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Sample records for active shape control

  1. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M.; Nguyen, Nguyen H. P.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-01-01

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  2. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    PubMed

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation.

  3. Robust Diffeomorphic Mapping via Geodesically Controlled Active Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Tward, Daniel J.; Ma, Jun; Miller, Michael I.; Younes, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents recent advances in the use of diffeomorphic active shapes which incorporate the conservation laws of large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping. The equations of evolution satisfying the conservation law are geodesics under the diffeomorphism metric and therefore termed geodesically controlled diffeomorphic active shapes (GDAS). Our principal application in this paper is on robust diffeomorphic mapping methods based on parameterized surface representations of subcortical template structures. Our parametrization of the GDAS evolution is via the initial momentum representation in the tangent space of the template surface. The dimension of this representation is constrained using principal component analysis generated from training samples. In this work, we seek to use template surfaces to generate segmentations of the hippocampus with three data attachment terms: surface matching, landmark matching, and inside-outside modeling from grayscale T1 MR imaging data. This is formulated as an energy minimization problem, where energy describes shape variability and data attachment accuracy, and we derive a variational solution. A gradient descent strategy is employed in the numerical optimization. For the landmark matching case, we demonstrate the robustness of this algorithm as applied to the workflow of a large neuroanatomical study by comparing to an existing diffeomorphic landmark matching algorithm. PMID:23690757

  4. Active sway control of a gantry crane using hybrid input shaping and PID control schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Tumari, M. Z.; Shabudin, L.; Zawawi, M. A.; Shah, L. H. Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    This project presents investigations into the development of hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes for active sway control of a gantry crane system. The application of positive input shaping involves a technique that can reduce the sway by creating a common signal that cancels its own vibration and used as a feed-forward control which is for controlling the sway angle of the pendulum, while the proportional integral derivative (PID) controller is used as a feedback control which is for controlling the crane position. The PID controller was tuned using Ziegler-Nichols method to get the best performance of the system. The hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes guarantee a fast input tracking capability, precise payload positioning and very minimal sway motion. The modeling of gantry crane is used to simulate the system using MATLAB/SIMULINK software. The results of the response with the controllers are presented in time domains and frequency domains. The performances of control schemes are examined in terms of level of input tracking capability, sway angle reduction and time response specification.

  5. Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamic control apparatus for an air vehicle improves various aerodynamic performance metrics by employing multiple spanwise flap segments that jointly form a continuous or a piecewise continuous trailing edge to minimize drag induced by lift or vortices. At least one of the multiple spanwise flap segments includes a variable camber flap subsystem having multiple chordwise flap segments that may be independently actuated. Some embodiments also employ a continuous leading edge slat system that includes multiple spanwise slat segments, each of which has one or more chordwise slat segment. A method and an apparatus for implementing active control of a wing shape are also described and include the determination of desired lift distribution to determine the improved aerodynamic deflection of the wings. Flap deflections are determined and control signals are generated to actively control the wing shape to approximate the desired deflection.

  6. Active Control of Flexible Space Structures Using the Nitinol Shape Memory Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    number) FIELD !GROUP SUBGROUP I Active Control, Nitinol Actuators, Space Structures 9. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block...number) Summarizes research progress in the feasibility demonstration of active vibration control using Nitinol shape memory actuators. Tests on...FLEXIBLE SPACE STRUCTURES USING NITINOL SHAPE MEMORY ACTUATORS FINAL REPORT FOR PHASE I SDIO CONTRACT #F49620-87-C-0035 0 BY DR. AMR M. BAZ KARIM R

  7. Controlling active self-assembly through broken particle-shape symmetry.

    PubMed

    Wensink, H H; Kantsler, V; Goldstein, R E; Dunkel, J

    2014-01-01

    Many structural properties of conventional passive materials are known to arise from the symmetries of their microscopic constituents. By contrast, it is largely unclear how the interplay between particle shape and self-propulsion controls the meso- and macroscale behavior of active matter. Here we use large-scale simulations of homo- and heterogeneous self-propelled particle systems to identify generic effects of broken particle-shape symmetry on collective motion. We find that even small violations of fore-aft symmetry lead to fundamentally different collective behaviors, which may facilitate demixing of differently shaped species as well as the spontaneous formation of stable microrotors. These results suggest that variation of particle shape yields robust physical mechanisms to control self-assembly of active matter, with possibly profound implications for biology and materials design.

  8. Shape and vibration control of active laminated plates for RF and optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punhani, Amitesh; Washington, Gregory N.

    2006-03-01

    Active shape and vibration control of large structures have long been desired for many practical applications. PVDF being one of the most suitable materials for these applications due to its strong piezoelectric properties and availability in thin sheets has been the focal point of most researchers in this area. Most of the research has been done to find an open loop solution, which would be able to shape the structure as per the desired requirements in an ideal atmosphere. Unmodeled dynamics and external disturbances prevent the open loop (no feedback) solution from achieving the desired shape. This research develops a dynamic model of a laminated plate consisting of two layers of PVDF film joined with a layer of epoxy. The orthotropic properties of PVDF have been modeled and the epoxy layer is considered to be isotropic. A general control model is developed, which would work for most boundary conditions and developed for a simply supported beam with patch actuators. The methodology is then extended for a simply supported laminated plate. This model could be used for real time dynamic disturbance rejection and shape and vibration control of the structure.

  9. Progress on Shape Memory Alloy Actuator Development for Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan; Melcher, Kevin; Noebe, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Results of a numerical analysis evaluating the feasibility of high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) for active clearance control actuation in the high-pressure turbine section of a modern turbofan engine has been conducted. The prototype actuator concept considered here consists of parallel HTSMA wires attached to the shroud that is located on the exterior of the turbine case. A transient model of an HTSMA actuator was used to evaluate active clearance control at various operating points in a test bed aircraft engine simulation. For the engine under consideration, each actuator must be designed to counteract loads from 380 to 2000 lbf and displace at least 0.033 in. Design results show that an actuator comprised of 10 wires 2 in. in length is adequate for control at critical engine operating points and still exhibit acceptable failsafe operability and cycle life. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with integrator windup protection was implemented to control clearance amidst engine transients during a normal mission. Simulation results show that the control system exhibits minimal variability in clearance control performance across the operating envelope. The final actuator design is sufficiently small to fit within the limited space outside the high-pressure turbine case and is shown to consume only small amounts of bleed air to adequately regulate temperature.

  10. Active vibration control of Flexible Joint Manipulator using Input Shaping and Adaptive Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. P.; Luo, B.; Huang, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a vibration control strategy for a two-link Flexible Joint Manipulator (FJM) with a Hexapod Active Manipulator (HAM). A dynamic model of the multi-body, rigid-flexible system composed of an FJM, a HAM and a spacecraft was built. A hybrid controller was proposed by combining the Input Shaping (IS) technique with an Adaptive-Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller (APADRC). The controller was used to suppress the vibration caused by external disturbances and input motions. Parameters of the APADRC were adaptively adjusted to ensure the characteristic of the closed loop system to be a given reference system, even if the configuration of the manipulator significantly changes during motion. Because precise parameters of the flexible manipulator are not required in the IS system, the operation of the controller was sufficiently robust to accommodate uncertainties in system parameters. Simulations results verified the effectiveness of the HAM scheme and controller in the vibration suppression of FJM during operation.

  11. Nanobiomimetic Active Shape Control - Fluidic and Swarm-Intelligence Embodiments for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoli, S.

    The concepts of Active Shape Control ( ASC ) and of Generalized Quantum Holography ( GQH ), respectively embodying a closer approach to biomimicry than the current macrophysics-based attempts at bioinspired robotic systems, and realizing a non-connectionistic, life-like kind of information processing that allows increasingly depths of mimicking of the biological structure-function solidarity, which have been formulated in physical terms in previous papers, are here further investigated for application to bioinspired flying or swimming robots for planetary exploration. It is shown that nano-to-micro integration would give the deepest level of biomimicry, and that both low and very low Reynolds number ( Re ) fluidics would involve GQH and Fiber Bundle Topology ( FBT ) for processing information at the various levels of ASC bioinspired robotics. While very low Re flows lend themselves to geometrization of microrobot dynamics and to FBT design, the general design problem is geometrized through GQH , i.e. made independent of dynamic considerations, thus allowing possible problems of semantic dyscrasias in highly complex hierarchical dynamical chains of sensing information processing actuating to be overcome. A roadmap to near- and medium-term nanostructured and nano-to-micro integration realizations is suggested.

  12. Design of an actively controlled steerable needle with tendon actuation and FBG-based shape sensing.

    PubMed

    van de Berg, Nick J; Dankelman, Jenny; van den Dobbelsteen, John J

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a new steerable needle to facilitate active steering toward predefined target locations. It focuses on mechanical aspects and design choices in relation to the observed response in a tissue phantom. Tip steering with two rotational degrees of freedom was achieved by a tendon actuated ball joint mechanism. During insertion, the flexible cannula bends as a result of asymmetric tip-tissue interaction forces. The stylet was equipped with fiber Bragg gratings to measure the needle shape and tip position during use. A PI-controller was implemented to facilitate steering to predefined targets. During the validation study, nine targets were defined at a depth of 100 mm below the gelatin surface. One was located below the insertion point, the others at a radial offset of 30 mm in each of the eight principle steering directions. Per location, six repetitions were performed. The targeting accuracy was 6.2 ± 1.4 mm (mean ± std). The steering precision was 2.6 ± 1.1 mm. The ability to steer with this new needle steering approach is presented and the mechanical characteristics are discussed for this representative subset of steering directions.

  13. Active Vibration Control of Elastic Beam by Means of Shape Memory Alloy Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Q.; Levy, C.

    1996-01-01

    The mathematical model of a flexible beam covered with shape memory alloy (SMA) layers is presented. The SMA layers are used as actuators, which are capable of changing their elastic modulus and recovery stress, thus changing the natural frequency of, and adjusting the excitation to, the vibrating beam. The frequency factor variation as a function of SMA Young's modulus, SMA layer thickness and beam thickness is discussed. Also control of the beam employing an optimal linear control law is evaluated. The control results indicate how the system reacts to various levels of excitation input through the non-homogeneous recovery shear term of the governing differential equation.

  14. Controlling Shape Anisotropy of ZnS-AgInS2 Solid Solution Nanoparticles for Improving Photocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Torimoto, Tsukasa; Kamiya, Yutaro; Kameyama, Tatsuya; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Uematsu, Taro; Kuwabata, Susumu; Shibayama, Tamaki

    2016-10-03

    Independently controlling the shape anisotropy and chemical composition of multinary semiconductor particles is important for preparing highly efficient photocatalysts. In this study, we prepared ZnS-AgInS2 solid solution ((AgIn)xZn2(1-x)S2, ZAIS) nanoparticles with well-controlled anisotropic shapes, rod and rice shapes, by reacting corresponding metal acetates with a mixture of sulfur compounds with different reactivities, elemental sulfur, and 1,3-dibutylthiourea, via a two-step heating-up process. The chemical composition predominantly determined the energy gap of ZAIS particles: the fraction of Zn(2+) in rod-shaped particles was tuned by the ratio of metal precursors used in the nanocrystal formation, while postpreparative Zn(2+) doping was necessary to increase the Zn(2+) fraction in the rice-shaped particles. The photocatalytic H2 evolution rate with irradiation to ZAIS particles dispersed in an aqueous solution was significantly dependent on the chemical composition in the case of using photocatalyst particles with a constant morphology. In contrast, photocatalytic activity at the optimum ZAIS composition, x of 0.35-0.45, increased with particle morphology in the order of rice (size: ca. 9 × ca. 16 nm) < sphere (diameter: ca. 5.5 nm) < rod (size: 4.6 × 27 nm). The highest apparent quantum yield for photocatalytic H2 evolution was 5.9% for rod-shaped ZAIS particles, being about two times larger than that obtained with spherical particles.

  15. Oriented active shape models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiamin; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2009-04-01

    Active shape models (ASM) are widely employed for recognizing anatomic structures and for delineating them in medical images. In this paper, a novel strategy called oriented active shape models (OASM) is presented in an attempt to overcome the following five limitations of ASM: 1) lower delineation accuracy, 2) the requirement of a large number of landmarks, 3) sensitivity to search range, 4) sensitivity to initialization, and 5) inability to fully exploit the specific information present in the given image to be segmented. OASM effectively combines the rich statistical shape information embodied in ASM with the boundary orientedness property and the globally optimal delineation capability of the live wire methodology of boundary segmentation. The latter characteristics allow live wire to effectively separate an object boundary from other nonobject boundaries with similar properties especially when they come very close in the image domain. The approach leads to a two-level dynamic programming method, wherein the first level corresponds to boundary recognition and the second level corresponds to boundary delineation, and to an effective automatic initialization method. The method outputs a globally optimal boundary that agrees with the shape model if the recognition step is successful in bringing the model close to the boundary in the image. Extensive evaluation experiments have been conducted by utilizing 40 image (magnetic resonance and computed tomography) data sets in each of five different application areas for segmenting breast, liver, bones of the foot, and cervical vertebrae of the spine. Comparisons are made between OASM and ASM based on precision, accuracy, and efficiency of segmentation. Accuracy is assessed using both region-based false positive and false negative measures and boundary-based distance measures. The results indicate the following: 1) The accuracy of segmentation via OASM is considerably better than that of ASM; 2) The number of landmarks

  16. Bi2WO6 nano- and microstructures: shape control and associated visible-light-driven photocatalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lisha; Wang, Wenzhong; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Haolan

    2007-09-01

    The shape-controlled synthesis of nano- and microstructured materials has opened up new possibilities to improve their physical and chemical properties. In this work, new types of Bi(2)WO(6) with complex morphologies, namely, flowerlike, tyre- and helixlike, and platelike shapes, have been controllably synthesized by a facile hydrothermal process. The benefits of the present work also stem from the first report on the transformation of Bi(2)WO(6) from three-dimensional (3D) flowerlike superstructures to 2D platelike structures, and on the formation of tyre- and helixlike Bi(2)WO(6) superstructures. UV/Vis absorption spectra show that the optical properties of Bi(2)WO(6) samples are relevant to their size and shape. More importantly, the photocatalytic activities of Bi(2)WO(6) nano- and microstructures are strongly dependent on their shape, size, and structure for the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) under visible-light irradiation. The reasons for the differences in the photocatalytic activities of these Bi(2)WO(6) nano- and microstructures are further investigated.

  17. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  18. Design and Control of a Proof-of-Concept Active Jet Engine Intake Using Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Gangbing; Ma, Ning; Penney, Nicholas; Barr, Todd; Lee, Ho-Jun; Arnold, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    The design and control of a novel proof-of-concept active jet engine intake using Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti or Nitinol) shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators is used to demonstrate the potential of an adaptive intake to improve the fuel efficiency of a jet engine. The Nitinol SMA material is selected for this research due to the material's ability to generate large strains of up to 5 percent for repeated operations, a high power-to-weight ratio, electrical resistive actuation, and easy fabrication into a variety of shapes. The proof-of-concept engine intake employs an overlapping leaf design arranged in a concentric configuration. Each leaf is mounted on a supporting bar that rotates upon actuation by SMA wires electrical resistive heating. Feedback control is enabled through the use of a laser range sensor to detect the movement of a leaf and determine the radius of the intake area. Due to the hysteresis behavior inherent in SMAs, a nonlinear robust controller is used to direct the SMA wire actuation. The controller design utilizes the sliding-mode approach to compensate for the nonlinearities associated with the SMA actuator. Feedback control experiments conducted on a fabricated proof-of-concept model have demonstrated the capability to precisely control the intake area and achieve up to a 25 percent reduction in intake area. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of engine intake area control using the proposed design.

  19. Multi-objective optimization of an active constrained layer damping treatment for shape control of flexible beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, L. C.; Fung, E. H. K.

    2004-08-01

    This work presents the use of a multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) to solve an integrated optimization problem for the shape control of flexible beams with an active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment. The design objectives are to minimize the total weight of the system, the input voltages and the steady-state error between the achieved and desired shapes. Design variables include the thickness of the constraining and viscoelastic layers, the arrangement of the ACLD patches, as well as the control gains. In order to set up an evaluator for the MOGA, the finite element method (FEM), in conjunction with the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method, is employed to model a clamped-free beam with ACLD patches to predict the dynamic behaviour of the system. As a result of the optimization, reasonable Pareto solutions are successfully obtained. It is shown that ACLD treatment is suitable for shape control of flexible structures and that the MOGA is applicable to the present integrated optimization problem.

  20. Shape-control of Zinc Oxide nanoparticles: enhancing photocatalytic activity under UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Muñoz, M.; Ramos-Ibarra, J. E.; Rodríguez-Páez, J. E.; Ramirez, A.; Huamaní-Coaquira, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures with different sizes and morphologies were synthesized using the Controlled Precipitation Method. It follows a standard process, but with different synthesis and washing solvents to modify the features related to the photocatalytic activity. The solid phase evolution during aging step was followed using Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and the solids obtained, after the washing process, were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The Rietveld refinement indicates a Wurtzite phase (space group P63mc) as majority phase with lattice parameters a = 3.2530 Å and c = 5.2125 Å. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image shows a sponge-like morphology for the sample synthesized with ethylene glycol as solvent, acidified with nitric acid and washed with water. The sample synthesized and washed with water shows a needle-like morphology; and the sample synthesized in acetic acid and washed with water shows particles with undefined morphology. The optical properties of the as-prepared ZnO samples were investigated by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Finally, the photocatalytic activity of ZnO powders was studied from the initial rate of decomposition of H2O2 in aqueous solution. The best results were obtained with samples synthesized and washed with water; the influence of all the solvents on the morphology of ZnO samples and the effect of the morphologies on the photocatalytic activity are discussed.

  1. Input Shaping enhanced Active Disturbance Rejection Control for a twin rotor multi-input multi-output system (TRMS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Jianwei; Lao, Dazhong; Li, Donghai; Chen, Junhui

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a composite control based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) and Input Shaping is presented for TRMS with two degrees of freedom (DOF). The control tasks consist of accurately tracking desired trajectories and obtaining disturbance rejection in both horizontal and vertical planes. Due to un-measurable states as well as uncertainties stemming from modeling uncertainty and unknown disturbance torques, ADRC is employed, and feed-forward Input Shaping is used to improve the dynamical response. In the proposed approach, because the coupling effects are maintained in controller derivation, there is no requirement to decouple the TRMS into horizontal and vertical subsystems, which is usually performed in the literature. Finally, the proposed method is implemented on the TRMS platform, and the results are compared with those of PID and ADRC in a similar structure. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The operation of the controller allows for an excellent set-point tracking behavior and disturbance rejection with system nonlinearity and complex coupling conditions.

  2. Modeling of electric resistance of shape memory alloys: self-sensing for temperature and actuation control of active hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissle, Sebastian; Hübler, Moritz; Gurka, Martin

    2016-04-01

    For actuation purposes active hybrid structures made of fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) and shape memory alloys (SMA) enable substantial savings concerning weight, space and cost. Such structures allow realizing new functions which are more or less impossible with commonly used systems consisting of the structure and the actuator as separated elements, e.g. morphing winglets in aeronautics. But there are also some challenges that still need to be addressed. For the successful application of SMA FRP composites a precise control of temperature is essential, as this is the activating quantity to reach the required deformation of the structure without overloading the active material. However, a direct measurement of the temperature is difficult due to the complete integration of SMA in the hybrid structure. Also the deformation of the structure which depends on the temperature, the stiffness of the hybrid structure and external loads is hard to determine. An opportunity for controlling the activation is provided by the special behavior of the electrical resistance of SMA. During the phase transformation of the SMA - also causing the actuation travel - the resistance drops with rising temperature. This behavior can be exploited for control purposes, especially as the electrical resistance can be easily measured during the activation done by Joule heating. As shown in this contribution, theoretical modelling and experimental tests provide a load-independent self-sensing control-concept of SMA-FRP-hybrid-structures.

  3. Active Control of Interface Shape During the Crystal Growth of Lead Bromide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Batur, C.; Singh, N. B.

    2003-01-01

    A thermal model for predicting and designing the furnace temperature profile was developed and used for the crystal growth of lead bromide. The model gives the ampoule temperature as a function of the furnace temperature, thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficients, and ampoule dimensions as variable parameters. Crystal interface curvature was derived from the model and it was compared with the predicted curvature for a particular furnace temperature and growth parameters. Large crystals of lead bromide were grown and it was observed that interface shape was in agreement with the shape predicted by this model.

  4. System-Level Design of a Shape Memory Alloy Actuator for Active Clearance Control in the High-Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Melcher, Kevin J.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes results of a numerical analysis evaluating the feasibility of high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) for active clearance control actuation in the high-pressure turbine section of a modern turbofan engine. The prototype actuator concept considered here consists of parallel HTSMA wires attached to the shroud that is located on the exterior of the turbine case. A transient model of an HTSMA actuator was used to evaluate active clearance control at various operating points in a test bed aircraft engine simulation. For the engine under consideration, each actuator must be designed to counteract loads from 380 to 2000 lbf and displace at least 0.033 inches. Design results show that an actuator comprised of 10 wires 2 inches in length is adequate for control at critical engine operating points and still exhibits acceptable failsafe operability and cycle life. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with integrator windup protection was implemented to control clearance amidst engine transients during a normal mission. Simulation results show that the control system exhibits minimal variability in clearance control performance across the operating envelope. The final actuator design is sufficiently small to fit within the limited space outside the high-pressure turbine case and is shown to consume only small amounts of bleed air to adequately regulate temperature.

  5. Microtubule-dependent control of cell shape and pseudopodial activity is inhibited by the antibody to kinesin motor domain

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    One of the major functions of cytoplasmic microtubules is their involvement in maintenance of asymmetric cell shape. Microtubules were considered to perform this function working as rigid structural elements. At the same time, microtubules play a critical role in intracellular organelle transport, and this fact raises the possibility that the involvement of microtubules in maintenance of cell shape may be mediated by directed transport of certain cellular components to a limited area of the cell surface (e.g., to the leading edge) rather than by their functioning as a mechanical support. To test this hypothesis we microinjected cultured human fibroblasts with the antibody (called HD antibody) raised against kinesin motor domain highly conserved among the different members of kinesin superfamily. As was shown before this antibody inhibits kinesin-dependent microtubule gliding in vitro and interferes with a number of microtubule-dependent transport processes in living cells. Preimmune IgG fraction was used for control experiments. Injections of fibroblasts with HD antibody but not with preimmune IgG significantly reduced their asymmetry, resulting in loss of long processes and elongated cell shape. In addition, antibody injection suppressed pseudopodial activity at the leading edge of fibroblasts moving into an experimentally made wound. Analysis of membrane organelle distribution showed that kinesin antibody induced clustering of mitochondria in perinuclear region and their withdrawal from peripheral parts of the cytoplasm. HD antibody does not affect either density or distribution of cytoplasmic microtubules. The results of our experiments show that many changes of phenotype induced in cells by microtubule-depolymerizing agents can be mimicked by the inhibition of motor proteins, and therefore microtubule functions in maintaining of the cell shape and polarity are mediated by motor proteins rather than by being provided by rigidity of tubulin polymer itself. PMID

  6. Weight Control Beliefs, Body Shape Attitudes, and Physical Activity among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Scott B.; Rhea, Deborah J.; Greenleaf, Christy A.; Judd, Doryce E.; Chambliss, Heather O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Relatively little is known about how perceived weight controllability influences important psychological health factors among adolescents. Thus, the purpose of this study is to explore adolescents' weight controllability beliefs and how those beliefs influence weight-related attitudes and behaviors. Methods: Adolescents (N = 369, mean…

  7. Formic acid electrooxidation on thallium-decorated shape-controlled platinum nanoparticles: an improvement in electrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Busó-Rogero, Carlos; Perales-Rondón, Juan V; Farias, Manuel J S; Vidal-Iglesias, Francisco J; Solla-Gullon, Jose; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M

    2014-07-21

    Thallium modified shape-controlled Pt nanoparticles were prepared and their electrocatalytic activity towards formic acid electrooxidation was evaluated in 0.5 M sulfuric acid. The electrochemical and in situ FTIR spectroscopic results show a remarkable improvement in the electrocatalytic activity, especially in the low potential region (around 0.1-0.2 V vs. RHE). Cubic Pt nanoparticles modified with Tl were found to be more active than the octahedral Pt ones in the entire range of Tl coverages and potential windows. In situ FTIR spectra indicate that the promotional effect produced by Tl results in the inhibition of the poisoning step leading to COads, thus improving the onset potential for the complete formic acid oxidation to CO2. Chronoamperometric experiments were also performed at 0.2 V to evaluate the stability of the electrocatalysts at constant potential. Finally, experiments with different concentrations of formic acid (0.05-1 M) were also carried out. In all cases, Tl-modified cubic Pt nanoparticles result to be the most active. All these facts reinforce the importance of controlling the surface structure of the electrocatalysts to optimize their electrocatalytic properties.

  8. Shape-controlled synthesis of Cu2O nano/microcrystals and their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binjie; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yanbao; Sun, Lei

    2013-12-01

    Uniform cuprous oxides with different morphologies have been successfully synthesized using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the structure and morphology of cuprous oxides. It was found that the reaction conditions such as PVP, reducing agent and complexing agent played important roles in the formation of regular cuprous oxide crystals. In addition, their antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) was also investigated by the Oxford cup method. Results suggested that cuprous oxides are selective in their antibacterial action. They display effective antibacterial activity against S. aureus, B. subtilis and P. aeruginosa. There is no bactericidal ability against E. coli in the tested concentration range, which indicates that E. coli may be a Cu(I)-tolerant bacterium.

  9. Shape-controlled nanostructures in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2013-10-01

    Nanotechnologies have provided new methods for the preparation of nanomaterials with well-defined sizes and shapes, and many of those procedures have been recently implemented for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. The control of nanoparticle shape in particular offers the promise of a better definition of catalytic activity and selectivity through the optimization of the structure of the catalytic active site. This extension of new nanoparticle synthetic procedures to catalysis is in its early stages, but has shown some promising leads already. Here, we survey the major issues associated with this nanotechnology-catalysis synergy. First, we discuss new possibilities associated with distinguishing between the effects originating from nanoparticle size versus those originating from nanoparticle shape. Next, we survey the information available to date on the use of well-shaped metal and non-metal nanoparticles as active phases to control the surface atom ensembles that define the catalytic site in different catalytic applications. We follow with a brief review of the use of well-defined porous materials for the control of the shape of the space around that catalytic site. A specific example is provided to illustrate how new selective catalysts based on shape-defined nanoparticles can be designed from first principles by using fundamental mechanistic information on the reaction of interest obtained from surface-science experiments and quantum-mechanics calculations. Finally, we conclude with some thoughts on the state of the field in terms of the advances already made, the future potentials, and the possible limitations to be overcome.

  10. Controlling Plasma Shapes in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. J.; Lao, L. L.

    1997-11-01

    The proposed shape control system on KSTAR uses 14 external PF coils to control the position of a small number of critical points in the magnetic field geometry. Shape control is accomplished on the slow time scale (>= 100 ms) by the detection of the plasma boundary from the external magnetic measurements and then applying the shape control matrices to determine the correction currents. We present the work on the determination of the location and the number of magnetic probes and flux loops for the KSTAR design using the EFIT code, which uses realistic distributed current source constrained by equilibrium. First of all, EFIT is run in equilibrium mode to simulate the flux loop and the magnetic probe signals at a large number of likely locations around the surrounding vacuum vessel. The number and the location of these probes are then optimized by comparing the reconstructed results using the EFIT code utilizing these simulated signals to the original equilibrium. Finally, we perturb the simulated signals by 3-5% randomly and run the reconstruction for many cases to determine the accuracy of the reconstruction for this particular set of probes and loops.

  11. Controlled synthesis of T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} and enhanced visible light responsive photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Shuying; Yu, Chongfei; Li, Yukun; Li, Yihui; Sun, Jianhui; Geng, Xiaofei

    2014-03-15

    A novel T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} microcrystal photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal method with the aid of a structure-directing surfactant SDBS in the present study. Having received well characterization with the aid of various techniques and the results showed that the SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO{sub 4}, which had a unique T shape and belonged to the monoclinic family. The fast exchange dynamics between the surfactants bound to the Bi{sup 3+} seed surface and the free VO{sub 3}{sup −} in the solution significantly increase the rate of heterogeneous nucleation. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of the prepared T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} was evaluated by the degradation of Methylene Blue solution under visible light irradiation, 17% and 47% higher decolorization rates than the commercial P25 and BiVO{sub 4} synthesized without SDBS, respectively. Meanwhile, it has been found that the degradation kinetics of MB fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} also displayed high photocatalytic performance for metronidazole degradation. -- Graphical abstract: H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecules function as electron trapping reagent to react with e{sup −} to enhance the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of MB in the BiVO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system under visible light irradiation. Highlights: • T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} was synthesized using SDBS as a structure-directing surfactant. • SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO{sub 4}. • The T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} had a better visible-light photocatalytic activity. • Degradation kinetics of MB by BiVO{sub 4} fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics.

  12. Shape- and Size-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aloe vera Plant Extract and Their Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Logaranjan, Kaliyaperumal; Raiza, Anasdass Jaculin; Gopinath, Subash C B; Chen, Yeng; Pandian, Kannaiyan

    2016-12-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) was performed at room temperature using Aloe vera plant extract in the presence of ammoniacal silver nitrate as a metal salt precursor. The formation of AgNP was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy at different time intervals. The shape and size of the synthesized particle were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. These results were confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses and further supported by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/Raman scattering (SERS) study. UV-visible spectrum has shown a sharp peak at 420 nm and further evidenced by FTIR peak profile (at 1587.6, 1386.4, and 1076 cm(-1) with corresponding compounds). The main band position with SERS was noticed at 1594 cm(-1) (C-C stretching vibration). When samples were heated under microwave radiation, AgNP with octahedron shapes with 5-50 nm were found and this method can be one of the easier ways to synthesis anisotropic AgNP, in which the plant extract plays a vital role to regulate the size and shape of the nanoparticles. Enhanced antibacterial effects (two- to fourfold) were observed in the case of Aloe vera plant protected AgNP than the routinely synthesized antibiotic drugs. Shape and size-controlled synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Aloe vera plant extract.

  13. Controlled synthesis of T-shaped BiVO4 and enhanced visible light responsive photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shuying; Yu, Chongfei; Li, Yukun; Li, Yihui; Sun, Jianhui; Geng, Xiaofei

    2014-03-01

    A novel T-shaped BiVO4 microcrystal photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal method with the aid of a structure-directing surfactant SDBS in the present study. Having received well characterization with the aid of various techniques and the results showed that the SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO4, which had a unique T shape and belonged to the monoclinic family. The fast exchange dynamics between the surfactants bound to the Bi3+ seed surface and the free VO3- in the solution significantly increase the rate of heterogeneous nucleation. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of the prepared T-shaped BiVO4 was evaluated by the degradation of Methylene Blue solution under visible light irradiation, 17% and 47% higher decolorization rates than the commercial P25 and BiVO4 synthesized without SDBS, respectively. Meanwhile, it has been found that the degradation kinetics of MB fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the T-shaped BiVO4 also displayed high photocatalytic performance for metronidazole degradation.

  14. Graphical fiber shaping control interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Eric T.; Ninomiya, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present an improved graphical user interface for defining single-pass novel shaping techniques on glass processing machines that allows for streamlined process development. This approach offers unique modularity and debugging capability to researchers during the process development phase not usually afforded with similar scripting languages.

  15. Silver ion mediated shape control of platinum nanoparticles: Removal of silver by selective etching leads to increased catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, Michael E.; Yue, Yao; Habas, Susan E.; Rioux, Robert M.; Teall, Chelsea I.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-01-09

    A procedure has been developed for the selective etching of Ag from Pt nanoparticles of well-defined shape, resulting in the formation of elementally-pure Pt cubes, cuboctahedra, or octahedra, with a largest vertex-to-vertex distance of {approx}9.5 nm from Ag-modified Pt nanoparticles. A nitric acid etching process was applied Pt nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica, as well as nanoparticles dispersed in aqueous solution. The characterization of the silica-supported particles by XRD, TEM, and N{sub 2} adsorption measurements demonstrated that the structure of the nanoparticles and the mesoporous support remained conserved during etching in concentrated nitric acid. Both elemental analysis and ethylene hydrogenation indicated etching of Ag is only effective when [HNO{sub 3}] {ge} 7 M; below this concentration, the removal of Ag is only {approx}10%. Ethylene hydrogenation activity increased by four orders of magnitude after the etching of Pt octahedra that contained the highest fraction of silver. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the unsupported particles after etching demonstrated that etching does not alter the surface structure of the Pt nanoparticles. High [HNO{sub 3}] led to the decomposition of the capping agent, polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP); infrared spectroscopy confirmed that many decomposition products were present on the surface during etching, including carbon monoxide.

  16. Shape control of inorganic nanoparticles from solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Shuanglei; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-21

    Inorganic materials with controllable shapes have been an intensely studied subject in nanoscience over the past decades. Control over novel and anisotropic shapes of inorganic nanomaterials differing from those of bulk materials leads to unique and tunable properties for widespread applications such as biomedicine, catalysis, fuels or solar cells and magnetic data storage. This review presents a comprehensive overview of shape-controlled inorganic nanomaterials via nucleation and growth theory and the control of experimental conditions (including supersaturation, temperature, surfactants and secondary nucleation), providing a brief account of the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles during wet-chemistry synthetic processes. Subsequently, typical mechanisms for shape-controlled inorganic nanoparticles and the general shape of the nanoparticles formed by each mechanism are also expounded. Furthermore, the differences between similar mechanisms for the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles are also clearly described. The authors envision that this review will provide valuable guidance on experimental conditions and process control for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles with tunable shapes in the solution state.

  17. Shape control of inorganic nanoparticles from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Shuanglei; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic materials with controllable shapes have been an intensely studied subject in nanoscience over the past decades. Control over novel and anisotropic shapes of inorganic nanomaterials differing from those of bulk materials leads to unique and tunable properties for widespread applications such as biomedicine, catalysis, fuels or solar cells and magnetic data storage. This review presents a comprehensive overview of shape-controlled inorganic nanomaterials via nucleation and growth theory and the control of experimental conditions (including supersaturation, temperature, surfactants and secondary nucleation), providing a brief account of the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles during wet-chemistry synthetic processes. Subsequently, typical mechanisms for shape-controlled inorganic nanoparticles and the general shape of the nanoparticles formed by each mechanism are also expounded. Furthermore, the differences between similar mechanisms for the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles are also clearly described. The authors envision that this review will provide valuable guidance on experimental conditions and process control for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles with tunable shapes in the solution state.

  18. Shape-controlled synthesis of porous AuPt nanoparticles and their superior electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Litai; Wang, Hongjing; Eid, Kamel; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Control of structure and morphology of Pt-based nanomaterials is of great importance for electrochemical energy conversions. In this work, we report an efficient one-step synthesis of bimetallic porous AuPt nanoparticles (PAuPt NPs) in an aqueous solution. The proposed synthesis is performed by a simple stirring treatment of an aqueous reactive mixture including K2PtCl4, HAuCl4, Pluronic F127 and ascorbic acid at a pH value of 1 without organic solvent or high temperature. Due to their porous structure and bimetallic composition, as-made PAuPt NPs exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:27877858

  19. Shape-memory-actuated compliant control surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Brian J.; Carpenter, Bernie F.; Draper, Jerry L.; Misra, Mohan S.

    1993-09-01

    Advanced submarine stern configurations require a variety of control surfaces to actively manage aftbody boundary layer flow, vorticity, propulsor inflow and intrapropulsor flow, as well as vehicle attitude. Two necessary attributes of advanced control surface designs include (1) integrated actuation to provide placement flexibility at remote locations with minimal structural interfacing and control interconnects, and (2) improved lift efficiency and flow using variable or adaptive camber control. To demonstrate these attributes, a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated compliant control fin (CCF) with a planform area of 620 sq. cm was developed for evaluation as rudder and sternplane appendages on a radio control submarine model at velocities up to 5.1 m/s (Reynolds No. approximately equals 1,000,000) and up to 0.2 Hz full cycle actuation. A completely fixed root design was developed to reduce turbulence at the hull/fine interface, with compliant deformation of the foil to improve flow characteristics over the baseline full-flying and trailing-edge-flap designs.

  20. Shape- and Size-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aloe vera Plant Extract and Their Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logaranjan, Kaliyaperumal; Raiza, Anasdass Jaculin; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chen, Yeng; Pandian, Kannaiyan

    2016-11-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) was performed at room temperature using Aloe vera plant extract in the presence of ammoniacal silver nitrate as a metal salt precursor. The formation of AgNP was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy at different time intervals. The shape and size of the synthesized particle were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. These results were confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses and further supported by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/Raman scattering (SERS) study. UV-visible spectrum has shown a sharp peak at 420 nm and further evidenced by FTIR peak profile (at 1587.6, 1386.4, and 1076 cm-1 with corresponding compounds). The main band position with SERS was noticed at 1594 cm-1 (C-C stretching vibration). When samples were heated under microwave radiation, AgNP with octahedron shapes with 5-50 nm were found and this method can be one of the easier ways to synthesis anisotropic AgNP, in which the plant extract plays a vital role to regulate the size and shape of the nanoparticles. Enhanced antibacterial effects (two- to fourfold) were observed in the case of Aloe vera plant protected AgNP than the routinely synthesized antibiotic drugs.

  1. Controlling the influence of SPM in fiber-based chirped-pulse amplification systems by using an actively shaped parabolic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Damian N; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-12-10

    We report on the experimental demonstration of the control of the influence of nonlinearity in fiber-based chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) using active spectral amplitude shaping. By applying a liquid crystal spatial light modulator, the influence of the spectral profile on the recompressed pulse quality is experimentally revealed. The parabolic spectrum is experimentally determined to be very suitable for CPA-systems in which nonlinearity is present. The corresponding nonlinear phase contribution can be efficiently compensated by a conventional grating compressor. In a proof-of-principle experiment using an Yb-doped fiber- CPA-system, control at a B-integral as high as 16 rad is demonstrated. The method allows significant performance improvement of fiber-based chirpedpulse amplification.

