desmoid tumors, further assessment of the efficacy of combination pharmacotherapy using hormonal agonists/antagonists together

  6. Failure to relate thyroid hormones and in vitro 5'-monodeiodination activity to oocyte development and sex steroids in the giant swamp frog Dicroglossus occipitalis at the equator.

    PubMed

    Vandorpe, G; Kühn, E R; Gevaerts, H

    1990-09-01

    Females of the giant swamp frog Dicroglossus occipitalis were captured in Zaïre close to the equator in the course of 1 month. During this period, females with fully developed eggs were found, together with females of which the eggs were still in the first developmental stages. A close relationship was established between the maturation of the eggs and the studied gonadal factors: the gonadosomatic index, the oviduct weight, plasma estradiol-17 beta (E2) concentrations, plasma testosterone concentrations, and the total ovarian E2 concentrations. At the level of the thyroidal axis, the studied factors (plasma thyroxine (T4), plasma triiodothyronine (T3), plasma T3/T4 ratio, T4 and T3 concentrations, and the T3/T4 ratio in the thyroids and the 5'-monodeiodination activity (5'-D-activity) in the skin and kidney homogenates) did not show parallel changes with the maturation process of the eggs. These results indicate that no causal relation has to exist between the annual variation in thyroid hormones and the annual reproductive patterns as found in frogs from the tropical or temperate climatic region.

  7. Sex steroid ablation: an immuno-regenerative strategy for immunocompromised patients

    PubMed Central

    Velardi, Enrico; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Age related decline in thymic function is a well-described process that results in reduced T cell development and thymic output of new naïve T cells. Thymic involution leads to reduced response to vaccines and new pathogens in otherwise healthy individuals; however, reduced thymic function is particularly detrimental in clinical scenarios where the immune system is profoundly depleted such as after chemotherapy, radiotherapy, infection and shock. Poor thymic function and restoration of immune competence has been correlated with increased risk of opportunistic infections, tumor relapse and autoimmunity. Apart from their primary role in sex dimorphism, sex steroid levels profoundly affect the immune system in general and, in fact, age-related thymic involution has been at least partially attributed to the increase of sex steroids at puberty. Subsequently it has been demonstrated that removal of sex steroids, or sex steroid ablation (SSA), triggers physiologic changes that ultimately led to thymic re-growth and improved T cell reconstitution in settings of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Although the cellular and molecular process underlying these regenerative effects are still poorly understood, SSA clearly represents an attractive therapeutic approach to enhance thymic function and restore immune competence in immunodeficient individuals. PMID:26039214

  8. Role of sex and sex steroids in mediating pituitary-adrenal responses to acute buspirone treatment in sheep.

    PubMed

    Broadbear, J H; Pierce, B N; Clarke, I J; Canny, B J

    2005-12-01

    Systematic characterisation of sex differences in the serotonergic modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may assist with our understanding of why stress-related disorders are disproportionately represented in women. In this study, we examined the acute effects of buspirone, a serotonergic 1A receptor subtype agonist, on the endocrine endpoints of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and cortisol secretion in gonadectomised male and female sheep. Each sheep was treated with an acute i.v. injection containing vehicle or buspirone (0.03, 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg) in the presence and absence of sex steroid replacement (SSR). In males, SSR treatment consisted of testosterone (2 x 200 mg s.c. pellets) and, in females, the mid-luteal phase of the oestrus cycle was simulated by treatment with oestradiol (1 cm s.c. implant) and an intravaginal controlled internal drug release device containing 0.3 g progesterone. ACTH, cortisol, testosterone and progesterone were measured in jugular blood. Basal ACTH levels were higher in males, whereas basal cortisol levels were higher in females, regardless of sex steroid status. The magnitude of the increase in ACTH and cortisol secretion following buspirone treatment was dose-dependent. There were no differences in the ACTH responses of males and females to buspirone treatment, either in the presence or absence of sex steroid replacement. However, although the cortisol response to buspirone was greater in females, there was no discernable effect of sex steroid status in addition to this sex difference on either basal or buspirone-stimulated cortisol release. We conclude that the larger basal and buspirone-stimulated cortisol response measured in females may reflect a sex difference, either in the sensitivity of the adrenal gland to ACTH or in the catecholaminergic innervation of the adrenal gland. The lack of effect of sex and sex steroids in the ACTH secretory response to buspirone may indicate that the sex differences in

  9. Annual changes in serum sex steroids in male and female black (Ursus americanus) and polar (Ursus maritimus) bears.

    PubMed

    Palmer, S S; Nelson, R A; Ramsay, M A; Stirling, I; Bahr, J M

    1988-06-01

    The adaptation of black and polar bears to their environments is proportional to the severity of climate and food restriction. Both black and polar bears mate during the spring, despite differences in their recent metabolic state. Reproductive activity in black bears follows 4 mo of torpor, whereas reproduction in polar bears occurs prior to torpor. The goals of this study were to measure the annual changes in serum sex steroids in male and female black and polar bears, and to determine if changes in serum levels of these steroids were associated with metabolic condition or photoperiod. Serum testosterone (T) concentrations were elevated during spring in black and polar bears. Moreover, this increase in serum T in polar bears during spring was correlated with age and testis size. Serum progesterone (P4) concentrations increased in pregnant polar bears in fall coincident with the time of expected implantation. No increases in serum P4 were observed in nonpregnant black and polar bears. Serum estradiol (E2) was elevated in nonpregnant and pregnant polar bears 2 mo prior to the time of expected implantation. We found that serum sex steroids measured in black and polar bears change independent of torpor. Therefore, our results suggest that photoperiod may be a more important regulator of serum steroid levels and reproduction than metabolic condition. PMID:3408772

  10. Annual changes in serum sex steroids in male and female black (Ursus americanus) and polar (Ursus maritimus) bears.

    PubMed

    Palmer, S S; Nelson, R A; Ramsay, M A; Stirling, I; Bahr, J M

    1988-06-01

    The adaptation of black and polar bears to their environments is proportional to the severity of climate and food restriction. Both black and polar bears mate during the spring, despite differences in their recent metabolic state. Reproductive activity in black bears follows 4 mo of torpor, whereas reproduction in polar bears occurs prior to torpor. The goals of this study were to measure the annual changes in serum sex steroids in male and female black and polar bears, and to determine if changes in serum levels of these steroids were associated with metabolic condition or photoperiod. Serum testosterone (T) concentrations were elevated during spring in black and polar bears. Moreover, this increase in serum T in polar bears during spring was correlated with age and testis size. Serum progesterone (P4) concentrations increased in pregnant polar bears in fall coincident with the time of expected implantation. No increases in serum P4 were observed in nonpregnant black and polar bears. Serum estradiol (E2) was elevated in nonpregnant and pregnant polar bears 2 mo prior to the time of expected implantation. We found that serum sex steroids measured in black and polar bears change independent of torpor. Therefore, our results suggest that photoperiod may be a more important regulator of serum steroid levels and reproduction than metabolic condition.

  11. Steroid Sulfatase Deficiency and Androgen Activation Before and After Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak, Jan; Taylor, Angela E.; Subtil, Sandra; O'Neil, Donna M.; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Dias, Renuka P.; Amin, Rakesh; Barrett, Timothy G.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Kirk, Jeremy M. W.; Moss, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Context: Steroid sulfatase (STS) cleaves the sulfate moiety off steroid sulfates, including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate (DHEAS), the inactive sulfate ester of the adrenal androgen precursor DHEA. Deficient DHEA sulfation, the opposite enzymatic reaction to that catalyzed by STS, results in androgen excess by increased conversion of DHEA to active androgens. STS deficiency (STSD) due to deletions or inactivating mutations in the X-linked STS gene manifests with ichthyosis, but androgen synthesis and metabolism in STSD have not been studied in detail yet. Patients and Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study in 30 males with STSD (age 6–27 y; 13 prepubertal, 5 peripubertal, and 12 postpubertal) and 38 age-, sex-, and Tanner stage-matched healthy controls. Serum and 24-hour urine steroid metabolome analysis was performed by mass spectrometry and genetic analysis of the STS gene by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and Sanger sequencing. Results: Genetic analysis showed STS mutations in all patients, comprising 27 complete gene deletions, 1 intragenic deletion and 2 missense mutations. STSD patients had apparently normal pubertal development. Serum and 24-hour urinary DHEAS were increased in STSD, whereas serum DHEA and testosterone were decreased. However, total 24-hour urinary androgen excretion was similar to controls, with evidence of increased 5α-reductase activity in STSD. Prepubertal healthy controls showed a marked increase in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in postpubertal controls and in STSD patients of any pubertal stage. Conclusions: In STSD patients, an increased 5α-reductase activity appears to compensate for a reduced rate of androgen generation by enhancing peripheral androgen activation in affected patients. In healthy controls, we discovered a prepubertal surge in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in STSD, indicative of physiologically up-regulated STS activity before puberty. This may

  12. Colonic transit in rats: effect of ovariectomy, sex steroid hormones, and pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.P.; Bhojwani, A.

    1986-07-01

    In vitro studies suggest that the female sex steroid hormones (estrogen (E) and progesterone (P)) can affect the myoelectric and mechanical activity of colonic smooth muscle. The present study was designed to examine the influence of the hormones on colonic transit in vivo. Transit was assessed by quantifying the distribution within the colon of a radiolabeled marker (0.5 Ci Na2V CrO4), using the geometric center method of analysis. Studies were performed with adult male rats and the following groups of female rats: nonpregnant, ovariectomized, ovariectomy plus hormone pretreatment, and pregnant (day 18). Hormone-pretreated animals were studied 24 h following the fourth injection. The data can be summarized as follows. 1) Colonic transit was affected by the timing of the estrus cycle. 2) Ovariectomy eliminated the biphasic transit pattern observed in estruscycling females and resulted in a geometric center value comparable with that of the metestrus-diestrus animals. 3) E + P pretreatment of ovariectomized rats resulted in a significant decrease in the geometric center compared with the untreated ovariectomized rats. 4) The geometric center value in pregnant anials and hormone-pretreated animals. 5) Adult male rats had a geometric center value of 4.12 +/- 0.29. The results suggest that a relation exists between colonic transit and the circulating levels of the steroid hormones.

  13. The information encoded by the sex steroid hormones testosterone and estrogen: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zahavi, Amotz; Perel, Marina

    2011-07-01

    It is suggested that the sex steroid hormones testosterone and estrogen (SSH) provide receptor cells with reliable information on protein synthesis and on the level of oxidative metabolism in the cells of the gonads. The SSH are derived from the oxidation of cholesterol. This oxidation is a side reaction of the oxidative processes in the mitochondria that generate most of the energy to the organism. The amount of SSH that is synthesized is correlated to the partial pressure of oxygen at the synthesizing cells. The amount of free SSH that a cell can hold is checked by the damage that free steroids may cause. This damage is prevented by proteins that bind with SSH. As a result, SSH levels are correlated also with the ability of the SSH synthesizing cell to produce proteins that bind with them. A cell can only synthesize SSH in relation to the oxidative processes within it and to its ability to produce the binding proteins necessary to prevent the damage caused by SSH. As a result, the information conveyed by SSH is reliable. We examine the specific damage caused by testosterone and estrogen, and suggest why each of them is best suited for its function. Although both SSH can provide similar information on the metabolism in the cells that synthesize them, there are secondary reasons why testosterone and estrogen were selected to serve particular functions. Testosterone improves the efficiency of the proton pump at the mitochondria in producing ATP, but increases oxidative damage. Estrogen on the other hand decreases oxygen damage but also decreases the efficiency of the proton pump. These differences between the two SSH may explain why females use estrogen to inform the body about the activity of the cells in their gonads while males do it by testosterone. The increased oxidative damage may also explain why in males the testosterone that reaches the brain is turned into estrogen. We also suggest why fish use 11-keto testosterone and why insects do not use these two

  14. Direct evidence for the localization of the steroid-binding site of the plasma sex steroid-binding protein (SBP or SHBG) at the interface between the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sui, L. M.; Hughes, W.; Hoppe, A. J.; Pétra, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    Complete dissociation of dimeric plasma sex steroid-binding protein (SBP or SHBG) was obtained in 6 M urea at 10 degrees C. Removal of urea resulted in the refolding of monomers, followed by reformation of dimeric SBP, which migrates with the same mobility as the native protein. Dimerization does not require Ca+2 or steroid. Renatured monomers yield dimers with dissociation constants for 5 alpha-dihydrotesterone (DHT) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) indistinguishable from those of native human SBP. This phenomenon was also demonstrated by mixing human and rabbit SBPs that, upon renaturation, form a hybrid dimer composed of one human subunit and one rabbit subunit. The hybrid binds both DHT and E2 in contrast to rSBP, which only binds the androgen. Therefore, we conclude that (1) docking of the two subunits creates an asymmetric steroid-binding site located at the interface between the subunits, and (2) only one face of the dimer defines the specificity for binding E2 by encompassing portion of a structural motif that recognizes the flat ring A of E2. The remaining portion, which recognizes the saturated ring A of DHT, is shared by both faces of the dimer. Because native monomers do not exist alone, the often-asked question of whether the SBP monomer binds steroid can be considered meaningless; steroid-binding activity is expressed only in the dimeric state. Finally, formation of the hybrid indicates that SBP dimerization represents a conserved event during the molecular evolution of SBP, suggesting that the structural elements responsible for dimerization will be homologous in SBPs from other species. PMID:8976560

  15. Sex Steroids Influence Brain-Derived Neurotropic Factor Secretion From Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Freeman, Michelle R; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-07-01

    Brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is emerging as an important player in airway inflammation, remodeling, and hyperreactivity. Separately, there is increasing evidence that sex hormones contribute to pathophysiology in the lung. BDNF and sex steroid signaling are thought to be intricately linked in the brain. There is currently little information on BDNF and sex steroid interactions in the airway but is relevant to understanding growth factor signaling in the context of asthma in men versus women. In this study, we assessed the effect of sex steroids on BDNF expression and secretion in human airway smooth muscle (ASM). Human ASM was treated with estrogen (E2 ) or testosterone (T, 10 nM each) and intracellular BDNF and secreted BDNF measured. E2 and T significantly reduced secretion of BDNF; effects prevented by estrogen and androgen receptor inhibitor, ICI 182,780 (1 μM), and flutamide (10 μM), respectively. Interestingly, no significant changes were observed in intracellular BDNF mRNA or protein expression. High affinity BDNF receptor, TrkB, was not altered by E2 or T. E2 (but not T) significantly increased intracellular cyclic AMP levels. Notably, Epac1 and Epac2 expression were significantly reduced by E2 and T. Furthermore, SNARE complex protein SNAP25 was decreased. Overall, these novel data suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of E2 or T inhibit BDNF secretion in human ASM, suggesting a potential interaction of sex steroids with BDNF in the airway that is different from brain. The relevance of sex steroid-BDNF interactions may lie in their overall contribution to airway diseases such as asthma. PMID:26566264

  16. Prenatal and postnatal energetic conditions and sex steroids levels across the first year of life

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Amanda L.; Lampl, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Human biologists have documented variability in reproductive maturation, fertility, and cancer risk related to developmental conditions. Yet no previous studies have directly examined the impact of pre- and post-natal energetic environments on sex steroids in infancy, a critical period for hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis development. Thus, we examined the impact of maternal characteristics, birth size, and feeding practices on fecal sex steroid production in a longitudinal sample of 31 American infants followed from 2 weeks to 12 months of age. Methods Maternal characteristics and birth size were collected at study enrollment, infant diet was assessed through weekly 24-hr food diaries, and anthropometrics were measured weekly. Fecal estradiol and testosterone levels were assessed weekly using validated microassay RIA techniques. Mixed models were used to test for associations between maternal and birth characteristics, feeding practices, and sex steroids across the first year of life. Formal mediation analysis examined whether the relationship between infant feeding and hormone levels was mediated by infant size. Results Maternal and birth characteristics had persistent effects on fecal sex steroid levels, with taller maternal height and larger birth size associated with lower estradiol levels in girls and higher testosterone levels in boys. Infant diet was also associated with sex steroid levels independently of infant size. Formula feeding was associated with higher estradiol levels in boys and girls and with higher testosterone in girls. Conclusion These results suggest that markers of early energy availability influence sex hormone levels with potential long-term consequences for reproductive development and function. PMID:23904043

  17. Sex steroid imbalances in the muricid Stramonita haemastoma from TBT contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Rossato, M; Castro, I B; Paganini, C L; Colares, E P; Fillmann, G; Pinho, G L L

    2016-04-01

    Imposex incidence, organotin tissue levels, and sex steroid (free and esterified testosterone and estradiol) levels were assessed in Stramonita haemastoma from Babitonga Bay (Santa Catarina State, Southern Brazil). The imposex levels showed a reduction when compared to a previous evaluation performed in the same area. In spite of that, the detected imposex incidence indicated the occurrence of tributyltin (TBT) inputs that were still able to produce endocrine disruption in local gastropods. In addition, a high level of organotins was observed in tissues of imposexed females. These females also showed a hormonal imbalance, especially in the total testosterone/total estradiol ratio. These findings obtained under realistic field conditions suggest that the steroid pathway could be responsible by the imposex induction after exposure to TBT. In this case, measurements of sex steroid levels can be an additional evidence for monitoring sites and impose affected gastropod populations. PMID:26758306

  18. Sex steroids and brain structure in pubertal boys and girls: a mini-review of neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Peper, J S; Hulshoff Pol, H E; Crone, E A; van Honk, J

    2011-09-15

    Puberty is an important period during development hallmarked by increases in sex steroid levels. Human neuroimaging studies have consistently reported that in typically developing pubertal children, cortical and subcortical gray matter is decreasing, whereas white matter increases well into adulthood. From animal studies it has become clear that sex steroids are capable of influencing brain organization, both during the prenatal period as well as during other periods characterized by massive sex steroid changes such as puberty. Here we review structural neuroimaging studies and show that the changes in sex steroids availability during puberty and adolescence might trigger a period of structural reorganization of grey and white matter in the developing human brain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroactive Steroids: Focus on Human Brain.

  19. Role of sex-hormone-binding globulin and free sex steroid hormones in hyperandrogenic anovulation.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, M; Asai, M; Masahashi, T; Narita, O; Tomoda, Y; Matsui, N

    1986-11-01

    To clarify the mechanism of hyperandrogenic anovulation, the binding capacity of sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG-BC), the levels of free steroid hormones, and the levels of basal serum testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), estrone (E1) and gonadotropins were determined in 42 hyperandrogenic anovulatory women. The mean levels of basal T (0.74 +/- 0.04 ng/ml, p less than 0.001), free T (3.07 +/- 0.51 ng/dl, p less than 0.01) and free E2 (2.26 +/- 0.27 pg/ml, p less than 0.05), basal luteinizing hormone (LH) (33.4 +/- 2.7 mIU/ml, p less than 0.001), responsiveness of LH (180.7 +/- 21.5 mIU/ml, p less than 0.001) after luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) administration, and the basal LH/basal follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) ratio (3.42 +/- 0.25, p less than 0.001) in the patients were significantly higher, the SHBG-BC level (1.76 +/- 0.33 micrograms DHT bound/dl, p less than 0.05) significantly reduced, and basal levels of E2 (38.0 +/- 3.2 pg/ml) and E1 (110 +/- 13 pg/ml) unchanged compared to the controls. These findings suggest that increased T in hyperandrogenic anovulatory women results in decreased SHBG-BC and increased free T and E2 which might be the cause of inappropriate gonadotropin secretion followed by chronic anovulation. PMID:2947958

  20. A possible relationship between Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and female sex steroid-related modulation of functional cerebral asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Drača, S

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (Tc) is a transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, with symptoms and signs of acute myocardial infarction. Tc syndrome, which occurs predominantly in postmenopausal women, is characterized by increase of sympathetic activity. Studies on the gender-specific differences in sympatho-vagal regulation and functional cerebral asymmetry (FCA) imply that female pattern of dominance is characterized by the left hemisphere, which is believed to have parasympathetic predominance, whereas male pattern indicates dominance of the right hemisphere, which is believed to have sympathetic predominance. Fluctuating levels of female sex steroids are supposed to change FCA, modulating transcallosal inter-hemispheric inhibition across the menstrual cycle. The findings suggest that FCA is enhanced during the low steroid phase (menstrual phase), whereas, during high estrogen and/or progesterone phases (follicular and luteal phase) FCA is reduced. This theory is in line with concept of decreased magnitude of inter-hemispheric cortical lateralization in premenopausal women compared to men and postmenopausal women. Therefore, if postmenopausal women are more lateralized for a variety of cerebral functions, they have less balanced equilibrium between the right-sided sympathetic and left-sided parasympathetic predominance. Decrease of endogenous female sex steroid levels in postmenopausal women leads to reduced influence of estrogens to the left hemisphere, which is believed to have parasympathetic predominance. If both of these mechanisms result in sympatho-vagal imbalance, increasing sympathetic system activity in postmenopausal women, it seems reasonable why postmenopausal women became more susceptible to sympathetically-mediated syndromes such as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  1. Major cardiac surgery induces an increase in sex steroids in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Matthias; d'Uscio, Claudia H; de Laffolie, Jan; Neuhaeuser, Christoph; Bödeker, Rolf-Hasso; Thul, Josef; Schranz, Dietmar; Frey, Brigitte M

    2014-03-01

    While the neuroprotective benefits of estrogen and progesterone in critical illness are well established, the data regarding the effects of androgens are conflicting. Surgical repair of congenital heart disease is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, but there are scant data regarding the postoperative metabolism of sex steroids in this setting. The objective of this prospective observational study was to compare the postoperative sex steroid patterns in pediatric patients undergoing major cardiac surgery (MCS) versus those undergoing less intensive non-cardiac surgery. Urinary excretion rates of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen metabolites (μg/mmol creatinine/m(2) body surface area) were determined in 24-h urine samples before and after surgery using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in 29 children undergoing scheduled MCS and in 17 control children undergoing conventional non-cardiac surgery. Eight of the MCS patients had Down's syndrome. There were no significant differences in age, weight, or sex between the groups. Seven patients from the MCS group showed multi-organ dysfunction after surgery. Before surgery, the median concentrations of 17β-estradiol, pregnanediol, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were (control/MCS) 0.1/0.1 (NS), 12.4/11.3 (NS), 4.7/4.4 (NS), and 2.9/1.1 (p=0.02). Postoperatively, the median delta 17β-estradiol, delta pregnanediol, delta DHT, and delta DHEA were (control/MCS) 0.2/6.4 (p=0.0002), -3.2/23.4 (p=0.013), -0.6/3.7 (p=0.0004), and 0.5/4.2 (p=0.004). Postoperative changes did not differ according to sex. We conclude that MCS, but not less intensive non-cardiac surgery, induced a distinct postoperative increase in sex steroid levels. These findings suggest that sex steroids have a role in postoperative metabolism following MCS in prepubertal children.

  2. Embryonic sex steroid hormones accumulate in the eggshell of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shohei; Saito, Yoshimichi; Osawa, Akihisa; Katsumata, Etsuko; Karaki, Isuke; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Gen

    2015-12-01

    Steroids hormones such as estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T) are involved in gonadal differentiation of oviparous animals with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), and are greatly distributed. This hypothesizes that these embryonic steroid hormones probably accumulate in the eggshell throughout blood or/and chorioallantoic fluid in sea turtle species with TSD, producing females at higher temperature. To demonstrate this hypothesis, concentrations of E2 and T in the blood plasma from the hatchling loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) and in their eggshells were measured by radioimmunoassay. In the present study we propose that both concentrations of E2 and T in the blood plasma are correlated with amounts of these sex steroids in the eggshell. Moreover, contents of E2 in the eggshell showed a significant positive correlation with mean incubation temperatures during a thermosensitive period in the experimental nests, whereas T contents in the eggshell did not. Taken together, these findings indicated that embryonic E2 and T that accumulated in the eggshell can be extracted and measured. Furthermore, the present study suggested that contents of E2 in the eggshell may differ between male and female, and monitoring of these steroids is a useful method to identify the sex of loggerhead sea turtle hatchling.

  3. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of novel steroidal dendrimer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Vergara, Nancy E; Rárová, Lucie; Soto-Castro, Delia; Farfán, Norberto; Strnad, Miroslav; Santillan, Rosa

    2013-12-11

    We describe the synthesis of steroidal dendrimer conjugates of first and second generation with tetramethylene core and 5-hydroxy-isophtalic acid dimethyl ester as branching unit modified to incorporate ethynylestradiol or 17α-estradiol as terminal units. The steroidal dendrimer conjugates, the free drug (steroids) and dendrimer were tested against a panel of cancer cell lines (CEM, MCF7, HeLa) and normal human fibroblast (BJ). The steroidal dendrimer conjugates of first generation exhibited cytotoxic activity and induced apoptosis in chronic leukemia (CEM) as resultant activation of caspase cascade which is mainly provoked in G2/M arrested cells.

  4. The mechanisms underlying sexual differentiation of behavior and physiology in mammals and birds: relative contributions of sex steroids and sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Fumihiko; Tsukahara, Shinji; Kawashima, Takaharu; Nohara, Keiko; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    From a classical viewpoint, sex-specific behavior and physiological functions as well as the brain structures of mammals such as rats and mice, have been thought to be influenced by perinatal sex steroids secreted by the gonads. Sex steroids have also been thought to affect the differentiation of the sex-typical behavior of a few members of the avian order Galliformes, including the Japanese quail and chickens, during their development in ovo. However, recent mammalian studies that focused on the artificial shuffling or knockout of the sex-determining gene, Sry, have revealed that sex chromosomal effects may be associated with particular types of sex-linked differences such as aggression levels, social interaction, and autoimmune diseases, independently of sex steroid-mediated effects. In addition, studies on naturally occurring, rare phenomena such as gynandromorphic birds and experimentally constructed chimeras in which the composition of sex chromosomes in the brain differs from that in the other parts of the body, indicated that sex chromosomes play certain direct roles in the sex-specific differentiation of the gonads and the brain. In this article, we review the relative contributions of sex steroids and sex chromosomes in the determination of brain functions related to sexual behavior and reproductive physiology in mammals and birds.

  5. Gender-Related Effects of Sex Steroids on Histamine Release and FcεRI Expression in Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Cruz, Samira; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Nava-Castro, Karen E.; Yepez-Mulia, Lilián; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are versatile effector and regulatory cells in various physiologic, immunologic, and pathologic processes. In addition to the well-characterized IgE/FcεRI-mediated degranulation, a variety of biological substances can induce MCs activation and release of their granule content. Sex steroids, mainly estradiol and progesterone, have been demonstrated to elicit MCs activation. Most published studies have been conducted on MCs lines or freshly isolated peritoneal and bone marrow-derived MC without addressing gender impact on MC response. Our goal was to investigate if the effect of estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on MCs may differ depending on whether female or male rats are used as MCs donors. Our results demonstrated that effect of sex steroids on MCs histamine release is dose- and gender-dependent and can be direct, synergistic, or inhibitory depending on whether hormones are used alone or to pretreat MCs followed by substance P-stimulation or upon IgE-mediated stimulation. In contrast, sex steroids did not have effect on the MC expression of the IgE high affinity receptor, FcεRI, no matter female or male rats were used. In conclusion, MCs degranulation is modulated by sex hormones in a gender-selective fashion, with MC from females being more susceptible than MC from males to the effects of sex steroids. PMID:25973435

  6. Sex Steroids Regulate Expression of Genes Containing Long Interspersed Elements-1s in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwatanakul, Saichon; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Tongsima, Sissades; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Boonyaratanakornkit, Viroj

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed elements-1s (LINE-1s) are dispersed all over the human genome. There is evidence that hypomethylation of LINE-1s and levels of sex steroids regulate gene expression leading to cancer development. Here, we compared mRNA levels of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 in breast cancer cells treated with various sex steroids from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), with the gene expression database using chi-square analysis (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo). We evaluated whether sex steroids influence expression of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1. Three sex steroids at various concentrations, 1 and 10 nM estradiol (E2), 10 nM progesterone (PG) and 10 nM androgen (AN), were assessed. In breast cancer cells treated with 1 or 10 nM E2, a significant percentage of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were down-regulated. A highly significant percentage of E2-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was down-regulated in cells treated with 1 nM E2 for 3 hours (<3.70E-25; OR=1.91; 95% CI=2.16-1.69). Similarly, high percentages of PG or AN- regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were also down-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM PG or 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=9.53E-06; OR=1.65; 95% CI=2.06-1.32 and p=3.81E-14; OR=2.01; 95% CI=2.42-1.67). Interestingly, a significant percentage of AN-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was up-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=4.03E-02; OR=1.40; 95% CI=1.95-1.01). These findings suggest that intragenic LINE-1s may play roles in sex steroid mediated gene expression in breast cancer cells, which could have significant implications for the development and progression of sex steroid-dependent cancers. PMID:27644652

  7. Steroid sex hormone dynamics during estradiol-17β induced gonadal differentiation in Paralichthys olivaceus (Teleostei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; You, Feng; Liu, Mengxia; Wu, Zhihao; Wen, Aiyun; Li, Jun; Xu, Yongli; Zhang, Peijun

    2010-03-01

    Steroid sex hormones, such as estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T), are important regulators of sex change in fish. In this study, we examined the effects of E2 treatment on the dynamics of E2 and T during gonadal differentiation in the olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using histology and radioimmunoassay (RIA). Flounder larvae were divided into five groups (G0-G4), and fed with 0 (control), 0.2, 2, 20 and 100 mg E2/kg feed from 35 to 110 day post hatching (dph). Fish growth in the G1 and G2 groups was not significantly different from that of the control group ( P>0.05), while fish in the G3 and G4 groups were less active and showed growth depression and high mortality. The gonads of fish in the G3 and G4 groups were smaller and surrounded by hyperplastic connective tissue. The frequency of females in the G0-G4 groups was 54.5%, 75.0%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. The RIA analyses of E2 and T showed that T levels decreased during gonadal differentiation, and increased slightly at the onset of ovarian differentiation, while E2 levels increased gradually and peaked at the onset of ovarian differentiation in the control group. In the E2-treated groups, T levels decreased before the onset of ovarian differentiation. E2 levels were high on the 48 dph, but declined to a lower level on the 54 dph, and then increased gradually during gonadal differentiation. And a sharp increase of E2 levels were observed in all E2-treated groups at the onset of ovarian differentiation. The data suggest that T and E2 play important roles during gonadal differentiation, and an E2 dose of 2 mg/kg feed could induce sex reversal in P. olivaceus.

  8. Non-lactating versus lactating females: a comparison of sex steroids, sexual coloration, and sexual behavior in Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Bernard; Aspernig, Doris; Millesi, Eva; Machatschke, Ivo H

    2011-01-01

    Female Japanese macaques are seasonal breeders distinguished by their red-colored hindquarters, face, and nipple skin areas. Intensity of coloration seems to be associated with sexual attractiveness, behavior, and fluctuating sex steroids. Our aim was to investigate whether the color intensity of these regions differed between lactating (LA) and non-lactating (NLA) females during sexually inactive (SI) and active (SA) phases. Coloration scores of 19 adult females were classified using color tables. Estrogen and progesterone metabolites were determined in fecal samples. Weekly comparison between both groups revealed significantly increased coloration of the hindquarters area from week 13 (SI) until the end of the observation period, and for the nipple skin throughout the SI and SA periods. Face coloration differed marginally. Hormonally, NLA females showed significantly increased excretion rates of sex steroids at the end of the SI phase and throughout the whole SA period. Logistic regression analyses between elevated fecal steroids and nipple coloration disclosed a significant relationship for NLA females during the SI period. This connection persisted and included hindquarter coloration during the SA period. NLA females showed increased intromission with ejaculation, but no difference was found for intromission without ejaculation. In conclusion, results demonstrate increased endocrine excretion rates for NLA females during the whole observation period, paralleled by an enhanced, fertility-signaling sexual attractiveness.

  9. Sex steroid binding proteins in the plasma of hatchling Chelonia mydas.

    PubMed

    Ikonomopoulou, M P; Ibrahim, K; Bradley, A J

    2008-09-01

    Sex steroid binding proteins were identified in hatchling female and male Chelonia mydas by dialysis and steady-state gel electrophoresis when examined at 4 degrees C. A testosterone binding protein with high binding affinity (K (a) = 0.98 +/- 0.5 x 10(8) M(-1)) and low to moderate binding capacity (B (max) = 7.58 +/- 4.2 x 10(-5) M) was observed in male hatchlings. An oestradiol binding protein with high affinity (K (a) = 0.35 +/- 1.8 x 10(8) M(-1)) and low to moderate binding capacity (B (max) = 0.16 +/- 0.5 x 10(-4) M) was identified in female hatchlings. This study confirmed that sex steroid binding proteins (SSBPs) become inactivate in both sexes at 36 degrees C, the maximum body temperature of sea turtle hatchlings at emergence. The inactivation of SSBPs at this temperature indicates that sex steroid hormones circulate freely in the body of the green turtles and are biologically available in the blood plasma. This observation is consistent with female and male hatchling C. mydas having different physiological (hormonal) and developmental requirements around the time of emergence. Moreover, concurrently conducted competition studies showed that sex steroids including testosterone and oestradiol do compete for binding sites in both male and female C. mydas hatchling plasma. Competition also occurred between testosterone and dihydrotestosterone for binding sites in the male C. mydas plasma. However, competition studies in the plasma of female hatchling C. mydas demonstrate that oestrone does not compete with oestradiol for binding sites.

  10. Early pregnancy sex steroids and maternal risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schock, Helena; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Grankvist, Kjell; Lakso, Hans-Åke; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pukkala, Eero; Lehtinen, Matti; Toniolo, Paolo; Lundin, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Well-established associations between reproductive characteristics and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) support an involvement of sex steroid hormones in the etiology of EOC. Limited prior studies have evaluated circulating androgens and risk of EOC, and estrogens and progesterone have been investigated in only one prior study. Further, there is little data on potential heterogeneity in the association between circulating hormones and EOC by histologic subgroup. Therefore, we conducted a nested case-control study within the Finnish Maternity Cohort and the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort to investigate the associations between circulating pre-diagnostic sex steroid concentrations with the histologic subtypes of EOC. We identified 1,052 EOC cases among cohort members diagnosed after recruitment (1975-2008) and before March 2011. Up to three controls were individually matched to each case (n=2,694). Testosterone, androstenedione, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), progesterone, estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured in serum samples collected during the last pregnancy before EOC diagnosis. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals [CI]. Associations between hormones and EOC differed by tumor histology and invasiveness. Sex steroid concentrations were not associated with invasive serous tumors, however, doubling of testosterone and 17-OHP concentration was associated with ~40% increased risk of borderline serous tumors. A doubling of androgen concentrations was associated with a 50% risk increase for mucinous tumors. Risk of endometrioid tumors increased with higher estradiol concentrations (OR: 1.89 [1.20-2.98]). This large prospective study in pregnant women supports a role of sex steroid hormones in the etiology of EOC arising in the ovaries. PMID:25270324

  11. Pesticide- and sex steroid analogue-induced endocrine disruption differentially targets hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal system during gametogenesis in teleosts - A review.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian

    2015-08-01

    Pesticide-induced endocrine disruption often mimics sex steroidal action resulting in physiological functional disarray of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal (HHG) system at multiple levels. Among various group of pesticides, organochlorine and organophosphate family of pesticides are known to impart sex steroidal mimicking activity with slightly higher resemblance to estrogens when compared to androgenic action. This review will highlight the effects of organochlorine (for e.g. endosulfan) and organophosphate (for e.g. malathion) pesticides in comparison with sex-steroid analogue-induced changes on HHG axis during gametogenesis in few teleost fish models. Interestingly, the effects of these compounds have produced differential effects in juveniles and adults which also vary based on exposure dosage and duration. Further, the treatments had caused at times sexually dimorphic effects indicating that the action of these compounds bring out serious implications in sexual development. A comprehensive overview has been provided by considering all these aspects to recognize the adverse impacts of pesticide-induced endocrine disruption with special reference to endosulfan and malathion as those had been applied even today or used before for controlling agricultural pests in several Asian countries including India. This review also compares the effects of sex-steroid analogues where in sex reversal to reproductive dysfunction is evident, which may imply the extent of sexual plasticity in teleosts compared to other vertebrates. PMID:25637674

  12. Pesticide- and sex steroid analogue-induced endocrine disruption differentially targets hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal system during gametogenesis in teleosts - A review.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian

    2015-08-01

    Pesticide-induced endocrine disruption often mimics sex steroidal action resulting in physiological functional disarray of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal (HHG) system at multiple levels. Among various group of pesticides, organochlorine and organophosphate family of pesticides are known to impart sex steroidal mimicking activity with slightly higher resemblance to estrogens when compared to androgenic action. This review will highlight the effects of organochlorine (for e.g. endosulfan) and organophosphate (for e.g. malathion) pesticides in comparison with sex-steroid analogue-induced changes on HHG axis during gametogenesis in few teleost fish models. Interestingly, the effects of these compounds have produced differential effects in juveniles and adults which also vary based on exposure dosage and duration. Further, the treatments had caused at times sexually dimorphic effects indicating that the action of these compounds bring out serious implications in sexual development. A comprehensive overview has been provided by considering all these aspects to recognize the adverse impacts of pesticide-induced endocrine disruption with special reference to endosulfan and malathion as those had been applied even today or used before for controlling agricultural pests in several Asian countries including India. This review also compares the effects of sex-steroid analogues where in sex reversal to reproductive dysfunction is evident, which may imply the extent of sexual plasticity in teleosts compared to other vertebrates.

  13. Effect of Sex Steroids on Babesia microti Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Mizuki; Fujii, Yoshito; Iwamoto, Maya; Ikadai, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Sex-based-differences are known to affect susceptibility to protozoan infections, but their effects on parasitemia and clinical symptoms in Babesia infections remain unclear. We examined the sex-based susceptibility of various mouse strains to Babesia microti Munich strain infection. In all strains, male mice exhibited significantly higher peak parasitemia and more severe anemia than female mice. Testosterone and estradiol-17β treatment caused an increase in parasitemia and aggravation of anemia. Orchidectomized male mice receiving testosterone exhibited smaller splenic macrophage populations three days after infection, smaller B cell populations 10 days after infection, and reduced splenic tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ mRNA expression than mice that did not receive testosterone. Mice receiving estradiol-17β did not exhibit immunosuppressive effects. Thus, a weakened and delayed innate immunity response may lead to acquired immunity failure. The results suggested that testosterone directly affects T or B cells, leading to delayed acquired immunity, dramatically increased parasitemia, and severe anemia. PMID:23249689

  14. Steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Felix J.; Frey, Brigitte M.; Benet, Leslie Z.

    If a radioimmunoassay, a protein binding method, or a colorimetric assay for the assessment of a steroid level is replaced by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the cost for the determination of a steroid level increases at least initially because one must acquire the new HPLC equipment. Therefore, if an older method provides the same results as the new, "advanced" HPLC method, the only advantage resulting from the introduction of a high performance chromatographic assay is that gained by the manufacturer in terms of greater sales. Thus, justification for the assessment of steroids by HPLC is only obtained if the quality and/or quantity of information gained is significantly increased as compared to that provided by the conventional methods. But this evidential relation, that more and better information justifies a higher price in any case, is no longer true in health care, with the birth some years ago of the categoric imperative for the reduction of costs in the medical sector. That is, each new technology introduced for health maintenance should demonstrate at least a stabilizing impact on total medical expenditures. Therefore, after reviewing the presently available HPLC methods for the clinically important steroids, we will consider whether HPLC analyses for these steroids can be recommended without violating this vox populi.

  15. Sex steroids and the male skeleton: a tale of two hormones.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Filip; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2010-02-01

    Traditionally, the stronger male skeleton was considered to result from higher androgen levels in men compared to women. However, the regulation of male bone growth by sex steroids appears more complex than originally anticipated. Based on clinical observations and studies in animal models, not only androgens and androgen receptor (AR), but also estrogens and estrogen receptor-alpha (not ERbeta) are required for optimal bone mineral acquisition during male growth. In addition, both sex steroids are involved in the maintenance of male skeletal health. In fact, bone loss and fracture risk have been associated with estrogen exposure in elderly men. Overall, a compelling body of evidence suggests that both androgens and estrogens are crucial for male skeletal growth and maintenance.

  16. Sex steroid and prolactin profiles in male American black bears (Ursus americanus) during denning.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, T; Garshelis, D L; Nelson, R A; Bahr, J M

    1999-01-01

    Serum sex steroid and prolactin profiles were examined in the male American black bear, Ursus americanus during denning. Sera collected in December and the following March from 8 denning male black bears in Minnesota, U.S.A. were assayed for testosterone, estradiol-17 beta and prolactin. Eight bears were confirmed to be the denning mode based on a serum urea to creatinine ratio less than 10. Serum testosterone concentrations tended to increase from December to the subsequent March whereas serum estradiol-17 beta concentrations tended to decrease during this period. There were few changes in serum prolactin concentrations between December and March. These findings suggest that spermatogenesis and testicular steroidogenesis initiated during denning may be influenced by changes in serum sex steroid concentrations in the American black bear. PMID:10027172

  17. Sex steroid levels and AD-like pathology in 3xTgAD mice.

    PubMed

    Overk, C R; Perez, S E; Ma, C; Taves, M D; Soma, K K; Mufson, E J

    2013-02-01

    Decreases in testosterone and 17β-oestradiol (E(2)) are associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), which has been attributed to an increase in β-amyloid and tau pathological lesions. Although recent studies have used transgenic animal models to test the effects of sex steroid manipulations on AD-like pathology, almost none have systematically characterised the associations between AD lesions and sex steroid levels in the blood or brain in any mutant model. The present study evaluated age-related changes in testosterone and E(2) concentrations, as well as androgen receptor (AR) and oestrogen receptor (ER) α and β expression, in brain regions displaying AD pathology in intact male and female 3xTgAD and nontransgenic (ntg) mice. We report for the first time that circulating and brain testosterone levels significantly increase in male 3xTgAD mice with age, but without changes in AR-immunoreactive (IR) cell number in the hippocampal CA1 or medial amygdala. The age-related increase in hippocampal testosterone levels correlated positively with increases in the conformational tau isoform, Alz50. These data suggest that the over-expression of human tau up-regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in these mice. Although circulating and brain E(2) levels remained stable with age in both male and female 3xTgAD and ntg mice, ER-IR cell number in the hippocampus and medial amygdala decreased with age in female transgenic mice. Furthermore, E(2) levels were significantly higher in the hippocampus than in serum, suggesting local production of E(2). Although triple transgenic mice mimic AD-like pathology, they do not fully replicate changes in human sex steroid levels, and may not be the best model for studying the effects of sex steroids on AD lesions.

  18. Sex steroids stimulate leptin gene expression in Atlantic salmon parr hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Trombley, Susanne; Rocha, Ana; Schmitz, Monika

    2015-09-15

    In mammals, leptin plays an important role in puberty and reproduction and leptin is regulated by sex steroids. Elevated leptin levels have been associated with sexual maturation in some teleosts such as Atlantic salmon. In the present study, primary cultures of Atlantic salmon hepatocytes were used to investigate the direct effects of different sex steroids on expression of the two salmon leptin-a genes, lepa1 and lepa2. Testosterone (T) stimulated both lepa1 and lepa2 in a dose dependent manner after four days of incubation. The stimulatory effect of T on leptin expression was not prevented by co-incubation with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole, indicating a direct androgen effect on transcription. The non-aromatizable androgen 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), which is the main androgen in fish, was generally slightly less potent than T in stimulating lepa1 and lepa2. The strongest stimulatory response was seen for 17β-estradiol (E2). E2 treatment significantly up-regulated lepa1 and lepa2 gene expression at doses of 10nM and 1nM for each gene, respectively. Lepa1, but not lepa2, was stimulated by T and 11-KT in immature male and immature female parr, while E2 stimulated expression of both genes. The sensitivity to sex steroid stimulation differed in maturing males compared to immature. In maturing males, the androgens and E2 stimulated lepa2 but not lepa1, while in immature males, the androgens and E2 stimulated lepa1, but only E2 stimulated lepa2. The differential response of the two leptin paralogues to the sex steroids suggests differences in regulation of the two leptin genes during maturation. Altogether, these results indicate that leptin expression in Atlantic salmon hepatocytes is directly regulated at the transcriptional level by the main teleost androgens and an estrogen, and that the response might depend on the developmental stage of the fish.

  19. Skeletal Involution by Age-associated Oxidative Stress and Its Acceleration by Loss of Sex Steroids*

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Maria; Han, Li; Martin-Millan, Marta; Plotkin, Lilian I.; Stewart, Scott A.; Roberson, Paula K.; Kousteni, Stavroula; O’Brien, Charles A.; Bellido, Teresita; Parfitt, A. Michael; Weinstein, Robert S.; Jilka, Robert L.; Manolagas, Stavros C.

    2011-01-01

    Both aging and loss of sex steroids have adverse effects on skeletal homeostasis, but whether and how they may influence each others negative impact on bone remains unknown. We report herein that both female and male C57BL/6 mice progressively lost strength (as determined by load-to-failure measurements) and bone mineral density in the spine and femur between the ages of 4 and 31 months. These changes were temporally associated with decreased rate of remodeling as evidenced by decreased osteoblast and osteoclast numbers and decreased bone formation rate; as well as increased osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis, increased reactive oxygen species levels, and decreased glutathione reductase activity and a corresponding increase in the phosphorylation of p53 and p66shc, two key components of a signaling cascade that are activated by reactive oxygen species and influences apoptosis and lifespan. Exactly the same changes in oxidative stress were acutely reproduced by gonadectomy in 5-month-old females or males and reversed by estrogens or androgens in vivo as well as in vitro.We conclude that the oxidative stress that underlies physiologic organismal aging in mice may be a pivotal pathogenetic mechanism of the age-related bone loss and strength. Loss of estrogens or androgens accelerates the effects of aging on bone by decreasing defense against oxidative stress. PMID:17623659

  20. SEX-STEROID AND THYROID HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) FROM CONTAMINATED AND REFERENCE LAKES IN FLORIDA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sex-steroid and thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth and reproduction in all vertebrates, and several recent studies suggest that environmental chemicals can alter circulating concentrations of these hormones. This study examines plasma concentrations of estradiol-...

  1. The effects of prenatal sex steroid hormones on sexual differentiation of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Karaismailoğlu, Serkan; Erdem, Ayşen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the anatomical, physiological and neurochemical gender-related differences in the brain occur prenatally. The sexual differences in the brain are affected by sex steroid hormones, which play important roles in the differentiation of neuroendocrine system and behavior. Testosterone, estrogen and dihydrotestosterone are the main steroid hormones responsible for the organization and sexual differentiation of brain structures during early development. The structural and behavioral differences in the female and male brains are observed in many animal species; however, these differences are variable between species. Animal and human (in vivo imaging and postmortem) studies on sex differences in the brain have shown many differences in the local distribution of the cortex, the gray-white matter ratio, corpus callosum, anterior commissure, hypothalamus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, limbic system and neurotransmitter systems. This review aims to evaluate the anatomical, physiological and neurochemical differences in the female and male brains and to assess the effect of prenatal exposure to sex steroid hormones on the developing brain. PMID:24592097

  2. The influence of sex steroids on structural brain maturation in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Peper, Jiska S; Crone, Eveline A

    2014-01-01

    Puberty reflects a period of hormonal changes, physical maturation and structural brain reorganization. However, little attention has been paid to what extent sex steroids and pituitary hormones are associated with the refinement of brain maturation across adolescent development. Here we used high-resolution structural MRI scans from 215 typically developing individuals between ages 8-25, to examine the association between cortical thickness, surface area and (sub)cortical brain volumes with luteinizing hormone, testosterone and estradiol, and pubertal stage based on self-reports. Our results indicate sex-specific differences in testosterone related influences on gray matter volumes of the anterior cingulate cortex after controlling for age effects. No significant associations between subcortical structures and sex hormones were found. Pubertal stage was not a stronger predictor than chronological age for brain anatomical differences. Our findings indicate that sex steroids are associated with cerebral gray matter morphology in a sex specific manner. These hormonal and morphological differences may explain in part differences in brain development between boys and girls. PMID:24416184

  3. The influence of sex steroids on structural brain maturation in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Peper, Jiska S; Crone, Eveline A

    2014-01-01

    Puberty reflects a period of hormonal changes, physical maturation and structural brain reorganization. However, little attention has been paid to what extent sex steroids and pituitary hormones are associated with the refinement of brain maturation across adolescent development. Here we used high-resolution structural MRI scans from 215 typically developing individuals between ages 8-25, to examine the association between cortical thickness, surface area and (sub)cortical brain volumes with luteinizing hormone, testosterone and estradiol, and pubertal stage based on self-reports. Our results indicate sex-specific differences in testosterone related influences on gray matter volumes of the anterior cingulate cortex after controlling for age effects. No significant associations between subcortical structures and sex hormones were found. Pubertal stage was not a stronger predictor than chronological age for brain anatomical differences. Our findings indicate that sex steroids are associated with cerebral gray matter morphology in a sex specific manner. These hormonal and morphological differences may explain in part differences in brain development between boys and girls.

  4. The Influence of Sex Steroids on Structural Brain Maturation in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Koolschijn, P. Cédric M. P.; Peper, Jiska S.; Crone, Eveline A.

    2014-01-01

    Puberty reflects a period of hormonal changes, physical maturation and structural brain reorganization. However, little attention has been paid to what extent sex steroids and pituitary hormones are associated with the refinement of brain maturation across adolescent development. Here we used high-resolution structural MRI scans from 215 typically developing individuals between ages 8–25, to examine the association between cortical thickness, surface area and (sub)cortical brain volumes with luteinizing hormone, testosterone and estradiol, and pubertal stage based on self-reports. Our results indicate sex-specific differences in testosterone related influences on gray matter volumes of the anterior cingulate cortex after controlling for age effects. No significant associations between subcortical structures and sex hormones were found. Pubertal stage was not a stronger predictor than chronological age for brain anatomical differences. Our findings indicate that sex steroids are associated with cerebral gray matter morphology in a sex specific manner. These hormonal and morphological differences may explain in part differences in brain development between boys and girls. PMID:24416184

  5. Heat shock protein 27 is required for sex steroid receptor trafficking to and functioning at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Razandi, Mahnaz; Pedram, Ali; Levin, Ellis R

    2010-07-01

    Classical sex steroid receptors (SRs) localize at the plasma membranes (PMs) of cells, initiating signal transduction through kinase cascades that contribute to steroid hormone action. Palmitoylation of the SRs is required for membrane localization and function, but the proteins that facilitate this modification and subsequent receptor trafficking are unknown. Initially using a proteomic approach, we identified that heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) binds to a motif in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and promotes palmitoylation of the SR. Hsp27-induced acylation occurred on the ERalpha monomer and augmented caveolin-1 interactions with ERalpha, resulting in membrane localization, kinase activation, and DNA synthesis in breast cancer cells. Oligomerization of Hsp27 was required, and similar results were found for the trafficking of endogenous progesterone and androgen receptors to the PMs of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of Hsp27 prevented sex SR trafficking to and signaling from the membrane. These results identify a conserved and novel function for Hsp27 with potential as a target for interrupting signaling from membrane sex SRs to tumor biology in hormone-responsive cancers. PMID:20439495

  6. Validation of murine and human placental explant cultures for use in sex steroid and phase II conjugation toxicology studies

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Brittany L.; Ward, Monika A.; Astern, Joshua M.; Kendal-Wright, Claire E.; Collier, Abby C.

    2014-01-01

    Human primary placental explant culture is well established for cytokine signaling and toxicity, but has not been validated for steroidogenic or metabolic toxicology. The technique has never been investigated in the mouse. We characterized human and mouse placental explants for up to 96hr in culture. Explant viability (Lactate dehydrogenase) and sex steroid levels were measured in media using spectrophotometry and ELISA, respectively. Expression and activities of the steroidogenic (3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, Cytochrome P45017A1, Cytochrome P45019), conjugation (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, sulfotransferase (SULT)), and regeneration (β-glucuronidase, arylsulfatase C (ASC)) enzymes were determined biochemically in tissues with fluorimetric and spectrophotometric assays, and western blot. Explants were viable up to 96hr, but progesterone, estrone, and 17β-estradiol secretion decreased. Steroidogenic enzyme expression and activities were stable in mouse explants and similar to levels in freshly isolated tissues, but were lower in human explants than in fresh tissue (P<0.01). Human and mouse explants exhibited significantly less conjugation after 96hr, SULT was not detected in the mouse, and neither explants had active ASC, although proteins were expressed. Mouse explants may be useful for steroid biochemistry and endocrine disruption studies, but not metabolic conjugation. In contrast, human explants may be useful for studying conjugation for <48hr, but not for steroid/endocrine studies. PMID:25283089

  7. A review of the relationships between endogenous sex steroids and incident ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease events.

    PubMed

    Kim, Catherine; Cushman, Mary; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Lisabeth, Lynda; Redberg, Rita F; Safford, Monika M

    2015-01-01

    For decades, it has been recognized that men have a higher age-adjusted risk of ischemic cardiovascular (CVD) events compared to women, thus generating hypotheses that sex steroids contribute to CVD risk. Potential mechanisms include genomic and non-genomic effects of sex steroids as well as mediation through classic CVD risk factors and obesity. However, results from randomized studies suggest that sex steroid supplementation in men and women do not result in improved CVD outcomes and may increase CVD risk. In contrast, prospective observations from endogenous sex steroid studies, i.e. among participants not using sex steroids, have suggested the opposite relationship. We reviewed the findings of prospective observational studies in men (17 studies) and women (8 studies) that examined endogenous sex steroids and CVD risk. These studies suggested a lack of association or that lower levels of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone are associated with higher CVD risk in both men and women. Higher, rather than lower, estradiol levels were associated with higher CVD risk in women. There were several significant gaps in the literature. First, it is unclear whether more sensitive measures of sex steroid levels might detect significant differences. Second, there are few prospective studies in women. Similarly, no studies report outcomes for high-risk groups such as African-Americans and Hispanics. Finally, few studies report upon ischemic coronary disease as opposed to ischemic stroke separately, although relationships between sex steroids and CVD may vary by vascular bed. Future investigations need to examine high risk groups and to distinguish between subtypes of CVD.

  8. Dynamics of yolk steroid hormones during development in a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Elf, P K; Lang, J W; Fivizzani, A J

    2002-06-01

    Many oviparous reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD); i.e., the temperature at which the egg is incubated determines the sex of the offspring. In TSD reptiles, yolk steroids not only may influence sex determination, but also may mediate hormonal effects on subsequent growth and behavior, as in some avian species. We investigated changes in the levels of estradiol (E(2)) and testosterone (T) during development in yolks of snapping turtle eggs, examined how incubation temperature affects hormone levels, and determined how hormones in turtle eggs are influenced by individual females (=clutch effects). Results indicate significant decreases in both hormones (>50% decline) by the end of the sex-determining period, when two-thirds of the development is complete. The declines in both E(2) and T were significantly affected by incubation temperature, but in different ways. Eggs incubated at female-producing temperatures maintained high levels, those incubated at male-producing temperatures had low E(2) values, and eggs incubated at pivotal temperatures had intermediate levels of E(2). At all three temperatures, T values underwent significant but approximately equal declines, except during the developmental stages just after the sex-determining period, when T levels decreased more at the male-producing temperature than at either of the other two temperatures. Initially, there were significant clutch effects in both hormones, but such differences, attributable to individual females, were maintained only for E(2) later in development. Here we report for the first time that incubation temperature significantly affects the hormonal environment of the developing embryo of a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination. Based on this and related findings, we propose that yolk sex steroids influence sexual differentiation in these TSD species and play a role in sex determination at pivotal temperatures.

  9. Dynamics of yolk steroid hormones during development in a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Elf, P K; Lang, J W; Fivizzani, A J

    2002-06-01

    Many oviparous reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD); i.e., the temperature at which the egg is incubated determines the sex of the offspring. In TSD reptiles, yolk steroids not only may influence sex determination, but also may mediate hormonal effects on subsequent growth and behavior, as in some avian species. We investigated changes in the levels of estradiol (E(2)) and testosterone (T) during development in yolks of snapping turtle eggs, examined how incubation temperature affects hormone levels, and determined how hormones in turtle eggs are influenced by individual females (=clutch effects). Results indicate significant decreases in both hormones (>50% decline) by the end of the sex-determining period, when two-thirds of the development is complete. The declines in both E(2) and T were significantly affected by incubation temperature, but in different ways. Eggs incubated at female-producing temperatures maintained high levels, those incubated at male-producing temperatures had low E(2) values, and eggs incubated at pivotal temperatures had intermediate levels of E(2). At all three temperatures, T values underwent significant but approximately equal declines, except during the developmental stages just after the sex-determining period, when T levels decreased more at the male-producing temperature than at either of the other two temperatures. Initially, there were significant clutch effects in both hormones, but such differences, attributable to individual females, were maintained only for E(2) later in development. Here we report for the first time that incubation temperature significantly affects the hormonal environment of the developing embryo of a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination. Based on this and related findings, we propose that yolk sex steroids influence sexual differentiation in these TSD species and play a role in sex determination at pivotal temperatures. PMID:12161199

  10. Bone turnover markers in patients with prostate carcinoma: influence of sex steroids levels.

    PubMed

    Varsavsky, Mariela; Reyes-García, Rebeca; García-Martín, Antonia; Rozas-Moreno, Pedro; González-Ramírez, Rocío; Rocío, González-Ramírez; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    There are limited data about bone turnover markers (BTM) in androgen deprivation therapy (ADT)-treated prostate cancer (PCa) patients, and the relationship between sex steroids, bone mass, and BTM has not been explored. Our objective was to analyze the influence of sex steroids levels on BTM in patients with PCa treated with or without ADT. We performed a cross-sectional study including 83 subjects with PCa (54% with ADT). BTM, bone mineral density (BMD), and sex steroids were determined. BTM were inversely related to serum level of estrogens. Tartrate-specific acid phosphatase (TRAP-5b) showed a negative correlation with free estradiol (Free E) (r = -0.274, p = 0.014) and Bio E (r = -0.256, p = 0.022) that remained after adjustment for age: Free E (β = -0.241, p = 0.03) and Bio E (β = -0.213, p = 0.063). Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) concentrations were inversely related to Free E (r = -0.281, p = 0.011, age-adjusted β = -0.256, p = 0.024). There was a negative correlation between osteocalcin (OC) levels and Free E (r = -0.195, p = 0.082; age-adjusted β = -0.203, p = 0.076) and Bio E (r = -0.215, p = 0.054; age-adjusted β = -0.240, p = 0.039). BTM and androgens were inversely related to TRAP-5b: total testosterone (total T) (r = -0.238, p = 0.033), Free T (r = -0.309, p = 0.05), and Bio T (r = -0.310, p = 0.05), but these correlations disappeared after age-adjustment. We did not find any relationship between BMD at different locations and sex steroids. In conclusion, in patients with PCa, estrogen levels influence bone resorption and bone formation whereas androgens may exert actions only in bone resorption. These results suggest that estradiol is the main sex steroid that regulates bone metabolism in males with prostate carcinoma.