  2. ITER Shape Controller and Transport Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T A; Meyer, W H; Pearlstein, L D; Portone, A

    2007-05-31

    We currently use the CORSICA integrated modeling code for scenario studies for both the DIII-D and ITER experiments. In these simulations, free- or fixed-boundary equilibria are simultaneously converged with thermal evolution determined from transport models providing temperature and current density profiles. Using a combination of fixed boundary evolution followed by free-boundary calculation to determine the separatrix and coil currents. In the free-boundary calculation, we use the state-space controller representation with transport simulations to provide feedback modeling of shape, vertical stability and profile control. In addition to a tightly coupled calculation with simulator and controller imbedded inside CORSICA, we also use a remote procedure call interface to couple the CORSICA non-linear plasma simulations to the controller environments developed within the Mathworks Matlab/Simulink environment. We present transport simulations using full shape and vertical stability control with evolution of the temperature profiles to provide simulations of the ITER controller and plasma response.

  3. Control of CuO nanocrystal morphology from ultrathin "willow-leaf" to "flower-shaped" for increased hydrazine oxidation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hui; Key, Julian; Ji, Shan; Lv, Weizhong; Wang, Rongfang

    2015-12-01

    Three CuO nanocrystal morphologies (willow-leaf, spiny, and flower-shaped) with different exposed crystal facets are prepared through a two-step liquid-phase procedure. The CuO crystals have high hydrazine oxidation reaction (HOR) activity and good stability. Flower-shaped CuO has the highest HOR activity and stability of the three forms, with a positive onset-potential of -0.14 V and a high oxidation peak current density of 5.23 mA cm-2. HOR activity of the CuO crystals correlates to the type of exposed crystalline facet.

  4. Shape-Controlled Metal Nanocrystals for Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ruditskiy, Aleksey; Peng, Hsin-Chieh; Xia, Younan

    2016-06-07

    The ability to control the shape of metal nanocrystals allows us to not only maneuver their physicochemical properties but also optimize their activity in a variety of applications. Heterogeneous catalysis, in particular, would benefit tremendously from the availability of metal nanocrystals with controlled shapes and well-defined facets or surface structures. The immediate benefits may include significant enhancements in catalytic activity and/or selectivity along with reductions in the materials cost. We provide a brief account of recent progress in the development of metal nanocrystals with controlled shapes and thereby enhanced catalytic performance for several reactions, including formic acid oxidation, oxygen reduction, and hydrogenation. In addition to monometallic nanocrystals, we also cover a bimetallic system, in which the two metals are formulated as alloyed, core-shell, or core-frame structures. We hope this article will provide further impetus for the development of next-generation heterogeneous catalysts essential to a broad range of applications.

  5. Sonochemical shape control of copper hydroxysulfates.

    PubMed

    Kaş, Recep; Birer, Özgür

    2012-05-01

    Shape control of inorganic nanoparticles generally requires the use of surfactants or ligands to passivate certain crystallographic planes. Additive free shape control methods utilize the differences in the growth rates of crystallographic planes. We combined this approach with the sonochemical method to synthesize copper hydroxysulfate (Brochantite) with morphologies ranging from flowers, to bricks, belts and needles. Sodium peroxydisulfate, which was used as the sulfate and hydroxide source, was decomposed thermally and/or sonically under various pH and temperature conditions. The relative release rates of the sulfate and hydroxide anions determined the final form of the crystals. This technique yielded products even at acidic pH, marking a distinction from the literature reactions, which start with stoichiometric amounts of sulfate and hydroxide anions and yield only a single crystal morphology.

  6. Static shape control for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Scheid, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An integrated methodology is described for defining static shape control laws for large flexible structures. The techniques include modeling, identifying and estimating the control laws of distributed systems characterized in terms of infinite dimensional state and parameter spaces. The models are expressed as interconnected elliptic partial differential equations governing a range of static loads, with the capability of analyzing electromagnetic fields around antenna systems. A second-order analysis is carried out for statistical errors, and model parameters are determined by maximizing an appropriate defined likelihood functional which adjusts the model to observational data. The parameter estimates are derived from the conditional mean of the observational data, resulting in a least squares superposition of shape functions obtained from the structural model.

  7. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  8. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  9. Shape Control of Solar Collectors Using Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, D. W.; Grossman, J. W.; Allen, J. J.; Rice, T. M.; Liang, C.; Davidson, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    Solar collectors that are focused on a central receiver are designed with a mechanism for defocusing the collector or disabling it by turning it out of the path of the sun's rays. This is required to avoid damaging the receiver during periods of inoperability. In either of these two cases a fail-safe operation is very desirable where during power outages the collector passively goes to its defocused or deactivated state. This paper is principally concerned with focusing and defocusing the collector in a fail-safe manner using shape memory alloy actuators. Shape memory alloys are well suited to this application in that once calibrated the actuators can be operated in an on/off mode using a minimal amount of electric power. Also, in contrast to other smart materials that were investigated for this application, shape memory alloys are capable of providing enough stroke at the appropriate force levels to focus the collector. Design and analysis details presented, along with comparisons to test data taken from an actual prototype, demonstrate that the collector can be repeatedly focused and defocused within accuracies required by typical solar energy systems. In this paper the design, analysis and testing of a solar collector which is deformed into its desired shape by shape memory alloy actuators is presented. Computations indicate collector shapes much closer to spherical and with smaller focal lengths can be achieved by moving the actuators inward to a radius of approximately 6 inches. This would require actuators with considerably more stroke and some alternate SMA actuators are currently under consideration. Whatever SMA actuator is finally chosen for this application, repeatability and fatigue tests will be required to investigate the long term performance of the actuator.

  10. Multi-shape active composites by 3D printing of digital shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiangtao; Yuan, Chao; Ding, Zhen; Isakov, Michael; Mao, Yiqi; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Recent research using 3D printing to create active structures has added an exciting new dimension to 3D printing technology. After being printed, these active, often composite, materials can change their shape over time; this has been termed as 4D printing. In this paper, we demonstrate the design and manufacture of active composites that can take multiple shapes, depending on the environmental temperature. This is achieved by 3D printing layered composite structures with multiple families of shape memory polymer (SMP) fibers – digital SMPs - with different glass transition temperatures (Tg) to control the transformation of the structure. After a simple single-step thermomechanical programming process, the fiber families can be sequentially activated to bend when the temperature is increased. By tuning the volume fraction of the fibers, bending deformation can be controlled. We develop a theoretical model to predict the deformation behavior for better understanding the phenomena and aiding the design. We also design and print several flat 2D structures that can be programmed to fold and open themselves when subjected to heat. With the advantages of an easy fabrication process and the controllable multi-shape memory effect, the printed SMP composites have a great potential in 4D printing applications.

  11. Multi-shape active composites by 3D printing of digital shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiangtao; Yuan, Chao; Ding, Zhen; Isakov, Michael; Mao, Yiqi; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-13

    Recent research using 3D printing to create active structures has added an exciting new dimension to 3D printing technology. After being printed, these active, often composite, materials can change their shape over time; this has been termed as 4D printing. In this paper, we demonstrate the design and manufacture of active composites that can take multiple shapes, depending on the environmental temperature. This is achieved by 3D printing layered composite structures with multiple families of shape memory polymer (SMP) fibers - digital SMPs - with different glass transition temperatures (Tg) to control the transformation of the structure. After a simple single-step thermomechanical programming process, the fiber families can be sequentially activated to bend when the temperature is increased. By tuning the volume fraction of the fibers, bending deformation can be controlled. We develop a theoretical model to predict the deformation behavior for better understanding the phenomena and aiding the design. We also design and print several flat 2D structures that can be programmed to fold and open themselves when subjected to heat. With the advantages of an easy fabrication process and the controllable multi-shape memory effect, the printed SMP composites have a great potential in 4D printing applications.

  12. Multi-shape active composites by 3D printing of digital shape memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiangtao; Yuan, Chao; Ding, Zhen; Isakov, Michael; Mao, Yiqi; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Recent research using 3D printing to create active structures has added an exciting new dimension to 3D printing technology. After being printed, these active, often composite, materials can change their shape over time; this has been termed as 4D printing. In this paper, we demonstrate the design and manufacture of active composites that can take multiple shapes, depending on the environmental temperature. This is achieved by 3D printing layered composite structures with multiple families of shape memory polymer (SMP) fibers – digital SMPs - with different glass transition temperatures (Tg) to control the transformation of the structure. After a simple single-step thermomechanical programming process, the fiber families can be sequentially activated to bend when the temperature is increased. By tuning the volume fraction of the fibers, bending deformation can be controlled. We develop a theoretical model to predict the deformation behavior for better understanding the phenomena and aiding the design. We also design and print several flat 2D structures that can be programmed to fold and open themselves when subjected to heat. With the advantages of an easy fabrication process and the controllable multi-shape memory effect, the printed SMP composites have a great potential in 4D printing applications. PMID:27071543

  13. Mirrors Containing Biomimetic Shape-Control Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart

    2003-01-01

    Curved mirrors of a proposed type would comprise lightweight sheets or films containing integral, biologically inspired actuators for controlling their surface figures. These mirrors could be useful in such applications as collection of solar energy, focusing of radio beams, and (provided sufficient precision could be achieved) imaging. These mirrors were originally intended for use in outer space, but it should also be possible to develop terrestrial versions. Several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles have described a variety of approaches to the design of curved, lightweight mirrors containing integral shape-control actuators. The primary distinction between the present approach and the prior approaches lies in the actuator design concept, which involves shapes and movements reminiscent of those of a variety of small, multi-armed animals. The shape and movement of an actuator of this type can also be characterized as reminiscent of that of an umbrella. This concept can be further characterized as a derivative of that of multifinger grippers, the fingers of which are bimorph bending actuators (see Figure 1). The fingers of such actuators can be strips containing any of a variety of materials that have been investigated for use as actuators, including such electroactive polymers as ionomeric polymer/metal composites (IPMCs), ferroelectric polymers, and grafted elastomers. A mirror according to this proposal would be made from a sheet of one of the actuator composites mentioned above. The design would involve many variables, including the pre-curvature and stiffness of the mirror sheet, the required precision of figure control, the required range of variation in focal length (see Figure 2), the required precision of figure control for imaging or non-imaging use, the bending and twisting moments needed to effect the required deformations, and voltage-tomoment coefficients of the actuators, and the voltages accordingly required for actuation. A typical design would call

  14. Shape Control in Multivariate Barycentric Rational Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa Thang; Cuyt, Annie; Celis, Oliver Salazar

    2010-09-01

    The most stable formula for a rational interpolant for use on a finite interval is the barycentric form [1, 2]. A simple choice of the barycentric weights ensures the absence of (unwanted) poles on the real line [3]. In [4] we indicate that a more refined choice of the weights in barycentric rational interpolation can guarantee comonotonicity and coconvexity of the rational interpolant in addition to a polefree region of interest. In this presentation we generalize the above to the multivariate case. We use a product-like form of univariate barycentric rational interpolants and indicate how the location of the poles and the shape of the function can be controlled. This functionality is of importance in the construction of mathematical models that need to express a certain trend, such as in probability distributions, economics, population dynamics, tumor growth models etc.

  15. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Pt Nanopeanuts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemei; Xia, Zengzilu; Huang, Yingzhou; Jia, Yunpeng; Sun, Xiaonan; Li, Yu; Li, Xueming; Wu, Rui; Liu, Anping; Qi, Xueqiang; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the novel shape of Pt nanoparticles is one of the most useful ways to improve the electrocatalytic performance of Pt in fuel cells. In this work, the Pt nanopeanuts consisting of two nanospheres grown together have been fabricated through a two-step polyol method. The high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrum collected at adjacent part point out the Pt nanopeanut is apparently different from the two physical attached nanospheres. To understand the growth mechanism of this nanopeanut, the final products in different synthesis situations are studied. The results indicate the interesting morphology of Pt nanopeanuts mainly benefit from the chemical reagent (FeCl3) while the size and homogeneity are greatly affected by the temperature. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic activity of the Pt nanopeanuts has also been demonstrated here. Our two-step synthesis of Pt nanopeanuts not only enlarges the group of Pt nanoparticles, but also provides a beneficial strategy for the synthesis of novel metal nanoparticles. PMID:27528078

  16. Shape Fixing via Salt Recrystallization: A Morphology-Controlled Approach To Convert Nanostructured Polymer to Carbon Nanomaterial as a Highly Active Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Li, Li; Xiong, Kun; Wang, Yao; Li, Wei; Nie, Yao; Chen, Siguo; Qi, Xueqiang; Wei, Zidong

    2015-04-29

    Herein, we report a "shape fixing via salt recrystallization" method to efficiently synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon material with a large number of active sites exposed to the three-phase zones, for use as an ORR catalyst. Self-assembled polyaniline with a 3D network structure was fixed and fully sealed inside NaCl via recrystallization of NaCl solution. During pyrolysis, the NaCl crystal functions as a fully sealed nanoreactor, which facilitates nitrogen incorporation and graphitization. The gasification in such a closed nanoreactor creates a large number of pores in the resultant samples. The 3D network structure, which is conducive to mass transport and high utilization of active sites, was found to have been accurately transferred to the final N-doped carbon materials, after dissolution of the NaCl. Use of the invented cathode catalyst in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell produces a peak power of 600 mW cm(-2), making this among the best nonprecious metal catalysts for the ORR reported so far. Furthermore, N-doped carbon materials with a nanotube or nanoshell morphology can be realized by the invented method.

  17. Shape-Memory-Alloy Actuator For Flight Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Report proposes use of shape-memory-alloy actuators, instead of hydraulic actuators, for aerodynamic flight-control surfaces. Actuator made of shape-memory alloy converts thermal energy into mechanical work by changing shape as it makes transitions between martensitic and austenitic crystalline phase states of alloy. Because both hot exhaust gases and cryogenic propellant liquids available aboard launch rockets, shape-memory-alloy actuators exceptionally suited for use aboard such rockets.

  18. Shape control of distributed parameter reflectors using sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Fukashi; Washington, Gregory N.; Utkin, Vadim

    2001-08-01

    Sliding mode control has become one of the most powerful control methods for variable structure systems, a set of continuous systems with an appropriate switching logic. Its robustness properties and order reduction capability have made sliding mode control one of the most efficient tools for relatively higher order nonlinear plants operating under uncertain conditions. Piezo-electric materials possess the property of creating a charge when subjected to a mechanical strain, and of generating a strain when subjected to an electric field. Piezo-electric actuators are known to have a hysteresis due to the thermal motion and Coulomb interaction of Weiss domains. Because of the thermal effect the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators is reproducible only with some uncertainty in experiments. The robustness of sliding mode control under uncertain conditions has an advantage in handling the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators. In this research sliding mode control is used to control the shape of one- and two-dimensionally curved adaptive reflectors with piezo-electric actuators. Four discrete linear actuators for the one-dimensionally curved reflector and eight actuators for the two-dimensionally curved reflector are assumed.

  19. Shape-Controlled Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    shaped nanoparticles were produced. Liu and Guyot -Sionnest (9) showed through high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that citrate-capped...14317. 9. Liu, M.; Guyot -Sionnest, P. Mechanism of Silver (I)-Assisted Growth of Gold Nanorods and Bipyramids. The Journal of Physical Chemistry B

  20. Shape-controlled ceria-based nanostructures for catalysis applications.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhen-An; Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Among oxide catalysts, ceria is a technologically important material because of its wide applications as a promoter in three-way catalysts for the elimination of toxic exhaust gases, low-temperature water-gas-shift reaction, oxygen sensors, oxygen permeation membrane systems, and fuel cells. The catalytic activities of cerium oxide are highly dependent on interfacial structures and nanocrystal morphologies. This Minireview highlights the recent progress in the research of ceria nanoshapes as both catalysts and catalyst supports, including the synthesis, structure characterization, catalytic properties, surface chemistry, as well as reaction mechanisms. Insights from in situ spectroscopy study and theoretical modeling of nanostructured ceria-based materials have shed light on the origin of the ceria shape effect. It is suggested that the surface structure of ceria controls the catalytic activity and selectivity through structure-dependent surface-site geometry, surface vacancy formation energy, defect sites, and coordinatively unsaturated sites on ceria. The morphology-dependent catalysis in ceria has offered a new strategy to finely tune the catalytic activity and selectivity through shape control without altering the catalyst composition. A brief summary and an outlook on this research field will be presented at the end.

  1. Colloid Science of Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts in 2D and 3D Structures. Challenges of Nucleation, Growth, Composition, Particle Shape, Size Control and their Influence on Activity and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-02-13

    Recent breakthroughs in synthesis in nanosciences have achieved control of size and shapes of nanoparticles that are relevant for catalyst design. In this article, we review the advance of synthesis of nanoparticles, fabrication of two and three dimensional model catalyst system, characterization, and studies of activity and selectivity. The ability to synthesize monodispersed platinum and rhodium nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm range permitted us to study the influence of composition, structure, and dynamic properties of monodispersed metal nanoparticle on chemical reactivity and selectivity. We review the importance of size and shape of nanoparticles to determine the reaction selectivity in multi-path reactions. The influence of metal-support interaction has been studied by probing the hot electron flows through the metal-oxide interface in catalytic nanodiodes. Novel designs of nanoparticle catalytic systems are discussed.

  2. Shape-controlled growth of metal nanoparticles: an atomistic view.

    PubMed

    Konuk, Mine; Durukanoğlu, Sondan

    2016-01-21

    Recent developments in shape-controlled synthesis of metallic nano-particles present a promising path for precisely tuning chemical activity, selectivity, and stability of nano-materials. While previous studies have highlighted the macroscopic description of synthesis processes, there is less understanding as to whether individual atomic-scale processes possess any significant role in controlling the growth of nano-products. The presented molecular static and dynamic simulations are the first simulations to understand the underlying atomistic mechanisms of the experimentally determined growth modes of metal nano-clusters. Our simulations on Ag nano-cubes confirm that metal nano-seeds enclosed by {100} facets can be directed to grow into octopods, concave, truncated cubes, and cuboctahedra when the relative surface diffusion and deposition rates are finely tuned. Here we further showed that atomic level processes play a significant role in controllably fine tuning the two competing rates: surface diffusion and deposition. We also found that regardless of temperature and the initial shape of the nano-seeds, the exchange of the deposited atom with an edge atom of the seed is by far the governing diffusion mechanism between the neighboring facets, and thus is the leading atomistic process determining the conditions for fine tuning of macroscopic processes.

  3. Reconstructing liver shape and position from MR image slices using an active shape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenchel, Matthias; Thesen, Stefan; Schilling, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    We present an algorithm for fully automatic reconstruction of 3D position, orientation and shape of the human liver from a sparsely covering set of n 2D MR slice images. Reconstructing the shape of an organ from slice images can be used for scan planning, for surgical planning or other purposes where 3D anatomical knowledge has to be inferred from sparse slices. The algorithm is based on adapting an active shape model of the liver surface to a given set of slice images. The active shape model is created from a training set of liver segmentations from a group of volunteers. The training set is set up with semi-manual segmentations of T1-weighted volumetric MR images. Searching for the optimal shape model that best fits to the image data is done by maximizing a similarity measure based on local appearance at the surface. Two different algorithms for the active shape model search are proposed and compared: both algorithms seek to maximize the a-posteriori probability of the grey level appearance around the surface while constraining the surface to the space of valid shapes. The first algorithm works by using grey value profile statistics in normal direction. The second algorithm uses average and variance images to calculate the local surface appearance on the fly. Both algorithms are validated by fitting the active shape model to abdominal 2D slice images and comparing the shapes, which have been reconstructed, to the manual segmentations and to the results of active shape model searches from 3D image data. The results turn out to be promising and competitive to active shape model segmentations from 3D data.

  4. Magnetically Controlled Shape Memory Behaviour—Materials and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandy, A. P.; Sheikh, A.; Neumann, K.; Neumann, K.-U.; Pooley, D.; Ziebeck, K. R. A.

    2008-06-01

    For most metals a microscopic change in shape occurs above the elastic limit by the irreversible creation and movement of dislocations. However a large number of metallic systems undergo structural, martensitic, phase transformations which are diffusionless, displacive first order transitions from a high-temperature phase to one of lower symmetry below a certain temperature TM. These transitions which have been studied for more than a century are of vital importance because of their key role in producing shape memory phenomena enabling the system to reverse large deformations in the martensitic phase by heating into the austenite phase. In addition to a change in shape (displacement) the effect can also produce a force or a combination of both. Materials having this unique property are increasing being used in medical applications—scoliosis correction, arterial clips, stents, orthodontic wire, orthopaedic implants etc. The structural phase transition essential for shape memory behaviour is usually activated by a change in temperature or applied stress. However for many applications such as for actuators the transformation is not sufficiently rapid. Poor energy conversion also limits the applicability of many shape memory alloys. In medicine a change of temperature or pressure is often inappropriate and new ferromagnetic materials are being considered in which the phenomena can be controlled by an applied magnetic field at constant temperature. In order to achieve this, it is important to optimise three fundamental parameters. These are the saturation magnetisation σs, the Curie temperature Tc and the martensitic temperature TM. Here, σs is important because the magnetic pressure driving the twin boundary motion is 2σsH. Furthermore the material must be in the martensitic state at the operating temperature which should be at or above room temperature. This may be achieved by alloying or controlling the stoichiometry. Recently new intermetallic compounds based

  5. LPFG sensing network for distributed shape control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Abraham K.; Ben-Menahem, Shahar; Kazemi, Alex; Kress, Bernard; Kulishov, Mykola

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss various aspects of the control and sensing in a flexible wing aircraft using embedded LPFG (Long Period Fiber Grating). Driven by the need to improve aerodynamic efficiency and reduce fuel burn, interest in light-weight structures for next generation aircraft has been on the rise. However, in order to fully exploit novel lightweight structures, there is a critical need for distributed sensing along the entire wing span and its integration with closed-loop control systems. A model of an LPFG sensor string embedded in an Euler-Bernoulli beam is proposed along with an associated control algorithm.

  6. Structured Robust Loop shaping control for HIMAT System Using PSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitwanidvilai, Somyot; Jangwanitlert, Anuwat; Parnichkun, Manukid

    2009-01-01

    Robust loop shaping control is a feasible method for designing a robust controller; however, the controller designed by this method is complicated and difficult to implement practically. To overcome this problem, in this paper, a new design technique of a fixed-structure robust loop shaping controller for a highly maneuverable airplane, HIMAT, is proposed. The performance and robust stability conditions of the designed system satisfying H∞ loop shaping control are formulated as the objective function in the optimization problem. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique is adopted to solve this problem and to achieve the control parameters of the proposed controller. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach is numerically efficient and leads to performance comparable to that of the other method.

  7. Nonstationary shape activities: dynamic models for landmark shape change and applications.

    PubMed

    Das, Samarjit; Vaswani, Namrata

    2010-04-01

    Our goal is to develop statistical models for the shape change of a configuration of "landmark" points (key points of interest) over time and to use these models for filtering and tracking to automatically extract landmarks, synthesis, and change detection. The term "shape activity" was introduced in recent work to denote a particular stochastic model for the dynamics of landmark shapes (dynamics after global translation, scale, and rotation effects are normalized for). In that work, only models for stationary shape sequences were proposed. But most "activities" of a set of landmarks, e.g., running, jumping, or crawling, have large shape changes with respect to initial shape and hence are nonstationary. The key contribution of this work is a novel approach to define a generative model for both 2D and 3D nonstationary landmark shape sequences. Greatly improved performance using the proposed models is demonstrated for sequentially filtering noise-corrupted landmark configurations to compute Minimum Mean Procrustes Square Error (MMPSE) estimates of the true shape and for tracking human activity videos, i.e., for using the filtering to predict the locations of the landmarks (body parts) and using this prediction for faster and more accurate landmarks extraction from the current image.

  8. Controlling the shape of glass microballoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, S. A.; Gunter, S.

    1980-01-01

    Percent yield of "perfect" glass microballoons is increased by using microlevitating furnaces. Furnace components operate at higher temperatures and with levitation gases that will not affect glass materials. Furnace speeds up remelting and reshaping, reducing number of rejects for laser fusion studies. Electronic sensing maintains constant pressure differential across CHS despite changing furnace pressure and temperature; control retains microballoon in stable levitating state.

  9. Multi configuration axysimmetric plasma shaping control on RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavazzana, R.; Finotti, C.; Marchiori, G.; Manduchi, G.; Zanotto, L.; Kudlacek, O.; Zuin, M.; Franz, P.; Zanca, P.; Marrelli, L.; Luce, T. C.; Jackson, G. L.

    2013-10-01

    RFX-mod is a flexible experiment, equipped with a full coverage MHD control system, composed by 192 (48 toroidal x 4 poloidal) coils. Being built as a high current RFP (a/R = 0.46m/2.0m; Ip max 2 MA) it has recently operated also as a low current circular tokamak (Bt = 0.45 T; Ip 85 kA @ q(a) ~ 3 ; Ip 150 kA @ q(a) ~ 2), achieving the full stabilization of m = 2, n = 1 mode at q(a) ~ 2. In order to extend the significance of MHD control experiments, there arose the need of creating non circular shaped discharges, exploiting the flexibility of the 16 shaping coils of the machine. Plasma of with moderate elliptical and triangular shape can be obtained both in tokamak and RFP configuration. Moreover tokamak D-shaped plasmas with double X-point have been obtained by proper reconfiguration of the power supply. The design structure and the experimental performance of the new shape reconstruction, plasma position and shape real-time control algorithms, tested in both RFP and tokamak configuration, are presented and discussed, along with some preliminary results of the MHD mode interaction and control behavior with the modified plasma shapes.

  10. Polarization Shaping for Control of Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Larocque, Hugo; Yao, Alison M.; Travis, Christopher; De Leon, Israel; Rubano, Andrea; Karimi, Ebrahim; Oppo, Gian-Luca; Boyd, Robert W.

    2016-12-01

    We study the nonlinear optical propagation of two different classes of light beams with space-varying polarization—radially symmetric vector beams and Poincaré beams with lemon and star topologies—in a rubidium vapor cell. Unlike Laguerre-Gauss and other types of beams that quickly experience instabilities, we observe that their propagation is not marked by beam breakup while still exhibiting traits such as nonlinear confinement and self-focusing. Our results suggest that, by tailoring the spatial structure of the polarization, the effects of nonlinear propagation can be effectively controlled. These findings provide a novel approach to transport high-power light beams in nonlinear media with controllable distortions to their spatial structure and polarization properties.

  11. Monodisperse Block Copolymer Particles with Controllable Size, Shape, and Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, Yongjoo; Kim, Bumjoon; PNEL Team

    Shape-anisotropic particles are important class of novel colloidal building block for their functionality is more strongly governed by their shape, size and nanostructure compared to conventional spherical particles. Recently, facile strategy for producing non-spherical polymeric particles by interfacial engineering received significant attention. However, achieving uniform size distribution of particles together with controlled shape and nanostructure has not been achieved. Here, we introduce versatile system for producing monodisperse BCP particles with controlled size, shape and morphology. Polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) self-assembled to either onion-like or striped ellipsoid particle, where final structure is governed by amount of adsorbed sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant at the particle/surrounding interface. Further control of molecular weight and particle size enabled fine-tuning of aspect ratio of ellipsoid particle. Underlying physics of free energy for morphology formation and entropic penalty associated with bending BCP chains strongly affects particle structure and specification.

  12. Role of Chemokines in Shaping Macrophage Activity in AMD.

    PubMed

    Rutar, Matt; Provis, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disorder that affects millions of individuals worldwide. While the advent of anti-VEGF therapy has allowed for effective treatment of neovascular 'wet' AMD, no treatments are available to mitigate the more prevalent 'dry' forms of the disease. A role for inflammatory processes in the progression of AMD has emerged over a period of many years, particularly the characterisation of leukocyte infiltrates in AMD-affected eyes, as well as in animal models. This review focuses on the burgeoning understanding of chemokines in the retina, and their potential role in shaping the recruitment and activation of macrophages in AMD. Understanding the mechanisms which promote macrophage activity in the degenerating retina may be key to controlling the potentially devastating consequences of inflammation in diseases such as AMD.

  13. Pulse shape control in a dual cavity laser: numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkir, Yuri

    2006-04-01

    We present a numerical model of the laser system for generating a special shape of the pulse: a steep peak at the beginning followed by a long pulse tail. Laser pulses of this nature are required for various applications (laser material processing, optical breakdown spectroscopy, etc.). The laser system consists of two "overlapped" cavities with different round-trip times. The laser crystal, the Q-switching element, the back mirror, and the output coupler are shared. A shorter pulse is generated in a short cavity. A small fraction of this pulse is injected into the long cavity as a seed. It triggers generation of the longer pulse. The output emission from this hybrid laser produces a required pulse shape. Parameters of the laser pulse (ratios of durations and energies of short- and long- pulse components) can be controlled through cavity length and the output coupler reflection. Modelling of the laser system is based on a set of coupled rate equations for dynamic variables of the system: the inverse population in an active laser media and photon densities in coupled cavities. Numerical experiments were provided with typical parameters of a Nd:YAG laser to study the system behaviour for different combinations of parameters.

  14. Shaping Social Activity by Incentivizing Users

    PubMed Central

    Farajtabar, Mehrdad; Du, Nan; Rodriguez, Manuel Gomez; Valera, Isabel; Zha, Hongyuan; Song, Le

    2015-01-01

    Events in an online social network can be categorized roughly into endogenous events, where users just respond to the actions of their neighbors within the network, or exogenous events, where users take actions due to drives external to the network. How much external drive should be provided to each user, such that the network activity can be steered towards a target state? In this paper, we model social events using multivariate Hawkes processes, which can capture both endogenous and exogenous event intensities, and derive a time dependent linear relation between the intensity of exogenous events and the overall network activity. Exploiting this connection, we develop a convex optimization framework for determining the required level of external drive in order for the network to reach a desired activity level. We experimented with event data gathered from Twitter, and show that our method can steer the activity of the network more accurately than alternatives. PMID:26005312

  15. Conducting-polymer-driven actively shaped propellers and screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, John D.; Schmid, Bryan; Lafontaine, Serge R.; Madden, Peter G. A.; Hover, Franz S.; McLetchie, Karl; Hunter, Ian W.

    2003-07-01

    Conducting polymer actuators are employed to create actively shaped hydrodynamic foils. The active foils are designed to allow control over camber, much like the ailerons of an airplane wing. Control of camber promises to enable variable thrust in propellers and screws, increased maneuverability, and improved stealth. The design and fabrication of the active foils are presented, the forces are measured and operation is demonstrated both in still air and water. The foils have a "wing" span of 240 mm, and an average chord length (width) of 70 mm. The trailing 30 mm of the foil is composed of a thin polypyrrole actuator that curls chordwise to achieve variable camber. The actuator consists of two 30 μm thick sheets of hexafluorophosphate doped polypyrrole separated from each other by a gel electrolyte. A polymer layer encapsulates the entire structure. Potentials are applied between the polymer layers to induce reversible bending by approximately 35 degrees, and generating forces of 0.15 N. These forces and displacements are expected to enable operation in water at flow rates of > 1 m/s and ~ 30 m/s in air.

  16. Feedback Control Systems Loop Shaping Design with Practical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopsakis, George

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes loop shaping control design in feedback control systems, primarily from a practical stand point that considers design specifications. Classical feedback control design theory, for linear systems where the plant transfer function is known, has been around for a long time. But it s still a challenge of how to translate the theory into practical and methodical design techniques that simultaneously satisfy a variety of performance requirements such as transient response, stability, and disturbance attenuation while taking into account the capabilities of the plant and its actuation system. This paper briefly addresses some relevant theory, first in layman s terms, so that it becomes easily understood and then it embarks into a practical and systematic design approach incorporating loop shaping design coupled with lead-lag control compensation design. The emphasis is in generating simple but rather powerful design techniques that will allow even designers with a layman s knowledge in controls to develop effective feedback control designs.

  17. Control of cell nucleus shapes via micropillar patterns.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhen; Yan, Ce; Peng, Rong; Zhao, Yingchun; He, Yao; Ding, Jiandong

    2012-02-01

    We herein report a material technique to control the shapes of cell nuclei by the design of the microtopography of substrates to which the cells adhere. Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) micropillars or micropits of a series of height or depth were fabricated, and some surprising self deformation of the nuclei of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was found in the case of micropillars with a sufficient height. Despite severe nucleus deformation, BMSCs kept the ability of proliferation and differentiation. We further demonstrated that the shapes of cell nuclei could be regulated by the appropriate micropillar patterns. Besides circular and elliptoid shapes, some unusual nucleus shapes of BMSCs have been achieved, such as square, cross, dumbbell, and asymmetric sphere-protrusion.

  18. Controlling the Shape and Crystallinity of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Personick, Michelle Louise

    The strong dependence of the optical, electronic, and catalytic properties of noble metal nanoparticles on their shape has necessitated the high-yield synthesis of gold and silver nanostructures with precisely defined morphologies. This directed synthesis requires a detailed mechanistic understanding of the chemical and physical factors which control nanoparticle shape; however, these mechanistic explanations are still incomplete. To this end, the work of this dissertation seeks to enhance the understanding of nanoparticle growth on a mechanistic level, while also developing synthetic methods for producing novel nanoparticle shapes. Chapter 1 describes the state of the art in shape-controlled noble metal nanoparticle synthesis prior to the work conducted in this dissertation. In Chapter 2, a method is reported for synthesizing {110}-faceted bipyramids and rhombic dodecahedra, in which the combination of a chloride-containing surfactant and a low concentration of silver ions leads to the stabilization of the {110} facets. Chapter 3 explores in mechanistic detail the use of silver underpotential deposition to control particle growth in the synthesis of four gold nanoparticle shapes: octahedra, rhombic dodecahedra, truncated ditetragonal prisms, and concave cubes. This mechanistic understanding is expanded in Chapter 4, where the independent and synergistic roles of silver ions and halide ions in the seed-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles are systematically probed, culminating in a set of design considerations for controlling the shape of gold nanoparticles. Chapter 5 investigates the role of excitation wavelength in controlling the rate of silver ion reduction in the plasmon-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and describes the synthesis of silver cubes with an unusual twinning structure. Finally, Chapter 6 combines the mechanistic insights gained in Chapters 2-5 to address a standing challenge in shape-controlled gold nanoparticle synthesis: the direct

  19. Marine soundscape shaped by fishing activity

    PubMed Central

    Lossent, Julie; Grall, Jacques; Chauvaud, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Marine communities face anthropogenic pressures that degrade ecosystems. Because underwater soundscapes carry information about habitat quality, we explored whether destructive impacts of fishing could be evaluated via the soundscape. Maerl beds are recognized as biodiversity hotspots and they experience major worldwide degradation owing to fishing. We collected field acoustic recordings in maerl beds exposed to different fishing practices. We found that unfished maerl beds were threefold louder and exhibited sound frequencies more diversified than those recorded in fished maerl beds. Analyses of associated fauna samples indicated that snapping shrimps provided a major contribution to the maerl bed soundscape. Moreover, sea urchins and squat lobsters most likely contributed to differences between the soundscapes of unfished and fished maerl beds. Our results supported the idea that the soundscape can provide valuable information on maerl bed ecosystem health related to fishing activity. PMID:28280559

  20. Optimal control design of pulse shapes as analytic functions.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Thomas E; Gershenzon, Naum I

    2010-06-01

    Representing NMR pulse shapes by analytic functions is widely employed in procedures for optimizing performance. Insights concerning pulse dynamics can be applied to the choice of appropriate functions that target specific performance criteria, focusing the solution search and reducing the space of possible pulse shapes that must be considered to a manageable level. Optimal control theory can accommodate significantly larger parameter spaces and has been able to tackle problems of much larger scope than more traditional optimization methods. However, its numerically generated pulses, as currently constructed, do not readily incorporate the capabilities of particular functional forms, and the pulses are not guaranteed to vary smoothly in time, which can be a problem for faithful implementation on older hardware. An optimal control methodology is derived for generating pulse shapes as simple parameterized functions. It combines the benefits of analytic and numerical protocols in a single powerful algorithm that both complements and enhances existing optimization strategies.

  1. AC Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Siochi, Emilie J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory materials have drawn interest for applications like intelligent medical devices, deployable space structures and morphing structures. Compared to other shape memory materials like shape memory alloys (SMAs) or shape memory ceramics (SMCs), shape memory polymers (SMPs) have high elastic deformation that is amenable to tailored of mechanical properties, have lower density, and are easily processed. However, SMPs have low recovery stress and long response times. A new shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive fillers to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. A new composition of shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. The elastic modulus of LaRC-SMPC is approximately 2.7 GPa at room temperature and 4.3 MPa above its glass transition temperature. Conductive FGSs-doped LaRC-SMPC exhibited higher conductivity compared to pristine LaRC SMP. Applying an electric field at between 0.1 Hz and 1 kHz induced faster heating to activate the LaRC-SMPC s shape memory effect relative to applying DC electric field or AC electric field at frequencies exceeding1 kHz.

  2. Flight Control Using Distributed Shape-Change Effector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Montgomery, Raymond C.; Green, Lawrence I.; Park, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent discoveries in material science and fluidics have been used to create a variety of novel effector devices that offer great potential to enable new approaches to aerospace vehicle flight control. Examples include small inflatable blisters, shape-memory alloy diaphragms, and piezoelectric patches that may be used to produce distortions or bumps on the surface of an airfoil to generate control moments. Small jets have also been used to produce a virtual shape-change through fluidic means by creating a recirculation bubble on the surface of an airfoil. An advanced aerospace vehicle might use distributed arrays of hundreds of such devices to generate moments for stabilization and maneuver control, either augmenting or replacing conventional ailerons, flaps or rudders. This research demonstrates the design and use of shape-change device arrays for a tailless aircraft in a low-rate maneuvering application. A methodology for assessing the control authority of the device arrays is described, and a suite of arrays is used in a dynamic simulation to illustrate allocation and deployment methodologies. Although the authority of the preliminary shape-change array designs studied in this paper appeared quite low, the simulation results indicate that the effector suite possessed sufficient authority to stabilize and maneuver the vehicle in mild turbulence.

  3. Shape-Grinding by Direct Position/Force Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanghua; Xu, Weiwei; Minami, Mamoru

    Based on the analysis of the interaction between a manipulator's hand and a working object, a model representing the constrained dynamics of the robot is first discussed. The constrained forces are expressed by an algebraic function of states, input generalized forces, and the constraint condition, and then a direct position/force controller without force sensor is proposed based on the algebraic relation. To give a grinding system the ability to adapt to any object shape being changed by the grinding, we add a function estimating the constraint condition in real time for the adaptive position/force control. Evaluations through simulations, by fitting the changing constraint surface with spline functions, indicate that reliable position/force control and shape-grinding can be achieved by the proposed controller.