  11. Sex steroids, sexual behavior, and selection attention for erotic stimuli in women using oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G M; Sherwin, B B

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between sex steroids and sexual behavior was examined in 19 oral contraceptive users. Retrospective assessment of sexual attitudes were obtained and women completed daily ratings of sexual behavior and well-being for 28 days. Plasma levels of free testosterone (T), estradiol, and progesterone were measured at weekly intervals. In addition, women performed a novel selective attention task designed to measure the strength of the tendency to be distracted by sexual stimuli. Multiple regression analyses using average sexual behavior variables as dependent variables, and hormone levels sexual attitudes and well-being as predictor variables, showed that free T was strongly and positively associated with sexual desire, sexual thoughts, and anticipation of sexual activity. A role for T in attention to sexual stimuli was also supported by the positive correlation between free T and the bias for sexual stimuli in a subgroup of women. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that T may enhance cognitive aspects of women's sexual behavior. PMID:8493300

  12. Sex steroids affect glucocorticoid response to chronic inflammation and to interleukin-1.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, J A; Peers, S H; Perretti, M; Willoughby, D A

    1993-03-01

    The influence of gender and sex hormones upon both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the immune and inflammatory responses is well recognized, but it is not clear to what extent the two effects are interdependent. We have investigated this interaction using a chronic inflammation model. Corticosterone levels were measured in mature BALB/c male and female mice, which were intact, sham-operated or gonadectomized. No significant differences were found between groups in baseline corticosterone, but systemic inflammation (cotton-induced granulomas) resulted in stimulation of the HPA axis in a reproducible pattern. Corticosterone levels were higher in sham-operated females than in males, but gonadectomy had opposing effects in the two genders, resulting in reduced levels in females but significantly increased levels in males. A similar pattern emerged after stimulation by ether exposure or injection of interleukin-1 beta. In the chronic inflammatory model, replacement of ovariectomized females with physiological levels of progesterone restored a response similar to that of intact females. Physiological levels of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone prevented the increase in corticosterone levels caused by castration in males and also resulted in reduced corticosterone levels in sham-operated females. Oestradiol treatment did not affect corticosterone levels. Release of interleukin-1 by peritoneal macrophages from intact and gonadectomized mice with chronic inflammation followed a similar pattern, females releasing more than males. These data suggest a complex inter-relationship between sex steroids, inflammatory stimuli and the HPA axis, such that females have a greater tendency than males to generate activating signals and in addition have a greater sensitivity to such factors.

  13. Sex Steroids Modulate Uterine-Placental Vasculature: Implications for Obstetrics and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Maliqueo, Manuel; Echiburú, Bárbara; Crisosto, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Adequate blood supply to the uterine-placental region is crucial to ensure the transport of oxygen and nutrients to the growing fetus. Multiple factors intervene to achieve appropriate uterine blood flow and the structuring of the placental vasculature during the early stages of pregnancy. Among these factors, oxygen concentrations, growth factors, cytokines, and steroid hormones are the most important. Sex steroids are present in extremely high concentrations in the maternal circulation and are important paracrine and autocrine regulators of a wide range of maternal and placental functions. In this regard, progesterone and estrogens act as modulators of uterine vessels and decrease the resistance of the spiral uterine arteries. On the other hand, androgens have the opposite effect, increasing the vascular resistance of the uterus. Moreover, progesterone and estrogens modulate the synthesis and release of angiogenic factors by placental cells, which regulates trophoblastic invasion and uterine artery remodeling. In this scenario, it is not surprising that women with pregnancy-related pathologies, such as early miscarriages, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, and fetal growth restriction, exhibit altered sex steroid concentrations. PMID:27199767

  14. Modulation of the cytosolic androgen receptor in striated muscle by sex steroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rance, N. E.; Max, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of orchiectomy (GDX) and steroid administration on the level of the cytosolic androgen receptor in the rat levator ani muscle and in rat skeletal muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus) was studied. Androgen receptor binding to muscle cytosol was measured using H-3 methyltrienolone (R1881) as ligand, 100 fold molar excess unlabeled R1881 to assess nonspecific binding, and 500 fold molar excess of triamcinolone acetonide to prevent binding to glucocorticoid and progestin receptors. Results demonstrate that modification of the levels of sex steroids can alter the content of androgen receptors of rat striated muscle. Data suggest that: (1) cytosolic androgen receptor levels increase after orchiectomy in both levator ani muscle and skeletal muscle; (2) the acute increase in receptor levels is blocked by an inhibitor of protein synthesis; and (3) administration of estradiol-17 beta to castrated animals increases receptor binding in levator ani muscle but not in skeletal muscle.

  15. Sex steroids do not affect muscle weight, oxidative metabolism or cytosolic androgen reception binding of functionally overloaded rat Plantaris muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of sex steroids on muscle weight and oxidative capacity of rat planaris muscles subjected to functional overload by removal of synergistic muscles were investigated. Ten weeks after bilateral synergist removal, plantaris muscles were significantly hypertrophic compared with unoperated controls. After this period, the ability of the muscles to oxide three substrates of oxidative metabolism was assessed. Experimental procedures are discussed and results are presented herein. Results suggest a lack of beneficial effect of sex hormone status on the process of hypertrophy and on biochemical changes in overloaded muscle. Such findings are not consistent with the idea of synergistic effects of sex steroids and muscle usage.

  16. Effects of 17 α-methyltestosterone on transcriptome, gonadal histology and sex steroid hormones in rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiancao; Liu, Shaozhen; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Yanping; Yuan, Cong; Chen, Shu; Wang, Zaizhao

    2015-09-01

    The 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), a synthetic androgen, is known for its interference effects on the endocrine system. Aiming to investigate the transcriptome profiling of gonads induced by MT and to understand the molecular mechanism by which MT causes adverse effects in fish, transcriptome profiling of gonads, gonadal histology and the sex steroid hormones in response to MT were analyzed in Gobiocypris rarus. Eight libraries, 4 from the ovary and 4 from the testis, were constructed and sequenced and then a total number of clean reads per sample ranging from 7.03 to 9.99 million were obtained. In females, a total of 191 transcripts were differentially regulated by MT, consisting of 102 up-regulated transcripts and 89 down-regulated transcripts. In males, 268 differentially expressed genes with 108 up-regulated and 160 down-regulated were detected upon MT exposure. Testosterone serves as the major sex steroid hormone content in G. rarus of both sexes. The concentrations of 17β-estradiol, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone were significantly increased in females and decreased in males after MT exposure. Interestingly, MT caused a decreased number of vitellogenic oocytes in the ovary and spermatozoa in the testis. After MT exposure, four differentially expressed genes (ndufa4, slc1a3a, caskin-2 and rpt3) were found in G. rarus of both sexes. Overall, we suggest that MT seemed to affect genes involved in pathways related to physiological processes in the gonads of G. rarus. These processes include the electron transfer of Complex IV, endothelial cell activation, axon growth and guidance, and proteasome assembly and glutamate transport metabolic.

  17. Effects of 17 α-methyltestosterone on transcriptome, gonadal histology and sex steroid hormones in rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiancao; Liu, Shaozhen; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Yanping; Yuan, Cong; Chen, Shu; Wang, Zaizhao

    2015-09-01

    The 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), a synthetic androgen, is known for its interference effects on the endocrine system. Aiming to investigate the transcriptome profiling of gonads induced by MT and to understand the molecular mechanism by which MT causes adverse effects in fish, transcriptome profiling of gonads, gonadal histology and the sex steroid hormones in response to MT were analyzed in Gobiocypris rarus. Eight libraries, 4 from the ovary and 4 from the testis, were constructed and sequenced and then a total number of clean reads per sample ranging from 7.03 to 9.99 million were obtained. In females, a total of 191 transcripts were differentially regulated by MT, consisting of 102 up-regulated transcripts and 89 down-regulated transcripts. In males, 268 differentially expressed genes with 108 up-regulated and 160 down-regulated were detected upon MT exposure. Testosterone serves as the major sex steroid hormone content in G. rarus of both sexes. The concentrations of 17β-estradiol, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone were significantly increased in females and decreased in males after MT exposure. Interestingly, MT caused a decreased number of vitellogenic oocytes in the ovary and spermatozoa in the testis. After MT exposure, four differentially expressed genes (ndufa4, slc1a3a, caskin-2 and rpt3) were found in G. rarus of both sexes. Overall, we suggest that MT seemed to affect genes involved in pathways related to physiological processes in the gonads of G. rarus. These processes include the electron transfer of Complex IV, endothelial cell activation, axon growth and guidance, and proteasome assembly and glutamate transport metabolic. PMID:26070167

  18. Sex steroids, bone mass, and bone loss. A prospective study of pre-, peri-, and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed Central

    Slemenda, C; Longcope, C; Peacock, M; Hui, S; Johnston, C C

    1996-01-01

    Although bone loss around the time of menopause is driven by estrogen deficiency, the roles of estrogens and androgens in the preservation of skeletal mass at other stages of life are less well understood. To address this issue we studied 231 women between the ages of 32 and 77 with multiple measurements of sex steroids and bone mass over a period of 2-8 yr. In all women bone mass was negatively associated with concentrations of sex-hormone binding globulin, and positively associated with weight. Bone loss occurred from all skeletal sites in peri- and postmenopausal women, but premenopausal women lost bone only from the hip (-0.3%/yr) and had positive rates of change in the radius and spine. Bone loss was significantly associated with lower androgen concentrations in premenopausal women, and with lower estrogens and androgens in peri- and postmenopausal women. Sex steroids are important for the maintenance of skeletal integrity before menopause, and for as long as 20-25 yr afterwards. PMID:8550826

  19. Linking physiological approaches to marine vertebrate conservation: using sex steroid hormone determinations in demographic assessments

    PubMed Central

    Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Mangel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sex, age and sexual maturation are key biological parameters for aspects of life history and are fundamental information for assessing demographic changes and the reproductive viability and performance of natural populations under exploitation pressures or in response to environmental influences. Much of the information available on the reproductive condition, length at sexual maturity and sex determinations of endangered species has been derived from direct examination of the gonads in dead animals, either intentionally or incidentally caught, or from stranded individuals. However, morphological data, when used alone, do not provide accurate demographic information in sexually monomorphic marine vertebrate species (e.g. sharks, sea turtles, seabirds and cetaceans). Hormone determination is an accurate and non-destructive method that provides indirect information about sex, reproductive condition and sexual maturity of free-ranging individuals. Correlations between sex steroid concentrations and biochemical parameters, gonadal development and state, reproductive behaviour and secondary external features have been already demonstrated in many species. Different non-lethal approaches (e.g. surgical and mark–recapture procedures), with intrinsic advantages and disadvantages when applied on free-ranging organisms, have been proposed to asses sex, growth and reproductive condition. Hormone determination from blood samples will generate valuable additional demographic information needed for stock assessment and biological conservation. PMID:27293619

  20. Linking physiological approaches to marine vertebrate conservation: using sex steroid hormone determinations in demographic assessments.

    PubMed

    Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Mangel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sex, age and sexual maturation are key biological parameters for aspects of life history and are fundamental information for assessing demographic changes and the reproductive viability and performance of natural populations under exploitation pressures or in response to environmental influences. Much of the information available on the reproductive condition, length at sexual maturity and sex determinations of endangered species has been derived from direct examination of the gonads in dead animals, either intentionally or incidentally caught, or from stranded individuals. However, morphological data, when used alone, do not provide accurate demographic information in sexually monomorphic marine vertebrate species (e.g. sharks, sea turtles, seabirds and cetaceans). Hormone determination is an accurate and non-destructive method that provides indirect information about sex, reproductive condition and sexual maturity of free-ranging individuals. Correlations between sex steroid concentrations and biochemical parameters, gonadal development and state, reproductive behaviour and secondary external features have been already demonstrated in many species. Different non-lethal approaches (e.g. surgical and mark-recapture procedures), with intrinsic advantages and disadvantages when applied on free-ranging organisms, have been proposed to asses sex, growth and reproductive condition. Hormone determination from blood samples will generate valuable additional demographic information needed for stock assessment and biological conservation.

  1. Linking physiological approaches to marine vertebrate conservation: using sex steroid hormone determinations in demographic assessments.

    PubMed

    Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Mangel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sex, age and sexual maturation are key biological parameters for aspects of life history and are fundamental information for assessing demographic changes and the reproductive viability and performance of natural populations under exploitation pressures or in response to environmental influences. Much of the information available on the reproductive condition, length at sexual maturity and sex determinations of endangered species has been derived from direct examination of the gonads in dead animals, either intentionally or incidentally caught, or from stranded individuals. However, morphological data, when used alone, do not provide accurate demographic information in sexually monomorphic marine vertebrate species (e.g. sharks, sea turtles, seabirds and cetaceans). Hormone determination is an accurate and non-destructive method that provides indirect information about sex, reproductive condition and sexual maturity of free-ranging individuals. Correlations between sex steroid concentrations and biochemical parameters, gonadal development and state, reproductive behaviour and secondary external features have been already demonstrated in many species. Different non-lethal approaches (e.g. surgical and mark-recapture procedures), with intrinsic advantages and disadvantages when applied on free-ranging organisms, have been proposed to asses sex, growth and reproductive condition. Hormone determination from blood samples will generate valuable additional demographic information needed for stock assessment and biological conservation. PMID:27293619

  2. Metabolite profiling of sex developmental steroid conjugates reveals an association between decreased levels of steroid sulfates and adiposity in obese girls.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Hyeon; Kim, Shin Hye; Lee, Won-Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Park, Mi Jung; Choi, Man Ho

    2016-09-01

    Free and conjugated steroids coexist in a dynamic equilibrium due to complex biosynthetic and metabolic processes. This may have clinical significance related to various physiological conditions, including sex development involving the reproductive system. Therefore, we performed quantitative profiling of 16 serum steroids conjugated with glucuronic and sulfuric acids using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). All steroid conjugates were purified by solid-phase extraction and then separated through a 3-μm particle size C18 column (150mm×2.1mm) at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min in the negative ionization mode. The LC-MS-based analysis was found to be linear (r(2)>0.99), and all steroid conjugates had a limit-of-quantification (LOQ) of 10ng/mL, except for cholesterol sulfate and 17β-estradiol-3,17-disulfate (20ng/mL). The extraction recoveries of all steroid conjugates ranged from 97.9% to 110.7%, while the overall precision (% CV) and accuracy (% bias) ranged from 4.8% to 10.9% and from 94.4% to 112.9% at four different concentrations, respectively. Profiling of steroid conjugates corrected by adiposity revealed decreased levels of steroid sulfates (P<0.01) in overweight and obese girls compared to normal girls. The suggested technique can be used for evaluating metabolic changes in steroid conjugates and for understanding the pathophysiology and relative contributions of adiposity in childhood obesity. PMID:27154415

  3. Sex Steroids Do Not Modulate TRPM2-Mediated Injury in Females following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Quillinan, Nidia; Grewal, Himmat; Klawitter, Jelena; Herson, Paco S

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-permeable transient receptor potential M2 (TRPM2) ion channel activation contributes to cerebral ischemic injury specifically in males. In male mice, circulating androgens are required for TRPM2 inhibition with clotrimazole (CTZ) to provide protection following experimental stroke. Sufficient levels of circulating androgens are necessary to support ischemia-induced activation of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) and consequent activation of TRPM2 channels. In this study, we tested whether differences in sex steroids contribute to the lack of CTZ neuroprotection in females. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was performed using adult female mice that were hormonally intact, ovariectomized (OVX) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treated. CTZ or vehicle was administered at the time of reperfusion, animals were euthanized 24 h later and brains and serum were collected. Infarct analysis revealed no effect of CTZ in intact females or females lacking endogenous sex steroids (OVX). Interestingly, treatment of female mice with the potent androgen receptor agonist DHT had no effect on ischemic injury and did not permit CTZ neuroprotection. Similarly, DHT-treated females did not exhibit increased levels of ADPribose, the TRPM2 ligand generated by PARP, following ischemia. No differences in TRPM2 or androgen receptor expression were observed between males and females. These data suggest that the lack of TRPM2 activation in females following experimental stroke is not due to the presence of estrogen or the absence of androgens. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that while circulating androgens are necessary for PARP-mediated TRPM2 injury in males, they are not sufficient to produce TRPM2 activation in females.

  4. Evidence for the presence of sex steroid hormones in Zhikong scallop, Chlamys farreri.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing-Hui; An, Li-Hui; Chang, Hong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-09-01

    To obtain evidence of the presence of sex steroid hormones in mollusks, hormone variation in the gonads of the Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri was analyzed using UPLC-MS/MS. These were found, as expected, with concentrations of estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and testosterone (T) in the testes ranging from not detected (ND) to 0.07 ± 0.10, ND to 3.10 ± 2.00, and ND to 2.67 ± 1.55 ng/g wet weight, respectively. In the ovaries, these hormones ranged from ND to 2.45 ± 1.22, ND to 27.90 ± 4.23, and ND to 2.38 ± 1.56 ng/g ww, respectively. The levels of T in males and E2 in females followed a trend similar to the gonadal-somatic index over the course of the reproductive period. In addition, the gene expression of vitellogenin and calmodulin-2 showed similar patterns to T and E2, while the estrogen receptors and calmodulin-1 did not. These results indicate that sex steroids are present in the scallop and that they may regulate endocrine functions during the reproductive process.

  5. Levels and actions of neuroactive steroids in the nervous system under physiological and pathological conditions: Sex-specific features.

    PubMed

    Melcangi, Roberto C; Giatti, Silvia; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2016-08-01

    Neuroactive steroids regulate the physiology of the central and peripheral nervous system, exert neuroprotective actions and represent interesting tools for therapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Sex differences in their levels are detected not only under physiological conditions but are also modified in a sex-dependent way in different pathological alterations such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, diabetic encephalopathy, psychiatric disorders and peripheral neuropathy. Interestingly, many of these disorders show sex differences in their incidence, symptomatology and/or neurodegenerative outcome. The neuroprotective actions of neuroactive steroids, together with the sex specific regulation of its levels might provide the basis to design sex-specific neuroprotective therapies. Indeed, some experiments here discussed suggest the viability of this approach. PMID:26657814

  6. Glia-neuron crosstalk in the neuroprotective mechanisms of sex steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Doncarlos, Lydia L; Melcangi, Roberto C; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2005-04-01

    Proteins involved in the intramitochondrial trafficking of cholesterol, the first step in steroidogenesis, such as the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), are upregulated in the nervous system after injury. Accordingly, a local increase in the levels of steroids, such as pregnenolone and progesterone, is observed following traumatic injury in the brain and spinal cord. The expression and activity of aromatase, the enzyme that synthesizes estradiol, is also increased in injured brain areas and its inhibition results in an increased neurodegeneration. These findings suggest that an increase in steroidogenesis is part of an overall mechanism used by the nervous tissue to cope with neurodegenerative conditions. Neural steroidogenesis is the result of a coordinated interaction of neurons and glia. For example, after neural injury, there is an upregulation of StAR in neurons and of PBR in microglia and astroglia. Aromatase is expressed in neurons under basal conditions and is upregulated in reactive astrocytes after injury. Some of the steroids produced by glia are neuroprotective. Progesterone and progesterone derivatives produced by Schwann cells, promote myelin formation and the remyelination and regeneration of injured nerves. In the central nervous system, the steroids produced by glia regulate synaptic function, affect anxiety, cognition, sleep and behavior, and exert neuroprotective and reparative roles. In addition, glial cells are targets for steroids and mediate some of the effects of these molecules on neurons, including the regulation of survival and regeneration. PMID:15850667

  7. Sex steroids modulate luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone secretion in a cholinergic cell line from the basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morales, J R; López-Coviella, I; Hernández-Jiménez, J G; Reyes, R; Bello, A R; Hernández, G; Blusztajn, J K; Alonso, R

    2001-01-01

    The function of a particular neuronal population is in part determined by its neurotransmitter phenotype. We have found that a neuronal-derived septal cell line (SN56), known for its cholinergic properties, also synthesizes and releases luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. In addition, these cells express the messenger RNAs encoding estrogen and progesterone receptors. The activation of these receptors by their respective ligands cooperatively modulates the depolarization-induced release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in these cells. We have also found that a number of septal neurons in postnatal (1-week-old) mice are immunoreactive to both choline acetyltransferase and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. These results indicate that both neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, may co-exist in septal neurons of the CNS and that they could be modulated by gonadal hormones, and suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone could be involved in some of the actions of sex steroids on cholinergic neurotransmission.

  8. Factors That Contribute to Assay Variation in Quantitative Analysis of Sex Steroid Hormones Using Liquid and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The list of physiological events in which sex steroids play a role continues to increase. To decipher the roles that sex steroids play in any condition requires high quality cohorts of samples and assays that provide highly accurate quantitative measures. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS and GC-MS) have…

  9. Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    Anabolic steroids are man-made substances related to male sex hormones. Doctors use anabolic steroids to treat some hormone problems in men, delayed ... from some diseases. Bodybuilders and athletes often use anabolic steroids to build muscles and improve athletic performance. Using ...

  10. Sex and stress steroids in adolescence: Gonadal regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Green, Matthew R; McCormick, Cheryl M

    2016-08-01

    This review provides an overview of the current understanding of the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stressors. HPA function is influenced by both organizational (programming) and activational effects of gonadal hormones. Typically, in adult rats, estradiol increases and androgens decrease the HPA response to stressors, thereby contributing to sex differences in HPA function, and sensitivity of the HPA axis to gonadal steroids is in part determined by exposure to these hormones in early development. Although developmental differences in HPA function are well characterized, the extent to which gonadal steroids contribute to age differences in HPA function is not well understood. Deficits in the understanding of the relationships between the HPA and HPG axes are greatest for the adolescent period of development. The critical outstanding questions are, when do gonadal hormones begin to regulate HPA function in adolescence, and what mechanisms precipitate change in sensitivity of the HPA axis to the HPG axis at this stage of life.

  11. Sex and stress steroids in adolescence: Gonadal regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Green, Matthew R; McCormick, Cheryl M

    2016-08-01

    This review provides an overview of the current understanding of the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stressors. HPA function is influenced by both organizational (programming) and activational effects of gonadal hormones. Typically, in adult rats, estradiol increases and androgens decrease the HPA response to stressors, thereby contributing to sex differences in HPA function, and sensitivity of the HPA axis to gonadal steroids is in part determined by exposure to these hormones in early development. Although developmental differences in HPA function are well characterized, the extent to which gonadal steroids contribute to age differences in HPA function is not well understood. Deficits in the understanding of the relationships between the HPA and HPG axes are greatest for the adolescent period of development. The critical outstanding questions are, when do gonadal hormones begin to regulate HPA function in adolescence, and what mechanisms precipitate change in sensitivity of the HPA axis to the HPG axis at this stage of life. PMID:26851306

  12. Sex steroid induced apoptosis as a rational strategy to treat anti-hormone resistant breast and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jordan, V Craig; Fan, Ping; Abderrahman, Balkees; Maximov, Philipp Y; Hawsawi, Yousef M; Bhattacharya, Poulomi; Pokharel, Niranjana

    2016-05-01

    The combined incidence and the extended disease course of breast and prostate cancer is a major challenge for health care systems. The solution for society requires an economically viable treatment strategy to maintain individuals disease free and productive, so as to avoid the fracture of the family unit. Forty years ago, translational research using the antiestrogen tamoxifen was targeted to estrogen receptor (ER) positive micrometastatic tumor cells and established the long-term antihormone adjuvant treatment strategy used universally today. The antihormone strategy was the accepted structure of cancer biology. Sex steroid deprivation therapy remains the orthodox strategy for the treatment of both breast and prostate cancer. Despite major initial therapeutic success, the strategies of long term anti-hormone therapies with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors (AI) or antiandrogens or abiraterone for breast and prostate cancer, respectively, eventually lead to a significant proportion of anti-hormone resistant or stimulated tumor growth. Remarkably, a general principle of anti-hormone resistance has emerged for both breast and prostate cancer based primarily on clinical and supportive laboratory data. Paradoxically, anti-hormone resistant cell populations emerge and grow but are vulnerable to the cytotoxicity of estrogen or androgen-induced apoptosis for both breast and prostate cancer, respectively. These consistent anticancer actions of sex steroids appear to recapitulate the more complex mechanism of bone remodeling in elderly men and women during sex steroid deprivation. Estrogen is the key hormone in both sexes because in men androgen is first converted to estrogen. Estrogen regulates and triggers apoptosis in osteoclasts that develop during estrogen deprivation and destroy bone to cause osteoporosis. Sex steroid deprived breast and prostate cancer has recruited a streamlined natural apoptotic program from the human genome, but this is suppressed in the

  13. Origin of the response to adrenal and sex steroids: Roles of promiscuity and co-evolution of enzymes and steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael E; Nelson, David R; Studer, Romain A

    2015-07-01

    Many responses to adrenal and sex steroids are mediated by receptors that belong to the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. We investigated the co-evolution of these vertebrate steroid receptors and the enzymes that synthesize adrenal and sex steroids through data mining of genomes from cephalochordates [amphioxus], cyclostomes [lampreys, hagfish], chondrichthyes [sharks, rays, skates], actinopterygii [ray-finned fish], sarcopterygii [coelacanths, lungfishes and terrestrial vertebrates]. An ancestor of the estrogen receptor and 3-ketosteroid receptors evolved in amphioxus. A corticoid receptor and a progesterone receptor evolved in cyclostomes, and an androgen receptor evolved in gnathostomes. Amphioxus contains CYP11, CYP17, CYP19, 3β/Δ5-4-HSD and 17β-HSD14, which suffice for the synthesis of estradiol and Δ5-androstenediol. Amphioxus also contains CYP27, which catalyzes the synthesis of 27-hydroxy-cholesterol, another estrogen. Lamprey contains, in addition, CYP21, which catalyzes the synthesis of 11-deoxycortisol. Chondrichthyes contain, in addition, CYP11A, CYP11C, CYP17A1, CYP17A2. Coelacanth also contains CYP11C1, the current descendent from a common ancestor with modern land vertebrate CYP11B genes, which catalyze the synthesis of cortisol, corticosterone and aldosterone. Interestingly, CYP11B2, aldosterone synthase, evolved from separate gene duplications in at least old world monkeys and two suborders of rodents. Sciurognathi (including mice and rats) and Hystricomorpha (including guinea pigs). Thus, steroid receptors and steroidogenic enzymes co-evolved at key transitions in the evolution of vertebrates. Together, this suite of receptors and enzymes through their roles in transcriptional regulation of reproduction, development, homeostasis and the response to stress contributed to the evolutionary diversification of vertebrates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'. PMID:25445914

  14. Origin of the response to adrenal and sex steroids: Roles of promiscuity and co-evolution of enzymes and steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael E; Nelson, David R; Studer, Romain A

    2015-07-01

    Many responses to adrenal and sex steroids are mediated by receptors that belong to the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. We investigated the co-evolution of these vertebrate steroid receptors and the enzymes that synthesize adrenal and sex steroids through data mining of genomes from cephalochordates [amphioxus], cyclostomes [lampreys, hagfish], chondrichthyes [sharks, rays, skates], actinopterygii [ray-finned fish], sarcopterygii [coelacanths, lungfishes and terrestrial vertebrates]. An ancestor of the estrogen receptor and 3-ketosteroid receptors evolved in amphioxus. A corticoid receptor and a progesterone receptor evolved in cyclostomes, and an androgen receptor evolved in gnathostomes. Amphioxus contains CYP11, CYP17, CYP19, 3β/Δ5-4-HSD and 17β-HSD14, which suffice for the synthesis of estradiol and Δ5-androstenediol. Amphioxus also contains CYP27, which catalyzes the synthesis of 27-hydroxy-cholesterol, another estrogen. Lamprey contains, in addition, CYP21, which catalyzes the synthesis of 11-deoxycortisol. Chondrichthyes contain, in addition, CYP11A, CYP11C, CYP17A1, CYP17A2. Coelacanth also contains CYP11C1, the current descendent from a common ancestor with modern land vertebrate CYP11B genes, which catalyze the synthesis of cortisol, corticosterone and aldosterone. Interestingly, CYP11B2, aldosterone synthase, evolved from separate gene duplications in at least old world monkeys and two suborders of rodents. Sciurognathi (including mice and rats) and Hystricomorpha (including guinea pigs). Thus, steroid receptors and steroidogenic enzymes co-evolved at key transitions in the evolution of vertebrates. Together, this suite of receptors and enzymes through their roles in transcriptional regulation of reproduction, development, homeostasis and the response to stress contributed to the evolutionary diversification of vertebrates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'.

  15. Offspring sex in a TSD gecko correlates with an interaction between incubation temperature and yolk steroid hormones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guo-Hua; Yang, Jing; Wang, Jin; Ji, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    We incubated eggs of the Japanese gecko Gekko japonicus at three temperatures, and measured yolk testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) levels at three time points in embryonic development (oviposition, 1/3 of incubation, and 2/3 of incubation), to examine whether maternal influence on offspring sex via yolk steroid hormone deposition is significant in the species. Eggs incubated at 24 °C and 32 °C produced mostly females, and eggs incubated at 28 °C almost a 50:50 sex ratio of hatchlings. Female-producing eggs were larger than male-producing eggs. Clutches in which eggs were incubated at the same temperature produced mostly same-sex siblings. Yolk T level at laying was negatively related to eggs mass, and yolk E2/T ratio was positively related to egg mass. Results of two-way ANOVA with incubation temperature and stage as the factors show that: yolk E2 level was higher at 32 °C than at 24 °C; yolk T level was higher, whereas yolk E2/T ratio was smaller, at 28 °C than at 24 °C; yolk E2 and T levels were higher at 2/3 than at 1/3 of incubation. Our data in G. japonucus show that: (1) maternal influence on offspring sex via yolk steroid hormone deposition is significant; (2) incubation temperature affects the dynamics of developmental changes in yolk steroid hormones; (3) influences of yolk steroid hormones on offspring sex are secondary relative to incubation temperature effects; and (4) offspring sex correlates with an interaction between incubation temperature and yolk steroid hormones.

  16. Morphology, sex steroid level and gene expression analysis in gonadal sex reversal of triploid female (XXX) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Xu, Gefeng; Huang, Tianqing; Jin, Xian; Cui, Cunhe; Li, Depeng; Sun, Cong; Han, Ying; Mu, Zhenbo

    2016-02-01

    In non-mammalian vertebrates, estrogens and expressions of cyp19a1 and foxl2 play critical roles in maintaining ovary differentiation and development, while dmrt1 and sox9 are male-specific genes in testicular differentiation and are highly conserved. In order to deeply understand the morphological change, sex steroids level and molecular mechanism of triploid female gonadal reversal in rainbow trout, we studied the ovary morphology, tendency of estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T) levels and the relative expressions of dmrt1, cyp19a1, sox9 and foxl2 in juvenile and adult fish. Our results demonstrated that the development of triploid female gonads in rainbow trout went through arrested development, oocytes dedifferentiation, ovary reconstruction and sex reversal finally. During early gonadal development (154-334 days post-fertilization), the expressions of foxl2 and cyp19a1 increased linearly, while expressions of dmrt1 and sox9 were extremely suppressed, and E2 level was higher, while T level was lower. During the mid-to-late period of triploid female gonadal development (574-964 days post-fertilization), the expressions of dmrt1 and sox9 remained high and were very close to the quantity of diploid male genes, and T levels were even reaching diploid male plasma concentrations, while expressions of cyp19a1 and foxl2 were decreased, leading to decrease in E2 level. We realized that the development model of rainbow trout triploid female gonads was extremely rare, and the regulatory mechanism was very special. Genes involved in gonadal development and endogenous estrogens are pivotal factors in fish natural sex reversal. PMID:26373423

  17. Morphology, sex steroid level and gene expression analysis in gonadal sex reversal of triploid female (XXX) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Xu, Gefeng; Huang, Tianqing; Jin, Xian; Cui, Cunhe; Li, Depeng; Sun, Cong; Han, Ying; Mu, Zhenbo

    2016-02-01

    In non-mammalian vertebrates, estrogens and expressions of cyp19a1 and foxl2 play critical roles in maintaining ovary differentiation and development, while dmrt1 and sox9 are male-specific genes in testicular differentiation and are highly conserved. In order to deeply understand the morphological change, sex steroids level and molecular mechanism of triploid female gonadal reversal in rainbow trout, we studied the ovary morphology, tendency of estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T) levels and the relative expressions of dmrt1, cyp19a1, sox9 and foxl2 in juvenile and adult fish. Our results demonstrated that the development of triploid female gonads in rainbow trout went through arrested development, oocytes dedifferentiation, ovary reconstruction and sex reversal finally. During early gonadal development (154-334 days post-fertilization), the expressions of foxl2 and cyp19a1 increased linearly, while expressions of dmrt1 and sox9 were extremely suppressed, and E2 level was higher, while T level was lower. During the mid-to-late period of triploid female gonadal development (574-964 days post-fertilization), the expressions of dmrt1 and sox9 remained high and were very close to the quantity of diploid male genes, and T levels were even reaching diploid male plasma concentrations, while expressions of cyp19a1 and foxl2 were decreased, leading to decrease in E2 level. We realized that the development model of rainbow trout triploid female gonads was extremely rare, and the regulatory mechanism was very special. Genes involved in gonadal development and endogenous estrogens are pivotal factors in fish natural sex reversal.

  18. Steroidal glycosides from Reineckia carnea herba and their antitussive activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Na; Chen, Ling Li; Wang, Yao; Xue, Rui; Zou, Li Bo; Liu, Fang; Yin, Jun

    2013-06-01

    Two new steroidal glycosides, 1α,3α-dihydroxy-5β-pregn-16-en-20-one 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (1) and 1β,3β,27-trihydroxycholest-16-en-22-one 1,3-di-O-α-L-rhamnoside (2), along with seven known steroidal glycosides (3-9), were isolated from Reineckia carnea herba. Their structures were determined by detailed analysis of their 1D- and 2D-NMR and MS spectra. Compound 9 was isolated for the first time from the Reineckia genus. Except for 8, compounds 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 9 displayed clear in vitro antitussive activity.

  19. Peripartum sex steroid changes and maternal style in rhesus and Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Bardi, Massimo; Shimizu, Keiko; Barrett, Gordon M; Borgognini-Tarli, Silvana M; Huffman, Michael A

    2003-10-01

    The subtle and complex relationships between the sequential maturation of the endocrine systems during pregnancy and parturition, and the hormonal role in activating the central nervous system to express maternal behavior in primates, are far from being completely understood. Recent studies on the association between sex steroids and maternal behavior have yielded conflicting results in this group. Here we use a comparative approach to assess the correlation between changes in the peripartum endocrine profiles and maternal styles in two closely related macaque species, housed in analogous environments. We included in this study the first seven Japanese macaque and seven rhesus macaque mother-infant pairs born during the birth season of 2001 at the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan. We observed each pair 3h/week (six weekly 30-min observation sessions) during the first 12 weeks of lactation. We collected fecal samples twice a week from each mother, starting 4 weeks before parturition and ending 4 weeks after parturition. We tested the hypothesis that neuroendocrine changes during pregnancy and lactation might specifically contribute to the regulation and timing of infant rejection. Despite their biological similarities, we observed a clear difference in maternal style between the two groups concerning rejection rates: rhesus macaque mothers rejected their infants earlier and more frequently throughout the whole 12 weeks of study. On the other hand, protectiveness showed similar patterns and values in the two groups, and maternal warmth was significantly higher in the rhesus group, but it followed a similar pattern over time. We also confirmed an association between maternal rejection and excreted estrogen, but not excreted progesterone, for Japanese macaques. This association was not apparent for the rhesus macaques. This result, coupled with the observation that rhesus mothers are more rejecting than Japanese macaque mothers, tends to support our

  20. Oct-GnRH, the first protostomian gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptide and a critical mini-review of the presence of vertebrate sex steroids in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Hiroyuki; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    In protostome and deuterosome invertebrates, neurosecretory cells play major roles in the endocrine system. The optic glands of cephalopods are indicators of sexual maturation. In mature octopuses, optic glands enlarge and secrete a gonadotropic hormone. A peptide with structural features similar to that of vertebrate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was isolated from the octopus, Octopus vulgaris, and was named oct-GnRH. The discovery of oct-GnRH has triggered structural determinations and predictions of other mollusc GnRH-like peptides in biochemical and in silico studies. Interestingly, cephalopods studied so far are characterized by a single molecular form of oct-GnRH with a C-terminal -Pro-Gly-NH2 sequence, which is critical for gonadotropin-releasing activity in vertebrates. Other molluscan GnRH-like peptides lack the C-terminal -Pro-Gly-NH2 sequence but have -X-NH2 or -Pro-Gly although all protostome GnRH-like peptides have yet to be sequenced. In marine molluscs, relationships between GnRH-like peptides and sex steroids have been studied to verify the hypothesis that molluscs have vertebrate-type sex steroid system. However, it is currently questionable whether such sex steroids are present and whether they play endogenous roles in the reproductive system of molluscs. Because molluscs uptake and store steroids from the environment and fishes release sex steroids into the external environment, it is impossible to rule out the contamination of vertebrate sex steroids in molluscs. The function of key enzymes of steroidogenesis within molluscs remains unclear. Thus, evidence to deny the existence of the vertebrate-type sex steroid system in molluscs has been accumulated. The elucidation of substances, which regulate the maturation and maintenance of gonads and other reproductive functions in molluscs will require rigorous and progressive scientific study.

  1. Oct-GnRH, the first protostomian gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptide and a critical mini-review of the presence of vertebrate sex steroids in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Hiroyuki; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    In protostome and deuterosome invertebrates, neurosecretory cells play major roles in the endocrine system. The optic glands of cephalopods are indicators of sexual maturation. In mature octopuses, optic glands enlarge and secrete a gonadotropic hormone. A peptide with structural features similar to that of vertebrate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was isolated from the octopus, Octopus vulgaris, and was named oct-GnRH. The discovery of oct-GnRH has triggered structural determinations and predictions of other mollusc GnRH-like peptides in biochemical and in silico studies. Interestingly, cephalopods studied so far are characterized by a single molecular form of oct-GnRH with a C-terminal -Pro-Gly-NH2 sequence, which is critical for gonadotropin-releasing activity in vertebrates. Other molluscan GnRH-like peptides lack the C-terminal -Pro-Gly-NH2 sequence but have -X-NH2 or -Pro-Gly although all protostome GnRH-like peptides have yet to be sequenced. In marine molluscs, relationships between GnRH-like peptides and sex steroids have been studied to verify the hypothesis that molluscs have vertebrate-type sex steroid system. However, it is currently questionable whether such sex steroids are present and whether they play endogenous roles in the reproductive system of molluscs. Because molluscs uptake and store steroids from the environment and fishes release sex steroids into the external environment, it is impossible to rule out the contamination of vertebrate sex steroids in molluscs. The function of key enzymes of steroidogenesis within molluscs remains unclear. Thus, evidence to deny the existence of the vertebrate-type sex steroid system in molluscs has been accumulated. The elucidation of substances, which regulate the maturation and maintenance of gonads and other reproductive functions in molluscs will require rigorous and progressive scientific study. PMID:26319132

  2. Sex Steroid Hormones Matter for Learning and Memory: Estrogenic Regulation of Hippocampal Function Inmale and Female Rodents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Karyn M.; Kim, Jaekyoon; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Fortress, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    Ample evidence has demonstrated that sex steroid hormones, such as the potent estrogen 17ß-estradiol (E[subscript 2]), affect hippocampal morphology, plasticity, and memory in male and female rodents. Yet relatively few investigators who work with male subjects consider the effects of these hormones on learning and memory. This review describes…

  3. Effects of sex steroids on expression of genes regulating growth-related mechanisms in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Beth M; Weber, Gregory M

    2015-05-15

    Effects of a single injection of 17β-estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), or 5β-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on expression of genes central to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis, muscle-regulatory factors, transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) superfamily signaling cascade, and estrogen receptors were determined in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver and white muscle tissue. In liver in addition to regulating GH sensitivity and IGF production, sex steroids also affected expression of IGF binding proteins, as E2, T, and DHT increased expression of igfbp2b and E2 also increased expression of igfbp2 and igfbp4. Regulation of this system also occurred in white muscle in which E2 increased expression of igf1, igf2, and igfbp5b1, suggesting anabolic capacity may be maintained in white muscle in the presence of E2. In contrast, DHT decreased expression of igfbp5b1. DHT and T decreased expression of myogenin, while other muscle regulatory factors were either not affected or responded similarly for all steroid treatments. Genes within the TGFβ superfamily signaling cascade responded to steroid treatment in both liver and muscle, suggesting a regulatory role for sex steroids in the ability to transmit signals initiated by TGFβ superfamily ligands, with a greater number of genes responding in liver than in muscle. Estrogen receptors were also regulated by sex steroids, with era1 expression increasing for all treatments in muscle, but only E2- and T-treatment in liver. E2 reduced expression of erb2 in liver. Collectively, these data identify how physiological mechanisms are regulated by sex steroids in a manner that promotes the disparate effects of androgens and estrogens on growth in salmonids.

  4. Effects of gonadal steroid hormones on the hypothalamo-pituitary-liver axis in the control of sex differences in hepatic steroid metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mode, A; Norstedt, G

    1982-11-01

    The site of action of gonadal hormones in the regulation of hepatic steroid metabolism was investigated by measuring the effects of (i) implantation of estradiol into the pituitary gland or anterior hypothalamus of males and (ii) subcutaneous injection of a synthetic androgen in differentiated male and female rats. The hepatic responses measured in vitro were 5 alpha-reduction, and 6 beta- and 16 alpha-hydroxylation of androstenedione. After intrapituitary or intrahypothalamic implantation of oestradiol, 5 alpha-reductase activity increased and 6 beta- and 16 alpha-hydroxylase activity decreased in males relative to the enzyme activities of cholesterol-implanted animals, indicating a feminizing effect of the oestrogen. This effect could not be accomplished by subcutaneous injection of the same oestrogen preparation. Deafferentation had no effect on hepatic steroid metabolism in females, but caused a feminization in males. In addition, subcutaneous treatment of intact females with the synthetic androgen caused masculinization of hepatic steroid metabolism, but was without effect in differentiated animals. Treatment with synthetic androgens had no effect on the hepatic steroid metabolism in differentiated male animals. Subcutaneous injection of a potent synthetic progestagen had little effect on hepatic steroid metabolism in intact females. It is concluded that oestrogen feminizes hepatic steroid metabolism by an action at the hypothalamic-pituitary level and that an intact hypothalamic-pituitary axis is required for the masculinizing action of the synthetic androgen on hepatic steroid metabolism. It is possible that the site of action of androgens is in the anterior hypothalamus or in adjacent areas of the brain.

  5. Effect Modification of Obesity on Associations between Endogenous Steroid Sex Hormones and Arterial Calcification in Women at Midlife

    PubMed Central

    El Khoudary, Samar R.; Wildman, Rachel P.; Matthews, Karen; Powell, Lynda; Hollenberg, Steven M.; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine whether obesity modify the effects of endogenous steroid sex hormones on arterial calcification in women at midlife. Methods Associations between estradiol, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin and free androgen index and the presence and extent of coronary and aortic calcification were evaluated in 187 obese (body mass index ≥30) and 281 non-obese (body mass index <30) women from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation. Logistic and linear regressions were used as appropriate. Results Prevalence rates of coronary and aortic calcification were significantly higher among obese compared to non-obese (P <0.001, for both). In multivariable analyses, steroid sex hormones were not associated with presence of coronary calcification. However, for extent of coronary calcification, significant interactions were found between obesity and both sex hormone binding globulin (P<0.0001) and free androgen index (P=0.008). In non-obese women, higher sex hormone binding globulin (P=0.0006) and lower free androgen index (P=0.01) were associated with greater extent of coronary calcification while lower sex hormone binding globulin was associated with greater extent of coronary calcification in obese women (P=0.05). For aortic calcification outcomes, higher sex hormone binding globulin was associated with presence of aortic calcification among non-obese (OR:1.64, 95%CI:1.16, 2.32, for each 1-SD greater sex hormone binding globulin). Conclusions Associations between endogenous steroid sex hormones and arterial calcification vary by obesity status among perimenopausal women. Further research is needed to better understand the possible mechanisms. PMID:21471825

  6. Manipulation of GABAergic Steroids: Sex Differences in the Effects on Alcohol Drinking- and Withdrawal-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Deborah A.; Beckley, Ethan H.; Kaufman, Katherine R.; Ford, Matthew M.

    2009-01-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disorder that represents an important contributor to health problems worldwide and that is difficult to encompass with a single preclinical model. Additionally, alcohol (ethanol) influences the function of many neurotransmitter systems, with the interaction at γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors being integral for ethanol's reinforcing and several withdrawal-related effects. Given that some steroid derivatives exert rapid membrane actions as potent positive modulators of GABAA receptors and exhibit a similar pharmacological profile to that of ethanol, studies in the laboratory manipulated GABAergic steroid levels and determined the impact on ethanol's rewarding- and withdrawal-related effects. Manipulations focused on the progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone (ALLO), since it is the most potent endogenous GABAergic steroid identified. The underlying hypothesis is that fluctuations in GABAergic steroid levels (and the resultant change in GABAergic inhibitory tone) alter sensitivity to ethanol, leading to changes in the positive motivational or withdrawal-related effects of ethanol. This review describes results that emphasize sex differences in the effects of ALLO and the manipulation of its biosynthesis on alcohol reward- versus withdrawal-related behaviors, with females being less sensitive to the modulatory effects of ALLO on ethanol-drinking behaviors but more sensitive to some steroid manipulations on withdrawal-related behaviors. These findings imply the existence of sex differences in the sensitivity of GABAA receptors to GABAergic steroids within circuits relevant to alcohol reward versus withdrawal. Thus, sex differences in the modulation of GABAergic neurosteroids may be an important consideration in understanding and developing therapeutic interventions in alcoholics. PMID:19615369

  7. Identification of sex in hatchling loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) by analysis of steroid concentrations in chorioallantoic/amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Gross, T S; Crain, D A; Bjorndal, K A; Bolten, A B; Carthy, R R

    1995-08-01

    A major difficulty in sea turtle conservation is the inability to nonlethally and noninvasively identify the sex of hatching sea turtles. Traditional sexing techniques such as plasma sex steroid quantification cannot be applied to hatchlings without sacrificing the hatchlings or utilizing invasive procedure. This paper presents a technique for sexing hatchling sea turtles by analysis of sex steroid concentrations in egg chorioallantoic/amniotic fluid (CAF). Metabolites of estradiol-17 beta (E) and testosterone (T) in CAF are best expressed as an index or E:T ratio. Chorioallantoic/amniotic fluid E:T ratios for males (0.5 +/- 0.1) were significantly lower than those for females (2.2 +/- 0.3). When separated by utilizing an E:T ratio of 1.25 as the determinant index value, 27 of 28 hatchlings were designated correctly as males (E:T < 1.25) or females (E:T > or = 1.25). Sex was verified for all hatchlings by gonadal histology. This study shows significant concentrations of T and E metabolites in CAF and plasma of hatchling loggerhead turtles and illustrates the use of a nonlethal, noninvasive method for determining sex, which could be potentially utilized for other endangered reptile and avian species.

  8. Multi-target QSAR and docking study of steroids binding to corticosteroid-binding globulin and sex hormone-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Katarina; Filipic, Slavica; Agbaba, Danica

    2012-12-01

    The QSAR and docking studies were performed on fifty seven steroids with binding affinities for corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) and eighty four steroids with binding affinities for sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Since the steroidal compounds have binding affinity for both CBG and SHBG, multi-target QSAR approach was employed to establish a unique QSAR method for simultaneous evaluation of the CBG and SHBG binding affinities. The constitutional, geometrical, physico-chemical and electronic descriptors were computed for the examined structures by use of the Chem3D Ultra 7.0.0, the Dragon 6.0, the MOPAC2009, and the Chemical Descriptors Library (CDL) program. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) has been applied for selection of the most relevant molecular descriptors and QSAR models building. The QSAR (SHGB) model, QSAR model (CBG), and multi-target QSAR model (CBG, SHBG) were created. The multi-target QSAR model (CBG and SHBG) was found to be more effective in describing the CBG and SHBG affinity of steroids in comparison to the one target models (QSAR (SHGB) model, QSAR model (CBG)). The multi-target QSAR study indicated the importance of the electronic descriptor (Mor16v), steric/symmetry descriptors (Eig06_EA(ed)), 2D autocorrelation descriptor (GATS4m), distance distribution descriptor (RDF045m), and atom type fingerprint descriptor (CDL-ATFP 253) in describing the CBG and SHBG affinity of steroidal compounds. Results of the created multi-target QSAR model were in accordance with the performed docking studies. The theoretical study defined physicochemical, electronic and structural requirements for selective and effective binding of steroids to the CBG and SHBG active sites.

  9. Steroidal glycosides from Furcraea foetida and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, Akihito; Sano, Tomoe; Hashimoto, Ken; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Mimaki, Yoshihiro

    2009-10-01

    Two new spirostanol glycosides (1, 2) and a new furostanol glycoside (3), together with nine known steroidal glycosides (4-12) were isolated from the leaves of Furcraea foetida (Agavaceae). The structures of the new compounds were determined by spectroscopic analysis and the results of hydrolytic cleavage. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against HL-60 human leukemia cells, A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells, HSC-2 human oral squamous carcinoma cells, and HSC-4 human oral squamous carcinoma cells.

  10. Patterns of peripheral steroid metabolism vary with sex, season, and tissue type in blotched blue-tongued lizards (Tiliqua nigrolutea).

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ashley; Jones, Susan M; Davies, Noel W

    2005-01-01

    We examined sexual and seasonal variation in the ability of reproductively relevant tissues (liver, skin, adrenal gland, cloaca, kidney, renal sexual segment, epididymis, oviduct, muscle, testis, and ovary) to metabolise a primary steroid [testosterone (T) or estradiol (E2)] in the scincid lizard, Tiliqua nigrolutea. We observed considerable variation between sexes and across seasons in the patterns of conjugation and derivatisation of the primary steroids by these tissues. All tissues demonstrated the ability to conjugate the relevant primary steroid. Other general trends included increased conjugation by all tissues of gestating females, reduced metabolism of E2 by female tissues during late vitellogenesis, and reduced metabolism of T by males during early spermatogenesis. 5alpha-Dihydrotestosterone was the most commonly detected derivative in males, and production varied with season and tissue type. We suggest that seasonal variation in the ability of reproductively relevant tissues may be important in the physiological regulation of reproduction in this species.

  11. Regulation of Estrogen Receptor α Expression in the Hypothalamus by Sex Steroids: Implication in the Regulation of Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian; Shi, Haifei

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences exist in the complex regulation of energy homeostasis that utilizes central and peripheral systems. It is widely accepted that sex steroids, especially estrogens, are important physiological and pathological components in this sex-specific regulation. Estrogens exert their biological functions via estrogen receptors (ERs). ERα, a classic nuclear receptor, contributes to metabolic regulation and sexual behavior more than other ER subtypes. Physiological and molecular studies have identified multiple ERα-rich nuclei in the hypothalamus of the central nervous system (CNS) as sites of actions that mediate effects of estrogens. Much of our understanding of ERα regulation has been obtained using transgenic models such as ERα global or nuclei-specific knockout mice. A fundamental question concerning how ERα is regulated in wild-type animals, including humans, in response to alterations in steroid hormone levels, due to experimental manipulation (i.e., castration and hormone replacement) or physiological stages (i.e., puberty, pregnancy, and menopause), lacks consistent answers. This review discusses how different sex hormones affect ERα expression in the hypothalamus. This information will contribute to the knowledge of estrogen action in the CNS, further our understanding of discrepancies in correlation of altered sex hormone levels with metabolic disturbances when comparing both sexes, and improve health issues in postmenopausal women. PMID:26491443

  12. Changes in the serum sex steroids, IL-7 and RANKL-OPG system after bone marrow transplantation: influences on bone and mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Baek, Ki Hyun; Oh, Ki Won; Lee, Won Young; Tae, Hyun Jung; Rhee, Eun Jung; Han, Je Ho; Cha, Bong Yun; Kim, Yoo Jin; Lee, Kwang Woo; Son, Ho Young; Kang, Sung Koo; Kim, Chun Choo; Kang, Moo Il

    2006-12-01

    This study prospectively investigated the changes of the serum levels of the sex steroids, IL-7, soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (sRANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) recipients. This study also examined whether the changes of these cytokine levels and sex steroids actually influence bone turnover and post-BMT bone loss by correlation analysis. Data were analyzed from 39 patients (33.6+/-6.4 years, 19 men and 20 women) who had DXA performed before BMT and at 1 year after BMT. The bone turnover markers, sex steroids and the cytokine levels were measured before BMT and serially after BMT. The mean bone loss in the lumbar spine and the total proximal femur was 5.9% (P < 0.01) and 11.3% (P < 0.01), respectively. During the immediate post-BMT period, bone formation decreased, whereas the bone resorption increased. For the female recipients, the estradiol levels declined at 1 week after BMT, and they did not recover to the basal levels. For the male recipients, the testosterone levels decreased at 1 week and then it increased to its baseline level. The IL-7 levels reached their maximum at 1 week and then declined to baseline level by 3 months. The serum sRANKL, OPG levels and the sRANKL/OPG ratio showed their peak at post-BMT 3 weeks. The mean daily dose of steroid was associated with suppressed bone formation, enhanced bone resorption and increased sRANKL levels. The IL-7 levels were also noted to be either positively correlated with the levels of ICTP or they were negatively correlated with the levels of osteocalcin at 1 and 3 weeks after BMT. Bone loss at the lumbar spine and the proximal femur was influenced by the decreased sex steroids and increased IL-7 levels. During the observation period, the IL-7 levels showed positive correlations with the sRANKL levels and the sRANKL/OPG ratio. For the female patients, the serum IL-7 levels were negatively associated with the estradiol levels at 1 and 3 weeks after

  13. Longitudinal monitoring of sex steroid hormones in excrement of spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri).

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Abigail; Buck, C Loren; Atkinson, Shannon; Hollmén, Tuula

    2014-03-01

    From the 1970s to the 1990s, the breeding population of spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) in western Alaska declined by 96%, which led to the listing of this species as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1993. Since then, the population has stabilized, but has not recovered to pre-decline numbers. While little is known about reproductive endocrinology in spectacled eiders, in other avian species, estrogen and testosterone are known to initiate and modulate various reproductive processes including yolk protein synthesis, reproductive behaviors and secondary sex characteristics. Measurement of the metabolites of estrogen and testosterone (EM and TM, respectively) in excrement reflect circulating hormone concentrations and provide a non-invasive method to monitor reproductive physiology. We measured concentrations of excreted EM in captive females and TM in males to (1) determine the efficacy of commercially available radioimmunoassay kits to detect EM and TM, (2) describe annual profiles of EM and TM concentrations, and (3) define the reproductive season of captive spectacled eiders using endocrine status. Excrement samples were collected from captive female and male spectacled eiders three times per week throughout 1 year. Female EM and male TM levels were quantified using radioimmunoassay. Mean female EM profile exhibited values exceeding the threshold for "peak" values (EM>193.3 ng/g) from mid-February to early July, and again in September. Additionally, the highest average concentrations of EM were seen in March, May and September. Elevated TM concentrations occurred in mid March, mid May and late June. These data suggest that levels of excreted sex steroids reflect patterns predicted by breeding landmarks in the annual cycle and will assist in field monitoring and captive breeding programs for spectacled eiders.

  14. The progestin levonorgestrel disrupts gonadotropin expression and sex steroid levels in pubertal roach (Rutilus rutilus).

    PubMed

    Kroupova, H K; Trubiroha, A; Lorenz, C; Contardo-Jara, V; Lutz, I; Grabic, R; Kocour, M; Kloas, W

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the synthetic progestin levonorgestrel (LNG) on the reproductive endocrine system of a teleost fish, the roach (Rutilus rutilus). Pubertal roach were exposed for 28 days in a flow-through system to four concentrations of LNG (3, 31, 312, and 3124 ng/l). Both males and females treated with 3124 ng/l LNG exhibited the upregulated levels of vitellogenin and oestrogen receptor 1 mRNA in the liver. At the same concentration, LNG caused a significant upregulation of the mRNA expression of the gene encoding luteinising hormone β-subunit (lhβ) and the suppression of the mRNA expression of the gene encoding follicle-stimulating hormone β-subunit (fshβ) in the pituitary of both male and female roach. A lower LNG concentration (312 ng/l) suppressed mRNA expression of fshβ in males only. Females treated with 3124 ng/l LNG exhibited significantly lower plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and oestradiol (E2) concentrations, whereas their testosterone (T) level was higher compared with the control. Females exposed to 312 ng/l LNG presented significantly lower plasma E2 concentrations. Males exposed to ≥31 ng/l LNG exhibited significantly reduced 11-KT levels. As determined through a histological analysis, the ovaries of females were not affected by LNG exposure, whereas the testes of males exposed to 31 and 312 ng/l LNG exhibited a significantly higher percentage of spermatogonia B compared with the control. The results of the present study demonstrate that LNG disrupts the reproductive system of pubertal roach by affecting the pituitary gonadotropin expression and the sex steroid levels. This disruption was determined to occur in males after exposure to an environmentally relevant concentration (31 ng/l). Moreover, the highest tested concentration of LNG (3124 ng/l) exerted an oestrogenic effect on fish of both sexes. PMID:24893273

  15. Expression of Sex Steroid Hormone Receptors in Vagal Motor Neurons Innervating the Trachea and Esophagus in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mukudai, Shigeyuki; Ichi Matsuda, Ken; Bando, Hideki; Takanami, Keiko; Nishio, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Hisa, Yasuo; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The medullary vagal motor nuclei, the nucleus ambiguus (NA) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV), innervate the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. We conducted immunohistochemical analysis of expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor α (ERα), in relation to innervation of the trachea and esophagus via vagal motor nuclei in mice. AR and ERα were expressed in the rostral NA and in part of the DMV. Tracing experiments using cholera toxin B subunit demonstrated that neurons of vagal motor nuclei that innervate the trachea and esophagus express AR and ERα. There was no difference in expression of sex steroid hormone receptors between trachea- and esophagus-innervating neurons. These results suggest that sex steroid hormones may act on vagal motor nuclei via their receptors, thereby regulating functions of the trachea and esophagus. PMID:27006520

  16. Sex steroid correlates of female-specific colouration, behaviour and reproductive state in Lake Eyre dragon lizards, Ctenophorus maculosus.

    PubMed

    Jessop, Tim S; Chan, Rita; Stuart-Fox, Devi

    2009-07-01

    In some species, females develop bright colouration to signal reproductive status and exhibit behavioural repertoires to incite male courtship and/or reduce male harassment and forced copulation. Sex steroids, including progesterone and testosterone, potentially mediate female reproductive colouration and reproductive behaviour. We measured associations among plasma profiles of testosterone and progesterone with variation in colour expression and reproductive behaviour, including unique courtship rejection behaviours, in female Lake Eyre dragon lizards, (Ctenophorus maculosus). At onset of breeding, progesterone and testosterone increased with vitellogenesis, coincident with colour intensification and sexual receptivity, indicated by acceptance of copulations. As steroid levels peaked around the inferred ovulation time, maximal colour development occurred and sexual receptivity declined. When females were gravid and exhibited maximal mate rejection behaviours, progesterone levels remained consistently high, while testosterone exhibited a discrete second peak. At oviposition, significant declines in plasma steroid levels, fading of colouration and a dramatic decrease in male rejection behaviours co-occurred. Our results indicate a generally concordant association among steroid levels, colouration, behaviour and reproductive events. However, the prolonged elevation in progesterone and a second peak of testosterone was unrelated to reproductive state or further colour change, possibly suggesting selection on females to retain high steroid levels for inducing rejection behaviours. PMID:19363614

  17. Sex steroid correlates of female-specific colouration, behaviour and reproductive state in Lake Eyre dragon lizards, Ctenophorus maculosus.

    PubMed

    Jessop, Tim S; Chan, Rita; Stuart-Fox, Devi

    2009-07-01

    In some species, females develop bright colouration to signal reproductive status and exhibit behavioural repertoires to incite male courtship and/or reduce male harassment and forced copulation. Sex steroids, including progesterone and testosterone, potentially mediate female reproductive colouration and reproductive behaviour. We measured associations among plasma profiles of testosterone and progesterone with variation in colour expression and reproductive behaviour, including unique courtship rejection behaviours, in female Lake Eyre dragon lizards, (Ctenophorus maculosus). At onset of breeding, progesterone and testosterone increased with vitellogenesis, coincident with colour intensification and sexual receptivity, indicated by acceptance of copulations. As steroid levels peaked around the inferred ovulation time, maximal colour development occurred and sexual receptivity declined. When females were gravid and exhibited maximal mate rejection behaviours, progesterone levels remained consistently high, while testosterone exhibited a discrete second peak. At oviposition, significant declines in plasma steroid levels, fading of colouration and a dramatic decrease in male rejection behaviours co-occurred. Our results indicate a generally concordant association among steroid levels, colouration, behaviour and reproductive events. However, the prolonged elevation in progesterone and a second peak of testosterone was unrelated to reproductive state or further colour change, possibly suggesting selection on females to retain high steroid levels for inducing rejection behaviours.

  18. Eysenck's personality dimensions and sex steroids in male abstinent alcoholics and nonalcoholics: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    King, A C; Errico, A L; Parsons, O A

    1995-02-01

    This study investigated the relationship between alcoholics' personality characteristics [as indexed by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ)] and sex steroid levels. Three serum samples were drawn over a 90-min period in 58 inpatient male alcoholics (mean 33 days sober) and 33 non-alcoholic controls. The EPQ was administered at approximately the same point in the treatment process. Replicating previous work, we found alcoholics scored significantly higher on the Neuroticism and Psychoticism scales of the EPQ than controls. Alcoholics also had higher levels of estradiol and total testosterone than controls, which may be reflective of a biological rebound or characteristic premorbid levels. A significant positive correlation was found between testosterone and extroversion in controls, but not in alcoholics. Alcoholics showed a positive correlation between estradiol and neuroticism and a negative relationship between estradiol and extroversion. The results suggest that (a) 'normal' hormone-personality relationships are disrupted in male alcoholics, and b) personality and psychological changes consistent with the physical feminization syndrome may occur in male alcoholics.

  19. Short fused? associations between white matter connections, sex steroids, and aggression across adolescence.

    PubMed

    Peper, Jiska S; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2015-03-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies in adults show that aggression involves reduced brain communication between subcortical and cortical areas dedicated to motivation and control, respectively. Prior research indicates that sex steroid hormone production during adolescence negatively influences the rapid development of white matter connectivity between subcortical and cortical areas during adolescence and may potentiate aggression. Here, we tested this hypothesis in 258 participants between 8 and 25 years of age by using Diffusion Weighted Imaging to examine the microstructure of white matter connections within the fronto-temporal-subcortical network. Trait aggression was measured using the Buss Perry Aggression Questionnaire and testosterone and estradiol levels were measured in saliva. Results indicated that higher levels of testosterone were associated with less white matter integrity within the fronto-temporal-subcortical network (i.e., higher mean diffusivity [MD] longitudinal [LD], and radial diffusivity [RD]). Furthermore, lower fractional anisotropy and higher MD, LD, and RD values within this network increased expressive forms of aggression and reduced inhibited forms of aggression (hostility). Our study indicates higher levels of testosterone relating to lower quality of structural cortical-subcortical connectivity, arguably resulting in a shift from inhibited towards expressive forms of aggression. Our data adds evidence to the idea that aggressive tendencies are subcortically driven, but individuals with relatively high testosterone might have lower structural connectivity within cortical control areas, resulting in a stronger tendency to act on these aggressive tendencies.

  20. [Pattern of plasma sex steroid hormone levels during the breeding season of male and female skink: Eumeces chinensis].

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Rao; Du, Ji Zeng; Ji, Xiang

    2004-12-01

    Changes in gonadal activity and plasma sex steroid hormone levels in male and female Eumece chinensis during the breeding season were described. The results showed that: The vitellogensis of follicles of female Eumeces chinensis needed the stimulation of 17beta-estradiol (E2). As ovary masses reached peak values between late April and mid-May, E2 levels rose to the top value by late March, and then sharply declined but went up again before preovulation; The physiological functions of plasma progesterone (P) consisted in its oviductal egg retention, embryo development, and eggshell formation. P levels fluctuated near the basic value between mid-March and late April. In mid-May, with the onset of ovulation, plasma P levels rose rapidly, reached peak value by late May and declined sharply after ovulation. Plasma E2 levels declined as plasma P levels rose, showing an inverse relationship between them; In males, plasma Testosterone (T) levels were closely correlated with the maintenance of spermatogenesis activities, male and male combat, sexual display, and mating. Plasma T levels tended to rise after the termination of hibernation, and reached peak value by mid-April. After mid-May, with the testis aggressing, plasma T levels gradually went down and reached bottom value by late June.

  1. The potential function of steroid sulphatase activity in steroid production and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Teruo; Fujimoto, Seiichiro

    2004-01-01

    The first step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones is conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone. StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory) protein plays a crucial role in the intra-mitochondrial movement of cholesterol. STS (steroid sulphatase), which is present ubiquitously in mammalian tissues, including the placenta, adrenal gland, testis and ovary, desulphates a number of 3beta-hydroxysteroid sulphates, including cholesterol sulphate. The present study was designed to examine the effect of STS on StAR protein synthesis and steroidogenesis in cells. Steroidogenic activities of COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with a vector for the cholesterol P450scc (cytochrome P450 side-chain-cleavage enzyme) system, named F2, a StAR expression vector (pStAR), and an STS expression vector (pSTS) were assayed. Whole-cell extracts were subjected to SDS/PAGE and then to Western blot analysis. pSTS co-expressed in COS-1 cells with F2 and pStAR increased pregnenolone synthesis 2-fold compared with that of co-expression with F2 and pStAR. Western blot analysis using COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with pSTS, F2 and pStAR revealed that StAR protein levels increased, whereas STS and P450scc protein levels did not change. The amount of StAR protein translation products increased when pSTS was added to an in vitro transcription-translation reaction mixture. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the 37 kDa StAR pre-protein disappeared significantly ( P <0.01) more slowly in COS-1 cells that had been transfected with pSTS than in COS-1 cells that had not been transfected with pSTS. The increase in StAR protein level is not a result of an increase in StAR gene expression, but is a result of both an increase in translation and a longer half-life of the 37 kDa pre-StAR protein. In conclusion, STS increases StAR protein expression level and stimulates steroid production. PMID:14969586

  2. Mechanisms of crosstalk between endocrine systems: regulation of sex steroid hormone synthesis and action by thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are well-known regulators of development and metabolism in vertebrates. There is increasing evidence that THs are also involved in gonadal differentiation and reproductive function. Changes in TH status affect sex ratios in developing fish and frogs and reproduction (e.g., fertility), hormone levels, and gonad morphology in adults of species of different vertebrates. In this review, we have summarized and compared the evidence for cross-talk between the steroid hormone and thyroid axes and present a comparative model. We gave special attention to TH regulation of sex steroid synthesis and action in both the brain and gonad, since these are important for gonad development and brain sexual differentiation and have been studied in many species. We also reviewed research showing that there is a TH system, including receptors and enzymes, in the brains and gonads in developing and adult vertebrates. Our analysis shows that THs influences sex steroid hormone synthesis in vertebrates, ranging from fish to pigs. This concept of crosstalk and conserved hormone interaction has implications for our understanding of the role of THs in reproduction, and how these processes may be dysregulated by environmental endocrine disruptors.

  3. Mechanisms of crosstalk between endocrine systems: regulation of sex steroid hormone synthesis and action by thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are well-known regulators of development and metabolism in vertebrates. There is increasing evidence that THs are also involved in gonadal differentiation and reproductive function. Changes in TH status affect sex ratios in developing fish and frogs and reproduction (e.g., fertility), hormone levels, and gonad morphology in adults of species of different vertebrates. In this review, we have summarized and compared the evidence for cross-talk between the steroid hormone and thyroid axes and present a comparative model. We gave special attention to TH regulation of sex steroid synthesis and action in both the brain and gonad, since these are important for gonad development and brain sexual differentiation and have been studied in many species. We also reviewed research showing that there is a TH system, including receptors and enzymes, in the brains and gonads in developing and adult vertebrates. Our analysis shows that THs influences sex steroid hormone synthesis in vertebrates, ranging from fish to pigs. This concept of crosstalk and conserved hormone interaction has implications for our understanding of the role of THs in reproduction, and how these processes may be dysregulated by environmental endocrine disruptors. PMID:24685768

  4. Novel galanin receptors in teleost fish: identification, expression and regulation by sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Martins, Rute S T; Pinto, Patrícia I S; Guerreiro, Pedro M; Zanuy, Silvia; Carrillo, Manuel; Canário, Adelino V M

    2014-09-01

    In fish, the onset of puberty, the transition from juvenile to sexually reproductive adult animals, is triggered by the activation of pituitary gonadotropin secretion and its timing is influenced by external and internal factors that include the growth/adiposity status of the animal. Kisspeptins have been implicated in the activation of puberty but peripheral signals coming from the immature gonad or associated to the metabolic/nutritional status are also thought to be involved. Therefore we hypothesize the importance of the galinergic system in the brain and testis of pre-pubertal male sea bass as a candidate to translate the signals leading to activation of testicular maturation. Here, the transcripts for four galanin receptors (GALR), named GALR1a, 1b, 2a and 2b, were isolated from European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the previously reported duplication of GALR1 in teleost fish, and unravelled the duplication of GALR2 in teleost fish and in some tetrapod species. Comparison with human showed that the key amino acids involved in ligand binding are present in the corresponding GALR1 and GALR2 orthologs. Transcripts for all four receptors are expressed in brain and testes of adult fish with GALR1a and GALR1b abundant in testes and hardly detected in ovaries. In order to investigate whether GALR1 dimorphic expression was dependent on steroid context we evaluated the effect of 11-ketotestosterone and 17β-estradiol treatments on the receptor expression in brain and testes of pre-pubertal males. Interestingly, steroid treatments had no effect on the expression of GALRs in the brain while in the testes, GALR1a and GALR1b were significantly up regulated by 11KT. Altogether, these results support a role for the galaninergic system, in particular the GALR1 paralog, in fish reproductive function.

  5. Comparison of Oogenesis and Sex Steroid Profiles between Twice and Once Annually Spawning of Rainbow Trout Females (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Estay, Francisco; Colihueque, Nelson; Araneda, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the gonadosomatic index (GSI), oocyte growth (OG), gonadal histology, and plasma level concentrations of sex hormones (estradiol-17β (E2) and vitellogenin (V)) of twice-spawning (T-SP) and once-spawning (O-SP) females of rainbow trout throughout the additional and the normal reproductive cycle, respectively. In T-SP, the GSI values rapidly increase from May to November, in contrast to O-SP, which showed low and constant GSI values (1.19 to 14.5 and 1.19 to 0.63, resp.). T-SP exhibited a marked increase of OG in the same period, reaching a maximum diameter of 4,900 ± 141.42 μm, in contrast to O-SP, which presented a slow OG. The gonadal histology of T-SP agreed with the general pattern of ovogenesis observed for O-SP (vitellogenesis, ovulation, and recrudescence); however, this process was nonsynchronous between the two breeder groups. Plasma steroid levels showed significant variation during oogenesis, which agreed with the GSI, OG, and gonadal histology patterns. The level of E2 increased to a maximum value of 26.2 ng/mL and 36.0 ng/mL in O-SP and T-SP, respectively, one or two months before the spawning event where vitellogenesis was fully active. The V concentrations followed a pattern similar to those of E2. PMID:23213308

  6. The Role of Ovarian Sex Steroids in Metabolic Homeostasis, Obesity, and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obese postmenopausal women have an increased risk of breast cancer and are likely to have a worse prognosis than nonobese postmenopausal women. The cessation of ovarian function after menopause results in withdrawal of ovarian sex steroid hormones, estrogen, and progesterone. Accumulating evidence suggests that the withdrawal of estrogen and progesterone causes homeostasis imbalances, including decreases in insulin sensitivity and leptin secretion and changes in glucose and lipid metabolism, resulting in a total reduction in energy expenditure. Together with a decrease in physical activity and consumption of a high fat diet, these factors significantly contribute to obesity in postmenopausal women. Obesity may contribute to breast cancer development through several mechanisms. Obesity causes localized inflammation, an increase in local estrogen production, and changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, obese women have a higher risk of insulin insensitivity, and an increase in insulin and other growth factor secretion. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the molecular actions of estrogen and progesterone and their contributions to cellular metabolism, obesity, inflammation, and postmenopausal breast cancer. We also discuss how modifications of estrogen and progesterone actions might be used as a therapeutic approach for obesity and postmenopausal breast cancer. PMID:25866757

  7. Examination on biological activities and fates of new steroids, steroid-17-yl methyl glycolate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Tada, H; Sato, E; Tojima, Y

    1999-02-01

    A variety of acyl derivatives based on the "antedrug" concept were synthesized to evaluate their biological activities, in vitro fate in human serum and examine pharmacokinetics in rats. Among the prepared compounds, acetyl and pivaloyl derivatives (8 and 9) showed strong to vasoconstrictive activity in human, exceeding that of dexamethasone. In rats, topical administration of the compound 8 significantly reduced oxazolone-induced ear edema compared to that of control. These activities were almost equal to that of prednisolone, however 9 did not show any suppression of the oxazolone-induced edema. The in vitro half-lives of 8 and 9 in human serum were 18.2 and 43.8 hours, respectively. Prednisolone and dexamethasone were extremely stable under the used conditions. When compound 8 was intravenously administrated to rats, its metabolites, 20(R)-methyl dexamethasonate (4) and carboxylic acid (18), were found in the systemic blood. The total body clearance of 8 was 1734 ml x hr(-1) x kg(-1), which was about 12 times larger than that of dexamethasone. On the other hand, 9 was found to be metabolized instantaneously to methyl prednisolonate (1) in systemic serum. Acetyl derivative 8 derived from dexamethasone may thus be useful as a topical steroid which offers the advantage of a low potential for systemic and local side effects. PMID:10228984

  8. Sex steroid levels in XY males and sex-reversed XX males, of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), during the reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, E; Josa, A; Gil, L; González, N

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the annual cycle of the gonadal steroids testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), 17β-oestradiol (E2) and 17α, 20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) was determined using radioimmunoassay and then compared, for XY males (n=35) and sex-reversed XX males (n=27) rainbow trout, to establish possible endocrinology differences. Both in XY males and sex-reversed XX males, significant correlation was shown between body weight and T (r=0.5046 and 0.34078, respectively; p<0.0001) or KT (r=0.52494 and 0.43545, respectively; p<0.0001) concentrations. Plasma androgen levels in XY and sex-reversed XX males were similar and showed an intense seasonal variation. The highest levels for T and 11-KT were detected from December to April with a peak in January (51.67 ± 5.11 and 61.95 ± 4.25 ng/ml, for XY males and 57.1 ± 5.82 and 59.27 ± 4.84 ng/ml, respectively, for XX males). In addition, there was a positive correlation (p<0.0001) between T and 11-KT levels for XY males (r=0.7533) and sex-reversed XX males (r=0.6019). Concentrations of DHP in XY males also showed seasonal variation with a peak in February (25.18 ± 12.99 ng/ml). However, DHP levels in sex-reversed XX males were undetectable (<0.1 ng/ml) over the year. Levels of E2 were undetectable through the year in both groups of trout. In conclusion, the androgenic and oestrogenic profiles of sex-reversed XX males were similar to those observed in XY males. The only difference in the annual gonadal steroid cycle between XY and sex-reversed XX males was in the DHP profile.

  9. Effects of developmental exposure to 2,2 ,4,4 ,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE-99) on sex steroids, sexual development, and sexually dimorphic behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Lilienthal, Hellmuth; Hack, Alfons; Roth-Härer, Astrid; Grande, Simone Wichert; Talsness, Chris E

    2006-02-01

    Increasing concentrations of polybrominated flame retardants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), in breast milk cause concern about possible developmental effects in nursed babies. Because previous studies in rats have indicated effects on sex steroids and sexually dimorphic behavior after maternal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), our goal in the present study was to determine if developmental exposure to 2,2 ,4,4 ,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE-99) induces similar endocrine-mediated effects. Pregnant rats were exposed to vehicle or PBDE-99 (1 or 10 mg/kg body weight, daily during gestational days 10-18). For comparison, we also included a group exposed to the technical PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 (30 mg/kg body weight, daily). PBDE exposure resulted in pronounced decreases in circulating sex steroids in male offspring at weaning and in adulthood. Female offspring were less affected. Anogenital distance was reduced in male offspring. Puberty onset was delayed in female offspring at the higher dose level, whereas a slight acceleration was detected in low-dose males. The number of primordial/primary ovarian follicles was reduced in females at the lower dose, whereas decline of secondary follicles was more pronounced at the higher dose. Sweet preference was dose-dependently increased in PBDE-exposed adult males, indicating a feminization of this sexually dimorphic behavior. Aroclor 1254 did not alter sweet preference and numbers of primordial/primary and secondary follicles but it did affect steroid concentrations in males and sexual development in both sexes. PBDE concentrations in tissues of dams and offspring were highest on gestational day 19. These results support the hypothesis that PBDEs are endocrine-active compounds and interfere with sexual development and sexually dimorphic behavior.

  10. Sexual Fate Reprogramming in the Steroid-Induced Bi-Directional Sex Change in the Protogynous Orange-Spotted Grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guan-Chung; Tey, Wei-Guan; Li, Hau-Wen; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Androgen administration has been widely used for masculinization in fish. The mechanism of the sex change in sexual fate regulation is not clear. Oral administration or pellet implantation was applied. We orally applied an aromatase inhibitor (AI, to decrease estrogen levels) and 17α-methyltestosterone (MT, to increase androgen levels) to induce masculinization to clarify the mechanism of the sex change in the protogynous orange-spotted grouper. After 3 mo of AI/MT administration, male characteristics were observed in the female-to-male sex change fish. These male characteristics included increased plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), decreased estradiol (E2) levels, increased male-related gene (dmrt1, sox9, and cyp11b2) expression, and decreased female-related gene (figla, foxl2, and cyp19a1a) expression. However, the reduced male characteristics and male-to-female sex change occurred after AI/MT-termination in the AI- and MT-induced maleness. Furthermore, the MT-induced oocyte-depleted follicle cells (from MT-implantation) had increased proliferating activity, and the sexual fate in a portion of female gonadal soma cells was altered to male function during the female-to-male sex change. In contrast, the gonadal soma cells were not proliferative during the early process of the male-to-female sex change. Additionally, the male gonadal soma cells did not alter to female function during the male-to-female sex change in the AI/MT-terminated fish. After MT termination in the male-to-female sex-changed fish, the differentiated male germ cells showed increased proliferating activities together with dormancy and did not show characteristics of both sexes in the early germ cells. In conclusion, these findings indicate for the first time in a single species that the mechanism involved in the replacement of soma cells is different between the female-to-male and male-to-female sex change processes in grouper. These results also demonstrate that sexual fate determination

  11. Sexual Fate Reprogramming in the Steroid-Induced Bi-Directional Sex Change in the Protogynous Orange-Spotted Grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guan-Chung; Tey, Wei-Guan; Li, Hau-Wen; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Androgen administration has been widely used for masculinization in fish. The mechanism of the sex change in sexual fate regulation is not clear. Oral administration or pellet implantation was applied. We orally applied an aromatase inhibitor (AI, to decrease estrogen levels) and 17α-methyltestosterone (MT, to increase androgen levels) to induce masculinization to clarify the mechanism of the sex change in the protogynous orange-spotted grouper. After 3 mo of AI/MT administration, male characteristics were observed in the female-to-male sex change fish. These male characteristics included increased plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), decreased estradiol (E2) levels, increased male-related gene (dmrt1, sox9, and cyp11b2) expression, and decreased female-related gene (figla, foxl2, and cyp19a1a) expression. However, the reduced male characteristics and male-to-female sex change occurred after AI/MT-termination in the AI- and MT-induced maleness. Furthermore, the MT-induced oocyte-depleted follicle cells (from MT-implantation) had increased proliferating activity, and the sexual fate in a portion of female gonadal soma cells was altered to male function during the female-to-male sex change. In contrast, the gonadal soma cells were not proliferative during the early process of the male-to-female sex change. Additionally, the male gonadal soma cells did not alter to female function during the male-to-female sex change in the AI/MT-terminated fish. After MT termination in the male-to-female sex-changed fish, the differentiated male germ cells showed increased proliferating activities together with dormancy and did not show characteristics of both sexes in the early germ cells. In conclusion, these findings indicate for the first time in a single species that the mechanism involved in the replacement of soma cells is different between the female-to-male and male-to-female sex change processes in grouper. These results also demonstrate that sexual fate determination

  12. Sexual Fate Reprogramming in the Steroid-Induced Bi-Directional Sex Change in the Protogynous Orange-Spotted Grouper, Epinephelus coioides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guan-Chung; Tey, Wei-Guan; Li, Hau-Wen; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Androgen administration has been widely used for masculinization in fish. The mechanism of the sex change in sexual fate regulation is not clear. Oral administration or pellet implantation was applied. We orally applied an aromatase inhibitor (AI, to decrease estrogen levels) and 17α-methyltestosterone (MT, to increase androgen levels) to induce masculinization to clarify the mechanism of the sex change in the protogynous orange-spotted grouper. After 3 mo of AI/MT administration, male characteristics were observed in the female-to-male sex change fish. These male characteristics included increased plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), decreased estradiol (E2) levels, increased male-related gene (dmrt1, sox9, and cyp11b2) expression, and decreased female-related gene (figla, foxl2, and cyp19a1a) expression. However, the reduced male characteristics and male-to-female sex change occurred after AI/MT-termination in the AI- and MT-induced maleness. Furthermore, the MT-induced oocyte-depleted follicle cells (from MT-implantation) had increased proliferating activity, and the sexual fate in a portion of female gonadal soma cells was altered to male function during the female-to-male sex change. In contrast, the gonadal soma cells were not proliferative during the early process of the male-to-female sex change. Additionally, the male gonadal soma cells did not alter to female function during the male-to-female sex change in the AI/MT-terminated fish. After MT termination in the male-to-female sex-changed fish, the differentiated male germ cells showed increased proliferating activities together with dormancy and did not show characteristics of both sexes in the early germ cells. In conclusion, these findings indicate for the first time in a single species that the mechanism involved in the replacement of soma cells is different between the female-to-male and male-to-female sex change processes in grouper. These results also demonstrate that sexual fate determination

  13. Non-genomic and genomic effects of steroids on neural activity.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B S

    1991-04-01

    Steroid hormones are recognized as producing their major long-term effects on cell structure and function via intracellular receptors acting on the expression of genes. There is now increasing evidence that steroids also affect the surface of cells and alter ion permeability, as well as release of neurohormones and neurotransmitters. Progesterone appears to be one of the most active of the steroids, and its naturally produced metabolites and some synthetic analogs show activities that are different from the parent steroid. Other steroids, such as estrogens and adrenal steroids and their naturally produced and synthetic analogs, also show membrane effects. Bruce McEwen reviews evidence that synergistic interactions occur between non-genomic and genomic actions of steroids.

  14. The influence of endogenous and exogenous sex hormones in adolescents with attention to oral contraceptives and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Lane, J R; Connor, J D

    1994-12-01

    The endogenous sex hormones produce dispositional changes in the developing child as well as imparting unique male and female dispositional patterns. Age-related changes have been observed for digoxin disposition and caffeine and theophylline metabolism. These age-related dispositional changes have led to age-dependent dosing recommendations. Studies with caffeine and antipyrine indicate that this change in drug disposition occurs over a short period of time, is seen earlier in girls than in boys, and is related to pubertal (Tanner) stage and the "growth spurt". Significant changes in endogenous sex hormone concentrations occur during the menstrual cycle and during pregnancy, leading to alterations in drug binding, distribution, and clearance. Oral contraceptives (OCs) inhibit the metabolism of certain drugs resulting in toxicity or lack of efficacy. Rifampin induces the OC metabolism, resulting in decreased clinical effectiveness. Most studies did not examine these kinetic and dynamic interactions between adult and adolescent users. It is estimated that there are over 45 anabolic steroid compounds available for abuse by athletes, and their use is increasing among male and female adolescents. Although the adolescent is at increased risk of developing adverse effects from these agents, a systematic evaluation of the long-term effects of anabolic steroid abuse has not been undertaken in this population. Further research is needed regarding the influence of endogenous and exogenous hormones on adolescent drug kinetics and dynamics. Because of their frequency of use among adolescents, OCs and anabolic steroids require particular emphasis.

  15. Association of serum inorganic phosphate with sex steroid hormones and vitamin D in a nationally representative sample of men.

    PubMed

    Wulaningsih, W; Van Hemelrijck, M; Michaelsson, K; Kanarek, N; Nelson, W G; Ix, J H; Platz, E A; Rohrmann, S

    2014-11-01

    Defects in bone regulatory pathways have been linked to chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease and cancer. In men, a link between bone metabolism and gonadal hormones has been suggested. However, to date, there is lack of evidence on the association between serum inorganic phosphate (Pi) and sex steroid hormones. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between Pi, sex steroid hormones and a known Pi metabolic regulator, vitamin D, in men in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III). From NHANES III, we selected 1412 men aged 20+ who participated in the morning session of Phase I (1988-1991) with serum measurements of Pi, sex hormones, and vitamin D. Multivariable linear regression was used to calculate crude and geometric mean Pi by total and estimated free testosterone and estradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, androstanediol glucuronide (AAG), and vitamin D. Similar analyses were performed while stratifying by race/ethnicity and vitamin D levels. We found a lack of statistically significant difference in geometric means of Pi across quintiles of concentrations of sex hormones, indicating a tight regulation of Pi. However, Pi levels were inversely associated with calculated free testosterone in non-Hispanic black men, with geometric mean levels of Pi of 1.16 and 1.02 ng/mL for those in the lowest and highest quintiles of free testosterone, respectively (p-trend < 0.05). A similar but weaker pattern was seen between total testosterone and Pi. An inverse association was also seen between AAG and Pi in men with vitamin D concentration below the median (<24.2 ng/mL). No associations were observed among men with vitamin D levels at or above the median. Our findings suggest a weak link among sex hormones, vitamin D, and Pi in men. The observed effects of race/ethnicity and vitamin D indicate a complex association involving various regulators of Pi homeostasis.

  16. Peripheral and central sex steroids have differential effects on the HPA axis of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Cheryl M; Linkroum, William; Sallinen, Bethany J; Miller, Nicholas W

    2002-12-01

    Sex differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function were examined in gonadectomized male and female rats given equivalent sex hormone replacement regimens either using subcutaneous silastic implants (Experiment 1) or cannula implants in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) (Experiment 2) containing either dihydrotestosterone (DHT), testosterone propionate (TP), estradiol benzoate (EB), or left empty (control). Plasma was obtained before and after 20 min of restraint stress to determine plasma ACTH, corticosterone, and CBG levels as measures of HPA function. Consistent with the literature, androgens decreased, and estrogen increased these measures of HPA function, although peripheral implants were more effective than MPOA implants. Gonadectomy and sex hormone treatment did not eliminate sex differences; overall, females had higher levels than males on measures of HPA function. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) indicated interactions of sex and sex hormone treatment on CBG levels and post-stress corticosterone levels in Expt. 1. The results suggest that sexual dimorphisms influence HPA function even when males and females are given equivalent physiological doses of gonadal steroids, and that the relevant sexual dimorphisms involve both the periphery and the CNS.

  17. Effect of steroids on the activation status of platelets in patients with Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).

    PubMed

    Bhoria, Preeti; Sharma, Saniya; Varma, Neelam; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash; Luthra-Guptasarma, Manni

    2015-01-01

    The activation status of platelets in Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients--which is still somewhat controversial--is of potential interest, because activated platelets tend to aggregate (leading to excessive clotting or thromboembolic events) but cannot do so when platelet numbers are low, as in ITP. Although corticosteroids are the first line of therapy in ITP, the effect of steroids on activation of platelets has not been evaluated so far. We examined the status of platelet activation (with and without stimulation with ADP) in ITP patients, at the start of therapy (pre-steroid treatment, naive) and post-steroid treatment (classified on the basis of steroid responsiveness). We used flow cytometry to evaluate the levels of expression of P-selectin, and PAC-1 binding to platelets of 55 ITP patients and a similar number of healthy controls, treated with and without ADP. We found that platelets in ITP patients exist in an activated state. In patients who are responsive to steroids, the treatment reverses this situation. Also, the fold activation of platelets upon treatment with ADP is more in healthy controls than in ITP patients; treatment with steroids causes platelets in steroid-responsive patients to become more responsive to ADP-activation, similar to healthy controls. Thus steroids may cause changes in the ability of platelets to get activated with an agonist like ADP. Our results provide new insights into how, and why, steroid therapy helps in the treatment of ITP.

  18. Hepatic Overexpression of Steroid Sulfatase Ameliorates Mouse Models of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes through Sex-specific Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mengxi; He, Jinhan; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Meishu; O'Doherty, Robert M.; Selcer, Kyle W.; Xie, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The steroid sulfatase (STS)-mediated desulfation is a critical metabolic mechanism that regulates the chemical and functional homeostasis of endogenous and exogenous molecules. In this report, we first showed that the liver expression of Sts was induced in both the high fat diet (HFD) and ob/ob models of obesity and type 2 diabetes and during the fed to fasting transition. In defining the functional relevance of STS induction in metabolic disease, we showed that overexpression of STS in the liver of transgenic mice alleviated HFD and ob/ob models of obesity and type 2 diabetes, including reduced body weight, improved insulin sensitivity, and decreased hepatic steatosis and inflammation. Interestingly, STS exerted its metabolic benefit through sex-specific mechanisms. In female mice, STS may have increased hepatic estrogen activity by converting biologically inactive estrogen sulfates to active estrogens and consequently improved the metabolic functions, whereas ovariectomy abolished this protective effect. In contrast, the metabolic benefit of STS in males may have been accounted for by the male-specific decrease of inflammation in white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle as well as a pattern of skeletal muscle gene expression that favors energy expenditure. The metabolic benefit in male STS transgenic mice was retained after castration. Treatment with the STS substrate estrone sulfate also improved metabolic functions in both the HFD and ob/ob models. Our results have uncovered a novel function of STS in energy metabolism and type 2 diabetes. Liver-specific STS induction or estrogen/estrogen sulfate delivery may represent a novel approach to manage metabolic syndrome. PMID:24497646

  19. Steroid biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kamrath, Clemens; Wudy, Stefan A; Krone, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Accurate analysis of steroid hormones represents an essential part in the evaluation of a patient with disorders or differences in sex development. Analytical methods based on mass spectrometry (MS) have become the state-of-the-art methodology allowing for the most specific qualitative and quantitative determination of steroid hormones and their metabolites. Liquid chromatography linked with tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) allows for rapid as well as highly specific and sensitive targeted steroid hormone analysis of multiple analytes from a single sample. Urinary steroid profile analysis by gas chromatography (GC)-MS is a non-invasive diagnostic approach and provides qualitative and quantitative data on the global excretion of steroid hormone metabolites. GC-MS remains the most powerful discovery tool for defining inborn errors of steroidogenesis, whereas LC-MS/MS represents a highly sensitive and specific method for targeted steroid hormone analysis.

  20. Sources of variation in HPG axis reactivity and individually consistent elevation of sex steroids in a female songbird

    PubMed Central

    Rosvall, Kimberly A.; Burns, Christine M. Bergeon; Hahn, Thomas P.; Ketterson, Ellen D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding sources of individual differences in steroid hormone production has important implications for the evolution of reproductive and social behaviors. In females in particular, little is known about the mechanistic sources of these individual differences, despite established linkages between sex steroids and a variety of fitness-related traits. Using captive female dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) from two subspecies, we asked how variation in different components of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis related to variation in testosterone production among females, and we compared females to males in multiple components of the HPG axis. We demonstrated consistent individual differences in testosterone elevation in response to challenges with luteinizing hormone (LH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). These hormone challenges led to more LH production but less testosterone production in females than males, and the sexes differed in some but not all measures of sensitivity to hormones along the HPG axis. Similar to findings in males, variation in testosterone production among females was not related to variation in LH production, gonadal LH-receptor mRNA abundance, or hypothalamic abundance of androgen receptor mRNA or aromatase mRNA. Rather, the primary source of individual variation in circulating steroids appears to the gonad, a conclusion further supported by positive correlations between testosterone and estradiol production. Unlike males, females did not differ by subspecies in any of the endocrine parameters that we assessed, suggesting some degree of independent evolution between the two sexes. Our results highlight the sources of physiological variation that may underlie the evolution of hormone-mediated phenotypes in females. PMID:24090613

  1. Sex steroids as pheromones in mammals: the exceptional role of estradiol.

    PubMed

    deCatanzaro, Denys

    2015-02-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue (Chemosignals and Reproduction). Whether from endogenous or exogenous sources, 17β-estradiol (E2) has very powerful influences over mammalian female reproductive physiology and behavior. Given its highly lipophilic nature and low molecular mass, E2 readily enters excretions and can be absorbed from exogenous sources via nasal, cutaneous, and other modes of exposure. Indeed, systemic injection of tritiated estradiol ((3)H-E2) into a male mouse or bat has been shown to produce significant levels of radioactivity in the reproductive tissues and brain of cohabiting female conspecifics. Bioactive E2 and other steroids are naturally found in male mouse urine and other excretions, and males actively direct their urine at proximate females. Very low doses of E2 can mimic the Bruce effect (disruption of peri-implantation pregnancy by novel males), the Vandenbergh effect (early reproductive maturation induced by novel males), and male-induced estrus and ovulation. Males' capacities to induce the Bruce and Vandenbergh effects can both be diminished by manipulations that reduce their urinary E2. Uterine dynamics during the Bruce and Vandenbergh effects are consistent with the actions of E2. Collectively, these data demonstrate a critical role of male-sourced E2 in these major mammalian pheromonal effects.

  2. Symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculation of the photoelectron spectra of famous biological active steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abyar, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2014-11-01

    The photoelectron spectra of some famous steroids, important in biology, were calculated in the gas phase. The selected steroids were 5α-androstane-3,11,17-trione, 4-androstane-3,11,17-trione, cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, dexamethasone, estradiol and cholesterol. The calculations were performed employing symmetry-adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method using the 6-311++G(2df,pd) basis set. The population ratios of conformers of each steroid were calculated and used for simulating the photoelectron spectrum of steroid. It was found that more than one conformer contribute to the photoelectron spectra of some steroids. To confirm the calculated photoelectron spectra, they compared with their corresponding experimental spectra. There were no experimental gas phase Hesbnd I photoelectron spectra for some of the steroids of this work in the literature and their calculated spectra can show a part of intrinsic characteristics of this molecules in the gas phase. The canonical molecular orbitals involved in the ionization of each steroid were calculated at the HF/6-311++g(d,p) level of theory. The spectral bands of each steroid were assigned by natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations. Knowing the electronic structures of steroids helps us to understand their biological activities and find which sites of steroid become active when a modification is performing under a biological pathway.

  3. Comparing sex steroid levels during the annual cycles of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) diploid female (XX) and triploid female (XXX) genotypic sex.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, E; Josa, A; Gil, L; Malo, C; Mitjana, O

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the annual cycle of the gonadal steroids testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α, 20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) was determined using radioimmunoassay and then compared for two populations of rainbow trout, XX diploid females (n = 40) and XXX triploid females (n = 15). In females, E2 and DHP levels were found to be significantly related to body weight (r = 0.22513; p < 0.0001 and r = 0.15831; p > 0.001, respectively). In this group, E2 concentrations peaked in November (25.05 ng/ml), while maximum DHP levels, only measurable from October to April, were attained in February (64.14 ng/ml). No significant differences in hormone ranges related to egg output ability were observed. Finally, sex steroid concentrations were low in the triploid female XXX fish compared to the female XX population. Nevertheless, maximum T (33.85 ng/ml) and 11-KT (32.35 ng/ml) levels were recorded in January, for XXX. The levels for these two hormones are relatively high and are also significantly associated (r = 0.8430; p < 0.0001). Diploid females showed significantly higher levels of E2 than triploids over the 12-month study period. The female triploid fish produced the lowest steroid hormone levels, such that these would be the most suitable for human consumption.

  4. Role of sex steroids and their receptors in human preterm infants: Impacts on future treatment strategies for cerebral development.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Stephanie; Reich, Bettina; Heckmann, Matthias

    2015-12-15

    Preterm birth is a major risk factor for cerebral complications, such as hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia, which lead to lifelong neurodevelopmental deficits. Hypoxia/ischemia, inflammation, hyperoxia, and prematurity itself contribute to the extent of impaired neurodevelopment. Preterm birth leads to disruption of the placental supply of estrogens and progesterone. Postnatally, the plasma levels of estrogens and progesterone drop 100-fold. Preterm infants are deprived of the placental supply of these hormones for up to sixteen weeks. Thus, supplementation of estradiol and progesterone to mimic intrauterine conditions may potentially improve a premature infant́s extrauterine development and help protect the brain against neurological complications. However, preliminary clinical studies did not find improved outcomes except for a trend towards less cerebral palsy. The decrease in estrogen and progesterone concentrations is accompanied by persistent, high postnatal production of fetal zone steroids, mainly dehydroepiandrosterone, which serve as precursors for maternal estrogen synthesis during pregnancy. This commentary will combine knowledge from endocrinology, pharmacology, and neonatology to explain the discrepancies between promising animal models and clinical findings. Most important targets will be classical and non-classical estrogen receptors, which interact differently-not only with estrogens but also with fetal zone steroids. The fetal zone is unique among humans and higher primates. Therefore, a clearly defined model is required to study the role of sex steroids and their receptors before further clinical studies begin. PMID:26300058

  5. Role of sex steroids and their receptors in human preterm infants: Impacts on future treatment strategies for cerebral development.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Stephanie; Reich, Bettina; Heckmann, Matthias

    2015-12-15

    Preterm birth is a major risk factor for cerebral complications, such as hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia, which lead to lifelong neurodevelopmental deficits. Hypoxia/ischemia, inflammation, hyperoxia, and prematurity itself contribute to the extent of impaired neurodevelopment. Preterm birth leads to disruption of the placental supply of estrogens and progesterone. Postnatally, the plasma levels of estrogens and progesterone drop 100-fold. Preterm infants are deprived of the placental supply of these hormones for up to sixteen weeks. Thus, supplementation of estradiol and progesterone to mimic intrauterine conditions may potentially improve a premature infant́s extrauterine development and help protect the brain against neurological complications. However, preliminary clinical studies did not find improved outcomes except for a trend towards less cerebral palsy. The decrease in estrogen and progesterone concentrations is accompanied by persistent, high postnatal production of fetal zone steroids, mainly dehydroepiandrosterone, which serve as precursors for maternal estrogen synthesis during pregnancy. This commentary will combine knowledge from endocrinology, pharmacology, and neonatology to explain the discrepancies between promising animal models and clinical findings. Most important targets will be classical and non-classical estrogen receptors, which interact differently-not only with estrogens but also with fetal zone steroids. The fetal zone is unique among humans and higher primates. Therefore, a clearly defined model is required to study the role of sex steroids and their receptors before further clinical studies begin.

  6. Retrospective evaluation of sex hormones and steroid hormone intermediates in dogs with alopecia.

    PubMed

    Frank, Linda A; Hnilica, Keith A; Rohrbach, Barton W; Oliver, Jack W

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there are specific steroid hormone aberrations associated with suspect endocrine alopecias in dogs in whom hypothyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism have been excluded. Steroid hormone panels submitted to the UTCVM endocrinology laboratory over a 7.5-year period (783 samples) from dogs with alopecia were reviewed. During this period, 276 dogs met the criteria for inclusion and were comprised of 54 different breeds. Approximately 73% of dogs had at least one baseline or post-ACTH stimulation steroid hormone intermediate greater than the normal range. The most frequent hormone elevation noted was for progesterone (57.6% of samples). When compared with normal dogs, oestradiol was significantly greater in Keeshond dogs and progesterone was significantly greater in Pomeranian and Siberian Husky dogs. Not all individual dogs had hormone abnormalities. Chow Chow, Samoyed and Malamute dogs had the greatest percentage of normal steroid hormone intermediates of the dogs in this study. Baseline cortisol concentrations were significantly correlated with progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) and androstenedione. Results of this study suggest that the pathomechanism of the alopecia, at least for some breeds, may not relate to steroid hormone intermediates and emphasizes the need for breed specific normals.

  7. Subchronic effects of cadmium on the gonads, expressions of steroid hormones and sex-related genes in tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongju; Shan, Dan; Zhong, Huan; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Wenzhi; Cao, Jinling; Guo, Zhongbao; Xiao, Jun; He, Fulin; Huang, Yifan; Li, Jian; Huang, Heming; Xu, Pao

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic heavy metals in aquatic ecosystem which affects fish health and aquaculture. In the present study, we examined the bioaccumulation of Cd in the gonads of tilapia via dissolved and dietary routes. We evaluated the subchronic effects of Cd on the histology of gonads, steroid hormone levels and sex-related gene expressions in tilapia. In addition, we also studied maternal transfer of Cd. Our results indicated that Cd was accumulated significantly in both ovary and testis from both exposure routes. Histopathological analysis showed that Cd induced ovary and testis injuries. Estradiol levels were significantly increased in dissolved Cd exposed female fish. In addition, the Cd exposure displayed different effects on gene expressions in gonads. In females, the estrogen receptor (ERα) was stimulated in dissolved Cd-exposed fish at 70.32 and 143.78 μg/L for 30 days and in fish at 143.78 μg/L for 60 days. Vitellogenin expression was significantly down-regulated in the ovary of dissolved Cd-exposed fish. In testis, GR expression was elevated after 60 days of dissolved Cd and dietary exposure. Furthermore, Cd level was significantly higher in the eggs than that in the fry. Our results demonstrated that both dissolved and dietary Cd exposures affected gonad development by altering steroid hormone levels and sex-related gene expressions in tilapia. PMID:26471182

  8. Correlation between steroid sex hormones, egg laying capacity and cercarial shedding in Biomphalaria alexandrina snails after treatment with Haplophyllum tuberculatum.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Maha Z; Metwally, Nadia S; Hamed, Manal A; Mohamed, Azza M

    2012-10-01

    Schistosomiasis is considered the second most pre-valiant worldwide parasitic disease ranked next to malaria. It has significant economic and public health consequences in many developing countries. Several ways have been practiced in order to bring the disease under an adequate control through the breakage of the life cycle of the parasite. Snail control could be regarded as a rapid and efficient of reducing or eliminating transmission and remains among the methods of choice for schistosomiasis control. The aim of this work is to evaluate the role of Haplophyllum tuberculatum (family Rutaceae) as a plant molluscicide. The mortality rate of Biomphalaria alexandrina snails were monitored after treatment with three extracts of the plant aerial parts; petroleum ether, chloroform and ethanol. Chloroform extract that recorded the most potent effect was further evaluated through measuring the toxicity pattern against B. alexandrina snails, egg laying capacity, cercarial shedding, phenol oxidase enzyme and the levels of steroid sex hormones. Histopathological examination of hepatopancreas and ovotestis of treated snails were also done for result confirmation. Treatment of snails by chloroform extract recorded reduction in egg laying capacity, decrease in cercarial shedding, diminution in phenol oxidase enzyme, disturbance in steroid sex hormones and sever alternation of the histopathological picture of snails tissue. In conclusion, H. tuberculatum recorded molluscicidal potency against B. alexandrina snails. Further studies are needed for its environmental applications. PMID:22771439

  9. Correlation of sex steroid and gonadotropin levels with body mass index in underweight and overweight female patients.

    PubMed

    Chikvaidze, N; Khristesashvili, J; Gegechkori, M

    2014-11-01

    Both extreme underweight or overweight negatively affects reproductive health, but evidence is inconsistent in terms of mechanisms by which low or high BMI causes reproductive problems. The aim of our study was to investigate associations of sex steroids and gonadotropins with BMI in underweight and overweight patients since childhood. In this study 48 underweight and 55 overweight/obese females underwent full clinical-hormonal analyses. Polycystic ovarian syndrome and metabolic syndrome was the most frequent in overweight and obese patients, whilst non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia and ovarian dysfunction prevailed in underweight patients (P=.000). FSH (P=.013) and SHBG (P=.000) levels were higher in patients with low BMI, whilst FT (p=.019) and TT (p=.003) levels were higher in high BMI patients. No difference was found in terms of AMH (P>.05). BMI negatively correlated with FSH (P=.009) and SHBG (P=.001) and positively correlated with FT (P=.001) and TT (P=.002). So sex steroid and gonadotropin levels are determined by particular reproductive disorders, which are associated to childhood BMI and progression of BMI changes.

  10. Effects of estradiol-17β implantation on ovarian growth, sex steroid levels and vitellogenin proxies in previtellogenic sturgeon Huso huso.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Sobhan R; Falahatkar, Bahram; Gilani, Mohammad H Tolouei; Lokman, P Mark

    2015-06-01

    Sexual development in female great sturgeon (Huso huso) is arrested at the previtellogenic stage for many years. The present study investigated the effects of different levels of estradiol-17β (E2) on gonadal development, levels of sex steroids and proxies of vitellogenin in 3-year-old cultured previtellogenic great sturgeon. Fish were intraperitoneally implanted every 1.5 months over a 6-month period from January to July with capsules filled with 0, 3, 6 or 12 mg E2/kg body mass as control, low, mid and high experimental groups, respectively. Blood sampling was performed at the start of experimentation and 3 weeks after each implantation for quantification of sex steroid levels and of vitellogenin-associated variables (triacylglycerol, cholesterol, calcium, phosphorus). Gonad biopsy samples were taken at the beginning and the end of the experiment in order to determine the gonad stage and oocyte morphometrical measures were taken to evaluate treatment effects. E2 implants produced a significant elevation in serum concentrations of E2, calcium, triacylglycerol, cholesterol and phosphorus. A rapid significant decrease was observed in serum testosterone levels in a dose-independent manner, so that the highest testosterone concentrations were observed in control fish throughout the experiment. There were no significant differences in oocyte stage or morphometric end points among the treated fish. We conclude that E2 implants do not stimulate ovarian growth, and hence, E2 implants alone are insufficient to reducing the time until onset of sexual maturation in previtellogenic great sturgeon.

  11. Effects of estradiol-17β implantation on ovarian growth, sex steroid levels and vitellogenin proxies in previtellogenic sturgeon Huso huso.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Sobhan R; Falahatkar, Bahram; Gilani, Mohammad H Tolouei; Lokman, P Mark

    2015-06-01

    Sexual development in female great sturgeon (Huso huso) is arrested at the previtellogenic stage for many years. The present study investigated the effects of different levels of estradiol-17β (E2) on gonadal development, levels of sex steroids and proxies of vitellogenin in 3-year-old cultured previtellogenic great sturgeon. Fish were intraperitoneally implanted every 1.5 months over a 6-month period from January to July with capsules filled with 0, 3, 6 or 12 mg E2/kg body mass as control, low, mid and high experimental groups, respectively. Blood sampling was performed at the start of experimentation and 3 weeks after each implantation for quantification of sex steroid levels and of vitellogenin-associated variables (triacylglycerol, cholesterol, calcium, phosphorus). Gonad biopsy samples were taken at the beginning and the end of the experiment in order to determine the gonad stage and oocyte morphometrical measures were taken to evaluate treatment effects. E2 implants produced a significant elevation in serum concentrations of E2, calcium, triacylglycerol, cholesterol and phosphorus. A rapid significant decrease was observed in serum testosterone levels in a dose-independent manner, so that the highest testosterone concentrations were observed in control fish throughout the experiment. There were no significant differences in oocyte stage or morphometric end points among the treated fish. We conclude that E2 implants do not stimulate ovarian growth, and hence, E2 implants alone are insufficient to reducing the time until onset of sexual maturation in previtellogenic great sturgeon. PMID:25724452

  12. Relationships of sex steroid hormone levels in benign and cancerous breast tissue and blood: A critical appraisal of current science.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Frank Z; Mathews, Brett W; Sherman, Mark E

    2015-07-01

    A systematic review of the literature on sex steroid measurement in breast tissue identified only 19 articles meeting the following criteria: menopausal status given; steroids measured in tissue homogenates by conventional RIA with a purification step or by mass spectrometry; and values reported per g tissue or per g protein. Twelve articles were analyzed in detail for: ratios of sex steroid hormone levels in cancerous or benign tissues to blood levels, stratified by menopausal status; ratios between the different hormone levels within tissues or within blood; and difference in these ratios between tissue and blood compartments. Estrogen and androgen concentrations varied greatly in benign and cancerous tissues and in blood between individuals. Postmenopausal, but not premenopausal, estradiol concentrations were significantly higher in cancerous compared to benign breast tissue. The estradiol/estrone ratio was lowest in premenopausal benign tissue, and substantially higher in premenopausal cancerous tissue and postmenopausal benign and cancerous tissues. Estradiol and estrone levels were considerably higher in tissue than in plasma in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Androgen levels were generally higher in the benign than the cancerous tissue, and tissue androgen levels were higher than in plasma, suggesting in situ aromatization of androgens to estrogens in breast cancer tissue. Limited available data on levels of hydroxylated estrogens in breast tissue compared to corresponding levels in plasma or urine were reviewed, but due to the paucity of studies no conclusions can presently be drawn regarding the relationship of the 2-hydroxyestrone:16α-hydroxyestrone ratio to breast cancer risk and genotoxic effects of 4-hydroxylated estrogens. Finally, data on hormone levels in breast adipose tissue were analyzed; high levels of androstenedione and testosterone and significant estrone and estradiol levels in breast adipocytes from postmenopausal breast

  13. Steroidal Saponins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, N. P.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. B.; Mandal, D.

    The medicinal activities of plants are generally due to the secondary metabolites (1) which often occur as glycosides of steroids, terpenoids, phenols etc. Saponins are a group of naturally occurring plant glycosides, characterized by their strong foam-forming properties in aqueous solution. The cardiac glycosides also possess this, property but are classified separately because of their specific biological activity. Unlike the cardiac glycosides, saponins generally do not affect the heart. These are classified as steroid or triterpenoid saponins depending on the nature of the aglycone. Steroidal glycosides are naturally occurring sugar conjugates of C27 steroidal compounds. The aglycone of a steroid saponin is usually a spirostanol or a furostanol. The glycone parts of these compounds are mostly oligosaccharides, arranged either in a linear or branched fashion, attached to hydroxyl groups through an acetal linkage (2, 3). Another class of saponins, the basic steroid saponins, contain nitrogen analogues of steroid sapogenins as aglycones.

  14. Effects of male and female sex steroids on the development of normal and the transient Froriep's dorsal root ganglia of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiali; Chen, Dawei; Goldstein, Ronald S; Cui, Sheng

    2005-03-22

    Sex steroids can influence developmental processes and support the survival of neurons in the embryonic central nervous system. Recent studies have shown that estrogen receptors are also expressed in the peripheral nervous system, in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of chick embryos. However, no studies have examined the effects of sex steroids on development of embryonic DRG. In the present study, 0.2 microg, 1.0 microg, 5.0 microg 10 microg, 20 microg, 25 microg, and 40 microg doses of testosterone or estradiol were delivered to chick embryos at Hamburger and Hamilton stage 18 (E3). The actions of these doses of sex steroids on the development of the C5DRG (fifth cervical ganglion, a "normal" DRG) and C2DRG (a transient ganglion known as a "Froriep's DRG") were then evaluated by quantifying ganglionic volumes, cell number, proliferation, and apoptosis after 1 day of growth to stage 23. We found that both testosterone and estradiol promoted proliferation of cells in both normal DRG and the Froriep's ganglia. By contrast, estradiol significantly increased the number of apoptotic cells, while testosterone strongly inhibited apoptosis. These actions of sex steroids on DRG development were dose-dependent, and C5DRG and C2DRG showed different sensitivities to the applied sex steroids. In addition, the present results demonstrated that specific ER and AR inhibitors (tamoxifen and flutamide) did not influence the effects of 5 microg E2 and 5 microg T on C2 and C5DRG significantly. These results demonstrate that male and female sex steroids can modulate DRG development through an epigenetic mechanism, as had been shown for the central nervous system.

  15. Assessment of spermatogenesis and plasma sex steroids in a seasonal breeding teleost: a comparative study in an area of influence of a tributary, downstream from a hydroelectric power dam, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Fabricio F T; Thomé, Ralph G; Arantes, Fabio P; Castro, Antonio Carlos S; Sato, Yoshimi; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2012-12-01

    River damming and building of hydroelectric power plants interrupt the reproductive migration routes and change the major physicochemical parameters of water quality, with drastic consequences for populations of migratory fishes. The goal of this study was to evaluate proliferation and cell death during spermatogenesis and serum profiles of sex steroids in Prochilodus argenteus, from the São Francisco River, downstream from the Três Marias Dam. A total of 257 adult males were caught quarterly during a reproductive cycle in two sites: the first 34 km of the river after the dam (site 1) and the second 34-54 km after the dam (site 2), after the confluence with a tributary, the Abaeté River. Seasonal changes in the testicular activity associated with morphometric analyses of germ cells as well as proliferation and testicular apoptosis support a more active spermatogenesis in fish from site 2, where higher levels of sex steroids and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were also found. In site 1, fish presented low serum levels of testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone and a low GSI during gonadal maturation. Spermatogonial proliferation (PCNA) and apoptosis (TUNEL) were more elevated in fish from site 1, but spermatocytes were mainly labelled in fish from site 2. Overall, these data demonstrate changes in testicular activity and plasma sex steroids in a neotropical teleost fish living downstream from a hydroelectric dam, supplying new data on fish reproduction in regulated rivers. Moreover, morphometric analyses associated with sex steroids profiles provide reliable tools to assess fish spermatogenesis under environmental stress conditions. PMID:22688450

  16. Assessment of spermatogenesis and plasma sex steroids in a seasonal breeding teleost: a comparative study in an area of influence of a tributary, downstream from a hydroelectric power dam, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Fabricio F T; Thomé, Ralph G; Arantes, Fabio P; Castro, Antonio Carlos S; Sato, Yoshimi; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2012-12-01

    River damming and building of hydroelectric power plants interrupt the reproductive migration routes and change the major physicochemical parameters of water quality, with drastic consequences for populations of migratory fishes. The goal of this study was to evaluate proliferation and cell death during spermatogenesis and serum profiles of sex steroids in Prochilodus argenteus, from the São Francisco River, downstream from the Três Marias Dam. A total of 257 adult males were caught quarterly during a reproductive cycle in two sites: the first 34 km of the river after the dam (site 1) and the second 34-54 km after the dam (site 2), after the confluence with a tributary, the Abaeté River. Seasonal changes in the testicular activity associated with morphometric analyses of germ cells as well as proliferation and testicular apoptosis support a more active spermatogenesis in fish from site 2, where higher levels of sex steroids and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were also found. In site 1, fish presented low serum levels of testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone and a low GSI during gonadal maturation. Spermatogonial proliferation (PCNA) and apoptosis (TUNEL) were more elevated in fish from site 1, but spermatocytes were mainly labelled in fish from site 2. Overall, these data demonstrate changes in testicular activity and plasma sex steroids in a neotropical teleost fish living downstream from a hydroelectric dam, supplying new data on fish reproduction in regulated rivers. Moreover, morphometric analyses associated with sex steroids profiles provide reliable tools to assess fish spermatogenesis under environmental stress conditions.