  4. Factors Shaping Students' Opportunities to Engage in Argumentative Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayalon, Michal; Even, Ruhama

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how students' opportunities to engage in argumentative activity are shaped by the teacher, the class, and the mathematical topic. It compares the argumentative activity between two classes taught by the same teacher using the same textbook and across two beginning algebra topics--investigating algebraic expressions and…

  5. Multivariable shape control development on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.L.; Humphreys, D.A.; Ferron, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, the authors describe recent work on plasma shape and position control at DIII-D. This control consists of two equally challenging problems--the problem of identifying what the plasma actually looks like in real time, i.e. measuring the parameters to be controlled, and the task of determining the feedback algorithm which best controls these plasma parameters in a multiple input-output system. Recent implementation of the EFIT plasma equilibrium reconstruction algorithm in real time code which produces a new equilibrium estimate every 1.5 ms seems to solve the longstanding problem of obtaining sufficiently accurate plasma shape and position estimation. Stabilization of the open-loop unstable vertical motion is also viewed as a solved problem. The primary remaining problem appears to be how best to command the power supplies to achieve a desired shaping control response. They will describe the effort to understand and apply linearized models of plasma evolution to development and implementation of multivariable plasma controllers.

  6. Trichomes control flower bud shape by linking together young petals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiafu; Walford, Sally-Anne; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Llewellyn, Danny

    2016-06-20

    Trichomes are widespread in plants and develop from surface cells on different tissues(1). They have many forms and functions, from defensive spines to physical barriers that trap layers of air to insulate against desiccation, but there is growing evidence that trichomes can also have developmental roles in regulating flower structure(2,3). We report here that the trichomes on petals of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., are essential for correct flower bud shape through a mechanical entanglement of the trichomes on adjacent petals that anchor the edges to counter the opposing force generated by asymmetric expansion of overlapping petals. Silencing a master regulator of petal trichomes, GhMYB-MIXTA-Like10 (GhMYBML10), by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed petal trichome growth and resulted in flower buds forming into abnormal corkscrew shapes that exposed developing anthers and stigmas to desiccation damage. Artificially gluing petal edges together could partially restore correct bud shape and fertility. Such petal 'Velcro' is present in other Malvaceae and perhaps more broadly in other plant families, although it is not ubiquitous. This mechanism for physical association between separate organs to regulate flower shape and function is different from the usual organ shape control(4) exerted through cell-to-cell communication and differential cell expansion within floral tissues(5,6).

  7. Investigation of thermal distortion and control of spacecraft based on shape memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Du, Xingwen; Tan, Huifeng

    2009-07-01

    Gossamer space structures are relatively large, flimsy, and lightweight. As a result, they are more easily affected or distortion by space thermal environments compared to other space structures. This study examines the structural integrity of a Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna under space thermal environments. To maintain the required accuracy of the reflector under orbital temperature changes, the Gossamer space structures will utilize an active control system, consisting of boundary control actuators and an electrostatic figure control system with a real time closed loop feedback. An experimental system is established to verify the control mechanism with photogrammetric measurement technique and Bragg fiber grating (FBG) sensor technique. The shape control experiments are finished by measuring and analyzing small amplitude distortion of Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna based on the active components made of shape memory alloy (SMA) and shape memory polymer composite (SMPC) material. Then, simulations are finished by NASTRAN finite element software with active effect which is considered to be deformation applied on the analytical model. The amplitude of distortion is obtained by the simulations. Both the experimental and numerical solution show that the amplitude of accuracy are developed which proves the feasibility of shape control using shape memory materials and this investigation explores the feasibility of utilizing an active cable based control system of shape memory materials to reduce global distortion due to thermal loading. It is found that through proper assemble of cable lengths and attachment points, significant thermal distortion reduction is achieved. Specifically, radial distortion due to on-orbit thermal loading .

  8. An investigation into shape and vibration control of space antenna reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susheel, C. K.; Kumar, Rajeev; Chauhan, Vishal S.

    2016-12-01

    A study into the shape and active vibration control of antenna reflectors, an important member of the space structures, is carried out in this paper. Geometric nonlinear analysis is considered for performance evaluation of antenna reflectors, as very high precision is an important aspect of space structures. An effort has been made to demonstrate the importance of functionally graded materials in space structures. Piezolaminated structures have been used for shape and vibration control applications for many years. However, due to the problems like debonding and delamination, the reliability of these materials in space structures is still uncertain. To overcome these problems, patches made of functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) are used for shape and vibration control of antenna reflectors in this investigation. FGPM patches are also used to demonstrate the beam-shaping and beam-steering application of antenna reflectors. For the active vibration control application, a fuzzy-logic controller (FLC) is designed and validated with the experimental results. An experimental study has been conducted for comparing the performance of different controllers in the context of vibration reduction. The FLC is then used for active vibration control of an antenna reflector under the application of thermal impact and sinusoidal loading.

  9. Thermoelectric control of shape memory alloy microactuators: a thermal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Chaillet, Nicolas; Lexcellent, Christian; Bourjault, Alain

    1999-06-01

    Microtechnologies and microsystems engineering use new active materials. These materials are interesting to realize microactuators and microsensors. In this category of materials, Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) are good candidates for microactuation. SMA wires, or thin plates, can be used as active material in microfingers. These microstructures are able to provide very important forces, but have low dynamic response, especially for cooling, in confined environment. The control of the SMA phase transformations, and then the mechanical power generation, is made by the temperature. The Joule effect is an easy and efficiency way to heat the SMA wires, but cooling is not so easy. The dynamic response of the actuator depends on cooling capabilities. The thermal convection and conduction are the traditional ways to cool the SMA, but have limitations for microsystems. We are looking for a reversible way of heating and cooling SMA microactuators, based on the thermoelectric effects. Using Peltier effect, a positive or a negative electrical courant is able to pump or produce heat, in the SMA actuator. A physical model based on thermal exchanges between a Nickel/Titanium (NiTi) SMA, and Bismuth/Telluride (Te3Bi2) thermoelectric material has been developed. For simulation, we use a numerical resolution of our model, with finite elements, which takes into account the Peltier effect, the Joule effect, the convection, the conduction and the phase transformation of the SMA. We have also developed the corresponding experimental system, with two thermoelectric junctions, where the SMA actuator is one of the element of each junction. In this paper, the physical model and its numerical resolution are given, the experimental system used to validate the model is described, and experimental results are shown.

  10. Active shape models with optimised texture features for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K.; Montgomery, D.; Yang, F.; McLaren, D. B.; McLaughlin, S.; Nailon, W. H.

    2014-03-01

    There is now considerable interest in radiation oncology on the use of shape models of anatomy to improve target delineation and assess anatomical disparity at time of radiotherapy. In this paper a texture based active shape model (ASM) is presented for automatic delineation of the gross tumor volume (GTV), containing the prostate, on computed tomography (CT) images of prostate cancer patients. The model was trained on two-dimensional (2D) contours identified by a radiation oncologist on sequential CT image slices. A three-dimensional (3D) GTV shape was constructed from these and iteratively aligned using Procrustes analysis. To train the model the shape deformation variance was learnt using the Active Shape Model (ASM) approach. In a novel development to this approach a profile feature was selected from pre-computed texture features by minimizing the Mahalanobis distance to obtain the most distinct feature for each landmark. The interior of the GTV was modelled using quantile histograms to initialize the shape model on new cases. From the archive of 42 cases of contoured CT scans, 32 cases were randomly selected for training the model and 10 cases for evaluating performance. The gold standard was defined by the radiation oncologist. The shape model achieved an overall Dice coefficient of 0.81 for all test cases. Performance was found to increase, mean Dice coefficient of 0.87, when the volume size of the new case was similar to the mean shape of the model. With further work the approach has the potential to be used in real-time delineation of target volumes and improve segmentation accuracy.

  11. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Metal Nanocrystals: Simple Chemistry Meets Complex Physics?

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Younan; Xiong, Yujie; Lim, Byungkwon; Skrabalak, Sara E.

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystals are fundamental to modern science and technology. Mastery over the shape of a nanocrystal enables control of its properties and enhancement of its usefulness for a given application. The aim of this article is to present a comprehensive review of current research activities that center on the shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals. We begin with a brief introduction to nucleation and growth within the context of metal nanocrystal synthesis, followed by a discussion of the possible shapes that a metal nanocrystal might take under different conditions. We then focus on a variety of experimental parameters that have been explored to manipulate the nucleation and growth of metal nanocrystals in solution-phase syntheses in an effort to generate specific shapes. We then elaborate on these approaches by selecting examples in which there is already reasonable understanding for the observed shape control or at least the protocols have proven to be reproducible and controllable. Toward the end of this article, we highlight a number of applications that have been enabled and/or enhanced by the shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals. We conclude this article with personal perspectives on the directions toward which future research in this field might take. PMID:19053095

  12. Shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals: simple chemistry meets complex physics?

    PubMed

    Xia, Younan; Xiong, Yujie; Lim, Byungkwon; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystals are fundamental to modern science and technology. Mastery over the shape of a nanocrystal enables control of its properties and enhancement of its usefulness for a given application. Our aim is to present a comprehensive review of current research activities that center on the shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals. We begin with a brief introduction to nucleation and growth within the context of metal nanocrystal synthesis, followed by a discussion of the possible shapes that a metal nanocrystal might take under different conditions. We then focus on a variety of experimental parameters that have been explored to manipulate the nucleation and growth of metal nanocrystals in solution-phase syntheses in an effort to generate specific shapes. We then elaborate on these approaches by selecting examples in which there is already reasonable understanding for the observed shape control or at least the protocols have proven to be reproducible and controllable. Finally, we highlight a number of applications that have been enabled and/or enhanced by the shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals. We conclude this article with personal perspectives on the directions toward which future research in this field might take.

  13. Active shape models incorporating isolated landmarks for medical image annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norajitra, Tobias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Stieltjes, Bram; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2014-03-01

    Apart from their robustness in anatomic surface segmentation, purely surface based 3D Active Shape Models lack the ability to automatically detect and annotate non-surface key points of interest. However, annotation of anatomic landmarks is desirable, as it yields additional anatomic and functional information. Moreover, landmark detection might help to further improve accuracy during ASM segmentation. We present an extension of surface-based 3D Active Shape Models incorporating isolated non-surface landmarks. Positions of isolated and surface landmarks are modeled conjoint within a point distribution model (PDM). Isolated landmark appearance is described by a set of haar-like features, supporting local landmark detection on the PDM estimates using a kNN-Classi er. Landmark detection was evaluated in a leave-one-out cross validation on a reference dataset comprising 45 CT volumes of the human liver after shape space projection. Depending on the anatomical landmark to be detected, our experiments have shown in about 1/4 up to more than 1/2 of all test cases a signi cant improvement in detection accuracy compared to the position estimates delivered by the PDM. Our results encourage further research with regard to the combination of shape priors and machine learning for landmark detection within the Active Shape Model Framework.

  14. Wingless signaling and the control of cell shape in Drosophila wing imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Thomas J; Dahmann, Christian

    2009-10-01

    The control of cell morphology is important for shaping animals during development. Here we address the role of the Wnt/Wingless signal transduction pathway and two of its target genes, vestigial and shotgun (encoding E-cadherin), in controlling the columnar shape of Drosophila wing disc cells. We show that clones of cells mutant for arrow (encoding an essential component of the Wingless signal transduction pathway), vestigial or shotgun undergo profound cell shape changes and are extruded towards the basal side of the epithelium. Compartment-wide expression of a dominant-negative form of the Wingless transducer T-cell factor (TCF/Pangolin), or double-stranded RNA targeting vestigial or shotgun, leads to abnormally short cells throughout this region, indicating that these genes act cell autonomously to maintain normal columnar cell shape. Conversely, overexpression of Wingless, a constitutively-active form of the Wingless transducer beta-catenin/Armadillo, or Vestigial, results in precocious cell elongation. Co-expression of Vestigial partially suppresses the abnormal cell shape induced by dominant-negative TCF. We conclude that Wingless signal transduction plays a cell-autonomous role in promoting and maintaining the columnar shape of wing disc cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that Wingless controls cell shape, in part, through maintaining vestigial expression.

  15. Recent Developments in Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaohu; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Moran, Christine H.; Xia, Younan

    2012-01-01

    This feature article introduces our recent work on understanding the roles played by citrate and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as capping agents in seed-mediated syntheses of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes. We have demonstrated that citrate and PVP selectively bind to Ag(111) and Ag(100) surfaces, respectively, and thus favor the formation of Ag nanocrystals enclosed preferentially by {111} or {100} facets. In addition, we have quantified the coverage density of PVP adsorbed on the surface of Ag nanocubes. Based on the mechanistic understanding, a series of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes and sizes have been successfully synthesized by using different combinations of seeds and capping agents: single-crystal spherical/cubic seeds with citrate for cuboctahedrons and octahedrons or with PVP for cubes and bars; and plate-like seeds with citrate for enlarged thin plates or with PVP for thickened plates. PMID:23105955

  16. An input shaping controller enabling cranes to move without sway

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, N.; Singhose, W.; Kriikku, E.

    1997-06-01

    A gantry crane at the Savannah River Technology Center was retrofitted with an Input Shaping controller. The controller intercepts the operator`s pendant commands and modifies them in real time so that the crane is moved without residual sway in the suspended load. Mechanical components on the crane were modified to make the crane suitable for the anti-sway algorithm. This paper will describe the required mechanical modifications to the crane, as well as, a new form of Input Shaping that was developed for use on the crane. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new process. Several practical considerations will be discussed including a novel (patent pending) approach for making small, accurate moves without residual oscillations.

  17. Shape control technology during electrochemical synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu-yu; Cui, Cong-ying; Cheng, Ying-wen; Ma, Hou-yi; Liu, Duo

    2013-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were prepared by adding gold precursor (HAuCl4) to an electrolyzed aqueous solution of poly( N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and KNO3, which indicates the good reducing capacity of the PVP-containing solution after being treated by electrolysis. Using a catholyte and an anolyte as the reducing agents for HAuCl4, respectively, most gold nanoparticles were spherical particles in the former case but plate-like particles in the latter case. The change in the pH value of electrolytes caused by the electrolysis of water would be the origin of the differences in shape and morphology of gold nanoparticles. A hypothesis of the H+ or OH- catalyzed PVP degradation mechanism was proposed to interpret why the pH value played a key role in determining the shape or morphology of gold nanoparticles. These experiments open up a new method for effectively controlling the shape and morphology of metal nanoparticles by using electrochemical methods.

  18. Control of multiphoton molecular excitation with shaped femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingwei

    The work presented in this dissertation describes the use of shaped femtosecond laser pulses to control the outcome of nonlinear optical process and thus to achieve the selectivity for multiphoton molecular transitions. This research could lead to applications in various fields including nonlinear optical spectroscopy, chemical identification, biological imaging, communications, photodynamic therapy, etc. In order to realize accurate pulse shaping of the femtosecond laser pulses, it is essential to measure and correct the spectral phase distortion of such pulses. A method called multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan is used to do so throughout this dissertation. This method is highly accurate and reproducible, and has been proved in this work to be compatible with any femtosecond pulses regardless of bandwidth, intensity and repetition rate of the laser. The phase control of several quasi-octave laser sources is demonstrated in this dissertation, with the generation of 4.3 fs and 5.9 fs pulses that reach the theoretically predicted transform-limited pulse duration. The excellent phase control achieved also guarantees the reproducibility for selective multiphoton excitations by accurate phase and/or amplitude shaping. Selective two-photon excitation, stimulated Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering with a single broadband laser source are demonstrated in this dissertation. Pulse shaping is used to achieve a fast and robust approach to measure the two-photon excitation spectrum from fluorescent molecules, which provide important information for two-photon biological imaging. The selective excitation concept is also applied in the field of remote chemical identification. Detection of characteristic Raman lines for several chemicals using a single beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy from a 12 meter standoff distance is shown, providing a promising approach to standoff detection of chemicals, hazardous contaminations

  19. Engineering Polyelectrolyte Capsules with Independently Controlled Size and Shape.

    PubMed

    Zan, Xingjie; Garapaty, Anusha; Champion, Julie A

    2015-07-14

    Polyelectrolyte capsules (PECs) are a promising delivery system that has the ability to carry a large payload of a variety of cargoes. Controlling PEC properties is critical to understanding and tuning their cellular uptake efficiency, kinetics, and mechanism as well as their biodistribution in the body. The lack of a method to independently engineer PEC size, shape, and chemistry impedes both basic understanding of how physicochemical parameters affect PEC behavior in drug delivery and other applications, and the ability to optimize parameters for best function. Here, we report the successful fabrication of PECs having constant surface chemistry with independently controlled size and shape by combining soft organic templates created by the particle stretching method and a modified layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition process. Changing the template dispersion solution during LBL deposition from water to ethanol allowed us to overcome previous issues with organic templates, such as aggregation and template removal. These results will contribute not only to the basic study of the role of capsule shape and size on its function but also to the optimization of capsule properties for drug or imaging carriers, sensors, reactors, and other applications.

  20. Shape-Controlled Growth of Carbon Nanostructures: Yield and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao; Sun, Xiao; Yang, Nianjun; Xia, Junhai; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Xin

    2015-08-24

    Carbon nanostructures with precisely controlled shapes are difficult materials to synthesize. A facet-selective-catalytic process was thus proposed to synthesize polymer-linked carbon nanostructures with different shapes, covering straight carbon nanofiber, carbon nano Y-junction, carbon nano-hexapus, and carbon nano-octopus. A thermal chemical vapor deposition process was applied to grow these multi-branched carbon nanostructures at temperatures lower than 350 °C. Cu nanoparticles were utilized as the catalyst and acetylene as the reaction gas. The growth of those multi-branched nanostructures was realized through the selective growth of polymer-like sheets on certain indexed facets of Cu catalyst. The vapor-facet-solid (VFS) mechanism, a new growth mode, has been proposed to interpret such a growth in the steps of formation, diffusion, and coupling of carbon-containing oligomers, as well as their final precipitation to form nanostructures on the selective Cu facets.

  1. Controlling third harmonic generation with gammadion-shaped chiral metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Li, Zhi-Qin; Yang, Xin; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically investigated third harmonic generation (THG) from planar chiral metamaterials consisting of a square array of gammadion-shaped metal-insulator-metal multilayered nanostructures. We show that there exists strong circular dichroism (CD) for THG on the proposed chiral metamaterials. We also demonstrate that geometrically mirroring the gammadion -shaped meta-atoms can result in reversal of the THG-CD effect. Based on these CD effects in the optical nonlinear regime, we propose a design of a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) for intense focusing of the THG signals, in which adjacent zones of the FZP consist of gammadions with mirror symmetry and generate circularly polarized THG with opposite handedness. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the relative phase of the THG can be continuously changed by rotating the gammadion around its rotational axis, which could be used in the FZP to control the polarization of the output THG signals.

  2. Agricultural activity shapes the communication and migration patterns in Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Gutierrez, S.; Borondo, J.; Morales, A. J.; Losada, J. C.; Tarquis, A. M.; Benito, R. M.

    2016-06-01

    The communication and migration patterns of a country are shaped by its socioeconomic processes. The economy of Senegal is predominantly rural, as agriculture employs over 70% of the labor force. In this paper, we use mobile phone records to explore the impact of agricultural activity on the communication and mobility patterns of the inhabitants of Senegal. We find two peaks of phone calls activity emerging during the growing season. Moreover, during the harvest period, we detect an increase in the migration flows throughout the country. However, religious holidays also shape the mobility patterns of the Senegalese people. Hence, in the light of our results, agricultural activity and religious holidays are the primary drivers of mobility inside the country.

  3. Agricultural activity shapes the communication and migration patterns in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gutierrez, S; Borondo, J; Morales, A J; Losada, J C; Tarquis, A M; Benito, R M

    2016-06-01

    The communication and migration patterns of a country are shaped by its socioeconomic processes. The economy of Senegal is predominantly rural, as agriculture employs over 70% of the labor force. In this paper, we use mobile phone records to explore the impact of agricultural activity on the communication and mobility patterns of the inhabitants of Senegal. We find two peaks of phone calls activity emerging during the growing season. Moreover, during the harvest period, we detect an increase in the migration flows throughout the country. However, religious holidays also shape the mobility patterns of the Senegalese people. Hence, in the light of our results, agricultural activity and religious holidays are the primary drivers of mobility inside the country.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Burton, Deborah; Turner, Travis L.; Brinson, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory alloy hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions are simulated using finite element analysis. The composite structure is a laminated fiber-polymer composite beam with embedded SMA ribbons at various positions with respect to the neutral axis of the beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating of the SMA ribbons or uniform thermal loads on the beam. The thermomechanical behavior of these composites was simulated in ABAQUS using user-defined SMA elements. The examples demonstrate the usefulness of the methods for the design and simulation of SMA hybrid composites. Keywords: shape memory alloys, Nitinol, ABAQUS, finite element analysis, post-buckling control, shape control, deflection control, adaptive stiffening, morphing, constitutive modeling, user element

  5. Sample Stimulus Control Shaping and Restricted Stimulus Control in Capuchin Monkeys: A Methodological Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brino, Ana Leda F., Barros, Romariz S., Galvao, Ol; Garotti, M.; Da Cruz, Ilara R. N.; Santos, Jose R.; Dube, William V.; McIlvane, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports use of sample stimulus control shaping procedures to teach arbitrary matching-to-sample to 2 capuchin monkeys ("Cebus apella"). The procedures started with identity matching-to-sample. During shaping, stimulus features of the sample were altered gradually, rendering samples and comparisons increasingly physically dissimilar. The…

  6. Imaging structure sensitive catalysis on different shape-controlled platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Carlos M; Solla-Gullón, José; Vidal-Iglesias, Francisco J; Aldaz, Antonio; Montiel, Vicente; Herrero, Enrique

    2010-04-28

    The structure sensitive catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on shape-controlled Pt nanoparticles (NPs) is directly imaged using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). We synthesize and compare four types of Pt NPs: spherical, cubic, hexagonal, and tetrahedral-octahedral. Our SECM images show the hexagonal Pt NPs displaying the highest activity for ORR in two acid electrolytes. Meanwhile, cubic and tetrahedral-octahedral NPs drastically change their activity depending on specific adsorption of the different anions in solution. The NPs morphology produces predominant crystallographic planes at the surface of these shape-controlled Pt NPs, which are responsible for their different catalytic activity. Our results translate the studies on Pt single crystal electrodes present in the literature into Pt NPs that are useful as a catalyst in real fuel cells.

  7. Shape determination and control for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    An integral operator approach is used to derive solutions to static shape determination and control problems associated with large space structures. Problem assumptions include a linear self-adjoint system model, observations and control forces at discrete points, and performance criteria for the comparison of estimates or control forms. Results are illustrated by simulations in the one dimensional case with a flexible beam model, and in the multidimensional case with a finite model of a large space antenna. Modal expansions for terms in the solution algorithms are presented, using modes from the static or associated dynamic mode. These expansions provide approximated solutions in the event that a used form analytical solution to the system boundary value problem is not available.

  8. Coupled parametric design of flow control and duct shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florea, Razvan (Inventor); Bertuccioli, Luca (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for designing gas turbine engine components using a coupled parametric analysis of part geometry and flow control is disclosed. Included are the steps of parametrically defining the geometry of the duct wall shape, parametrically defining one or more flow control actuators in the duct wall, measuring a plurality of performance parameters or metrics (e.g., flow characteristics) of the duct and comparing the results of the measurement with desired or target parameters, and selecting the optimal duct geometry and flow control for at least a portion of the duct, the selection process including evaluating the plurality of performance metrics in a pareto analysis. The use of this method in the design of inter-turbine transition ducts, serpentine ducts, inlets, diffusers, and similar components provides a design which reduces pressure losses and flow profile distortions.

  9. Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control

    SciTech Connect

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-02-21

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or “photonic reagents,” that achieve a wide variety of objectives. An important additional practical desire is for photonic reagent prescriptions to produce good, if not optimal, objective yields when transferred to a different system or laboratory. Building on general experience in chemistry, the hope is that transferred photonic reagent prescriptions may remain functional even though all features of a shaped pulse profile at the sample typically cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments. First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found to still produce near optimal yields on the second laser system. Third, transferring a collection of photonic reagents optimized on the first laser system to the second laser system reproduced systematic trends in photoproduct yields upon interaction with the homologous chemical family. These three transfers of photonic reagents are demonstrated to be successful upon paying reasonable attention to overall laser system characteristics. The ability to transfer photonic reagents from one laser system to another is analogous to well-established utilitarian operating procedures with traditional chemical reagents. The practical implications of the present results for experimental quantum control are discussed.

  10. Practical Loop-Shaping Design of Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    An improved methodology for designing feedback control systems has been developed based on systematically shaping the loop gain of the system to meet performance requirements such as stability margins, disturbance attenuation, and transient response, while taking into account the actuation system limitations such as actuation rates and range. Loop-shaping for controls design is not new, but past techniques do not directly address how to systematically design the controller to maximize its performance. As a result, classical feedback control systems are designed predominantly using ad hoc control design approaches such as proportional integral derivative (PID), normally satisfied when a workable solution is achieved, without a good understanding of how to maximize the effectiveness of the control design in terms of competing performance requirements, in relation to the limitations of the plant design. The conception of this improved methodology was motivated by challenges in designing control systems of the types needed for supersonic propulsion. But the methodology is generally applicable to any classical control-system design where the transfer function of the plant is known or can be evaluated. In the case of a supersonic aerospace vehicle, a major challenge is to design the system to attenuate anticipated external and internal disturbances, using such actuators as fuel injectors and valves, bypass doors, and ramps, all of which are subject to limitations in actuator response, rates, and ranges. Also, for supersonic vehicles, with long slim type of structures, coupling between the engine and the structural dynamics can produce undesirable effects that could adversely affect vehicle stability and ride quality. In order to design distributed controls that can suppress these potential adverse effects, within the full capabilities of the actuation system, it is important to employ a systematic control design methodology such as this that can maximize the

  11. Near-field optical control of doughnut-shaped nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovkin, A. M.; Barillé, R.; Ortyl, E.; Zielinska, S.

    2015-01-01

    The application of a local near-field optical excitation with a control of the illumination time can be used to manage step-by-step the reshape of individual doughnut-shaped azopolymer nano-objects demonstrating their performances as a promising functional nano-objects. The possibility to provide a photoinduced reshaping opens a way to the fundamental study of size-dependent scaling laws of optical properties, photoinduced reshaping efficiency and possible nanoreactor or nanoresonator behaviors at nanometer scales. As an example the created nano-object is used to self-assembly polystyrene nanospheres in a supraball.

  12. A new metric to measure shape differences in fMRI activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khullar, Siddharth; Michael, Andrew M.; Correa, Nicolle; Adali, Tulay; Cahill, Nathan; Baum, Stefi A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel shape metric for quantification of shape differences between the spatial components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA) of group functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. This metric is utilized to measure the difference in shapes of the activation regions obtained from different subjects within a group (healthy controls or patients). The parameters comprising the metric are computed for each pixel on the outermost contour (edge) of an activation region for each slice. These parameters are in the form of (r, θ) pairs that may be interpreted as the length and orientation of a vector originating from the centroid of the activation region to the pixel belonging to the boundary contour. Using this information we extract three features that quantify the shape difference between the two shapes under observation. The reference and observation shapes may be selected in two ways: (a) activation maps from two different subjects or (b) mean activation map compared against subject-wise activations, as obtained from group ICA. We present different methods to visualize the shape differences, thus providing a tool to observe the spatial differences within a group or across groups. In addition to the above results, we also address a few special cases where two or more activation contours are present in a single slice and present potential solutions for accounting for these regions as special measures. Our results show that this metric has utility in creating a better understanding of the variability in brain activity among different groups of subjects performing the same task.

  13. Restricted Stimulus Control in Stimulus Control Shaping with a Capuchin Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Brino, Ana Leda F.; Galvão, Olavo F.; Barros, Romariz S.; Goulart, Paulo R. K.; McIlvane, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching the first instances of arbitrary matching to sample to nonhumans can prove difficult and time consuming. Stimulus control relations may develop that differ from those intended by the experimenter – even when stimulus control shaping procedures are used. This paper reports efforts to identify sources of shaping program failure with a capuchin monkey. Procedures began with a baseline of identity matching. During subsequent shaping trials, compound comparison stimuli had two components – one identical to and another different from the sample. The identical component was eliminated gradually by removing portions across trials (i.e., subtracting stimulus elements). The monkey performed accurately throughout shaping. At a late stage in the program, probe tests were conducted: (1) arbitrary matching trials that had all elements of the identical comparison removed and (2) other trials that included residual elements. During the test, the monkey performed at low levels on the former trials and higher levels on the latter. These results suggested that higher accuracy was due merely to continued control by the residual elements: the target arbitrary matching relations had not been learned. Thus, it appears that procedures that gradually transform identity matching baselines into arbitrary matching can fail by inadvertently shaping restricted control by residual elements. Subsequent probes at the end of the shaping series showed a successful transfer of stimulus control from identity to arbitrary matching after further programming steps apparently overcame the restricted stimulus control. PMID:24817994

  14. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  15. Midbrain volume segmentation using active shape models and LBPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olveres, Jimena; Nava, Rodrigo; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Cristóbal, Gabriel; García-Moreno, Carla María.

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to detect different brain structures such as midbrain, white matter, gray matter, corpus callosum, and cerebellum has increased. This fact together with the evidence that midbrain is associated with Parkinson's disease has led researchers to consider midbrain segmentation as an important issue. Nowadays, Active Shape Models (ASM) are widely used in literature for organ segmentation where the shape is an important discriminant feature. Nevertheless, this approach is based on the assumption that objects of interest are usually located on strong edges. Such a limitation may lead to a final shape far from the actual shape model. This paper proposes a novel method based on the combined use of ASM and Local Binary Patterns for segmenting midbrain. Furthermore, we analyzed several LBP methods and evaluated their performance. The joint-model considers both global and local statistics to improve final adjustments. The results showed that our proposal performs substantially better than the ASM algorithm and provides better segmentation measurements.

  16. Improvement of electron beam shape control in radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, A.; Fang, R.; Kuntz, F.

    1994-05-01

    The development of radiation processing using electron accelerators requires good control of the treatment parameters to improve the dosimetry quality. Especially, the analysis of the shape of the scanned electron beam that interacts with the product, is of prime necessity. A Multiwire Beam Shape Analyser (MBSA) has been developed by the AERIAL Laboratory in order to insure good monitoring of the scanning length and uniformity. This device consists of an aluminum beam-stop covered with a mesh of individually insulated stainless steel wires, placed under the scanning cone. The current generated by the impact of the electron beam on each wire is converted into voltage. After pulse shaping and multiplexing of the different channels, the beam profile can be displayed on an oscilloscope or on a PC screen. A prototype is now operating on an experimental irradiation plant based on a 2.5 MeV /300 W Van de Graaff electron accelerator. It allows almost continuous visualization of the beam profile (between two conveyor passes) and its response was compared to classical film dosimeters (Gafchromic, FWT 60.00). Considering FWHM and homogeneous treatment regions of the profiles, MBSA and the dosimeters give similar responses and variations remain lower than ± 12%. The acquisition of an electrical signal corresponding to the beam profile in air constitutes the original aspect of the MBSA and is in keeping with the general pattern of continuous control and automation of the irradiation processes. Hereafter, much work has to be done to adapt this device to an industrial use (higher energy, high power electron beams, non-destructive measurements…).

  17. Graphene blisters with switchable shapes controlled by pressure and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Boddeti, Narasimha G; Liu, Xinghui; Long, Rong; Xiao, Jianliang; Bunch, J Scott; Dunn, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    We created graphene blisters that cover and seal an annular cylinder-shaped microcavity in a SiO2 substrate filled with a gas. By controlling the pressure difference between the gas inside and outside of the microcavity, we switch the graphene membrane between multiple stable equilibrium configurations. We carried out experiments starting from the situation where the pressure of the gas inside and outside of the microcavity is set equal to a prescribed charging pressure, p0 and the graphene membrane covers the cavity like an annular drum, adhered to the central post and the surrounding substrate due to van der Waals forces. We decrease the outside pressure to a value, pe which causes it to bulge into an annular blister. We systematically increase the charging pressure by repeating this procedure causing the annular blister to continue to bulge until a critical charging pressure pc(i) is reached. At this point the graphene membrane delaminates from the post in an unstable manner, resulting in a switch of graphene membrane shape from an annular to a spherical blister. Continued increase of the charging pressure results in the spherical blister growing with its height increasing, but maintaining a constant radius until a second critical charging pressure pc(o) is reached at which point the blister begins to delaminate from the periphery of the cavity in a stable manner. Here, we report a series of experiments as well as a mechanics and thermodynamic model that demonstrate how the interplay among system parameters (geometry, graphene stiffness (number of layers), pressure, and adhesion energy) results in the ability to controllably switch graphene blisters among different shapes. Arrays of these blisters can be envisioned to create pressure-switchable surface properties where the difference between patterns of annular versus spherical blisters will impact functionalities such as wettability, friction, adhesion, and surface wave characteristics.

  18. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  19. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure.

    PubMed

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R

    2015-07-08

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes.

  20. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure

    PubMed Central

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes. PMID:26345083

  1. Pareto-front shape in multiobservable quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiuyang; Wu, Re-Bing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2017-03-01

    Many scenarios in the sciences and engineering require simultaneous optimization of multiple objective functions, which are usually conflicting or competing. In such problems the Pareto front, where none of the individual objectives can be further improved without degrading some others, shows the tradeoff relations between the competing objectives. This paper analyzes the Pareto-front shape for the problem of quantum multiobservable control, i.e., optimizing the expectation values of multiple observables in the same quantum system. Analytic and numerical results demonstrate that with two commuting observables the Pareto front is a convex polygon consisting of flat segments only, while with noncommuting observables the Pareto front includes convexly curved segments. We also assess the capability of a weighted-sum method to continuously capture the points along the Pareto front. Illustrative examples with realistic physical conditions are presented, including NMR control experiments on a 1H-13C two-spin system with two commuting or noncommuting observables.

  2. Shape-retainment control using an antagonistic shape memory alloy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, T.; Sawamura, K.; Senba, A.; Tamayama, M.

    2015-04-01

    Since shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators can generate large force per unit weight, they are expected as one of the next generation actuators for aircraft. To keep a position of conventional control surfaces or morphing wings with SMA actuators, the SMA actuators must keep being heated, and the heating energy is not small. To save the energy, a new control method proposed for piezoelectric actuators utilizing hysteresis in deformation [Ikeda and Takahashi, Proc. SPIE 8689 (2013), 86890C] is applied to an antagonistic SMA system. By using the control method any position can be an equilibrium point within hysteresis of stress-strain diagrams. To confirm a feasibility of the control method, a fundamental experiment is performed. The SMA wires are heated by applying electric current to the wires. When a pulsed current is applied to the two SMA wires alternately, the equilibrium position changes between two positions alternately, and when a series of pulse whose amplitude increases gradually is applied to one SMA wire, the equilibrium position changes like a staircase. However, just after the pulse the position returns slightly, that is, overshoot takes place. To investigate such a behavior of the system, numerical simulation is also performed. The one-dimensional phase transformation model [Ikeda, Proc. SPIE 5757 (2005), 344-352] is used for a constitutive model of the SMA wires. The simulated result agrees with the experiment qualitatively, including the overshoot. By examining volume fraction of each phase, it is found that the overshoot is caused by that austenite phase transforms into stress-induced martensite phase during the cooling process after the pulse.

  3. Active subthreshold dendritic conductances shape the local field potential

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Torbjørn V.; Remme, Michiel W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The local field potential (LFP), the low‐frequency part of extracellular potentials recorded in neural tissue, is often used for probing neural circuit activity. Interpreting the LFP signal is difficult, however.While the cortical LFP is thought mainly to reflect synaptic inputs onto pyramidal neurons, little is known about the role of the various subthreshold active conductances in shaping the LFP.By means of biophysical modelling we obtain a comprehensive qualitative understanding of how the LFP generated by a single pyramidal neuron depends on the type and spatial distribution of active subthreshold currents.For pyramidal neurons, the h‐type channels probably play a key role and can cause a distinct resonance in the LFP power spectrum.Our results show that the LFP signal can give information about the active properties of neurons and imply that preferred frequencies in the LFP can result from those cellular properties instead of, for example, network dynamics. Abstract The main contribution to the local field potential (LFP) is thought to stem from synaptic input to neurons and the ensuing subthreshold dendritic processing. The role of active dendritic conductances in shaping the LFP has received little attention, even though such ion channels are known to affect the subthreshold neuron dynamics. Here we used a modelling approach to investigate the effects of subthreshold dendritic conductances on the LFP. Using a biophysically detailed, experimentally constrained model of a cortical pyramidal neuron, we identified conditions under which subthreshold active conductances are a major factor in shaping the LFP. We found that, in particular, the hyperpolarization‐activated inward current, I h, can have a sizable effect and cause a resonance in the LFP power spectral density. To get a general, qualitative understanding of how any subthreshold active dendritic conductance and its cellular distribution can affect the LFP, we next performed a systematic

  4. Active control of combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Masoud, Nidal A.

    A theoretical analysis of active control of combustion thermo-acoustic instabilities is developed in this dissertation. The theoretical combustion model is based on the dynamics of a two-phase flow in a liquid-fueled propulsion system. The formulation is based on a generalized wave equation with pressure as the dependent variable, and accommodates all influences of combustion, mean flow, unsteady motions and control inputs. The governing partial differential equations are converted to an equivalent set of ordinary differential equations using Galerkin's method by expressing the unsteady pressure and velocity fields as functions of normal mode shapes of the chamber. This procedure yields a representation of the unsteady flow field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators that is used as a basis for controllers design. Major research attention is focused on the control of longitudinal oscillations with both linear and nonlinear processes being considered. Starting with a linear model using point actuators, the optimal locations of actuators and sensors are developed. The approach relies on the quantitative measures of the degree of controllability and component cost. These criterion are arrived at by considering the energies of the system's inputs and outputs. The optimality criteria for sensor and actuator locations provide a balance between the importance of the lower order (controlled) and the higher (residual) order modes. To address the issue of uncertainties in system's parameter, the minimax principles based controller is used. The minimax corresponds to finding the best controller for the worst parameter deviation. In other words, choosing controller parameters to minimize, and parameter deviation to maximize some quadratic performance metric. Using the minimax-based controller, a remarkable improvement in the control system's ability to handle parameter uncertainties is achieved when compared to the robustness of the regular control schemes such as LQR

  5. Shape-Dependent Surface Reactivity and Antimicrobial Activity of Nano-Cupric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Leanne M; Albalghiti, Eva M; Fishman, Zachary S; Perreault, François; Corredor, Charlie; Posner, Jonathan D; Elimelech, Menachem; Pfefferle, Lisa D; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2016-04-05

    Shape of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) can be used as a design handle to achieve controlled manipulation of physicochemical properties. This tailored material property approach necessitates the establishment of relationships between specific ENM properties that result from such manipulations (e.g., surface area, reactivity, or charge) and the observed trend in behavior, from both a functional performance and hazard perspective. In this study, these structure-property-function (SPF) and structure-property-hazard (SPH) relationships are established for nano-cupric oxide (n-CuO) as a function of shape, including nanospheres and nanosheets. In addition to comparing these shapes at the nanoscale, bulk CuO is studied to compare across length scales. The results from comprehensive material characterization revealed correlations between CuO surface reactivity and bacterial toxicity with CuO nanosheets having the highest surface reactivity, electrochemical activity, and antimicrobial activity. While less active than the nanosheets, CuO nanoparticles (sphere-like shape) demonstrated enhanced reactivity compared to the bulk CuO. This is in agreement with previous studies investigating differences across length-scales. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action to further explain the shape-dependent behavior, kinetic models applied to the toxicity data. In addition to revealing different CuO material kinetics, trends in observed response cannot be explained by surface area alone. The compiled results contribute to further elucidate pathways toward controlled design of ENMs.