  17. Do mollusks use vertebrate sex steroids as reproductive hormones? Part I: Critical appraisal of the evidence for the presence, biosynthesis and uptake of steroids.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexander P

    2012-11-01

    The consensus view is that vertebrate-type steroids are present in mollusks and perform hormonal roles which are similar to those that they play in vertebrates. Although vertebrate steroids can be measured in molluscan tissues, a key question is 'Are they formed endogenously or they are picked up from their environment?'. The present review concludes that there is no convincing evidence for biosynthesis of vertebrate steroids by mollusks. Furthermore, the 'mollusk' genome does not contain the genes for key enzymes that are necessary to transform cholesterol in progressive steps into vertebrate-type steroids; nor does the mollusk genome contain genes for functioning classical nuclear steroid receptors. On the other hand, there is very strong evidence that mollusks are able to absorb vertebrate steroids from the environment; and are able to store some of them (by conjugating them to fatty acids) for weeks to months. It is notable that the three steroids that have been proposed as functional hormones in mollusks (i.e. progesterone, testosterone and 17β-estradiol) are the same as those of humans. Since humans (and indeed all vertebrates) continuously excrete steroids not just via urine and feces, but via their body surface (and, in fish, via the gills), it is impossible to rule out contamination as the sole reason for the presence of vertebrate steroids in mollusks (even in animals kept under supposedly 'clean laboratory conditions'). Essentially, the presence of vertebrate steroids in mollusks cannot be taken as reliable evidence of either endogenous biosynthesis or of an endocrine role.

  18. Sex-steroid and thyroid hormone concentrations in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from contaminated and reference lakes in Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grain, D.A.; Guillette, L.J.; Pickford, D.B.; Percival, H.F.; Woodward, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sex-steroid and thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth and reproduction in all vertebrates, and several recent studies suggest that environmental chemicals can alter circulating concentrations of these hormones. This study examines plasma concentrations of estradiol-171?? (E2), testosterone (T), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) in juvenile alligators (60-140 cm total length) from two contaminated lakes and one reference lake in Florida. First, the data were analyzed by comparing hormone concentrations among males and females from the different lakes. Whereas there were no differences in plasma E2 concentrations among animals of the three lakes, male alligators from the contaminated lakes (Lake Apopka and Lake Okeechobee) had significantly lower plasma T concentrations compared 10 males from the reference take (Lake Woodruff). Concentrations of thyroid hormones also differed in animals of the three lakes, with T4 concentrations being elevated in Lake Okeechobee males compared to Lake Woodruff males. Second, the relationship between body size and hormone concentration was examined using regression analysis. Most notably for steroid hormones, no clear relationship was detected between E2 and total length in Apopka females (r2 0.09, p = 0.54) or between T and total length in Apopka males (r2 = 0.007, p = 0.75). Females from Apopka (r2 = 0.318, p = 0.09) and Okeechobee (r2 = 0.222, p = 0.09) exhibited weak correlations between T3 and total length. Males from Apopka (r2 = 0.015, p = 0.66) and Okeechobee (r2 = 0.128, p = 0.19) showed no correlation between T4 and total length. These results indicate: some of the previously reported abnormalities in steroid hormones of hatchling alligators persist, at least, through the juvenile years; steroid and thyroid hormones are related to body size in juvenile alligators from the reference lake, whereas alligators living in lakes Apopka and Okeechobee experience alterations in circulating thyroid and steroid

  19. Effects of GH and/or sex steroid administration on abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat in healthy aged women and men.

    PubMed

    Münzer, T; Harman, S M; Hees, P; Shapiro, E; Christmas, C; Bellantoni, M F; Stevens, T E; O'Connor, K G; Pabst, K M; St Clair, C; Sorkin, J D; Blackman, M R

    2001-08-01

    Aging is associated with reduced GH, IGF-I, and sex steroid axis activity and with increased abdominal fat. We employed a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, noncross-over design to study the effects of 6 months of administration of GH alone (20 microg/kg BW), sex hormone alone (hormone replacement therapy in women, testosterone enanthate in men), or GH + sex hormone on total abdominal area, abdominal sc fat, and visceral fat in 110 healthy women (n = 46) and men (n = 64), 65-88 yr old (mean, 72 yr). GH administration increased IGF-I levels in women (P = 0.05) and men (P = 0.0001), with the increment in IGF-I levels being higher in men (P = 0.05). Sex steroid administration increased levels of estrogen and testosterone in women and men, respectively (P = 0.05). In women, neither GH, hormone replacement therapy, nor GH + hormone replacement therapy altered total abdominal area, sc fat, or visceral fat significantly. In contrast, in men, administration of GH and GH + testosterone enanthate decreased total abdominal area by 3.9% and 3.8%, respectively, within group and vs. placebo (P = 0.05). Within-group comparisons revealed that sc fat decreased by 10% (P = 0.01) after GH, and by 14% (P = 0.0005) after GH + testosterone enanthate. Compared with placebo, sc fat decreased by 14% (P = 0.05) after GH, by 7% (P = 0.05) after testosterone enanthate, and by 16% (P = 0.0005) after GH + testosterone enanthate. Compared with placebo, visceral fat did not decrease significantly after administration of GH, testosterone enanthate, or GH + testosterone enanthate. These data suggest that in healthy older individuals, GH and/or sex hormone administration elicits a sexually dimorphic response on sc abdominal fat. The generally proportionate reductions we observed in sc and visceral fat, after 6 months of GH administration in healthy aged men, contrast with the disproportionate reduction of visceral fat reported after a similar period of GH treatment of nonelderly GH

  20. Sex differences in feeding behavior in rats: the relationship with neuronal activation in the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Hiroko; Fujioka, Hitomi; Kimura, Fukuko; Akema, Tatsuo; Funabashi, Toshiya

    2015-01-01

    There is general agreement that the central nervous system in rodents differs between sexes due to the presence of gonadal steroid hormone during differentiation. Sex differences in feeding seem to occur among species, and responses to fasting (i.e., starvation), gonadal steroids (i.e., testosterone and estradiol), and diet (i.e., western-style diet) vary significantly between sexes. The hypothalamus is the center for controlling feeding behavior. We examined the activation of feeding-related peptides in neurons in the hypothalamus. Phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a good marker for neural activation, as is the Fos antigen. Therefore, we predicted that sex differences in the activity of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons would be associated with feeding behavior. We determined the response of MCH neurons to glucose in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and our results suggested MCH neurons play an important role in sex differences in feeding behavior. In addition, fasting increased the number of orexin neurons harboring phosphorylated CREB in female rats (regardless of the estrous day), but not male rats. Glucose injection decreased the number of these neurons with phosphorylated CREB in fasted female rats. Finally, under normal spontaneous food intake, MCH neurons, but not orexin neurons, expressed phosphorylated CREB. These sex differences in response to fasting and glucose, as well as under normal conditions, suggest a vulnerability to metabolic challenges in females. PMID:25870535

  1. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity of Steroidal Thiosemicarbazone Platinum (Pt(II)) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmin; Kong, Erbin; Gan, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiping; Lin, Qifu; Cui, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal compounds exhibit particular physiological activities. In this paper, some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes were synthesized by the condensation of steroidal ketones with thiosemicarbazide using estrone, chenodeoxycholic acid, and 7-deoxycholic acid as starting materials and complexation of steroidal thiosesemicarbazones with Pt(II). The complexes were characterized by IR, NMR, and MS, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated. The results showed that some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes displayed moderate cytotoxicity to HeLa and Bel-7404 cells. Thereinto, complex 6 showed an excellent inhibited selectivity to HeLa cells with an IC50 value of 9.2 μM and SI value of 21.7. At the same time, all compounds were almost inactive to HEK293T (normal kidney epithelial cells). The information obtained from the studies may be useful for the design of novel chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26635511

  2. Sexual Dimorphisms of Adrenal Steroids, Sex Hormones, and Immunological Biomarkers and Possible Risk Factors for Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Rehman, Azeem A.; Jorgenson, Laura C.; Smith, Jennifer M.; Aldag, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity and immunological biomarkers are believed to be interrelated with sex hormones and other neuroendocrine factors. Sexual dimorphism mechanisms may be operating in certain rheumatic and inflammatory diseases which occur more frequently in women than men, as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Less data have been available on altered interrelations of the combined neuroendocrine and immune (NEI) systems as risk factors for development of certain diseases. In this study, serological interrelations of NEI biomarkers are analyzed before symptomatic onset of RA (pre-RA) versus control (CN) subjects, stratified by sex. Sexual dimorphism was found in serum levels of acute serum amyloid A (ASAA), soluble interleukin-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2Rα), and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNF-R1). Multiple steroidal and hormonal (neuroendocrine) factors also showed highly (p < 0.001) significant sexual dimorphism in their assayed values, but less for cortisol (p = 0.012), and not for 17-hydroxyprogesterone (p = 0.176). After stratification by sex and risk of developing RA, differential NEI correlational patterns were observed in the interplay of the NEI systems between the pre-RA and CN groups, which deserve further investigation. PMID:26693225

  3. Sexual Dimorphisms of Adrenal Steroids, Sex Hormones, and Immunological Biomarkers and Possible Risk Factors for Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Masi, Alfonse T; Rehman, Azeem A; Jorgenson, Laura C; Smith, Jennifer M; Aldag, Jean C

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity and immunological biomarkers are believed to be interrelated with sex hormones and other neuroendocrine factors. Sexual dimorphism mechanisms may be operating in certain rheumatic and inflammatory diseases which occur more frequently in women than men, as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Less data have been available on altered interrelations of the combined neuroendocrine and immune (NEI) systems as risk factors for development of certain diseases. In this study, serological interrelations of NEI biomarkers are analyzed before symptomatic onset of RA (pre-RA) versus control (CN) subjects, stratified by sex. Sexual dimorphism was found in serum levels of acute serum amyloid A (ASAA), soluble interleukin-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2Rα), and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNF-R1). Multiple steroidal and hormonal (neuroendocrine) factors also showed highly (p < 0.001) significant sexual dimorphism in their assayed values, but less for cortisol (p = 0.012), and not for 17-hydroxyprogesterone (p = 0.176). After stratification by sex and risk of developing RA, differential NEI correlational patterns were observed in the interplay of the NEI systems between the pre-RA and CN groups, which deserve further investigation. PMID:26693225

  4. [Diurnal dynamics of thyroid and sex steroid hormones in the blood of yearlings of the resident form of Black Sea trout Salmo trutta labrax].

    PubMed

    Ganzha, E V; Pavlov, E D; Kostin, V V; Pavlov, D S

    2015-01-01

    The diurnal dynamics of the content of thyroid and sex steroid hormones is investigated in the blood of the resident form of Black Sea trout in summer. The maximums and minimums of concentration of the investigated hormones do not coincide over 24 h, except for the decrease in the level of T3 and testosterone before dawn. The dynamics of the investigated hormones is controlled to a high extent by the sex of fish in the morning and in the daytime.

  5. Pattern of sex steroids secretion and their relationship with embryo yield in Jersey cows superovulated with PMSG.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, A; Anwar, M; Ullah, N; Baig, S M; Wright, R W

    1991-03-01

    The levels of progesterone and estrogen secretion were studied in relationship to the superovulatory response in Jersey cows. Progesterone and estrogen concentrations were measured in superovulated Jersey cows with the objective of correlating the patterns of steroid secretion with embryo yield and quality. Pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) was used in combination with prostaglandin F(2) alpha analogue to induce superovulation in 18 multiparous, cyclic cows. Serum progesterone and estradiol levels from cows which exhibited estrus within 24 to 48 h after prostaglandin administration (n=13) were used to estimate the superovulatory response. Sex steroid concentrations at the day of estrus (Day 0) was a strong indicator of embryo yield. Progesterone was negatively (r=-0.56) and estrogen positively (r=0.80) correlated to the number of embryos collected. Dramatic increase in progesterone from Day 0 to Day 7 was a significant indicator of embryo yield. A higher rise of estrogen in the follicular phase was an indicator of a larger number of growing follicles and, consequently, better superovulatory response. Nonresponding animals did not show any significant change in the hormonal profile from the day of PMSG treatment to the day of embryo collection. The estimation of progesterone and estradiol concentrations, simultaneously, gave a more objective prediction of embryo yield.

  6. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT--7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory.

  7. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L.; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT-7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory. PMID:23792034

  8. Annual changes in plasma levels of cortisol and sex steroid hormones in male rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ya-Yi; Han, Xiao-Dong; Suzuki, Yuzuru

    2001-09-01

    The profiles of cortisol, testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and 17α, 20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3-one in male rainbow trout reared under constant water temperature and natural photoperiod were determined by radioimmunoassay. Gonads of male rainbow trout reached maturity when the fish were two years old. Changes in the plasma levels of both sex steroid hormones and cortisol were closely related to the GSI. Plasma levels of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and 17α; 20β-dihydroxy 4-pregnene-3-one showed a clear peak in the annual breeding season, when the GSI reached their maxima. Plasma cortisol levels also showed clearly seasonal changes in both two- and three-year-old fish. The results suggest that the elevated plasma levels of cortisol may not just be due to stresses during the breeding season but have certain physiological functions in the reproduction of rainbow trout.

  9. Sex steroid hormones matter for learning and memory: estrogenic regulation of hippocampal function in male and female rodents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekyoon; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Fortress, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    Ample evidence has demonstrated that sex steroid hormones, such as the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2), affect hippocampal morphology, plasticity, and memory in male and female rodents. Yet relatively few investigators who work with male subjects consider the effects of these hormones on learning and memory. This review describes the effects of E2 on hippocampal spinogenesis, neurogenesis, physiology, and memory, with particular attention paid to the effects of E2 in male rodents. The estrogen receptors, cell-signaling pathways, and epigenetic processes necessary for E2 to enhance memory in female rodents are also discussed in detail. Finally, practical considerations for working with female rodents are described for those investigators thinking of adding females to their experimental designs. PMID:26286657

  10. Synthesis and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of polyhydroxylated sulfated steroids: structure/activity studies.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Victoria; Murray, Ana P; Maier, Marta S

    2013-11-01

    Disulfated and trisulfated steroids have been synthesized from cholesterol and their acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity has been evaluated. In our studies we have found that the activity was not only dependent on the location of the sulfate groups but on their configurations. 2β,3α,6α-trihydroxy-5α-cholestan-6-one trisulfate (18) was the most active steroid with an IC50 value of 15.48 μM comparable to that of 2β,3α-dihydroxy-5α-cholestan-6-one disulfate (1). Both compounds were found to be less active than the reference compound eserine. The butyrylcholinesterase activity of 1 and 18 was one magnitude lower than that against acetylcholinesterase revealing a selective inhibitor profile.

  11. Side effects of anabolic androgenic steroids: pathological findings and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Andreas; Thieme, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Side effects of anabolic steroids with relevance in forensic medicine are mainly due to life-threatening health risks with potential fatal outcome and cases of uncertain limitations of criminal liability after steroid administration. Both problems are typically associated with long-term abuse and excessive overdose of anabolic steroids. Side effects may be due to direct genomic or nongenomic activities (myotrophic, hepatotoxic), can result from down-regulation of endogenous biosynthesis (antiandrogenic) or be indirect consequence of steroid biotransformation (estrogenic).Logically, there are no systematic clinical studies available and the number of causally determined fatalities is fairly limited. The following compilation reviews typical abundant observations in cases where nonnatural deaths (mostly liver failure and sudden cardiac death) were concurrent with steroid abuse. Moreover, frequent associations between structural characteristics and typical side effects are summarized.

  12. Activated p38 MAPK in Peripheral Blood Monocytes of Steroid Resistant Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-bo; Leung, Donald Y. M.; Goleva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Steroid resistance is a significant problem in management of chronic inflammatory diseases, including asthma. Accessible biomarkers are needed to identify steroid resistant patients to optimize their treatment. This study examined corticosteroid resistance in severe asthma. 24 asthmatics with forced expiratory volume in one second of less then 80% predicted were classified as steroid resistant or steroid sensitive based on changes in their lung function following a week of treatment with oral prednisone. Heparinised blood was collected from patients prior to oral prednisone administration. Phosphorylated mitogen activated kinases (MAPK) (extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and jun kinase (JNK)) were analyzed in whole blood samples using flow cytometry. Activation of phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1) in asthmatics’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were confirmed by Western blot. Dexamethasone suppression of the LPS-induced IL-8 mRNA production by steroid resistant asthmatics PBMC in the presence of p38 and ERK inhibitors was evaluated by real time PCR. Flow cytometry analysis identified significantly stronger p38 phosphorylation in CD14+ monocytes from steroid resistant than steroid sensitive asthmatics (p = 0.014), whereas no difference was found in phosphorylation of ERK or JNK in CD14+ cells from these two groups of asthmatics. No difference in phosphorylated p38, ERK, JNK was detected in CD4+, CD8+ T cells, B cells and NK cells from steroid resistant vs. steroid sensitive asthmatics. P38 MAPK pathway activation was confirmed by Western blot, as significantly higher phospho-p38 and phospho-MSK1 levels were detected in the PBMC lysates from steroid resistant asthmatics. P38 inhibitor significantly enhanced DEX suppression of LPS-induced IL-8 mRNA by PBMC of steroid resistant asthmatics. This is the first report demonstrating selective p38 MAPK pathway activation in blood monocytes of steroid

  13. Theory of partial agonist activity of steroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Carson C.; Ong, Karen M.; Kagan, Benjamin; Simons, S. Stoney

    2015-01-01

    The different amounts of residual partial agonist activity (PAA) of antisteroids under assorted conditions have long been useful in clinical applications but remain largely unexplained. Not only does a given antagonist often afford unequal induction for multiple genes in the same cell but also the activity of the same antisteroid with the same gene changes with variations in concentration of numerous cofactors. Using glucocorticoid receptors as a model system, we have recently succeeded in constructing from first principles a theory that accurately describes how cofactors can modulate the ability of agonist steroids to regulate both gene induction and gene repression. We now extend this framework to the actions of antisteroids in gene induction. The theory shows why changes in PAA cannot be explained simply by differences in ligand affinity for receptor and requires action at a second step or site in the overall sequence of reactions. The theory also provides a method for locating the position of this second site, relative to a concentration limited step (CLS), which is a previously identified step in glucocorticoid-regulated transactivation that always occurs at the same position in the overall sequence of events of gene induction. Finally, the theory predicts that classes of antagonist ligands may be grouped on the basis of their maximal PAA with excess added cofactor and that the members of each class differ by how they act at the same step in the overall gene induction process. Thus, this theory now makes it possible to predict how different cofactors modulate antisteroid PAA, which should be invaluable in developing more selective antagonists. PMID:25984562

  14. Plasma gonadotropin II, sex steroids, and thyroid hormones in wild striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during spermiation and final oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, C C; Scott, A P; Zohar, Y

    1997-11-01

    The blood levels of gonadotropin II (GtH II), sex-steroid hormones, and thyroid hormones were determined in wild spermiating male striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in males and in females at various stages of final oocyte maturation (FOM), captured on their spawning grounds. The progression of spermiation was associated with increases in plasma GtH II and decreases in plasma testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone, and thyroxine (T4). Plasma triiodothyronine (T3) remained at high and relatively unchanged levels. Plasma levels of 17,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20beta-P) and 17,20beta, 21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20beta,21-P), the proposed maturation-inducing steroids (MIS) in striped bass, were low and unchanged during the same period. It was concluded that low progestogen levels are adequate to induce spermiation in striped bass, and that higher levels may be associated with spawning behavior. In the females, based on the profiles of the studied hormones, FOM was separated into two phases. Early FOM, which included germinal vesicle (GV) migration and lipid-droplet coalescence, was associated with elevations in plasma GtH II, T, and estradiol 17beta. Late FOM, which included GV breakdown and yolk-globule coalescence, was associated with a further surge in plasma GtH II, increases in the levels of the two MIS, mainly 17, 20beta-P, and a drop in T4. Plasma T3 levels did not change during FOM. Examination of conjugated steroids demonstrated, in the males, a reduction in conjugated androgens at the peak of the spawning season and, in the females, a small increase in conjugated 17, 20beta-dihydroxylated and 5beta-reduced,3alpha-hydroxylated steroids after spawning. This is the most comprehensive report, to date, on the endocrine regulation of gonadal maturation in wild striped bass, demonstrating that a two-stage process of FOM is regulated by different endocrine signals, providing further evidence for the involvement of 17,20beta-P as a MIS in the females

  15. Steroid osteopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients receiving steroids or having disease processes which increase natural steroid production often demonstrate ''the classic x-ray changes'' of avascular necrosis of bone. Bone scintigraphy in these patients most frequently demonstrates an increased radionuclide localization. The literature suggests that the increased activity is related to healing of the avascular process. In a recent study of Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD), 37 of the children had multiple studies and increased activity within the epiphysis during revascularization was extremely rare. Not only are the scintigraphic findings in steroid osteopathy dissimilar to that in healing LCPD, but the time interval for healing is much to short for that of a vascular necrosis and no patients demonstrated an avascular phase on bone scintigraphy. Of 15 children with renal transplants on steroid therapy, 9 demonstrated x-ray and clinical findings of osteopathy. In 8 of 9 instances, bone scintigraphy showed increased localization of radionuclide in the affected bone. Improvement or a return to normal occurred in those patients in whom steroids were discontinued. The following is a proposed mechanism for steroid osteopathy. Steroids affect the osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity of bone and weaken its internal structure. Ordinary stress produces microtrabecular fractures. Fractures characteristically stimulate reactive hyperemia and increase bone metabolism. The result is increased bone radiopharmaceutical localization. The importance of recognizing this concept is that steroid osteopathy is preventable by reducing the administered steroid dose. As opposed to avascular necrosis, bone changes are reversible.

  16. Androgenic-anabolic activities of some new synthesized steroidal pyrane, pyridine and thiopyrimidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Mohamed M; Amr, Abd El-Galil E; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Hussain, Azza A; Amer, Mohamed S

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our previous work, fused steroidal derivatives with pyrane, pyridine, pyrimidine moieties were synthesized and evaluated as androgenic-anabolic agents. Some of the newly synthesized compounds are exhibited pronounced androgenic-anabolic activities.

  17. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of a family of steroids acutely controlling steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Midzak, Andrew; Rammouz, Georges; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2012-11-01

    Steroids metabolically derive from lipid cholesterol, and vertebrate steroids additionally derive from the steroid pregnenolone. Pregnenolone is derived from cholesterol by hydrolytic cleavage of the aliphatic tail by mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP11A1, located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Delivery of cholesterol to CYP11A1 comprises the principal control step of steroidogenesis, and requires a series of proteins spanning the mitochondrial double membranes. A critical member of this cholesterol translocation machinery is the integral outer mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (18kDa, TSPO), a high-affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding protein. The cholesterol-binding site of TSPO consists of a phylogenetically conserved cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC). Previous studies from our group identified 5-androsten-3β,17,19-triol (19-Atriol) as drug ligand for the TSPO CRAC motif inhibiting cholesterol binding to CRAC domain and steroidogenesis. To further understand 19-Atriol's mechanism of action as well as the molecular recognition by the TSPO CRAC motif, we undertook structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of the 19-Atriol molecule with a variety of substituted steroids oxygenated at positions around the steroid backbone. We found that in addition to steroids hydroxylated at carbon C19, hydroxylations at C4, C7, and C11 contributed to inhibition of cAMP-mediated steroidogenesis in a minimal steroidogenic cell model. However, only substituted steroids with C19 hydroxylations exhibited specificity to TSPO, its CRAC motif, and mitochondrial cholesterol transport, as the C4, C7, and C11 hydroxylated steroids inhibited the metabolic transformation of cholesterol by CYP11A1. We thus provide new insights into structure-activity relationships of steroids inhibiting mitochondrial cholesterol transport and steroidogenic cholesterol metabolic enzymes.

  18. Effects of prenatal treatment with antiandrogens on luteinizing hormone secretion and sex steroid concentrations in adult spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta.

    PubMed

    Place, Ned J; Holekamp, Kay E; Sisk, Cheryl L; Weldele, Mary L; Coscia, Elizabeth M; Drea, Christine M; Glickman, Stephen E

    2002-11-01

    Prenatal androgen treatment can alter LH secretion in female offspring, often with adverse effects on ovulatory function. However, female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta), renowned for their highly masculinized genitalia, are naturally exposed to high androgen levels in utero. To determine whether LH secretion in spotted hyenas is affected by prenatal androgens, we treated pregnant hyenas with antiandrogens (flutamide and finasteride). Later, adult offspring of the antiandrogen-treated (AA) mothers underwent a GnRH challenge to identify sex differences in the LH response and to assess the effects of prenatal antiandrogen treatment. We further considered the effects of blocking prenatal androgens on plasma sex steroid concentrations. To account for potential differences in the reproductive state of females, we suppressed endogenous hormone levels with a long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRHa) and then measured plasma androgens after an hCG challenge. Plasma concentrations of LH were sexually dimorphic in spotted hyenas, with females displaying higher levels than males. Prenatal antiandrogen treatment also significantly altered the LH response to GnRH. Plasma estradiol concentration was higher in AA-females, whereas testosterone and androstenedione levels tended to be lower. This trend toward lower androgen levels disappeared after GnRHa suppression and hCG challenge. In males, prenatal antiandrogen treatment had long-lasting effects on circulating androgens: AA-males had lower T levels than control males. The sex differences and effects of prenatal antiandrogens on LH secretion suggest that the anterior pituitary gland of the female spotted hyena is partially masculinized by the high androgen levels that normally occur during development, without adverse effects on ovulatory function.

  19. Identification and transcriptional modulation of the largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, vitellogenin receptor during oocyte development by insulin and sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Gustavo A; Quattro, Joseph M; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Prucha, Melinda S; Porak, Wesley F; Grier, Harry J; Sabo-Attwood, Tara L

    2012-09-01

    Fish vitellogenin synthesized and released from the liver of oviparous animals is taken up into oocytes by the vitellogenin receptor. This is an essential process in providing nutrient yolk to developing embryos to ensure successful reproduction. Here we disclose the full length vtgr cDNA sequence for largemouth bass (LMB) that reveals greater than 90% sequence homology with other fish vtgr sequences. We classify LMB Vtgr as a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily based on conserved domains and categorize as the short variant that is devoid of the O-glycan segment. Phylogenetic analysis places LMB Vtgr sequence into a well-supported monophyletic group of fish Vtgr. Real-time PCR showed that the greatest levels of LMB vtgr mRNA expression occurred in previtellogenic ovarian tissues. In addition, we reveal the effects of insulin, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in modulation of vtgr, esr, and ar mRNAs in previtellogenic oocytes. Insulin increased vtgr expression levels in follicles ex vivo while exposure to E(2) or 11-KT did not result in modulation of expression. However, both steroids were able to repress insulin-induced vtgr transcript levels. Coexposure with insulin and E(2) or of insulin and 11-KT increased ovarian esr2b and ar mRNA levels, respectively, which suggest a role for these nuclear receptors in insulin-mediated signaling pathways. These data provide the first evidence for the ordered stage-specific expression of LMB vtgr during the normal reproductive process and the hormonal influence of insulin and sex steroids on controlling vtgr transcript levels in ovarian tissues. PMID:22786822

  20. Identification and transcriptional modulation of the largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, vitellogenin receptor during oocyte development by insulin and sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Gustavo A; Quattro, Joseph M; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Prucha, Melinda S; Porak, Wesley F; Grier, Harry J; Sabo-Attwood, Tara L

    2012-09-01

    Fish vitellogenin synthesized and released from the liver of oviparous animals is taken up into oocytes by the vitellogenin receptor. This is an essential process in providing nutrient yolk to developing embryos to ensure successful reproduction. Here we disclose the full length vtgr cDNA sequence for largemouth bass (LMB) that reveals greater than 90% sequence homology with other fish vtgr sequences. We classify LMB Vtgr as a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily based on conserved domains and categorize as the short variant that is devoid of the O-glycan segment. Phylogenetic analysis places LMB Vtgr sequence into a well-supported monophyletic group of fish Vtgr. Real-time PCR showed that the greatest levels of LMB vtgr mRNA expression occurred in previtellogenic ovarian tissues. In addition, we reveal the effects of insulin, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in modulation of vtgr, esr, and ar mRNAs in previtellogenic oocytes. Insulin increased vtgr expression levels in follicles ex vivo while exposure to E(2) or 11-KT did not result in modulation of expression. However, both steroids were able to repress insulin-induced vtgr transcript levels. Coexposure with insulin and E(2) or of insulin and 11-KT increased ovarian esr2b and ar mRNA levels, respectively, which suggest a role for these nuclear receptors in insulin-mediated signaling pathways. These data provide the first evidence for the ordered stage-specific expression of LMB vtgr during the normal reproductive process and the hormonal influence of insulin and sex steroids on controlling vtgr transcript levels in ovarian tissues.

  1. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Drew, Sally A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goals of this study were to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR and ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR and ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH.

  2. Effect of obesity and fertility status on sex steroid levels in men.

    PubMed

    Jarow, J P; Kirkland, J; Koritnik, D R; Cefalu, W T

    1993-08-01

    Endocrine studies were performed on fertile and infertile obese men and compared with fertile and infertile nonobese men in order to determine the independent and codependent effects of obesity and fertility status on the male hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. The obese infertile group exhibited significant endocrinologic changes as compared with fertile nonobese control group which was not observed in any of the other three groups. Serum testosterone was significantly lower. The testosterone/estradiol ratio was significantly lower despite a lack of significant change in serum estradiol levels. Serum steroid hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was significantly lower which correlated with elevated bioavailability of both testosterone and estradiol in the obese infertile group. Serum luteinizing hormone levels were no different, suggesting that free testosterone levels were unchanged. Obese infertile men exhibit endocrinologic changes that are not observed in men with either obesity or infertility alone. Reduction of serum SHBG, total testosterone, and testosterone/estradiol ratio appear to be a marker of infertility among obese men.

  3. Suppression of sex behavior by kappa opiates and stress steroids occurs via independent neuroendocrine pathways.

    PubMed

    Lombana, Karla; Middleton, Natalie; Coddington, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and their receptors are found throughout the brain of all vertebrates. By virtue of their wide distribution, endocannabinoids have the potential to affect many behaviors. Prior research has shown that cannabinoids inhibit courtship-clasping and mediate behavioral responses to stress in male rough-skinned newts, Taricha granulosa, and cannabinoid signaling is initiated by rapid actions of the steroid corticosterone (CORT) at its specific membrane receptor (mCR). This same mCR also recognizes κ-opioid receptor agonists and antagonists. Prior behavioral studies show that κ-opioid agonists suppress clasping behavior in a dose dependent manner. Combined, these studies suggest that κ-opioid agonists might suppress clasping behavior via the same pathway initiated by CORT: up-regulation of endocannabinoid signaling. We examined whether pretreatment with a CB1 antagonist, AM281, would block κ-opioid-mediated suppression of clasping. We found that the CB1 antagonist did not reverse κ-opioid-induced suppression of clasping, revealing that while endocannabinoids mediate CORT-induced suppression of clasping, endocannabinoids do not mediate the κ-opioid-induced suppression of clasping.

  4. Steroid signaling system responds differently to temperature and hormone manipulation in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans), a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, M; Crews, D

    2007-01-01

    Many reptiles, including the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans), exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Temperature determines gonadal sex during the middle of embryogenesis, or the temperature-sensitive period (TSP), when gonadal sex is labile to both temperature and hormones--particularly estrogen. The biological actions of steroid hormones are mediated by their receptors as defined here as the classic transcriptional regulation of target genes. To elucidate estrogen action during sex determination, we examined estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1, hereafter referred to as ERalpha), estrogen receptor beta (Esr2, hereafter referred to as ERbeta), and androgen receptor (Ar, hereafter referred to as AR) expression in slider turtle gonads before, during and after the TSP, as well as following sex reversal via temperature or steroid hormone manipulation. ERalpha and AR levels spike at the female-producing temperature while ovarian sex is determined, but none of the receptors exhibited sexually dimorphic localization within the gonad prior to morphological differentiation. All three receptors respond differentially to sex-reversing treatments. When shifted to female-producing temperatures, embryos maintain ERalpha and AR expression while ERbeta is reduced. When shifted to male-producing temperatures, medullary expression of all three receptors is reduced. Feminization via estradiol (E(2)) treatment at a male-producing temperature profoundly changed the expression patterns for all three receptors. ERalpha and ERbeta redirected to the cortex in E(2)-created ovaries, while AR medullary expression was transiently reduced. Although warmer incubation temperature and estrogen result in the same endpoint (ovarian development), our results indicate different steroid signaling patterns between temperature- and estrogen-induced feminization.

  5. Sex- and age-specific effects of anabolic androgenic steroids on reproductive behaviors and on GABAergic transmission in neuroendocrine control regions.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ann S; Costine, Beth A; Jones, Brian L; Kelton-Rehkopf, Megan C; Meerts, Sarah H; Nutbrown-Greene, Lora L; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Yang, Paul; Henderson, Leslie P

    2006-12-18

    Illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has become a prevalent health concern not only among male professional athletes, but, disturbingly, among a growing number of women and adolescent girls. Despite the increasing use of AAS among women and adolescents, few studies have focused on the effects of these steroids in females, and female adolescent subjects are particularly underrepresented. Among the hallmarks of AAS abuse are changes in reproductive behaviors. Here, we discuss work from our laboratories on the actions of AAS on the onset of puberty and sexual behaviors in female rodents, AAS interactions and sex- and age-specific effects of these steroids on neural transmission mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors within forebrain neuroendocrine control regions that may underlie AAS-induced changes in these behaviors.

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase is activated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    King, Tanya S; Russe, Otto Quintus; Möser, Christine V; Ferreirós, Nerea; Kynast, Katharina L; Knothe, Claudia; Olbrich, Katrin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2015-09-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated in stages of increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decrease of inflammatory processes and inhibition of disease progression of diabetes and obesity. A recent study suggested that salicylate, the active metabolite of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) acetyl-salicylic acid (aspirin), is able to activate AMPK pharmacologically. This observation raised the question whether or not other NSAIDs might also act as AMPK activators and whether this action might contribute to their cyclooxygenase (COX)-independent anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated mouse and human neuronal cells and liver tissue of mice after treatment with various NSAIDs. Our results showed that the non-selective acidic NSAIDs ibuprofen and diclofenac induced AMPK activation similar to aspirin while the COX-2 selective drug etoricoxib and the non-opioid analgesic paracetamol, both drugs have no acidic structure, failed to activate AMPK. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK can be activated by specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as salicylic acid, ibuprofen or diclofenac possibly depending on the acidic structure of the drugs. AMPK might therefore contribute to their antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26049010

  7. Effects of steroids and sex reversal on intestinal absorption of L-(/sup 14/C)leucine in vivo, in rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri

    SciTech Connect

    Habibi, H.R.; Ince, B.W.

    1983-12-01

    The effects of steroids (17 alpha-methyltestosterone (MT), 17 beta-oestradiol (E2)), and of sex reversal (XX male) on intestinal absorption and accumulation of L-(/sup 14/C)leucine (5 mM), were investigated in unanaesthetized rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), using an in vivo gut perfusion technique. Each steroid was luminally perfused through the gut at a concentration of 50 micrograms/ml perfusate, during five separate perfusions carried out on the same fish at 30-min intervals (perfusion periods 1 to 5), for a total of 120 min at 14 degrees. Experiments were also conducted on masculinized, genetically female trout (XX male) with steroid-free perfusate. MT treatment significantly increased the intestinal absorption of radioleucine during periods 1 and 2, whilst E2 was without effect. Neither MT nor E2 influenced intestinal accumulation (mid- and hindgut) of radioleucine, and accumulation of /sup 14/C-solutes in skeletal muscle. Sex reversal, however, whilst having no effect on leucine absorption, nevertheless significantly increased intestinal accumulation of radioleucine, and accumulation of /sup 14/C-solutes in skeletal muscle. The effects observed in the present study are in agreement with previous work in trout using everted gut sac preparations. It is suggested that the growth-promoting effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids in fish may be partly explained by their action on gastrointestinal function.

  8. Seasonal and sex-related variations in serum steroid hormone levels in wild and farmed brown trout Salmo trutta L. in the north-west of Spain.

    PubMed

    Fregeneda-Grandes, Juan M; Hernández-Navarro, Salvador; Fernandez-Coppel, Ignacio A; Correa-Guimaraes, Adriana; Ruíz-Potosme, Norlan; Navas-Gracia, Luis M; Aller-Gancedo, J Miguel; Martín-Gil, Francisco J; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2013-12-01

    Serum steroid profiles were investigated in order to evaluate the potential use of circulating sex steroid levels as a tool for sex identification in brown trout. Changes in the serum concentrations of testosterone (T), progesterone (P), 17-β-estradiol (E2), and cortisol (F) in wild and farmed mature female and male brown trout, Salmo trutta L., were measured in each season (January, May, July, and October) in six rivers and four hatcheries located in the north-west of Spain. Serum cortisol levels in farmed brown trout were significantly higher and showed a seasonal pattern opposite to that found in wild trout. Because levels of the hormones under study can be affected by disruptive factors such as exposure to phytoestrogens (which alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis) and infection with Saprolegnia parasitica (which alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis), both factors are taken into account.

  9. Sex Steroids Effects on the Molting Process of the Helminth Human Parasite Trichinella spiralis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Bello, Romel; Ramirez-Nieto, Ricardo; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé; Nava-Castro, Karen; Pavón, Lenin; Sánchez-Acosta, Ana Gabriela; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro effects of estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone on the molting process, which is the initial and crucial step in the development of the muscular larvae (ML or L1) to adult worm. Testosterone had no significative effect on the molting rate of the parasite, however, progesterone decreased the molting rate about a 50% in a concentration- and time-independent pattern, while estradiol had a slight effect (10%). The gene expression of caveolin-1, a specific gene used as a marker of parasite development, showed that progesterone and estradiol downregulated its expression, while protein expression was unaffected. By using flow citometry, a possible protein that is recognized by a commercial antiprogesterone receptor antibody was detected. These findings may have strong implications in the host-parasite coevolution, in the sex-associated susceptibility to this infection and could point out to possibilities to use antihormones to inhibit parasite development. PMID:22162638

  10. Dicer1 Ablation in the Mouse Epididymis Causes Dedifferentiation of the Epithelium and Imbalance in Sex Steroid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Björkgren, Ida; Saastamoinen, Lauri; Krutskikh, Anton; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Poutanen, Matti; Sipilä, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Background The postnatal development of the epididymis is a complex process that results in a highly differentiated epithelium, divided into several segments. Recent studies indicate a role for RNA interference (RNAi) in the development of the epididymis, however, the actual requirement for RNAi has remained elusive. Here, we present the first evidence of a direct need for RNAi in the differentiation of the epididymal epithelium. Methodology/Principal Findings By utilizing the Cre-LoxP system we have generated a conditional knock-out of Dicer1 in the two most proximal segments of the mouse epididymis. Recombination of Dicer1, catalyzed by Defb41iCre/wt, took place before puberty, starting from 12 days postpartum. Shortly thereafter, downregulation of the expression of two genes specific for the most proximal epididymis (lipocalin 8 and cystatin 8) was observed. Following this, segment development continued until week 5 at which age the epithelium started to regress back to an undifferentiated state. The dedifferentiated epithelium also showed an increase in estrogen receptor 1 expression while the expression of androgen receptor and its target genes; glutathione peroxidase 5, lipocalin 5 and cysteine-rich secretory protein 1 was downregulated, indicating imbalanced sex steroid signaling. Conclusions/Significance At the time of the final epididymal development, Dicer1 acts as a regulator of signaling pathways essential for maintaining epithelial cell differentiation. PMID:22701646

  11. Cross-Sectional Associations between Body Size, Circulating Sex-Steroid Hormones and IGF Components among Healthy Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Lauren E; Miller, Erline E; Wang, Qiong; Li, Jia-Yuan; Liu, Li; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Smith, Jennifer S

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer has increased in Asian countries and rates of hormone receptor (HR) negative breast cancer exceed those of Western countries. Epidemiologic data suggest that the association between body size and BC risk may vary by HR status, and could differ geographically. While body size may influence BC risk by moderating the synthesis and metabolism of circulating sex-steroid hormones, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and related binding proteins, there is a dearth of literature among Asian women. We aimed to examine these specific associations in a sample of Chinese women. In Sichuan Province 143 women aged ≥40 years were recruited through outpatient services (2011-2012). Questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and blood samples were utilized for data collection and linear regression was applied in data analyses. Among women <50 years we observed a non-monotonic positive association between body mass index (BMI) and 17β-estradiol, and a reversed J-shaped association between BMI and IGF-1 (p ≤0.05). We observed similar associations between waist-to-hip ratio and these markers. Our finding of augmented IGF-1 among women with low body mass may have implications for understanding breast tumor heterogeneity in diverse populations and should be evaluated in larger prospective studies with cancer outcomes. PMID:26352264

  12. Urinary Sex Steroids and Anthropometric Markers of Puberty - A Novel Approach to Characterising Within-Person Changes of Puberty Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurmeet K. S.; Balzer, Ben W. R.; Kelly, Patrick J.; Paxton, Karen; Hawke, Catherine I.; Handelsman, David J.; Steinbeck, Katharine S.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The longitudinal relationships of within-individual hormone and anthropometric changes during puberty have not ever been fully described. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate that 3 monthly urine collection was feasible in young adolescents and to utilise liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay methods for serum and urine testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in adolescents by relating temporal changes in urine and serum hormones over 12 months to standard measures of pubertal development. Methods A community sample of 104 adolescents (57 female) was studied over 12 months with annual anthropometric assessment, blood sampling and self-rated Tanner staging and urine collected every 3 months. Serum and urine sex steroids (T, E2) were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and LH by immunoassay. Results A high proportion (92%) of scheduled samples were obtained with low attrition rate of 6.7% over the 12 months. Urine hormone measurements correlated cross-sectionally and longitudinally with age, anthropometry and Tanner stage. Conclusion We have developed a feasible and valid sampling methodology and measurements for puberty hormones in urine, which allows a sampling frequency by which individual pubertal progression in adolescents can be described in depth. PMID:26599397

  13. The association of smoking with clinical indicators of altered sex steroids--a study of 50,145 women.

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, A J; Kelber, S; Borkowf, H; Wild, R; Gillis, B L; Rimm, A A

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to test the association of smoking with four clinically apparent conditions that may be related to altered sex steroids: natural and induced menopause, infertility, oligomenorrhea, and hirsutism. Data were obtained from the personal inventories of 50,145 women ages 20-59 years in TOPS, a weight reduction program. The age-adjusted odds ratios of each condition for heavy smokers compared with nonsmokers were 1.59 for natural menopause, 1.49 for induced menopause, 1.35 for infertility, 1.30 for oligomenorrhea among women younger than 40 years, 1.63 for oligomenorrhea among women 40-49 years, and 1.54 for hirsutism (P less than .05 for oligomenorrhea and P less than .001 for all other risks). The odds ratios were not substantially changed after adjustment for obesity, parity, and husband's education level. These results suggest that smoking may affect the ovaries or hormone metabolism, or both, with medical and cosmetic consequences. PMID:3108939

  14. Modulatory effects of sex steroid hormones on brain-derived neurotrophic factor-tyrosine kinase B expression during adolescent development in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Hill, R A; Wu, Y W C; Kwek, P; van den Buuse, M

    2012-05-01

    Sex steroid hormones and neurotrophic factors are involved in pruning and shaping the adolescent brain and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental illness. We aimed to determine the association between altered levels of sex steroid hormones during adolescent development and neurotrophic signalling in the C57Bl/6 mouse. We first performed a week by week analysis from pre-pubescence to adulthood in male and female C57Bl/6 mice, measuring serum levels of testosterone and oestradiol in conjunction with western blot analysis of neurotrophin expression in the forebrain and hippocampal regions. Second, we manipulated adolescent sex steroid hormone levels by gonadectomy and hormone replacement at the pre-pubescent age of 5 weeks. Young-adult forebrain and hippocampal neurotrophin expression was then determined. Male mice showed significant changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the forebrain regions during weeks 7-10, which corresponded significantly with a surge in serum testosterone. Castration and testosterone or di-hydrotestosterone replacement experiments revealed an androgen receptor-dependent effect on BDNF-tyrosine kinase (Trk) B signalling in the forebrain and hippocampal regions during adolescence. Female mice showed changes in BDNF-TrkB signalling at a much earlier time point (weeks 4-8) in the forebrain and hippocampal regions and these did not correspond with changes in serum oestradiol. Ovariectomy actually increased BDNF expression but decreased TrkB phosphorylation in the forebrain regions. 17β-Oestradiol replacement had no effect, suggesting a role for other ovarian hormones in regulating BDNF-TrkB signalling in the adolescent female mouse brain. These results suggest the differential actions of sex steroid hormones in modulating BDNF-TrkB signalling during adolescence. These data provide insight into how the male and female brain changes in response to altered levels of

  15. Sex Steroid Replacement Therapy in Female Hypogonadism from Childhood to Young Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Norjavaara, Ensio; Ankarberg-Lindgren, Carina; Kriström, Berit

    2016-01-01

    The overall goal of pubertal sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in girls is not only about development of secondary sexual characteristics, but also to establish an adult endocrine and metabolic milieu, as well as adult cognitive function. Estradiol (E2) is the first choice for HRT compared to ethinyl estradiol (EE2). E2 is the most potent endogenous estrogen in the circulation, with established levels during spontaneous puberty. Transdermal E2, compared to oral administration, is the first choice to start pubertal HRT. Transdermal application avoids liver exposure to supraphysiologic estrogen concentrations and provides a more physiologic mechanism for hormone delivery. By cutting E2 matrix patches in doses of 0.05-0.07 µg/kg or administrate E2 gel in doses of 0.1 mg/day, serum concentrations of E2 seen in early spontaneous puberty can be obtained. Patches can be removed in the morning and thereby mimic the normal circadian rhythm. For those clinics with access to sensitive E2 determinations methods (extraction followed by radioimmunoassay or mass spectrometry) monitoring the attained E2 serum levels is recommended in order to optimally mimic the levels seen in early puberty as well as growth velocity, breast and uterus development. Mid- and late pubertal HRT is obtained by increased doses of E2, adding cyclic oral or transdermal progestin, as well as testosterone gel over the pubic area if indicated. PMID:26680580

  16. Steroid hormones augment nitric oxide synthase activity and expression in rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Ogando, D; Farina, M; Ribeiro, M L; Perez Martinez, S; Cella, M; Rettori, V; Franchi, A

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized in a variety of tissues, including rat uterus, from L-arginine by NO synthase (NOS), of which there are three isoforms, namely neuronal, endothelial and inducible NOS (nNOS, eNOS and iNOS, respectively). Nitric oxide is an important regulator of the biology and physiology of the organs of the reproductive system, including the uterus. Some studies have shown increased variation in NO production and NOS expression during the oestrous cycle. However, the factors that regulate NO production in the uterus remain unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of sex steroids on NOS expression and activity in the ovariectomized rat uterus. Ovariectomized rats received progesterone (4 mg per rat) or 17beta-oestradiol (1 microg per rat). All rats were killed 18 h after treatment. Both progesterone and oestradiol were able to augment NOS activity. The effect of oestradiol was abolished by pre-incubation with 500 micro M aminoguanidine, an iNOS inhibitor, or by coadministration of oestradiol with 3 mg kg(-1) dexamethasone, but the effect of progesterone was not affected by these treatments. Uterine nNOS, eNOS and iNOS protein levels were assessed using Western blots. Ovariectomized rat uteri expressed iNOS and eNOS. Progesterone increased the expression of eNOS and iNOS, whereas oestradiol increased iNOS expression only. These results suggest that oestradiol and progesterone are involved in the regulation of NOS expression and activity during pregnancy and implantation in the rat. PMID:14588184

  17. Circulating gonadotropins and ovarian adiponectin system are modulated by acupuncture independently of sex steroid or β-adrenergic action in a female hyperandrogenic rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maliqueo, Manuel; Benrick, Anna; Alvi, Asif; Johansson, Julia; Sun, Miao; Labrie, Fernand; Ohlsson, Claes; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2015-09-01

    Acupuncture with combined manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation, or electroacupuncture (EA), reduces endocrine and reproductive dysfunction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), likely by modulating sympathetic nerve activity or sex steroid synthesis. To test this hypothesis, we induced PCOS in rats by prepubertal implantation of continuous-release letrozole pellets (200 µg/day) or vehicle. Six weeks later, rats were treated for 5-6 weeks with low-frequency EA 5 days/week, subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (2.0 µg) every fourth day, or a β-adrenergic blocker (propranolol hydrochloride, 0.1 mg/kg) 5 days/week. Letrozole controls were handled without needle insertion or injected with sesame oil every fourth day. Estrous cyclicity, ovarian morphology, sex steroids, gonadotropins, insulin-like growth factor I, bone mineral density, and gene and protein expression in ovarian tissue were measured. Low-frequency EA induced estrous-cycle changes, decreased high levels of circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) and the LH/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ratio, decreased high ovarian gene expression of adiponectin receptor 2, and increased expression of adiponectin receptor 2 protein and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. EA also increased cortical bone mineral density. Propranolol decreased ovarian expression of Foxo3, Srd5a1, and Hif1a. Estradiol decreased circulating LH, induced estrous cycle changes, and decreased ovarian expression of Adipor1, Foxo3, and Pik3r1. Further, total bone mineral density was higher in the letrozole-estradiol group. Thus, EA modulates the circulating gonadotropin levels independently of sex steroids or β-adrenergic action and affects the expression of ovarian adiponectin system. PMID:25963796

  18. Circulating gonadotropins and ovarian adiponectin system are modulated by acupuncture independently of sex steroid or β-adrenergic action in a female hyperandrogenic rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maliqueo, Manuel; Benrick, Anna; Alvi, Asif; Johansson, Julia; Sun, Miao; Labrie, Fernand; Ohlsson, Claes; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2015-09-01

    Acupuncture with combined manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation, or electroacupuncture (EA), reduces endocrine and reproductive dysfunction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), likely by modulating sympathetic nerve activity or sex steroid synthesis. To test this hypothesis, we induced PCOS in rats by prepubertal implantation of continuous-release letrozole pellets (200 µg/day) or vehicle. Six weeks later, rats were treated for 5-6 weeks with low-frequency EA 5 days/week, subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (2.0 µg) every fourth day, or a β-adrenergic blocker (propranolol hydrochloride, 0.1 mg/kg) 5 days/week. Letrozole controls were handled without needle insertion or injected with sesame oil every fourth day. Estrous cyclicity, ovarian morphology, sex steroids, gonadotropins, insulin-like growth factor I, bone mineral density, and gene and protein expression in ovarian tissue were measured. Low-frequency EA induced estrous-cycle changes, decreased high levels of circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) and the LH/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ratio, decreased high ovarian gene expression of adiponectin receptor 2, and increased expression of adiponectin receptor 2 protein and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. EA also increased cortical bone mineral density. Propranolol decreased ovarian expression of Foxo3, Srd5a1, and Hif1a. Estradiol decreased circulating LH, induced estrous cycle changes, and decreased ovarian expression of Adipor1, Foxo3, and Pik3r1. Further, total bone mineral density was higher in the letrozole-estradiol group. Thus, EA modulates the circulating gonadotropin levels independently of sex steroids or β-adrenergic action and affects the expression of ovarian adiponectin system.

  19. Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor alters levels of key sex steroids and steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Craig, Zelieann R; Leslie, Traci C; Hatfield, Kimberly P; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A

    2010-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by decreasing antral follicle numbers and increasing follicular death. MXC is metabolized in the body to mono-hydroxy MXC (mono-OH). Little is known about the effects of mono-OH on the ovary. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that mono-OH exposure decreases production of 17β-estradiol (E₂) by cultured mouse antral follicles. Antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mice (age 35-39 days) and exposed to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or mono-OH (0.1-10 μg/mL) for 96 h. Media and follicles were collected for analysis of sex steroid levels and mRNA expression, respectively. Mono-OH treatment (10 μg/mL) decreased E(2) (DMSO: 3009.72±744.99 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 μg/mL: 1679.66±461.99 ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 1752.72±532.41 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 45.89±33.83 ng/mL), testosterone (DMSO: 15.43±2.86 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1μg/mL: 17.17±4.71 ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 13.64±3.53 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 1.29±0.23 ng/mL), androstenedione (DMSO: 1.92±0.34 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 μg/mL: 1.49±0.43ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 0.64±0.31 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 0.12±0.06 ng/mL) and progesterone (DMSO: 24.11±4.21 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1μg/mL: 26.77±4.41 ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 20.90±3.75 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 9.44±2.97 ng/mL) levels. Mono-OH did not alter expression of Star, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1 and Cyp1b1, but it did reduce levels of Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 mRNA. Collectively, these data suggest that mono-OH significantly decreases levels of key sex steroid hormones and the expression of enzymes required for steroidogenesis.

  20. Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor alters levels of key sex steroids and steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Zelieann R.; Leslie, Traci C.; Hatfield, Kimberly P.; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2010-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by decreasing antral follicle numbers and increasing follicular death. MXC is metabolized in the body to mono-hydroxy MXC (mono-OH). Little is known about the effects of mono-OH on the ovary. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that mono-OH exposure decreases production of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) by cultured mouse antral follicles. Antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mice (age 35-39 days) and exposed to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or mono-OH (0.1-10 {mu}g/mL) for 96 h. Media and follicles were collected for analysis of sex steroid levels and mRNA expression, respectively. Mono-OH treatment (10 {mu}g/mL) decreased E{sub 2} (DMSO: 3009.72 {+-} 744.99 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1679.66 {+-} 461.99 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 1752.72 {+-} 532.41 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 45.89 {+-} 33.83 ng/mL), testosterone (DMSO: 15.43 {+-} 2.86 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 17.17 {+-} 4.71 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 13.64 {+-} 3.53 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 1.29 {+-} 0.23 ng/mL), androstenedione (DMSO: 1.92 {+-} 0.34 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1.49 {+-} 0.43 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 0.64 {+-} 0.31 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 0.12 {+-} 0.06 ng/mL) and progesterone (DMSO: 24.11 {+-} 4.21 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 26.77 {+-} 4.41 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 20.90 {+-} 3.75 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 9.44 {+-} 2.97 ng/mL) levels. Mono-OH did not alter expression of Star, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1 and Cyp1b1, but it did reduce levels of Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 mRNA. Collectively, these data suggest that mono-OH significantly decreases levels of key sex steroid hormones and the expression of enzymes required for steroidogenesis.

  1. Serum Sex Steroid Levels and Longitudinal Changes in Bone Density in Relation to the Final Menstrual Period

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chi-Hong; Karlamangla, Arun S.; Finkelstein, Joel S.; Randolph, John F.; Thurston, Rebecca C.; Huang, Mei-Hua; Zheng, Huiyong; Greendale, Gail A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The associations of serum sex steroid and FSH levels with change of bone mineral density (BMD) across the complete menopausal transition are incompletely understood. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the associations of annual serum levels of FSH, estradiol (E2), T, and SHBG with the rates of bone loss in 3 phases: pretransmenopausal [baseline to 1 year before the final menstrual period (FMP)], transmenopausal (1 year before to 2 years after the FMP), later postmenopausal (≥ 2 years after the FMP). Design: The design of the study was a repeated-measures, mixed-effects regression. Setting: This was a community-based observational study, with a 10-year follow-up. Participants: A total of 720 participants of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Bone Study participated in the study. Outcome Measures: Annualized lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) BMD decline was measured. Results: The mean annual change in BMD was slowest in pretransmenopause (0.27%/year in FN) and fastest in transmenopause (2.16%/year in LS). In the pretransmenopausal phase, for every doubling of FSH level, LS BMD change was faster by −0.32%/year (P < .0001). In the transmenopausal phase, for every doubling of FSH level, LS BMD change was −0.35%/year faster (P < .0001); for every doubling of SHBG level, LS BMD change was −0.36%/year faster (P < .0001). In the later postmenopausal phase, for each doubling of the E2 level, the LS BMD change was slower by +0.26%/year (P = .049); for each SHBG doubling, the LS BMD change was 0.21%/year slower (P = .048). The FN associations were weaker and inconsistent. Conclusions: Higher E2 levels and lower FSH levels were associated with lower rates of LS bone loss in some but not all menopausal transition phases. PMID:23443812

  2. Effects of thermal regime on ovarian maturation and plasma sex steroids in farmed white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, M.A.H.; Van Eenennaam, J. P.; Feist, G.W.; Linares-Casenave, J.; Fitzpatrick, M.S.; Schreck, C.B.; Doroshov, S.I.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, commercial aquaculture farms in Northern California have exposed gravid, cultured white sturgeon females to cold water (12 ?? 1??C) throughout the late phase of vitellogenesis and ovarian follicle maturation resulting in improved ovulation rates and egg quality. However, the optimum timing for transfer of broodfish to the cold water and the capacity of transferred broodfish to maintain reproductive competence over an extended time in cold water had not been evaluated. Gravid white sturgeon females that have been raised at water temperatures of 16-20??C were transported to either cold water (12 ?? 1??C; Group 1) in November 1997 or maintained in ambient water temperatures (10-19??C; Group 2) until early spring. In March 1998, half of the fish in Group 2 had regressed ovaries, but the remaining females had intact ovarian follicles and were transported to the cold water. Ovarian follicles and blood were collected from females until they reached the stage of spawning readiness (determined by germinal vesicle position and an oocyte maturation assay) or underwent ovarian regression. Exposure of gravid sturgeon females to ambient water temperatures (14.5 ?? 2.3??C, mean ?? S.D.) from October to March led to a decrease in plasma sex steroids and a high incidence of ovarian regression in fish with a more advanced stage of oocyte development. Transfer of females with intact ovarian follicles to cold water (12 ?? 1??C) in the fall or early spring resulted in normal ovarian development in the majority of females. Holding females in cold water does not seem to override their endogenous reproductive rhythms but extends their capacity to maintain oocyte maturational competence over a longer period of time. A temperature-sensitive phase in ovarian development may occur during the transition from vitellogenic growth to oocyte maturation, and the degree and timing of sensitivity to environmental temperature are dependent on the female's endogenous reproductive rhythm

  3. Further investigations of the relation between polymorphisms in sex steroid related genes and autistic-like traits.

    PubMed

    Zettergren, Anna; Karlsson, Sara; Hovey, Daniel; Jonsson, Lina; Melke, Jonas; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lundström, Sebastian; Westberg, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are more prevalent in boys than in girls, indicating that high levels of testosterone during early development may be a risk factor. Evidence for this hypothesis comes from studies showing associations between fetal testosterone levels, as well as indirect measures of prenatal androgenization, and ASDs and autistic-like traits (ALTs). In a recent study we reported associations between ALTs and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), steroid-5-alpha-reductase, type 2 (SRD5A2) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in a subset (n=1771) from the Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS). The aim of the present study was to try to replicate these findings in an additional, larger, sample of individuals from the CATSS (n=10,654), as well as to analyze additional SNPs of functional importance in SHBG and SRD5A2. No associations between the previously associated SNPs in the genes ESR1 and SRD5A2 and ALTs could be seen in the large replication sample. Still, our results show that two non-linked SNPs (rs6259 and rs9901675) at the SHBG gene locus might be of importance for language impairment problems in boys. The results of the present study do not point toward a major role for the investigated SNPs in the genes ESR1 and SRD5A2 in ALTs, but a possible influence of genetic variation in SHBG, especially for language impairment problems in boys, cannot be ruled out.