  6. Recurrent circuitry dynamically shapes the activation of piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Franks, Kevin M; Russo, Marco J; Sosulski, Dara L; Mulligan, Abigail A; Siegelbaum, Steven A; Axel, Richard

    2011-10-06

    In the piriform cortex, individual odorants activate a unique ensemble of neurons that are distributed without discernable spatial order. Piriform neurons receive convergent excitatory inputs from random collections of olfactory bulb glomeruli. Pyramidal cells also make extensive recurrent connections with other excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We introduced channelrhodopsin into the piriform cortex to characterize these intrinsic circuits and to examine their contribution to activity driven by afferent bulbar inputs. We demonstrated that individual pyramidal cells are sparsely interconnected by thousands of excitatory synaptic connections that extend, largely undiminished, across the piriform cortex, forming a large excitatory network that can dominate the bulbar input. Pyramidal cells also activate inhibitory interneurons that mediate strong, local feedback inhibition that scales with excitation. This recurrent network can enhance or suppress bulbar input, depending on whether the input arrives before or after the cortex is activated. This circuitry may shape the ensembles of piriform cells that encode odorant identity.

  7. Chemical control of graphene architecture: tailoring shape and properties.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Raymond L D

    2014-10-28

    Single layer graphene and graphene oxide feature useful and occasionally unique properties by virtue of their two-dimensional structure. Given that there is a strong correlation between graphene architecture and its conductive, mechanical, chemical, and sorptive properties, which lead to useful technologies, the ability to systematically deform graphene into three-dimensional structures, therefore, provides a controllable, scalable route toward tailoring such properties in the final system. However, the advent of chemical methods to control graphene architecture is still coming to fruition and requires focused attention. The flexibility of the graphene system and the direct and indirect methods available to induce morphology changes of graphene sheets are first discussed in this review. Focus is then given toward chemical reactions that influence the shape of presynthesized graphene and graphene oxide sheets, from which a toolbox can be extrapolated and used in controlling the spatial arrangement of graphene sheets within composite materials and ultimately tailoring graphene-based device performance. Finally, the properties of three-dimensionally controlled graphene-based systems are highlighted for their use as batteries, strengthening additives, gas or liquid sorbents, chemical reactor platforms, and supercapacitors.

  8. Shape and aggregation control of nanoparticles: not shaken, not stirred.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Kaner, Richard B

    2006-01-25

    The aggregation of nanoparticles during synthesis, particularly the effect of mechanical agitation, is investigated from a viewpoint of nucleation using a conjugated polymer, polyaniline, as an example. Homogeneous nucleation of polyaniline results in nanofibers, while heterogeneous nucleation leads to granular particulates. Mechanical agitation, which is a common method for disrupting aggregates, instead dramatically triggers aggregation during the synthetic process and favors the formation of granular particulates. Correlating the shape and aggregation of polyaniline nanoparticles with the mode of nucleation, a new aggregation mechanism is proposed in which aggregation is triggered by heterogeneous nucleation. The mechanism may be quite general as indicated by experiments with other materials such as silica nanoparticles. Highly dispersible polyaniline nanofibers can now be reproducibly prepared from a conventional reaction simply by not mechanically agitating the reaction and carrying it out at an elevated temperature. This work may prove to be of great value in reproducibly synthesizing nanoparticles with well-controlled sizes and shapes and in effectively preventing aggregation in chemical, pharmaceutical, and materials production processes.

  9. Shaped optimal control pulses for increased excitation bandwidth in EPR.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Philipp E; Zhang, Yun; Endeward, Burkhard; Gershernzon, Naum; Skinner, Thomas E; Glaser, Steffen J; Prisner, Thomas F

    2012-05-01

    A 1 ns resolution pulse shaping unit has been developed for pulsed EPR spectroscopy to enable 14-bit amplitude and phase modulation. Shaped broadband excitation pulses designed using optimal control theory (OCT) have been tested with this device at X-band frequency (9 GHz). FT-EPR experiments on organic radicals in solution have been performed with the new pulses, designed for uniform excitation over a significantly increased bandwidth compared to a classical rectangular π/2 pulse of the same B(1) amplitude. The concept of a dead-time compensated prefocused pulse has been introduced to EPR with a self-refocusing of 200 ns after the end of the pulse. Echo-like refocused signals have been recorded and compared to the performance of a classical Hahn-echo sequence. The impulse response function of the microwave setup has been measured and incorporated into the algorithm for designing OCT pulses, resulting in further significant improvements in performance. Experimental limitations and potential new applications of OCT pulses in EPR spectroscopy will be discussed.

  10. Water levels shape fishing participation in flood-control reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Meals, K. O.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the relationship between fishing effort (hours fished) and average March–May water level in 3 flood control reservoirs in Mississippi. Fishing effort increased as water level rose, peaked at intermediate water levels, and decreased at high water levels. We suggest that the observed arched-shaped relationship is driven by the shifting influence of fishability (adequacy of the fishing circumstances from an angler's perspective) and catch rate along a water level continuum. Fishability reduces fishing effort during low water, despite the potential for higher catch rates. Conversely, reduced catch rates and fishability at high water also curtail effort. Thus, both high and low water levels seem to discourage fishing effort, whereas anglers seem to favor intermediate water levels. Our results have implications for water level management in reservoirs with large water level fluctuations.

  11. Sample Stimulus Control Shaping and Restricted Stimulus Control in Capuchin Monkeys: A Methodological Note

    PubMed Central

    Brino, Ana Leda F; Barros, Romariz S; Galvão, Olavo F; Garotti, M; da Cruz, Ilara R. N; Santos, José R; Dube, William V; McIlvane, William J

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports use of sample stimulus control shaping procedures to teach arbitrary matching-to-sample to 2 capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). The procedures started with identity matching-to-sample. During shaping, stimulus features of the sample were altered gradually, rendering samples and comparisons increasingly physically dissimilar. The objective was to transform identity matching into arbitrary matching (i.e., matching not based on common physical features of the sample and comparison stimuli). Experiment 1 used a two-comparison procedure. The shaping procedure was ultimately effective, but occasional high error rates at certain program steps inspired a follow-up study. Experiment 2 used the same basic approach, but with a three-comparison matching task. During shaping, the monkey performed accurately until the final steps of the program. Subsequent experimentation tested the hypothesis that the decrease in accuracy was due to restricted stimulus control by sample stimulus features that had not yet been changed in the shaping program. Results were consistent with this hypothesis, thus suggesting a new approach that may transform the sample stimulus control shaping procedure from a sometimes useful laboratory tool to a more general approach to teaching the first instance of arbitrary matching performances to participants who show protracted difficulties in learning such performances. PMID:21547073

  12. Sample stimulus control shaping and restricted stimulus control in capuchin monkeys: a methodological note.

    PubMed

    Brino, Ana Leda F; Barros, Romariz S; Galvão, Olavo F; Garotti, M; da Cruz, Ilara R N; Santos, José R; Dube, William V; McIlvane, William J

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports use of sample stimulus control shaping procedures to teach arbitrary matching-to-sample to 2 capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). The procedures started with identity matching-to-sample. During shaping, stimulus features of the sample were altered gradually, rendering samples and comparisons increasingly physically dissimilar. The objective was to transform identity matching into arbitrary matching (i.e., matching not based on common physical features of the sample and comparison stimuli). Experiment 1 used a two-comparison procedure. The shaping procedure was ultimately effective, but occasional high error rates at certain program steps inspired a follow-up study. Experiment 2 used the same basic approach, but with a three-comparison matching task. During shaping, the monkey performed accurately until the final steps of the program. Subsequent experimentation tested the hypothesis that the decrease in accuracy was due to restricted stimulus control by sample stimulus features that had not yet been changed in the shaping program. Results were consistent with this hypothesis, thus suggesting a new approach that may transform the sample stimulus control shaping procedure from a sometimes useful laboratory tool to a more general approach to teaching the first instance of arbitrary matching performances to participants who show protracted difficulties in learning such performances.

  13. Laser-activated shape memory polymer intravascular thrombectomy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Ward, IV; Wilson, Thomas S.; Benett, William J.; Loge, Jeffrey M.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2005-10-01

    A blood clot (thrombus) that becomes lodged in the arterial network supplying the brain can cause an ischemic stroke, depriving the brain of oxygen and often resulting in permanent disability. As an alternative to conventional clot-dissolving drug treatment, we are developing an intravascular laser-activated therapeutic device using shape memory polymer (SMP) to mechanically retrieve the thrombus and restore blood flow to the brain. Thermal imaging and computer simulation were used to characterize the optical and photothermal behavior of the SMP microactuator. Deployment of the SMP device in an in vitro thrombotic vascular occlusion model demonstrated the clinical treatment concept.

  14. Adaptive beam shaping by controlled thermal lensing in optical elements.

    PubMed

    Arain, Muzammil A; Quetschke, Volker; Gleason, Joseph; Williams, Luke F; Rakhmanov, Malik; Lee, Jinho; Cruz, Rachel J; Mueller, Guido; Tanner, D B; Reitze, David H

    2007-04-20

    We describe an adaptive optical system for use as a tunable focusing element. The system provides adaptive beam shaping via controlled thermal lensing in the optical elements. The system is agile, remotely controllable, touch free, and vacuum compatible; it offers a wide dynamic range, aberration-free focal length tuning, and can provide both positive and negative lensing effects. Focusing is obtained through dynamic heating of an optical element by an external pump beam. The system is especially suitable for use in interferometric gravitational wave interferometers employing high laser power, allowing for in situ control of the laser modal properties and compensation for thermal lensing of the primary laser. Using CO(2) laser heating of fused-silica substrates, we demonstrate a focal length variable from infinity to 4.0 m, with a slope of 0.082 diopter/W of absorbed heat. For on-axis operation, no higher-order modes are introduced by the adaptive optical element. Theoretical modeling of the induced optical path change and predicted thermal lens agrees well with measurement.

  15. Passive and active pulse stacking scheme for pulse shaping

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Schipper, John F.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing a sequence of radiation pulses with a pulse envelope of time variation which is controllable by an external electromagnetic signal applied to an active medium or by a sectored reflector, through which the radiation passes.

  16. Shape control of composite plates and shells with embedded actuators. 2: Desired shape specified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koconis, David B.; Kollar, Laszlo P.; Springer, George S.

    The changes in shapes of fiber-reinforced composite beams, plates and shells affected by embedded piezoelectric actuators were investigated. An analytical method was developed to determine the voltages needed to achieve a specified desired shape. The method is formulated on the basis of mathematical models using two-dimensional, linear, shallow shell theory including transverse shear effects which are important in the case of sandwich construction. The solution technique is a minimization of an error function which is a measure of the difference between the deformed shape caused by the application of voltages and the desired shape. A computationally efficient, user-friendly computer code was written which is suitable for performing the numerical calculations. The code, designated as SHAPE2, gives the voltages needed to achieve specified changes in shape. To validate the method and the computer code, results generated by the code were compared to existing analytical and experimental results. The predictions provided by the SHAPE2 code were in excellent agreement with the results of the other analyses and data.

  17. Pupil segmentation using active contour with shape prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukpai, Charles O.; Dlay, Satnam S.; Woo, Wai L.

    2015-03-01

    Iris segmentation is the process of defining the valid part of the eye image used for further processing (feature extraction, matching and decision making). Segmentation of the iris mostly starts with pupil boundary segmentation. Most pupil segmentation techniques are based on the assumption that the pupil is circular shape. In this paper, we propose a new pupil segmentation technique which combines shape, location and spatial information for accurate and efficient segmentation of the pupil. Initially, the pupil's position and radius is estimated using a statistical approach and circular Hough transform. In order to segment the irregular boundary of the pupil, an active contour model is initialized close to the estimated boundary using information from the first step and segmentation is achieved using energy minimization based active contour. Pre-processing and post-processing were carried out to remove noise and occlusions respectively. Experimental results on CASIA V1.0 and 4.0 shows that the proposed method is highly effective at segmenting irregular boundaries of the pupil.

  18. Active control of convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    1991-12-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that active (feedback) control can be used to alter the characteristics of thermal convection in a toroidal, vertical loop heated from below and cooled from above. As the temperature difference between the heated and cooled sections of the loop increases, the flow in the uncontrolled loop changes from no motion to steady, time-independent motion to temporally oscillatory, chaotic motion. With the use of a feedback controller effecting small perturbations in the boundary conditions, one can maintain the no-motion state at significantly higher temperature differences than the critical one corresponding to the onset of convection in the uncontrolled system. Alternatively, one can maintain steady, time-independent flow under conditions in which the flow would otherwise be chaotic. That is, the controller can be used to suppress chaos. Likewise, it is possible to stabilize periodic nonstable orbits that exist in the chaotic regime of the uncontrolled system. Finally, the controller also can be used to induce chaos in otherwise laminar (fully predictable), nonchaotic flow.

  19. Social Support Can Buffer against Stress and Shape Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hostinar, Camelia E.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Social support from close relationship partners is an important resource for coping with stress, particularly during childhood. We discuss ethical challenges associated with studying stress and its social buffering in the laboratory, as well as emerging evidence regarding two potential neural substrates for the social buffering of stress: hypothalamic oxytocin activity and activation of areas in the prefrontal cortex associated with effective self-regulation. We also address the role of early-life social experiences in shaping brain development, as well as recommendations for practice and policy that would advance the ethical treatment of children and reduce social inequalities in early-life experiences and opportunities–e.g., investing in programs that prevent child maltreatment and facilitating access to high-quality child care for economically disadvantaged families. We also debate the ethical implications of using oxytocin nasal sprays to simulate the stress-reducing properties of social support and advise waiting for more evidence before recommending their use. PMID:26478822

  20. Tuning selectivity in catalysis by controlling particle shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ilkeun; Delbecq, Françoise; Morales, Ricardo; Albiter, Manuel A.; Zaera, Francisco

    2009-02-01

    A catalytic process for the selective formation of cis olefins would help minimize the production of unhealthy trans fats during the partial hydrogenation of edible oils. Here we report on the design of such a process on the basis of studies with model systems. Temperature programmed desorption data on single crystals showed that the isomerization of trans olefins to their cis counterparts is promoted by (111) facets of platinum, and that such selectivity is reversed on more open surfaces. Quantum mechanics calculations suggested that the extra stability of cis olefins seen on hydrogen-saturated Pt(111) surfaces may be due to a lesser degree of surface reconstruction, a factor found to be significant in the adsorption on close-packed platinum surfaces. Kinetic data using catalysts made out of dispersed tetrahedral Pt nanoparticles corroborated the selective promotion of the trans-to-cis isomerization on the (111) facets of the metal. Our work provides an example for how catalytic selectivity may be controlled by controlling the shape of the catalytic particles.

  1. Modeling, analysis, and validation of an active T-shaped noise barrier.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rongping; Su, Zhongqing; Cheng, Li

    2013-09-01

    With ever-increasing land traffic, abatement of traffic noise using noise barriers remains significant, yet it is a challenging task due to spatial competition with other infrastructure. In this study, a deep insight into the diffraction characteristics of acoustic fields near noise barriers of various geometries and surface conditions was achieved using numerical simulations. A T-shaped passive noise barrier with acoustically soft upper surfaces was demonstrated to outperform other candidates in a middle- or high-frequency range. Based on attributes of the acoustic field diffracted by T-shaped barriers, an active control strategy was developed to revamp the T-shaped barrier, in which a filtered minimax algorithm was established to drive the secondary sound sources. This algorithm resulted in more uniformly distributed residual sound fields than a filtered-X least mean square algorithm. Performance of the actively controlled barrier was evaluated at different positions and spacings of secondary sound sources and error sensors, leading to a series of optimal criteria for the design of active noise barriers. A prototype was fabricated and validated experimentally, manifesting particular effectiveness in insulating low-frequency noise, supplementing well the capacity of a passive T-shaped barrier which is effective in the middle- or high-frequency range.

  2. Preliminary Assessment of Optimal Longitudinal-Mode Control for Drag Reduction through Distributed Aeroelastic Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Corey; Nguyen, Nhan; Lohn, Jason; Dolan, John

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of advanced lightweight materials is resulting in a new generation of lighter, flexible, more-efficient airframes that are enabling concepts for active aeroelastic wing-shape control to achieve greater flight efficiency and increased safety margins. These elastically shaped aircraft concepts require non-traditional methods for large-scale multi-objective flight control that simultaneously seek to gain aerodynamic efficiency in terms of drag reduction while performing traditional command-tracking tasks as part of a complete guidance and navigation solution. This paper presents results from a preliminary study of a notional multi-objective control law for an aeroelastic flexible-wing aircraft controlled through distributed continuous leading and trailing edge control surface actuators. This preliminary study develops and analyzes a multi-objective control law derived from optimal linear quadratic methods on a longitudinal vehicle dynamics model with coupled aeroelastic dynamics. The controller tracks commanded attack-angle while minimizing drag and controlling wing twist and bend. This paper presents an overview of the elastic aircraft concept, outlines the coupled vehicle model, presents the preliminary control law formulation and implementation, presents results from simulation, provides analysis, and concludes by identifying possible future areas for research

  3. Bio-inspired smart single asymmetric hourglass nanochannels for continuous shape and ion transport control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huacheng; Hou, Xu; Yang, Zhe; Yan, Dadong; Li, Lin; Tian, Ye; Wang, Huanting; Jiang, Lei

    2015-02-18

    Inspired by biological asymmetric ion channels, new shape-tunable and pH-responsive asymmetric hourglass single nanochannel systems demonstrate unique ion-transport properties. It is found that the change in shape and pH cooperatively control the ion transport within the nanochannel ranging from asymmetric shape with asymmetric ion transport, to asymmetric shape with symmetric ion transport and symmetric shape with symmetric ion transport.

  4. Mesoscale architecture shapes initiation and richness of spontaneous network activity.

    PubMed

    Okujeni, Samora; Kandler, Steffen; Egert, Ulrich

    2017-03-14

    Spontaneous activity in the absence of external input, including propagating waves of activity, is a robust feature of neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. The neurophysiological and anatomical requirements for initiation and persistence of such activity, however, are poorly understood, as is their role in the function of neuronal networks. Computational network studies indicate that clustered connectivity may foster the generation, maintenance and richness of spontaneous activity. Since this mesoscale architecture cannot be systematically modified in intact tissue, testing these predictions is impracticable in vivo. Here, we investigate how the mesoscale structure shapes spontaneous activity in generic networks of rat cortical neurons in vitro. In these networks, neurons spontaneously arrange into local clusters with high neurite density and form fasciculating long-range axons. We modified this structure by modulation of protein kinase C, an enzyme regulating neurite growth and cell migration. Inhibition of protein kinase C reduced neuronal aggregation and fasciculation of axons, i.e. promoted uniform architecture. Conversely, activation of protein kinase C promoted aggregation of neurons into clusters, local connectivity and bundling of long-range axons. Supporting predictions from theory, clustered networks were more spontaneously active and generated diverse activity patterns. Neurons within clusters received stronger synaptic inputs and displayed increased membrane potential fluctuations. Intensified clustering promoted the initiation of synchronous bursting events but entailed incomplete network recruitment. Moderately clustered networks appear optimal for initiation and propagation of diverse patterns of activity. Our findings support a crucial role of the mesoscale architectures in the regulation of spontaneous activity dynamics.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTComputational studies predict richer and persisting spatio-temporal patterns of spontaneous activity in

  5. Learning shapes spontaneous activity itinerating over memorized states.

    PubMed

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-03-08

    Learning is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems so that an appropriate output pattern is generated for a given input. Often, such a memory is considered to be included in one of the attractors in neural dynamical systems, depending on the initial neural state specified by an input. Neither neural activities observed in the absence of inputs nor changes caused in the neural activity when an input is provided were studied extensively in the past. However, recent experimental studies have reported existence of structured spontaneous neural activity and its changes when an input is provided. With this background, we propose that memory recall occurs when the spontaneous neural activity changes to an appropriate output activity upon the application of an input, and this phenomenon is known as bifurcation in the dynamical systems theory. We introduce a reinforcement-learning-based layered neural network model with two synaptic time scales; in this network, I/O relations are successively memorized when the difference between the time scales is appropriate. After the learning process is complete, the neural dynamics are shaped so that it changes appropriately with each input. As the number of memorized patterns is increased, the generated spontaneous neural activity after learning shows itineration over the previously learned output patterns. This theoretical finding also shows remarkable agreement with recent experimental reports, where spontaneous neural activity in the visual cortex without stimuli itinerate over evoked patterns by previously applied signals. Our results suggest that itinerant spontaneous activity can be a natural outcome of successive learning of several patterns, and it facilitates bifurcation of the network when an input is provided.

  6. Shape-controlled continuous synthesis of metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Victor; Smith, Christopher D.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2016-03-01

    A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a thickness of 1.5 nm; and Pt nanocubes with a 5.6 nm edge length, all in a synthesis time as low as 150 s.A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a

  7. Biomedical Applications of Thermally Activated Shape Memory Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Singhal, P; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2009-04-10

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs.

  8. Biomedical applications of thermally activated shape memory polymers†

    PubMed Central

    Small, Ward; Singhal, Pooja; Wilson, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs. PMID:21258605

  9. Abdomen and spinal cord segmentation with augmented active shape models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhoubing; Conrad, Benjamin N; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Smith, Seth A; Poulose, Benjamin K; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-07-01

    Active shape models (ASMs) have been widely used for extracting human anatomies in medical images given their capability for shape regularization of topology preservation. However, sensitivity to model initialization and local correspondence search often undermines their performances, especially around highly variable contexts in computed-tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. In this study, we propose an augmented ASM (AASM) by integrating the multiatlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques into the traditional ASM framework. Using AASM, landmark updates are optimized globally via a region-based LS evolution applied on the probability map generated from MALF. This augmentation effectively extends the searching range of correspondent landmarks while reducing sensitivity to the image contexts and improves the segmentation robustness. We propose the AASM framework as a two-dimensional segmentation technique targeting structures with one axis of regularity. We apply AASM approach to abdomen CT and spinal cord (SC) MR segmentation challenges. On 20 CT scans, the AASM segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous/visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. On 28 3T MR scans, AASM yields better performances than other state-of-the-art approaches in segmenting white/gray matter in SC.

  10. Shape-controlled synthesis of Pd nanocrystals and their catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Jin, Mingshang; Xiong, Yujie; Lim, Byungkwon; Xia, Younan

    2013-08-20

    Palladium is a marvelous catalyst for a rich variety of reactions in industrial processes and commercial devices. Most Pd-catalyzed reactions exhibit structure sensitivity, meaning that the activity or selectivity depends on the arrangement of atoms on the surface. Previously, such reactions could only be studied in ultrahigh vacuum using Pd single crystals cut with a specific crystallographic plane. However, these model catalysts are far different from real catalytic systems owing to the absence of atoms at corners and edges and the extremely small specific surface areas for the model systems. Indeed, enhancing the performance of a Pd-based catalyst, in part to reduce the amount needed of this precious and rare metal for a given reaction, requires the use of Pd with the highest possible specific surface area. Recent advances in nanocrystal synthesis are offering a great opportunity to investigate and quantify the structural sensitivity of catalysts based on Pd and other metals. For a structure-sensitive reaction, the catalytic properties of Pd nanocrystals are strongly dependent on both the size and shape. The shape plays a more significant role in controlling activity and selectivity, because the shape controls not only the facets but also the proportions of surface atoms at corners, edges, and planes, which affect the outcomes of possible reactions. We expect catalysts based on Pd nanocrystals with optimized shapes to meet the increasing demands of industrial applications at reduced loadings and costs. In this Account, we discuss recent advances in the synthesis of Pd nanocrystals with controlled shapes and their resulting performance as catalysts for a large number of reactions. First, we review various synthetic strategies based on oxidative etching, surface capping, and kinetic control that have been used to direct the shapes of nanocrystals. When crystal growth is under thermodynamic control, the capping agent plays a pivotal role in determining the shape of

  11. Sand availability control on dune shape and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clement; Rozier, Olivier; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain

    2015-04-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that sand availability does not only control dune type but also the underlying dune growth mechanism. Consequently, the same wind regime can produce different bedform orientations. Here, we use numerical simulations with different conditions of sand availability to predict dune shape and alignment in asymmetric bimodal wind regimes. In zones of abundant sand supply, linear dunes grow in height and propagate selecting the orientation for which the normal to crest components of transport reaches a maximum. In zones of limited sand supply, linear dunes grow by extension in the direction of the resultant sand flux. Considering these two independent dune growth mechanisms, we find good agreement between numerical and analytical models, and estimate the magnitude of wind velocity acceleration up the dune stoss slopes. In the extensional mode of linear dune formation, there is no abrupt change in dune trend when the divergence angle between the two winds crosses 90°. Instead, there are systematic transitions in dune type from linear to barchan for critical values of the divergence angle that depend on the transport ratio. We show how the growth rates of the two dune growth mechanisms may be used to infer the dune field morphology in zones of low sediment availability.

  12. Geometric shape control of thin film ferroelectrics and resulting structures

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    2000-01-01

    A monolithic crystalline structure and a method of making involves a semiconductor substrate, such as silicon, and a ferroelectric film, such as BaTiO.sub.3, overlying the surface of the substrate wherein the atomic layers of the ferroelectric film directly overlie the surface of the substrate. By controlling the geometry of the ferroelectric thin film, either during build-up of the thin film or through appropriate treatment of the thin film adjacent the boundary thereof, the in-plane tensile strain within the ferroelectric film is relieved to the extent necessary to permit the ferroelectric film to be poled out-of-plane, thereby effecting in-plane switching of the polarization of the underlying substrate material. The method of the invention includes the steps involved in effecting a discontinuity of the mechanical restraint at the boundary of the ferroelectric film atop the semiconductor substrate by, for example, either removing material from a ferroelectric film which has already been built upon the substrate, building up a ferroelectric film upon the substrate in a mesa-shaped geometry or inducing the discontinuity at the boundary by ion beam deposition techniques.

  13. Control of atomic transition rates via laser-light shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáuregui, R.

    2015-04-01

    A modular systematic analysis of the feasibility of modifying atomic transition rates by tailoring the electromagnetic field of an external coherent light source is presented. The formalism considers both the center of mass and internal degrees of freedom of the atom, and all properties of the field: frequency, angular spectrum, and polarization. General features of recoil effects for internal forbidden transitions are discussed. A comparative analysis of different structured light sources is explicitly worked out. It includes spherical waves, Gaussian beams, Laguerre-Gaussian beams, and propagation invariant beams with closed analytical expressions. It is shown that increments in the order of magnitude of the transition rates for Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian beams, with respect to those obtained in the paraxial limit, require waists of the order of the wavelength, while propagation invariant modes may considerably enhance transition rates under more favorable conditions. For transitions that can be naturally described as modifications of the atomic angular momentum, this enhancement is maximal (within propagation invariant beams) for Bessel modes, Mathieu modes can be used to entangle the internal and center-of-mass involved states, and Weber beams suppress this kind of transition unless they have a significant component of odd modes. However, if a recoil effect of the transition with an adequate symmetry is allowed, the global transition rate (center of mass and internal motion) can also be enhanced using Weber modes. The global analysis presented reinforces the idea that a better control of the transitions between internal atomic states requires both a proper control of the available states of the atomic center of mass, and shaping of the background electromagnetic field.

  14. Thermally activated retainer means utilizing shape memory alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimaldi, Margaret E. (Inventor); Hartz, Leslie S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A retainer member suitable for retaining a gap filler placed in gaps between adjacent tile members is presented. One edge of the retainer member may be attached to the gap filler and another edge may be provided with a plurality of tab members which in an intermediate position do not interfere with placement or removal of the gap filler between tile members. The retainer member may be fabricated from a shape memory alloy which when heated to a specified memory temperature will thermally activate the tab members to predetermined memory positions engaging the tile members to retain the gap filler in the gap. This invention has particular application to the thermal tiles on space vehicles such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  15. Plasmonic and Catalytic Properties of Shape-Controlled Metal Nanoparticles and their Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkova, Anna

    This work explores the effect of the shape of metal nanoscale building blocks on the structural, optical, and plasmonic properties of their assemblies, as well as on the catalytic performance and hydrogen interactions of individual nanoparticles with specific shapes. In Chapter 3, I describe the linear self-assembly of bifunctional metal nanoparticles in the presence of monofunctional nanoscale chain stoppers. Chain stoppers with controlled reactivity were synthesized allowing control over the morphology of the self-assembled structures. Analysis of the degree of polymerization of linear nanostructures provided information about self-assembly kinetics, side reactions, and the distribution of species in the reaction. This work facilitated testing of theoretical models developed for molecular polymerization and fabrication of linear nanoparticle assemblies with controllable properties. In Chapter 4, I developed linear solution-based self-assembly of cubic metal nanoparticles, examined the morphology of the nanocube chains and their optical characteristics. In comparison with chains of nanospheres with similar dimensions, compositions, and surface chemistry, predominant face-to-face assembly of nanocubes leads to a larger volume of plasmonic hot spots, uniform electromagnetic field enhancement in the gaps between nanocubes, and a new coupling mode for nanocube chains, associated with Fabry-Perot structure. In Chapter 5, I investigated plasmon-mediated enhancement of the catalysis by palladium-based nanoparticles with different shapes and composition, bearing surface plasmon resonance in visible range. The photocatalytic activity of palladium-based nanoparticles depended more on their shape than internal structure. These findings pave the way for the design of palladium nanocatalysts with enhanced performance acting under visible light illumination. In Chapter 6, I developed a facile scaled-up synthesis of monodisperse palladium nanoparticles with various shapes

  16. Wind Tunnel Test of an RPV with Shape-Change Control Effector and Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Sloan, Adam R.; Barnwell, William G.; Lion, S. Todd; Hautamaki, Bret A.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of novel control effector concepts have recently emerged that may enable new approaches to flight control. In particular, the potential exists to shift the composition of the typical aircraft control effector suite from a small number of high authority, specialized devices (rudder, aileron, elevator, flaps), toward larger numbers of smaller, less specialized, distributed device arrays. The concept envisions effector and sensor networks composed of relatively small high-bandwidth devices able to simultaneously perform a variety of control functions using feedback from disparate data sources. To investigate this concept, a remotely piloted flight vehicle has been equipped with an array of 24 trailing edge shape-change effectors and associated pressure measurements. The vehicle, called the Multifunctional Effector and Sensor Array (MESA) testbed, was recently tested in NASA Langley's 12-ft Low Speed wind tunnel to characterize its stability properties, control authorities, and distributed pressure sensitivities for use in a dynamic simulation prior to flight testing. Another objective was to implement and evaluate a scheme for actively controlling the spanwise pressure distribution using the shape-change array. This report describes the MESA testbed, design of the pressure distribution controller, and results of the wind tunnel test.

  17. Prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons shape neuronal activity to drive fear expression.

    PubMed

    Courtin, Julien; Chaudun, Fabrice; Rozeske, Robert R; Karalis, Nikolaos; Gonzalez-Campo, Cecilia; Wurtz, Hélène; Abdi, Azzedine; Baufreton, Jerome; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2014-01-02

    Synchronization of spiking activity in neuronal networks is a fundamental process that enables the precise transmission of information to drive behavioural responses. In cortical areas, synchronization of principal-neuron spiking activity is an effective mechanism for information coding that is regulated by GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons through the generation of neuronal oscillations. Although neuronal synchrony has been demonstrated to be crucial for sensory, motor and cognitive processing, it has not been investigated at the level of defined circuits involved in the control of emotional behaviour. Converging evidence indicates that fear behaviour is regulated by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). This control over fear behaviour relies on the activation of specific prefrontal projections to the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), a structure that encodes associative fear memories. However, it remains to be established how the precise temporal control of fear behaviour is achieved at the level of prefrontal circuits. Here we use single-unit recordings and optogenetic manipulations in behaving mice to show that fear expression is causally related to the phasic inhibition of prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons (PVINs). Inhibition of PVIN activity disinhibits prefrontal projection neurons and synchronizes their firing by resetting local theta oscillations, leading to fear expression. Our results identify two complementary neuronal mechanisms mediated by PVINs that precisely coordinate and enhance the neuronal activity of prefrontal projection neurons to drive fear expression.

  18. Shape and composition-controlled platinum alloy nanocrystals using carbon monoxide as reducing agent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbo; Gross, Adam; Yang, Hong

    2011-02-09

    The shape of metal alloy nanocrystals plays an important role in catalytic performances. Many methods developed so far in controlling the morphologies of nanocrystals are however limited by the synthesis that is often material and shape specific. Here we show using a gas reducing agent in liquid solution (GRAILS) method, different Pt alloy (Pt-M, M = Co, Fe, Ni, Pd) nanocrystals with cubic and octahedral morphologies can be prepared under the same kind of reducing reaction condition. A broad range of compositions can also be obtained for these Pt alloy nanocrystals. Thus, this GRAILS method is a general approach to the preparation of uniform shape and composition-controlled Pt alloy nanocrystals. The area-specific oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities of Pt(3)Ni catalysts at 0.9 V are 0.85 mA/cm(2)(Pt) for the nanocubes, and 1.26 mA/cm(2)(Pt) for the nanooctahedra. The ORR mass activity of the octahedral Pt(3)Ni catalyst reaches 0.44 A/mg(Pt).

  19. Shaping tissues by balancing active forces and geometric constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foolen, Jasper; Yamashita, Tadahiro; Kollmannsberger, Philip

    2016-02-01

    The self-organization of cells into complex tissues during growth and regeneration is a combination of physical-mechanical events and biochemical signal processing. Cells actively generate forces at all stages in this process, and according to the laws of mechanics, these forces result in stress fields defined by the geometric boundary conditions of the cell and tissue. The unique ability of cells to translate such force patterns into biochemical information and vice versa sets biological tissues apart from any other material. In this topical review, we summarize the current knowledge and open questions of how forces and geometry act together on scales from the single cell to tissues and organisms, and how their interaction determines biological shape and structure. Starting with a planar surface as the simplest type of geometric constraint, we review literature on how forces during cell spreading and adhesion together with geometric constraints impact cell shape, stress patterns, and the resulting biological response. We then move on to include cell-cell interactions and the role of forces in monolayers and in collective cell migration, and introduce curvature at the transition from flat cell sheets to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Fibrous 3D environments, as cells experience them in the body, introduce new mechanical boundary conditions and change cell behaviour compared to flat surfaces. Starting from early work on force transmission and collagen remodelling, we discuss recent discoveries on the interaction with geometric constraints and the resulting structure formation and network organization in 3D. Recent literature on two physiological scenarios—embryonic development and bone—is reviewed to demonstrate the role of the force-geometry balance in living organisms. Furthermore, the role of mechanics in pathological scenarios such as cancer is discussed. We conclude by highlighting common physical principles guiding cell mechanics, tissue patterning and

  20. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  1. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: New method to control the shape of spectral characteristics of Bragg gratings in electrooptical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamrai, A. V.; Kozlov, A. S.; Il'ichev, I. V.; Petrov, Mikhail P.

    2005-08-01

    A new method is proposed to control the shape of spectral characteristics of Bragg gratings, which is based on the introduction of electrically controlled shifts of the average refractive index. The shape of the spectral characteristics of Bragg gratings with a complex step structure of the spatial distribution of the average refractive index is calculated. The operative electric control of their shape in a channel optical LiNbO3 crystal waveguide is experimentally demonstrated.

  2. Cell Shape and Negative Links in Regulatory Motifs Together Control Spatial Information Flow in Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Susana R.; Tsokas, Panayiotis; Sarkar, Anamika; Grace, Elizabeth A.; Rangamani, Padmini; Taubenfeld, Stephen M.; Alberini, Cristina M.; Schaff, James C.; Blitzer, Robert D.; Moraru, Ion I.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Summary The role of cell size and shape in controlling local intracellular signaling reactions, and how this spatial information originates and is propagated, is not well understood. We have used partial differential equations to model the flow of spatial information from the β-adrenergic receptor to MAPK1,2 through the cAMP/PKA/B-Raf/MAPK1,2 network in neurons using real geometries. The numerical simulations indicated that cell shape controls the dynamics of local biochemical activity of signal-modulated negative regulators, such as phosphodiesterases and protein phosphatases within regulatory loops to determine the size of microdomains of activated signaling components. The model prediction that negative regulators control the flow of spatial information to downstream components was verified experimentally in rat hippocampal slices. These results suggest a mechanism by which cellular geometry, the presence of regulatory loops with negative regulators, and key reaction rates all together control spatial information transfer and microdomain characteristics within cells. PMID:18485874

  3. Passive control of a sphere by complex-shaped appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Olivieri, Stefano; Mazzino, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Appendages of various shapes and sizes (e.g. plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins) play an important role in dispersion and locomotion. In our previous work (Lacis, U. et al. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking. Nat. Commun. 5:5310, doi: 10.1038/ncomms6310, 2014), we showed that a free-falling cylinder with a splitter plate turns and drifts due to a symmetry-breaking instability (called inverted-pendulum instability or IPL). In other words, in a separated flow, the straight position of a short splitter plate is unstable and as a consequence a side force and a torque are induced on the cylinder. In this work, we seek the three-dimensional (3D) appendage shape (on a sphere at Re =200) that induces the largest drift of the sphere. We find that highly non-trivial shapes of appendages on a sphere increase the side force significantly compared to trivial shapes (such as an elliptic sheet). We also find that appendages may be designed to generate drift in either direction, that is, a free-falling sphere can drift either in the direction in which appendage is tilted or in the opposite direction depending on the particular geometry of the appendage. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind these optimal appendage shapes in the context of the IPL instability.

  4. Interface Shape Control Using Localized Heating during Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Croll, A.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical calculations were performed to assess the effect of localized radial heating on the melt-crystal interface shape during vertical Bridgman growth. System parameters examined include the ampoule, melt and crystal thermal conductivities, the magnitude and width of localized heating, and the latent heat of crystallization. Concave interface shapes, typical of semiconductor systems, could be flattened or made convex with localized heating. Although localized heating caused shallower thermal gradients ahead of the interface, the magnitude of the localized heating required for convexity was less than that which resulted in a thermal inversion ahead of the interface. A convex interface shape was most readily achieved with ampoules of lower thermal conductivity. Increasing melt convection tended to flatten the interface, but the amount of radial heating required to achieve a convex interface was essentially independent of the convection intensity.

  5. Statistical analysis of static shape control in space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1990-01-01

    The article addresses the problem of efficient analysis of the statistics of initial and corrected shape distortions in space structures. Two approaches for improving efficiency are considered. One is an adjoint technique for calculating distortion shapes: the second is a modal expansion of distortion shapes in terms of pseudo-vibration modes. The two techniques are applied to the problem of optimizing actuator locations on a 55 m radiometer antenna. The adjoint analysis technique is used with a discrete-variable optimization method. The modal approximation technique is coupled with a standard conjugate-gradient continuous optimization method. The agreement between the two sets of results is good, validating both the approximate analysis and optimality of the results.

  6. SHADE: A Shape-Memory-Activated Device Promoting Ankle Dorsiflexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.; Rossini, M.; Magoni, L.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    Acute post-stroke rehabilitation protocols include passive mobilization as a means to prevent contractures. A device (SHADE) that provides repetitive passive motion to a flaccid ankle by using shape memory alloy actuators could be of great help in providing this treatment. A suitable actuator was designed as a cartridge of approximately 150 × 20 × 15 mm, containing 2.5 m of 0.25 mm diameter NiTi wire. This actuator was activated by Joule’s effect employing a 7 s current input at 0.7 A, which provided 10 N through 76 mm displacement. Cooling and reset by natural convection took 30 s. A prototype of SHADE was assembled with two thermoplastic shells hinged together at the ankle and strapped on the shin and foot. Two actuators were fixed on the upper shell while an inextensible thread connected each NiTi wire to the foot shell. The passive ankle motion (passive range of motion, PROM) generated by SHADE was evaluated optoelectronically on three flaccid patients (58 ± 5 years old); acceptability was assessed by a questionnaire presented to further three flaccid patients (44 ± 11.5 years old) who used SHADE for 5 days, 30 min a day. SHADE was well accepted by all patients, produced good PROM, and caused no pain. The results prove that suitable limb mobilization can be produced by SMA actuators.

  7. Shape-dependent photocatalytic activities of bismuth subcarbonate nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiale; Cheng, Gang; Zhou, Huamin; Yang, Hao; Lu, Zhong; Chen, Rong

    2012-05-01

    Different shaped bismuth subcarbonate ((BiO)2CO3) nanostructures including irregular nanoplates, relatively uniform nanoplates and nanocubes were prepared and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and nitrogen adsorption. The photocatalytic performance of the as-synthesized (BiO)2CO3 nanostructures on the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB), methyl orange (MO) and methyl blue (MB) were evaluated under UV-vis light irradiation (modeling sunlight). The photocatalysis tests showed that all the different (BiO)2CO3 nanostructures displayed enhanced photodegradation performance compared with commercial (BiO)2CO3. The irregular (BiO)2CO3 nanoplates exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity on the degradation of different organic dyes. (BiO)2CO3 nanosturctures exhibited the different capacity to bleach the three organic dyes, which might be attributed to their different molecular structures. This work may provide a potential photocatalyst for the environmental pollutants treatments.

  8. Controlled Aeroelastic Response and Airfoil Shaping Using Adaptive Materials and Integrated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program; the Actively Controlled Response of Buffet Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to Ascertain Characteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant rcductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. Th,e ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using Thin-Layer Composite-Uimorph Piezoelectric Driver and Sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  9. Locomotion in fluids using shape-changing active materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter; Comacho-Lopez, Miguel; Malacarne, Luis; Finkelmann, Heino

    2004-11-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are rubbers made up of liquid crystal molecules, and can exhibit large and fast shape deformations when exposed to external fields. We discuss recent experiments in which an LCE sample floating on water is illuminated by a laser. Upon illumination the sample simultaneously changes both its shape and position, ``swimming'' away from the laser light. In this system, energy from the light is used to effect momentum transfer between the LCE body and the surrounding fluid. We discuss the origins of the shape change, the resulting LCE/fluid interaction, and the modeling of such fluid/materials systems.

  10. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  11. Chemical synthesis and antibacterial activity of novel-shaped silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dong, Pham; Ha, Chu Hoang; Binh, Le Tran; Kasbohm, Jörn

    2012-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles are useful for medical applications due to their strong antibacterial activity. The antibacterial activity can be tuned by controlling the size and shape of the prepared silver nanoparticles. In this work, silver nanoparticles with different sizes and shapes were synthesized by solution phase routes, and their interactions with Escherichia coli were studied. Triangular silver nanoprisms were prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate at room temperature in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone, sodium citrate, hydrogen peroxide and sodium borohydride. Spherical silver nanoparticles were also prepared using silver nitrate as metal precursor and sodium citrate as well as sodium borohydride as reducing agents. The morphologies and structures of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicated that spherical silver nanoparticles were obtained with different average sizes of 4, 21 and 40 nm, respectively. The edged silver nanoprisms containing mainly {111} lattice planes were obtained in the range size of 25 to 400 nm. The antibacterial study revealed that the edged triangular silver nanoprisms with {111} lattice planes exhibited the strongest antibacterial property, compared with spherical nanoparticles. Our study demonstrated that triangular silver nanoprisms with sharp edges also display a good antibacterial activity in comparison to other shaped nanoparticles.

  12. The colloidal chemistry synthesis and electron microscopy characterization of shape-controlled metal and semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biacchi, Adam J.

    Solution methods of materials synthesis have found application in a variety of fields due to the diversity of products accessible, facility of process scalability, and the ease of tuning their properties through prudent selection of reaction conditions. Control of experimental variables during the formation of colloidally stable nanoscale solids within a liquid matrix allows for tailoring of the particles' characteristics, including shape, size, composition, and surface chemistry. In this dissertation, I will discuss how the manipulation of reaction chemistries can be used to synthesize shape-controlled metal and semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals. Further, I will elaborate on the mechanisms by which these particles form from molecular precursors and describe how their properties can differ from their bulk analogues through extensive characterization, especially using transmission electron microscopy. These studies contribute to the continued development of chemical routes to nanocrystals and their application as functional materials. First, I will review recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of shape-controlled nanocrystals, as well as highlight their promising applicability in a number of emerging technologies. These principles will then be leveraged to the specific case of catalytically-active rhodium nanocrystals, which can be synthesized with morphological and dimensional control using a polyol solution-mediated strategy. I describe an innovative shape-controlled synthesis to monodisperse colloidal rhodium icosahedra, cubes, triangular plates, and octahedra using this route. Additionally, new insights into the important role of the polyol reducing solvent on the synthesis of these nanocrystals are revealed, and how these might be exploited to engender superior reaction control and novel products. Next, I will describe how a crystallization mechanism was established for the synthesis of numerous morphologies of noble metal nanocrystals. I

  13. Controlled-Shape, Ultrasonic-Angle-Beam Standard Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, J., Robertf.

    1986-01-01

    New ultrasonic angle-beam standard reflector uses impression of letter "l" steel-die stamp. NDE techniques and standard reflector apply to use of pulse-echo-type ultrasonic equipment for inspection of wrought metals including forgings and forging stock; rolled billet, bar or plate; and extruded bar, tube, and shapes. "l" reference standard reflector affords advantages of easy insertion in inspected item using common hand-tools and greatly reduced implementation time through elimination of machining operations.

  14. Cell shape controls terminal differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, F M; Jordan, P W; O'Neill, C H

    1988-01-01

    Cultures of human epidermal keratinocytes provide a useful experimental model with which to study the factors that regulate cell proliferation and terminal differentiation. One situation that is known to trigger premature terminal differentiation is suspension culture, when keratinocytes are deprived of substratum and intercellular contact. We have now investigated whether area of substratum contact, and hence cell shape, can regulate terminal differentiation. Keratinocytes were grown on circular adhesive islands that prevented cell-cell contact. By varying island area we could vary cell shape from fully spread to almost spherical. We found that when substratum contact was restricted, DNA synthesis was inhibited and expression of involucrin, a marker of terminal differentiation, was stimulated. Inhibition of proliferation was not a sufficient stimulus for involucrin synthesis in fully spread cells. When DNA synthesis and involucrin expression were plotted against contact area, classic dose-response curves were obtained. Thus cell shape acts as a signal for the terminal differentiation of keratinocytes in culture. Images PMID:2456572

  15. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  16. Diacylglycerol Kinases: Shaping Diacylglycerol and Phosphatidic Acid Gradients to Control Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Baldanzi, Gianluca; Bettio, Valentina; Malacarne, Valeria; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) terminate diacylglycerol (DAG) signaling and promote phosphatidic acid (PA) production. Isoform specific regulation of DGKs activity and localization allows DGKs to shape the DAG and PA gradients. The capacity of DGKs to constrain the areas of DAG signaling is exemplified by their role in defining the contact interface between T cells and antigen presenting cells: the immune synapse. Upon T cell receptor engagement, both DGK α and ζ metabolize DAG at the immune synapse thus constraining DAG signaling. Interestingly, their activity and localization are not fully redundant because DGKζ activity metabolizes the bulk of DAG in the cell, whereas DGKα limits the DAG signaling area localizing specifically at the periphery of the immune synapse. When DGKs terminate DAG signaling, the local PA production defines a new signaling domain, where PA recruits and activates a second wave of effector proteins. The best-characterized example is the role of DGKs in protrusion elongation and cell migration. Indeed, upon growth factor stimulation, several DGK isoforms, such as α, ζ, and γ, are recruited and activated at the plasma membrane. Here, local PA production controls cell migration by finely modulating cytoskeletal remodeling and integrin recycling. Interestingly, DGK-produced PA also controls the localization and activity of key players in cell polarity such as aPKC, Par3, and integrin β1. Thus, T cell polarization and directional migration may be just two instances of the general contribution of DGKs to the definition of cell polarity by local specification of membrane identity signaling. PMID:27965956

  17. Shape control of bimetallic nanocatalysts through well-designed colloidal chemistry approaches.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jun; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2012-12-21

    Synthesis of bimetallic nanomaterials with well controlled shape is an important topic in heterogeneous catalysis, low-temperature fuel cell technology, and many other fields. Compared with monometallic counterparts, bimetallic nanocatalysts endow scientists with more opportunities to optimize the catalytic performance by modulating the charge transfer between different metals, local coordination environment, lattice strain and surface element distribution. Considering the current challenges in shape controlled synthesis of bimetallic nanocatalysts, this tutorial review highlights some significant achievements in preparing bimetallic alloy, core-shell and heterostructure nanocrystals with well-defined morphologies, summarizes four general routes and some key factors of the bimetallic shape control scenarios, and provides some general ideas on how to design synthetic strategies to control the shape and exposing facets of bimetallic nanocrystals. The composition and shape dependent catalytic behaviours of bimetallic nanocrystals are reviewed as well.

  18. Complexity and simplicity of optimal control theory pulses shaped for controlling vibrational qubits.

    PubMed

    Shyshlov, Dmytro; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-11-21

    In the context of molecular quantum computation the optimal control theory (OCT) is used to obtain shaped laser pulses for high-fidelity control of vibrational qubits. Optimization is done in time domain and the OCT algorithm varies values of electric field in each time step independently, tuning hundreds of thousands of parameters to find one optimal solution. Such flexibility is not available in experiments, where pulse shaping is done in frequency domain and the number of "tuning knobs" is much smaller. The question of possible experimental interpretations of theoretically found OCT solutions arises. In this work we analyze very accurate optimal pulse that we obtained for implementing quantum gate CNOT for the two-qubit system encoded into the exited vibrational states of thiophosgene molecule. Next, we try to alter this pulse by reducing the number of available frequency channels and intentionally introducing systematic and random errors (in frequency domain, by modifying the values of amplitudes and phases of different frequency components). We conclude that a very limited number of frequency components (only 32 in the model of thiophosgene) are really necessary for accurate control of the vibrational two-qubit system, and such pulses can be readily constructed using OCT. If the amplitude and phase errors of different frequency components do not exceed ±3% of the optimal values, one can still achieve accurate transformations of the vibrational two-qubit system, with gate fidelity of CNOT exceeding 0.99.

  19. Stepwise assembly of a cross-linked free-standing nanoparticle sheet with controllable shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Mei; Zhou, Tian; Dong, Bin; Li, Christopher Y.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report a free-standing thin lamella consisting of nanoparticles with controllable shape. A self-assembly technique is utilized to obtain this sheet in a step by step fashion with nanoparticles and polymer single crystals as the basic building blocks. Inside the thin lamella, nanoparticles are not only immobilized on the surface of a polymer single crystal, which functions as a template, but also interconnected by a bifunctional crosslinker, i.e. 1,6-hexane dithiol. As a consequence, the nanoparticle lamella is crosslinked and cannot be destructed by solvent and heat treatment. This fabrication strategy is generally applicable and can be applied to a variety of different nanoparticles with various properties, including catalytically active platinum nanoparticles, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles or luminescent quantum dots, and different types of polymer single crystals, such as hexagonal polycaprolactone and square-shaped polyethylene glycol ones. Based on the abundant properties originating from both nanoparticles and polymer single crystals, we have demonstrated that the resulting ensemble can function as recyclable catalytically active materials or magnetically responsive luminescent materials.In this paper, we report a free-standing thin lamella consisting of nanoparticles with controllable shape. A self-assembly technique is utilized to obtain this sheet in a step by step fashion with nanoparticles and polymer single crystals as the basic building blocks. Inside the thin lamella, nanoparticles are not only immobilized on the surface of a polymer single crystal, which functions as a template, but also interconnected by a bifunctional crosslinker, i.e. 1,6-hexane dithiol. As a consequence, the nanoparticle lamella is crosslinked and cannot be destructed by solvent and heat treatment. This fabrication strategy is generally applicable and can be applied to a variety of different nanoparticles with various properties, including

  20. Electrospun nanofiber membranes for electrically activated shape memory nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-06-01

    A novel shape memory nanocomposite system, consisting of a thermoplastic Nafion polymer and ultrathin electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbonization nanofiber membranes, is successfully synthesized. PAN-based carbonization nanofiber networks that offer responses to deformations are considered to be an excellent actuation source. Significant improvement in the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber membranes is found by adjusting the applied voltage power in the electrospinning PAN process varying from 7.85 to 12.30 S cm-1. The porous structure of the carbon nanofiber membranes provides a large specific surface area and interfacial contact area when combined with the polymer matrix. Shape memory Nafion nanocomposites filled with interpenetrating non-woven electrospun PAN carbonization membranes can be actuated by applying 14 V electrical voltage within 5 s. The results, as demonstrated through morphology, electrical and thermal measurements and a shape recovery test, suggest a valuable route to producing soft nanocomposites.

  1. How Life Experience Shapes Cognitive Control Strategies: The Case of Air Traffic Control Training

    PubMed Central

    Arbula, Sandra; Capizzi, Mariagrazia; Lombardo, Nicoletta; Vallesi, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Although human flexible behavior relies on cognitive control, it would be implausible to assume that there is only one, general mode of cognitive control strategy adopted by all individuals. For instance, different reliance on proactive versus reactive control strategies could explain inter-individual variability. In particular, specific life experiences, like a highly demanding training for future Air Traffic Controllers (ATCs), could modulate cognitive control functions. A group of ATC trainees and a matched group of university students were tested longitudinally on task-switching and Stroop paradigms that allowed us to measure indices of cognitive control. The results showed that the ATCs, with respect to the control group, had substantially smaller mixing costs during long cue-target intervals (CTI) and a reduced Stroop interference effect. However, this advantage was present also prior to the training phase. Being more capable in managing multiple task sets and less distracted by interfering events suggests a more efficient selection and maintenance of task relevant information as an inherent characteristic of the ATC group, associated with proactive control. Critically, the training that the ATCs underwent improved their accuracy in general and reduced response time switching costs during short CTIs only. These results indicate a training-induced change in reactive control, which is described as a transient process in charge of stimulus-driven task detection and resolution. This experience-based enhancement of reactive control strategy denotes how cognitive control and executive functions in general can be shaped by real-life training and underlines the importance of experience in explaining inter-individual variability in cognitive functioning. PMID:27311017

  2. Iron pyrite: Phase and shape control by facile hot injection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Thanh Kieu; Pham, Viet Thanh Hau; Truong, Nguyen Tam Nguyen; Kim, Chang Duk; Park, Chinho

    2017-03-01

    Pure phases of cubic and spherical FeS2 nanocrystals (NCs) with the mean size of 80 nm and 30 nm, respectively, were obtained using trioctylamine and oleylamine as the solvents to dissolve the sulfur source via a facile and efficient hot injection method. The pure phase formation and shape control were strongly dependent on the concentration of active sulfur source (H2S) that could be formed by the reaction between the elemental sulfur and a primary amine. The chemically active sulfur source could facilitate the formation of a pure FeS2 phase from a FeS phase via a Fe3S4 phase. In addition, the active sulfur concentration is believed to be the main factor to drive the orientation attachment to obtain different shapes of FeS2 NCs. The obtained FeS2 pyrite NCs with excellent phase purity and good optical properties are believed to have potential applications to various energy devices including low-cost photovoltaics.

  3. Shape-controlled colloidal synthesis of rock-salt lead selenide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Ali M; Asunskis, Daniel J; Snee, Preston T

    2011-08-23

    Developing simple synthetic methods to control the size and morphology of nanocrystals is an active area of research as these parameters control the material's electronic and optical properties. For a semiconductor with a symmetrical crystal structure such as lead selenide, anisotropic colloidal growth has been previously accomplished via the use of templates, seeds, or by block assembly of smaller, symmetrical subunits. Here, we present a simple method to create monodisperse lead selenide nanorods and multipods at low temperatures. The size distribution and the observed morphologies are consistent with a continuous, anisotropic growth of material. The syntheses of these anisotropic shapes are due to the nature of the nuclei that form upon injection of precursors into partially oxidized alkene solvents that may contain lactone and carbonate-functional derivatives.

  4. Piezoelectric Polymers Actuators for Precise Shape Control of Large Scale Space Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Qin; Natale, Don; Neese, Bret; Ren, Kailiang; Lin, Minren; Zhang, Q. M.; Pattom, Matthew; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood

    2007-01-01

    Extremely large, lightweight, in-space deployable active and passive microwave antennas are demanded by future space missions. This paper investigates the development of PVDF based piezopolymer actuators for controlling the surface accuracy of a membrane reflector. Uniaxially stretched PVDF films were poled using an electrodeless method which yielded high quality poled piezofilms required for this application. To further improve the piezoperformance of piezopolymers, several PVDF based copolymers were examined. It was found that one of them exhibits nearly three times improvement in the in-plane piezoresponse compared with PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) piezopolymers. Preliminary experimental results indicate that these flexible actuators are very promising in controlling precisely the shape of the space reflectors.

  5. Root Cohesion Controls on Shallow Landslide Size, Shape and Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, M.; Bellugi, D. G.; Perron, J.; Coe, J. A.; Schmidt, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many environmental factors, including ground cover, local hydrology, and recent weather events interact to cause shallow landslides and determine landslide characteristics. Vegetation is of particular interest, because changes in vegetation density, age, and composition are expected consequences of human land use and climate change. These changes alter effective cohesion due to root reinforcement, which is known to impact landslide abundance, but the effects of root cohesion on landslide size, shape and location have not been quantified. The Elliott State Forest, a 376 km2 managed forest in Douglas County, Oregon, provides an ideal venue to study these effects. There, a single storm in November 1996 triggered 154 shallow landslides, which were subsequently mapped using aerial images onto laser altimetry data, in an area with a range of vegetation ages but relatively uniform soil properties, topography, and lithology. We used aerial imagery to categorize areas with different land use histories into 3 vegetation classes, ranging from clear-cuts to forest with mature trees over 100 years old. Each mapped landslide was then assigned to a class, and its size, shape and location was recorded. Our results show that, in addition to the expected decrease in landslide abundance in more-vegetated areas (which could be influenced by a bias against detecting landslides under trees), landslides in those areas were also larger and more elongated in the down-slope direction. Although landslides in all three classes generally occurred at locations with similar drainage area and slope, we observed that slides with a larger ratio of drainage area to slope were slightly more abundant in areas with lower vegetation cover. To investigate the causes of these variations, we used a new shallow landslide model calibrated for the Oregon Coast Range to predict the size, shape and location of landslides triggered by the 1996 storm under a range of root cohesion values in a subset of the study

  6. Aeroelastic Wing Shaping Control Subject to Actuation Constraints.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Nguyen, Nhan

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the control of coupled aeroelastic aircraft model which is configured with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system. The relative deflection between two adjacent flaps is constrained and this actuation constraint is accounted for when designing an effective control law for suppressing the wing vibration. A simple tuned-mass damper mechanism with two attached masses is used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of vibration suppression with confined motion of tuned masses. In this paper, a dynamic inversion based pseudo-control hedging (PCH) and bounded control approach is investigated, and for illustration, it is applied to the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) configured with VCCTEF system.

  7. Albumin-Mediated Biomineralization of Shape-Controllable and Biocompatible Ceria Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhangyou; Luo, Shenglin; Zeng, Yiping; Shi, Chunmeng; Li, Rong

    2017-03-01

    Although ceria-based nanostructures have emerged as fascinating materials with diverse biological activities, developing a facile, rapid, and biocompatible method of their preparation remains a major challenge. Herein we describe bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein-directed synthesis of ceria-based nanostructures, including ceria nanoclusters (CNLs), nanoparticles (CNPs), and nanochains (CNHs). Their preparation is simple, one-pot, and performed in a mild reaction condition with a "green" synthetic approach. Most importantly, these three kinds of ceria-based nanostructures can be synthesized in a shape and size controllable manner by tuning the reaction time, temperature, and molar ratio. The formation mechanism shows that growth of these ceria nanostructures is mediated by Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) switchable redox system, reducible disulfide bonds, and unique spatial structures in albumin proteins. More importantly, these albumin-based ceria nanostructures exhibit high superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity and good biocompatibility, providing a promising prospect in biomedical application.

  8. Global cortical activity predicts shape of hand during grasping

    PubMed Central

    Agashe, Harshavardhan A.; Paek, Andrew Y.; Zhang, Yuhang; Contreras-Vidal, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show that the amplitude of cortical field potentials is modulated in the time domain by grasping kinematics. However, it is unknown if these low frequency modulations persist and contain enough information to decode grasp kinematics in macro-scale activity measured at the scalp via electroencephalography (EEG). Further, it is unclear as to whether joint angle velocities or movement synergies are the optimal kinematics spaces to decode. In this offline decoding study, we infer from human EEG, hand joint angular velocities as well as synergistic trajectories as subjects perform natural reach-to-grasp movements. Decoding accuracy, measured as the correlation coefficient (r) between the predicted and actual movement kinematics, was r = 0.49 ± 0.02 across 15 hand joints. Across the first three kinematic synergies, decoding accuracies were r = 0.59 ± 0.04, 0.47 ± 0.06, and 0.32 ± 0.05. The spatial-temporal pattern of EEG channel recruitment showed early involvement of contralateral frontal-central scalp areas followed by later activation of central electrodes over primary sensorimotor cortical areas. Information content in EEG about the grasp type peaked at 250 ms after movement onset. The high decoding accuracies in this study are significant not only as evidence for time-domain modulation in macro-scale brain activity, but for the field of brain-machine interfaces as well. Our decoding strategy, which harnesses the neural “symphony” as opposed to local members of the neural ensemble (as in intracranial approaches), may provide a means of extracting information about motor intent for grasping without the need for penetrating electrodes and suggests that it may be soon possible to develop non-invasive neural interfaces for the control of prosthetic limbs. PMID:25914616

  9. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  10. Engineering an Effective Immune Adjuvant by Designed Control of Shape and Crystallinity of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingbing; Ji, Zhaoxia; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Juyao; Chang, Chong Hyun; Li, Ruibin; Zhang, Haiyuan; Nel, André E.; Xia, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants based on aluminum salts (Alum) are commonly used in vaccines to boost the immune response against infectious agents. However, the detailed mechanism of how Alum enhances adaptive immunity and exerts its adjuvant immune effect remains unclear. Other than being comprised of micron-sized aggregates that include nanoscale particulates, Alum lacks specific physicochemical properties to explain activation of the innate immune system, including the mechanism by which aluminum-based adjuvants engage the NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β production. This is putatively one of the major mechanisms required for an adjuvant effect. Because we know that long aspect ratio nanomaterials trigger the NLRP3 inflammasome, we synthesized a library of aluminum oxyhydroxide (AlOOH) nanorods to determine whether control of the material shape and crystalline properties could be used to quantitatively assess NLRP3 inflammasome activation and linkage of the cellular response to the material’s adjuvant activities in vivo. Using comparison to commercial Alum, we demonstrate that the crystallinity and surface hydroxyl group display of AlOOH nanoparticles quantitatively impact the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human THP-1 myeloid cells or murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Moreover, these in vitro effects were correlated with the immunopotentiation capabilities of the AlOOH nanorods in a murine OVA immunization model. These results demonstrate that shape, crystallinity and hydroxyl content play an important role in NLRP3 inflammasome activation and are therefore useful for quantitative boosting of antigen-specific immune responses. These results show that the engineered design of aluminum-based adjuvants in combination with dendritic cell property-activity analysis can be used to design more potent aluminum-based adjuvants. PMID:24261790

  11. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SHAPE-CONTROLLED BULK SYNTHESIS OF NOBLE NANOCRYSTALS AND THEIR CATALYTIC PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bulk and shape-controlled synthesis of gold (Au) nanostructures with various shapes such as prisms, cubes and hexagons is described that occurs via microwave-assisted spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts using an aqueous solution of α-D-glucose, sucrose and maltose. The exp...

  12. Activity flow over resting-state networks shapes cognitive task activations

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael W.; Ito, Takuya; Bassett, Danielle S.; Schultz, Douglas H.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (FC) has helped reveal the intrinsic network organization of the human brain, yet its relevance to cognitive task activations has been unclear. Uncertainty remains despite evidence that resting-state FC patterns are highly similar to cognitive task activation patterns. Identifying the distributed processes that shape localized cognitive task activations may help reveal why resting-state FC is so strongly related to cognitive task activations. We found that estimating task-evoked activity flow (the spread of activation amplitudes) over resting-state FC networks allows prediction of cognitive task activations in a large-scale neural network model. Applying this insight to empirical functional MRI data, we found that cognitive task activations can be predicted in held-out brain regions (and held-out individuals) via estimated activity flow over resting-state FC networks. This suggests that task-evoked activity flow over intrinsic networks is a large-scale mechanism explaining the relevance of resting-state FC to cognitive task activations. PMID:27723746

  13. Control of Vibration in Mechanical Systems Using Shaped Reference Inputs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    SCARA .- robot arm. Sehitoglu and Aristizabal [151 used a cycloidal motion profile to generate smooth motions . However, no attempt was made to tune these...of a Trajectory Controller for Industrial Robots Using Bang-Bang and Cycloidal Motion Profiles," Robotics : Theory and Applications, ASME Winter Annual...Control on Trajectory Tracking N." Errors," Proceedings of the 1986 IEEE International Conference on Robotics 0 and Automation. San Francisco, CA

  14. Views towards infectious diseases shape control strategies. Behavior and attitudes.

    PubMed

    1999-02-08

    To successfully implement infectious disease control programs that rely on meaningful community participation, infection control strategies must consider the views of lay people about contagion, the extent to which diseases are considered infectious, and the relationship between these perceptions and preventive practices. Ethnographic studies in the Ivory Coast and Brazil have revealed that these interpretations involve empirical and analogical thinking, symbolic factors and social organization, concepts of person and body elements, ideas about natural and supernatural powers, and individual and contextual factors.

  15. Star-shaped ZnO/Ag hybrid nanostructures for enhanced photocatalysis and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, George R. S.; Nascimento, Cristiane C.; Lima, Zenon M.; Teixeira-Neto, Erico; Costa, Luiz P.; Gimenez, Iara F.

    2017-03-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) particles with a star-shaped morphology have been synthesized by a novel and simple room-temperature method and decorated with silver nanoparticles (SNPs) for enhanced photocatalysis and bactericide applications. The presence of thiourea during the precipitation of ZnO in alkaline conditions allowed the control of morphological features (e.g. average size and shape) and the surface functionalization with thiocyanate ions (SCN-). SNPs were deposited into the ZnO surface by a photoreduction method and their sizes could be easily controlled by changing the ZnO/AgNO3 ratio. The presence of SCN- on the semiconductor surface prevents uncontrollable growth of Ag nanoparticles into different morphologies and high degrees of polydispersity. XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR, UV-vis-NIR and PL were employed for characterizing the structure, morphology and optical properties of the as-obtained pure and hybrid nanostructures. Finally, the hybrid ZnO/Ag particles have shown plasmon-enhanced performance for applications in photocatalysis and antibacterial activity compared to the pure ZnO counterpart. In this work, evaluation of the photodegradation of an aqueous methylene blue solution under UV-A irradiation and the antibacterial activity toward 4 bacterial strains, including Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 43300, ATCC 25923 and ATCC 33591) and Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853).

  16. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  17. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    D’Ostilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C; Murphy, David L

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (<10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in 10 healthy volunteers. Significance The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool. PMID:25242286

  18. Shape-controlled synthesis of nanocarbons through direct conversion of carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiong; Sun, Xianzhong; Ma, Yanwei

    2013-01-01

    Morphology control of carbon-based nanomaterials (nanocarbons) is critical to practical applications because their physical and chemical properties are highly shape-dependent. The discovery of novel shaped nanocarbons stimulates new development in carbon science and technology. Based on direct reaction of CO2 with Mg metal, we achieved controlled synthesis of several different types of nanocarbons including mesoporous graphene, carbon nanotubes, and hollow carbon nanoboxes. The last one, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported to this date. The method described here allows effective control of the shape and dimensions of nanocarbons through manipulation of reaction temperature. The formation mechanism of nanocarbons is proposed. As a proof of concept, the synthesized nanocarbons are used for electrodes in symmetrical supercapacitors, which exhibit high capacitance and good cycling stability. The reported protocols are instructive to production of nanocarbons with controlled shape and dimensions which are much desirable for many practical applications. PMID:24346481

  19. Shape-controlled synthesis of nanocarbons through direct conversion of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiong; Sun, Xianzhong; Ma, Yanwei

    2013-12-18

    Morphology control of carbon-based nanomaterials (nanocarbons) is critical to practical applications because their physical and chemical properties are highly shape-dependent. The discovery of novel shaped nanocarbons stimulates new development in carbon science and technology. Based on direct reaction of CO2 with Mg metal, we achieved controlled synthesis of several different types of nanocarbons including mesoporous graphene, carbon nanotubes, and hollow carbon nanoboxes. The last one, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported to this date. The method described here allows effective control of the shape and dimensions of nanocarbons through manipulation of reaction temperature. The formation mechanism of nanocarbons is proposed. As a proof of concept, the synthesized nanocarbons are used for electrodes in symmetrical supercapacitors, which exhibit high capacitance and good cycling stability. The reported protocols are instructive to production of nanocarbons with controlled shape and dimensions which are much desirable for many practical applications.

  20. Shape-controlled anisotropy of superparamagnetic micro-/nanohelices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshansky, Alexander M.; Morozov, Konstantin I.; Rubinstein, Boris Y.

    2016-07-01

    propose a semi-quantitative energy criterion to rank polarizable helices with different geometries of the filament by their propulsive capacity and also estimate their maximal propulsion speed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Effective concentration of magnetic inclusions, geometry of micro-/nanohelices and shape parametrization, effective magnetization: slender body theory. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01803C

  1. Does shape discrimination by the mouth activate the parietal and occipital lobes? - near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Tomonori; Narita, Noriyuki; Iwaki, Sunao; Kawasaki, Shingo; Kamiya, Kazunobu; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    A cross-modal association between somatosensory tactile sensation and parietal and occipital activities during Braille reading was initially discovered in tests with blind subjects, with sighted and blindfolded healthy subjects used as controls. However, the neural background of oral stereognosis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether the parietal and occipital cortices are activated during shape discrimination by the mouth using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Following presentation of the test piece shape, a sham discrimination trial without the test pieces induced posterior parietal lobe (BA7), extrastriate cortex (BA18, BA19), and striate cortex (BA17) activation as compared with the rest session, while shape discrimination of the test pieces markedly activated those areas as compared with the rest session. Furthermore, shape discrimination of the test pieces specifically activated the posterior parietal cortex (precuneus/BA7), extrastriate cortex (BA18, 19), and striate cortex (BA17), as compared with sham sessions without a test piece. We concluded that oral tactile sensation is recognized through tactile/visual cross-modal substrates in the parietal and occipital cortices during shape discrimination by the mouth.

  2. Does Shape Discrimination by the Mouth Activate the Parietal and Occipital Lobes? – Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Tomonori; Narita, Noriyuki; Iwaki, Sunao; Kawasaki, Shingo; Kamiya, Kazunobu; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    A cross-modal association between somatosensory tactile sensation and parietal and occipital activities during Braille reading was initially discovered in tests with blind subjects, with sighted and blindfolded healthy subjects used as controls. However, the neural background of oral stereognosis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether the parietal and occipital cortices are activated during shape discrimination by the mouth using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Following presentation of the test piece shape, a sham discrimination trial without the test pieces induced posterior parietal lobe (BA7), extrastriate cortex (BA18, BA19), and striate cortex (BA17) activation as compared with the rest session, while shape discrimination of the test pieces markedly activated those areas as compared with the rest session. Furthermore, shape discrimination of the test pieces specifically activated the posterior parietal cortex (precuneus/BA7), extrastriate cortex (BA18, 19), and striate cortex (BA17), as compared with sham sessions without a test piece. We concluded that oral tactile sensation is recognized through tactile/visual cross-modal substrates in the parietal and occipital cortices during shape discrimination by the mouth. PMID:25299397

  3. Charting Early Trajectories of Executive Control with the Shape School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Caron A. C.; Sheffield, Tiffany D.; Chevalier, Nicolas; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Wiebe, Sandra A.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews

    2013-01-01

    Despite acknowledgement of the importance of executive control for learning and behavior, there is a dearth of research charting its developmental trajectory as it unfolds against the background of children's sociofamilial milieus. Using a prospective, cohort-sequential design, this study describes growth trajectories for inhibitory control…

  4. Optimal pulse shaping for coherent control by the penalty algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hai; Dussault, Jean-Pièrre; Bandrauk, André D.

    1994-04-01

    We use penalty methods coupled with unitary exponential operator methods to solve the optimal control problem for molecular time-dependent Schrödinger equations involving laser pulse excitations. A stable numerical algorithm is presented which propagates directly from initial states to given final states. Results are reported for an analytically solvable model for the complete inversion of a three-state system.

  5. Active beam shaping in multi-levels amplification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tianzhuo; Fan, Zhongwei; Qiu, Jisi; Tang, Xiongxin; Lin, Weiran; Zhang, Hongbo

    2016-09-01

    Using Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator (LC-SLM) as a beam shaping device to improve beam quality in high-gain amplification system is reported. 1.6 nJ injected small-size signal Gaussian beam can be amplified to 5 J by 4 stages amplification, and finally output beam is a 50mm×50mm square spot with flat-top intensity distribution. In the amplification system we designed, LC-SLM is placed after the second level of amplifier, where the signal laser energy is about 20mJ, and beam size is 10mm×10mm. The structure of Fourier image transfer is also implemented in this amplifications system to be capable of maintaining high-quality image transmission in the amplification process. The LC-SLM as an object, is imaged by beam expand lenses and spatial filters lenses in the amplifications system to get good quality of imaging. By catching output spot and making a feed-back, transmission efficiency of each pixel on LC-SLM is modulated, high energy density area can be decreased to realize flat-top intensity distribution. A spot modulation function is defined as, using the maximum grey value on spot area divided by the average grey value of the image after background correction. By this, amplified laser obtains the spot modulation of 1.24 on central 90% area of the spot. Furthermore, un-uniform distribution on the full spot, soften effects of spot edge, and output beam shape can also be optimized by the LC-SLM shaping scheme in the amplification system.

  6. Acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sipei; Qiu, Xiaojun; Burnett, Ian

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a method of creating acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array. The boundary of the arc-shaped area is treated as the envelope of the tangent lines that can be formed by manipulating the phase profile of the loudspeakers in the array. When compared with the existing acoustic contrast control method, the proposed method is able to generate sound field inside an arc-shaped area and achieve a trade-off between acoustic uniformity and acoustic contrast. The acoustic contrast created by the proposed method increases while the acoustic uniformity decreases with frequency.

  7. Shape-controlled synthesis of Cu2O nanocrystals by one pot solution-phase reduction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meili; Yu, Jinpeng; Zhang, Jianmin; Lan, Qi; Dai, Jia; Huang, Yaohan; Li, Guangli; Fan, Qingfei; Fan, Ximei; Zhou, Zuowan

    2017-03-01

    An interesting evolution to prepare shape-controlled Cu2O nanocrystals was realized by a convenient one pot synthesis. The Cu2O nanocrystals with different shapes can be obtained simply by adjusting the composition of reaction system. And, a plausible mechanism was also proposed to explain the nanostructures formation. The surface of Cu2O spheres with thorn exhibited high photocatalytic activity on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) solution under visible light irradiation. The photodegradation efficiency of MO solution reach up to 99.67% at the first 10 min. It is still as high as 98% even at the end of the fourth cycle.

  8. Controlled shaping of photonic nanojets using core shell microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, P. K.; Patel, H. S.; Swami, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    Photonic nanojet (PNJ), the sub wavelength confinement of light by dielectric microspheres is finding applications in nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy and nano lithography. These applications require control over the length and lateral dimension of the nanojets. In the paper we present the results of numerical simulation to show that a core shell microspheres can be used to generate photonic nanojet with controllable length and confinement by varying the relative refractive index of the microspheres and the separation between the core and shell centers. We show that a length of up to 27λ can be achieved when the core microsphere has lower refractive index than the shell and lateral dimensions down to λ/3 with core microsphere having higher refractive index.