  4. Pleasantness, activation, and sex differences in advertising.

    PubMed

    Whissell, C; McCall, L

    1997-10-01

    Advertisements in men's, women's, girls', and boys' magazines (n = 38,195 words) were scored objectively in terms of 15 measures of linguistic style, e.g., use of common words, use of long words, use of specific words and emotional tone (pleasantness and activation, as measured by the Dictionary of Affect). There were several sex- and age-related differences among advertisements from different sources. Advertisements from boys' magazines were extremely active, those from women's and girls' magazines were shorter and unusually pleasant. In two follow-up studies (N = 122 volunteers), objective emotional measures of advertising text proved to be related to ratings of persuasion and of success of appeal for individual advertisements. The most preferred advertisement for women was pleasant and active, that for men unpleasant and active. When men and women created advertisements, women's were shorter and more pleasant. PMID:9354085

  5. Pleasantness, activation, and sex differences in advertising.

    PubMed

    Whissell, C; McCall, L

    1997-10-01

    Advertisements in men's, women's, girls', and boys' magazines (n = 38,195 words) were scored objectively in terms of 15 measures of linguistic style, e.g., use of common words, use of long words, use of specific words and emotional tone (pleasantness and activation, as measured by the Dictionary of Affect). There were several sex- and age-related differences among advertisements from different sources. Advertisements from boys' magazines were extremely active, those from women's and girls' magazines were shorter and unusually pleasant. In two follow-up studies (N = 122 volunteers), objective emotional measures of advertising text proved to be related to ratings of persuasion and of success of appeal for individual advertisements. The most preferred advertisement for women was pleasant and active, that for men unpleasant and active. When men and women created advertisements, women's were shorter and more pleasant.

  6. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  7. Acute exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation modulates sex steroid hormones and receptor expression in the skin and may contribute to the sex bias of melanoma in a fish model.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David L; Fernandez, André A; Garcia, Rachel; Paniker, Lakshmi; Lin, Kevin; Hanninen, Amanda; Zigelsky, Kyle; May, Matthew; Nuttall, Mark; Lo, Herng-Hsiang; Person, Maria D; Earley, Ryan

    2014-05-01

    Using the Xiphophorus fish melanoma model, we show a strong male bias for sunlight-induced malignant melanoma, consistent with that seen in the human population. To examine underlying factors, we exposed adult X. couchianus fish to a single, sublethal dose of UVB and measured circulating sex steroid hormones and expression of associated hormone receptor genes over a 24-h period. We found that a single exposure had profound effects on circulating levels of steroid hormones with significant decreases for all free sex steroids at 6 and 24 h and increases in conjugated 2-estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone at 6 and 24 h, respectively. Whereas ARα expression increased in male and female skin, neither ARβ nor either of the ERs showed significant responses to UVB in either sex. The rapid response of male androgens and their receptors in the skin after UVB irradiation implicates hormones in the male bias of skin cancer and suggests that the photoendocrine response immediately after UV exposure may be relevant to melanomagenesis.

  8. Acute exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation modulates sex steroid hormones and receptor expression in the skin and may contribute to the sex-bias of melanoma in a fish model

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, David L.; Fernandez, André A.; Garcia, Rachel; Paniker, Lakshmi; Lin, Kevin; Hanninen, Amanda; Zigelsky, Kyle; May, Matthew; Nuttall, Mark; Lo, Herng-hsiang; Person, Maria D.; Earley, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Using the Xiphophorus fish melanoma model we show a strong male bias for cutaneous malignant melanoma, consistent with that seen in the human population. To examine underlying factors, we exposed adult X. couchianus fish to a single, sub-lethal dose of UVB and measured circulating sex steroid hormones and expression of associated hormone receptor genes over a 24 hour period. We found that a single exposure had profound effects on circulating levels of steroid hormones with significant decreases for all free sex steroids at 6 and 24 h and increases in conjugated 2-estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone at 6 and 24 h, respectively. Whereas ARα expression increased in male and female skin, neither ARβ nor either of the ER’s showed significant responses to UVB in either sex. The rapid response of male androgens and their receptors in the skin after UVB irradiation implicates hormones in the male-bias of skin cancer and suggests that the photoendocrine response immediately after UV exposure may be relevant to melanomagenesis. PMID:24406016

  9. Patterns of sex steroid hormones in nipple aspirate fluid during the menstrual cycle and after menopause in relation to serum concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chatterton, Robert T; Khan, Seema A; Heinz, Richard; Ivancic, David; Lee, Oukseub

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that progesterone concentrations in serum and nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) are significantly correlated in premenopausal women, but estradiol concentrations are not. We therefore sought to ascertain the patterns of both steroids in NAF throughout the menstrual cycle and in postmenopausal women. Simultaneous samples of blood and NAF were obtained from 40 premenopausal and 16 postmenopausal women. Premenopausal samples were backdated from the following menstrual period. Steroids were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography before quantification by immunoassays. Serum steroids and NAF progesterone followed the expected pattern across the menstrual cycle, with a midcycle peak of estradiol and a midluteal peak of progesterone. However, the estradiol peak in NAF occurred about a week after the serum peak in the midluteal phase, when serum estradiol had declined to less than half the value at midcycle. NAF estrone was also elevated at the midluteal phase. Potential estrogen precursors androstenedione, estrone sulfate, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate declined in NAF from midcycle to the midluteal phase as NAF estradiol was increasing. Progesterone concentrations were significantly lower in NAF in postmenopausal women than in premenopausal women, but estrogen concentrations were not. This is the first description of the temporal relationships of sex steroids in NAF and serum relative to the menstrual cycle. These results provide insights into the lack of correlation of NAF and breast tissue estrogens with serum estrogens, and generate new hypotheses. PMID:20056648

  10. Steroids from the roots of Asparagus officinalis and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue-Feng; Lin, Yu-Ying; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2008-06-01

    One new (Sarsasapogenin O) and seven known steroids were isolated from the roots of Asparagus officinalis L. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including various 2D-NMR techniques, hydrolysis, and by comparison of spectral data of known compounds. These compounds together with nine steroids which were previously isolated from this plant, were tested for cytotoxic activity. Among them, eight compounds displayed significant cytotoxicities against human A2780, HO-8910, Eca-109, MGC-803, CNE, LTEP-a-2, KB and mouse L1210 tumor cells. PMID:18713412

  11. Sex steroid hormones do not enhance the direct stimulatory effect of kisspetin-10 on the secretion of growth hormone from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat Ahmed, Ahmed; Saito, Hayato; Sawada, Tatsuru; Yaegashi, Tomoyoshi; Jin, Jin; Sawai, Ken; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2011-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of kisspeptin10 (Kp10) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells, and evaluate the ability of sex steroid hormones to enhance the sensitivity of somatotrophic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 8-11-month-old castrated calves were incubated for 12 h with estradiol (E(2), 10(-8) mol/L),progesterone (P(4), 10(-8) mol/L), testosterone (T, 10(-8) mol/L), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2 h with Kp10. The amount of GH released in the medium was measured by a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. Kp10 (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L) significantly stimulated the secretion of GH from the AP cells regardless of steroid treatments (P < 0.05), and E(2), P(4), and T had no effect on this response. The GH-releasing response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH, 10(-8) mol/L) was significantly greater than that to Kp10 (P < 0.05). The present results suggest that Kp10 directly stimulates the release of GH from somatotrophic cells and sex steroid hormones do not enhance the sensitivity of these cells to Kp10. Furthermore, they suggest that the GH-releasing effect of Kp10 is less potent than that of GHRH.

  12. Measuring water-borne cortisol in Poecilia latipinna:is the process stressful, can stress be minimized and is cortisol correlated with sex steroid release rates?

    PubMed

    Gabor, C R; Contreras, A

    2012-09-01

    The stress of water-borne hormone collection process was examined in sailfin mollies Poecilia latipinna. Baseline release rates of the stress hormone cortisol were measured and minimum confinement time for water sampling was evaluated for a standard 60 min v. a 30 min protocol. A 30 min hormone collection period reflects release rates over 60 min. Potential stress response to confinement in the beaker for the water-borne collection process was tested over 4 days. There was no evidence of stress due to the collection methods, as cortisol release rates did not differ significantly across four sequential days of handling for P. latipinna. Males and females did not differ significantly in baseline cortisol release rates. Baseline cortisol release rates from fish immediately after being collected in the field were also not significantly different than those in the 4 day confinement experiment. After exposure to a novel environment, however, P. latipinna mounted a stress response. Stress may also affect sex steroids and behaviour but cortisol release rates were not significantly correlated with sex steroids [11-ketotestosterone (KT), testosterone, or oestradiol], or mating attempts. The correlation between water-borne release rates and plasma steroid levels was validated for both cortisol and KT. Finally, normalizing cortisol release rates using standard length in lieu of mass is viable and accurate. Water-borne hormone assays are a valuable tool for investigating questions concerning the role of hormones in mediating stress responses and reproductive behaviours in P. latipinna and other livebearing fishes.

  13. Role of endotoxin and interleukin-1 in modulating ACTH, LH and sex steroid secretion.

    PubMed

    Rivier, C

    1990-01-01

    We have shown that the endotoxin LPS acted both at the level of the brain and the gonads to stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, and inhibit the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, axis. Exogenously administered IL-1 mimics most of the effects of LPS on pituitary activity. In addition, antibodies against IL-1 receptors can interfere with LPS-induced ACTH secretion. These results suggest that at least part of the ability of LPS to alter endocrine functions appears to depend upon endogenous interleukin-1.

  14. Do Changes in Sex Steroid Hormones Precede or Follow Increases in Body Weight during the Menopause Transition? Results from The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Ping G.; Crawford, Sybil; Finkelstein, Joel S.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Thurston, Rebecca C.; Santoro, Nanette; Sternfeld, Barbara; Greendale, Gail A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Whether menopause-related changes in sex steroids account for midlife weight gain in women or whether weight drives changes in sex steroids remains unanswered. Objective: The objective of the study was to characterize the potential reciprocal nature of the associations between sex hormones and their binding protein with waist circumference in midlife women. Design, Setting, and Participants: The study included 1528 women (mean age 46 yr) with 9 yr of follow-up across the menopause transition from the observational Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. Main Outcome Measures: Waist circumference, SHBG, testosterone, FSH, and estradiol were measured. Results: Current waist circumference predicted future SHBG, testosterone, and FSH but not vice versa. For each sd higher current waist circumference, at the subsequent visit SHBG was lower by 0.04–0.15 sd, testosterone was higher by 0.08–0.13 sd, and log2 FSH was lower by 0.15–0.26 sd. Estradiol results were distinct from those above, changing direction across the menopause transition. Estradiol and waist circumference were negatively associated in early menopausal transition stages and positively associated in later transition stages (for each sd higher current waist circumference, future estradiol was lower by 0.15 sd in pre- and early perimenopause and higher by 0.38 sd in late peri- and postmenopause; P for interaction <0.001). In addition, they appeared to be reciprocal, with current waist circumference associated with future estradiol and current estradiol associated with future waist circumference. However, associations in the direction of current waist circumference predicting future estradiol levels were of considerably larger magnitude than the reverse. Conclusions: These Study of Women's Health Across the Nation data suggest that the predominant temporal sequence is that weight gain leads to changes in sex steroids rather than vice versa. PMID:22723312

  15. Normal neonatal surge of gonadotrophins and sex steroids in infants of men with isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Rose, S R; Cassorla, F; Sherins, R J

    1988-12-01

    The inheritance of isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (IHH) is not fully determined. Although men with this diagnosis can be treated to induce fertility, it is not known whether their offspring will inherit the hormonal deficiency. We evaluated the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in nine children (born to men with IHH) during the first few months of life. This axis normally shows activation in infancy similar to that which occurs at puberty. Luteinizing hormone (LH) releasing hormone stimulated a peak LH response in excess of prepubertal levels (39.0 +/- 11 mIU/ml [mean +/- SD]). Testosterone in males (6.2 +/- 2.8 nmol/l and oestradiol in two of the females (320 and 100 pmol/l) were also in excess of prepubertal levels. These infants of men with IHH showed no evidence of inheriting hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. While further studies will be conducted at the usual age of puberty to confirm spontaneous activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, our studies suggest that it may be possible to assess the integrity of this axis at a much younger age.

  16. Regulation of object recognition and object placement by ovarian sex steroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Fortress, Ashley M.; Kim, Jaekyoon; Frick, Karyn M.

    2014-01-01

    The ovarian hormones 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) are potent modulators of hippocampal memory formation. Both hormones have been demonstrated to enhance hippocampal memory by regulating the cellular and molecular mechanisms thought to underlie memory formation. Behavioral neuroendocrinologists have increasingly used the object recognition and object placement (object location) tasks to investigate the role of E2 and P4 in regulating hippocampal memory formation in rodents. These one-trial learning tasks are ideal for studying acute effects of hormone treatments on different phases of memory because they can be administered during acquisition (pre-training), consolidation (post-training), or retrieval (pre-testing). This review synthesizes the rodent literature testing the effects of E2 and P4 on object recognition (OR) and object placement (OP), and the molecular mechanisms in the hippocampus supporting memory formation in these tasks. Some general trends emerge from the data. Among gonadally intact females, object memory tends to be best when E2 and P4 levels are elevated during the estrous cycle, pregnancy, and in middle age. In ovariectomized females, E2 given before or immediately after testing generally enhances OR and OP in young and middle-aged rats and mice, although effects are mixed in aged rodents. Effects of E2 treatment on OR 7and OP memory consolidation can be mediated by both classical estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ), and depend on glutamate receptors (NMDA, mGluR1) and activation of numerous cell signaling cascades (e.g., ERK, PI3K/Akt, mTOR) and epigenetic processes (e.g., histone H3 acetylation, DNA methylation). Acute P4 treatment given immediately after training also enhances OR and OP in young and middle-aged ovariectomized females by activating similar cell signaling pathways as E2 (e.g., ERK, mTOR). The few studies that have administered both hormones in combination suggest that treatment can enhance OR and OP, but that

  17. Sex steroid and growth hormone supplementation to enhance performance in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Rogol, A D

    2000-08-01

    Ergogenic aids are taken to enhance energy utilization by producing more, controlling its use, or increasing mechanical efficiency. Most athletes are looking toward enhancing performance by proper training modalities and methods; however, some look to the biochemical route for a "quick fix." Thus, the use of chemical agents is on the rise. Herein is provided information on the anabolic-androgenic agents androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone, and the "parent" compound, testosterone. The former two, at best, have equivocal activity, but testosterone is both anabolic and androgenic in doses that adolescents might receive. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 are anabolic, nonandrogenic compounds with undoubted effects on the lean body mass compartment. Both are expensive, not readily available, and subject to the art of counterfeiting. Thus, very few data are available in non-growth hormone-deficient adolescents. The discussion of these agents ends with issues of fairness, ethics, and the message we attempt to project to our teenagers, whether athletes or not. PMID:10943821

  18. New steroidal saponins and antiulcer activity from Solanum paniculatum L.

    PubMed

    Vieira Júnior, Gerardo Magela; da Rocha, Cláudia Quintino; de Souza Rodrigues, Tamires; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko; Vilegas, Wagner

    2015-11-01

    Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) is a plant species widespread throughout tropical America, especially in the Brazilian Savanna region. It is used in Brazil for culinary purposes and in folk medicine to treat liver and gastric dysfunctions, as well as hangovers. Fractionation of the ethanolic extracts (70%) from aerial parts (leaves and twigs) of S. paniculatum led to the isolation of the two new saponins (22R, 23S, 25R)-3β, 6α, 23-trihydroxy-5α-spirostane 6-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1" → 3"')-O-[β-D-quinovopyranosyl(1″' → 2')]-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1" → 3')]-O-β-D-quinovopyranoside (1) and diosgenin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1" → 6')-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2) together with four know compounds: caffeic acid (3), diosgenin β-D-glucopyranoside (4), rutin (5), and quercetin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1"' → 6 ″)-O-β-D-galactopyranoside (6). The structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive use of 1D and 2D NMR experiments along with HRESIMS analyses. Different doses (31.25-500 mg/kg) of ethanolic extract of leaves from S. paniculatum were evaluated against gastric ulcer induced by ethanol in rats. The lower dose of extract able to promote antiulcer effect was 125 mg/kg. The treatment with S. paniculatum by oral route was able to decrease gastric lesion area and also reduced levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the gastric mucosa. Our results reveal for the first time, steroidal saponins from S. paniculatum and the antiulcer effect of this species at this lower dose. PMID:25976806

  19. Regulation of sexual odor preference by sex steroids in the posterodorsal medial amygdala in female rats.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masaya; Nitta, Asano; Chiba, Atsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Our previous study in male rats demonstrated that bilateral administration of flutamide, an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, into the posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) increased the time sniffing male odors to as high as that sniffing estrous odors, eliminating the preference for estrous odors over male odors. This made us speculate that under blockade of AR in the MePD, testosterone-derived estrogen acting on the same brain region arouses interest in male odors which is otherwise suppressed by concomitant action of androgen. In cyclic female rats, endogenous androgen has been thought to be involved in inhibitory regulation of estrogen-activated sexual behavior. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the possibility that in female rats the arousal of interest in male odors is also normally regulated by both estrogen and androgen acting on the MePD, as predicted by our previous study in male rats. Implantation of either the estrogen receptor blocker tamoxifen (TX) or a non-aromatizable androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) into the MePD of ovariectomized, estrogen-primed female rats eliminated preference for male odors over estrous odors by significantly decreasing the time sniffing male odors to as low as that sniffing estrous odors. The subsequent odor discrimination tests confirmed that the DHT and TX administration did not impair the ability to discriminate between male and estrous odors. These results suggest that in estrous female rats estrogen action in the MePD plays critical roles in the expression of the preference for male odors while androgen action in the same brain region interferes with the estrogen action. PMID:27178578

  20. Plasma steroid-binding proteins: primary gatekeepers of steroid hormone action

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biologically active steroids are transported in the blood by albumin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). These plasma proteins also regulate the non-protein-bound or ‘free’ fractions of circulating steroid hormones that are considered to be biologically active; as such, they can be viewed as the ‘primary gatekeepers of steroid action’. Albumin binds steroids with limited specificity and low affinity, but its high concentration in blood buffers major fluctuations in steroid concentrations and their free fractions. By contrast, SHBG and CBG play much more dynamic roles in controlling steroid access to target tissues and cells. They bind steroids with high (~nM) affinity and specificity, with SHBG binding androgens and estrogens and CBG binding glucocorticoids and progesterone. Both are glycoproteins that are structurally unrelated, and they function in different ways that extend beyond their transportation or buffering functions in the blood. Plasma SHBG and CBG production by the liver varies during development and different physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and abnormalities in the plasma levels of SHBG and CBG or their abilities to bind steroids are associated with a variety of pathologies. Understanding how the unique structures of SHBG and CBG determine their specialized functions, how changes in their plasma levels are controlled, and how they function outside the blood circulation provides insight into how they control the freedom of steroids to act in health and disease. PMID:27113851

  1. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  2. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  3. Steroid hormones as biomarkers of endocrine disruption in wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Guillette, L.J. Jr.; Rooney, A.A.; Crain, D.A.; Orlando, E.F.

    1999-07-01

    Xenobiotic compounds introduced into the environment by human activity have been shown to adversely affect the endocrine system of wildlife. Various species exhibit abnormalities of (1) plasma sex steroid hormones, (2) altered steroid synthesis form the gonad in vitro and (3) altered steroidogenic enzyme function. These endpoints are sensitive and relatively easy to measure quantitatively with reliability and precision. These observations have led to the conclusion that sex steroid hormones could be markers of exposure to, and altered function from, endocrine disrupting contaminants (EDCs). However, there are serious limitations in the use of steroid hormones as generalized markers of EDC exposure. Steroid hormones exhibit seasonal, ontogenetic, gender and species-specific variation. Moreover, the regulation of sex steroid plasma concentrations is a relatively complex phenomenon capable of short-term (minutes-hours) alteration due to environmental inputs, such as acute stress--an activational response. Alterations in steroids synthesis and degradation also can be a response to altered embryonic development due to EDC exposure--an organizational response. If steroid hormones are to be used as biomarkers, then closely controlled, well designed sampling has to be performed. Additionally, an appreciation of the variation possible in endocrine responses among the species to be studied must be obtained.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of Bacillus P450 monooxygenases and evaluation of their activity towards steroids.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Shibata, Daisuke; Kino, Kuniki

    2009-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) open reading frames (ORFs) identified in genome sequences of Bacillus species are potential resources for new oxidation biocatalysts. Phylogenetic analysis of 29 Bacillus P450 ORFs revealed that the P450s consist of a limited number of P450 families, CYP102, CYP106, CYP107, CYP109, CYP134, CYP152, and CYP197. Previously, we identified the catalytic activities of three P450s of Bacillus subtilis towards steroids by rapid substrate screening using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR/MS). Here, we further applied this method to evaluate the activity of Bacillus cereus P450s towards steroids. Five P450 genes were cloned from B. cereus ATCC 10987 based on its genomic sequence and were expressed in Escherichia coli. These P450s were reacted with a mixture of 30 compounds that mainly included steroids, and the reaction mixtures were analyzed using FT-ICR/MS. We found that BCE_2659 (CYP106) catalyzed the monooxygenation of methyltestosterone, progesterone, 11-ketoprogesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and chlormadinone acetate. BCE_2654 (CYP107) monooxygenated testosterone enanthate, and BCE_3250 (CYP109) monooxygenated testosterone and compactin. Based on the phylogenetic relationship and the known substrate specificities including ones identified in this study, we discuss the catalytic potential of Bacillus P450s towards steroids.

  5. Involvement of pituitary gonadotropins, gonadal steroids and breeding season in sex change of protogynous dusky grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Teleostei: Serranidae), induced by a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Carlos Eduardo de O; Araújo, Bruno C; Mello, Paulo H; Narcizo, Amanda de M; Rodrigues-Filho, Jandyr A; Medrado, Andreone T; Zampieri, Ricardo A; Floeter-Winter, Lucile M; Moreira, Renata Guimarães

    2013-10-01

    Two experiments were performed using the aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozole (100mg/kg) to promote sex change, from female-to-male, in protogynous dusky grouper. One experiment was performed during the breeding season (spring) and the other at the end of the breeding season (summer). During the spring, AI promoted sex change after 9 weeks and the sperm produced was able to fertilize grouper oocytes. During the summer, the sex change was incomplete; intersex individuals were present and sperm was not released by any of the animals. Sex changed gonads had a lamellar architecture; cysts of spermatocytes and spermatozoa in the lumen of the germinal compartment. In the spring, after 4 weeks, 11ketotestosterone (11KT) levels were higher in the AI than in control fish, and after 9 weeks, coincident with semen release, testosterone levels increased in the AI group, while 11KT returned to the initial levels. Estradiol (E2) levels remained unchanged during the experimental period. Instead of decreasing throughout the period, as in control group, 17 α-OH progesterone levels did not change in the AI-treated fish, resulting in higher values after 9 weeks when compared with control fish. fshβ and lhβ gene expression in the AI animals were lower compared with control fish after 9 weeks. The use of AI was effective to obtain functional males during the breeding season. The increase in androgens, modulated by gonadotropins, triggered the sex change, enabling the development of male germ cells, whereas a decrease in E2 levels was not required to change sex in dusky grouper.

  6. Melatonin reduces LH, 17 beta-estradiol and induces differential regulation of sex steroid receptors in reproductive tissues during rat ovulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Melatonin is associated with direct or indirect actions upon female reproductive function. However, its effects on sex hormones and steroid receptors during ovulation are not clearly defined. This study aimed to verify whether exposure to long-term melatonin is able to cause reproductive hormonal disturbances as well as their role on sex steroid receptors in the rat ovary, oviduct and uterus during ovulation. Methods Twenty-four adult Wistar rats, 60 days old (+/- 250 g) were randomly divided into two groups. Control group (Co): received 0.9% NaCl 0.3 mL + 95% ethanol 0.04 mL as vehicle; Melatonin-treated group (MEL): received vehicle + melatonin [100 μg/100 g BW/day] both intraperitoneally during 60 days. All animals were euthanized by decapitation during the morning estrus at 4 a.m. Results Melatonin significantly reduced the plasma levels of LH and 17 beta-estradiol, while urinary 6-sulfatoximelatonin (STM) was increased at the morning estrus. In addition, melatonin promoted differential regulation of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), androgen receptor (AR) and melatonin receptor (MTR) along the reproductive tissues. In ovary, melatonin induced a down-regulation of ER-alpha and PRB levels. Conversely, it was observed that PRA and MT1R were up-regulated. In oviduct, AR and ER-alpha levels were down-regulated, in contrast to high expression of both PRA and PRB. Finally, the ER-beta and PRB levels were down-regulated in uterus tissue and only MT1R was up-regulated. Conclusions We suggest that melatonin partially suppress the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian axis, in addition, it induces differential regulation of sex steroid receptors in the ovary, oviduct and uterus during ovulation. PMID:21810236

  7. Omega-pyridiniumalkylethers of steroidal phenols: new compounds with potent antibacterial and antiproliferative activities.

    PubMed

    Lange, C; Holzhey, N; Schönecker, B; Beckert, R; Möllmann, U; Dahse, H-M

    2004-06-15

    Novel omega-pyridiniumalkylethers of two steroidal phenols were synthesized as compounds with potential antimicrobial activity. 3-Hydroxy-estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-17-one and 1-hydroxy-4-methyl-estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-17-one were reacted with omega,omega'-dibromoalkanes to omega-bromoalkoxy-estra-1,3,5(10)-trienes followed by reaction with pyridine to obtain the desired steroidal omega-pyridiniumalkoxy compounds as bromides. Their antimicrobial activity against strains of multiresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis and fast growing mycobacteria depends clearly on the length of the alkyl chain. A strong broadband activity has been found for the compounds with eight or 10 C-atoms; in some cases better than ciprofloxacin or cetylpyridinium salts. In addition, the antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity depends on the chain length, too. The differentiation between antibacterial and cytotoxic activity is better for the steroid hybrid molecules than the cetylpyridinium salts. These new compounds can serve as lead compounds for further optimization.

  8. Inhaled Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... potential for side effects than steroid pills or syrups. There have been concerns regarding the possibility of ... treatment. Learn about oral steroids (steroid pills and syrups), and more about steroid side effects. What are ...

  9. Asymmetry within and around the human planum temporale is sexually dimorphic and influenced by genes involved in steroid hormone receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Zwiers, Marcel P; Wittfeld, Katharina; Teumer, Alexander; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hoogman, Martine; Hagoort, Peter; Fernandez, Guillen; Buitelaar, Jan; van Bokhoven, Hans; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E; Grabe, Hans J; Francks, Clyde

    2015-01-01

    The genetic determinants of cerebral asymmetries are unknown. Sex differences in asymmetry of the planum temporale (PT), that overlaps Wernicke's classical language area, have been inconsistently reported. Meta-analysis of previous studies has suggested that publication bias established this sex difference in the literature. Using probabilistic definitions of cortical regions we screened over the cerebral cortex for sexual dimorphisms of asymmetry in 2337 healthy subjects, and found the PT to show the strongest sex-linked asymmetry of all regions, which was supported by two further datasets, and also by analysis with the FreeSurfer package that performs automated parcellation of cerebral cortical regions. We performed a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis of PT asymmetry in a pooled sample of 3095 subjects, followed by a candidate-driven approach which measured a significant enrichment of association in genes of the 'steroid hormone receptor activity' and 'steroid metabolic process' pathways. Variants in the genes and pathways identified may affect the role of the PT in language cognition. PMID:25239853

  10. Steroid modulation of the chloride ionophore in rat brain: structure-activity requirements, regional dependence and mechanism of action

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, K.W.; Bolger, M.B.; Brinton, R.E.; Coirini, H.; McEwen, B.S.

    1988-08-01

    Further in vitro studies of steroids active at the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor regulated Cl- channel labeled by (35S)-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ((35S)TBPS) reveal additional structural requirements necessary for activity. Evaluation of selected steroids for activity against TBPS-induced convulsions show similar requirements for activity. Interestingly, steroids (e.g., 5 alpha-pregnan-3 alpha, 20 alpha-diol) were identified that have high potency but limited efficacy as modulators of (35S)TBPS binding. These characteristics are reminiscent of the clinically useful benzodiazepines (BZs) such as clonazepam. However, interactions between the prototypical anesthetic-barbiturate, sodium pentobarbital, and steroids active at the Cl- channel suggest that they do not share a common site of action as allosteric modulators of (35S)TBPS and BZ receptor binding. The most potent steroid evaluated, 5 alpha-pregnan-3 alpha-ol-20-one, modulates (35S)TBPS binding at low concentrations (IC50 approximately 17 nM) in a regionally dependent manner. All (35S)TBPS binding sites appear to be functionally coupled to a steroid modulatory site. Because several of the active steroids are metabolites of progesterone, their ability to inhibit the binding of (3H)promegestrone to the cytosolic progestin receptor in rat uterus was evaluated. Those steroids showing potent activity at the GABAA receptor-Cl- ionophore were inactive at the intracellular progestin receptor. Such specificity coupled with their high potency provide additional support for the hypothesis that some of these steroids may be involved in the homeostatic regulation of brain excitability via the GABAA-BZ receptor complex.

  11. Steroidal glycosides from Agave utahensis and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, Akihito; Jitsuno, Maki; Yui, Satoru; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Mimaki, Yoshihiro

    2009-08-01

    Eight new spirostanol saponins (1-8) and three new furostanol saponins (9-11) were isolated from the whole plants of Agave utahensis. The structures of 1-11 were determined by analysis of extensive spectroscopic data. The saponins were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells. Compound 1 showed cytotoxicity against HL-60 cells with an IC(50) value of 4.9 microg/mL, induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells, and markedly activated caspase-3.

  12. Reproductive activity in the peninsular pronghorn determined from excreted gonadal steroid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kersey, David C; Holland, Jeff; Eng, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Fecal hormone monitoring was employed to better define annual patterns of reproductive steroid metabolites from a breeding pair of peninsular pronghorn (Antilocapra americana peninsularis) maintained at the Los Angeles Zoo. Notably in the female, increased excretion of estrogen metabolites occurred during the breeding season (Jun-Aug), and a biphasic pattern in progestagen activity was measured during gestation. Of additional interest, a preterm increase in estrogen that continued for an additional 64 days post partum. Male androgen activity correlated with the female estrogen patterns, with a single successful copulation occurring during the breeding season; interestingly however, the male exhibited no reproductive behaviors during the female's preterm/post partum estrogen increase. These data are the first reproductive steroid profiles for the peninsular pronghorn and provide valuable insight that will aid efforts that link the species' reproductive physiology with conservation management. PMID:25652944

  13. Building a better hormone therapy? How understanding the rapid effects of sex steroid hormones could lead to new therapeutics for age-related memory decline.

    PubMed

    Frick, Karyn M

    2012-02-01

    A wealth of data collected in recent decades has demonstrated that ovarian sex-steroid hormones, particularly 17β-estradiol (E2), are important trophic factors that regulate the function of cognitive regions of the brain such as the hippocampus. The loss of hormone cycling at menopause is associated with cognitive decline and dementia in women, and the onset of memory decline in animal models. However, hormone therapy is not currently recommended to prevent or treat cognitive decline, in part because of its detrimental side effects. In this article, it is proposed that investigations of the rapid effects of E2 on hippocampal function be used to further the design of new drugs that mimic the beneficial effects of E2 on memory without the side effects of current therapies. A conceptual model is presented for elucidating the molecular and biochemical mechanisms through which sex-steroid hormones modulate memory, and a specific hypothesis is proposed to account for the rapid memory-enhancing effects of E2. Empirical support for this hypothesis is discussed as a means of stimulating the consideration of new directions for the development of hormone-based therapies to preserve memory function in menopausal women.

  14. Seasonality of reproduction in male spotted murrel Channa punctatus: correlation of environmental variables and plasma sex steroids with histological changes in testis.

    PubMed

    Basak, Reetuparna; Roy, Alivia; Rai, Umesh

    2016-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to develop a comprehensive understanding of how environmental cues and sex steroids relate with cyclic changes in spermatogenesis in freshwater spotted snakehead Channa punctatus that is nutritious and economically important. The seasonal histological changes in testis and annual profile of gonadosomatic index (GSI) of C. punctatus delineated the testicular cycle into four phases: regressed (December-March), preparatory (April-June), spawning (July and August) and postspawning (September-November). Among environmental variables, correlation and regression analyses exhibited an important relationship between photoperiod and testicular weight while role of rainfall was seen confined to spawning. The seasonal profile of plasma sex steroids when correlated with cyclic changes in spermatogenesis in spotted snakehead, testosterone (T) seems to be involved in controlling the major events of spermatogenesis from renewal of stem cells to spawning of spermatozoa. Another important androgen prevalent in teleosts, 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), was high during preparatory phase, suggesting that 11-KT in addition to T plays an important role in progression of spermatogenesis and spermiation in C. punctatus. However, 11-KT was not seen to be associated with milt production and release of spermatozoa during spawning. Plasma profile of estradiol-17β (E2) during different reproductive phases revealed the involvement of E2 in repopulation of stem cells during postspawning phase and in maintaining quiescence of testis during regressed phase.

  15. Differences in brain edema and intracranial pressure following traumatic brain injury across the estrous cycle: involvement of female sex steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Maghool, Fatemeh; Khaksari, Mohammad; Siahposht Khachki, Ali

    2013-02-25

    It has been shown that sex steroid hormones have profound neuroprotective effects in experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). Because the endogenous hormone levels are proven to differ with estrous cycle stage, we evaluated whether estrous cycle stage affects various outcomes following diffuse TBI. TBI was induced by Marmarou's method in normal cycling and in ovariectomized rats with physiologically relevant restoration of hormonal levels by hormone capsule implantation. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were measured before and different times after TBI and brain edema was assessed at 24h after trauma. Results indicated that after TBI, water content (WC) in traumatic proestrous (TP) rats was less than the one in traumatic non-proestrous (TNP) and ovariectomized (TOVX) and also in high estradiol (HE) and progesterone (HP) was statistically less than in TBI untreated groups.There was no significant difference in WC between high doses hormone treated and TP and also between TNP, TOVX, low estradiol (LE) and progesterone (LP) groups. At 4h and 24h after trauma, there was a significant difference in ICP between TP, HE and HP compared to TNP and other TBI nontreated groups. Also in these times, the CPP increased in TP and hormone treated groups compared with TOVX, but the difference between TNP and TOVX was not significant. The results indicate that the estrous cycle has a prominent role in TBI outcome's and the difference in female sex steroid levels might be the reason of the different neuroprotective effects in proestrous and non-proestrous groups.

  16. Network of nuclear receptor ligands in multiple sclerosis: Common pathways and interactions of sex-steroids, corticosteroids and vitamin D3-derived molecules.

    PubMed

    Rolf, Linda; Damoiseaux, Jan; Hupperts, Raymond; Huitinga, Inge; Smolders, Joost

    2016-09-01

    Sex-steroids, corticosteroids and vitamin D3-derived molecules have all been subject to experimental studies and clinical trials in a plethora of autoimmune diseases. These molecules are all derived from cholesterol metabolites and are ligands for nuclear receptors. Ligation of these receptors results in direct regulation of multiple gene transcription involved in general homeostatic and adaptation networks, including the immune system. Indeed, the distinct ligands affect the function of both myeloid and lymphoid cells, eventually resulting in a less pro-inflammatory immune response which is considered beneficial in autoimmune diseases. Next to the immune system, also the central nervous system is prone to regulation by these nuclear receptor ligands. Understanding of the intricate interactions between sex-steroids, corticosteroids and vitamin D3 metabolites, on the one hand, and the immune and central nervous system, on the other hand, may reveal novel approaches to utilize these nuclear receptor ligands to full extent as putative treatments in multiple sclerosis, the prototypic immune-driven disease of the central nervous system.

  17. Building a better hormone therapy?: How understanding the rapid effects of sex steroid hormones could lead to new therapeutics for age-related memory decline

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Karyn M.

    2012-01-01

    A wealth of data collected in recent decades has demonstrated that ovarian sex-steroid hormones, particularly 17β-estradiol (E2), are important trophic factors that regulate the function of cognitive regions of the brain such as the hippocampus. The loss of hormone cycling at menopause is associated with cognitive decline and dementia in women, and the onset of memory decline in animal models. However, hormone therapy is not currently recommended to prevent or treat cognitive decline, in part because of its detrimental side effects. In this article, it is proposed that investigations of the rapid effects of E2 on hippocampal function be used to further the design of new drugs that mimic the beneficial effects of E2 on memory without the side effects of current therapies. A conceptual model is presented for elucidating the molecular and biochemical mechanisms through which sex-steroid hormones modulate memory, and a specific hypothesis is proposed to account for the rapid memory-enhancing effects of E2. Empirical support for this hypothesis is discussed as a means of stimulating the consideration of new directions for the development of hormone-based therapies to preserve memory function in menopausal women. PMID:22289043

  18. Plasma sex steroid hormonal profile and gonad histology during the annual reproductive cycle of river catfish Hemibagrus nemurus (Valenciennes, 1840) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Adebiyi, Fatimat Adenike; Siraj, Siti Shapor; Harmin, Sharr Azni; Christianus, Annie

    2013-06-01

    Plasma sex steroid hormonal profile and gonad histology were correlated to study the annual reproductive cycle of Hemibagrus nemurus. Hormones were measured by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Gonad tissues were observed by using light microscopy. The highest testosterone (T) value for male was observed in November and that of female was in October. 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and 17β-estradiol (E2) levels were highest in June and November, respectively. Hormonal profiles of T, 11-KT and E2 showed several peaks which indicated a non-seasonal pattern. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) in the monthly levels of T, 11-KT and E2. Gonadosomatic index of H. nemurus ranged from 1.14 ± 0.02 % to 7.06 ± 1.40 %, and high gonadosomatic indices were recorded in May, August and November. Gonad histology revealed that spermatozoa were always present in the testes which implied continuous spermatogenesis and asynchronous ovarian development pattern was observed in the ovaries. The annual reproductive cycle of H. nemurus did not show a seasonal pattern and this indicate that H. nemurus is a non-seasonal breeder with several spawning cycles and can be referred to as indeterminate batch spawner. The major significances of this study are annual sex steroid hormonal profile and asynchronous ovarian development of H. nemurus. This information will contribute to our knowledge of reproductive biology of H. nemurus.

  19. Steroidal saponins from the whole plants of Agave utahensis and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the whole plants of Agave utahensis Engelm. (Agavaceae) has resulted in the isolation of 15 steroidal saponins (1-15), including five spirostanol saponins (1-5) and three furostanol saponins (11-13). Structures of compounds 1-5 and 11-13 were determined by spectroscopic analysis and the results of hydrolytic cleavage. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

  20. The effects of sex steroids and vasotocin on behavioral responses to visual and olfactory sexual stimuli in ovariectomized female roughskin newts.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R R; Moore, F L

    2003-11-01

    Previous studies have found that vasotocin (AVT) administration to male roughskin newts (Taricha granulosa) enhances courtship clasping as well as appetitive responses to specific sexual stimuli and that treating female newts with androgens plus AVT induces the expression of male-typical courtship clasping (the selective clasping of females). However, the unique and/or interactive effects of sex steroids and AVT on appetitive responses to specific sexual stimuli have not yet been determined. To first identify male-typical, sexually dimorphic appetitive responses to female sexual stimuli, we tested intact newts during the breeding season and found that males, but not females, are attracted to female visual and pheromonal sexual stimuli. We then used ovariectomized (ovx) females implanted with empty silastic capsules (Blk) or with capsules containing testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or estradiol (E2) and then injected with either saline or AVT to determine the effects of steroids and AVT, alone or in combination with each other, on male-typical behavioral responses to those stimuli. E2 treatment depressed responses toward female visual stimuli independently of AVT. On the other hand, only T-implanted, AVT-injected females displayed male-typical behavioral responses toward female olfactory stimuli, preferring to spend more time in proximity to female-scented than unscented newt models and selectively clasping the female-scented models. Together, these results support the conclusion that sex steroids and AVT influence behavioral responses to sexual stimuli via sensory-specific mechanisms. Furthermore, they suggest that T and AVT interact within the brain to influence sensorimotor processing in the pathways that integrate olfactory sexual stimuli into male-typical courtship behaviors.

  1. Activity affects dendritic shape and synapse elimination during steroid controlled dendritic retraction in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Duch, Carsten; Mentel, Tim

    2004-11-01

    Insect metamorphosis is a compelling example for dendritic and synaptic remodeling as larval and adult behaviors place distinct demands on the CNS. During the metamorphosis of the moth, Manduca sexta, many larval motoneurons are remodeled to serve a new function in the adult. During late larval life, steroid hormones trigger axonal and dendritic regression as well as larval synapse elimination. These regressive events are accompanied by stereotypical changes in motor behavior during the so-called wandering stages. Both normally occurring changes in dendritic shape and in motor output have previously been analyzed quantitatively for the individually identified motoneuron MN5. This study tested whether activity affected steroid-induced dendritic regression and synapse disassembly in MN5 by means of chronically implanted extracellular electrodes. Stimulating MN5 in vivo in intact, normally developing animals during a developmental period when it usually shows no activity significantly slowed the regression of high-order dendrites. Both physiological and anatomical analysis demonstrated that reduced dendritic regression was accompanied by a significant reduction in larval synapse disassembly. Therefore, steroid-induced alterations of dendritic shape and synaptic connectivity are modified by activity-dependent mechanisms. This interaction might be a common mechanism for rapid adjustments of rigid, inflexible, hormonal programs.

  2. Transport of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity across a swine lagoon/sprayfield system.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Williams, C Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2014-10-01

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones and phytoestrogens and estrogenic activity were assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet, particularly, daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at 2 months postapplication. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone was found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a livestock lagoon/sprayfield and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system.

  3. Fecal steroid monitoring for assessing gonadal and adrenal activity in the golden eagle and peregrine falcon.

    PubMed

    Staley, Airica M; Blanco, Juan M; Dufty, Alfred M; Wildt, David E; Monfort, Steven L

    2007-08-01

    We examined the efficacy of noninvasive monitoring of endocrine function via fecal steroid immunoassays in the golden eagle and peregrine falcon. High-pressure liquid chromatography analyses of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (fGCM) revealed that minor percentages of immunoreactive fGCM co-eluted with [(3)H]corticosterone in both sexes of the eagle (2.5-2.7%) and falcon (7.5-11.9%). In contrast, most fecal estrogen metabolites in eagle and falcon females co-eluted with radiolabeled estradiol-17beta ([(3)H]; 57.6, 64.6%, respectively) or estrone ([(3)H]; 26.9, 4.1%, respectively). Most fecal progestin metabolite immunoreactivity in the female eagle (24.8%) and falcon (21.7%) co-eluted with progesterone ([(14)C]). Most fecal androgen metabolite immunoreactivity in eagle (55.8%) and falcon (63.7%) males co-eluted with testosterone ([(14)C]). Exogenous adrenocorticotropin hormone induced increased fGCM excretion above pre-treatment in both species, but only significantly (P < 0.05) in the eagle. Both species showed increased fGCM after saline administration, suggesting the detection of 'handling stress.' Both species exhibited enterohepatic and renal recirculation of administered steroids as demonstrated by biphasic and triphasic excretion patterns. Thus, noninvasive fecal hormone monitoring is a valid and promising tool for assessing gonadal and adrenal status in rare and threatened birds-of-prey. PMID:17464481

  4. Four New Sulfated Polar Steroids from the Far Eastern Starfish Leptasterias ochotensis: Structures and Activities

    PubMed Central

    Malyarenko, Timofey V.; Malyarenko (Vishchuk), Olesya S.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I.; Popov, Roman S.; Kicha, Alla A.

    2015-01-01

    Three new sulfated steroid monoglycosides, leptaochotensosides A–C (1–3), and a new sulfated polyhydroxylated steroid (4) were isolated from the alcoholic extract of the Far Eastern starfish Leptasterias ochotensis. The structures of compounds 1–4 were established by extensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) analyses and chemical transformations. Although the isolated compounds did not show any apparent cytotoxicity against melanoma RPMI-7951 and breast cancer T-47D cell lines, leptaochotensoside A (1) demonstrated inhibition of T-47D cell colony formation in a soft agar clonogenic assay at nontoxic doses. In addition, this compound decreased the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced colony formation of mouse epidermal JB6 Cl41 cells. The cancer preventive action of 1 is realized through regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. PMID:26193286

  5. In vitro steroid-induced meiosis in Rhinella arenarum oocytes: role of pre-MPF activation.

    PubMed

    Arias Torres, Ana Josefina; Bühler, Marta Inés; Zelarayán, Liliana Isabel

    2016-04-01

    In this work we showed the relationship between seasonal periods and the response of R. arenarum follicles and oocytes to different steroids. Using in vitro germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) assays, we demonstrated that P4 is the main steroid capable of inducing maturation in R. arenarum oocytes and follicles. In the second part of this work we showed that androgens can activate pre-maturation promoting factors (pre-MPFs) such as P4, by cytoplasm microinjection experiments. The results indicated that the steroids assayed induced oocyte and follicle maturation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In oocytes, P4 was the most efficient steroid as a maturation inducer (EC50 of the reproductive period, 6 nM, EC50 of the non-reproductive period ≅ 30 nM). Androgens (DHEA, dehydroepiandrosterone; T, testosterone; and AD, androstenedione) were less efficient maturation inducers than P4 (EC50 reproductive period ≅ 50, 120 and 600 nM respectively). Similar results were obtained with intact follicles in both seasonal periods. Although the response of follicles to the different androgens was variable, in no case was it above the above the response induced by P4. Independently of the season, oocytes and follicles incubated in P4, P5 and T underwent GVBD after 6-10 h while oocytes and follicles incubated in DHEA and AD matured more slowly. Furthermore, we demonstrated that microinjection of mature cytoplasm from androgen-treated oocytes is sufficient to promote GVBD in immature recipient oocytes (DHEA, 57 ± 12%; AD, 60 ± 8%; T, 56 ± 13%). Thus, androgens such as DHEA, T and AD are as competent as P4 to activate pre-MPF.

  6. In vitro steroid-induced meiosis in Rhinella arenarum oocytes: role of pre-MPF activation.

    PubMed

    Arias Torres, Ana Josefina; Bühler, Marta Inés; Zelarayán, Liliana Isabel

    2016-04-01

    In this work we showed the relationship between seasonal periods and the response of R. arenarum follicles and oocytes to different steroids. Using in vitro germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) assays, we demonstrated that P4 is the main steroid capable of inducing maturation in R. arenarum oocytes and follicles. In the second part of this work we showed that androgens can activate pre-maturation promoting factors (pre-MPFs) such as P4, by cytoplasm microinjection experiments. The results indicated that the steroids assayed induced oocyte and follicle maturation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In oocytes, P4 was the most efficient steroid as a maturation inducer (EC50 of the reproductive period, 6 nM, EC50 of the non-reproductive period ≅ 30 nM). Androgens (DHEA, dehydroepiandrosterone; T, testosterone; and AD, androstenedione) were less efficient maturation inducers than P4 (EC50 reproductive period ≅ 50, 120 and 600 nM respectively). Similar results were obtained with intact follicles in both seasonal periods. Although the response of follicles to the different androgens was variable, in no case was it above the above the response induced by P4. Independently of the season, oocytes and follicles incubated in P4, P5 and T underwent GVBD after 6-10 h while oocytes and follicles incubated in DHEA and AD matured more slowly. Furthermore, we demonstrated that microinjection of mature cytoplasm from androgen-treated oocytes is sufficient to promote GVBD in immature recipient oocytes (DHEA, 57 ± 12%; AD, 60 ± 8%; T, 56 ± 13%). Thus, androgens such as DHEA, T and AD are as competent as P4 to activate pre-MPF. PMID:26006336

  7. Gonadal Steroid Modulation of Sleep and Wakefulness in Male and Female Rats Is Sexually Differentiated and Neonatally Organized by Steroid Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hadjimarkou, Maria M.; Mong, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    The paucity of clinical and preclinical studies investigating sex differences in sleep has resulted in mixed findings as to the exact nature of these differences. Although gonadal steroids are known to modulate sleep in females, less is known about males. Moreover, little evidence exists concerning the origin of these sex differences in sleep behavior. Thus, the goal of this study was to directly compare the sensitivity of sleep behavior in male and female Sprague Dawley rats to changes in the gonadal steroid milieu and to test whether the sex differences in sleep are the result of brain sexual differentiation or differences in circulating gonadal steroids. Here we report the magnitude of change in sleep behavior induced by either estradiol (E2) or testosterone (T) was greater in females compared with males, suggesting that sleep behavior in females is more sensitive to the suppressive effects of gonadal steroids. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the organizational effects of early gonadal steroid exposure result in male-like responsivity to gonadal steroids and directly alter the activity of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO), an established sleep-promoting nucleus, in adult masculinized females. Moreover, the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone did not suppress sleep in either males or females, suggesting that the T-mediated effect in females was due to the aromatization of T into E2. Together our data suggest that, like sex behavior, sex differences in sleep follow the classical organizational/activational effects of gonadal steroids. PMID:24189140

  8. Catalytic cyclometallation in steroid chemistry III: Synthesis of steroidal derivatives of 5Z,9Z-dienoic acid and investigation of its human topoisomerase I inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    D'yakonov, Vladimir A; Dzhemileva, Lilya U; Tuktarova, Regina A; Makarov, Aleksey A; Islamov, Ilgiz I; Mulyukova, Alfiya R; Dzhemilev, Usein M

    2015-10-01

    Two approaches to stereoselective synthesis of steroid 5Z,9Z-dienoic acids were developed, the first one being based on the cross-cyclomagnesiation of 2-(hepta-5,6-dien-1-yloxy)tetrahydro-2H-pyran and 1,2-diene cholesterol derivatives on treatment with EtMgBr catalyzed by Cp2TiCl2, while the other involving the synthesis of esters of hydroxy steroids with (5Z,9Z)-tetradeca-5,9-dienedioic acid, prepared in two steps using homo-cyclomagnesiation of 2-(hepta-5,6-dien-1-yloxy)tetrahydro-2H-pyran as the key step. High inhibitory activity of the synthesized acids against human topoisomerase I (hTop1) was found.

  9. [Composition and biological activity of triterpenes and steroids from Inonotus obliquus (chaga)].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, S A; Khabibrakhmanova, V R; Sysoeva, M A

    2016-05-01

    Data on the chemical composition of triterpenic and steroid compounds, isolated from the chaga mushroom grown in natural environment or in a synthetic culture have been summarized. Special attention has been paid to the biological activity of chaga mushroom extracts and these particular compounds against various cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. This analysis has demonstrated some common features in inhibition of growth of various cell lines by chaga mushroom components. In this context, the most active are triterpene compounds containing OH group at C-22 and a side chain unsaturated bond. PMID:27562990

  10. Steroidal glycosides from the underground parts of Yucca glauca and their cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, Akihito; Suzuki, Tomoka; Tatsuno, Satoru; Mimaki, Yoshihiro

    2014-05-01

    Six steroidal glycosides and 14 known compounds were isolated from the underground parts of Yucca glauca (Agavaceae). Their structures were determined from extensive spectroscopic analysis, including analysis of two-dimensional NMR data, and from chemical transformations. The compounds were also evaluated for cytotoxic activities against HL-60 human leukemia cells and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Four spirostanol glycosides and three furostanol glycosides exhibited cytotoxic activities against both HL-60 and A549 cells. Two of the compounds induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells.

  11. Sex determination in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masahisa

    2009-05-01

    The heterogametic sex is male in all mammals, whereas it is female in almost all birds. By contrast, there are two heterogametic types (XX/XY and ZZ/ZW) for genetic sex determination in amphibians. Though the original heterogametic sex was female in amphibians, the two heterogametic types were probably interchangeable, suggesting that sex chromosomes evolved several times in this lineage. Indeed, the frog Rana rugosa has the XX/XY and ZZ/ZW sex-determining systems within a single species, depending on the local population in Japan. The XY and ZW geographic forms with differentiated sex chromosomes probably have a common origin as undifferentiated sex chromosomes resulted from the hybridization between the primary populations of West Japan and Kanto forms. It is clear that the sex chromosomes are still undergoing evolution in this species group. Regardless of the presence of a sex-determining gene in amphibians, the gonadal sex of some species can be changed by sex steroids. Namely, sex steroids can induce the sex reversal, with estrogens inducing the male-to-female sex reversal, whereas androgens have the opposite effect. In R. rugosa, gonadal activity of CYP19 (P450 aromatase) is correlated with the feminization of gonads. Of particular interest is that high levels of CYP19 expression are observed in indifferent gonads at time before sex determination. Increases in the expression of CYP19 in female gonads and CYP17 (P450 17alpha-hydroxylase/C17-20 lyase) in male gonads suggest that the former plays an important role in phenotypic female determination, whereas the latter is needed for male determination. Thus, steroids could be the key factor for sex determination in R. rugosa. In addition to the role of sex steroids in gonadal sex determination in this species, Foxl2 and Sox3 are capable of promoting CYP19 expression. Since both the genes are autosomal, another factor up-regulating CYP19 expression must be recruited. The factor, which may be located on the X or W

  12. Evaluation of activity inotropic of a new steroid derivative using an isolated rat heart model

    PubMed Central

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Maria, López-Ramos; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Bety, Sarabia-Alcocer; Landy, Campos-Ramos

    2014-01-01

    There are studies which indicate that some steroid derivatives have inotropic activity; nevertheless, the cellular site and mechanism of action at cardiovascular level is very confusing. In order, to clarify these phenomena in this study, a new estradiol derivative was synthesized with the objective of to evaluate its biological activity on left ventricular pressure and characterize their molecular mechanism. The Langendorff technique was used to measure changes on perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in an isolated rat heart model in absence or presence of the estradiol derivative. Additionally, to characterize the molecular mechanism involved in the inotropic activity induced by the OTBDS-estradiol-hexanoic acid derivative was evaluated by measuring left ventricular pressure in absence or presence of following compounds; tamoxifen, prazosin, metoprolol, indomethacin and nifedipine. The results showed that the OTBDS-estradiol-hexanoic acid derivative significantly increased the perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in comparison with the control conditions. Additionally, other data indicate that OTBDS-estradiol-hexanoic acid derivative increase left ventricular pressure in a dose-dependent manner (0.001 to 100 nM); nevertheless, this phenomenon was significantly inhibited only by nifedipine at a dose of 1 nM. These data suggest that positive inotropic activity induced by the OTBDS-estradiol-hexanoic acid derivative is via activation of L-type calcium channel. This phenomenon is a particularly interesting because the positive inotropic activity induced by this steroid derivative involves a molecular mechanism different in comparison with other positive inotropic drugs. PMID:24995077

  13. Evaluation of activity inotropic of a new steroid derivative using an isolated rat heart model.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Maria, López-Ramos; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Bety, Sarabia-Alcocer; Landy, Campos-Ramos

    2014-01-01

    There are studies which indicate that some steroid derivatives have inotropic activity; nevertheless, the cellular site and mechanism of action at cardiovascular level is very confusing. In order, to clarify these phenomena in this study, a new estradiol derivative was synthesized with the objective of to evaluate its biological activity on left ventricular pressure and characterize their molecular mechanism. The Langendorff technique was used to measure changes on perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in an isolated rat heart model in absence or presence of the estradiol derivative. Additionally, to characterize the molecular mechanism involved in the inotropic activity induced by the OTBDS-estradiol-hexanoic acid derivative was evaluated by measuring left ventricular pressure in absence or presence of following compounds; tamoxifen, prazosin, metoprolol, indomethacin and nifedipine. The results showed that the OTBDS-estradiol-hexanoic acid derivative significantly increased the perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in comparison with the control conditions. Additionally, other data indicate that OTBDS-estradiol-hexanoic acid derivative increase left ventricular pressure in a dose-dependent manner (0.001 to 100 nM); nevertheless, this phenomenon was significantly inhibited only by nifedipine at a dose of 1 nM. These data suggest that positive inotropic activity induced by the OTBDS-estradiol-hexanoic acid derivative is via activation of L-type calcium channel. This phenomenon is a particularly interesting because the positive inotropic activity induced by this steroid derivative involves a molecular mechanism different in comparison with other positive inotropic drugs.