  9. Rod-shaped nanocrystals elicit neuronal activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Malvindi, Maria Ada; Carbone, Luigi; Quarta, Alessandra; Tino, Angela; Manna, Liberato; Pellegrino, Teresa; Tortiglione, Claudia

    2008-10-01

    The development of novel nanomaterials has raised great interest in efforts to evaluate their effect on biological systems, ranging from single cells to whole animals. In particular, there exists an open question regarding whether nanoparticles per se can elicit biological responses, which could interfere with the phenomena they are intended to measure. Here it is reported that challenging the small cnidaria Hydra vulgaris in vivo with rod-shaped semiconductor nanoparticles, also known as quantum rods (QRs), results in an unexpected tentacle-writhing behavior, which is Ca(2+) dependent and relies on the presence of tentacle neurons. Due to the absence of surface functionalization of the QRs with specific ligands, and considering that spherical nanoparticles with same composition as the QRs fail to induce any in vivo behavior on the same experimental model, it is suggested that unique shape-tunable electrical properties of the QRs may account for the neuronal stimulation. This model system may represent a widely applicable tool for screening neuronal response to nanoparticles in vivo.

  10. Modeling injection molding of net-shape active ceramic components.

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Tomas; Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Yang, Pin; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Noble, David R.; Notz, Patrick K.; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Halbleib, Laura L.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Burns, George Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    To reduce costs and hazardous wastes associated with the production of lead-based active ceramic components, an injection molding process is being investigated to replace the current machining process. Here, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic particles are suspended in a thermoplastic resin and are injected into a mold and allowed to cool. The part is then bisque fired and sintered to complete the densification process. To help design this new process we use a finite element model to describe the injection molding of the ceramic paste. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element based, Newton-Raphson numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. Thermal, rheological, and wetting properties of the PZT paste are measured for use as input to the model. The viscosity of the PZT is highly dependent both on temperature and shear rate. One challenge in modeling the injection process is coming up with appropriate constitutive equations that capture relevant phenomenology without being too computationally complex. For this reason we model the material as a Carreau fluid and a WLF temperature dependence. Two-dimensional (2D) modeling is performed to explore the effects of the shear in isothermal conditions. Results indicate that very low viscosity regions exist near walls and that these results look similar in terms of meniscus shape and fill times to a simple Newtonian constitutive equation at the shear-thinned viscosity for the paste. These results allow us to pick a representative viscosity to use in fully three-dimensional (3D) simulation, which because of numerical complexities are restricted to using a Newtonian constitutive equation. Further 2D modeling at nonisothermal conditions shows that the choice of

  11. Biodegradable shape-memory polymers exhibiting sharp thermal transitions and controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Koji; Ueda, Yuichi; Ouchi, Tatsuro; Ohya, Yuichi

    2009-07-13

    Biodegradable shape-memory polymer networks prepared by cross-linking star shape branched oligo(ε-caprolactone) (bOCL) with hexamethylene diisocyanate are introduced. The thermal and mechanical properties of these networks were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and tensile testing, respectively, and the morphology of the phase structure was characterized by polarized optical microscopy. The shape-memory properties of the networks were quantified using thermomechanical tensile experiments and showed strain fixity rates R(f) higher than 97% and strain recovery rates R(r) as high as 100%. Of note, networks of OCL segments with a lower degree of polymerization (DP; 10) exhibited significantly improved temperature-sensitive shape recovery: 90% of the permanent shape was recovered upon heating to within a 2 °C range (37-39 °C). The networks exhibited complete shape recovery to the permanent shape within 10 s at 42 °C. Theophylline-loaded (10 and 20 wt %) shape-memory materials, prepared by cross-linking bOCL with hexamethylene diisocyanate in the presence of theophylline, are also described as a model for a controlled drug release device. The 10 wt % loaded material was sufficiently soft and flexible for complex shape transformation and also showed high R(f) (98%) and R(r) (99%). Sustained release of loaded theophylline was achieved over 1 month without initial burst-release in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS; pH 7.4) at 37 °C.

  12. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    DOE PAGES

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; ...

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled bymore » the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.« less

  13. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  14. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  15. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  16. Surface-Engineered Graphene Quantum Dots for Shape Control of Block Copolymer Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyunseung; Ku, Kang Hee; Shin, Jae Man; Lee, Junhyuk; Park, Chan Ho; Cho, Han-Hee; Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Bumjoon; KIST Collaboration

    Surface-engineered, 10 nm-sized graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are shown to be efficient surfactants for producing poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) particles that feature tunable shapes and internal morphologies. The surface properties of GQDs were modified by grafting different alkyl ligands, such as hexylamine and oleylamine, to generate the surfactant behavior of the GQDs. In stark contrast to the behavior of the unmodified GQDs, hexylamine-grafted GQDs and oleylamine-grafted GQD surfactants were selectively positioned on the PS and P4VP domains, respectively, at the surface of the particles. This positioning effectively tuned the interfacial interaction between two different PS/P4VP domains of the particles and the surrounding water during emulsification and induced a dramatic morphological transition to an unconventional convex lens-shaped particles. Precise and systematic control of interfacial activity of GQD surfactants was also demonstrated by varying the density of the alkyl ligands on the GQDs. The excellent surface tunability of 10 nm-sized GQDs combined with their significant optical and electrical properties highlight their importance as surfactants for producing colloidal particles with novel functions.

  17. High-Precision Shape Control of In-Space Deployable Large Membrane/Thin-Shell Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This innovation has been developed to improve the resolutions of future spacebased active and passive microwave antennas for earth-science remote sensing missions by maintaining surface figure precisions of large membrane/thin-shell reflectors during orbiting. The intention is for these sensing instruments to be deployable at orbit altitudes one or two orders of magnitude higher than Low Earth Orbit (LEO), but still being able to acquire measurements at spatial resolution and sensitivity similar to those of LEO. Because active and passive microwave remote sensors are able to penetrate through clouds to acquire vertical profile measurements of geophysical parameters, it is desirable to elevate them to the higher orbits to obtain orbital geometries that offer large spatial coverage and more frequent observations. This capability is essential for monitoring and for detailed understanding of the life cycles of natural hazards, such as hurricanes, tropical storms, flash floods, and tsunamis. Major components of this high-precision antenna-surface-control system include a membrane/thin shell reflector, a metrology sensor, a controller, actuators, and corresponding power amplifier and signal conditioning electronics (see figure). Actuators are attached to the back of the reflector to produce contraction/ expansion forces to adjust the shape of the thin-material reflector. The wavefront-sensing metrology system continuously measures the surface figure of the reflector, converts the surface figure to digital data and feeds the data to the controller. The controller determines the control parameters and generates commands to the actuator system. The flexible, piezoelectric polymer actuators are thus activated, providing the control forces needed to correct any distortions that exist in the reflector surface. Piezoelectric polymer actuators are very thin and flexible. They can be implemented on the back of the membrane/thin-shell reflector without introducing significant

  18. On Shape Normalization for Non-Uniformly Active Catalyst Pellets. III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    ON SHAPE NORMALIZATION FOR NON-UNIFORMLY ACTIVE CATALYST PELLET--ETC(U) OCT Al M4 MORBIDELLI . A VARMA DAA629 RI C 001 UNCLASSIFIED MRC-TSR-2289 NL 7...RESEARCH CENTRR ON SHAPE NORMALIZATION FOR NON-UNIFORMLY ACTIVE CATALYST PELLETS - III M. Morbidelli and A. Varma Technical Summary Report #2289 October...lies with N4RC, and not with the authors of this report. ON SHAPE NORMALIZATION FOR NON-UNIFORMLY ACTIVE CATALYST PELLETS - III M. Morbidelli and A

  19. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  20. Shape and Displacement Fluctuations in Soft Vesicles Filled by Active Particles

    PubMed Central

    Paoluzzi, Matteo; Di Leonardo, Roberto; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Angelani, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We investigate numerically the dynamics of shape and displacement fluctuations of two-dimensional flexible vesicles filled with active particles. At low concentration most of the active particles accumulate at the boundary of the vesicle where positive particle number fluctuations are amplified by trapping, leading to the formation of pinched spots of high density, curvature and pressure. At high concentration the active particles cover the vesicle boundary almost uniformly, resulting in fairly homogeneous pressure and curvature, and nearly circular vesicle shape. The change between polarized and spherical shapes is driven by the number of active particles. The center-of-mass of the vesicle performs a persistent random walk with a long time diffusivity that is strongly enhanced for elongated active particles due to orientational correlations in their direction of propulsive motion. In our model shape-shifting induces directional sensing and the cell spontaneously migrate along the polarization direction. PMID:27678166

  1. Subjective Significance Shapes Arousal Effects on Modified Stroop Task Performance: A Duality of Activation Mechanisms Account

    PubMed Central

    Imbir, Kamil K.

    2016-01-01

    Activation mechanisms such as arousal are known to be responsible for slowdown observed in the Emotional Stroop and modified Stroop tasks. Using the duality of mind perspective, we may conclude that both ways of processing information (automatic or controlled) should have their own mechanisms of activation, namely, arousal for an experiential mind, and subjective significance for a rational mind. To investigate the consequences of both, factorial manipulation was prepared. Other factors that influence Stroop task processing such as valence, concreteness, frequency, and word length were controlled. Subjective significance was expected to influence arousal effects. In the first study, the task was to name the color of font for activation charged words. In the second study, activation charged words were, at the same time, combined with an incongruent condition of the classical Stroop task around a fixation point. The task was to indicate the font color for color-meaning words. In both studies, subjective significance was found to shape the arousal impact on performance in terms of the slowdown reduction for words charged with subjective significance. PMID:26869974

  2. Laser-Machined Shape Memory Alloy Sensors for Position Feedback in Active Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Alexander T.; Park, Byong-Ho; Liang, David H.; Niemeyer, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-based interventions are a form of minimally invasive surgery that can decrease hospitalization time and greatly lower patient morbidity compared to traditional methods. However, percutaneous catheter procedures are hindered by a lack of precise tip manipulation when actuation forces are transmitted over the length of the catheter. Active catheters with local shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuation can potentially provide the desired manipulation of a catheter tip, but hysteresis makes it difficult to control the actuators. A method to integrate small-volume, compliant sensors on an active catheter to provide position feedback for control would greatly improve the viability of SMA-based active catheters. In this work, we describe the design, fabrication, and performance of resistance-based position sensors that are laser-machined from superelastic SMA tubing. Combining simple material models and rapid prototyping, we can develop sensors of appropriate stiffness and sensitivity with simple modifications in sensor geometry. The sensors exhibit excellent linearity over the operating range and are designed to be easily integrated onto an active catheter substrate. PMID:19759806

  3. An active contour framework based on the Hermite transform for shape segmentation of cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba-J, Leiner; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of cardiac affections is fundamental to address a correct treatment that allows preserving the patient's life. Since heart disease is one of the main causes of death in most countries, analysis of cardiac images is of great value for cardiac assessment. Cardiac MR has become essential for heart evaluation. In this work we present a segmentation framework for shape analysis in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images. The method consists of an active contour model which is guided by the spectral coefficients obtained from the Hermite transform (HT) of the data. The HT is used as model to code image features of the analyzed images. Region and boundary based energies are coded using the zero and first order coefficients. An additional shape constraint based on an elliptical function is used for controlling the active contour deformations. The proposed framework is applied to the segmentation of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of the left ventricle using MR images with short axis view. The segmentation is sequential for both regions: the endocardium is segmented followed by the epicardium. The algorithm is evaluated with several MR images at different phases of the cardiac cycle demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method. Several metrics are used for performance evaluation.

  4. Controllable shrinking and shaping of glass nanocapillaries under electron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Steinbock, L J; Steinbock, J F; Radenovic, A

    2013-04-10

    The ability to reshape nanopores and observe their shrinkage under an electron microscope is a powerful and novel technique. It increases the sensitivity of the resistive pulse sensing and enables to detect very short and small molecules. However, this has not yet been shown for glass nanocapillaries. In contrast to their solid-state nanopore counterparts, nanocapillaries are cheap, easily fabricated and in the production do not necessitate clean room facilities. We show for the first time that quartz nanocapillaries can be shrunken under a scanning electron microscope beam. Since the shrinking is caused by the thermal heating of the electrons, increasing the beam current increases the shrink rate. Higher acceleration voltage on the contrary increases the electron penetration depth and reduces the electron density causing slower shrinkage. This allows us to fine control the shrink rate and to stop the shrinking process at any desired diameter. We show that a shrunken nanocapillary detects DNA translocation with six times higher signal amplitudes than an unmodified nanocapillary. This will open a new path to detect small and short molecules such as proteins or RNA with nanocapillaries.

  5. Solution to Shape Identification of Unsteady Natural Convection Fields to Control Temperature Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katamine, Eiji; Imai, Shinya; Mathmatical design Team; Computational mechanics Team

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical solution to shape identification of unsteady natural convection fields to control temperature to a prescribed distribution. The square error integral between the actual temperature distributions and the prescribed temperature distributions on the prescribed sub-boundaries during the specified period of time is used as the objective functional. Shape gradient of the shape identification problem is derived theoretically using the Lagrange multiplier method, adjoint variable method, and the formulae of the material derivative. Reshaping is carried out by the traction method proposed as an approach to solving shape optimization problems. Numerical analyses program for the shape identification is developed based on FreeFem++, and the validity of proposed method is confirmed by results of 2D numerical analyses.

  6. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  7. Active vibration control using DEAP actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarban, Rahimullah; Jones, Richard W.

    2010-04-01

    Dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP) is a new type of smart material, which has the potential to be used to provide effective actuation for a wide range of applications. The properties of DEAP material place it somewhere between those of piezoceramics and shape memory alloys. Of the range of DEAP-based actuators that have been developed those having a cylindrical configuration are among the most promising. This contribution introduces the use of a tubular type DEAP actuator for active vibration control purposes. Initially the DEAP-based tubular actuator to be used in this study, produced by Danfoss PolyPower A/S, is introduced along with the static and dynamic characteristics. Secondly an electromechanical model of the tubular actuator is briefly reviewed and its ability to model the actuator's hysteresis characteristics for a range of periodic input signals at different frequencies demonstrated. The model will be used to provide hysteresis compensation in future vibration isolation studies. Experimental active vibration control using the actuator is then examined, specifically active vibration isolation of a 250 g mass subject to shaker generated 'ground vibration'. An adaptive feedforward control strategy is used to achieve this. The ability of the tubular actuator to reject both tonal and broadband random vibratory disturbances is then demonstrated.

  8. Shape-controlled syntheses of metal oxide nanoparticles by the introduction of rare-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyo-Won; Kim, Na-Young; Park, Ji-Eun; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Hickey, Robert J; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, So-Jung

    2017-02-23

    Here, we report the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles through the introduction of rare-earth metals. The addition of gadolinium oleate in the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles induced sphere-to-cube shape changes of nanoparticles and generated iron oxide nanocubes coated with gadolinium. Based on experimental investigations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we attribute the shape change to the facet-selective binding of undecomposed gadolinium oleates. While many previous studies on the shape-controlled syntheses of nanoparticles rely on the stabilization of specific crystal facets by anionic surfactants or their decomposition products, this study shows that the interaction between growing transition metal oxide nanoparticles and rare-earth metal complexes can be used as a robust new mechanism for shape-controlled syntheses. Indeed, we demonstrated that this approach was applicable to other transition metal oxide nanoparticles (i.e., manganese oxide and manganese ferrite) and rare earth metals (i.e., gadolinium, europium, and cerium). This study also demonstrates that the nature of metal-ligand bonding can play an important role in the shape control of nanoparticles.

  9. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  10. Active Control of Stationary Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Giovanni; Breidenthal, Robert; Bhide, Aditi; Sridhar, Aditya

    2016-11-01

    A system for active stationary vortex control is presented. The system uses a combination of plasma actuators, pressure sensors and electrical circuits deposited on aerodynamic surfaces using printing electronics methods. Once the pressure sensors sense a change on the intensity or on the position of the stationary vortices, its associated controller activates a set of plasma actuator to return the vortices to their original or intended positions. The forces produced by the actuators act on the secondary flow in the transverse plane, where velocities are much less than in the streamwise direction. As a demonstration case, the active vortex control system is mounted on a flat plate under low speed wind tunnel testing. Here, a set of vortex generators are used to generate the stationary vortices and the plasma actuators are used to move them. Preliminary results from the experiments are presented and compared with theoretical values. Thanks to the USAF AFOSR STTR support under contract # FA9550-15-C-0007.

  11. High-resolution liquid patterns via three-dimensional droplet shape control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Rishi; Adera, Solomon; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-09-01

    Understanding liquid dynamics on surfaces can provide insight into nature’s design and enable fine manipulation capability in biological, manufacturing, microfluidic and thermal management applications. Of particular interest is the ability to control the shape of the droplet contact area on the surface, which is typically circular on a smooth homogeneous surface. Here, we show the ability to tailor various droplet contact area shapes ranging from squares, rectangles, hexagons, octagons, to dodecagons via the design of the structure or chemical heterogeneity on the surface. We simultaneously obtain the necessary physical insights to develop a universal model for the three-dimensional droplet shape by characterizing the droplet side and top profiles. Furthermore, arrays of droplets with controlled shapes and high spatial resolution can be achieved using this approach. This liquid-based patterning strategy promises low-cost fabrication of integrated circuits, conductive patterns and bio-microarrays for high-density information storage and miniaturized biochips and biosensors, among others.

  12. Shape of porous region to control cooling along curved exit boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Snyder, A.

    1984-01-01

    A cooled porous insert in a curved wall has a specified spatially varying heat flux applied to one side. It is desired to control the distribution of coolant flow out through this curved surface so that the surface will be kept at a desired uniform temperature. The flow regulation is accomplished by shaping the surface through which the coolant enters the region to obtain the required variation of flow resistance within the region. The proper surface shape is found by solving a Cauchy boundary value problem. Analytical solutions are given in two dimensions for various shapes of the heated boundary subjected to different heating distributions.

  13. Analysis of coolant entrance boundary shape of porous region to control cooling along exit boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Snyder, A.

    1983-01-01

    A cooled porous region has a plane surface exposed to a specified spatially varying heat flux. The coolant leaves the region through this surface, and it is desired to control the flow distribution to maintain a specified uniform surface temperature. This is accomplished by having the coolant entrance surface shaped to provide in the region the necessary variation of path length and, hence, flow resistance. The surface shape at the coolant entrance is found by solving a Cauchy boundary value problem. An exact solution is obtained that will deal with a wide variety of heating distributions for both two- and three-dimensional shapes.

  14. Locomotion and Control of a Self-Propelled Shape-Changing Body in a Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambrion, Thomas; Munnier, Alexandre

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we study the locomotion of a shape-changing body swimming in a two-dimensional perfect fluid of infinite extent. The shape changes are prescribed as functions of time satisfying constraints ensuring that they result from the work of internal forces only: conditions necessary for the locomotion to be termed self-propelled. The net rigid motion of the body results from the exchange of momentum between these shape changes and the surrounding fluid. The aim of this paper is three-fold. First, it describes a rigorous framework for the study of animal locomotion in fluid. Our model differs from previous ones mostly in that the number of degrees of freedom related to the shape changes is infinite. The Euler-Lagrange equation is obtained by applying the least action principle to the system body fluid. The formalism of Analytic Mechanics provides a simple way to handle the strong coupling between the internal dynamics of the body causing the shape changes and the dynamics of the fluid. The Euler-Lagrange equation takes the form of a coupled system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and partial differential equations (PDEs). The existence and uniqueness of solutions for this system are rigorously proved. Second, we are interested in making clear the connection between shape changes and internal forces. Although classical, it can be quite surprising to select the shape changes to play the role of control because the internal forces they are due to seem to be a more natural and realistic choice. We prove that, when the number of degrees of freedom relating to the shape changes is finite, both choices are actually equivalent in the sense that there is a one-to-one relation between shape changes and internal forces. Third, we show how the control problem, consisting in associating with each shape change the resulting trajectory of the swimming body, can be analysed within the framework of geometric control theory. This allows us to take advantage of the

  15. Pulse-shaping algorithm of a coherent matter-wave-controlling reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen, Solvejg; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2004-07-01

    A pulse-shaping algorithm for a matter wave with the purpose of controlling a binary reaction has been designed. The scheme is illustrated for an Eley-Rideal reaction where an impinging matter-wave atom recombines with an adsorbed atom on a metal surface. The wave function of the impinging atom is shaped such that the desorbing molecule leaves the surface in a specific vibrational state.

  16. Simulations of plasma shape and vertical-instability control in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodestro, L. L.; Bulmer, R. H.; Meyer, W. H.; Pearlstein, L. D.

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, prompted by applications to ITER, the Corsica code's capability for evolving free-boundary equilibria coupled to transport, in particular current-profile transport, has been improved. All active and passive material conductors (coils, conducting plates, vessel walls) in these calculations are represented as axisymmetric wires, coupled to each other and the plasma with circuit equations; up/down asymmetric elongated plasmas require a feedback circuit to control the vertical instability. The improvements include: completion of the facility for running Corsica as the plasma model in Matlab/Simulink simulations of the circuits, benchmarked against stand-alone Corsica simulations; development of a general machine-description data-base for importing or verifying a machine's conductor configurations; and modernization and generalization of the (scripted) algorithms that accomplish the couplings in Corsica, plus new features needed for ITER scenario development. The code has been used to assess the capability of ITER's in-vessel coils (VS3) and is presently being used for ITER control simulations. In this paper, we apply the code to KSTAR. We have updated the KSTAR machine description and will present simulations of plasma-shape and vertical-instability control.

  17. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  18. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  19. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  20. LaRC controls activity for LSST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Math models were developed for various types of large flexible structures. These models were used to study the uncontrolled dynamic characteristics of the structures in orbit and to devise control concepts in order to control their orientation and geometrical shape. Reduced order decoupled control of the 100 meter long free free beam were studied. The inplane orientation and shape of the beam was controlled in a decoupled manner with as few actuators as possible. Using two controllers, near each end of the beam, to produce a 0.01 radian pitch change, perfect decoupled control was achieved for the rigid body pitch theta mode and the first flexible mode A sub 1.

  1. Shaping Student Activists: Discursive Sensemaking of Activism and Participation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taha, Diane E.; Hastings, Sally O.; Minei, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    As social media becomes a more potent force in society, particularly for younger generations, the role in activism has been contested. This qualitative study examines 35 interviews with students regarding their perceptions of the use of social media in social change, their perceptions of activists, and their level of self-identification as an…

  2. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  3. Shaped and Feedback-Controlled Excitation of Single Molecules in the Weak-Field Limit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control uses tailored femtosecond pulse shapes to influence quantum pathways and drive a light-induced process toward a specific outcome. There has been a long-standing debate whether the absorption properties or the probability for population to remain in an excited state of a molecule can be influenced by the pulse shape, even if only a single photon is absorbed. Most such experiments are performed on many molecules simultaneously, so that ensemble averaging reduces the access to quantum effects. Here, we demonstrate systematic coherent control experiments on the fluorescence intensity of a single molecule in the weak-field limit. We demonstrate that a delay scan of interfering pulses reproduces the excitation spectrum of the molecule upon Fourier transformation, but that the spectral phase of a pulse sequence does not affect the transition probability. We generalize this result to arbitrary pulse shapes by performing the first closed-loop coherent control experiments on a single molecule. PMID:26706166

  4. Differential hippocampal shapes in posterior cortical atrophy patients: A comparison with control and typical AD subjects.

    PubMed

    Manning, Emily N; Macdonald, Kate E; Leung, Kelvin K; Young, Jonathan; Pepple, Tracey; Lehmann, Manja; Zuluaga, Maria A; Cardoso, M Jorge; Schott, Jonathan M; Ourselin, Sebastien; Crutch, Sebastian; Fox, Nick C; Barnes, Josephine

    2015-12-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by predominant visual deficits and parieto-occipital atrophy, and is typically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In AD, assessment of hippocampal atrophy is widely used in diagnosis, research, and clinical trials; its utility in PCA remains unclear. Given the posterior emphasis of PCA, we hypothesized that hippocampal shape measures may give additional group differentiation information compared with whole-hippocampal volume assessments. We investigated hippocampal volume and shape in subjects with PCA (n = 47), typical AD (n = 29), and controls (n = 48). Hippocampi were outlined on MRI scans and their 3D meshes were generated. We compared hippocampal volume and shape between disease groups. Mean adjusted hippocampal volumes were ∼ 8% smaller in PCA subjects (P < 0.001) and ∼ 22% smaller in tAD subject (P < 0.001) compared with controls. Significant inward deformations in the superior hippocampal tail were observed in PCA compared with controls even after adjustment for hippocampal volume. Inward deformations in large areas of the hippocampus were seen in tAD subjects compared with controls and PCA subjects, but only localized shape differences remained after adjusting for hippocampal volume. The shape differences observed, even allowing for volume differences, suggest that PCA and tAD are each associated with different patterns of hippocampal tissue loss that may contribute to the differential range and extent of episodic memory dysfunction in the two groups.

  5. Theory of simple biochemical ``shape recognition'' via diffusion from activator coated nanoshapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, D. R.

    2008-09-01

    Inspired by recent experiments, we model the shape sensitivity, via a typical threshold initiation response, of an underlying complex biochemical reaction network to activator coated nanoshapes. Our theory re-emphasizes that shape effects can be vitally important for the onset of functional behavior in nanopatches and nanoparticles. For certain critical or particular shapes, activator coated nanoshapes do not evoke a threshold response in a complex biochemical network setting, while for different critical or specific shapes, the threshold response is rapidly achieved. The model thus provides a general theoretical understanding for how activator coated nanoshapes can enable a chemical system to perform simple "shape recognition," with an associated "all or nothing" response. The novel and interesting cases of the chemical response due to a nanoshape that shrinks with time is additionally considered, as well as activator coated nanospheres. Possible important applications of this work include the initiation of blood clotting by nanoshapes, nanoshape effects in nanocatalysis, physiological toxicity to nanoparticles, as well as nanoshapes in nanomedicine, drug delivery, and T cell immunological response. The aim of the theory presented here is that it inspires further experimentation on simple biochemical shape recognition via diffusion from activator coated nanoshapes.

  6. Shape-Controlled, Self-Wrapped Carbon Nanotube 3D Electronics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiliang; Wang, Yanming; Tee, Benjamin C-K; Kim, Kwanpyo; Lopez, Jeffrey; Cai, Wei; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical flexibility and structural softness of ultrathin devices based on organic thin films and low-dimensional nanomaterials have enabled a wide range of applications including flexible display, artificial skin, and health monitoring devices. However, both living systems and inanimate systems that are encountered in daily lives are all 3D. It is therefore desirable to either create freestanding electronics in a 3D form or to incorporate electronics onto 3D objects. Here, a technique is reported to utilize shape-memory polymers together with carbon nanotube flexible electronics to achieve this goal. Temperature-assisted shape control of these freestanding electronics in a programmable manner is demonstrated, with theoretical analysis for understanding the shape evolution. The shape control process can be executed with prepatterned heaters, desirable for 3D shape formation in an enclosed environment. The incorporation of carbon nanotube transistors, gas sensors, temperature sensors, and memory devices that are capable of self-wrapping onto any irregular shaped-objects without degradations in device performance is demonstrated.

  7. Frequency-Shaped Sliding Mode Control for Rudder Roll Damping System of Robotic Boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xinping; Yu, Zhenyu; Nonami, Kenzo

    In this paper, a robotic boat model of combined yaw and roll rate is obtained by a system identification approach. The identified system is designed with frequency-shaped sliding mode control. The control scheme is composed of a sliding mode observer and a sliding mode controller. The stability and reachability of the switching function are proved by Lyapunov theory. Computer simulations and experiment carried out at INAGE offshore show that successful course keeping and roll reduction results are achieved.

  8. Efficient thermolysis route to monodisperse Cu₂ZnSnS₄ nanocrystals with controlled shape and structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Guobiao; Ji, Cheng; Huang, Kai; Zha, Chenyang; Wang, Yifeng; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2014-05-28

    Monodisperse Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals with tunable shape, crystalline phase, and composition are synthesized by efficient thermolysis of a single source precursor of mixed metal-oleate complexes in hot organic solvents with dissolved sulfur sources. Suitable tuning of the synthetic conditions and the Cu/(Zn + Sn) ratio of the precursor has enabled precise control of the crystalline phase in the form of kesterite, or a newly observed wurtzite structure. Nanocrystals with morphology in the form of spherical, rice-like, or rod-like shapes are obtained over a wide range of compositions (0.5 ≤ Cu/(Zn + Sn) ≤ 1.2). Both the final products and intermediates for each shape exhibit consistent composition and structure, indicating homogenous nucleation and growth of single-phase nanocrystals. Thin films prepared from colloidal nanocrystal suspensions display interesting shape-dependent photoresponse behavior under white light illumination from a solar simulator.

  9. Effortful Control and Context Interact in Shaping Neuroendocrine Stress Responses during Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stefanie E.; Abelson, James L.; Lopez-Duran, Nestor L.

    2014-01-01

    Trait and contextual factors can shape individual and group differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) response to stress; but the ways in which these factors may interact with each other to modulate stress activity has rarely been examined. Here, we investigated whether the association between a temperamental self-regulatory trait – Effortful Control (EC) – and HPA axis stress response is moderated by type of laboratory stress in sixty-five children (35 boys). EC was measured at age 3 and 6 using age-appropriate laboratory batteries as well as mother reports. HPA axis responses were measured at age 7 by randomly assigning children to one of two laboratory stress tasks (frustration vs. fear). Results indicated that EC interacted with stress context in predicting cortisol response. Specifically, lower EC was associated with greater cortisol response (steeper reactivity slopes) in the context of a frustration stressor but this was reversed in a fear context where lower EC was associated with flatter, more gradual activation. It is likely that different components of EC, such as emotion regulation and attention, differentially interact with the stress context. These types of effects and interactions need to be more thoroughly understood in order to meaningfully interpret cortisol reactivity data and better characterize the role of the HPA axis in human psychopathology. PMID:25019964

  10. Shape control of colloidal Mn doped ZnO nanocrystals and their visible light photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yefeng; Li, Yaguang; Zhu, Liping; He, Haiping; Hu, Liang; Huang, Jingyun; Hu, Fengchun; He, Bo; Ye, Zhizhen

    2013-11-07

    For colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), shape control and doping as two widely applied strategies are crucial for enhancing and manipulating their functional properties. Here we report a facile and green synthetic approach for high-quality colloidal Mn doped ZnO NCs with simultaneous control over composition, shape and optical properties. Specifically, the shape of doped ZnO NCs can be finely modulated from three dimensional (3D) tetrapods to 0D spherical nanoparticles in a single reaction scheme. The growth mechanism of doped ZnO NCs with interesting shape transition is explored. Furthermore, we demonstrate the tunable optical absorption features of Mn doped ZnO NCs by varying the Mn doping levels, and the enhanced photocatalytic performance of Mn doped ZnO NCs under visible light, which can be further optimized by delicately controlling their shapes and Mn doping concentrations. Our results provide an improved understanding of the growth mechanism of doped NCs during the growth process and can be potentially extended to ZnO NCs doped with other metal ions for various applications.

  11. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Pd Nanocrystals inAqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lim,B.; Tao,J.

    2009-01-23

    This article provides an overview of recent developments regarding synthesis of Pd nanocrystals with well-controlled shapes in aqueous solutions. In a solution-phase synthesis, the final shape taken by a nanocrystal is determined by the twin structures of seeds and the growth rates of different crystallographic facets. Here, the maneuvering of these factors in an aqueous system to achieve shape control for Pd nanocrystals is discussed. L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) are tested for manipulating the reduction kinetics, with citric acid and B-ions used as capping agents to selectively promote the formation of {111} and {100} facets, respectively. The distribution of single-crystal versus multiple-twinned seeds can be further manipulated by employing or blocking oxidative etching. The shapes obtained for the Pd nanocrystals include truncated octahedron, icosahedron,octahedron, decahedron, hexagonal and triangular plates, rectangular bar, and cube. The ability to control the shape of Pd nanocrystals provides a great opportunity to systematically investigate their catalytic, electrical, and plasmonic properties.

  12. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Isotopic Yttrium-90-Labeled Rare Earth Fluoride Nanocrystals for Multimodal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Paik, Taejong; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Mikitsh, John L; Friedberg, Joseph S; Pryma, Daniel A; Murray, Christopher B

    2015-09-22

    Isotopically labeled nanomaterials have recently attracted much attention in biomedical research, environmental health studies, and clinical medicine because radioactive probes allow the elucidation of in vitro and in vivo cellular transport mechanisms, as well as the unambiguous distribution and localization of nanomaterials in vivo. In addition, nanocrystal-based inorganic materials have a unique capability of customizing size, shape, and composition; with the potential to be designed as multimodal imaging probes. Size and shape of nanocrystals can directly influence interactions with biological systems, hence it is important to develop synthetic methods to design radiolabeled nanocrystals with precise control of size and shape. Here, we report size- and shape-controlled synthesis of rare earth fluoride nanocrystals doped with the β-emitting radioisotope yttrium-90 ((90)Y). Size and shape of nanocrystals are tailored via tight control of reaction parameters and the type of rare earth hosts (e.g., Gd or Y) employed. Radiolabeled nanocrystals are synthesized in high radiochemical yield and purity as well as excellent radiolabel stability in the face of surface modification with different polymeric ligands. We demonstrate the Cerenkov radioluminescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging capabilities of (90)Y-doped GdF3 nanoplates, which offer unique opportunities as a promising platform for multimodal imaging and targeted therapy.

  13. What controls the growth and shape of the Himalayan foreland fold-and-thrust belt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujic, Djordje; Hirschmiller, John; Mallyon, Deirdre

    2014-05-01

    We provide empirical evidence for the impact of surface processes on the structure and geometry of the present-day foreland fold-and-thrust belt (FTB) of the Himalaya. We have reconstructed and analysed ten balanced cross sections distributed along the entire length of the Himalayan arc. Here, we focus on the Siwalik Group, which represents the deformed part of the foreland basin and consists of synorogenic middle Miocene to Pleistocene sediments that form the youngest and frontal part of the Himalayan orogen. Within the active foreland fold-and-thrust belt of the Himalaya, extension, strain rate, and belt morphology vary systematically from west to east. Strain rates correlate well with west-to east increases in convergence rates according to both long-term plate velocity data and GPS data, suggesting that Pliocene to Holocene shortening is externally imposed and related to plate convergence rates. Conversely, the eastward decrease in belt width corresponds to an eastward increase in rainfall rates and specific stream power. Although mass accretion rates have not been well constrained, we argue that they remain relatively constant along the FTB. We suggest that the morphology of the Himalayan FTB is controlled primarily by erosion, in accordance with the critical taper model. Surface material removal is mainly controlled through rainfall and runoff and can be expressed as specific stream power. Thus, we propose that climatically induced erosion is the principal control on Himalayan foreland fold-and-thrust belt morphology. We test this hypothesis through a series of 1D numerical models. Among the parameters controlling the form of a wedge, lithology, erodibility, and rock mechanical properties are relatively homogeneous throughout the belt. Hence, within the range of observed values in the Himalaya, we investigate the sensitivity of the shape of the Himalayan fold-and-thrust belt to the sole-out depth of the basal décollement, flux of tectonically added material

  14. Plasma Shape Control on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) using Real-time Equilibrium Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Gates; J.R. Ferron; M. Bell; T. Gibney; R. Johnson; R.J. Marsala; D. Mastrovito; J.E. Menard; D. Mueller; B. Penaflor; S.A. Sabbagh; T. Stevenson

    2005-04-15

    Plasma shape control using real-time equilibrium reconstruction has been implemented on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The rtEFIT code originally developed for use on DIII-D was adapted for use on NSTX. The real-time equilibria provide calculations of the flux at points on the plasma boundary, which is used as input to a shape control algorithm known as isoflux control. The flux at the desired boundary location is compared to a reference flux value, and this flux error is used as the basic feedback quantity for the poloidal-field coils on NSTX. The hardware that comprises the control system is described, as well as the software infrastructure. Examples of precise boundary control are also presented.

  15. Combined input shaping and feedback control for double-pendulum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, Robert; Goyal, Anurag; Nguyen, Vinh; Yang, Tianle; Singhose, William

    2017-02-01

    A control system combining input shaping and feedback is developed for double-pendulum systems subjected to external disturbances. The proposed control method achieves fast point-to-point response similar to open-loop input-shaping control. It also minimizes transient deflections during the motion of the system, and disturbance-induced residual swing using the feedback control. Effects of parameter variations such as the mass ratio of the double pendulum, the suspension length ratio, and the move distance were studied via numerical simulation. The most important results were also verified with experiments on a small-scale crane. The controller effectively suppresses the disturbances and is robust to modelling uncertainties and task variations.

  16. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Trimetallic Nanoclusters: Structure Elucidation and Properties Investigation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xi; Xiong, Lin; Wang, Shuxin; Yu, Haizhu; Jin, Shan; Song, Yongbo; Chen, Tao; Zheng, Liwei; Pan, Chensong; Pei, Yong; Zhu, Manzhou

    2016-11-21

    The shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanoclusters (NCs) with precise atomic arrangement is crucial for tailoring the properties. In this work, we successfully control the shape of alloy NCs by altering the dopants in the alloying processes. The shape of the spherical [Pt1 Ag24 (SPhMe2 )18 ] NC is maintained when [Au(I) SR] is used as dopant. By contrast, the shape of Pt1 Ag24 is changed to be rodlike by alloying with [Au(I) (PPh3 )Br]. The structures of the trimetallic NCs were determined by X-ray crystallography and further confirmed by both DFT and far-IR measurements. The shape-preserved [Pt1 Au6.4 Ag17.6 (SPhMe2 )18 ] NC is in a tristratified arrangement-[Pt(center)@Au/Ag(shell)@Ag(exterior)]-and is indeed the first X-ray crystal structure of thiolated trimetallic NCs. On the other hand, the resulting rodlike NC ([Pt2 Au10 Ag13 (PPh3 )10 Br7 ]) exhibits a high quantum yield (QY=14.7 %), which is in striking contrast to the weakly luminescent Pt1 Ag24 (QY=0.1 %, about 150-fold enhancement). In addition, the thermal stabilities of both trimetallic products are remarkably improved. This study presents a controllable strategy for synthesis of alloy NCs with different shapes (by alloying heteroatom complexes coordinated by different ligands), and may stimulate future work for a deeper understanding of the morphology (shape)-property correlation in NCs.