  14. Sex steroid levels, oocyte maturation and spawning performance in Waigieu seaperch (Psammoperca waigiensis) exposed to thyroxin, human chorionic gonadotropin, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone and carp pituitary extract.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Quoc; Nguyen, Anh Tuong; Nguyen, Mao Dinh; Arukwe, Augustine

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the sex steroid hormone levels, oocyte maturation and spawning performance in Waigieu seaperch (Psammoperca waigiensis) exposed to different doses (0, (control), 0.05, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg fish) of thyroxin (T(4)) both through diet (continuously) and injection (single injection). In addition, we also studied plasma steroid hormone levels and spawning performances in female fish injected with a single dose of D-Ala(6), Pro(9)-Net-mGnRH (LHRHa: 50 microg/kg), human chronic gonadotropin (HCG: 1,500 IU/kg) and carp pituitary extract (CPE: 10 mg/kg). In all experiments, samples were collected at 0, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after exposure. T4 exposure via dietary route produced differential and enhanced effects, compared with when the compound was injected to the broodstock. A significant association between exposure to dietary T4, elevated plasma steroid hormone levels, maturation-, spawning-, fertilization- and hatching rate, egg diameter, embryogenesis and larval growth were observed. Interestingly, we observed that broodstock groups fed with T4 doses spawned 20 days earlier than the control group. Thus, we propose that these differences may be attributed to higher systemic availability of T4 due to dietary exposure that is easily transferable to eggs and embryos, as opposed to injection that require absorption to increase bioavailability. Furthermore, our results show that LHRHa, CPE and HCG produced significant increase in spawning rate, but significantly reduced fertilization- and hatching rates. Waigieu seaperch is a new candidate for marine aquaculture in Vietnam and relatively little is known about the reproductive biology and endocrinology of this species. Therefore, the present study forms an integral basis for understanding the reproductive endocrinology of a tropical marine finfish with increasing aquaculture prospects and may also contribute in the development of sustainable aquaculture of this species in a developing

  15. Age-related changes in the concentrations of cytosol receptors for sex steroid hormones in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland of the rat.

    PubMed

    Haji, M; Kato, K I; Nawata, H; Ibayashi, H

    1981-01-12

    Estrogen and androgen receptors were measured in cytosols from hypothalamus, pituitary and uterus or prostate of rats at 3 stages in life, from 90 to 650 days old in females and from 90 to 550 days old in males. Saturation analysis of cytosol 17 beta-estradiol receptors in females demonstrated a significant age-associated reduction in maximum binding capacity in hypothalamus and uterus already at 300-330 days of life, but there was no significant change in pituitary gland. However, there was no difference in binding affinity, steroid specificity, sedimentation coefficient, chemical nature and heat lability of cytosol 17 beta-estradiol binding of these tissues among the 3 age groups. In males, each receptor for 17 beta-estradiol, testosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation from hypothalamic, pituitary and prostate cytosols. These receptors showed the same sedimentation coefficient of 8-9S in all age groups. Androgen binding by cytosols already decreased at 300-330 days of life, but estrogen binding was lower at 500-550 days of life than in younger adults. The increase in the serum luteinizing hormone level after gonadectomy was significantly depressed with aging in both females and males. These findings suggested that the age-associated reduction in cytosol sex steroid hormone receptors was ascribable to changes of numbers of binding sites. These age-related changes may be concerned with feedback system dysfunction of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in aged rats.

  16. Induction of a deficiency of steroid delta 4-5 alpha-reductase activity in liver by a porphyrinogenic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Kappas, A; Bradlow, H L; Bickers, D R; Alvares, A P

    1977-01-01

    The hepatic enzymes that catalyze drug oxidations and the reductive metabolism of steroid hormones to 5alpha-derivatives are localized in membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Phenobarbital, which exacerbates acute intermittent porphyria in man, induces drug-oxidizing enzymes in liver. Additionally, patients in whome the primary gene defect (uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase deficiency) of acute intermittent porphyria has become clinically expressed have low levels of hepatic steroid delta4-5alpha-reductase activity. This 5alpha-reductase deficiency in acute intermittent porphyria leads to the disproportionate generation of 5beta-steroid metabolites from precursor hormones; such steroid metabolites have significant porphyria-inducing action experimentally. In this study the effects of phenobarbital on drug oxidation and steroid 5alpha-reduction in man were examined to determine if this drug could produce changes in steroid 5alpha-reductase activity which mimicked those seen in patients with acute intermittent porphyria. Metabolic studies with [14C]-testosterone and 11beta-[3H]hydroxyandrostenedione were carried out in five normal volunteers. In all five subjects phenobarbital administration (2 mg/kg/per day for 21 days) enhanced plasma removal of the test drugs antipyrine and phenylbutazone as expected; but in four subjects phenobarbital also substantially depressed 5alpha-metabolite formation from [14C]testosterone and resulted in a pattern of hormone biotransformation characterized by a high ratio of 5beta/5alpha-metabolite formation. Studies with 11beta-[3H]hydroxy-androstenedione in three subjects confirmed that phenobarbital produced this high 5beta/5alpha ratio of steroid metabolism by depressing 5alpha-reductase activity for steroid hormones in liver. The high ratio of 5beta/5alpha-metabolites formed in normals after drug treatment mimicks the high 5beta/5alpha-steroid metabolite ratio formed from endogenous hormones in acute intermittent porphyria. The

  17. Sex worker activism, feminist discourse and HIV in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between sex worker activism and HIV-related discourse in Bangladesh, relating recent developments in activism to the influence of feminist thought. Following their eviction in 1991 from brothels from red light areas, Bangladeshi sex workers started a social movement, at just about the same time that programmes started to work with sex workers to reduce the transmission of HIV. This paper argues that both sex worker activism and HIV-prevention initiatives find impetus in feminist pro-sex-work perspectives, which place emphasis on individual and collective agency. However, by participating in these programmes, sex workers failed to contest the imagery of themselves as 'vectors' of HIV. In this way, they were unwittingly complicit in reproducing their identity as 'polluting others'. Moreover, by focusing on individual behaviour and the agency of sex workers, HIV programmes ignored the fact that the 'choices' made by sex workers are influenced by a wide range of structural and discursive factors, including gender norms and notions of bodily purity, which in turn have implications for the construction of HIV-related risk.

  18. Sex worker activism, feminist discourse and HIV in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between sex worker activism and HIV-related discourse in Bangladesh, relating recent developments in activism to the influence of feminist thought. Following their eviction in 1991 from brothels from red light areas, Bangladeshi sex workers started a social movement, at just about the same time that programmes started to work with sex workers to reduce the transmission of HIV. This paper argues that both sex worker activism and HIV-prevention initiatives find impetus in feminist pro-sex-work perspectives, which place emphasis on individual and collective agency. However, by participating in these programmes, sex workers failed to contest the imagery of themselves as ‘vectors’ of HIV. In this way, they were unwittingly complicit in reproducing their identity as ‘polluting others’. Moreover, by focusing on individual behaviour and the agency of sex workers, HIV programmes ignored the fact that the ‘choices’ made by sex workers are influenced by a wide range of structural and discursive factors, including gender norms and notions of bodily purity, which in turn have implications for the construction of HIV-related risk. PMID:25588539

  19. Sex worker activism, feminist discourse and HIV in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between sex worker activism and HIV-related discourse in Bangladesh, relating recent developments in activism to the influence of feminist thought. Following their eviction in 1991 from brothels from red light areas, Bangladeshi sex workers started a social movement, at just about the same time that programmes started to work with sex workers to reduce the transmission of HIV. This paper argues that both sex worker activism and HIV-prevention initiatives find impetus in feminist pro-sex-work perspectives, which place emphasis on individual and collective agency. However, by participating in these programmes, sex workers failed to contest the imagery of themselves as 'vectors' of HIV. In this way, they were unwittingly complicit in reproducing their identity as 'polluting others'. Moreover, by focusing on individual behaviour and the agency of sex workers, HIV programmes ignored the fact that the 'choices' made by sex workers are influenced by a wide range of structural and discursive factors, including gender norms and notions of bodily purity, which in turn have implications for the construction of HIV-related risk. PMID:25588539

  20. Profiles of sex steroids, fecundity and spawning of a migratory characiform fish from the Paraguay-Paraná basin: a comparative study in a three-river system.

    PubMed

    Perini, Violeta da Rocha; Paschoalini, Alessandro Loureiro; Cruz, Cláudia Kelly Fernandes da; Rocha, Rita de Cássia Gimenes Alcântara de; Senhorini, José Augusto; Ribeiro, Dirceu Marzulo; Formagio, Paulo Sérgio; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated for the first time the reproductive biology of Prochilodus lineatus in a system of rivers in southeastern Brasil, relating it to the role of tributary rivers in the reproductive success of this important commercial fish in the Upper Paraná River basin, where a cascade of hydroelectric dams were deployed. Specimens were caught bimonthly in three river sites: (S1) Grande River, downstream from the Porto Colômbia dam; (S2) Pardo River; and (S3) Mogi Guaçu River. Sex steroid plasma levels, fecundity, follicular atresia, oocyte diameter and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were compared among sites. In S1, fish exhibited changes in the reproductive parameters: lower GSI, oocyte diameter and fecundity and higher follicular atresia index, when compared to S2 and S3. Frequency of maturing fish was higher in S3 and spawning was only registered in S3. In sites S2 and S3, plasma concentrations of testosterone and 17β-estradiol in females and testosterone in males showed wide variations following gonadal maturation. Fish from S1 showed few significant variations in sex steroid concentrations throughout the gonadal cycle. These results indicate that P. lineatus does not reproduce in Grande River (S1), but probably uses the Pardo River (S2) as a migratory route towards the Mogi Guaçu River (S3) where they complete gonadal maturation and spawning. Our findings contribute for understanding the reproductive biology of P. lineatus and to highlight the importance of tributaries in impounded rivers as a favourable environment for migration and spawning of fish.

  1. Profiles of sex steroids, fecundity and spawning of a migratory characiform fish from the Paraguay-Paraná basin: a comparative study in a three-river system.

    PubMed

    Perini, Violeta da Rocha; Paschoalini, Alessandro Loureiro; Cruz, Cláudia Kelly Fernandes da; Rocha, Rita de Cássia Gimenes Alcântara de; Senhorini, José Augusto; Ribeiro, Dirceu Marzulo; Formagio, Paulo Sérgio; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated for the first time the reproductive biology of Prochilodus lineatus in a system of rivers in southeastern Brasil, relating it to the role of tributary rivers in the reproductive success of this important commercial fish in the Upper Paraná River basin, where a cascade of hydroelectric dams were deployed. Specimens were caught bimonthly in three river sites: (S1) Grande River, downstream from the Porto Colômbia dam; (S2) Pardo River; and (S3) Mogi Guaçu River. Sex steroid plasma levels, fecundity, follicular atresia, oocyte diameter and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were compared among sites. In S1, fish exhibited changes in the reproductive parameters: lower GSI, oocyte diameter and fecundity and higher follicular atresia index, when compared to S2 and S3. Frequency of maturing fish was higher in S3 and spawning was only registered in S3. In sites S2 and S3, plasma concentrations of testosterone and 17β-estradiol in females and testosterone in males showed wide variations following gonadal maturation. Fish from S1 showed few significant variations in sex steroid concentrations throughout the gonadal cycle. These results indicate that P. lineatus does not reproduce in Grande River (S1), but probably uses the Pardo River (S2) as a migratory route towards the Mogi Guaçu River (S3) where they complete gonadal maturation and spawning. Our findings contribute for understanding the reproductive biology of P. lineatus and to highlight the importance of tributaries in impounded rivers as a favourable environment for migration and spawning of fish. PMID:23616136

  2. Effects of sex steroid hormones and their metabolites on neuronal injury caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Fujitani, Noriko; Sakurai, Hikaru; Takemoto, Takuya; Ikeda-Ishihara, Nami; Mori-Yasumoto, Kanami; Nehira, Tatsuo; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    In this study, protective actions of the sex steroid hormones, progesterone, testosterone, and 17β-estradiol, against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation-induced neuronal cell death were examined using rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Progesterone, testosterone, and 17β-estradiol significantly attenuated neuronal cell death elicited by OGD/reoxygenation. While the neuroprotection conferred by progesterone was not affected by SU-10603, an inhibitor of cytochrome P45017α, finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor that blocks the conversion of progesterone to allopregnanolone, partially reversed the neuroprotection induced by progesterone. The progesterone metabolite, allopregnanolone attenuated neuronal injury induced by OGD/reoxygenation. Pretreatment with letrozole, a cytochrome P450 aromatase inhibitor or 4-hydroxyphenyl-1-naphthol, a 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 inhibitor showed no effect on testosterone-mediated neuroprotection, while finasteride completely abolished the protective action of testosterone. Treatment with 5α-dihydrotestosterone significantly suppressed neuronal injury. Pretreatment with mifepristone, a progesterone receptor antagonist and hydroxyflutamid, an androgen receptor antagonist significantly diminished the neuroprotective effects of progesterone and testosterone, respectively. ICI182,780, an estrogen receptor antagonist, showed no effect on neuroprotection mediated by 17β-estradiol. Pretreatment with actinomycin D or cycloheximide clearly abolished the neuroprotective effects of progesterone and testosterone, while actinomycin D and cycloheximide did not show any effect on neuroprotection mediated by 17β-estradiol. Taken together, progesterone protects neurons via progesterone receptor-dependent genomic pathway, and allopregnanolone is involved in progesterone-mediated neuroprotection. Testosterone and its metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone protect neurons via the genomic pathway of the androgen receptor

  3. Sex and Exercise Interact to Alter the Expression of Anabolic Androgenic Steroid-Induced Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Onakomaiya, Marie M.; Porter, Donna M.; Oberlander, Joseph G.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are taken by both sexes to enhance athletic performance and body image, nearly always in conjunction with an exercise regime. Although taken to improve physical attributes, chronic AAS use can promote negative behavior, including anxiety. Few studies have directly compared the impact of AAS use in males versus females or assessed the interaction of exercise and AAS. We show that AAS increase anxiety-like behaviors in female but not male mice and that voluntary exercise accentuates these sex-specific differences. We also show that levels of the anxiogenic peptide corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) are significantly greater in males, but that AAS selectively increase CRF levels in females, thus abrogating this sex-specific difference. Exercise did not ameliorate AAS-induced anxiety or alter CRF levels in females. Exercise was anxiolytic in males, but this behavioral outcome did not correlate with CRF levels. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has also been implicated in the expression of anxiety. As with CRF, levels of hippocampal BDNF mRNA were significantly greater in males than females. AAS and exercise were without effect on BDNF mRNA in females. In males, anxiolytic effects of exercise correlated with increased BDNF mRNA, however AAS-induced changes in BDNF mRNA and anxiety did not. In sum, we find that AAS elicit sex-specific differences in anxiety and that voluntary exercise accentuates these differences. In addition, our data suggest that these behavioral outcomes may reflect convergent actions of AAS and exercise on a sexually differentiated CRF signaling system within the extended amygdala. PMID:24768711

  4. Sex and exercise interact to alter the expression of anabolic androgenic steroid-induced anxiety-like behaviors in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Onakomaiya, Marie M; Porter, Donna M; Oberlander, Joseph G; Henderson, Leslie P

    2014-07-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are taken by both sexes to enhance athletic performance and body image, nearly always in conjunction with an exercise regime. Although taken to improve physical attributes, chronic AAS use can promote negative behavior, including anxiety. Few studies have directly compared the impact of AAS use in males versus females or assessed the interaction of exercise and AAS. We show that AAS increase anxiety-like behaviors in female but not male mice and that voluntary exercise accentuates these sex-specific differences. We also show that levels of the anxiogenic peptide corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) are significantly greater in males, but that AAS selectively increase CRF levels in females, thus abrogating this sex-specific difference. Exercise did not ameliorate AAS-induced anxiety or alter CRF levels in females. Exercise was anxiolytic in males, but this behavioral outcome did not correlate with CRF levels. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has also been implicated in the expression of anxiety. As with CRF, levels of hippocampal BDNF mRNA were significantly greater in males than females. AAS and exercise were without effect on BDNF mRNA in females. In males, anxiolytic effects of exercise correlated with increased BDNF mRNA, however AAS-induced changes in BDNF mRNA and anxiety did not. In sum, we find that AAS elicit sex-specific differences in anxiety and that voluntary exercise accentuates these differences. In addition, our data suggest that these behavioral outcomes may reflect convergent actions of AAS and exercise on a sexually differentiated CRF signaling system within the extended amygdala. PMID:24768711

  5. Sex and exercise interact to alter the expression of anabolic androgenic steroid-induced anxiety-like behaviors in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Onakomaiya, Marie M; Porter, Donna M; Oberlander, Joseph G; Henderson, Leslie P

    2014-07-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are taken by both sexes to enhance athletic performance and body image, nearly always in conjunction with an exercise regime. Although taken to improve physical attributes, chronic AAS use can promote negative behavior, including anxiety. Few studies have directly compared the impact of AAS use in males versus females or assessed the interaction of exercise and AAS. We show that AAS increase anxiety-like behaviors in female but not male mice and that voluntary exercise accentuates these sex-specific differences. We also show that levels of the anxiogenic peptide corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) are significantly greater in males, but that AAS selectively increase CRF levels in females, thus abrogating this sex-specific difference. Exercise did not ameliorate AAS-induced anxiety or alter CRF levels in females. Exercise was anxiolytic in males, but this behavioral outcome did not correlate with CRF levels. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has also been implicated in the expression of anxiety. As with CRF, levels of hippocampal BDNF mRNA were significantly greater in males than females. AAS and exercise were without effect on BDNF mRNA in females. In males, anxiolytic effects of exercise correlated with increased BDNF mRNA, however AAS-induced changes in BDNF mRNA and anxiety did not. In sum, we find that AAS elicit sex-specific differences in anxiety and that voluntary exercise accentuates these differences. In addition, our data suggest that these behavioral outcomes may reflect convergent actions of AAS and exercise on a sexually differentiated CRF signaling system within the extended amygdala.

  6. Identification and steroid receptor activity of products formed from the bromination of technical nonylphenol.

    PubMed

    Hill, Elizabeth M; Smith, Michael D

    2006-09-01

    Alkylphenols are commonly present in wastewater effluents and may contribute to the total hormonal loading of receiving waters due to their weakly estrogenic properties. However the presence of reactive bromine species in some treated wastewaters can result in the formation of brominated alkylphenols which may also possess steroid receptor activity. In this study, the products of bromination of technical nonylphenol (NP) were identified, purified and tested in vitro in recombinant yeast steroid receptor transcription assays. Bromination of NP in the presence of acetic acid resulted in the formation of one major product which was identified as 2-bromo-4-nonylphenol (NPBr). In the presence of methanol/water, bromination of NP resulted in the formation 2,6-dibromo-4-nonylphenol (NPBr2) as well as a number of other minor polybrominated products. The EC50 of NPBr in the yeast estrogen receptor transcription (YES) assay was 6.7x10(-6) M, which was 48 fold less active than NP and 86,000 fold less active than the estrogen agonist 17beta-estradiol NPBr2 was not active in the YES assay. NP, NPBr and NPBr2 were all weakly androgenic in the yeast androgen receptor transcription assay but at concentrations which were 100,000 fold less active than the androgen receptor agonist dihydrotestosterone. Neither NP, NPBr or NPBr2 exhibited appreciable anti-estrogenic or anti-androgenic activity in the yeast receptor transcription assays. This study suggests that bromination of NP markedly reduces its estrogen receptor transcription activity but has no effect on the weak androgen receptor transcription activity of the alkylphenol. PMID:16473392

  7. Sex Trade Behavior Among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joan S.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Kennedy, David P.; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Sex trade behavior is fairly common among homeless adults and may contribute to higher rates of HIV/AIDS in this population. This study provides a detailed examination of the sex trade-related attitudes and behaviors of homeless men by: (1) determining the prevalence of sex trade-related behaviors, including sex with female sex workers (FSWs); (2) identifying risk factors for having sex with FSWs; and (3) comparing men's relationships with FSWs and non-FSWs in terms of relationship qualities and HIV-related risk behaviors, such as condom use. Structured interviews were conducted with a probability sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men recruited from meal lines in Los Angeles. Recent sex with a FSW was reported by 26% of men, and more likely among those who were older, used crack cocaine, had more sex partners, believed that sometimes men just need to have sex no matter what, and were embedded in networks that were denser and where risky sex was more normative. Compared to non-FSW partners, men with FSW partners felt less emotionally close to them, were more likely to believe the partner had never been tested for HIV, and were more likely to have sex with them under the influence of drugs or alcohol; however, they were not more likely to talk about using condoms or to use condoms with FSWs. Whether the relationship was considered “serious” was a stronger correlate of condom use than whether the partner was a FSW. Implications of these findings for HIV prevention efforts among homeless adults are discussed. PMID:23720137

  8. Conserved steroid hormone homology converges on nuclear factor κB to modulate inflammation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Payne, Asha S; Freishtat, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is a complex, multifactorial disease comprising multiple different subtypes, rather than a single disease entity, yet it has a consistent clinical phenotype: recurring episodes of chest tightness, wheezing, and difficulty breathing (Pediatr Pulmonol Suppl. 1997;15:9-12). Despite the complex pathogenesis of asthma, steroid hormones (eg, glucocorticoids) are ubiquitous in the short-term and long-term management of all types of asthma. Overall, steroid hormones are a class of widely relevant, biologically active compounds originating from cholesterol and altered in a stepwise fashion, but maintain a basic 17-carbon, 4-ring structure. Steroids are lipophilic molecules that diffuse readily through cell membranes to directly and/or indirectly affect gene transcription. In addition, they use rapid, nongenomic actions to affect cellular products. Steroid hormones comprise several groups (including glucocorticoids, sex steroid hormones, and secosteroids) with critical divergent biological and physiological functions relevant to health and disease. However, the conserved homology of steroid hormone molecules, receptors, and signaling pathways suggests that each of these is part of a dynamic system of hormone interaction, likely involving an overlap of downstream signaling mechanisms. Therefore, we will review the similarities and differences of these 3 groups of steroid hormones (ie, glucocorticoids, sex steroid hormones, and secosteroids), identifying nuclear factor κB as a common inflammatory mediator. Despite our understanding of the impact of individual steroids (eg, glucocorticoids, sex steroids and secosteroids) on asthma, research has yet to explain the interplay of the dynamic system in which these hormones function. To do so, there needs to be a better understanding of the interplay of classic, nonclassic, and nongenomic steroid hormone functions. However, clues from the conserved homology steroid hormone structure and function and signaling pathways offer

  9. Display activity and seasonality of faecal sexual steroids in male great bustard (Otis tarda L.).

    PubMed

    Biczó, A; Péczely, P

    2007-03-01

    The non-invasive faecal sampling and RIA was used to measure faecal equivalents of testosterone (T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), oestradiol-17beta (E2) and progesterone (P4) in juvenile and adult great bustard males. Possible connections of diurnal and seasonal changes of sexual steroid levels and display activity were studied. Correlations were found between sexual steroid equivalent levels of faeces and display activity and agonistic behaviour in the different phases of annual cycle of adult males. In early display period increasing levels of androgens were measured, during main display period very high androgen dominance was observable against E2 and P4. During postnuptial moult strong T decrease and DHEA and P4 increase were detected. Elevation of E2 was measured during wintering. In juveniles level of DHEA was higher than level of T suggesting its importance in immature males. Decrease of T was detected between reproductive period and postnuptial moult and DHEA between reproduction and wintering, accompanying with E2 elevation. The inhibiting effect of inclement weather on gonad functions also was detected in our study. We suppose that the unexpected cold weather with strong wind depressed the levels of androgens both in juveniles and adults and the increase of faecal E2 was also detected. PMID:17385541

  10. Display activity and seasonality of faecal sexual steroids in male great bustard (Otis tarda L.).

    PubMed

    Biczó, A; Péczely, P

    2007-03-01

    The non-invasive faecal sampling and RIA was used to measure faecal equivalents of testosterone (T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), oestradiol-17beta (E2) and progesterone (P4) in juvenile and adult great bustard males. Possible connections of diurnal and seasonal changes of sexual steroid levels and display activity were studied. Correlations were found between sexual steroid equivalent levels of faeces and display activity and agonistic behaviour in the different phases of annual cycle of adult males. In early display period increasing levels of androgens were measured, during main display period very high androgen dominance was observable against E2 and P4. During postnuptial moult strong T decrease and DHEA and P4 increase were detected. Elevation of E2 was measured during wintering. In juveniles level of DHEA was higher than level of T suggesting its importance in immature males. Decrease of T was detected between reproductive period and postnuptial moult and DHEA between reproduction and wintering, accompanying with E2 elevation. The inhibiting effect of inclement weather on gonad functions also was detected in our study. We suppose that the unexpected cold weather with strong wind depressed the levels of androgens both in juveniles and adults and the increase of faecal E2 was also detected.

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extracts and steroidal sapogenins of Agave americana.

    PubMed

    Peana, A T; Moretti, M D; Manconi, V; Desole, G; Pippia, P

    1997-06-01

    Lyophilized aqueous extracts obtained from Agave americana L (Agavaceae) collected in the north of Sardinia were characterized with regard to their steroidal sapogenin content. Extracts of A. americana and genins isolated from them were evaluated for anti-inflammatory properties by testing their effects on carrageenin-induced edema. The effect of orally administered genins on gastric mucous membranes was also assessed. Lyophilized extracts administered by the intraperitoneal route at doses equivalent to 200 and 300 mg/kg of fresh plant starting material, showed good anti-inflammatory activity. Doses of genins (total steroidal sapogenins, hecogenin and tigogenin) equivalent to the amount in the lyophilized extracts produced an antiedentatous effect which was much stronger and more efficacious than that obtained with an i.p. administration of 5 mg/kg of indomethacin or dexamethasone 21-phosphate at a dose equivalent to the molar content of hecogenin administered. At the doses used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity, the genins did not have any harmful effect on the gastric mucous membranes. Lesions occurred when significantly higher doses of hecogenin were given, but gastric damage was still less than that caused by the drugs used for comparative purposes.

  12. Sex differences in the activation of language cortex during childhood.

    PubMed

    Plante, Elena; Schmithorst, Vince J; Holland, Scott K; Byars, Anna W

    2006-01-01

    Sex differences have been well documented in the behavioral literature but have occurred inconsistently in the neuroimaging literature. This investigation examined the impact of subject age, language task, and cortical region on the occurrence of sex differences in functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two hundred and five (104 m, 101 f) right handed, monolingual English speaking children between the ages of 5 and 18 years were enrolled in this study. The study used fMRI at 3T to evaluate BOLD signal variation associated with sex, age, and their interaction. Children completed up to four language tasks, which involved listening to stories, prosody processing, single word vocabulary identification, and verb generation. A sex difference for behavioral performance was found for the prosodic processing task only. Brain activation in the classical left hemisphere language areas of the brain and their right homologues were assessed for sex differences. Although left lateralization was present for both frontal and temporal regions for all but the prosody task, no significant sex differences were found for the degree of lateralization. Sex x age interaction effects were found for all but the task involving single word vocabulary. However effect sizes associated with the sex differences were small, which suggests that relatively large sample sizes would be needed to detect these effects reliably.

  13. Effects of chlorpyrifos on in vitro sex steroid production and thyroid follicular development in adult and larval Lake Sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Catherine; Burnett, Duncan C; Arcinas, Liane; Palace, Vince; Gary Anderson, W

    2015-08-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a widely used organophosphate pesticide that has previously been shown to enter waterways in biologically relevant concentrations and has the potential to disrupt both thyroid hormone and sex steroid biosynthesis in vertebrates. Because gonadal maturation and larval development in Lake Sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, potentially coincide with the application of chlorpyrifos we examined the effects of chlorpyrifos on both thyroid follicular development in larval Lake Sturgeon, and sex hormone synthesis in adult Lake Sturgeon. For the first time, the present study reports steroidogenesis from testicular and ovarian tissue in Lake Sturgeon using an established in vitro bioassay. Furthermore, incubating gonad tissue with 5, 500 or 2000ngmL(-1) chlorpyrifos revealed an inhibitory effect on testosterone synthesis in both testicular (control, 40.29pgmg(-1) tissue wet weight(-1)h(-1) compared to experimental, 21.84pgmg(-1) tissue wet weight(-1)h(-1)) and ovarian (control, 33.83pgmg(-1) tissue wet weight(-1)h(-1) compared to experimental, 15.19pgmg(-1) tissue wet weight(-1)h(-1)) tissue. In a second series of experiments, larval Lake Sturgeon were exposed to equivalent concentrations of chlorpyrifos as above for 10days (d) between hatch and the onset of exogenous feeding. Larvae from each treatment group were raised until 67days post hatch (dph) and growth rates were compared alongside key indicators of thyroid follicle growth. Chlorpyrifos treatment had no effect on the measured indicators of thyroid follicular development.

  14. Joint Effects of Smoking and Gene Variants Involved in Sex Steroid Metabolism on Hot Flashes in Late Reproductive-Age Women

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Ellen W.; Sammel, Mary D.; Queen, Kaila; Lin, Hui; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although smoking has a known association with hot flashes, the factors distinguishing smokers at greatest risk for menopausal symptoms have not been well delineated. Recent evidence supports a relationship between menopausal symptoms and variants in several genes encoding enzymes that metabolize substrates such as sex steriods, xenobiotics, and catechols. It is currently not known whether the impact of smoking on hot flashes is modified by the presence of such variants. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between smoking and hot flash occurrence as a function of genetic variation in sex steroid-metabolizing enzymes. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of data from the Penn Ovarian Aging study, an ongoing population-based cohort of late reproductive-aged women, was performed. Smoking behavior was characterized. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in five genes were investigated: COMT Val158Met (rs4680), CYP1A2*1F (rs762551), CYP1B1*4 (Asn452Ser, rs1800440), CYP1B1*3 (Leu432Val, rs1056836), and CYP3A4*1B (rs2740574). Results: Compared with nonsmokers, European-American COMT Val158Met double-variant carriers who smoked had increased odds of hot flashes [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 6.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32–28.78)]; European-American COMT Val158Met double-variant carriers who smoked heavily had more frequent moderate or severe hot flashes than nonsmokers (AOR 13.7, 95% CI 1.2–154.9). European-American CYP 1B1*3 double-variant carriers who smoked described more frequent moderate or severe hot flashes than nonsmoking (AOR 20.6, 95% CI 1.64–257.93) and never-smoking (AOR 20.59, 95% CI 1.39–304.68) carriers, respectively. African-American single-variant CYP 1A2 carriers who smoked were more likely to report hot flashes than the nonsmoking carriers (AOR 6.16, 95% CI 1.11–33.91). Conclusion: This is the first report demonstrating the effects of smoking within the strata of gene variants involved in sex

  15. Female rats release more corticosterone than males in response to alcohol: influence of circulating sex steroids and possible consequences for blood alcohol levels.

    PubMed

    Rivier, C

    1993-08-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of female rats is more responsive to a variety of stimuli than that of males. Proestrous females are also reported to release more ACTH and corticosterone in response to restraint stress than females at other stages of the estrous cycle. Finally, blood alcohol levels (BALs) reached in response to a standard dose of alcohol also indicate the presence of a gender specificity, with females exhibiting higher BALs than males. The aim of this study was therefore 2-fold: first, we investigated the influence of gender on the ability of alcohol to increase plasma ACTH and corticosterone secretion in the rat. Second, we tested the hypothesis that corticosterone alters alcohol metabolism and asked whether this might represent a mechanism underlying the sex difference in BALs. We observed that compared with intact males, intact females taken at random stages of the estrous cycle secreted significantly (p < 0.01) more ACTH and corticosterone in response to alcohol (0.2-1.8 g/kg). Within females, the intraperitoneal administration of alcohol was followed by higher plasma ACTH and corticosteroids levels during proestrus and estrus, compared with diestrus. Removal of circulating sex steroids abolished the gender difference in terms of ACTH secretion, but ovariectomized females still released more corticosterone than castrated males in response to 0.6 and 1.8 g alcohol/kg. This difference could not be explained by a sex-related component of pituitary responsiveness to corticotropin-releasing factor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity evaluation of steroidal imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Rassokhina, Irina V; Volkova, Yulia A; Kozlov, Andrey S; Scherbakov, Alexander M; Andreeva, Olga E; Shirinian, Valerik Z; Zavarzin, Igor V

    2016-09-01

    An elegant approach to unknown steroidal imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine hybrids is disclosed. Unique derivatives of androstene and estrane series containing imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine motifs were prepared from 17-ethynyl steroids in good yields via copper-catalyzed cascade aminomethylation/cycloisomerization with imines. The synthesized compounds were screened for cytotoxicity against human breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HBL-100, MDA-MB-453) and prostate (LNCaP-LN3, PC-3, DU 145) cancer cell lines. The majority of tested compounds showed activities at μM level in breast cancer cells. The hormone-responsive breast cancer cells MCF-7 were more sensitive to novel compounds than ERα-negative cells; in particular, compounds 6a,b exhibited promising cytotoxicity against this cell line with the IC50 values in the range of 3-4μM. Furthermore, compound 4a showed remarkable effects as a selective ERα receptor modulator.

  17. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity evaluation of steroidal imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Rassokhina, Irina V; Volkova, Yulia A; Kozlov, Andrey S; Scherbakov, Alexander M; Andreeva, Olga E; Shirinian, Valerik Z; Zavarzin, Igor V

    2016-09-01

    An elegant approach to unknown steroidal imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine hybrids is disclosed. Unique derivatives of androstene and estrane series containing imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine motifs were prepared from 17-ethynyl steroids in good yields via copper-catalyzed cascade aminomethylation/cycloisomerization with imines. The synthesized compounds were screened for cytotoxicity against human breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HBL-100, MDA-MB-453) and prostate (LNCaP-LN3, PC-3, DU 145) cancer cell lines. The majority of tested compounds showed activities at μM level in breast cancer cells. The hormone-responsive breast cancer cells MCF-7 were more sensitive to novel compounds than ERα-negative cells; in particular, compounds 6a,b exhibited promising cytotoxicity against this cell line with the IC50 values in the range of 3-4μM. Furthermore, compound 4a showed remarkable effects as a selective ERα receptor modulator. PMID:27263438

  18. Sex and age differences in the impact of the forced swimming test on the levels of steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mota, Lucía; Ulloa, Rosa-Elena; Herrera-Pérez, Jaime; Chavira, Roberto; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso

    2011-10-24

    Compared with the adult disorder, depression in children exhibits differences in its neurobiology, particularly in the HPA axis regulation. The bases of such differences can be evaluated in animal models of depression. The objective of the present study was to determine age and sex differences of Wistar rats in the forced swimming test (FST). The influence of sex and age on corticosterone, estrogens and testosterone serum levels was also determined. Prepubertal rats showed immobility, swimming and climbing behaviors during the pre-test and test sessions. In addition, in the prepubertal animals, no sex differences were found during the pre-test and test sessions. Age comparisons indicated no differences in the female groups, however adult males exhibited more immobility and less swimming than young males, in both FST sessions. The young and female rats showed less immobility behavior and increased levels of estrogens after the FST. The present results indicate that the FST is an animal model suitable to evaluate depressive-like behaviors in prepubertal subjects and to explore behavioral changes related to neurodevelopment.

  19. Steroid biosynthesis in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Vihma, Veera

    2015-11-01

    Tissue-specific expression of steroidogenic enzymes allows the modulation of active steroid levels in a local manner. Thus, the measurement of local steroid concentrations, rather than the circulating levels, has been recognized as a more accurate indicator of the steroid action within a specific tissue. Adipose tissue, one of the largest endocrine tissues in the human body, has been established as an important site for steroid storage and metabolism. Locally produced steroids, through the enzymatic conversion from steroid precursors delivered to adipose tissue, have been proven to either functionally regulate adipose tissue metabolism, or quantitatively contribute to the whole body's steroid levels. Most recently, it has been suggested that adipose tissue may contain the steroidogenic machinery necessary for the initiation of steroid biosynthesis de novo from cholesterol. This review summarizes the evidence indicating the presence of the entire steroidogenic apparatus in adipose tissue and discusses the potential roles of local steroid products in modulating adipose tissue activity and other metabolic parameters.

  20. Femoral bone structural geometry adapts to mechanical loading and is influenced by sex steroids: the Penn State Young Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Petit, Moira A; Beck, Thomas J; Lin, Hung-Mo; Bentley, Christy; Legro, Richard S; Lloyd, Tom

    2004-09-01

    We used 10 years of longitudinal data from Penn State Young Women's Health Study to explore predictors of adult bone structural geometry and strength. One hundred twelve participants were enrolled in the study at age 12. We report findings on the 76 participants who remained in the study for 10 years. Measurements were recorded biannually for the first 4 years and annually thereafter. Proximal femur DXA scans (Hologic QDR 2000) were taken from 17-22 years and analyzed using a hip structure analysis program to assess areal bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm2), subperiosteal width, cortical thickness, bone cross-sectional area (CSA), and section modulus (Z) at the narrow neck and femoral shaft. Total body lean mass (g) was measured with DXA total body scans. Nutrition, anthropometry, and sex steroids [testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2)] were measured from ages 12-22 years. Multiple regression models were used to assess predictors of change in bone variables (17-22 years) and absolute bone values (average of age 21 and 22 years, n = 79). Neck Z (+3.1%) and width (+1.3%), but not BMD (-0.8%), increased significantly from age 17 to 22 years. At the shaft, all variables increased (+1.0-4.0%, P < 0.01). After controlling for baseline (age 17) height, weight and bone measurement, weight change (neck) or lean mass (shaft), and age of menarche were the primary predictors of change in bone strength. After controlling for height and weight, only lean mass predicted absolute young adult Z at both the neck (r2 = 0.48, P < 0.01) and the shaft (r2 = 0.67, P < 0.01). When lean mass was removed from the model, sports exercise score replaced lean mass as a predictor of Z at both neck (r2 = 0.40, P < 0.01) and shaft (r2 = 0.60, P < 0.01) sites. For neck and shaft cortical thickness and BMD, both estradiol and sports score/lean mass were positive predictors (r2 = 0.15-0.40, P < 0.01). For neck bone width, testosterone levels (negative) and lean mass (positive) were significant (r2 = 0

  1. Fate of steroid hormones and endocrine activities in swine manure disposal and treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Combalbert, Sarah; Bellet, Virginie; Dabert, Patrick; Bernet, Nicolas; Balaguer, Patrick; Hernandez-Raquet, Guillermina

    2012-03-01

    Manure may contain high concern endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) such as steroid hormones, naturally produced by pigs, which are present at μgL(-1) levels. Manure may also contain other EDCs such as nonylphenols (NP), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins. Thus, once manure is applied to the land as soil fertilizer these compounds may reach aquifers and consequently living organisms, inducing abnormal endocrine responses. In France, manure is generally stored in anaerobic tanks prior spreading on land; when nitrogen removal is requested, manure is treated by aerobic processes before spreading. However, little is known about the fate of hormones and multiple endocrine-disrupting activities in such manure disposal and treatment systems. Here, we determined the fate of hormones and diverse endocrine activities during manure storage and treatment by combining chemical analysis and in vitro quantification of estrogen (ER), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), androgen (AR), pregnane-X (PXR) and peroxysome proliferator-activated γ (PPARγ) receptor-mediated activities. Our results show that manure contains large quantities of hormones and activates ER and AhR, two of the nuclear receptors studied. Most of these endocrine activities were found in the solid fraction of manure and appeared to be induced mainly by hormones and other unidentified pollutants. Hormones, ER and AhR activities found in manure were poorly removed during manure storage but were efficiently removed by aerobic treatment of manure.

  2. Comparative aspects of steroid hormone metabolism and ovarian activity in felids, measured noninvasively in feces.

    PubMed

    Brown, J L; Wasser, S K; Wildt, D E; Graham, L H

    1994-10-01

    Noninvasive fecal assays were used to study steroid metabolism and ovarian activity in several felid species. Using the domestic cat (Felis catus) as model, the excretory products of injected [14C]estradiol (E2) and [14C]progesterone (P4) were determined. Within 2 days, 97.0 +/- 0.6% and 96.7 +/- 0.5% of recovered E2 and P4 radioactivity, respectively, was found in feces. E2 was excreted as unconjugated estradiol and estrone (40%) and as a non-enzyme-hydrolyzable conjugate (60%). P4 was excreted primarily as non-enzyme-hydrolyzable, conjugated metabolites (78%) and as unconjugated pregnenolone epimers. A simple method for extracting fecal steroid metabolites optimized extraction efficiencies of the E2 and P4 excretion products (90.1 +/- 0.8% and 87.2 +/- 1.4%, respectively). Analysis of HPLC fractions of extracted fecal samples from the radiolabel-injected domestic cats revealed that E2 immunoreactivity coincided primarily with the unconjugated metabolized [14C]E2 peak, whereas progestogen immunoreactivity coincided with a single conjugated epimer and multiple unconjugated pregnenolone epimers. After HPLC separation, similar immunoreactive E2 and P4 metabolite profiles were observed in the leopard cat (F. bengalensis), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa), and snow leopard (Panthera uncia). Longitudinal analyses demonstrated that changes in fecal E2 and P4 metabolite concentrations reflected natural or artificially induced ovarian activity. For example, severalfold increases in E2 excretion were associated with overt estrus or exogenous gonadotropin treatment, and elevated fecal P4 metabolite concentrations occurred during pregnant and nonpregnant (pseudopregnant) luteal phases. Although overall concentrations were similar, the duration of elevated fecal P4 metabolites during pseudopregnancy was approximately half that observed during pregnancy. In summary, steroid metabolism mechanisms appear to be conserved among these physically

  3. Comparative aspects of steroid hormone metabolism and ovarian activity in felids, measured noninvasively in feces.

    PubMed

    Brown, J L; Wasser, S K; Wildt, D E; Graham, L H

    1994-10-01

    Noninvasive fecal assays were used to study steroid metabolism and ovarian activity in several felid species. Using the domestic cat (Felis catus) as model, the excretory products of injected [14C]estradiol (E2) and [14C]progesterone (P4) were determined. Within 2 days, 97.0 +/- 0.6% and 96.7 +/- 0.5% of recovered E2 and P4 radioactivity, respectively, was found in feces. E2 was excreted as unconjugated estradiol and estrone (40%) and as a non-enzyme-hydrolyzable conjugate (60%). P4 was excreted primarily as non-enzyme-hydrolyzable, conjugated metabolites (78%) and as unconjugated pregnenolone epimers. A simple method for extracting fecal steroid metabolites optimized extraction efficiencies of the E2 and P4 excretion products (90.1 +/- 0.8% and 87.2 +/- 1.4%, respectively). Analysis of HPLC fractions of extracted fecal samples from the radiolabel-injected domestic cats revealed that E2 immunoreactivity coincided primarily with the unconjugated metabolized [14C]E2 peak, whereas progestogen immunoreactivity coincided with a single conjugated epimer and multiple unconjugated pregnenolone epimers. After HPLC separation, similar immunoreactive E2 and P4 metabolite profiles were observed in the leopard cat (F. bengalensis), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa), and snow leopard (Panthera uncia). Longitudinal analyses demonstrated that changes in fecal E2 and P4 metabolite concentrations reflected natural or artificially induced ovarian activity. For example, severalfold increases in E2 excretion were associated with overt estrus or exogenous gonadotropin treatment, and elevated fecal P4 metabolite concentrations occurred during pregnant and nonpregnant (pseudopregnant) luteal phases. Although overall concentrations were similar, the duration of elevated fecal P4 metabolites during pseudopregnancy was approximately half that observed during pregnancy. In summary, steroid metabolism mechanisms appear to be conserved among these physically

  4. Race and Sex Differences in College Student Physical Activity Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Laura H.; Raedeke, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess sex/race differences on psychosocial correlates of physical activity among college students. Methods: Survey research protocol. Results: Students (n = 636) exercised an average of 3.5 days per week, with black females being the least active. Across subgroups, health/fitness was rated as the most important motive for exercise,…

  5. Anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cynthia M

    2002-01-01

    pharmacology of "anabolism" is in its infancy: no drugs currently available are "purely" anabolic but all possess androgenic properties as well. The present review briefly recapitulates the historic literature about the androgenic/anabolic steroids and describes literature supporting the anabolic activity of these drugs in normal people, focusing on the use of suprapharmacologic doses by athletes and clinicians to achieve anabolic effects in normal humans. We will present the emerging literature that is beginning to explore more specific mechanisms that might mediate the effects of suprapharmacologic regimens. The terms anabolic/androgenic steroids will be used throughout to reflect the combined actions of all drugs that are currently available.

  6. Effects of sex steroid hormones, thyroid hormone levels, and insulin regulation on thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Changsheng, Chen; Jiangfang, Fu; Bin, Gao; Nanyan, Zhang; Xiaomiao, Li; Deqiang, Li; Ying, Xing; Wensong, Zai; Qiuhe, Ji

    2010-12-01

    Our study is to determine the expression of thyroid hormone, sex hormone, insulin, and C-peptide in Chinese male patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP). This study covered 102 patients with hyperthyroidism from Xijing Hospital. According to whether occurrence of TPP or not, patients were divided into two groups (those that were hyperthyroid with and without TPP) that were, matched with age, blood pressure, urea, and creatinine. We found the body mass index (BMI) in patients with TPP was higher than that in pure hyperthyroidism patients. The levels of the total thyroxine (T4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and free thyroxine (FT4) were significantly lower in patients with TPP compared with pure hyperthyroidism patients, while serum testosterone levels were higher compared with pure hyperthyroidism patients. Moreover, after glucose administration, the concentration of insulin at 60, 120, and 180 min were significantly higher in patients with TPP than those in pure hyperthyroidism patients. The insulin area under the curve (AUC) was significantly increased in patients with TPP compared with pure hyperthyroidism patients. The levels of thyroid hormone, sex hormone, and insulin were different in Chinese male patients with TPP compared to those with only hyperthyroidism.

  7. Comparison of new nitrosoureas esters with modified steroidal nucleus for cytogenetic and antineoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Hussein, A; Mioglou-Kalouptsi, E; Papageorgiou, A; Karapidaki, I; Iakovidou-Kritsi, Z; Lialiaris, T; Xrysogelou, E; Camoutsis, C; Mourelatos, D

    2007-01-01

    Nitrosourea is decomposed under physiological conditions to react with biological macromolecules by two mechanisms: alkylation (with proteins and nucleic acids) and carbamoylation (with proteins but not nucleic acids). It has been suggested that the alkylating action is responsible for the therapeutic effects of nitrosoureas, and that the carbamoylation activity leads to toxicity effects. In order to reduce systemic toxicity and improve specificity and distribution for cancer therapy, 2-haloethyl nitrosourea has been esterified with modified steroids, which are used as biological platforms for transporting the alkylating agent to the tumor site in a specific manner. The cytogenetic and antineoplastic effect were studied of seven newly synthesized esters of N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)alanyl carboxyl derivatives with a modified steroidal nucleus (compounds 1-7). As a very sensitive indicator of genotoxicity the Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) assay was used and as a valuable marker of cytostatic activity the cell Proliferation Rate Index (PRI) in cultures of normal human lymphocytes was used. The order of magnitude of the cytogenetic activity on a molar basis (15, 30, 120 microM) of the compounds was 7>6>3>5>2>4>1. The most active compound 7 has an enlarged (seven carbon atoms) A ring modified with a lactam group (-NHCO-) with the nitrosourea moiety esterified at position 17 In the group of seven substances a correlation was observed between the magnitude of SCE response and the depression in PRI (r=-O, 65, p<0.001). According to the criterion of activity of National Cancer Institute (NCI), the order of antineoplastic activity of compounds on lymphoid L1210 leukemia is 7>6>2>5>4>3>1 and on lympocytic P388 leukemia cells is 7>2>6>5>4>3>1. The present results are in agreement with previous suggestions that the effectiveness in cytogenetic activity may well be correlated with antitumor effects [T/C: 248% for the compound 7 in 250 mg/kg b.w.; T/C: mean survival time of drug

  8. A cross-sectional study of the association of age, race and ethnicity, and body mass index with sex steroid hormone marker profiles among men in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)

    PubMed Central

    Ritchey, Jamie; Karmaus, Wilfried; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Steck, Susan E; Zhang, Hongmei

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Since sex hormone markers are metabolically linked, examining sex steroid hormones singly may account for inconsistent findings by age, race/ethnicity and body mass index (BMI) across studies. First, these markers were statistically combined into profiles to account for the metabolic relationship between markers. Then, the relationships between sex steroid hormone profiles and age, race/ethnicity and BMI were explored in multinomial logistic regression models. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting The US Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Participants 1538 Men, >17 years. Primary outcome measure Sex hormone profiles. Results Cluster analysis was used to identify four statistically determined profiles with Blom-transformed T, E, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and 3-α diol G. We used these four profiles with multinomial logistic regression models to examine differences by race/ethnicity, age and BMI. Mexican American men >50 years were associated with the profile that had lowest T, E and 3-α diol G levels compared to other profiles (p<0.05). Non-Hispanic Black, overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2) and obese (>30 kg/m2) men were most likely to be associated with the cluster with the lowest SHBG (p<0.05). Conclusion The associations of sex steroid hormone profiles by race/ethnicity are novel, while the findings by age and BMI groups are largely consistent with observations from single hormone studies. Future studies should validate these hormone profile groups and investigate these profiles in relation to chronic diseases and certain cancers. PMID:23043125

  9. How to make a sexy snake: estrogen activation of female sex pheromone in male red-sided garter snakes.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Rockwell; Mason, Robert T

    2012-03-01

    Vertebrates indicate their genetic sex to conspecifics using secondary sexual signals, and signal expression is often activated by sex hormones. Among vertebrate signaling modalities, the least is known about how hormones influence chemical signaling. Our study species, the red-sided garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis), is a model vertebrate for studying hormonal control of chemical signals because males completely rely on the female sex pheromone to identify potential mates among thousands of individuals. How sex hormones can influence the expression of this crucial sexual signal is largely unknown. We created two groups of experimental males for the first experiment: Sham (blank implants) and E2 (17β-estradiol implants). E2 males were vigorously courted by wild males in outdoor bioassays, and in a Y-maze E2 pheromone trails were chosen by wild males over those of small females and were indistinguishable from large female trails. Biochemically, the E2 pheromone blend was similar to that of large females, and it differed significantly from Shams. For the second experiment, we implanted males with 17β-estradiol in 2007 but removed the implants the following year (2008; Removal). That same year, we implanted a new group of males with estrogen implants (Implant). Removal males were courted by wild males in 2008 (implant intact) but not in 2009 (removed). Total pheromone quantity and quality increased following estrogen treatment, and estrogen removal re-established male-typical pheromone blends. Thus, we have shown that estrogen activates the production of female pheromone in adult red-sided garter snakes. This is the first known study to quantify both behavioral and biochemical responses in chemical signaling following sex steroid treatment of reptiles in the activation/organization context. We propose that the homogametic sex (ZZ, male) may possess the same targets for activation of sexual signal production, and the absence of the activator (17

  10. How to make a sexy snake: estrogen activation of female sex pheromone in male red-sided garter snakes.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Rockwell; Mason, Robert T

    2012-03-01

    Vertebrates indicate their genetic sex to conspecifics using secondary sexual signals, and signal expression is often activated by sex hormones. Among vertebrate signaling modalities, the least is known about how hormones influence chemical signaling. Our study species, the red-sided garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis), is a model vertebrate for studying hormonal control of chemical signals because males completely rely on the female sex pheromone to identify potential mates among thousands of individuals. How sex hormones can influence the expression of this crucial sexual signal is largely unknown. We created two groups of experimental males for the first experiment: Sham (blank implants) and E2 (17β-estradiol implants). E2 males were vigorously courted by wild males in outdoor bioassays, and in a Y-maze E2 pheromone trails were chosen by wild males over those of small females and were indistinguishable from large female trails. Biochemically, the E2 pheromone blend was similar to that of large females, and it differed significantly from Shams. For the second experiment, we implanted males with 17β-estradiol in 2007 but removed the implants the following year (2008; Removal). That same year, we implanted a new group of males with estrogen implants (Implant). Removal males were courted by wild males in 2008 (implant intact) but not in 2009 (removed). Total pheromone quantity and quality increased following estrogen treatment, and estrogen removal re-established male-typical pheromone blends. Thus, we have shown that estrogen activates the production of female pheromone in adult red-sided garter snakes. This is the first known study to quantify both behavioral and biochemical responses in chemical signaling following sex steroid treatment of reptiles in the activation/organization context. We propose that the homogametic sex (ZZ, male) may possess the same targets for activation of sexual signal production, and the absence of the activator (17

  11. [Regulation of the differentiation and proliferation of smooth muscle cells by the sex hormones].

    PubMed

    Guiochon-Mantel, A

    2000-06-01

    Steroids effects are mediated by their receptors. These proteins define the large family of steroid hormone receptors, characterized by the presence of 3 functional domains: a transactivation domain, a DNA-binding domain and a ligand-binding domain. Receptor activation induces the modulation of transcription of specific genes, and as a consequence, the modulation of production of specific proteins. Sex steroid receptors are located in the nucleus. This nuclear localization is in fact a dynamic situation, resulting from a continuous shuttling of the receptor between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The recent discovery that an additional estrogen receptor is present in various tissues has advanced our understanding of the mechanism underlying estrogen signalling. Non genomic effects of steroids have also been described. Sex steroids inhibit proliferation of smooth muscle cells. On the contrary, they stimulate proliferation of tumoral muscle cells. The mechanisms of sex steroid effects on cellular proliferation are complex, and may involve transcriptional or non transcriptional phenomena. PMID:10939122

  12. Mechanisms of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ regulation by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Ana C.; Milton, Flora A.; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Campos, Jéssica C.L.; Bernardes, Amanda; Filgueira, Carly S.; Lindemann, Jan Lammel; Deng, Tuo; Neves, Francisco A.R.; Polikarpov, Igor; Webb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) display anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties by inhibiting cyclooxygenases and blocking prostaglandin production. Previous studies, however, suggested that some NSAIDs also modulate peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs), raising the possibility that such off target effects contribute to the spectrum of clinically relevant NSAID actions. In this study, we set out to understand how peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ/PPARG) interacts with NSAIDs using X-ray crystallography and to relate ligand binding modes to effects on receptor activity. We find that several NSAIDs (sulindac sulfide, diclofenac, indomethacin and ibuprofen) bind PPARγ and modulate PPARγ activity at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. Diclofenac acts as a partial agonist and binds to the PPARγ ligand binding pocket (LBP) in typical partial agonist mode, near the β-sheets and helix 3. By contrast, two copies of indomethacin and sulindac sulfide bind the LBP and, in aggregate, these ligands engage in LBP contacts that resemble agonists. Accordingly, both compounds, and ibuprofen, act as strong partial agonists. Assessment of NSAID activities in PPARγ-dependent 3T3-L1 cells reveals that NSAIDs display adipogenic activities and exclusively regulate PPARγ-dependent target genes in a manner that is consistent with their observed binding modes. Further, PPARγ knockdown eliminates indomethacin activities at selected endogenous genes, confirming receptor-dependence of observed effects. We propose that it is important to consider how individual NSAIDs interact with PPARγ to understand their activities, and that it will be interesting to determine whether high dose NSAID therapies result in PPAR activation. PMID:26445566

  13. Sex Hormones' Regulation of Rodent Physical Activity: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, J. Timothy

    2008-01-01

    There is a large body of emerging literature suggesting that physical activity is regulated to a varying extent by biological factors. Available animal data strongly suggests that there is a differential regulation of physical activity by sex and that the majority of this differential regulation is mediated by estrogen/testosterone pathways with females in many animal species having higher daily activity levels than males. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the mechanisms by which estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone affect the regulation of physical daily activity. This review lays the foundation for future investigations in humans as well as discussions about relative disease risk mediated by differential biological regulation of physical activity by sex. PMID:18449357

  14. Steroid-induced protein synthesis in giant-toad (Bufo marinus) urinary bladders. Correlation with natriferic activity.

    PubMed

    Geheb, M; Alvis, R; Owen, A; Hercker, E; Cox, M

    1984-02-15

    We have identified a group of proteins (Mr approximately 70 000-80 000; pI approximately 5.5-6.0) in giant-toad (Bufo marinus) urinary bladders whose synthesis appears to be related to aldosterone-stimulated Na+ transport. Spironolactone, a specific mineralocorticoid antagonist in renal epithelia, inhibits the synthesis of these proteins as well as the natriferic effect of the hormone. Since a variety of other steroids (some of which are traditionally considered to be glucocorticoids) also stimulate Na+ transport in toad urinary bladders, we examined whether their natriferic activity was expressed in a fashion similar to that of aldosterone. Short-circuit current was used to measure Na+ transport, and epithelial-cell protein synthesis was detected with high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. At a concentration of approximately 100 nM, dexamethasone, corticosterone and aldosterone were equinatriferic. Dexamethasone and aldosterone had identical dose-response curves, maximal and half-maximal activity being evident at concentrations of approximately 100 nM and 10 nM respectively. In contrast, at a concentration of approximately 10 nM, corticosterone had no effect on Na+ transport. The natriferic activities of these three steroids correlate with their known affinities for the putative mineralocorticoid receptor in toad urinary bladders. Natriferic concentrations of dexamethasone and corticosterone (140 nM) induced the synthesis of proteins with characteristics identical with those induced by aldosterone. Spironolactone, at an antagonist/agonist ratio of 2000:1, inhibited steroid-induced Na+ transport and the synthesis of these proteins. Thus it appears that all natriferic steroids share a common mechanism of action in toad urinary bladders. Natriferic activity can be correlated not only with relative steroid-receptor affinity but also with the induction of a specific group of epithelial-cell proteins. PMID:6424655

  15. Topical Steroids.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Gretchen M; Harvey, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an inflammatory condition with heterogeneous pathophysiology. A cornerstone of the management of this condition is the use of anti-inflammatory agents. Corticosteroids are very effective and the most commonly used, but other drugs with immunodulatory activity such as anti-IL5, doxycycline (Th2), and macrolides (anti-neutrophilic/IL8) have been shown to have efficacy. Although systemic corticosteroids have shown benefit in managing this condition, the frequency of use often required in this condition is associated with significant adverse effects. Topical corticosteroids, particularly when utilized after endoscopic sinus surgery and delivered in a high volume, high pressure manner, provide the desired anti-inflammatory effects with nearly negligible systemic absorption. Studies assessing the long-term use of second generation topical corticosteroids have demonstrated no significant effects on cortisol levels, growth rate, intraocular pressures or lens opacification, or local mucosal atrophy. Patients who often respond most favorably to corticosteroid treatment are those with a Th2-mediated, highly eosinophilic CRSwNP. However, there is a subset of patients who are steroid resistant. In the case of a predominantly neutrophilic CRSwNP, it is important to be aware that patients may respond well to the use of macrolide therapy. Additionally, the use of verapamil has shown promise in increasing steroid responsiveness in a difficult to treat group of patients with steroid resistance. Topical corticosteroids play a key role in the long term management of this complicated inflammatory condition by providing the much needed pharmacologic local control with minimal systemic adverse effects. PMID:27466854

  16. Gender difference in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to alcohol in the rat: activational role of gonadal steroids.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, K M; Rivier, C

    1997-08-22

    Alcohol administration activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of both male and female rats, with females secreting more adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone than males in response to the same dose of alcohol. Our earlier work suggested that this gender difference arises due to the activational effects of gonadal steroids. In particular, we hypothesized that both androgens and estrogens play a role, with androgens exerting an inhibitory influence while estrogens elevate activity of the HPA. In the present studies, we tested this hypothesis by manipulating steroidal milieu in male rats using surgical castration and chronic implantation of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or estradiol (E2). Intact male and female rats were included as controls. Injection of alcohol (3 g/kg b.wt., i.p.) resulted in elevation of blood alcohol levels, ACTH and corticosterone in all groups. However, the amount of ACTH secreted was greater in females and castrated males implanted with E2 than in intact males. In castrated males, regardless of androgen implantation, the ACTH response was intermediate, with mean levels between those of females and males, but not differing significantly from either. In contrast to the ACTH results, significantly higher corticosterone secretion was measured in females and castrated males which did not receive a steroid implant. Since there were no significant differences between groups in blood alcohol levels (BALs), these results are not due to steroid-dependent alterations in alcohol metabolism. Because the ACTH data confirmed an activational effect of E2, we sought to determine whether this steroid regulated levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNAs in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Four pretreatment groups were studied: intact males, intact females, castrated males, and castrated males implanted with E2. Two weeks after surgery, alcohol or vehicle was

  17. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    PubMed

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity.

  18. A short-term longitudinal study of preschoolers' (Homo sapiens) sex segregation: the role of physical activity, sex, and time.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Anthony D; Long, Jeffrey D; Roseth, Cary J; Bohn, Catherine M; Van Ryzin, Mark

    2007-08-01

    The interactive influence of preschool children's level of physical activity, sex, and time on the degree of sex segregation was assessed. A sample of nursery school children was observed across much of a school year, and levels of physical activity and sex segregation were sampled during their free play periods. Following sexual selection theory, we predicted a Sex X Time X Physical Activity interaction on segregation such that high-activity girls early in the school year would interact with boys but, with time, the high-activity girls would be segregated among themselves. Boys (both high- and low-activity) should remain segregated across the year. The hypothesis was supported, and results are discussed in terms of the interactive role of biology and socialization on sex segregation. PMID:17696654

  19. The effects of sex steroids on thyroid C cells and trabecular bone structure in the rat model of male osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Filipović, Branko; Šošić-Jurjević, Branka; Ajdžanović, Vladimir; Pantelić, Jasmina; Nestorović, Nataša; Milošević, Verica; Sekulić, Milka

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deficiency is one of the major factors leading to the development of osteoporosis in men. Since calcitonin (CT) is a potent antiresorptive agent, in the present study we investigated the effects of androgen deficiency and subsequent testosterone and estradiol treatment on CT-producing thyroid C cells, skeletal and hormonal changes in middle-aged orchidectomized (Orx) rats. Fifteen-month-old male Wistar rats were either Orx or sham-operated (SO). One group of Orx rats received 5 mg kg−1 b.w. testosterone propionate (TP) subcutaneously, while another group was injected with 0.06 mg kg−1 b.w. estradiol dipropionate (EDP) once a day for 3 weeks. A peroxidase–antiperoxidase method was applied for localization of CT in the C cells. The studies included ultrastructural microscopic observation of these cells. The metaphyseal region of the proximal tibia was measured histomorphometrically using an imagej public domain image processing program. TP or EDP treatment significantly increased C cell volume (Vc), volume densities (Vv) and serum CT concentration compared with the Orx animals. Administration of both TP and EDP significantly enhanced cancellous bone area (B.Ar), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular number (Tb.N) and reduced trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). Serum osteocalcin (OC) and urinary Ca concentrations were significantly lower after these treatments in comparison with Orx rats. These data suggest that testosterone and estradiol treatment in Orx middle-aged rats affect calcitonin-producing thyroid C cells, which may contribute to the bone protective effects of sex hormones in the rat model of male osteoporosis. PMID:23171170

  20. Cytochrome P4503A activity affects the gender difference in the development of steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Zhao, Garida; Iwasaki, Kenyu; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cytochrome P4503A activity and its correlation with the development of osternecrosis (ON) among male and female steroid-treated rabbits. Forty adult rabbits (male, n = 20; female, n = 20) were injected once with 20 mg/kg of methylprednisolone intramuscularly. Haematologically, cytochrome P4503A activity was measured by plasma 1'-hydroxymidazolam-to-midazolam (1'-OH-MDZ/MDZ) ratio just before and 48 h after the steroid injection. We also measured the levels of oestradiol every week. Both femora and humeri were histopathologically examined for the presence of ON. Fifteen of 20 male rabbits (75%) developed ON, while 6 of 20 female rabbits (30%) did so. There was a significant difference in the rate of incidence of ON between male and female rabbits (P = 0.010). The 1'-OH-MDZ/MDZ ratio in female rabbits just before, as well as 48 h after the steroid injection was significantly higher than that in male rabbits (P = 0.039 and P = 0.001 respectively). In addition, 1'-OH-MDZ/MDZ ratio in female rabbits significantly increased in 48 h after the steroid injection (P = 0.044), while that in male rabbits did not so (P = 0.978). The levels of oestradiol in female rabbits were significantly higher than those in male rabbits during the experimental period (P = 0.008). In conclusion, this study indicates that the gender difference in cytochrome P4503A activity may be one of the important factors for the development of steroid-induced ON, possibly due to the effects of oestradiol.

  1. Steroid hormones in cluster headaches.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Mark

    2006-04-01

    For decades, glucocorticoid therapy has been a well-recognized abortive treatment for cluster headaches. However, the role of steroid hormones, including both glucocorticoids and sex steroids, in the pathophysiology and therapy of cluster headaches has been a topic of much debate and speculation. Current research now points to the importance of cortisol and testosterone in the pathogenesis of cluster headaches, and they appear to be linked mechanistically to another hormone, melatonin. Melatonin, unlike cortisol or testosterone, is not a product of the hypothalamic pituitary axis but of the retinohypothalamic pineal axis, and is the major biomarker of circadian rhythms. The regulation of steroids and melatonin in the pathogenesis of cluster headaches in turn depends on the sympathetic nervous system. Accumulated evidence suggests sympathetic dysfunction--embodied in the Horner sign so commonly seen in the cluster headache--as a necessary ingredient in the inception of the cluster headache. Sympathetic dysfunction now is thought to be associated with the hypercortisolism, hypotestosteronism, and lower-than-normal melatonin levels in the active cluster patient. Future research may hold the key to a fuller explanation of the complex interaction of hormonal systems in the cluster headache.

  2. Polyhydroxy steroids and saponins from China Sea starfish Asterina pectinifera and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yan; Zheng, Jianxian; Huang, Riming; Wang, Yifei; Xu, Tunhai; Zhou, Xuefeng; Liu, Qiuying; Zeng, Fanli; Ju, Huaiqiang; Yang, Xianwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2010-06-01

    A new polyhydroxy sterol ester, (25S)-5alpha-cholestane-3beta,6alpha,7alpha,8,15alpha,16beta-hexahydroxyl-26-O-14'Z-eicosenoate (1), together with seven known steroid derivatives (2-8), were isolated from the EtOH extract of the whole body of China Sea starfish Asterina pectinifera. The structure of 1 was determined by using extensive spectra analysis (IR, 1D and 2D NMR, and MS), chemical degradation, and comparison with the known compound (25S)-5alpha-cholestane-3beta,6alpha,7alpha,8,15alpha,16beta,26-heptol (2). All the isolates were evaluated for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and their cytotoxicity against human liver carcinoma HepG2 cell line in vitro. Compounds 3-6, and 8 exhibited antiviral activity against HSV-1 virus with the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 0.2, 0.05, 0.2, 0.22, and 0.07 microM, respectively. While compounds 4 and 5 exhibited cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells with IC(50) values of 0.2 and 1.6 microM, respectively.

  3. Drug interaction study of natural steroids from herbs specifically toward human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A4 and their quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) analysis for prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Dong, Peipei; Tian, Xiangge; Wang, Chao; Huo, Xiaokui; Zhang, Baojing; Wu, Lijun; Deng, Sa; Ma, Xiaochi

    2016-08-01

    The wide application of herbal medicines and foods containing steroids has resulted in the high risk of herb-drug interactions (HDIs). The present study aims to evaluate the inhibition potential of 43 natural steroids from herb medicines toward human UDP- glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). A remarkable structure-dependent inhibition toward UGT1A4 was observed in vitro. Some natural steroids such as gitogenin, tigogenin, and solasodine were found to be the novel selective inhibitors of UGT1A4, and did not inhibit the activities of major human CYP isoforms. To clarify the possibility of the in vivo interaction of common steroids and clinical drugs, the kinetic inhibition type and related kinetic parameters (Ki) were measured. The target compounds 2-6 and 15, competitively inhibited the UGT1A4-catalyzed trifluoperazine glucuronidation reaction, with Ki values of 0.6, 0.18, 1.1, 0.7, 0.8, and 12.3μM, respectively. And this inhibition of steroids towards UGT1A4 was also verified in human primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of steroids with inhibitory effects toward human UGT1A4 isoform was established using the computational methods. Our findings elucidate the potential for in vivo HDI effects of steroids in herbal medicine and foods, with the clinical dr ugs eliminated by UGT1A4, and reveal the vital pharamcophoric requirement of natural steroids for UGT1A4 inhibition activity. PMID:27208893

  4. Drug interaction study of natural steroids from herbs specifically toward human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A4 and their quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) analysis for prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Dong, Peipei; Tian, Xiangge; Wang, Chao; Huo, Xiaokui; Zhang, Baojing; Wu, Lijun; Deng, Sa; Ma, Xiaochi

    2016-08-01

    The wide application of herbal medicines and foods containing steroids has resulted in the high risk of herb-drug interactions (HDIs). The present study aims to evaluate the inhibition potential of 43 natural steroids from herb medicines toward human UDP- glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). A remarkable structure-dependent inhibition toward UGT1A4 was observed in vitro. Some natural steroids such as gitogenin, tigogenin, and solasodine were found to be the novel selective inhibitors of UGT1A4, and did not inhibit the activities of major human CYP isoforms. To clarify the possibility of the in vivo interaction of common steroids and clinical drugs, the kinetic inhibition type and related kinetic parameters (Ki) were measured. The target compounds 2-6 and 15, competitively inhibited the UGT1A4-catalyzed trifluoperazine glucuronidation reaction, with Ki values of 0.6, 0.18, 1.1, 0.7, 0.8, and 12.3μM, respectively. And this inhibition of steroids towards UGT1A4 was also verified in human primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of steroids with inhibitory effects toward human UGT1A4 isoform was established using the computational methods. Our findings elucidate the potential for in vivo HDI effects of steroids in herbal medicine and foods, with the clinical dr ugs eliminated by UGT1A4, and reveal the vital pharamcophoric requirement of natural steroids for UGT1A4 inhibition activity.

  5. Partial characterization of a biologically active steroid glycosideisolated from the starfish Marthasterias glacialis.

    PubMed

    Mackie, A M; Turner, A B

    1970-04-01

    1. A steroid glycoside (M(2)), which induces avoidance and other reactions in the mollusc Buccinum undatum, has been isolated from extracts of the starfish Marthasterias glacialis by ion-exchange chromatography. 2. The steroid glycoside was homogeneous by t.l.c. and contained glucose, quinovose, fucose and sulphate in the molar proportions 1:2:1:1, in addition to a water-insoluble aglycone. 3. The aglycone was identified as a cholestane derivative containing an unusual Delta(24)-23-ketone system, two secondary hydroxyl groups and an olefinic double bond, and had the molecular formula C(27)H(42)O(3). 4. The rates of release of sugars and sulphate suggested that fucose was at the non-reducing end of the oligosaccharide, with glucose glycosidically linked to the steroid. The sulphate group appeared to be linked to the other hydroxyl group of the steroid.

  6. Partial characterization of a biologically active steroid glycoside isolated from the starfish Marthasterias glacialis

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, A. M.; Turner, A. B.

    1970-01-01

    1. A steroid glycoside (M2), which induces avoidance and other reactions in the mollusc Buccinum undatum, has been isolated from extracts of the starfish Marthasterias glacialis by ion-exchange chromatography. 2. The steroid glycoside was homogeneous by t.l.c. and contained glucose, quinovose, fucose and sulphate in the molar proportions 1:2:1:1, in addition to a water-insoluble aglycone. 3. The aglycone was identified as a cholestane derivative containing an unusual Δ24-23-ketone system, two secondary hydroxyl groups and an olefinic double bond, and had the molecular formula C27H42O3. 4. The rates of release of sugars and sulphate suggested that fucose was at the non-reducing end of the oligosaccharide, with glucose glycosidically linked to the steroid. The sulphate group appeared to be linked to the other hydroxyl group of the steroid. PMID:5419749

  7. Steroid receptor coactivators 1, 2, and 3: critical regulators of nuclear receptor activity and steroid receptor modulator (SRM)-based cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amber B; O'Malley, Bert W

    2012-01-30

    Coactivators are a diverse group of non-DNA binding proteins that induce structural changes in agonist-bound nuclear receptors (NRs) that are essential for NR-mediated transcriptional activation. Once bound, coactivators function to bridge enhancer binding proteins to the general transcription machinery, as well as to recruit secondary coactivators that modify promoter and enhancer chromatin in a manner permissive for transcriptional activation. In the following review article, we focus on one of the most in-depth studied families of coactivators, the steroid receptor coactivators (SRC) 1, 2, and 3. SRCs are widely implicated in NR-mediated diseases, especially in cancers, with the majority of studies focused on their roles in breast cancer. We highlight the relevant literature supporting the oncogenic activity of SRCs and their future as diagnostic and prognostic indicators. With much interest in the development of selective receptor modulators (SRMs), we focus on how these coactivators regulate the interactions between SRMs and their respective NRs; and, importantly, the influence that coactivators have on the functional output of SRMs. Furthermore, we speculate that coactivator-specific inhibitors could provide powerful, all-encompassing treatments that target multiple modes of oncogenic regulation in cancers resistant to typical anti-endocrine treatments.

  8. Steroid Receptor Coactivators 1, 2, and 3: Critical Regulators of Nuclear Receptor Activity and Steroid Receptor Modulator (SRM)-based Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amber B.; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2011-01-01

    Coactivators are a diverse group of non-DNA binding proteins that induce structural changes in agonist-bound nuclear receptors (NRs) that are essential for NR-mediated transcriptional activation. Once bound, coactivators function to bridge enhancer binding proteins to the general transcription machinery, as well as to recruit secondary coactivators that modify promoter and enhancer chromatin in a manner permissive for transcriptional activation. In the following review article, we focus on one of the most in-depth studied families of coactivators, the steroid receptor coactivators (SRC) 1, 2, and 3. SRCs are widely implicated in NR-mediated diseases, especially in cancers, with the majority of studies focused on their roles in breast cancer. We highlight the relevant literature supporting the oncogenic activity of SRCs and their future as diagnostic and prognostic indicators. With much interest in the development of selective receptor modulators (SRMs), we focus on how these coactivators regulate the interactions between SRMs and their respective NRs; and, importantly, the influence that coactivators have on the functional output of SRMs. Furthermore, we speculate that coactivator-specific inhibitors could provide powerful, all-encompassing treatments that target multiple modes of oncogenic regulation in cancers resistant to typical anti-endocrine treatments. PMID:21664237

  9. Disturbance in sex-steroid serum profiles of cattle in response to exogenous estradiol: a screening approach to detect forbidden treatments.

    PubMed

    Regal, Patricia; Nebot, Carolina; Díaz-Bao, Mónica; Barreiro, Rocio; Cepeda, Alberto; Fente, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Estradiol benzoate (EB) has been one of the most widely used estrogenic agents in animal husbandry, as a way of exogenously introducing the natural hormone estradiol-17β into the animal organism. Estradiol was previously employed to induce anabolic effects or reproductive improvements in cattle. However, the employment of EB in European countries has been permanently forbidden by Directive 2008/97/EC to guarantee consumers' health. Despite this prohibition, the control of estradiol-17β and its esters continues to be a difficult task for residue-monitoring plans in European Communities because official analyses of natural thresholds for hormones in cattle have not yet been established, leading to a lack of confirmation for any exogenous administration of natural hormones. Several researchers have worked on excretion profiles of metabolites, variation in specific hormonal ratios and metabolomic fingerprints after hormonal treatments. This research focuses on the possible existence of disturbances in the serum profile of animals treated with EB in terms of steroid sex hormones (androgens, oestrogens and progestogens), by investigating the serum levels of several of these hormones. The serum samples were collected from three groups of cows: one treated with an intramuscular injection of EB, one treated with a combination of intravaginal EB and progesterone and a control (non-treated) group. The samples have been analysed by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method, and 17 natural hormones were identified and quantified. Subsequently, data from the serum profiles were submitted for statistic and multivariate analysis, and it was possible to observe a manifest variation between animal groups. The obtained results can help in the development of a viable screening tool for monitoring purposes in cattle.

  10. Stimulatory effect of interleukin-1 beta on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of the rat: influence of age, gender and circulating sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Rivier, C

    1994-03-01

    The bilateral communication between the immune and neuroendocrine systems plays an essential role in modulating the adequate response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to the stimulatory influence of interleukins (ILs). It is thus reasonable to assume that inappropriate responses of the HPA axis to ILs might play a role in modulating the onset of pathological conditions such as infections. As part of our programme aimed at investigating the ability of ILs to release pro-opiomelanocortin-like peptides and corticosterone in rats exposed to alcohol, we observed that this stimulatory action appeared to be influenced by the gender of the animals. We therefore examined the ability of IL-1 beta, injected peripherally, to stimulate the HPA axis as a function of stage of sexual maturation and the presence or absence of circulating sex steroids. In immature (21 to 22-day-old) rats, both males and females responded to the i.p. administration of 0.5 or 2.0 micrograms IL-1 beta/kg with statistically comparable increases in plasma ACTH levels. In contrast, females released significantly (P < 0.01) more corticosterone in response to the lower dose of cytokine. Forty-day-old intact animals showed no sexual dimorphism in ACTH secretion, but the females again secreted significantly (P < 0.05-0.01) more corticosterone. Gonadectomy, performed 7-8 days prior to the assay, increased the absolute amount of corticosterone released over a 60-min period. A noticeable dimorphism of the ACTH response to IL-1 beta became apparent in 70-day-old intact rats, with females secreting more ACTH than males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Plasma sex steroid and thyroid hormones profile in male water frogs of the Rana esculenta complex from agricultural and pristine areas.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, G; Di Rosa, I; Bucci, S; Morosi, L; Franzoni, M F; Polzonetti-Magni, A M; Pascolini, R

    2005-07-01

    Some chemical compounds used in intensive agriculture have been found to induce estrogenic effects; therefore a histological analysis of the testes and an evaluation of plasma levels of sex steroid, thyroid hormones, and vitellogenin were carried out in adult male water frogs of two coexisting taxa (Rana lessonae and the hemiclonal hybrid Rana esculenta) sampled in agricultural and pristine areas. Differences in seasonal profiles of hormones were found in water frogs living in the agricultural area where the presence of endocrine disrupting compounds was suspected on the basis of a previous study. In R. esculenta, sampled in the pristine area, high androgen levels were found in May; the opposite trend was found for R. esculenta sampled in agricultural areas in which the highest androgen levels were found in September, significantly lower compared with those found in R. esculenta sampled in the pristine area. Low androgen levels were also recorded in R. lessonae males sampled both in pristine and agricultural areas, while the highest levels were found in September. Regarding the trend of estradiol-17beta, an increase of this hormone was found in July both in esculenta and lessonae sampled in the agricultural area, and in the same month an estradiol-17beta peak, even though lower, was also found both in esculenta and lessonae males captured in the pristine area; detectable vitellogenin was found neither in males captured in the agricultural area, nor in those sampled in the pristine one. Moreover, while no significant changes of thyroid hormones were found either in the esculenta or lessonae males sampled in the pristine area, increased T3 and T4 titers were found in July in both esculenta and lessonae captured in the agricultural area. Morphological differences of the testes in males of parental species captured in the agricultural area were also observed. These findings indicate alterations in endocrine and reproductive function in frogs in the agricultural area

  12. Xenobiotic and steroid biotransformation activities in rainbow trout gill epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Leguen; Carlsson; Perdu-Durand; Prunet; Pärt; Cravedi

    2000-03-01

    The biotransformation of xenobiotics and steroids was investigated in cultured respiratory epithelial cells from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gills. As a first approach, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), chosen as a marker of CYP1A activity, was measured in monolayers of adherent cells. The induction of this enzyme was studied in cells exposed to beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in concentrations ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-12) M. After 24 h, TCDD showed a maximal induction at a concentration of 10(-9) M while BNF showed a maximal induction at a concentration of 10(-7) M. Concurrently, a variety of substrates involved in cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism as well as phase II reactions, namely ethoxycoumarin, aniline and testosterone were incubated with cultured gill cells for 2 or 8 h and with freshly isolated hepatocytes for comparison. Our results revealed a significant cytochrome P450-dependent activity in gill cells with ethoxycoumarin and aniline, but no hydroxylation was observed with testosterone as substrate. No trace of sulfate conjugate was detected. With 2.5 µM aniline as substrate, 2-hydroxyaniline accounted for 32.1% of the radioactivity after 2 h incubation whereas acetanilide amounted to 6.4%. Significant differences were found between gill cells and isolated hepatocytes in the capacity of these systems to conduct oxidative and conjugating metabolic pathways. Qualitatively, the main difference was observed for testosterone which is hydroxylated in position 6beta and 16beta and conjugated to glucuronic acid in liver cells, whereas reductive biotransformation giving rise to dihydrotestosterone and androstanediol and traces of androstenedione were observed in gill cells. Quantitatively, the biotransformation activity in gill epithelial cells, expressed as pmol/h per mg protein, was between 1.5 and 14% of the activity level observed in isolated hepatocytes, depending on the substrate.

  13. 76 FR 72355 - Classification of Two Steroids, Prostanozol and Methasterone, as Schedule III Anabolic Steroids...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... steroids and ] depend on several factors (e.g., age, sex, anabolic steroid used, the amount used, and the.... Evaluation of Statutory Factors for Classification as an Anabolic Steroid DEA is proposing by this NPRM to... interaction with DNA. In this study, transcription of a reporter gene provides information as to a...

  14. Assessment of ovarian activity in captive goral (Naemorhedus griseus) using noninvasive fecal steroid monitoring.

    PubMed

    Khonmee, Jaruwan; Brown, Janine L; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Rojanasthien, Suvichai; Punyapornwithaya, Veerasak; Thumasanukul, Dissakul; Kongphoemphun, Adisorn; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Tipkantha, Wanlaya; Pongpiachan, Petai; Thitaram, Chatchote

    2014-10-15

    To date, there is no information on gonadal steroidogenic activity of female goral (Naemorhedus griseus), a threatened species of Thailand. Captive goral populations have been established to produce animals for ex situ conservation and reintroduction, but as yet none are self-sustaining. The objectives of the present study were to (1) determine the influence of season on ovarian steriodogenic function; and (2) examine the relationship between gonadal hormone excretion and sexual behaviors throughout the year. Fecal samples were collected 5 to 7 days/wk for 15 months from 8 adult females housed at Omkoi Wildlife Breeding Center in Thailand and analyzed for ovarian steroid metabolites using validated enzyme immunoassays. Observations of sexual behaviors and mating were conducted each morning for 30 min/session. Based on fecal estrogen and progestagen metabolite concentrations, the overall estrous cycle length was about 21 days, with a 2- to 3-day follicular phase and an 18- to 20-day luteal phase. Sexual behaviors, most notably tail-up, increased for 2 to 3 days during the time estrogens were elevated during mating. Fecal progestagens were elevated during luteal phases and increased further during gestation, which lasted approximately 7 months. The lactation period was 5 months, and females were anestrus for 2 to 5 of those months, with the exception of one that cycled continuously throughout. Two females conceived around 2 months postpartum and so were pregnant during lactation. Birth records over the past 21 years indicated young are born throughout the year. This combined with the hormonal data suggests that female gorals are not strongly seasonal, at least in captivity, although there was considerable variation among females in estrogen and progestagen patterns. In conclusion, fecal steroid metabolite monitoring is an effective means of assessing ovarian function in this species and will be a useful tool for breeding management and planned development of

  15. Tocotrienols activate the steroid and xenobiotic receptor, SXR, and selectively regulate expression of its target genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changcheng; Tabb, Michelle M; Sadatrafiei, Asal; Grün, Felix; Blumberg, Bruce

    2004-10-01

    Vitamin E is an essential nutrient with antioxidant activity. Vitamin E is comprised of eight members, alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherols and alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-tocotrienols. All forms of vitamin E are initially metabolized by omega-oxidation, which is catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes. The steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates drug clearance in the liver and intestine via induction of genes involved in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. We show here that all four tocotrienols specifically bind to and activate SXR, whereas tocopherols neither bind nor activate. Surprisingly, tocotrienols show tissue-specific induction of SXR target genes, particularly CYP3A4. Tocotrienols up-regulate expression of CYP3A4 but not UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) or multidrug resistance protein-1 (MDR1) in primary hepatocytes. In contrast, tocotrienols induce MDR1 and UGT1A1 but not CYP3A4 expression in intestinal LS180 cells. We found that nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) is expressed at relatively high levels in intestinal LS180 cells compared with primary hepatocytes. The unliganded SXR interacts with NCoR, and this interaction is only partially disrupted by tocotrienols. Expression of a dominant-negative NCoR enhanced the ability of tocotrienols to induce CYP3A4 in LS180 cells, suggesting that NCoR plays an important role in tissue-specific gene regulation by SXR. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism explaining how vitamin supplements affect the absorption and effectiveness of drugs. Knowledge of drug-nutrient interactions may help reduce the incidence of decreased drug efficacy. PMID:15269186

  16. Polyhydroxylated steroids from the South China Sea soft coral Sarcophyton sp. and their cytotoxic and antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kai-Kai; Tang, Xu-Li; Zhang, Gang; Cheng, Can-Ling; Zhang, Xing-Wang; Li, Ping-Lin; Li, Guo-Qiang

    2013-12-01

    Chemical investigation on the soft coral Sarcophyton sp. collected from the South China Sea yielded three new polyhydroxylated steroids, compounds (1-3), together with seven known ones (4-10). Their structures were established by extensive spectroscopic methods and comparison of their data with those of the related known compounds. All the isolates possessed the 3β,5α,6β-trihydroxylated steroidal nucleus. The cytotoxicities against selected HL-60, HeLa and K562 tumor cell lines and anti-H1N1 (Influenza A virus (IAV)) activities for the isolates were evaluated. Compounds 2, 3 and 5-8 exhibited potent activities against K562 cell lines with IC₅₀ values ranging from 6.4 to 10.3 μM. Compounds 1, 6-8 potently inhibited the growth of HL-60 tumor cell lines, and 6 also showed cytotoxicity towards HeLa cell lines. In addition, preliminary structure-activity relationships for the isolates are discussed. The OAc group at C-11 is proposed to be an important pharmacophore for their cytotoxicities in the 3β,5α,6β-triol steroids. Compounds 4 and 9 exhibited significant anti-H1N1 IAV activity with IC₅₀ values of 19.6 and 36.7 μg/mL, respectively.

  17. A new steroidal saponin from AGAVE brittoniana and its biphasic effect on the Na+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Graziela M; De Souza, Aloa M; Lara, Luciene S; Mendes, Tatiana P; da Silva, Bernadete P; Lopes, Anibal G

    2005-01-01

    A new steroidal saponin, 3-{(O-6-deoxy-a-L-mannopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 3)-O-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)]-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl)oxy}-6-hydroxy-(3beta,5alpha,6alpha,25R)-spirostan-12-one, was isolated from Agave brittoniana Trel. The structure was determined by extensive NMR spectroscopy studies and chemical conversions. Its effects on the Na+-ATPase and (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activities of the proximal tubule from pig kidney were evaluated. It was observed that this steroidal saponin exerts a biphasic effect on the Na+-ATPase activity. It is concluded that the effect of the aqueous extract as a diuretic is due, at least in part, to the action of saponin on the ouabain-insensitive Na+-ATPase.

  18. Sex- and age-dependent activity of glutathione peroxidase in reproductive organs in pre- and post-pubertal cattle in relation to total antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kankofer, M; Wawrzykowski, J; Giergiel, M

    2013-08-01

    Antioxidative/oxidative balance is crucial for proper functioning of cells and tissues. It is suggested that this balance can be partly controlled by sex steroid hormones and in consequence can exhibit age- and sex-related dependency. The aim of present study was to describe sex- and age-related changes in the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) with respect to total antioxidant activity (TAC) in reproductive organs of cattle. Biological samples were collected from slaughterhouse and comprised of ovaries, uterus, testes as well as livers as reference tissue. Animals were divided into group of bulls (aged between 13 and 24 months; n = 12), cows (aged between 14 and 27 months; n = 12) and female calves (aged between 2 weeks and 2 months; n = 12). Examined parameters were determined spectrophotometrically and the presence of GSH-Px isoform was confirmed by Western blotting technique. Activity of GSH-Px in genital tissues regardless of sex was significantly higher than in livers, while TAC showed opposite relationship. The differences in antioxidative parameters between testes and mature ovaries (e.g. GSH-Px-1.42 ± 0.47 nkat/mg prot vs. 1.08 ± 0.24 and 1.15 ± 0.23) were noticed as well as in chosen values between cows and female calves. Western blotting allowed the detection of cytosolic GSH-Px in all examined tissues with molecular weight around 21 kDa as monomer and around 84 kDa as tetramer depending on conditions of electrophoresis. The results may confirm the influence and regulatory role of sex steroid hormones on GSH-Px activity because the alterations were sex and age dependent. PMID:23740597

  19. Sex- and age-dependent activity of glutathione peroxidase in reproductive organs in pre- and post-pubertal cattle in relation to total antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kankofer, M; Wawrzykowski, J; Giergiel, M

    2013-08-01

    Antioxidative/oxidative balance is crucial for proper functioning of cells and tissues. It is suggested that this balance can be partly controlled by sex steroid hormones and in consequence can exhibit age- and sex-related dependency. The aim of present study was to describe sex- and age-related changes in the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) with respect to total antioxidant activity (TAC) in reproductive organs of cattle. Biological samples were collected from slaughterhouse and comprised of ovaries, uterus, testes as well as livers as reference tissue. Animals were divided into group of bulls (aged between 13 and 24 months; n = 12), cows (aged between 14 and 27 months; n = 12) and female calves (aged between 2 weeks and 2 months; n = 12). Examined parameters were determined spectrophotometrically and the presence of GSH-Px isoform was confirmed by Western blotting technique. Activity of GSH-Px in genital tissues regardless of sex was significantly higher than in livers, while TAC showed opposite relationship. The differences in antioxidative parameters between testes and mature ovaries (e.g. GSH-Px-1.42 ± 0.47 nkat/mg prot vs. 1.08 ± 0.24 and 1.15 ± 0.23) were noticed as well as in chosen values between cows and female calves. Western blotting allowed the detection of cytosolic GSH-Px in all examined tissues with molecular weight around 21 kDa as monomer and around 84 kDa as tetramer depending on conditions of electrophoresis. The results may confirm the influence and regulatory role of sex steroid hormones on GSH-Px activity because the alterations were sex and age dependent.

  20. 76 FR 80966 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection: Age, Sex, and Race of Persons...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection: Age, Sex, and Race of Persons Arrested 18 Years of Age and Over; Age, Sex, and Race of Persons Arrested Under 18... the form/collection: Age, Sex, and Race of Persons Arrested 18 Years of Age and Over; Age, Sex,...

  1. Purification, characterization, and substrate specificity of a glucoamylase with steroidal saponin-rhamnosidase activity from Curvularia lunata.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bing; Hu, Wei; Ma, Bai-ping; Wang, Yong-ze; Huang, Hong-ze; Wang, Sheng-qi; Qian, Xiao-hong

    2007-10-01

    It has been previously reported that a glucoamylase from Curvularia lunata is able to hydrolyze the terminal 1,2-linked rhamnosyl residues of sugar chains at C-3 position of steroidal saponins. In this work, the enzyme was isolated and identified after isolation and purification by column chromatography including gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. Analysis of protein fragments by MALDI-TOF/TOF proteomics Analyzer indicated the enzyme to be 1,4-alpha-D-glucan glucohydrolase EC 3.2.1.3, GA and had considerable homology with the glucoamylase from Aspergillus oryzae. We first found that the glucoamylase was produced from C. lunata and was able to hydrolyze the terminal rhamnosyl of steroidal saponins. The enzyme had the general character of glucoamylase, which hydrolyze starch. It had a molecular mass of 66 kDa and was optimally active at 50 degrees C, pH 4, and specific activity of 12.34 U mg of total protein(-1) under the conditions, using diosgenin-3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->4)-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->2)]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (compound II) as the substrate. Furthermore, four kinds of commercial glucoamylases from Aspergillus niger were investigated in this work, and they had the similar activity in hydrolyzing terminal rhamnosyl residues of steroidal saponin.

  2. Tumor cell growth inhibitory activity and structure-activity relationship of polyoxygenated steroids from the gorgonian Menella kanisa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Tang, Hua; Liu, Bao-Shu; Li, Tie-Jun; Sun, Peng; Zhu, Wen; Luo, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Fourteen new polyoxygenated steroids (6, 9, 14-18, 20-23, 25-27) having carbon skeletons of cholestane, ergostane, and 24-norcholestane, were isolated together with thirteen known analogues (1-5, 7, 8, 10-13, 19, 24) from the South China Sea gorgonian Menella kanisa. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by detailed analysis of spectroscopic data and comparisons with reported data. This is the first report of chemical investigation on the title gorgonian. Compounds 12 and 13 were reported for the first time from natural sources. These compounds exhibited different levels of growth inhibition activity against A549 and MG-63 cell lines in bioassay in vitro. Preliminary structure-activity analysis revealed an important role of side chain in the activity. A substitution of a 5α-hydroxy or an oxidation of 6β-hydroxy to a ketone carbonyl group may decrease the activity whereas the contribution of the 1-ketone group remains uncertain.

  3. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Markers of Inflammation: Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. Given sex differences in the prevalence of inflammatory disorders with stronger associations in females, this study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on cellular mechanisms that contribute to proinflammatory cytokine activity. In 26 healthy adults (11 females; 15 males), monocyte intracellular proinflammatory cytokine production was repeatedly assessed at 08:00, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00, and 23:00 h during a baseline period and after partial sleep deprivation (awake from 11 PM to 3 AM). In the morning after a night of sleep loss, monocyte production of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor- α differentially changed between the two sexes. Whereas both females and males showed a marked increase in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated production of IL-6 and TNF-α in the morning immediately after PSD, production of these cytokines during the early- and late evening was increased in the females as compared to decreases in the males. Sleep loss induces a functional alteration of monocyte proinflammatory cytokine responses with females showing greater cellular immune activation as compared to changes in males. These results have implications for understanding the role of sleep disturbance in the differential risk profile for inflammatory disorders between the sexes. PMID:19520155

  4. Select steroid hormone glucuronide metabolites can cause Toll-like receptor 4 activation and enhanced pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susannah S.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Frick, Morin M.; Zhang, Yingning; Maier, Steven F.; Sammakia, Tarek; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that several classes of glucuronide metabolites, including the morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide and the ethanol metabolite ethyl glucuronide, cause toll like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent signalling in vitro and enhanced pain in vivo. Steroid hormones, including estrogens and corticosterone, are also metabolized through glucuronidation. Here we demonstrate that in silico docking predicts that corticosterone, corticosterone-21-glucuronide, estradiol, estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide all dock with the MD-2 component of the TLR4 receptor complex. In addition to each docking with MD-2, the docking of each was altered by pre-docking with (+)-naloxone, a TLR4 signaling inhibitor. As agonist versus antagonist activity cannot be determined from these in silico interactions, an in vitro study was undertaken to clarify which of these compounds can act in an agonist fashion. Studies using a cell line transfected with TLR4, necessary co-signaling molecules, and a reporter gene revealed that only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide increased reporter gene product, indicative of TLR4 agonism. Finally, in in vivo studies, each of the 5 drugs was injected intrathecally at equimolar doses. In keeping with the in vitro results, only estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide caused enhanced pain. For both compounds, pain enhancement was blocked by the TLR4 antagonist lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, evidence for the involvement in TLR4 in the resultant pain enhancement. These findings have implications for several chronic pain conditions, including migraine and tempromandibular joint disorder, in which pain episodes are more likely in cycling females when estradiol is decreasing and estradiol metabolites are at their highest. PMID:25218902

  5. Anabolic steroids alter the physiological activity of aggression circuits in the lateral anterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Morrison, T R; Sikes, R W; Melloni, R H

    2016-02-19

    Syrian hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence consistently show increased aggressive behavior across studies. Although the behavioral and anatomical profiles of AAS-induced alterations have been well characterized, there is a lack of data describing physiological changes that accompany these alterations. For instance, behavioral pharmacology and neuroanatomical studies show that AAS-induced changes in the vasopressin (AVP) neural system within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH) interact with the serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) systems to modulate aggression. To characterize the electrophysiological profile of the AAS aggression circuit, we recorded LAH neurons in adolescent male hamsters in vivo and microiontophoretically applied agonists and antagonists of aggressive behavior. The interspike interval (ISI) of neurons from AAS-treated animals correlated positively with aggressive behaviors, and adolescent AAS exposure altered parameters of activity in regular firing neurons while also changing the proportion of neuron types (i.e., bursting, regular, irregular). AAS-treated animals had more responsive neurons that were excited by AVP application, while cells from control animals showed the opposite effect and were predominantly inhibited by AVP. Both DA D2 antagonists and 5HT increased the firing frequency of AVP-responsive cells from AAS animals and dual application of AVP and D2 antagonists doubled the excitatory effect of AVP or D2 antagonist administration alone. These data suggest that multiple DA circuits in the LAH modulate AAS-induced aggressive responding. More broadly, these data show that multiple neurochemical interactions at the neurophysiological level are altered by adolescent AAS exposure.

  6. Anabolic steroids alter the physiological activity of aggression circuits in the lateral anterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Morrison, T R; Sikes, R W; Melloni, R H

    2016-02-19

    Syrian hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence consistently show increased aggressive behavior across studies. Although the behavioral and anatomical profiles of AAS-induced alterations have been well characterized, there is a lack of data describing physiological changes that accompany these alterations. For instance, behavioral pharmacology and neuroanatomical studies show that AAS-induced changes in the vasopressin (AVP) neural system within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH) interact with the serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) systems to modulate aggression. To characterize the electrophysiological profile of the AAS aggression circuit, we recorded LAH neurons in adolescent male hamsters in vivo and microiontophoretically applied agonists and antagonists of aggressive behavior. The interspike interval (ISI) of neurons from AAS-treated animals correlated positively with aggressive behaviors, and adolescent AAS exposure altered parameters of activity in regular firing neurons while also changing the proportion of neuron types (i.e., bursting, regular, irregular). AAS-treated animals had more responsive neurons that were excited by AVP application, while cells from control animals showed the opposite effect and were predominantly inhibited by AVP. Both DA D2 antagonists and 5HT increased the firing frequency of AVP-responsive cells from AAS animals and dual application of AVP and D2 antagonists doubled the excitatory effect of AVP or D2 antagonist administration alone. These data suggest that multiple DA circuits in the LAH modulate AAS-induced aggressive responding. More broadly, these data show that multiple neurochemical interactions at the neurophysiological level are altered by adolescent AAS exposure. PMID:26691962

  7. Pharmacology of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Kicman, A T

    2008-06-01

    Athletes and bodybuilders have recognized for several decades that the use of anabolic steroids can promote muscle growth and strength but it is only relatively recently that these agents are being revisited for clinical purposes. Anabolic steroids are being considered for the treatment of cachexia associated with chronic disease states, and to address loss of muscle mass in the elderly, but nevertheless their efficacy still needs to be demonstrated in terms of improved physical function and quality of life. In sport, these agents are performance enhancers, this being particularly apparent in women, although there is a high risk of virilization despite the favourable myotrophic-androgenic dissociation that many xenobiotic steroids confer. Modulation of androgen receptor expression appears to be key to partial dissociation, with consideration of both intracellular steroid metabolism and the topology of the bound androgen receptor interacting with co-activators. An anticatabolic effect, by interfering with glucocorticoid receptor expression, remains an attractive hypothesis. Behavioural changes by non-genomic and genomic pathways probably help motivate training. Anabolic steroids continue to be the most common adverse finding in sport and, although apparently rare, designer steroids have been synthesized in an attempt to circumvent the dope test. Doping with anabolic steroids can result in damage to health, as recorded meticulously in the former German Democratic Republic. Even so, it is important not to exaggerate the medical risks associated with their administration for sporting or bodybuilding purposes but to emphasize to users that an attitude of personal invulnerability to their adverse effects is certainly misguided.

  8. Neural Activation During Mental Rotation in Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: The Influence of Sex Hormones and Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    van Hemmen, Judy; Veltman, Dick J; Hoekzema, Elseline; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Dessens, Arianne B; Bakker, Julie

    2016-03-01

    Sex hormones, androgens in particular, are hypothesized to play a key role in the sexual differentiation of the human brain. However, possible direct effects of the sex chromosomes, that is, XX or XY, have not been well studied in humans. Individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), who have a 46,XY karyotype but a female phenotype due to a complete androgen resistance, enable us to study the separate effects of gonadal hormones versus sex chromosomes on neural sex differences. Therefore, in the present study, we compared 46,XY men (n = 30) and 46,XX women (n = 29) to 46,XY individuals with CAIS (n = 21) on a mental rotation task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Previously reported sex differences in neural activation during mental rotation were replicated in the control groups, with control men showing more activation in the inferior parietal lobe than control women. Individuals with CAIS showed a female-like neural activation pattern in the parietal lobe, indicating feminization of the brain in CAIS. Furthermore, this first neuroimaging study in individuals with CAIS provides evidence that sex differences in regional brain function during mental rotation are most likely not directly driven by genetic sex, but rather reflect gonadal hormone exposure.

  9. Steroids and endocrine disruptors--History, recent state of art and open questions.

    PubMed

    Hampl, Richard; Kubátová, Jana; Stárka, Luboslav

    2016-01-01

    This introductory chapter provides an overview of the levels and sites at which endocrine disruptors (EDs) affect steroid actions. In contrast to the special issue of Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology published three years ago and devoted to EDs as such, this paper focuses on steroids. We tried to point to more recent findings and opened questions. EDs interfere with steroid biosynthesis and metabolism either as inhibitors of relevant enzymes, or at the level of their expression. Particular attention was paid to enzymes metabolizing steroid hormones to biologically active products in target cells, such as aromatase, 5α-reductase and 3β-, 11β- and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. An important target for EDs is also steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR), responsible for steroid precursor trafficking to mitochondria. EDs influence receptor-mediated steroid actions at both genomic and non-genomic levels. The remarkable differences in response to various steroid-receptor ligands led to a more detailed investigation of events following steroid/disruptor binding to the receptors and to the mapping of the signaling cascades and nuclear factors involved. A virtual screening of a large array of EDs with steroid receptors, known as in silico methods (≡computer simulation), is another promising approach for studying quantitative structure activity relationships and docking. New data may be expected on the effect of EDs on steroid hormone binding to selective plasma transport proteins, namely transcortin and sex hormone-binding globulin. Little information is available so far on the effects of EDs on the major hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal/gonadal axes, of which the kisspeptin/GPR54 system is of particular importance. Kisspeptins act as stimulators for hormone-induced gonadotropin secretion and their expression is regulated by sex steroids via a feed-back mechanism. Kisspeptin is now believed to be one of the key factors triggering puberty in

  10. Characterization of human fetal cord blood steroid profiles in relation to fetal sex and mode of delivery using temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography and principal component analysis (PCA).

    PubMed

    Clifton, Vicki L; Bisits, Andrew; Zarzycki, Paweł K

    2007-08-15

    In the present work, human male and female fetal cord blood samples were purified, selectively extracted and separated to examine a fraction of steroids ranging from polar estetrol to relatively non-polar progesterone using solid phase extraction based on C-18 tubes and beta-cyclodextrin driven temperature dependent inclusion chromatography. Resulting UV diode array chromatographic patterns revealed the presence of 27 peaks. Chromatographic patterns of UV detected steroids were analyzed using principal components analysis which revealed differences between male/female and labour/not-in-labour clusters. Quantitative analysis of nine identified steroids including: estetrol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, estriol, cortisol, cortisone, progesterone, 20 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone were not significantly different between males and females. Significant differences between male and female fetuses were related to as yet unidentified compounds. Four peaks were significantly different with labour which corresponded with cortisol, cortisone and two unidentified compounds. This protocol may distinguish significant differences between clinical groups that are not readily identifiable using univariate measurements of single steroids or different low molecular mass biomarkers. Moreover, we have provided new evidence that despite the absence of testosterone there are number of steroids and low molecular mass compounds that differ between male and female fetuses. PMID:17625993

  11. Anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Strauss, R H

    1984-07-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroid hormones are used by athletes in an attempt to improve performance. Side effects include decreased testosterone and sperm production, acne, balding, and increased aggression. The long-term effects are not known.

  12. EFFECTS OF PROTEIN, LIPIDS, AND SURFACTANTS ON THE ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SYNTHETIC STEROIDS.

    PubMed

    SMITH, R F; SHAY, D E; DOORENBOS, N J

    1963-11-01

    Three 4-azacholestanes and two A-norcholestanes were inactivated by 10 and 20% bovine serum and by 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0% sheep blood. The five compounds exhibited hemolytic properties when tested with 2% sheep blood and 2% human blood. These cholestanes inhibited Streptococcus pyogenes and were completely inactivated by 0.1% lecithin. Tween 80 was comparable to lecithin in causing the inactivation of steroids; 1% polyethylene glycol-4000 was inert; 1% Tween 20 and 1.0% Span 20 caused the inactivation of 3beta,4-dimethyl-4-aza-5alpha-cholestane (ND-307). The sodium salts of four fatty acids, oleate, stearate, deoxycholate, and lauryl sulfate (0.1 to 1.0 mg/ml), effectively interfered with the action of ND-307. The steroids appear to have some properties similar to those of antimicrobial surfactants of the cationic type but have certain distinct features.

  13. Immunological Adjuvant Activity of Pectinioside A, the Steroidal Saponin from the Starfish Patiria pectinifera.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Osamu; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-05-01

    The steroidal saponin, pectinioside A, was isolated from the starfish, Patiria pectinifera. When it was subcutaneously injected into mice with ovalbumin (OVA), it facilitated the production of OVA-specific total IgG and IgG1 but not IgG2a. To our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting that starfish saponin has the potential to be an immunological adjuvant, stimulating Th2 type immune response. PMID:27319128

  14. Synthesis and antifungal activity of C-21 steroids with an aromatic D ring.

    PubMed

    Sonego, Juan M; Cirigliano, Adriana M; Cabrera, Gabriela M; Burton, Gerardo; Veleiro, Adriana S

    2013-07-01

    Six analogues of salpichrolides with a simplified side chain (6-11) were synthesized using a new methodology to obtain steroids with an aromatic D-ring. The key step was the elimination of HBr in a vicinal dibromo D-homosteroid by treatment with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO). All new compounds were completely characterized by 2D NMR techniques and tested on two fungal pathogenic species, Fusarium virguliforme and Fusarium solani.

  15. Stressor specificity of sex differences in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activity: cortisol responses to exercise, endotoxin, wetting, and isolation/restraint stress in gonadectomized male and female sheep.

    PubMed

    Turner, A I; Rivalland, E T A; Clarke, I J; Tilbrook, A J

    2010-09-01

    Sex differences in the stress-induced activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in sheep appear to be dependent on the stressor encountered and occur irrespective of the presence of gonadal steroids. We tested the hypotheses that cortisol responses to exercise, endotoxin, wetting (experiment 1), and isolation/restraint (experiment 2) stress differ between gonadectomized male and female sheep. At weekly intervals (in experiment 1), we subjected gonadectomized rams and ewes (n = 6/group) to control conditions, to exercise stress, to iv injection of endotoxin, and to wetting stress. In a second experiment (experiment 2), we subjected gonadectomized rams and ewes (n = 5/group) to control conditions or to isolation/restraint stress. In both experiments, we measured plasma concentrations of cortisol before, during, and after stress at a frequency of at least 15 min with samples collected (from an indwelling jugular catheter) at a greater frequency around the time of the stressor. Cortisol responses to wetting (experiment 1) and isolation/restraint (experiment 2) stress were significantly higher in females compared with males but in response to exercise (experiment 1) and endotoxin (experiment 1) stress, there were no differences between the sexes. For some stressors, there are sex differences in sheep in the stress-induced activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis that are independent of the presence of the sex steroids, but the existence of these sex differences and the direction of these sex differences differs, depending on the stressor imposed. PMID:20668025

  16. Melatonin and Steroid Hormones Activate Intermembrane CU,ZN-Superoxide Dismutase by Means of Mitochondrial Cytochrome P450

    PubMed Central

    IÑARREA, Pedro; CASANOVA, Alvaro; ALAVA, Maria Angeles; ITURRALDE, María; CADENAS, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin and steroid hormones are cytochrome P450 (CYP or P450; EC 1.14.14.1) substrates that have antioxidant properties and mitochondrial protective activities. IMS (Mitochondrial intermembrane space) SOD1 (Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase) is activated following oxidative modification of its critical thiol moieties by superoxide anion (O2.− ). This study was aimed at investigating the potential association between the hormonal protective antioxidant actions in mitochondria and regulation of IMS SOD1 activity. Melatonin, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estradiol, and vitamin D induced a sustained activation over time of SOD1 in intact mitochondria showing a bell-shaped enzyme activation dose-response with a threshold at 50 nM and a maximum effect at 1 μM concentration. Enzyme activation was not affected by furafylline, but it was inhibited by omeprazole, ketoconazole, and tiron, thereby supporting the occurrence of a mitochondrial P450 activity and O2.− requirements. Mitochondrial P450–dependent activation of IMS SOD1 prevented O2.− -induced loss of aconitase activity in intact mitochondria respiring at state 3 respiration. Optimal protection of aconitase activity was observed at 0.1 μM P450 substrate concentration evidencing a likely oxidative effect on the mitochondrial matrix by higher substrate concentrations. Likewise, enzyme activation mediated by mitochondrial P450 activity delayed CaCl2-induced loss of trans-membrane potential, and decreased cytochrome c release. Omeprazole and ketoconazole abrogated both protecting mitochondrial functions promoted by melatonin and steroid hormones. PMID:21397009

  17. Drug Ligand-Induced Activation of Translocator Protein (TSPO) Stimulates Steroid Production by Aged Brown Norway Rat Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, J.-Y.; Chen, H.; Midzak, A.; Burnett, A. L.; Papadopoulos, V.

    2013-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO; 18 kDA) is a high-affinity cholesterol-binding protein that is integrally involved in cholesterol transfer from intracellular stores into mitochondria, the rate-determining step in steroid formation. Previous studies have shown that TSPO drug ligands are able to activate steroid production by MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells and by mitochondria isolated from steroidogenic cells. We hypothesized herein that the direct, pharmacological activation of TSPO might induce aged Leydig cells, which are characterized by reduced T production, to produce significantly higher levels of T both in vitro and in vivo. To test this, we first examined the in vitro effects of the TSPO selective and structurally distinct drug ligands N,N-dihexyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)indole-3-acetamide (FGIN-1-27) and benzodiazepine 4′-chlorodiazepam (Ro5-4864) on steroidogenesis by Leydig cells isolated from aged (21-24 months old) and young adult (3-6 months old) Brown Norway rats. The ligands stimulated Leydig cell T production significantly, and equivalently, in cells of both ages, an effect that was significantly inhibited by the specific TSPO inhibitor 5-androsten-3,17,19-triol (19-Atriol). Additionally, we examined the in vivo effects of administering FGIN-1-27 to young and aged rats. In both cases, serum T levels increased significantly, consistent with the in vitro results. Indeed, serum T levels in aged rats administered FGIN-1-27 were equivalent to T levels in the serum of control young rats. Taken together, these results indicate that although there are reduced amounts of TSPO in aged Leydig cells, its direct activation is able to increase T production. We suggest that this approach might serve as a therapeutic means to increase steroid levels in vivo in cases of primary hypogonadism. PMID:23525219

  18. Multiple monolithic fiber solid-phase microextraction based on a polymeric ionic liquid with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of steroid sex hormones in water and urine.

    PubMed

    Liao, Keren; Mei, Meng; Li, Haonan; Huang, Xiaojia; Wu, Cuiqin

    2016-02-01

    The development of a simple and sensitive analytical approach that combines multiple monolithic fiber solid-phase microextraction with liquid desorption followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection is proposed for the determination of trace levels of seven steroid sex hormones (estriol, 17β-estradiol, testosterone, ethinylestradiol, estrone, progesterone and mestranol) in water and urine matrices. To extract the target analytes effectively, multiple monolithic fiber solid-phase microextraction based on a polymeric ionic liquid was used to concentrate hormones. Several key extraction parameters including desorption solvent, extraction and desorption time, pH value and ionic strength in sample matrix were investigated in detail. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection were found to be in the range of 0.027-0.12 μg/L. The linear range was 0.10-200 μg/L for 17β-estradiol, 0.25-200 μg/L estriol, ethinylestradiol and estrone, and 0.50-200 μg/L for the other hormones. Satisfactory linearities were achieved for analytes with the correlation coefficients above 0.99. Acceptable method reproducibility was achieved by evaluating the repeatability and intermediate precision with relative standard deviations of both less than 8%. The enrichment factors ranged from 54- to 74-fold. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of steroid sex hormones in environmental water samples and human urines with spiking recoveries ranged from 75.6 to 116%.

  19. Steroid Receptor-Associated Immunophilins: A Gateway to Steroid Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, Thomas; Cluning, Carmel; Ward, Bryan K

    2015-01-01

    The steroid receptor-associated immunophilins FKBP51, FKBP52, CyP40 and PP5 have specific roles in steroid receptor function that impact steroid hormone-binding affinity, nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and transcriptional activation of target genes in a tissue-specific manner. Aberrant expression of these functionally unique immunophilins has the potential to cause steroid-based diseases, including breast and prostate cancer, diabetes and related metabolic disorders, male and female infertility and major depressive disorders. This review addresses the function of these proteins as co-chaperones in steroid receptor-Hsp90 complexes and extensively covers current knowledge of the link between the steroid receptor-associated immunophilins and human disease. An improved understanding of their mechanisms of action has revealed opportunities for molecular therapies to enhance or inhibit cellular processes under immunophilin control that contribute both to human health and disease. PMID:26224894

  20. Sex and stress hormone influences on the expression and activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Carbone, D L; Handa, R J

    2013-06-01

    The neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is recognized as a key component in the regulation of CNS ontogeny, homeostasis and adult neuroplasticity. The importance of BDNF in CNS development and function is well documented by numerous reports from animal studies linking abnormal BDNF signaling to metabolic disturbances and anxiety or depressive-like behavior. Despite the diverse roles for BDNF in nearly all aspects of CNS physiology, the regulation of BDNF expression, as well as our understanding of the signaling mechanisms associated with this neurotrophin, remains incomplete. However, links between sex hormones such as estradiol and testosterone, as well as endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs), have emerged as important mediators of BDNF expression and function. Examples of such regulation include brain region-specific induction of Bdnf mRNA in response to estradiol. Additional studies have also documented regulation of the expression of the high-affinity BDNF receptor Tropomyosin-Related Kinase B by estradiol, thus implicating sex steroids not only in the regulation of BDNF expression, but also in mechanisms of signaling associated with it. In addition to gonadal steroids, further evidence also suggests functional interaction between BDNF and GCs, such as in the regulation of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and other important neuropeptides. In this review, we provide an overview of the roles played by selected sex or stress hormones in the regulation of BDNF expression and signaling in the CNS. PMID:23211562

  1. Gender difference in alcohol-evoked hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in the rat: ontogeny and role of neonatal steroids.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, K M; Rivier, C

    1996-04-01

    Alcohol administration results in activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, with female rats secreting more adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone (B) than males in response to the same dose of alcohol. We first examined the ontogeny of the gender difference in HPA responsiveness to alcohol by administering four doses (0, 1, 2, or 3 g/kg body weight) to animals at 21, 41, and 61 days of age (prepubertal, peripubertal, and postpubertal, respectively). We then investigated the organizational role of steroids by manipulating the neonatal steroidal milieu. Rats of both genders were gonadectomized or injected with testosterone propionate within 24 hr of birth and the HPA response to 3 g/kg body weight alcohol was tested in adulthood (postpubertal period). Our data show that the gender difference in HPA responsiveness to alcohol administration arises peripubertally. In addition, HPA response to alcohol is quantitatively smaller in intact male rats than in feminized groups (gonadectomized males and females, intact females) and masculinized female rats. We conclude that the gender difference in HPA response to alcohol observed in postpubertal rats injected with alcohol depends on the activational role of testicular androgens, rather than on their organizational influence.