  17. STATs Shape the Active Enhancer Landscape of T Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, Golnaz; Takahashi, Hayato; Nakayamada, Shingo; Sun, Hong-wei; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Kanno, Yuka; O’Shea, John J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Signaling pathways are intimately involved in cellular differentiation, allowing cells to respond to their environment by regulating gene expression. While enhancers are recognized as key elements that regulate selective gene expression, the interplay between signaling pathways and actively used enhancer elements is not clear. Here, we use CD4+ T cells as a model of differentiation, mapping the acquisition of cell-type-specific enhancer elements in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cells. Our data establish that STAT proteins have a major impact on the acquisition of lineage-specific enhancers and the suppression of enhancers associated with alternative cell fates. Transcriptome analysis further supports a functional role for enhancers regulated by STATs. Importantly, expression of lineage-defining master regulators in STAT-deficient cells fails to fully recover the chromatin signature of STAT-dependent enhancers. Thus, these findings point to a critical role of STATs as environmental sensors in dynamically molding the specialized enhancer architecture of differentiating cells. PMID:23178119

  18. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  19. Active contour-based visual tracking by integrating colors, shapes, and motions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Zhou, Xue; Li, Wei; Luo, Wenhan; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Maybank, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for active contour-based visual tracking using level sets. The main components of our framework include contour-based tracking initialization, color-based contour evolution, adaptive shape-based contour evolution for non-periodic motions, dynamic shape-based contour evolution for periodic motions, and the handling of abrupt motions. For the initialization of contour-based tracking, we develop an optical flow-based algorithm for automatically initializing contours at the first frame. For the color-based contour evolution, Markov random field theory is used to measure correlations between values of neighboring pixels for posterior probability estimation. For adaptive shape-based contour evolution, the global shape information and the local color information are combined to hierarchically evolve the contour, and a flexible shape updating model is constructed. For the dynamic shape-based contour evolution, a shape mode transition matrix is learnt to characterize the temporal correlations of object shapes. For the handling of abrupt motions, particle swarm optimization is adopted to capture the global motion which is applied to the contour in the current frame to produce an initial contour in the next frame.

  20. Achilles tendon shape and echogenicity on ultrasound among active badminton players.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, P; Voss, C; Garau, G; Richards, P; Maffulli, N

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between Achilles tendon ultrasound abnormalities, including a spindle shape and heterogeneous echogenicity, is unclear. This study investigated the relationship between these abnormalities, tendon thickness, Doppler flow and pain. Sixty-one badminton players (122 tendons, 36 men, and 25 women) were recruited. Achilles tendon thickness, shape (spindle, parallel), echogenicity (heterogeneous, homogeneous) and Doppler flow (present or absent) were measured bilaterally with ultrasound. Achilles tendon pain (during or after activity over the last week) and pain and function [Victorian Institute of Sport Achilles Assessment (VISA-A)] were measured. Sixty-eight (56%) tendons were parallel with homogeneous echogenicity (normal), 22 (18%) were spindle shaped with homogeneous echogenicity, 16 (13%) were parallel with heterogeneous echogenicity and 16 (13%) were spindle shaped with heterogeneous echogenicity. Spindle shape was associated with self-reported pain (P<0.05). Heterogeneous echogenicity was associated with lower VISA-A scores than normal tendon (P<0.05). There was an ordinal relationship between normal tendon, parallel and heterogeneous and spindle shaped and heterogeneous tendons with regard to increasing thickness and likelihood of Doppler flow. Heterogeneous echogenicity with a parallel shape may be a physiological phase and may develop into heterogeneous echogenicity with a spindle shape that is more likely to be pathological.

  1. Active controls for ride smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Thompson, G. O.

    1976-01-01

    Active controls technology offers great promise for significantly smoothing the ride, and thus improving public and air carrier acceptance, of certain types of transport aircraft. Recent findings which support this promise are presented in the following three pertinent areas: (1) Ride quality versus degree of traveler satisfaction; (2) significant findings from a feasibility study of a ride smoothing system; and (3) potential ride problems identified for several advanced transport concepts.

  2. Self-folding origami: shape memory composites activated by uniform heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolley, Michael T.; Felton, Samuel M.; Miyashita, Shuhei; Aukes, Daniel; Rus, Daniela; Wood, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    Self-folding is an approach used frequently in nature for the efficient fabrication of structures, but is seldom used in engineered systems. Here, self-folding origami are presented, which consist of shape memory composites that are activated with uniform heating in an oven. These composites are rapidly fabricated using inexpensive materials and tools. The folding mechanism based on the in-plane contraction of a sheet of shape memory polymer is modeled, and parameters for the design of composites that self-fold into target shapes are characterized. Four self-folding shapes are demonstrated: a cube, an icosahedron, a flower, and a Miura pattern; each of which is activated in an oven in less than 4 min. Self-sealing is also investigated using hot melt adhesive, and the resulting structures are found to bear up to twice the load of unsealed structures.

  3. Controlling the Velocity of Jumping Nanodroplets Via Their Initial Shape and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Controlling the movement of nanoscale objects is a significant goal of nanotechnology. Dewetting-induced ejection of nanodroplets could provide another means of achieving that goal. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the dewetting-induced ejection of nanoscale liquid copper nanostructures that were deposited on a graphitic substrate. Nanostructures in the shape of a circle, square, equilateral, and isosceles triangle dewet and form nanodroplets that are ejected from the substrate with a velocity that depends on the initial shape and temperature. The dependence of the ejected velocity on shape is ascribed to the temporal asymmetry of the mass coalescence during the droplet formation; the dependence on temperature is ascribed to changes in the density and viscosity. The results suggest that dewetting induced by nanosecond laser pulses could be used to control the velocity of ejected nanodroplets.

  4. Passive resting state and history of antagonist muscle activity shape active extensions in an insect limb

    PubMed Central

    Ache, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Limb movements can be driven by muscle contractions, external forces, or intrinsic passive forces. For lightweight limbs like those of insects or small vertebrates, passive forces can be large enough to overcome the effects of gravity and may even generate limb movements in the absence of active muscle contractions. Understanding the sources and actions of such forces is therefore important in understanding motor control. We describe passive properties of the femur-tibia joint of the locust hind leg. The resting angle is determined primarily by passive properties of the relatively large extensor tibiae muscle and is influenced by the history of activation of the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron. The resting angle is therefore better described as a history-dependent resting state. We selectively stimulated different flexor tibiae motor neurons to generate a range of isometric contractions of the flexor tibiae muscle and then stimulated the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron to elicit active tibial extensions. Residual forces in the flexor muscle have only a small effect on subsequent active extensions, but the effect is larger for distal than for proximal flexor motor neurons and varies with the strength of flexor activation. We conclude that passive properties of a lightweight limb make substantial and complex contributions to the resting state of the limb that must be taken into account in the patterning of neuronal control signals driving its active movements. Low variability in the effects of the passive forces may permit the nervous system to accurately predict their contributions to behavior. PMID:22357791

  5. Optogenetic control of epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Sørensen, Andreas T.; Deisseroth, Karl; Lundberg, Cecilia; Kokaia, Merab

    2009-01-01

    The optogenetic approach to gain control over neuronal excitability both in vitro and in vivo has emerged as a fascinating scientific tool to explore neuronal networks, but it also opens possibilities for developing novel treatment strategies for neurologic conditions. We have explored whether such an optogenetic approach using the light-driven halorhodopsin chloride pump from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR), modified for mammalian CNS expression to hyperpolarize central neurons, may inhibit excessive hyperexcitability and epileptiform activity. We show that a lentiviral vector containing the NpHR gene under the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα promoter transduces principal cells of the hippocampus and cortex and hyperpolarizes these cells, preventing generation of action potentials and epileptiform activity during optical stimulation. This study proves a principle, that selective hyperpolarization of principal cortical neurons by NpHR is sufficient to curtail paroxysmal activity in transduced neurons and can inhibit stimulation train-induced bursting in hippocampal organotypic slice cultures, which represents a model tissue of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This study demonstrates that the optogenetic approach may prove useful for controlling epileptiform activity and opens a future perspective to develop it into a strategy to treat epilepsy. PMID:19581573

  6. Dynamics and Control of a Quadrotor with Active Geometric Morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Dustin A.

    Quadrotors are manufactured in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and performance levels to fulfill a multitude of roles. Robodub Inc. has patented a morphing quadrotor which will allow active reconfiguration between various shapes for performance optimization across a wider spectrum of roles. The dynamics of the system are studied and modeled using Newtonian Mechanics. Controls are developed and simulated using both Linear Quadratic and Numerical Nonlinear Optimal control for a symmetric simplificiation of the system dynamics. Various unique vehicle capabilities are investigated, including novel single-throttle flight control using symmetric geometric morphing, as well as recovery from motor loss by reconfiguring into a trirotor configuration. The system dynamics were found to be complex and highly nonlinear. All attempted control strategies resulted in controllability, suggesting further research into each may lead to multiple viable control strategies for a physical prototype.

  7. Trans-Membrane Area Asymmetry Controls the Shape of Cellular Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Pilyugin, Sergei S.; Geerts, Willie J. C.; Kozlov, Michael M.; Burger, Koert N. J.; Luini, Alberto; Derganc, Jure; Mironov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane organelles often have complicated shapes and differ in their volume, surface area and membrane curvature. The ratio between the surface area of the cytosolic and luminal leaflets (trans-membrane area asymmetry (TAA)) determines the membrane curvature within different sites of the organelle. Thus, the shape of the organelle could be critically dependent on TAA. Here, using mathematical modeling and stereological measurements of TAA during fast transformation of organelle shapes, we present evidence that suggests that when organelle volume and surface area are constant, TAA can regulate transformation of the shape of the Golgi apparatus, endosomal multivesicular bodies, and microvilli of brush borders of kidney epithelial cells. Extraction of membrane curvature by small spheres, such as COPI-dependent vesicles within the Golgi (extraction of positive curvature), or by intraluminal vesicles within endosomes (extraction of negative curvature) controls the shape of these organelles. For instance, Golgi tubulation is critically dependent on the fusion of COPI vesicles with Golgi cisternae, and vice versa, for the extraction of membrane curvature into 50–60 nm vesicles, to induce transformation of Golgi tubules into cisternae. Also, formation of intraluminal ultra-small vesicles after fusion of endosomes allows equilibration of their TAA, volume and surface area. Finally, when microvilli of the brush border are broken into vesicles and microvilli fragments, TAA of these membranes remains the same as TAA of the microvilli. Thus, TAA has a significant role in transformation of organelle shape when other factors remain constant. PMID:25761238

  8. FUNCTION FOLLOWS FORM: ACTIVATION OF SHAPE & FUNCTION FEATURES DURING OBJECT IDENTIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Eiling; Huffstetler, Stacy; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Most theories of semantic memory characterize knowledge of a given object as comprising a set of semantic features. But how does conceptual activation of these features proceed during object identification? We present the results of a pair of experiments that demonstrate that object recognition is a dynamically unfolding process in which function follows form. We used eye movements to explore whether activating one object’s concept leads to the activation of others that share perceptual (shape) or abstract (function) features. Participants viewed four-picture displays and clicked on the picture corresponding to a heard word. In critical trials, the conceptual representation of one of the objects in the display was similar in shape or function (i.e., its purpose) to the heard word. Importantly, this similarity was not apparent in the visual depictions (e.g., for the target “frisbee,” the shape-related object was a triangular slice of pizza – a shape that a frisbee cannot take); preferential fixations on the related object were therefore attributable to overlap of the conceptual representations on the relevant features. We observed relatedness effects for both shape and function, but shape effects occurred earlier than function effects. We discuss the implications of these findings for current accounts of the representation of semantic memory. PMID:21417543

  9. Reply to "Comment on `Controlling the spectral shape of nonlinear Thomson scattering with proper laser chirping'"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykovanov, S. G.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    We reply to Terzic and Krafft's forgoing Comment [Phys. Rev. Accel. Beams, Comment on "Controlling the spectral shape of nonlinear Thomson scattering with proper laser chirping" 19 (2016)]. We disagree with the conclusion of the Comment regarding the novelty of solutions and the citations presented in our paper.

  10. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Laskar, Aparna; Jana, Madhurya; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain.

  11. Three-dimensional shape optical measurement using constant gap control and error compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kyihwan; Kim, Sangyoo; Choi, Kyosoon

    2008-03-15

    The optical laser displacement sensor is widely used for noncontact measurement of the three-dimensional (3D) shape profile of the object surface. When the surface of an object has a slope variation, the sensor gain is proportionally varied according to that of the object surface. In order to solve the sensor gain variation problem, the constant gap control method is applied to adjust the gap to the nominal distance. Control error compensation is also proposed to cope with the situation even when the gap is not perfectly controlled to the nominal distance using an additional sensor attached to the actuator. 3D shape measurement applying the proposed constant gap control method shows better performances rather than the constant sensor height method.

  12. Exploiting object constancy: effects of active exploration and shape morphing on similarity judgments of novel objects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haemy; Wallraven, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Humans are experts at shape processing. This expertise has been learned and fine tuned by actively manipulating and perceiving thousands of objects during development. Therefore, shape processing possesses an active component and a perceptual component. Here, we investigate both components in six experiments in which participants view and/or interact with novel, parametrically defined 3D objects using a touch-screen interface. For probing shape processing, we use a similarity rating task. In Experiments 1-3, we show that active manipulation leads to a better perceptual reconstruction of the physical parameter space than judging rotating objects, or passively viewing someone else's exploration pattern. In Experiment 4, we exploit object constancy-the fact that the visual system assumes that objects do not change their identity during manipulation. We show that slow morphing of an object during active manipulation systematically biases similarity ratings-despite the participants being unaware of the morphing. Experiments 5 and 6 investigate the time course of integrating shape information by restricting the morphing to the first and second half of the trial only. Interestingly, the results indicate that participants do not seem to integrate shape information beyond 5 s of exploration time. Finally, Experiment 7 uses a secondary task that suggests that the previous results are not simply due to lack of attention during the later parts of the trial. In summary, our results demonstrate the advantage of active manipulation for shape processing and indicate a continued, perceptual integration of complex shape information within a time window of a few seconds during object interactions.

  13. Controls on pebbles size and shape in streams of the Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litty, Camille; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2016-04-01

    Rivers in the Swiss Alps have been analyzed to determine the relationships between fluvial processes and grain size and shape to emphasize the factors controlling the grain characteristics. 18 bars of gravel-bed rivers have been sampled. At each site the long axis and the intermediate axis of about 500 pebbles have been measured. In addition the morphometric properties of each river basin have been studied. Looking for correlation between grain size and shape and other fluvial properties the study shows that grain size and shape are mainly controlled by the lithology on which the rivers are mainly flowing and by the supply of material through mass failure processes. Deposits of rivers flowing on sedimentary lithology are better sorted and the pebbles are more rounds and have smoother surface than the deposits of rivers flowing on metamorphic lithology. The percentage of hillslopes angles ranging between 20 and 30° correlate with the coarser fraction of the pebbles in all the studied streams. These hillslopes angles ranging between 20 and 30° reflect threshold conditions for failure and so it appeared that mass failure processes along the streams impact the grain size population through the supply of coarse grained material. However, no correlations have been found between grain size and shape and erosion rate, hydrological conditions or basins metric properties. The lack of correlation between grain size and shape and the water discharge is mainly explained by the fact that the streams of the Swiss Alps are in a supply limited state. Remarkably for all these different pebbles size and river/basin properties, the ratio of the intermediate axis and the long axis only ranges between 0.63 and 0.72 without any relationships with the lithology. This ratio named the elongation E is not impacted by any of the analyzed river processes in the studied rivers. Pebbles' size and shape reflect the sediment dynamics and can be used to explore the controls of river processes on

  14. Vibration and shape control of hinged light structures using electromagnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yuji; Miyachi, Shigenobu; Sasaki, Toshiyuki

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes a new electromagnetic device for vibration control of a light-weighted deployable/retractable structure which consists of many small units connected with mechanical hinges. A typical example of such a structure is a solar cell paddle of an artificial satellite which is composed of many thin flexible blankets connected in series. Vibration and shape control of the paddle is not easy, because control force and energy do not transmit well between the blankets which are discretely connected by hinges with each other. The new device consists of a permanent magnet glued along an edge of a blanket and an electric current-conducting coil glued along an adjoining edge of another adjacent blanket. Conduction of the electric current in a magnetic field from the magnet generates an electromagnetic force on the coil. By changing the current in the coil, therefore, we may control the vibration and shape of the blankets. To confirm the effectiveness of the new device, constructing a simple paddle model consisting eight hinge- panels, we have carried out a model experiment of vibration and shape control of the paddle. In addition, a numerical simulation of vibration control of the hinge structure is performed to compare with measured data.

  15. Multivariable robust controller design of ACLS using loop-shaping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chaoyang; Cui, Haihua; Wang, Qing

    2008-10-01

    In this paper a multivariable robust controller design approach of the ACLS is accomplished by using robust loop-shaping techniques. In order to avoid the inefficient way of choosing the weight functions by trial-and-error method, the structured genetic algorithm (SGA) approach is introduced, which is capable of simultaneously searching the orders and coefficients of the pre- and post-compensator for weight matrices. According to this approach, engineers can achieve an ideal loop-shape which lies in an appropriate region relating to the desired performance specifications. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated by the longitudinal equations of a carrier-based aircraft's motion design example.

  16. Shape changes induced by biologically active peptides and nerve growth factor in blood platelets of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gudat, F; Laubscher, A; Otten, U; Pletscher, A

    1981-11-01

    1 Nerve growth factor (NGF), substance P (SP) and thymopoietin all caused shape change reactions of rapid onset in rabbit platelets. NGF had the highest maximal effect, and SP the lowest EC50 (concentration causing half maximal shape change). The action of SP was reversible within 5 min, whereas that of NGF lasted for at least 1 h. A series of other peptides were inactive. 2 After preincubation of platelets with SP, a second application of SP no longer caused a shape change reaction, whereas the effect of NGF was not influenced. 3 An oxidized NGF-derivative without biological activity did not cause a shape change reaction, neither did epidermal growth factor. 4 Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and pretreatment of the platelets with 3% butanol, which counteract the shape changes caused by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate, also antagonized those induced by NGF and SP. Neither heparin nor methysergide, an antagonist of 5-HT-receptors, influenced the shape change induced by NGF or SP. The action of NGF was also antagonized by a specific antibody to NGF. 5 Thymopoietin, like the basic polypeptide polyornithine (mol. wt. 40,000) was not antagonized by PGE1 and butanol. Heparin, which counteracted the effect of polyornithine, did not influence that of thymopoietin. 6 In conclusion, different modes of action are involved in the shape change of blood platelets induced by polypeptides and proteins. SP and NGF may act by stimulating specific membrane receptors.

  17. On-Demand Removal of Bacterial Biofilms via Shape Memory Activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a major cause of chronic infections and biofouling; however, effective removal of established biofilms remains challenging. Here we report a new strategy for biofilm control using biocompatible shape memory polymers with defined surface topography. These surfaces can both prevent bacterial adhesion and remove established biofilms upon rapid shape change with moderate increase of temperature, thereby offering more prolonged antifouling properties. We demonstrate that this strategy can achieve a total reduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by 99.9% compared to the static flat control. It was also found effective against biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and an uropathogenic strain of Escherichia coli. PMID:27517738

  18. From active shape model to active optical flow model: a shape-based approach to predicting voxel-level dose distributions in spine SBRT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianfei; Wu, Q Jackie; Kirkpatrick, John P; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yuan, Lulin; Ge, Yaorong

    2015-03-07

    Prediction of achievable dose distribution in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can help in designing high-quality treatment plans to maximally protect spinal cords and to effectively control tumours. Dose distributions at spinal cords are primarily affected by the shapes of adjacent planning target volume (PTV) contours. In this work, we estimate such contour effects and predict dose distributions by exploring active optical flow model (AOFM) and active shape model (ASM). We first collect a sequence of dose sub-images and PTV contours near spinal cords from fifteen SBRT plans in the training dataset. The data collection is then classified into five groups according to the PTV locations in relation to spinal cords. In each group, we randomly choose a dose sub-image as the reference and register all other sub-images to the reference using an optical flow method. AOFM is then constructed by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA). Similarly, we build ASM by using PCA on PTV contour points. The correlation between ASM and AOFM is estimated via a stepwise multiple regression model. When predicting dose distribution of a new case, the group is first determined based on the PTV contour. The prediction model of the selected group is used to estimate dose distributions by mapping the PTV contours from the ASM space to the AOFM space. This method was validated on fifteen SBRT plans in the testing dataset. Analysis of dose-volume histograms revealed that the important D2%, D5%, D10% and D0.1cc dosimetric parameters of spinal cords between the prediction and the clinical plans were 11.7 ± 1.7 Gy versus 11.8 ± 1.7 Gy (p = 0.95), 10.9 ± 1.7 Gy versus 11.1 ± 1.9 Gy (p = 0.8295), 10.2 ± 1.6 Gy versus 10.1 ± 1.7 (p = 0.9036) and 11.2 ± 2.0 Gy versus 11.1 ± 2.2 Gy (p = 0.5208), respectively. Here, the ‘cord’ is the spinal cord proper (not the thecal sac) extended 5 mm inferior and superior to the involved

  19. From active shape model to active optical flow model: a shape-based approach to predicting voxel-level dose distributions in spine SBRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Wu, Q. Jackie; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yuan, Lulin; Ge, Yaorong

    2015-03-01

    Prediction of achievable dose distribution in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can help in designing high-quality treatment plans to maximally protect spinal cords and to effectively control tumours. Dose distributions at spinal cords are primarily affected by the shapes of adjacent planning target volume (PTV) contours. In this work, we estimate such contour effects and predict dose distributions by exploring active optical flow model (AOFM) and active shape model (ASM). We first collect a sequence of dose sub-images and PTV contours near spinal cords from fifteen SBRT plans in the training dataset. The data collection is then classified into five groups according to the PTV locations in relation to spinal cords. In each group, we randomly choose a dose sub-image as the reference and register all other sub-images to the reference using an optical flow method. AOFM is then constructed by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA). Similarly, we build ASM by using PCA on PTV contour points. The correlation between ASM and AOFM is estimated via a stepwise multiple regression model. When predicting dose distribution of a new case, the group is first determined based on the PTV contour. The prediction model of the selected group is used to estimate dose distributions by mapping the PTV contours from the ASM space to the AOFM space. This method was validated on fifteen SBRT plans in the testing dataset. Analysis of dose-volume histograms revealed that the important D2%, D5%, D10% and D0.1cc dosimetric parameters of spinal cords between the prediction and the clinical plans were 11.7  ±  1.7 Gy versus 11.8  ±  1.7 Gy (p = 0.95), 10.9  ±  1.7 Gy versus 11.1  ±  1.9 Gy (p = 0.8295), 10.2  ±  1.6 Gy versus 10.1  ±  1.7 (p = 0.9036) and 11.2  ±  2.0 Gy versus 11.1  ±  2.2 Gy (p = 0.5208), respectively. Here, the ‘cord’ is the spinal cord proper (not the

  20. Somatostatin and Somatostatin-Containing Neurons in Shaping Neuronal Activity and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery over four decades ago, somatostatin (SOM) receives growing scientific and clinical interest. Being localized in the nervous system in a subset of interneurons somatostatin acts as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator and its role in the fine-tuning of neuronal activity and involvement in synaptic plasticity and memory formation are widely recognized in the recent literature. Combining transgenic animals with electrophysiological, anatomical and molecular methods allowed to characterize several subpopulations of somatostatin-containing interneurons possessing specific anatomical and physiological features engaged in controlling the output of cortical excitatory neurons. Special characteristic and connectivity of somatostatin-containing neurons set them up as significant players in shaping activity and plasticity of the nervous system. However, somatostatin is not just a marker of particular interneuronal subpopulation. Somatostatin itself acts pre- and postsynaptically, modulating excitability and neuronal responses. In the present review, we combine the knowledge regarding somatostatin and somatostatin-containing interneurons, trying to incorporate it into the current view concerning the role of the somatostatinergic system in cortical plasticity. PMID:27445703

  1. Differential hippocampal shapes in posterior cortical atrophy patients: A comparison with control and typical AD subjects

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Kate E.; Leung, Kelvin K.; Young, Jonathan; Pepple, Tracey; Lehmann, Manja; Zuluaga, Maria A.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Crutch, Sebastian; Fox, Nick C.; Barnes, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by predominant visual deficits and parieto‐occipital atrophy, and is typically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In AD, assessment of hippocampal atrophy is widely used in diagnosis, research, and clinical trials; its utility in PCA remains unclear. Given the posterior emphasis of PCA, we hypothesized that hippocampal shape measures may give additional group differentiation information compared with whole‐hippocampal volume assessments. We investigated hippocampal volume and shape in subjects with PCA (n = 47), typical AD (n = 29), and controls (n = 48). Hippocampi were outlined on MRI scans and their 3D meshes were generated. We compared hippocampal volume and shape between disease groups. Mean adjusted hippocampal volumes were ∼8% smaller in PCA subjects (P < 0.001) and ∼22% smaller in tAD subject (P < 0.001) compared with controls. Significant inward deformations in the superior hippocampal tail were observed in PCA compared with controls even after adjustment for hippocampal volume. Inward deformations in large areas of the hippocampus were seen in tAD subjects compared with controls and PCA subjects, but only localized shape differences remained after adjusting for hippocampal volume. The shape differences observed, even allowing for volume differences, suggest that PCA and tAD are each associated with different patterns of hippocampal tissue loss that may contribute to the differential range and extent of episodic memory dysfunction in the two groups. Hum Brain Mapp 36:5123–5136, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26461053

  2. Controlled Shape Memory Behavior of a Smectic Main-Chain Liquid Crystalline Elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuzhan; Pruitt, Cole; Rios, Orlando; Wei, Liqing; Rock, Mitch; Keum, Jong K.; McDonald, Armando G.; Kessler, Michael R.

    2015-04-10

    Here, we describe how a smectic main-chain liquid crystalline elastomer (LCE), with controlled shape memory behavior, is synthesized by polymerizing a biphenyl-based epoxy monomer with an aliphatic carboxylic acid curing agent. Microstructures of the LCEs, including their liquid crystallinity and cross-linking density, are modified by adjusting the stoichiometric ratio of the reactants to tailor the thermomechanical properties and shape memory behavior of the material. Thermal and liquid crystalline properties of the LCEs, characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis, and structural analysis, performed using small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, show that liquid crystallinity, cross-linking density, and network rigidity are strongly affected by the stoichiometry of the curing reaction. With appropriate structural modifications it is possible to tune the thermal, dynamic mechanical, and thermomechanical properties as well as the shape memory and thermal degradation behavior of LCEs.

  3. Controlled Shape Memory Behavior of a Smectic Main-Chain Liquid Crystalline Elastomer

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yuzhan; Pruitt, Cole; Rios, Orlando; ...

    2015-04-10

    Here, we describe how a smectic main-chain liquid crystalline elastomer (LCE), with controlled shape memory behavior, is synthesized by polymerizing a biphenyl-based epoxy monomer with an aliphatic carboxylic acid curing agent. Microstructures of the LCEs, including their liquid crystallinity and cross-linking density, are modified by adjusting the stoichiometric ratio of the reactants to tailor the thermomechanical properties and shape memory behavior of the material. Thermal and liquid crystalline properties of the LCEs, characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis, and structural analysis, performed using small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, show that liquid crystallinity, cross-linking density, and network rigiditymore » are strongly affected by the stoichiometry of the curing reaction. With appropriate structural modifications it is possible to tune the thermal, dynamic mechanical, and thermomechanical properties as well as the shape memory and thermal degradation behavior of LCEs.« less

  4. Control of sound radiation with active/adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research is discussed in the area of active structural acoustic control with active/adaptive structures. Progress in the areas of structural acoustics, actuators, sensors, and control approaches is presented. Considerable effort has been given to the interaction of these areas with each other due to the coupled nature of the problem. A discussion is presented on actuators bonded to or embedded in the structure itself. The actuators discussed are piezoceramic actuators and shape memory alloy actuators. The sensors discussed are optical fiber sensors, Nitinol fiber sensors, piezoceramics, and polyvinylidene fluoride sensors. The active control techniques considered are state feedback control techniques and least mean square adaptive algorithms. Results presented show that significant progress has been made towards controlling structurally radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure.

  5. Shape-Controllable Formation of Poly-imidazolium Salts for Stable Palladium N-Heterocyclic Carbene Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaixia; Li, Liuyi; Wang, Yangxin; Wang, Ruihu

    2014-01-01

    The imidazolium-based main-chain organic polymers are one of promising platforms in heterogeneous catalysis, the size and outer morphology of polymer particles are known to have important effects on their physical properties and catalytic applications, but main-chain ionic polymers usually generate amorphous or spherical particles. Herein, we presented a versatile and facile synthetic route for size- and shape-controllable synthesis of main-chain poly-imidazolium particles. The wire-shaped, spherical and ribbon-shaped morphologies of poly-imidazolium particles were readily synthesized through quaternization of bis-(imidazol-1-yl)methane and 2,4,6-tris(4-(bromomethyl)phenyl)-1,3,5-triazine, and the modification of their size and morphology were realized through adjusting solvent polarity, solubility, concentration and temperatures. The direct complexation of the particles with Pd(OAc)2 produced ionic polymers containing palladium N-heterocyclic carbene units (NHCs) with intactness of original morphologies. The particle morphologies have a significant effect on catalytic performances. Wire-shaped palladium-NHC polymer shows excellent catalytic activity and recyclabilty in heterogeneous Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. PMID:24969738

  6. Quantification of parameter uncertainty for robust control of shape memory alloy bending actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, John H.; McMahan, Jerry A.; Smith, Ralph C.; Hannen, Jennifer C.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we employ Bayesian parameter estimation techniques to derive gains for robust control of smart materials. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing parameter uncertainty estimation provided by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to determine controller gains for a shape memory alloy bending actuator. We treat the parameters in the equations governing the actuator’s temperature dynamics as uncertain and use the MCMC method to construct the probability densities for these parameters. The densities are then used to derive parameter bounds for robust control algorithms. For illustrative purposes, we construct a sliding mode controller based on the homogenized energy model and experimentally compare its performance to a proportional-integral controller. While sliding mode control is used here, the techniques described in this paper provide a useful starting point for many robust control algorithms.

  7. Deformable Model-Based Methods for Shape Control of a Haptic Jamming Surface.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Andrew A; Okamura, Allison M

    2017-02-01

    Haptic Jamming, the approach of simultaneously controlling mechanical properties and surface deformation of a tactile display via particle jamming and pneumatics, shows promise as a tangible, shape-changing human-computer interface. Previous research introduced device design and described the force-displacement interactions for individual jamming cells. The work in this article analyzes the shape output capabilities of a multi-cell array. A spring-mass deformable body simulation combines models of the three actuation inputs of a Haptic Jamming surface: node pinning, chamber pressurization, and cell jamming. Surface measurements of a 12-cell prototype from a depth camera fit the mass and stiffness parameters to the device during pressurization tests and validate the accuracy of the model for various actuation sequences. The simulator is used to develop an algorithm that generates a sequence of actuation inputs for a Haptic Jamming array of any size in order to match a desired surface output shape. Data extracted from topographical maps and three-dimensional solid object models are used to evaluate the shape-matching algorithm and assess the utility of increasing array size and resolution. Results show that a discrete Laplace operator applied to the input is a suitable predictor of the correlation coefficient between the desired shape and the device output.

  8. Intact vinculin protein is required for control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and rac-dependent lamellipodia formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldmann, Wolfgang H.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Studies were carried out using vinculin-deficient F9 embryonic carcinoma (gamma229) cells to analyze the relationship between structure and function within the focal adhesion protein vinculin, in the context of control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and movement. Atomic force microscopy studies revealed that transfection of the head (aa 1-821) or tail (aa 811-1066) domain of vinculin, alone or together, was unable to fully reverse the decrease in cell stiffness, spreading, and lamellipodia formation caused by vinculin deficiency. In contrast, replacement with intact vinculin completely restored normal cell mechanics and spreading regardless of whether its tyrosine phosphorylation site was deleted. Constitutively active rac also only induced extension of lamellipodia when microinjected into cells that expressed intact vinculin protein. These data indicate that vinculin's ability to physically couple integrins to the cytoskeleton, to mechanically stabilize cell shape, and to support rac-dependent lamellipodia formation all appear to depend on its intact three-dimensional structure.

  9. Shape Representation of Word Was Automatically Activated in the Encoding Phase

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Tianyu; Zheng, Liling; Mo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Theories of embodied language comprehension have proposed that language processing includes perception simulation and activation of sensorimotor representation. Previous studies have used a numerical priming paradigm to test the priming effect of semantic size, and the negative result showed that the sensorimotor representation has not been activated during the encoding phase. Considering that the size property is unstable, here we changed the target property to examine the priming effect of semantic shape using the same paradigm. The participants would see three different object names successively, and then they were asked to decide whether the shape of the second referent was more similar to the first one or the third one. In the eye-movement experiment, the encoding time showed a distance-priming effect, as the similarity of shapes between the first referent and the second referent increased, the encoding time of the second word gradually decreased. In the event-related potentials experiment, when the difference of shapes between the first referent and the second referent increased, the N400 amplitude became larger. These findiings suggested that the shape information of a word was activated during the encoding phase, providing supportive evidence for the embodied theory of language comprehension. PMID:27788236

  10. Controllable synthesis of rice-shape Alq3 nanoparticles with single crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wanfeng; Fan, Jihui; Song, Hui; Jiang, Feng; Yuan, Huimin; Wei, Zhixian; Ji, Ziwu; Pang, Zhiyong; Han, Shenghao

    2016-10-01

    We report the controllable growth of rice-shape nanoparticles of Alq3 by an extremely facile self-assembly approach. Possible mechanisms have been proposed to interpret the formation and controlled process of the single crystal nanoparticles. The field-emission performances (turn-on field 7 V μm-1, maximum current density 2.9 mA cm-2) indicate the potential application on miniaturized nano-optoelectronics devices of Alq3-based. This facile method can potentially be used for the controlled synthesis of other functional complexes and organic nanostructures.

  11. Complex shape product tolerance and accuracy control method for virtual assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Huiping; Jin, Yuanqiang; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Hai

    2015-02-01

    The simulation of virtual assembly process for engineering design lacks of accuracy in the software of three-dimension CAD at present. Product modeling technology with tolerance, assembly precision preanalysis technique and precision control method are developed. To solve the problem of lack of precision information transmission in CAD, tolerance mathematical model of Small Displacement Torsor (SDT) is presented, which can bring about technology transfer and establishment of digital control function for geometric elements from the definition, description, specification to the actual inspection and evaluation process. Current tolerance optimization design methods for complex shape product are proposed for optimization of machining technology, effective cost control and assembly quality of the products.

  12. Shape-controlled ceria-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites toward high-sensitive in situ detection of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang Xin; Xie, Jia Le; Bao, Shu Juan; Yu, Ling; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-08-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signal molecule released by most cancer cells under drug stimulation or/and disease development but it is extremely challenging to in situ while real-time sensitively detect NO due to its large diffusivity, low concentration and fast decay. Herein, shape-controlled reduced graphene oxide nanocomposing with ceria (rGO-CeO2) was synthesized via hydrothermal reaction to construct a highly sensitive real-time sensing platform for NO detection. The crystal shape of CeO2 nanoparticles in rGO-CeO2 composites significantly affects the sensing performance of rGO-CeO2, of which the regular hexagonal nanocrystal CeO2 achieves the highest sensitivity (1676.06 mA cm(-2) M(-1)), a wide dynamic range (18.0 nM to 5.6 µM) and a low detection limit (9.6 nM). This attributes to a synergical effect from high catalytic activity of the specifically shaped CeO2 nanocrystal and good conductivity/high surface area of rGO. This work demonstrates a way by rationally compose individual merit components while well control the nanostructure for a superior synergistic effect to build a smart sensing platform, while offering a great application potential to sensitively real-time detect NO released from living cells for diagnosis or/and studies of complicated biological processes.

  13. Pulse width modulation-based temperature tracking for feedback control of a shape memory alloy actuator.

    PubMed

    Ayvali, Elif; Desai, Jaydev P

    2014-04-01

    This work presents a temperature-feedback approach to control the radius of curvature of an arc-shaped shape memory alloy (SMA) wire. The nonlinear properties of the SMA such as phase transformation and its dependence on temperature and stress make SMA actuators difficult to control. Tracking a desired trajectory is more challenging than controlling just the position of the SMA actuator since the desired path is continuously changing. Consequently, tracking the desired strain directly or tracking the parameters such as temperature and electrical resistance that are related to strain with a model is a challenging task. Temperature-feedback is an attractive approach when direct measurement of strain is not practical. Pulse width modulation (PWM) is an effective method for SMA actuation and it can be used along with a compensator to control the temperature of the SMA. Using the constitutive model of the SMA, the desired temperature profile can be obtained for a given strain trajectory. A PWM-based nonlinear PID controller with a feed-forward heat transfer model is proposed to use temperature-feedback for tracking a desired temperature trajectory. The proposed controller is used during the heating phase of the SMA actuator. The controller proves to be effective in tracking step-wise and continuous trajectories.

  14. Feedback shape control for deployable mesh reflectors using gain scheduling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangmin; Shi, Hang; Alleyne, Andrew; Yang, Bingen

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the dynamic shape control problem of deployable mesh reflectors (DMRs) via feedback approaches. The reflector structure is simplified from a nonlinear model to be quasi-static with respect to temperature variations but dynamic with respect to mechanical vibrations. The orbital cycle is segmented into multiple temperature zones, and an H∞ robust state feedback controller is designed for each zone to guarantee the local stability of the system under the model uncertainty caused by thermal effects and to reject external force disturbances. At the same time, gain scheduling control method is adopted to compensate thermal distortions and to ensure smooth transition response when switching among the local robust controllers. A DMR model is considered in the case study to show the effectiveness of the control approach. The structural vibrations caused by external force disturbances can be sufficiently suppressed in a much shorter time. The closed loop response of the DMR structure shows that much higher surface accuracy is obtained during the orbiting mission compared to the open-loop configuration, and transient focal length and transient de-focus of the reflector are well controlled within the satisfactory bounds, demonstrating the numerical feasibility of the proposed method to solve the dynamic shape control problem of DMRs.