  2. Vestigialization of an Allosteric Switch: Genetic and Structural Mechanisms for the Evolution of Constitutive Activity in a Steroid Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bridgham, Jamie T.; Keay, June; Ortlund, Eric A.; Thornton, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    An important goal in molecular evolution is to understand the genetic and physical mechanisms by which protein functions evolve and, in turn, to characterize how a protein's physical architecture influences its evolution. Here we dissect the mechanisms for an evolutionary shift in function in the mollusk ortholog of the steroid hormone receptors (SRs), a family of biologically essential transcription factors. In vertebrates, the activity of SRs allosterically depends on binding a hormonal ligand; in mollusks, however, the SR ortholog (called ER, because of high sequence similarity to vertebrate estrogen receptors) activates transcription in the absence of ligand and does not respond to steroid hormones. To understand how this shift in regulation evolved, we combined evolutionary, structural, and functional analyses. We first determined the X-ray crystal structure of the ER of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (CgER), and found that its ligand pocket is filled with bulky residues that prevent ligand occupancy. To understand the genetic basis for the evolution of mollusk ERs' unique functions, we resurrected an ancient SR progenitor and characterized the effect of historical amino acid replacements on its functions. We found that reintroducing just two ancient replacements from the lineage leading to mollusk ERs recapitulates the evolution of full constitutive activity and the loss of ligand activation. These substitutions stabilize interactions among key helices, causing the allosteric switch to become “stuck” in the active conformation and making activation independent of ligand binding. Subsequent changes filled the ligand pocket without further affecting activity; by degrading the allosteric switch, these substitutions vestigialized elements of the protein's architecture required for ligand regulation and made reversal to the ancestral function more complex. These findings show how the physical architecture of allostery enabled a few large-effect mutations

  3. Vestigialization of an allosteric switch: genetic and structural mechanisms for the evolution of constitutive activity in a steroid hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Bridgham, Jamie T; Keay, June; Ortlund, Eric A; Thornton, Joseph W

    2014-01-01

    An important goal in molecular evolution is to understand the genetic and physical mechanisms by which protein functions evolve and, in turn, to characterize how a protein's physical architecture influences its evolution. Here we dissect the mechanisms for an evolutionary shift in function in the mollusk ortholog of the steroid hormone receptors (SRs), a family of biologically essential transcription factors. In vertebrates, the activity of SRs allosterically depends on binding a hormonal ligand; in mollusks, however, the SR ortholog (called ER, because of high sequence similarity to vertebrate estrogen receptors) activates transcription in the absence of ligand and does not respond to steroid hormones. To understand how this shift in regulation evolved, we combined evolutionary, structural, and functional analyses. We first determined the X-ray crystal structure of the ER of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (CgER), and found that its ligand pocket is filled with bulky residues that prevent ligand occupancy. To understand the genetic basis for the evolution of mollusk ERs' unique functions, we resurrected an ancient SR progenitor and characterized the effect of historical amino acid replacements on its functions. We found that reintroducing just two ancient replacements from the lineage leading to mollusk ERs recapitulates the evolution of full constitutive activity and the loss of ligand activation. These substitutions stabilize interactions among key helices, causing the allosteric switch to become "stuck" in the active conformation and making activation independent of ligand binding. Subsequent changes filled the ligand pocket without further affecting activity; by degrading the allosteric switch, these substitutions vestigialized elements of the protein's architecture required for ligand regulation and made reversal to the ancestral function more complex. These findings show how the physical architecture of allostery enabled a few large-effect mutations to

  4. Oral Steroids (Steroid Pills and Syrups)

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about steroids? How are steroid pills and syrups used? Steroid pills and syrups are very effective at reducing swelling and mucus ... liver or cause sterility Available as pills and syrups. Often necessary for treating more severe episodes of ...

  5. Antifungal activity and fungal metabolism of steroidal glycosides of Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) by the plant pathogenic fungus, Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Munafo, John P; Gianfagna, Thomas J

    2011-06-01

    Botrytis cinerea Pers. Fr. is a plant pathogenic fungus and the causal organism of blossom blight of Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.). Easter lily is a rich source of steroidal glycosides, compounds which may play a role in the plant-pathogen interaction of Easter lily. Five steroidal glycosides, including two steroidal glycoalkaloids and three furostanol saponins, were isolated from L. longiflorum and evaluated for fungal growth inhibition activity against B. cinerea, using an in vitro plate assay. All of the compounds showed fungal growth inhibition activity; however, the natural acetylation of C-6''' of the terminal glucose in the steroidal glycoalkaloid, (22R,25R)-spirosol-5-en-3β-yl O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-[6-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), increased antifungal activity by inhibiting the rate of metabolism of the compound by B. cinerea. Acetylation of the glycoalkaloid may be a plant defense response to the evolution of detoxifying mechanisms by the pathogen. The biotransformation of the steroidal glycoalkaloids by B. cinerea led to the isolation and characterization of several fungal metabolites. The fungal metabolites that were generated in the model system were also identified in Easter lily tissues infected with the fungus by LC-MS. In addition, a steroidal glycoalkaloid, (22R,25R)-spirosol-5-en-3β-yl O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), was identified as both a fungal metabolite of the steroidal glycoalkaloids and as a natural product in L. longiflorum for the first time.

  6. Clinically insignificant improvement of prostate cancer prediction by addition of sex steroid hormones and SHBG serum levels to serum PSA, fPSA%, and age in a screening setting.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Popovscaia, Marina; Ramoner, Reinhold; Schäfer, Georg; Stenzel, Birgit; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Klocker, Helmut

    2012-10-01

    Abstract Various findings implicate sex hormones in prostate growth and development and also in prostate carcinogenesis. We investigated if addition of sex steroid hormone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) serum levels to standard risk assessment parameters [prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free PSA percentage (fPSA%), and age] improves prostate cancer prediction in a PSA screening setting. Steroid hormones testosterone (T), free testosterone (fT), and estradiol (E2), and binding protein SHBG levels were measured in 762 men undergoing prostate biopsy due to suspect PSA serum levels. Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 286 (37.5%) of these men. Our data confirmed that PSA (mean BE=5.09; mean CA=6.05; p=1.24×10-5), fPSA% (mean BE=22.08; mean CA=18.67; p=1.97×10-7), and age (mean BE=60.64; mean CA=64.5; p=7.05×10-10) differentiate men with cancer (CA) and men with benign disease (BE), such as benign prostate hyperplasia. In addition, SHBG (mean BE=50.3; mean CA=54.9; p=0.008) also differed statistically significantly between these two groups. All hormones except E2 and tumor markers correlated significantly with age (T: ρ=-0.09; fT: ρ=-0.27; SHBG: ρ=0.21; PSA: ρ=0.32; and fPSA%: ρ=0.22). Furthermore, we found that PSA correlates with E2 (ρ=0.08), and fPSA% with SHBG (ρ=0.1) and fT (ρ=-0.09). Addition of hormones and SHBG to a baseline marker model including PSA, fPSA%, and age improved cancer prediction in three multivariate classification methods; however, the improvement was minimal. The best improvement by 0.8% was obtained in the logistic regression model with the addition of T and SHBG or of E2 and SHBG, or in the support vector machine model with the addition of SHBG and all steroid hormones to the combination of standard markers PSA, fPSA%, and age; however, this additional gain of accuracy is too small to justify the additional efforts and costs.

  7. Extensive esterification of adrenal C19-delta 5-sex steroids to long-chain fatty acids in the ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, R.; Poirier, D.; Merand, Y.; Theriault, C.; Belanger, A.; Labrie, F.

    1989-06-05

    Estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer cells (ZR-75-1) were incubated with the 3H-labeled adrenal C19-delta 5-steroids dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its fully estrogenic derivative, androst-5-ene-3 beta,17 beta-diol (delta 5-diol) for various time intervals. When fractionated by solvent partition, Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and silica gel TLC, the labeled cell components were largely present (40-75%) in three highly nonpolar, lipoidal fractions. Mild alkaline hydrolysis of these lipoidal derivatives yielded either free 3H-labeled DHEA or delta 5-diol. The three lipoidal fractions cochromatographed with the synthetic DHEA 3 beta-esters, delta 5-diol 3 beta (or 17 beta)-monoesters and delta 5-diol 3 beta,17 beta-diesters of long-chain fatty acids. DHEA and delta 5-diol were mainly esterified to saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. For delta 5-diol, the preferred site of esterification of the fatty acids is the 3 beta-position while some esterification also takes place at the 17 beta-position. Time course studies show that ZR-75-1 cells accumulate delta 5-diol mostly (greater than 95%) as fatty acid mono- and diesters while DHEA is converted to delta 5-diol essentially as the esterified form. Furthermore, while free C19-delta 5-steroids rapidly diffuse out of the cells after removal of the precursor (3H)delta 5-diol, the fatty acid ester derivatives are progressively hydrolyzed, and DHEA and delta 5-diol thus formed are then sulfurylated prior to their release into the culture medium. The latter process however is rate-limited, since new steady-state levels of free steroids and fatty acid esters are rapidly reached and maintained for extended periods of time after removal of precursor, thus maintaining minimal concentrations of intracellular steroids.

  8. The effect of organochlorines and heavy metals on sex steroid-binding proteins in vitro in the plasma of nesting green turtles, Chelonia mydas.

    PubMed

    Ikonomopoulou, Maria Petrou; Olszowy, Henry; Hodge, Mary; Bradley, Adrian J

    2009-07-01

    In this study on green turtles, Chelonia mydas, from Peninsular Malaysia, the effect of selected environmental toxicants was examined in vitro. Emphasis was placed on purported hormone-mimicking chemicals such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, dieldrin, lead, zinc and copper. Five concentrations were used: high (1 mg/L), medium (10(-1) mg/L), low (10(-2) mg/L), very low (10(-6) mg/L) and control (diluted carrier solvent but no toxicants). The results suggest that environmental pesticides and heavy metals may significantly alter the binding of steroids [i.e. testosterone (T) and oestradiol] to the plasma proteins in vitro. Competition studies showed that only Cu competed for binding sites with testosterone in the plasma collected from nesting C. mydas. Dieldrin and all heavy metals competed with oestradiol for binding sites. Furthermore, testosterone binding affinity was affected at various DDT concentrations and was hypothesised that DDT in vivo may act to inhibit steroid-protein interactions in nesting C. mydas. Although the precise molecular mechanism is yet to be described, DDT could have an effect upon the protein conformation thus affecting T binding (e.g. the T binding site on the steroid hormone binding protein molecule).

  9. Effects of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and its inactive derivative 1,9-dideoxyforskolin on insect cytochrome P-450 dependent steroid hydroxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Keogh, D P; Mitchell, M J; Crooks, J R; Smith, S L

    1992-01-15

    The adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and its pharmacologically inactive derivative 1,9-dideoxyforskolin were found to inhibit in a dose-dependent fashion the ecdysone 20-monooxygenase activity associated with wandering stage larvae of Drosophila melanogaster and fat body and midgut from last instar larvae of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. The concentrations of these labdane diterpenes required to elicit a 50% inhibition of the cytochrome P-450 dependent steroid hydroxylase activity in the insect tissues ranged from approximately 5 x 10(-6) to 5 x 10(-4) M.

  10. Rooibos flavonoids inhibit the activity of key adrenal steroidogenic enzymes, modulating steroid hormone levels in H295R cells.

    PubMed

    Schloms, Lindie; Swart, Amanda C

    2014-03-24

    Major rooibos flavonoids--dihydrochalcones, aspalathin and nothofagin, flavones--orientin and vitexin, and a flavonol, rutin, were investigated to determine their influence on the activity of adrenal steroidogenic enzymes, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD2) and cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, P450 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1), P450 21-hydroxylase (CYP21A2) and P450 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1). All the flavonoids inhibited 3βHSD2 and CYP17A1 significantly, while the inhibition of downstream enzymes, CYP21A2 and CYP11B1, was both substrate and flavonoid specific. The dihydrochalcones inhibited the activity of CYP21A2, but not that of CYP11B1. Although rutin, orientin and vitexin inhibited deoxycortisol conversion by CYP11B1 significantly, inhibition of deoxycorticosterone was <20%. These three flavonoids were unable to inhibit CYP21A2, with negligible inhibition of deoxycortisol biosynthesis only. Rooibos inhibited substrate conversion by CYP17A1 and CYP21A2, while the inhibition of other enzyme activities was <20%. In H295R cells, rutin had the greatest inhibitory effect on steroid production upon forskolin stimulation, reducing total steroid output 2.3-fold, while no effect was detected under basal conditions. Nothofagin and vitexin had a greater inhibitory effect on overall steroid production compared to aspalathin and orientin, respectively. The latter compounds contain two hydroxyl groups on the B ring, while nothofagin and vitexin contain a single hydroxyl group. In addition, all of the flavonoids are glycosylated, albeit at different positions--dihydrochalcones at C3' and flavones at C8 on ring A, while rutin, a larger molecule, has a rutinosyl moiety at C3 on ring C. Structural differences regarding the number and position of hydroxyl and glucose moieties as well as structural flexibility could indicate different mechanisms by which these flavonoids influence the activity of adrenal steroidogenic enzymes.

  11. [Content of Thyroid and Sex Steroid Hormones in Young-of-the-Year of Black Sea Trout Salmo trutta labrax from Two Spatial Groups for Different Duration of Starvation].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, D S; Pavlov, E D; Ganzha, E V; Kostin, V V

    2015-01-01

    The content of thyroid and sex steroid hormones is determined in fish-farm juveniles of Black Sea trout 5.5 months old, from the bottom and pelagic spatial groups differing in the probability of future selection of the resident or anadromous life strategies, respectively. Differences in the concentration of the aforementioned hormones are found in young-of-the-year corresponding to those in the migratory and resident forms of yearlings of trout. In the juveniles from the pelagic group at the age 0+, the level of triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and testosterone is higher than in specimens from the bottom group. Prolonged starvation results in a higher content of triiodthyronine, thyroxine, and testosterone in the blood of juveniles from both spatial groups. The concentration of estradiol-17β increases in pelagic specimens and decreases in bottom specimens.

  12. Steroids. A Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of School Health Education and Services.

    This guide provides information on steroid use as well as prevention and intervention strategies. It is intended to serve as a supplement to drug abuse education and prevention programs in elementary and secondary schools and as the basis for local curriculum development and instructional activities. The following topics are covered: (1) history…

  13. Creative activity and sex-role identity in elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Milgram, R M; Yitzhak, V; Milgram, N A

    1977-10-01

    The relationship of creative activity to sex-role identity was examined in boys (N = 80) and girls (N = 56), aged nine to twelve, of above average intelligence. Endorsement of personal characteristics that cut across sex stereotypes was associated with participation in a wide variety of creative activities. When analyzed by specific activity, the relationship with sex-role followed a consistent pattern for boys and girls combined: male activities such as sports with scores on the masculine scale, female activity such as dance or art with scores on the feminine scale, and sexually indeterminate activities such as drama or social leadership with scores on both scales. PMID:917690

  14. Regulation of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and sulphotransferase 2A1 gene expression in primary porcine hepatocytes by selected sex-steroids and plant secondary metabolites from chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and wormwood (Artemisia sp.).

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Ekstrand, Bo

    2014-02-15

    In pigs the endogenously produced compound androstenone is metabolised in the liver in two steps by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and sulphotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1). The present study investigated the effect of selected sex-steroids (0.01-1 μM androstenone, testosterone and estradiol), skatole (1-100 μM) and secondary plant metabolites (1-100 μM) on the expression of 3β-HSD and SULT2A1 mRNA. Additionally the effect of a global methanolic extract of dried chicory root was investigated and compared to previous obtained in vivo effects. Primary hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of piglets (crossbreed: Landrace×Yorkshire and Duroc) and cultured for 24h before treatment for an additionally 24h. RNA was isolated from the hepatocytes and specific gene expression determined by RT-PCR using TaqMan probes. The investigated sex-steroids had no effect on the mRNA expression of 3β-HSD and SULT2A1, while skatole decreased the content of SULT2A1 30% compared to control. Of the investigated secondary plant metabolites artemisinin and scoparone (found in Artemisia sp.) lowered the content of SULT2A1 by 20 and 30% compared to control, respectively. Moreover, we tested three secondary plant metabolites (lactucin, esculetin and esculin) found in chicory root. Lactucin increased the mRNA content of both 3β-HSD and SULT2A1 by 200% compared to control. An extract of chicory root was shown to decrease the expression of both 3β-HSD and SULT2A1. It is concluded that the gene expression of enzymes with importance for androstenone metabolism is regulated by secondary plant metabolites in a complex manner. PMID:24333270

  15. Regulation of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and sulphotransferase 2A1 gene expression in primary porcine hepatocytes by selected sex-steroids and plant secondary metabolites from chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and wormwood (Artemisia sp.).

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Ekstrand, Bo

    2014-02-15

    In pigs the endogenously produced compound androstenone is metabolised in the liver in two steps by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and sulphotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1). The present study investigated the effect of selected sex-steroids (0.01-1 μM androstenone, testosterone and estradiol), skatole (1-100 μM) and secondary plant metabolites (1-100 μM) on the expression of 3β-HSD and SULT2A1 mRNA. Additionally the effect of a global methanolic extract of dried chicory root was investigated and compared to previous obtained in vivo effects. Primary hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of piglets (crossbreed: Landrace×Yorkshire and Duroc) and cultured for 24h before treatment for an additionally 24h. RNA was isolated from the hepatocytes and specific gene expression determined by RT-PCR using TaqMan probes. The investigated sex-steroids had no effect on the mRNA expression of 3β-HSD and SULT2A1, while skatole decreased the content of SULT2A1 30% compared to control. Of the investigated secondary plant metabolites artemisinin and scoparone (found in Artemisia sp.) lowered the content of SULT2A1 by 20 and 30% compared to control, respectively. Moreover, we tested three secondary plant metabolites (lactucin, esculetin and esculin) found in chicory root. Lactucin increased the mRNA content of both 3β-HSD and SULT2A1 by 200% compared to control. An extract of chicory root was shown to decrease the expression of both 3β-HSD and SULT2A1. It is concluded that the gene expression of enzymes with importance for androstenone metabolism is regulated by secondary plant metabolites in a complex manner.

  16. Cerebral activity to opposite-sex voices reflected by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Gu, Feng; Zhang, Xiliang; Yang, Lizhuang; Chen, Lijun; Wei, Zhengde; Zha, Rujing; Wang, Ying; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2014-01-01

    Human voice is a gender discriminating cue and is important to mate selection. This study employed electrophysiological recordings to examine whether there is specific cerebral activity when presented with opposite-sex voices as compared to same-sex voices. Male voices and female voices were pseudo-randomly presented to male and female participants. In Experiment 1, participants were instructed to determine the gender of each voice. A late positivity (LP) response around 750 ms after voice onset was elicited by opposite-sex voices, as reflected by a positive deflection of the ERP to opposite-sex voices than that to same-sex voices. This LP response was prominent around parieto-occipital recording sites, and it suggests an opposite-sex specific process, which may reflect emotion- and/or reward-related cerebral activity. In Experiment 2, participants were instructed to press a key when hearing a non-voice pure tone and not give any response when they heard voice stimuli. In this task, no difference were found between the ERP to same-sex voices and that to opposite-sex voices, suggesting that the cerebral activity to opposite-sex voices may disappear without gender-related attention. These results provide significant implications on cognitive mechanisms with regard to opposite-sex specific voice processing.

  17. Role of sex hormones in hypercapnia-induced activation of the locus coeruleus in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, D; Marques, D A; Bernuci, M P; Leite, C M; Araújo-Lopes, R; Anselmo-Franci, J; Bícego, K C; Szawka, R E; Gargaglioni, L H

    2016-01-28

    The locus coeruleus (LC) has been suggested as a CO2 chemoreceptor site in mammals. Most of the studies involving the role of the LC in hypercapnic ventilatory responses have been performed in males. Since ovarian steroids modulate the activity of LC neurons and females have a different respiratory response to CO2 than males, we evaluated the activity of LC noradrenergic neurons during normocapnia and hypercapnia in female and male rats with distinct sex hormone levels. Ovariectomized (OVX), estradiol (E2)-treated ovariectomized (OVX+E2) and female rats on the diestrous day of the estrous cycle were evaluated. Concurrently, males were investigated as gonad-intact, orchidectomized (ORX), testosterone (T)-treated ORX (ORX+T), and E2-treated ORX (ORX+E2). Activation of LC neurons was determined by double-label immunohistochemistry to c-Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Hypercapnia induced by 7% CO2 increased the number of c-Fos/TH-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the LC of all groups when compared to air exposure. Hypercapnia-induced c-Fos expression did not differ between diestrous females and intact male rats. In the OVX+E2 group, there was attenuation in the c-Fos expression during normocapnia compared with OVX rats, but CO2 responsiveness was not altered. Moreover, in ORX rats, neither T nor E2 treatments changed c-Fos expression in LC noradrenergic neurons. Thus, in female rats, E2 reduces activation of LC noradrenergic neurons, whereas in males, sex hormones do not influence the LC activity.

  18. Neuropeptidase activity is down-regulated by estradiol in steroid-sensitive regions of the hypothalamus in female mice.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Lisa A; Cyr, Nicole E; Qiao, Jana W; Defries, Christa C; Tetel, Marc J; Wolfson, Adele J

    2012-08-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) and prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) are neuropeptidases involved in the hydrolysis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, a key component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnRH is regulated in part by feedback from steroid hormones such as estradiol. Previously, we demonstrated that TOP levels are down-regulated by estradiol in reproductively-relevant regions of the female rodent brain. The present study supports these findings by showing that TOP enzyme activity, as well as protein levels, in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus of female mice is controlled by estradiol. We further demonstrate that PEP levels in this same brain region are down-regulated by estradiol in parallel with those of TOP. These findings provide evidence that these neuropeptidases are part of the fine control of hormone levels in the HPG axis.

  19. The effect of indomethacin, myeloperoxidase, and certain steroid hormones on bactericidal activity: an ex vivo and in vivo experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) is essential in the killing of phagocytosed bacteria. Certain steroid hormones increase MPO plasma concentration. Our aim was to test the effect of MPO, its inhibitor indomethacin, and certain steroid hormones on bactericidal activity. Methods Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were incubated with opsonised Escherichia coli and either MPO, indomethacin, estradiol, or hydrocortisone. Intracellular killing capacity was evaluated with UV microscopy after treatment with fluorescent dye. Next, an in vivo experiment was performed with nine groups of rats: in the first phase of the study indomethacin treatment and Pasteurella multocida infection (Ii), indomethacin treatment without infection (I0), untreated control with infection (Mi) and untreated control without infection (M0); in the second phase of the study rats with infection and testosterone treatment (NT), castration, infection and testosterone treatment (CT), castration, infection and estradiol treatment (CE), non-castrated infected control (N0), and castrated infected control (C0). After treatment bacteria were reisolated from the liver and heart blood on agar plates, and laboratory parameters were analyzed. For the comparison of laboratory results ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis test and LSD post hoc test was used. Results Indomethacin did not have a remarkable effect on the bacterial killing of PMNs, while the other compounds increased bacterial killing to various degrees. In the animal model indomethacin and infection caused a poor clinical state, a great number of reisolated bacteria, elevated white blood cell (WBC) count, decreased C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum albumin levels. Testosterone treatment resulted in less bacterial colony numbers in group NT, but not in group CT compared to respective controls (N0, C0). Estradiol treatment (CE) decreased colony numbers compared to control (C0). Hormone administration resulted in lower WBC counts, and in group CE, a

  20. Synthesis of new steroidal imidazo [1,2-a] pyridines: DNA binding studies, cleavage activity and in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dar, Ayaz Mahmood; Shamsuzzaman; Gatoo, Manzoor Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    A one-pot strategy for the catalytic synthesis of series of new 5α-cholestan-6-spiro-5'-phenylamino-2H-imidazo [1',2'-a] pyridines (4-14) has been investigated. The synthesized products were obtained in good yields (85-90%) and the protocol uses Multi-component Reaction (MCR) involving steroidal ketones, 2-aminopyridines, isocyanides and propylphosphonic anhydride (®T3P) as a catalyst. After characterization by spectral and analytical data, the interaction studies of compounds (4-6) with DNA were studied by UV-vis, fluorescence spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and molecular docking. The compounds bind to DNA preferentially through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with Kb; 2.35×10(4), 3.71×10(4) and 3.24×10(4) M(-1), respectively, indicating the higher binding affinity of compound 5 towards DNA. Gel electrophoresis showed the concentration dependent cleavage activity of compounds 4-6 with DNA. Molecular docking studies suggested that compounds bind through minor groove to DNA. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay depicted promising anti-proliferative activity of compound 4-9 against different given cancer cells. In Western blotting, the expressions of relevant apoptotic markers depicted an apoptosis by steroidal imidazopyridines in A549 cells. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining data indicated that compounds could effectively induce apoptosis in A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. FACS analysis shows that the compound 6 bring about cell cycle arrest at 2.62 μM concentration.

  1. Combined effects of androgen anabolic steroids and physical activity on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Hengevoss, Jonas; Piechotta, Marion; Müller, Dennis; Hanft, Fabian; Parr, Maria Kristina; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Diel, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Analysing effects of pharmaceutical substances and training on feedback mechanisms of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be helpful to quantify the benefit of strategies preventing loss of muscle mass, and in the fight against doping. In this study we analysed combined effects of anabolic steroids and training on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Therefore intact male Wistar rats were dose-dependently treated with metandienone, estradienedione and the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S-1. In serum cortisol, testosterone, 17β-estradiol (E2), prolactin, inhibin B, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and thyroxine (T4) concentrations were determined. Six human volunteers were single treated with 1-androstenedione. In addition abusing and clean body builders were analysed. Serum concentrations of inhibin B, IGF-1, cortisol, prolactin, T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), testosterone and LH were determined. In rats, administration of metandienone, estradienedione and S-1 resulted in an increase of muscle fiber diameter. Metandienone and estradienedione but not S-1 administration significantly decreases LH and inhibin B serum concentration. Administration of estradienedione resulted in an increase of E2 and S-1 in an increase of cortisol. Single administration of 1-androstenedione in humans decreased cortisol and inhibin B serum concentrations. LH was not affected. In abusing body builders a significantly decrease of LH, TSH and inhibin B and an increase of prolactin, IGF-1 and T4 was detected. In clean body builders only T4 and TSH were affected. PMID:25797375

  2. Combined effects of androgen anabolic steroids and physical activity on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Hengevoss, Jonas; Piechotta, Marion; Müller, Dennis; Hanft, Fabian; Parr, Maria Kristina; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Diel, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Analysing effects of pharmaceutical substances and training on feedback mechanisms of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be helpful to quantify the benefit of strategies preventing loss of muscle mass, and in the fight against doping. In this study we analysed combined effects of anabolic steroids and training on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Therefore intact male Wistar rats were dose-dependently treated with metandienone, estradienedione and the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S-1. In serum cortisol, testosterone, 17β-estradiol (E2), prolactin, inhibin B, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and thyroxine (T4) concentrations were determined. Six human volunteers were single treated with 1-androstenedione. In addition abusing and clean body builders were analysed. Serum concentrations of inhibin B, IGF-1, cortisol, prolactin, T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), testosterone and LH were determined. In rats, administration of metandienone, estradienedione and S-1 resulted in an increase of muscle fiber diameter. Metandienone and estradienedione but not S-1 administration significantly decreases LH and inhibin B serum concentration. Administration of estradienedione resulted in an increase of E2 and S-1 in an increase of cortisol. Single administration of 1-androstenedione in humans decreased cortisol and inhibin B serum concentrations. LH was not affected. In abusing body builders a significantly decrease of LH, TSH and inhibin B and an increase of prolactin, IGF-1 and T4 was detected. In clean body builders only T4 and TSH were affected.

  3. Contraceptives and other steroid drugs: their production from steroidal sapogenins.

    PubMed

    Fazli, F R

    1968-01-01

    Sterols, steroidal sapogenins, steroidal alkaloids and alkaloidal amines derived from plant sources provide the starting materials for steroid production. Sarmentogenin (III) a cardiac glycoside, was first used, but the source was limited. Hecogenin (IV), a saponin (Agave sislana), was manufactured to cortisone by the process of Spensley et al. Introduction of an oxygen atom at carbon 11 by microbiological means gave a new series of starting compounds, among them, diosgenin (V) which converts to progesterone, to 11 hydroxyprogesterone by fermentation, cortisone, hydrocortisone and delta compounds. Reviews on the development, physiological and biochemical aspects of oral contraceptives were mentioned. A steroid with activity equivalent to progesterone was made by Ehrenstein in a 12-step synthesis from a cardiac aglycone strophanthidin. Estradiol converted to 19-nor testosterone by Birch and Mukherji provided a breakthrough in production of 19-nor steroids and led to production of 19-nor progesterone (VI) with a higher activity than progesterone. 19-nor-17alpha-ethynyltestosterone (VIII), its acetate derivative, and a related compound (I) account for 80% of consumption of oral contraceptives in the United States. Reviews of nor-steroids by Colton and Kilmstra, and of the chemical developments leading to currently used steroid contraceptives by Djerassi are mentioned.

  4. Structure–Activity Relationship for the First-in-Class Clinical Steroid Sulfatase Inhibitor Irosustat (STX64, BN83495)

    PubMed Central

    Woo, L W Lawrence; Ganeshapillai, Dharshini; Thomas, Mark P; Sutcliffe, Oliver B; Malini, Bindu; Mahon, Mary F; Purohit, Atul; Potter, Barry V L

    2011-01-01

    Structure–activity relationship studies were conducted on Irosustat (STX64, BN83495), the first steroid sulfatase (STS) inhibitor to enter diverse clinical trials for patients with advanced hormone-dependent cancer. The size of its aliphatic ring was expanded; its sulfamate group was N,N-dimethylated, relocated to another position and flanked by an adjacent methoxy group; and series of quinolin-2(1H)-one and quinoline derivatives of Irosustat were explored. The STS inhibitory activities of the synthesised compounds were assessed in a preparation of JEG-3 cells. Stepwise enlargement of the aliphatic ring from 7 to 11 members increases potency, although a further increase in ring size is detrimental. The best STS inhibitors in vitro had IC50 values between 0.015 and 0.025 nm. Other modifications made to Irosustat were found to either abolish or significantly weaken its activity. An azomethine adduct of Irosustat with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) was isolated, and crystal structures of Irosustat and this adduct were determined. Docking studies were conducted to explore the potential interactions between compounds and the active site of STS, and suggest a sulfamoyl group transfer to formylglycine 75 during the inactivation mechanism. PMID:21990014

  5. Unconventional endocannabinoid signaling governs sperm activation via the sex hormone progesterone.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa R; Mannowetz, Nadja; Iavarone, Anthony T; Safavi, Rojin; Gracheva, Elena O; Smith, James F; Hill, Rose Z; Bautista, Diana M; Kirichok, Yuriy; Lishko, Polina V

    2016-04-29

    Steroids regulate cell proliferation, tissue development, and cell signaling via two pathways: a nuclear receptor mechanism and genome-independent signaling. Sperm activation, egg maturation, and steroid-induced anesthesia are executed via the latter pathway, the key components of which remain unknown. Here, we present characterization of the human sperm progesterone receptor that is conveyed by the orphan enzyme α/β hydrolase domain-containing protein 2 (ABHD2). We show that ABHD2 is highly expressed in spermatozoa, binds progesterone, and acts as a progesterone-dependent lipid hydrolase by depleting the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2AG) from plasma membrane. The 2AG inhibits the sperm calcium channel (CatSper), and its removal leads to calcium influx via CatSper and ensures sperm activation. This study reveals that progesterone-activated endocannabinoid depletion by ABHD2 is a general mechanism by which progesterone exerts its genome-independent action and primes sperm for fertilization. PMID:26989199

  6. Unconventional endocannabinoid signaling governs sperm activation via the sex hormone progesterone.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa R; Mannowetz, Nadja; Iavarone, Anthony T; Safavi, Rojin; Gracheva, Elena O; Smith, James F; Hill, Rose Z; Bautista, Diana M; Kirichok, Yuriy; Lishko, Polina V

    2016-04-29

    Steroids regulate cell proliferation, tissue development, and cell signaling via two pathways: a nuclear receptor mechanism and genome-independent signaling. Sperm activation, egg maturation, and steroid-induced anesthesia are executed via the latter pathway, the key components of which remain unknown. Here, we present characterization of the human sperm progesterone receptor that is conveyed by the orphan enzyme α/β hydrolase domain-containing protein 2 (ABHD2). We show that ABHD2 is highly expressed in spermatozoa, binds progesterone, and acts as a progesterone-dependent lipid hydrolase by depleting the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2AG) from plasma membrane. The 2AG inhibits the sperm calcium channel (CatSper), and its removal leads to calcium influx via CatSper and ensures sperm activation. This study reveals that progesterone-activated endocannabinoid depletion by ABHD2 is a general mechanism by which progesterone exerts its genome-independent action and primes sperm for fertilization.

  7. Unprotected sex among heterosexually active homeless men: results from a multi-level dyadic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David P; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Brown, Ryan; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela

    2013-06-01

    HIV is a serious public health problem for homeless populations. Homeless men who have sex with women have received less attention in the HIV risk literature than other homeless populations. This research uses multi-level modeling to investigate the context of unprotected sex among heterosexually active homeless men in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Based on interviews with 305 randomly selected men who discussed 665 of their recent female sexual relationships, this project investigates the correlates of unprotected sex during the past 6 months at the partnership, individual, and social network levels. Several different measures of relationship closeness and lack of communication about HIV/condoms were associated with unprotected sex. Controlling for relationship factors, men's negative attitudes towards condoms, mental health, and higher number of male sex partners also were associated with having unprotected sex with female partners. We discuss the implications of these findings for health interventions. PMID:23212852

  8. Sex Differences in Mental Rotation and Cortical Activation Patterns: Can Training Change Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jausovec, Norbert; Jausovec, Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    In two experiments the neuronal mechanisms of sex differences in mental rotation were investigated. In Experiment 1 cortical activation was studied in women and men with similar levels of mental rotation ability (high, and average to low), who were equalized with respect to general intelligence. Sex difference in neuroelectric patterns of brain…

  9. In vitro and in vivo association of porcine hepatic cytochrome P450 3A and 2C activities with testicular steroids.

    PubMed

    Zamaratskaia, G; Zlabek, V; Ropstad, E; Andresen, Ø

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to screen the inhibitory potential of several testicular steroids on cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) and 2C (CYP2C) activities in porcine liver microsomes. The microsomes used in this study were obtained from pubertal male pigs of two breeds, Landrace and Duroc. For the in vitro inhibition study, porcine microsomes were incubated in the presence of 17β-estradiol, 17α-estradiol, androstenone, dehydroepiandrosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Both reversible and mechanism-based inhibitions were examined. 7-benzyloxyresorufin (BR) and 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (BFC) were used as substrates for CYP3A, and diclofenac and tolbutamide (TB) as substrates for CYP2C. 7-benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylase (BROD) activity was inhibited by all tested steroids in the microsomes from Landrace pigs via mechanism-based mode, but in the microsomes from Duroc pigs, BROD activities were inhibited only in the presence of 17β-oestradiol. Mechanism-based inhibition of BFC metabolism by the tested steroids was observed in the microsomes from both breeds, but this inhibition was weak and did not exceed 20%. TB hydroxylase (TBOH) activity in the microsomes from Duroc pigs was inhibited by 17α-oestradiol through the mechanism-based mode of inhibition. None of the investigated steroids inhibited TBOH activity in Landrace pigs. For the in vivo study, male pigs were injected with a single dose of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to stimulate testicular steroid production by the Leydig cells. In vivo stimulation with hGC did not alter BROD activity either in Landrace or in Duroc pigs. BFC metabolism was significantly induced by hCG stimulation in both breeds and TBOH activity only in Duroc pigs. Activity of diclofenac hydroxylase was not detected in either Landrace or Duroc pigs. Breed significantly affected BROD and TBOH activity with BROD being higher in Landrace and TBOH in Duroc pigs. This study improved our understanding of the role of testicular steroids in

  10. The effect of anabolic-androgenic steroids on aromatase activity and androgen receptor binding in the rat preoptic area.

    PubMed

    Roselli, C E

    1998-05-11

    The level of aromatase in the preoptic area of rats is transcriptionally regulated through a specific androgen-receptor mediated mechanism and can be used as a measure of central androgenic effect. Therefore, several commonly abused anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) were tested for their ability to induce aromatase activity in the preoptic area of castrated rats. In addition, we determined the relative binding affinities of these compounds for the androgen receptor, as well as their ability to bind androgen receptor in vivo following subcutaneous injections. All of the AAS compounds tested significantly stimulated POA aromatase activity above castrate levels. The compounds that produced the greatest stimulation of aromatase activity were those that bound most avidly to the androgen receptor in vitro (i.e., testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and nandrolone). In contrast, the 17alpha-alkylated compounds that were tested (stanozolol, danazol, methandrostenolone) modestly stimulated aromatase and were weak competitors for the androgen receptor. The subcutaneous injection of AAS compounds increased the concentrations of occupied nuclear androgen receptors in the brain, but the magnitude of effect was not related to their potency for inducing aromatase or their relative binding affinity for the androgen receptor suggesting that androgen receptor occupancy in POA is not correlated with the action of androgen on aromatase. The present results help explain the behavioral effects of AAS compounds in rats. PMID:9593936

  11. Spectrophotometric method for the assay of steroid 5α-reductase activity of rat liver and prostate microsomes.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Teruki; Wada, Keiji; Watabe, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuki; Ito, Etsuro; Miura, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric method for the assay of steroid 5α-reductase (5α-SR) was developed in which 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) and 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5α-diol), metabolites formed in the NADPH-dependent reduction of testosterone with enzyme sources of 5α-SR, were measured by enzymatic cycling using 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the presence of excess thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (thio-NAD) and NADH. It was found that 5α-SR activity was proportional to the accumulated thio-NADH having an absorption maximum at 400 nm. Because of the high cycling rate (> 600 cycle per min) and no interference from testosterone, enzymatic cycling can determine the sum of 5α-DHT and 5α-diol at the picomole level without separation from excess testosterone. The present method was readily applicable to the assay of 5α-SR activity of rat liver and prostate microsomes as well as to the assay of inhibitory activity of finasteride, a synthetic inhibitor of 5α-SR. PMID:23574674

  12. A comparison of the ocular anti-inflammatory activity of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bhattacherjee, P; Williams, R N; Eakins, K E

    1983-08-01

    The anti-inflammatory activities of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds have been evaluated in the rat model of ocular inflammation induced by subcutaneous injection of lipopolysaccharides. Dexamethasone sodium phosphate, BW755C, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, and benoxaprofen were administered orally or topically for 24 or 48 hrs. Oral administration of dexamethasone, BW755C, and flurbiprofen inhibited iris-vasodilatation and leukocyte accumulation in the anterior chamber in a dose-dependent manner. Indomethacin and benoxaprofen were active only at high doses. Topical administration of these compounds inhibited the inflammatory responses in a similar manner. The inhibitory effect on leukocyte accumulation by these compounds was greater than their effect on vasodilatation. BW755C, a phenyl pyrazoline derivative, which is an inhibitor of both the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism was the most active nonsteroidal compound and had an anti-inflammatory profile similar to dexamethasone. The results of this study also indicate that the model of rat ocular inflammation induced by subcutaneous injection of endotoxin can be used satisfactorily for comparative evaluation of anti-inflammatory agents.

  13. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  14. [Determination by high performance chromatography, steroid saponins in a biologically active food supplements containing the extract of Tribulus terrestris].

    PubMed

    Kozlova, O I; Perederiaev, O I; Ramenskaia, G V

    2011-01-01

    Steroidal saponins are bioactive substances of Tribulus terrestris and can be used to assess the quality of raw materials and processed products from them. For this purpose has been developed the method of qualitative and quantitative determination of steroidal saponins by high performance liquid chromatography with spectrophotometric and mass-selective detection and optimal conditions of sample preparation (70% methanol extraction with sonication and heating); also has been studied steroidal saponins composition of Tribulus terrestris (protodioscin, tribulosaponin B, metilprotodiostsin, terrestrozin H, prototribestin, gracillin and others were found).

  15. How do sex hormones modify arrhythmogenesis in long QT syndrome? Sex hormone effects on arrhythmogenic substrate and triggered activity.

    PubMed

    Odening, Katja E; Koren, Gideon

    2014-11-01

    Gender differences in cardiac repolarization and the arrhythmogenic risk of patients with inherited and acquired long QT syndromes are well appreciated clinically. Enhancing our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these differences is critical to improve our therapeutic strategies for preventing sudden cardiac death in such patients. This review summarizes the effects of sex hormones on the expression and function of ion channels that control cardiac cell excitation and repolarization as well as key proteins that regulate Ca(2+) dynamics at the cellular level. Moreover, it examines the role of sex hormones in modifying the dynamic spatiotemporal (regional and transmural) heterogeneities in action potential duration (eg, the arrhythmogenic substrate) and the susceptibility to (sympathetic) triggered activity at the tissue, organ, and whole animal levels. Finally, it explores the implications of these effects on the management of patients with LQTS.

  16. Steroid toxicity and detoxification in ascomycetous fungi.

    PubMed

    Cvelbar, Damjana; Zist, Vanja; Kobal, Katja; Zigon, Dušan; Zakelj-Mavrič, Marija

    2013-02-25

    In the last couple of decades fungal infections have become a significant clinical problem. A major interest into fungal steroid action has been provoked since research has proven that steroid hormones are toxic to fungi and affect the host/fungus relationship. Steroid hormones were found to differ in their antifungal activity in ascomycetous fungi Hortaea werneckii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus oryzae. Dehydroepiandrosterone was shown to be the strongest inhibitor of growth in all three varieties of fungi followed by androstenedione and testosterone. For their protection, fungi use several mechanisms to lower the toxic effects of steroids. The efficiency of biotransformation in detoxification depended on the microorganism and steroid substrate used. Biotransformation was a relatively slow process as it also depended on the growth phase of the fungus. In addition to biotransformation, steroid extrusion out of the cells contributed to the lowering of the active intracellular steroid concentration. Plasma membrane Pdr5 transporter was found to be the most effective, followed by Snq2 transporter and vacuolar transporters Ybt1 and Ycf1. Proteins Aus1 and Dan1 were not found to be involved in steroid import. The research of possible targets of steroid hormone action in fungi suggests that steroid hormones inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae and H. werneckii. Results of this inhibition caused changes in the sterol content of the cellular membrane. The presence of steroid hormones most probably causes the degradation of the Tat2 permease and impairment of tryptophan import.

  17. Dendritic growth gated by a steroid hormone receptor underlies increases in activity in the developing Drosophila locomotor system

    PubMed Central

    Zwart, Maarten F.; Randlett, Owen; Evers, Jan Felix; Landgraf, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    As animals grow, their nervous systems also increase in size. How growth in the central nervous system is regulated and its functional consequences are incompletely understood. We explored these questions, using the larval Drosophila locomotor system as a model. In the periphery, at neuromuscular junctions, motoneurons are known to enlarge their presynaptic axon terminals in size and strength, thereby compensating for reductions in muscle excitability that are associated with increases in muscle size. Here, we studied how motoneurons change in the central nervous system during periods of animal growth. We find that within the central nervous system motoneurons also enlarge their postsynaptic dendritic arbors, by the net addition of branches, and that these scale with overall animal size. This dendritic growth is gated on a cell-by-cell basis by a specific isoform of the steroid hormone receptor ecdysone receptor-B2, for which functions have thus far remained elusive. The dendritic growth is accompanied by synaptic strengthening and results in increased neuronal activity. Electrical properties of these neurons, however, are independent of ecdysone receptor-B2 regulation. We propose that these structural dendritic changes in the central nervous system, which regulate neuronal activity, constitute an additional part of the adaptive response of the locomotor system to increases in body and muscle size as the animal grows. PMID:24043825

  18. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on three sex steroids in two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and in the H295R cell assay.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Nellemann, Christine; Styrishave, Bjarne; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    2015-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are known to have a range of disorders that are often linked to the endocrine system e.g. hormonal imbalances, breast enlargement, sexual dysfunction, and menstrual cycle disorders. The mechanisms behind most of these disorders are not known in details. In this study we investigated whether the endocrine effect due to SSRI exposure could be detected in well adopted in vitro steroidogenesis assays, two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and the H295R cell assay. The five drugs citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline, were shown to inhibit the aromatase enzyme in both types of aromatase assays. The IC50 values ranged from 3 to 600 μM. All five SSRIs, were further investigated in the H295R cell line. All compounds altered the steroid secretion from the cells, the lowest observed effect levels were 0.9 μM and 3.1 μM for sertraline and fluvoxamine, respectively. In general the H295R cell assay was more sensitive to SSRI exposure than the two aromatase assays, up to 20 times more sensitive. This indicates that the H295R cell line is a better tool for screening endocrine disrupting effects. Our findings show that the endocrine effects of SSRIs may, at least in part, be due to interference with the steroidogenesis. PMID:26162595

  19. Demonstration of 26-hydroxylation of C27-steroids in human skin fibroblasts, and a deficiency of this activity in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Skrede, S; Björkhem, I; Kvittingen, E A; Buchmann, M S; Lie, S O; East, C; Grundy, S

    1986-01-01

    26-Hydroxylation of 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha-triol and other C27-steroids was demonstrated in cultured skin fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Activities in skin fibroblasts were approximately 5-10% of those previously found in human liver homogenates, and were inhibited by CO. The apparent Km was lowest for 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha-triol (1.3 mumol/liter) and highest for 5-cholestene-3 beta, 7 alpha-diol (12 mumol/liter). The rate of 26-hydroxylation was highest with 7 alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one. These characteristics are similar to those of hepatic mitochondrial C27-steroid 26-hydroxylase. In skin fibroblasts from three patients with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), 26-hydroxylation of C27-steroids proceeded at a rate of only 0.2-2.5% of healthy controls. No accumulation of endogenous 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha-triol could be demonstrated in these cells, and the lowered formation of radioactive, 26-hydroxylated products could not be explained by dilution of the labeled exogenous substrate. The present results add strong evidence to the concept that the primary metabolic defect in CTX is a deficiency of C27-steroid 26-hydroxylase. PMID:3745434

  20. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Siril, Prem Felix; Javid, Farideh

    2016-12-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug. PMID:27612834

  1. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Siril, Prem Felix; Javid, Farideh

    2016-12-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug.

  2. Seasonal variation in tissue estrogen-2/4-hydroxylases (EH) and in vitro effects of steroids on ovarian EH activity in the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, T K; Joy, K P

    2010-12-12

    A radiometric assay was used to measure microsomal EH activity from tritiated H(2)O formed during the conversion of [2,4 (3)H] estradiol-17β into catecholestrogens in the microsomal fractions of liver, brain and ovary of the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis. The validation data show that enzyme activity increased with incubation time, and substrate and cofactor (NADPH) concentrations, elicited temperature optima of 30-37°C and pH optima of 6.8-7.8. EH activity was strongly NADPH-dependent and in its absence only 13.48% activity was recorded. Liver recorded the highest enzyme activity, followed by brain and ovary. EH activity showed a significant seasonal variation with the peak activity in spawning phase and the lowest activity in resting phase. In the ovary, the follicular layer (theca and granulosa) elicited the highest activity over that of the denuded oocytes. Modulatory effects of steroids on ovarian enzyme activity were further demonstrated. The incubation of postvitellogenic follicles with 1, 10 or 100 nM concentrations of various steroids for 24 h produced varied effects on EH activity. Progesterone and 2-hydroxyestradiol-17β elicited strong suppressive effects on enzyme activity. Estrogens (E(1), E(2) and E(3)) suppressed the activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Among the progestins tested, 17,20α-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one, the isomer of 17,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (a teleost maturation-inducing steroid) showed the lowest depressing effect. Among androgens, the testosterone metabolite 11-ketotestosterone (functional teleost androgen) showed a high suppressing effect. Corticosteroids elicited low activity with cortisol suppressed the activity at higher concentrations. The study will form a basis to understand the physiological role of catecholestrogens in ovarian functions.

  3. Dax-1 and steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) function as transcriptional coactivators for steroidogenic factor 1 in steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Wei-Hsiung; Gerin, Isabelle; Hu, Chang-Deng; Hammer, Gary D; Koenig, Ronald J

    2009-04-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is essential for adrenal development and steroidogenesis. The atypical orphan nuclear receptor Dax-1 binds to SF-1 and represses SF-1 target genes. Paradoxically, however, loss-of-function mutations of Dax-1 also cause adrenal hypoplasia, suggesting that Dax-1 may function as an SF-1 coactivator under some circumstances. Indeed, we found that Dax-1 can function as a dosage-dependent SF-1 coactivator. Both SF-1 and Dax-1 bind to steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a coactivator that functions as an RNA. The coactivator TIF2 also associates with Dax-1 and synergistically coactivates SF-1 target gene transcription. A naturally occurring Dax-1 mutation inhibits this transactivation, and the mutant Dax-1-TIF2 complex mislocalizes in living cells. Coactivation by Dax-1 is abolished by SRA knockdown. The expression of the steroidogenic gene products steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and melanocortin 2 receptor is reduced in adrenal Y1 cells following the knockdown of endogenous SRA. Similarly, the knockdown of endogenous Dax-1 downregulates the expression of the steroidogenic gene products CYP11A1 and StAR in both H295R adrenal and MA-10 Leydig cells. These findings reveal novel functions of SRA and Dax-1 in steroidogenesis and adrenal biology. PMID:19188450

  4. Dax-1 and Steroid Receptor RNA Activator (SRA) Function as Transcriptional Coactivators for Steroidogenic Factor 1 in Steroidogenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Wei-Hsiung; Gerin, Isabelle; Hu, Chang-Deng; Hammer, Gary D.; Koenig, Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is essential for adrenal development and steroidogenesis. The atypical orphan nuclear receptor Dax-1 binds to SF-1 and represses SF-1 target genes. Paradoxically, however, loss-of-function mutations of Dax-1 also cause adrenal hypoplasia, suggesting that Dax-1 may function as an SF-1 coactivator under some circumstances. Indeed, we found that Dax-1 can function as a dosage-dependent SF-1 coactivator. Both SF-1 and Dax-1 bind to steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a coactivator that functions as an RNA. The coactivator TIF2 also associates with Dax-1 and synergistically coactivates SF-1 target gene transcription. A naturally occurring Dax-1 mutation inhibits this transactivation, and the mutant Dax-1-TIF2 complex mislocalizes in living cells. Coactivation by Dax-1 is abolished by SRA knockdown. The expression of the steroidogenic gene products steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and melanocortin 2 receptor is reduced in adrenal Y1 cells following the knockdown of endogenous SRA. Similarly, the knockdown of endogenous Dax-1 downregulates the expression of the steroidogenic gene products CYP11A1 and StAR in both H295R adrenal and MA-10 Leydig cells. These findings reveal novel functions of SRA and Dax-1 in steroidogenesis and adrenal biology. PMID:19188450

  5. Increased dopaminergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic activities in male rat brain following long-term treatment with anabolic androgenic steroids

    PubMed Central

    Thiblin, Ingemar; Finn, Anja; Ross, Svante B; Stenfors, Carina

    1999-01-01

    The effects of treating groups of rats with four different anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) (testosterone, nandrolone, methandrostenolone, and oxymetholone) on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) neurones in different brain regions were examined. The AAS was injected six times with 1 week's interval and the rats were sacrificed 2 days after the final injection. 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were measured. The effect on DA and 5-HT synthesis rate was analysed as the accumulation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (DOPA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), respectively, after inhibition of the amino acid decarboxylase with NSD-1015 (3-hydroxy-benzylhydrazine dihydrochloride). Additionally, the monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity was analysed in the hypothalamus. The DOPAC+HVA/DA ratio was increased in the striatum in all treatment groups. However, the synthesis rate of DA was significantly increased only in the methandrostenolone treated group. The 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was increased in all treatment groups in the hippocampus, in the frontal cortex in the methandrostenolone-treated animals and in the hypothalamus in the testosterone- and oxymetholone-treated rats, while the 5-HT synthesis rate was not affected by the AAS-treatments. The MAO-A activity was increased in the oxymetholone-treated rats while the other treatment groups were unaffected. The MAO-B activity was not changed. The results indicate that relatively high doses of AAS increase dopaminergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic metabolism in male rat brain, probably due to enhanced turnover in these monaminergic systems. PMID:10217522

  6. Increased dopaminergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic activities in male rat brain following long-term treatment with anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Thiblin, I; Finn, A; Ross, S B; Stenfors, C

    1999-03-01

    1. The effects of treating groups of rats with four different anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) (testosterone, nandrolone, methandrostenolone, and oxymetholone) on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) neurones in different brain regions were examined. The AAS was injected six times with 1 week's interval and the rats were sacrificed 2 days after the final injection. 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were measured. The effect on DA and 5-HT synthesis rate was analysed as the accumulation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (DOPA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), respectively, after inhibition of the amino acid decarboxylase with NSD-1015 (3-hydroxy-benzylhydrazine dihydrochloride). Additionally, the monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity was analysed in the hypothalamus. 2. The DOPAC + HVA/DA ratio was increased in the striatum in all treatment groups. However, the synthesis rate of DA was significantly increased only in the methandrostenolone treated group. 3. The 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was increased in all treatment groups in the hippocampus, in the frontal cortex in the methandrostenolone-treated animals and in the hypothalamus in the testosterone- and oxymetholone-treated rats, while the 5-HT synthesis rate was not affected by the AAS-treatments. 4. The MAO-A activity was increased in the oxymetholone-treated rats while the other treatment groups were unaffected. The MAO-B activity was not changed. 5. The results indicate that relatively high doses of AAS increase dopaminergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic metabolism in male rat brain, probably due to enhanced turnover in these monaminergic systems. PMID:10217522

  7. Community environments shaping transactional sex among sexually active men in Malawi, Nigeria, and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Rob; Winter, Amy; Elfstrom, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Transactional sex, or the exchange of sex for material goods or money, is a risky sexual behavior that has been linked to HIV/AIDS and gender-based violence. Throughout sub-Saharan Africa, transactional sex remains a common practice, putting men and women at risk of HIV. However, little is known of how community environments shape men's participation in risky transactional sex. This analysis examines community-level influences on participation in risky transactional sex among sexually active men in three African countries (Malawi, Tanzania, and Nigeria). The analysis uses Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data to examine the association between men's report of risky transactional sex and community characteristics including economic, gender norms, HIV behavior and knowledge, and demographic factors. The results show that men residing in communities with more female education and later age of first birth are less likely to report risky transactional sex, while men who live in communities where men report higher number of sexual partners are more likely to report risky transactional sex. While programmatic interventions should continue to improve women's status individually and relative to men, such efforts should be extended to recognize that many community and cultural influences also affect men's sexual behavior. Programs that understand, discuss, and challenge community factors that influence men's sexual behavior may be able to provide a more effective intervention resulting in opportunities for communities to initiate behavioral change.

  8. Community environments shaping transactional sex among sexually active men in Malawi, Nigeria, and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Rob; Winter, Amy; Elfstrom, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Transactional sex, or the exchange of sex for material goods or money, is a risky sexual behavior that has been linked to HIV/AIDS and gender-based violence. Throughout sub-Saharan Africa, transactional sex remains a common practice, putting men and women at risk of HIV. However, little is known of how community environments shape men's participation in risky transactional sex. This analysis examines community-level influences on participation in risky transactional sex among sexually active men in three African countries (Malawi, Tanzania, and Nigeria). The analysis uses Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data to examine the association between men's report of risky transactional sex and community characteristics including economic, gender norms, HIV behavior and knowledge, and demographic factors. The results show that men residing in communities with more female education and later age of first birth are less likely to report risky transactional sex, while men who live in communities where men report higher number of sexual partners are more likely to report risky transactional sex. While programmatic interventions should continue to improve women's status individually and relative to men, such efforts should be extended to recognize that many community and cultural influences also affect men's sexual behavior. Programs that understand, discuss, and challenge community factors that influence men's sexual behavior may be able to provide a more effective intervention resulting in opportunities for communities to initiate behavioral change. PMID:23215551

  9. Adolescent Steroid Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    The study focused on non-medical steroid use by adolescents according to data obtained from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, professional literature, 30 key informants knowledgeable in steroid issues, and 72 current or former steroid users. The findings indicated: (1) over 250,000 adolescents, primarily males, used or have used steroids, and…

  10. The different role of sex hormones on female cardiovascular physiology and function: not only oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Salerni, Sara; Di Francescomarino, Samanta; Cadeddu, Christian; Acquistapace, Flavio; Maffei, Silvia; Gallina, Sabina

    2015-06-01

    Human response to different physiologic stimuli and cardiovascular (CV) adaptation to various pathologies seem to be gender specific. Sex-steroid hormones have been postulated as the major contributors towards these sex-related differences. This review will discuss current evidence on gender differences in CV function and remodelling, and will present the different role of the principal sex-steroid hormones on female heart. Starting from a review of sex hormones synthesis, receptors and CV signalling, we will summarize the current knowledge concerning the role of sex hormones on the regulation of our daily activities throughout the life, via the modulation of autonomic nervous system, excitation-contraction coupling pathway and ion channels activity. Many unresolved questions remain even if oestrogen effects on myocardial remodelling and function have been extensively studied. So this work