  15. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  16. Elemental Anisotropic Growth and Atomic-Scale Structure of Shape-Controlled Octahedral Pt-Ni-Co Alloy Nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Arán-Ais, Rosa M; Dionigi, Fabio; Merzdorf, Thomas; Gocyla, Martin; Heggen, Marc; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Gliech, Manuel; Solla-Gullón, José; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M; Strasser, Peter

    2015-11-11

    Multimetallic shape-controlled nanoparticles offer great opportunities to tune the activity, selectivity, and stability of electrocatalytic surface reactions. However, in many cases, our synthetic control over particle size, composition, and shape is limited requiring trial and error. Deeper atomic-scale insight in the particle formation process would enable more rational syntheses. Here we exemplify this using a family of trimetallic PtNiCo nanooctahedra obtained via a low-temperature, surfactant-free solvothermal synthesis. We analyze the competition between Ni and Co precursors under coreduction "one-step" conditions when the Ni reduction rates prevailed. To tune the Co reduction rate and final content, we develop a "two-step" route and track the evolution of the composition and morphology of the particles at the atomic scale. To achieve this, scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray elemental mapping techniques are used. We provide evidence of a heterogeneous element distribution caused by element-specific anisotropic growth and create octahedral nanoparticles with tailored atomic composition like Pt1.5M, PtM, and PtM1.5 (M = Ni + Co). These trimetallic electrocatalysts have been tested toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), showing a greatly enhanced mass activity related to commercial Pt/C and less activity loss than binary PtNi and PtCo after 4000 potential cycles.

  17. Atypical balance between occipital and fronto-parietal activation for visual shape extraction in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Christodoulou, Joanna A; Gabrieli, John D E

    2013-01-01

    Reading requires the extraction of letter shapes from a complex background of text, and an impairment in visual shape extraction would cause difficulty in reading. To investigate the neural mechanisms of visual shape extraction in dyslexia, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain activation while adults with or without dyslexia responded to the change of an arrow's direction in a complex, relative to a simple, visual background. In comparison to adults with typical reading ability, adults with dyslexia exhibited opposite patterns of atypical activation: decreased activation in occipital visual areas associated with visual perception, and increased activation in frontal and parietal regions associated with visual attention. These findings indicate that dyslexia involves atypical brain organization for fundamental processes of visual shape extraction even when reading is not involved. Overengagement in higher-order association cortices, required to compensate for underengagment in lower-order visual cortices, may result in competition for top-down attentional resources helpful for fluent reading.

  18. Atypical Balance between Occipital and Fronto-Parietal Activation for Visual Shape Extraction in Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Christodoulou, Joanna A.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2013-01-01

    Reading requires the extraction of letter shapes from a complex background of text, and an impairment in visual shape extraction would cause difficulty in reading. To investigate the neural mechanisms of visual shape extraction in dyslexia, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain activation while adults with or without dyslexia responded to the change of an arrow’s direction in a complex, relative to a simple, visual background. In comparison to adults with typical reading ability, adults with dyslexia exhibited opposite patterns of atypical activation: decreased activation in occipital visual areas associated with visual perception, and increased activation in frontal and parietal regions associated with visual attention. These findings indicate that dyslexia involves atypical brain organization for fundamental processes of visual shape extraction even when reading is not involved. Overengagement in higher-order association cortices, required to compensate for underengagment in lower-order visual cortices, may result in competition for top-down attentional resources helpful for fluent reading. PMID:23825653

  19. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  20. Intelligent structures based on the improved activation of shape memory polymers using Peltier cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Lafont Morgado, Pilar; Muñoz Sanz, José Luis; Muñoz García, Julio; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan Manuel; Echávarri Otero, Javier

    2010-05-01

    This study is focused on obtaining intelligent structures manufactured from shape memory polymers possessing the ability to change their geometry in successive or 'step-by-step' actions. This objective has been reached by changing the conventionally used shape memory activation systems (heating resistance, laser or induction heating). The solution set out consists in using Peltier cells as a heating system capable of heating (and activating) a specific zone of the device in the first activation, while the opposite zone keeps its original geometry. By carefully reversing the polarity of the electrical supply to the Peltier cell, in the second activation, the as yet unchanged zone is activated while the already changed zone in the first activation remains unaltered. We have described the criteria for the selection, calibration and design of this alternative heating (activation) system based on the thermoelectric effect, together with the development of different 'proof of concept' prototypes that have enabled us to validate the concepts put forward, as well as suggest future improvements for 'intelligent' shape memory polymer-based devices.

  1. Simultaneous Nano- and Microscale Control of Nanofibrous Microspheres Self-Assembled from Star-Shaped Polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanpeng; Marson, Ryan L; Ge, Zhishen; Glotzer, Sharon C; Ma, Peter X

    2015-07-08

    Star-shaped polymers with varying arm numbers and arm lengths are synthesized, and self-assembled into microspheres, which are either smooth or fibrous on the nanoscale, and either nonhollow, hollow, or spongy on the microscale. The molecular architecture and functional groups determine the structure on both length scales. This exciting mechanistic discovery guides simultaneous control of both the nano- and microfeatures of the microspheres.

  2. Control Algorithms for a Shape-shifting Tracked Robotic Vehicle Climbing Obstacles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    conduits sur Ie vrai robot afin de verifier la fiabilite et la robust esse des controleurs avec de vrais environnements, capteurs et actuateurs...perception, control and learning algorithms that are widely applicable , fast to compute and adaptive to changing ground conditions. The development of...navigation tasks [11-201. There has been limited application of learning algorithms to shape-shifting platforms for choice of geometry based on

  3. Coherent control of double deflected anomalous modes in ultrathin trapezoid-shaped slit metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z.; Liu, H.; Wang, D.; Li, Y. X.; Guan, C. Y.; Zhang, H.; Shi, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Coherent light-matter interaction in ultrathin metamaterials has been demonstrated to dynamically modulate intensity, polarization and propagation direction of light. The gradient metasurface with a transverse phase variation usually exhibits an anomalous refracted beam of light dictated by so-called generalized Snell’s law. However, less attention has been paid to coherent control of the metasurface with multiple anomalous refracted beams. Here we propose an ultrathin gradient metasurface with single trapezoid-shaped slot antenna as its building block that allows one normal and two deflected transmitted beams. It is numerically demonstrated that such metasurface with multiple scattering modes can be coherently controlled to modulate output intensities by changing the relative phase difference between two counterpropagating coherent beams. Each mode can be coherently switched on/off and two deflected anomalous beams can be synchronously dictated by the phase difference. The coherent control effect in the trapezoid-shaped slit metasurface will offer a promising opportunity for multichannel signals modulation, multichannel sensing and wave front shaping. PMID:27874053

  4. Shape-controlled synthesis of hybrid nanomaterials via three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mengqian; Yang, Shikuan; Ho, Yi-Ping; Grigsby, Christopher L; Leong, Kam W; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-10-28

    Shape-controlled synthesis of nanomaterials through a simple, continuous, and low-cost method is essential to nanomaterials research toward practical applications. Hydrodynamic focusing, with its advantages of simplicity, low-cost, and precise control over reaction conditions, has been used for nanomaterial synthesis. While most studies have focused on improving the uniformity and size control, few have addressed the potential of tuning the shape of the synthesized nanomaterials. Here we demonstrate a facile method to synthesize hybrid materials by three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing (3D-HF). While keeping the flow rates of the reagents constant and changing only the flow rate of the buffer solution, the molar ratio of two reactants (i.e., tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and HAuCl4) within the reaction zone varies. The synthesized TTF-Au hybrid materials possess very different and predictable morphologies. The reaction conditions at different buffer flow rates are studied through computational simulation, and the formation mechanisms of different structures are discussed. This simple one-step method to achieve continuous shape-tunable synthesis highlights the potential of 3D-HF in nanomaterials research.

  5. Coherent control of double deflected anomalous modes in ultrathin trapezoid-shaped slit metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.; Liu, H.; Wang, D.; Li, Y. X.; Guan, C. Y.; Zhang, H.; Shi, J. H.

    2016-11-01

    Coherent light-matter interaction in ultrathin metamaterials has been demonstrated to dynamically modulate intensity, polarization and propagation direction of light. The gradient metasurface with a transverse phase variation usually exhibits an anomalous refracted beam of light dictated by so-called generalized Snell’s law. However, less attention has been paid to coherent control of the metasurface with multiple anomalous refracted beams. Here we propose an ultrathin gradient metasurface with single trapezoid-shaped slot antenna as its building block that allows one normal and two deflected transmitted beams. It is numerically demonstrated that such metasurface with multiple scattering modes can be coherently controlled to modulate output intensities by changing the relative phase difference between two counterpropagating coherent beams. Each mode can be coherently switched on/off and two deflected anomalous beams can be synchronously dictated by the phase difference. The coherent control effect in the trapezoid-shaped slit metasurface will offer a promising opportunity for multichannel signals modulation, multichannel sensing and wave front shaping.

  6. 3D nanopore shape control by current-stimulus dielectric breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Cuifeng; Zhang, Yuechuan; Feng, Yanxiao; Zhou, Daming; Wang, Deqiang; Xiang, Yinxiao; Zhou, Wenyuan; Chen, Yongsheng; Du, Chunlei; Tian, Jianguo

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple and cost-effect method, current-stimulus dielectric breakdown, to manipulate the 3D shapes of the nanochannels in 20-nm-thick SiNx membranes. Besides the precise control of nanopore size, the cone orientation can be determined by the pulse polarity. The cone angle of nanopores can be systematically tuned by simply changing the stimulus pulse waveform, allowing the gradual shape control from conical to obconical. After they are formed, the cone angle of these nanopores can be further tuned in a certain range by adjusting the widening pulse. Such size and 3D shape controllable abiotic nanopores can construct a constriction in the nanochannel and hence produce a sub-nm "sensing zone" to suit any desired bio-sensing or precise DNA sequencing. Using these conical nanopores, 20-nt ssDNA composed of homopolymers (poly(dA)20, poly(dC)20, and poly(dT)20) can be clearly differentiated by their ionic current signals.

  7. Autonomous Real-Time Interventional Scan Plane Control With a 3-D Shape-Sensing Needle

    PubMed Central

    Plata, Juan Camilo; Holbrook, Andrew B.; Park, Yong-Lae; Pauly, Kim Butts; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates real-time scan plane control dependent on three-dimensional needle bending, as measured from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible optical strain sensors. A biopsy needle with embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to measure surface strains is used to estimate its full 3-D shape and control the imaging plane of an MR scanner in real-time, based on the needle’s estimated profile. The needle and scanner coordinate frames are registered to each other via miniature radio-frequency (RF) tracking coils, and the scan planes autonomously track the needle as it is deflected, keeping its tip in view. A 3-D needle annotation is superimposed over MR-images presented in a 3-D environment with the scanner’s frame of reference. Scan planes calculated based on the FBG sensors successfully follow the tip of the needle. Experiments using the FBG sensors and RF coils to track the needle shape and location in real-time had an average root mean square error of 4.2 mm when comparing the estimated shape to the needle profile as seen in high resolution MR images. This positional variance is less than the image artifact caused by the needle in high resolution SPGR (spoiled gradient recalled) images. Optical fiber strain sensors can estimate a needle’s profile in real-time and be used for MRI scan plane control to potentially enable faster and more accurate physician response. PMID:24968093

  8. Autonomous real-time interventional scan plane control with a 3-D shape-sensing needle.

    PubMed

    Elayaperumal, Santhi; Plata, Juan Camilo; Holbrook, Andrew B; Park, Yong-Lae; Pauly, Kim Butts; Daniel, Bruce L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2014-11-01

    This study demonstrates real-time scan plane control dependent on three-dimensional needle bending, as measured from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible optical strain sensors. A biopsy needle with embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to measure surface strains is used to estimate its full 3-D shape and control the imaging plane of an MR scanner in real-time, based on the needle's estimated profile. The needle and scanner coordinate frames are registered to each other via miniature radio-frequency (RF) tracking coils, and the scan planes autonomously track the needle as it is deflected, keeping its tip in view. A 3-D needle annotation is superimposed over MR-images presented in a 3-D environment with the scanner's frame of reference. Scan planes calculated based on the FBG sensors successfully follow the tip of the needle. Experiments using the FBG sensors and RF coils to track the needle shape and location in real-time had an average root mean square error of 4.2 mm when comparing the estimated shape to the needle profile as seen in high resolution MR images. This positional variance is less than the image artifact caused by the needle in high resolution SPGR (spoiled gradient recalled) images. Optical fiber strain sensors can estimate a needle's profile in real-time and be used for MRI scan plane control to potentially enable faster and more accurate physician response.

  9. Chemical Control of Lead Sulfide Quantum Dot Shape, Self-Assembly, and Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Martin R.

    Lead(II) sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) are a promising excitonic material for numerous application that require that control of fluxes of charge and energy at nanoscale interfaces, such as solar energy conversion, photo- and electrocatalysis, light emitting diodes, chemical sensing, single-electron logic elements, field effect transistors, and photovoltaics. PbS QDs are particularly suitable for photonics applications because they exhibit size-tunable band-edge absorption and fluorescence across the entire near-infrared spectrum, undergo efficient multi-exciton generation, exhibit a long radiative lifetime, and possess an eight-fold degenerate ground-state. The effective integration of PbS QDs into these applications requires a thorough understanding of how to control their synthesis, self-assembly, and charge transport phenomena. In this document, I describe a series of experiments to elucidate three levels of chemical control on the emergent properties of PbS QDs: (1) the role of surface chemistry in controlling PbS QD shape during solvothermal synthesis, (2) the role of QD shape and ligand functionalization in self-assembly at a liquid-air interface, and (3) the role of QD packing structure on steady-state conductivity and transient current dynamics. At the synthetic level (1), I show that the final shape and surface chemistry of PbS QDs is highly sensitive to the formation of organosulfur byproducts by commonly used sulfur reagents. The insight into PbS QD growth gained from this work is then developed to controllably tune PbS QD shape from cubic to octahedral to hexapodal while maintaining QD size. At the following level of QD self-assembly (2), I show how QD size and shape dictate packing geometry in extended 2D arrays and how this packing can be controllably interrupted in mixed monolayers. I also study the role of ligand structure on the reorganization of QD arrays at a liquid-air interface and find that the specific packing defects in QD arrays vary

  10. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOEpatents

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  11. Adaptive Control of Two-Photon Excitation of Green Fluorescent Protein with Shaped Femtosecond Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Nabekawa, Yasuo; Suda, Akira; Oishi, Yu; Mizuno, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    For many years, it has been believed that a Fourier-transform-limited (FTL) laser pulse is the most effective light source for the generation of nonlinear phenomena, since the FTL pulse has the shortest pulse duration, that is, the highest intensity, that can be limited by the spectral width due to the principle of uncertainty. Recently, many reports have been published on the adaptive control of nonlinear phenomena with shaped femtosecond excitation laser pulses [1, 2]. Their reports have shown that the modification of the spectral and temporal phases of excitation pulses can increase or decrease the probabilities and efficiencies of such nonlinear phenomena. This method has been widely applied to studies on the active control of molecular motions or chemical reactions [3,4]. Considering further novel biological applications, we focus on the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. GFP is spontaneously fluorescent and is relatively nontoxic compared with other organic dyes used as optical markers. Therefore, it has been widely used as a "tag" material for the fluorescence observation of living cells [5]. Two-photon excitation microscopy (TPEM) is a powerful tool for biological real-time observation due to its various advantages, such as a clear contrast, good S/N ratio, and high spatial resolution [7]. From a practical point of view, however, there is a serious problem with TPEM, which is the photobleaching of a dye. The intensity of a fluorescence signal decreases significantly during observation. One of the reasons for this is that the chromophore structure is degraded by intense excitation laser pulses that are required for efficient two-photon excitation. In this study, therefore, we attempted to determine the optimal phase for maximizing the fluorescence efficiency of a GFP variant with excitation laser pulses of minimal intensity. We considered that GFP can be an ideal dye for the

  12. User-centered evaluation of handle shape and size and input controls for a neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Herring, Scarlett R; Castillejos, Pamela; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2011-11-01

    Current neutron detectors are big, heavy, difficult to use and are not ergonomically designed. Good handle design and easy to use control mechanisms are imperative for comfort, usability and accuracy for hand-held tools. Two studies were performed to assess these factors; Study I explored handle design (shape and size) preference and Study II evaluated the effects of control mechanisms, device orientations and word orientation on performance time. According to research findings, the recommended handle perimeter is 11 cm with a diameter range of 3.5-4.0 cm. These results demonstrated that as the handle perimeter decreased the handle becomes less preferred by first responders when using layered gloves. For control type, the fastest performance time was found with vertical push buttons and a vertical word orientation. These objective results matched the subjective results, which showed that the most preferred controller was a vertical push button control.

  13. On the shape and orientation control of an orbiting shallow spherical shell structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of orbiting shallow flexible spherical shell structures under the influence of control actuators was studied. Control laws are developed to provide both attitude and shape control of the structure. The elastic modal frequencies for the fundamental and lower modes are closely grouped due to the effect of the shell curvature. The shell is gravity stabilized by a spring loaded dumbbell type damper attached at its apex. Control laws are developed based on the pole clustering techniques. Savings in fuel consumption can be realized by using the hybrid shell dumbbell system together with point actuators. It is indicated that instability may result by not including the orbital and first order gravity gradient effects in the plant prior to control law design.

  14. Feedforward-feedback hybrid control for magnetic shape memory alloy actuators based on the Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miaolei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jingyuan

    2014-01-01

    As a new type of smart material, magnetic shape memory alloy has the advantages of a fast response frequency and outstanding strain capability in the field of microdrive and microposition actuators. The hysteresis nonlinearity in magnetic shape memory alloy actuators, however, limits system performance and further application. Here we propose a feedforward-feedback hybrid control method to improve control precision and mitigate the effects of the hysteresis nonlinearity of magnetic shape memory alloy actuators. First, hysteresis nonlinearity compensation for the magnetic shape memory alloy actuator is implemented by establishing a feedforward controller which is an inverse hysteresis model based on Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii operator. Secondly, the paper employs the classical Proportion Integration Differentiation feedback control with feedforward control to comprise the hybrid control system, and for further enhancing the adaptive performance of the system and improving the control accuracy, the Radial Basis Function neural network self-tuning Proportion Integration Differentiation feedback control replaces the classical Proportion Integration Differentiation feedback control. Utilizing self-learning ability of the Radial Basis Function neural network obtains Jacobian information of magnetic shape memory alloy actuator for the on-line adjustment of parameters in Proportion Integration Differentiation controller. Finally, simulation results show that the hybrid control method proposed in this paper can greatly improve the control precision of magnetic shape memory alloy actuator and the maximum tracking error is reduced from 1.1% in the open-loop system to 0.43% in the hybrid control system.

  15. Shape controllers enhance the efficiency of graphene-TiO2 hybrids in pollutant abatement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordello, F.; Odorici, E.; Hu, K.; Minero, C.; Cerruti, M.; Calza, P.

    2016-02-01

    The addition of graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) to TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) has been recently considered as a method to improve the photocatalytic efficiency of TiO2 by favoring charge carrier separation. Here, we show that it is possible to improve the efficiency of GNP-TiO2 composites by controlling the shape, stability, and facets of TiO2 NPs grown on GNP functionalized with either COOH or NH2 groups, while adding ethylendiamine (EDA) and oleic acid (OA) during a hydrothermal synthesis. We studied the photocatalytic activity of all synthesized materials under UV-A light using phenol as a target molecule. GNP-TiO2 composites synthesized on COOH-functionalized GNP, exposing {101} facets, were more efficient at abating phenol than those synthesized on NH2-functionalized GNP, exposing {101} and {100} facets. However, neither of these composites was stable under irradiation. The addition of both OA and EDA stabilized the materials under irradiation; however, only the composite prepared on COOH-functionalized GNP in the presence of EDA showed a significant increase in phenol degradation rate, leading to results that were better than those obtained with TiO2 alone. This result can be attributed to Ti-OH complexation by EDA, which protects GNP from oxidation. The orientation of the most reducing {101} facets toward GNP and the most oxidizing {100} facets toward the solution induces faster phenol degradation owing to a better separation of the charge carriers.The addition of graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) to TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) has been recently considered as a method to improve the photocatalytic efficiency of TiO2 by favoring charge carrier separation. Here, we show that it is possible to improve the efficiency of GNP-TiO2 composites by controlling the shape, stability, and facets of TiO2 NPs grown on GNP functionalized with either COOH or NH2 groups, while adding ethylendiamine (EDA) and oleic acid (OA) during a hydrothermal synthesis. We studied the photocatalytic

  16. Emergent Structures in an Active Polar Fluid: Dynamics of Shape, Scattering, and Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Kabir; Rao, Madan

    2017-02-01

    Spatially localized defect structures emerge spontaneously in a hydrodynamic description of an active polar fluid comprising polar "actin" filaments and "myosin" motor proteins that (un)bind to filaments and exert active contractile stresses. These emergent defect structures are characterized by distinct textures and can be either static or mobile—we derive effective equations of motion for these "extended particles" and analyze their shape, kinetics, interactions, and scattering. Depending on the impact parameter and propulsion speed, these active defects undergo elastic scattering or merger. Our results are relevant for the dynamics of actomyosin-dense structures at the cell cortex, reconstituted actomyosin complexes, and 2D active colloidal gels.

  17. The shapes of bird beaks are highly controlled by nondietary factors

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Jen A.; Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Cobb, Samuel N.

    2016-01-01

    Bird beaks are textbook examples of ecological adaptation to diet, but their shapes are also controlled by genetic and developmental histories. To test the effects of these factors on the avian craniofacial skeleton, we conducted morphometric analyses on raptors, a polyphyletic group at the base of the landbird radiation. Despite common perception, we find that the beak is not an independently targeted module for selection. Instead, the beak and skull are highly integrated structures strongly regulated by size, with axes of shape change linked to the actions of recently identified regulatory genes. Together, size and integration account for almost 80% of the shape variation seen between different species to the exclusion of morphological dietary adaptation. Instead, birds of prey use size as a mechanism to modify their feeding ecology. The extent to which shape variation is confined to a few major axes may provide an advantage in that it facilitates rapid morphological evolution via changes in body size, but may also make raptors especially vulnerable when selection pressures act against these axes. The phylogenetic position of raptors suggests that this constraint is prevalent in all landbirds and that breaking the developmental correspondence between beak and braincase may be the key novelty in classic passerine adaptive radiations. PMID:27125856

  18. Aerodynamic control of bridge cables through shape modification: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, K.; Georgakis, C. T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper examines the viability of modifying bridge cable shape and surface for the purpose of controlling wind-induced vibrations. To this end, an extensive wind-tunnel test campaign was carried out on various cable shapes about the critical Reynolds number region. Cable shapes were chosen to passively modify the flow in a particular manner. Tested shapes included those which have some form of waviness, faceting and shrouding. Section models were tested using a static inclined rig, allowing them to be installed at yawed cable-wind angles for both smooth and turbulent flow conditions. The aerodynamic damping of the tested cylinders is evaluated by applying both 1- and 2-dof quasi-steady aerodynamic instability models. This allows for the prediction of regions of aerodynamic instability, as a function of flow angle and Reynolds number. Whilst the plain, wavy and faceted cylinders are predicted to suffer from either dry inclined galloping, “drag crisis” or Den Hartog galloping, the shrouded cylinder is found to be stable for all angles of attack, albeit with an increase in drag at typical design wind velocities. Finally, turbulent flow is found to introduce an increased amount of aerodynamic damping mainly by providing a more constant lift force over tested Reynolds numbers.

  19. Shape and Mechanical Control of Poly(ethylene oxide) Based Polymersome with Polyoxometalates via Hydrogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Jing, Benxin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Haitao; Qiu, Jie; Shi, Yi; Gao, Haifeng; Zhu, Yingxi

    2017-02-23

    Polymersomes are self-assembled vesicles of amphiphilic block copolymers and have been explored for wide applications from drug delivery to micro/nanoreactors. As polymersomes are soft and highly deformable, their shape instability due to osmolarity difference across polymer membranes and low elasticity could conversely limit their practical use. Instead of selecting particular polymer chemical reactions to enhance the mechanical properties, we have employed inorganic polyoxometalate (POM) clusters as simple physical cross-linkers to control the shape and mechanical stability of polymersomes in aqueous suspensions. Robust spherical shape with enhanced elastic and bending moduli of POM-dressed poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) based polymersomes is achieved. We have accounted for the hydrogen bonding between POM and PEO blocks for the adsorption and stabilization of POMS on polymersomes, whose interaction strength could also be tuned by mixing solvents of hydrogen bond donors or receptors with water. The stimuli-responsive properties of POMs are introduced in POM-dressed polymersomes upon the interaction of POMs with PEO blocks in aqueous media. As POM can be used as nanomedicines, catalysts, and other functional nanomaterials, POM-dressed polymersomes with significant shape and mechanical reinforcement could broaden the applications of PEO-based polymersomes and other PEO-tethered nanocolloids.

  20. Control of Four-Level Quantum Coherence via Discrete Spectral Shaping of an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Matthew C.; Peer, Avi; Ye Jun

    2008-05-23

    We present experiments demonstrating high-resolution and wide-bandwidth coherent control of a four-level atomic system in a diamond configuration. A femtosecond frequency comb is used to excite a specific pair of two-photon transitions in cold {sup 87}Rb. The optical-phase-sensitive response of the closed-loop diamond system is studied by controlling the phase of the comb modes with a pulse shaper. Finally, the pulse shape is optimized resulting in a 256% increase in the two-photon transition rate by forcing constructive interference between the mode pairs detuned from an intermediate resonance.

  1. Partial Tuning of Dynamical Controllers by Data-Driven Loop-Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, Masami; Sugitani, Yosuke

    In this paper, a data-driven design method that gives a desirable loop-shape is proposed for a single input plant. This method is applicable to the tuning of a static feedback gain and also that of the output matrix of a dynamical controller by using a transient response of the plant. Constraints on the feedback gain are derived from the maximum sensitivity and complementary sensitivity conditions based on the unfalsified control idea. A solution is obtained by solving a linear matrix inequality, where the integral gain of the loop transfer function is maximized subject to the constraints. Usefulness is demonstrated by two numerical examples.

  2. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis of Ag nanomaterials via proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong-Joon; Song, Jae Hee

    2012-07-01

    We present a facile one-pot synthetic route for the production of silver nanocrystals via a simple proton beam irradiation process at room temperature. Size- and shape-controlled silver nanostructures were prepared in an aqueous phase-based solution without the addition of any harsh reductants just by changing the stabilizer and by controlling the molar concentration ratios of surfactants to metal precursors. We observed that the size of the resulting Ag nanocrystals was easily varied by changing the stabilizer from hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide to sodium dodecyl sulfate. We also found that the size of the prepared silver nanocrystals decreased as the molar ratio of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide to silver ions was increased.

  3. Mathematical Modeling and Control of Nonlinear Oscillators with Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendame, Mohamed

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) belong to an interesting type of materials that have attracted the attention of scientists and engineers over the last few decades. They have some interesting properties that made them the subject of extensive research to find the best ways to utilize them in different engineering, biomedical, and scientific applications. In this thesis, we develop a mathematical model and analyze the behavior of SMAs by considering a one degree of freedom nonlinear oscillator consisting of a mass connected to a fixed frame through a viscous damping and a shape memory alloy device. Due to the nonlinear and dissipative nature of shape memory alloys, optimal control and Lyapunov stability theories are used to design a controller to stabilize the response of the one degree of freedom nonlinear oscillator. Since SMAs exist in two phases, martensite and austenite, and their phase transformations are dependent on stress and temperature, this work is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the nonlinear oscillator system in its two separate phases by considering a temperature where the SMA exists in only one of the phases. A model for each phase is developed based on Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory that defines the free energy in a polynomial form enabling us to describe the SMAs shape memory effect and pseudoelasticity. However, due to the phenomenon of hysteresis in SMAs, the response of the nonlinear oscillator with a SMA element, in either phase, is chaotic and unstable. In order to stabilize the chaotic behavior, an optimal linear quadratic regulator controller is designed around a stable equilibrium for the martensitic and the austenitic phases. The closed-loop response for each phase is then simulated and computational results are presented. The second part of the thesis deals with the entire system in its dynamics by combining the two phases and taking into account the effect of temperature on the response of the system. Governing equations

  4. Polarized Growth Controls Cell Shape and Bipolar Bud Site Selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Jun; Barral, Yves; Snyder, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between polarized growth and division site selection, two fundamental processes important for proper development of eukaryotes. Diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exhibit an ellipsoidal shape and a specific division pattern (a bipolar budding pattern). We found that the polarity genes SPA2, PEA2, BUD6, and BNI1 participate in a crucial step of bud morphogenesis, apical growth. Deleting these genes results in round cells and diminishes bud elongation in mutants that exhibit pronounced apical growth. Examination of distribution of the polarized secretion marker Sec4 demonstrates that spa2Δ, pea2Δ, bud6Δ, and bni1Δ mutants fail to concentrate Sec4 at the bud tip during apical growth and at the division site during repolarization just prior to cytokinesis. Moreover, cell surface expansion is not confined to the distal tip of the bud in these mutants. In addition, we found that the p21-activated kinase homologue Ste20 is also important for both apical growth and bipolar bud site selection. We further examined how the duration of polarized growth affects bipolar bud site selection by using mutations in cell cycle regulators that control the timing of growth phases. The grr1Δ mutation enhances apical growth by stabilizing G1 cyclins and increases the distal-pole budding in diploids. Prolonging polarized growth phases by disrupting the G2/M cyclin gene CLB2 enhances the accuracy of bud site selection in wild-type, spa2Δ, and ste20Δ cells, whereas shortening the polarized growth phases by deleting SWE1 decreases the fidelity of bipolar budding. This study reports the identification of components required for apical growth and demonstrates the critical role of polarized growth in bipolar bud site selection. We propose that apical growth and repolarization at the site of cytokinesis are crucial for establishing spatial cues used by diploid yeast cells to position division planes. PMID:10866679

  5. Biosynthesis of controllable size and shape gold nanoparticles by black seed (Nigella sativa) extract.

    PubMed

    Fragoon, Ahmed; Li, Jianjun; Zhu, Jian; Zhao, Junwu

    2012-03-01

    We report on the use of black seed (Nigella sativa) extract, previously not exploited, in synthesis of gold nanoparticles. On treating aqueous chloroauric acid solution with black seed extract, the antioxidant activities critical roles of the various phytochemicals is observed leading to the formation of crystalline and poly shaped gold nanoparticles. In this research work, we developed a rapid and non-toxic method for the preparation of biocompatible gold nanoparticles by two different synthetic routes: microwave irradiation and thermo-induced procedures. The nanoparticles were characterized and investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The size and shape of the nanoparticles were found to be very sensitive to the quantity of the extract. As the amount of extract is increased, the stronger the interaction between the extract biomolecules and nascent nanoparticles, thus the yield of nanoparticles increased as shown by surface plasmon resonance bands in the UV-vis-NIR spectra. The reaction temperature has a significant role in production of gold nanoparticles with different shapes. The XRD studies reflect an interesting feature indicates that gold nanocrystals are highly anisotropic in nature, mainly triangular and hexagonal shapes, and that the particles are (111) oriented. The observed characteristics suggest the application of the biocompatible gold nanoparticles to future in vivo imaging and therapy.

  6. Tracking Control of a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator Using an Inverse Preisach Model with Modified Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys are a new class of smart materials with extraordinary strains up to 12% and frequencies in the range of 1 to 2 kHz. The MSM actuator is a potential device which can achieve high performance electromagnetic actuation by using the properties of MSM alloys. However, significant non-linear hysteresis behavior is a significant barrier to control the MSM actuator. In this paper, the Preisach model was used, by capturing experiments from different input signals and output responses, to model the hysteresis of MSM actuator, and the inverse Preisach model, as a feedforward control, provided compensational signals to the MSM actuator to linearize the hysteresis non-linearity. The control strategy for path tracking combined the hysteresis compensator and the modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) which served as a path controller. Based on the experimental results, it was verified that a tracking error in the order of micrometers was achieved. PMID:27571081

  7. Tracking Control of a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator Using an Inverse Preisach Model with Modified Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2016-08-25

    Magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys are a new class of smart materials with extraordinary strains up to 12% and frequencies in the range of 1 to 2 kHz. The MSM actuator is a potential device which can achieve high performance electromagnetic actuation by using the properties of MSM alloys. However, significant non-linear hysteresis behavior is a significant barrier to control the MSM actuator. In this paper, the Preisach model was used, by capturing experiments from different input signals and output responses, to model the hysteresis of MSM actuator, and the inverse Preisach model, as a feedforward control, provided compensational signals to the MSM actuator to linearize the hysteresis non-linearity. The control strategy for path tracking combined the hysteresis compensator and the modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) which served as a path controller. Based on the experimental results, it was verified that a tracking error in the order of micrometers was achieved.

  8. Synthesis and characterisation of flower shaped zinc oxide nanostructures and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Appala Naidu, Etcherla; Sinha, Madhulika; Siva Kumar, Koppala; Sreedhara Reddy, Pamanji

    2013-03-01

    Flower shaped Zinc Oxide nanostructures was synthesized using a simple method without using any structure directing agents. Elemental analysis, crystalline nature, shape and size were examined using Powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDAX). XRD revealed the formation of hexagonal ZnO nanostructures. SEM and TEM analyses revealed the formation of crystalline ZnO flowers in which a bunch of ZnO nanorods assembled together to form a leaf like structure followed by flower shaped ZnO nanostructures. Thus synthesised ZnO nanostructures showed good antimicrobial activity towards gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus as well as gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli with a MIC/MBC of 25mg/L.

  9. Multi-object active shape model construction for abdomen segmentation: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Gollmer, Sebastian T; Simon, Martin; Bischof, Arpad; Barkhausen, Jorg; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2012-01-01

    The automatic segmentation of abdominal organs is a pre-requisite for many medical applications. Successful methods typically rely on prior knowledge about the to be segmented anatomy as it is for instance provided by means of active shape models (ASMs). Contrary to most previous ASM based methods, this work does not focus on individual organs. Instead, a more holistic approach that aims at exploiting inter-organ relationships to eventually segment a complex of organs is proposed. Accordingly, a flexible framework for automatic construction of multi-object ASMs is introduced, employed for coupled shape modeling, and used for co-segmentation of liver and spleen based on a new coupled shape/separate pose approach. Our first results indicate feasible segmentation accuracies, whereas pose decoupling leads to substantially better segmentation results and performs in average also slightly better than the standard single-object ASM approach.

  10. Novel active comb-shaped dry electrode for EEG measurement in hairy site.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Wu, Chung-Yu; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important biopotential, and has been widely applied in clinical applications. The conventional EEG electrode with conductive gels is usually used for measuring EEG. However, the use of conductive gel also encounters with the issue of drying and hardening. Recently, many dry EEG electrodes based on different conductive materials and techniques were proposed to solve the previous issue. However, measuring EEG in the hairy site is still a difficult challenge. In this study, a novel active comb-shaped dry electrode was proposed to measure EEG in hairy site. Different form other comb-shaped or spike-shaped dry electrodes, it can provide more excellent performance of avoiding the signal attenuation, phase distortion, and the reduction of common mode rejection ratio. Even under walking motion, it can effectively acquire EEG in hairy site. Finally, the experiments for alpha rhythm and steady-state visually evoked potential were also tested to validate the proposed electrode.

  11. Nonlinear Numerical Modeling of Shape Control in IGNITOR in the Presence of 3D Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; de Tommasi, G.; Pironti, A.; Rubinacci, G.; Villone, F.; Ramogida, G.; Coppi, B.

    2014-10-01

    IGNITOR is a high field compact machine designed for the investigation of fusion burning plasmas at or close to ignition. The integrated plasma position, shape and current control plays an important role in its safe operation. The analysis of its behavior taking into account nonlinear and 3D effects can be of great interest for assessing its performances. In fact, the system was designed on the basis of an axisymmetric linearized model. To this purpose, we use a computational tool, called CarMa0NL, with the unprecedented capability of simultaneously considering three-dimensional effects of conductors surrounding the plasma and the inherent nonlinearity of the plasma behaviour itself, in the presence of the complex set of circuit equations describing the control system. Preliminary results already lead to the conclusion that the vertical position response is not much influenced by nonlinear and 3D effects, as the vertical stabilization controller is able to ``hide'' the differences in open-loop models. Here we assess the performance of the shape controller, by coupling the nonlinear plasma evolution in the presence of the 3D vessel with ports to the complex circuit dynamics simulating the integrated closed loop control system.

  12. Reducing the pressure drag of a D-shaped bluff body using linear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Longa, L.; Morgans, A. S.; Dahan, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    The pressure drag of blunt bluff bodies is highly relevant in many practical applications, including to the aerodynamic drag of road vehicles. This paper presents theory revealing that a mean drag reduction can be achieved by manipulating wake flow fluctuations. A linear feedback control strategy then exploits this idea, targeting attenuation of the spatially integrated base (back face) pressure fluctuations. Large-eddy simulations of the flow over a D-shaped blunt bluff body are used as a test-bed for this control strategy. The flow response to synthetic jet actuation is characterised using system identification, and controller design is via shaping of the frequency response to achieve fluctuation attenuation. The designed controller successfully attenuates integrated base pressure fluctuations, increasing the time-averaged pressure on the body base by 38%. The effect on the flow field is to push the roll-up of vortices further downstream and increase the extent of the recirculation bubble. This control approach uses only body-mounted sensing/actuation and input-output model identification, meaning that it could be applied experimentally.

  13. Spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound.

    PubMed

    Rafaely, Boaz

    2009-05-01

    Active control of sound has been employed to reduce noise levels around listeners' head using destructive interference from noise-canceling sound sources. Recently, spherical loudspeaker arrays have been studied as multiple-channel sound sources, capable of generating sound fields with high complexity. In this paper, the potential use of a spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound is investigated. A theoretical analysis of the primary and secondary sound fields around a spherical sound source reveals that the natural quiet zones for the spherical source have a shell-shape. Using numerical optimization, quiet zones with other shapes are designed, showing potential for quiet zones with extents that are significantly larger than the well-known limit of a tenth of a wavelength for monopole sources. The paper presents several simulation examples showing quiet zones in various configurations.

  14. Design of an adaptive controller for dive-plane control of a torpedo-shaped AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Su, Yumin; Zhao, Jinxin

    2011-09-01

    Underwater vehicles operating in complex ocean conditions present difficulties in determining accurate dynamic models. To guarantee robustness against parameter uncertainty, an adaptive controller for dive-plane control, based on Lyapunov theory and back-stepping techniques, was proposed. In the closed-loop system, asymptotic tracking of the reference depth and pitch angle trajectories was accomplished. Simulation results were presented which show effective dive-plane control in spite of the uncertainties in the system parameters.

  15. Single Input Fuzzy Controller with Command Shaping Schemes for Double-Pendulum Overhead Crane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. A.; Saealal, M. S.; Ismail, R. M. T. Raja; Zawawi, M. A.; Nasir, A. N. K.; Ramli, M. S.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents investigations into the development of composite control schemes for trajectory tracking and anti-sway control of a double-pendulum-type overhead crane (DPTOC) system. A nonlinear DPTOC system is considered and the dynamic model of the system is derived using the Euler-Lagrange formulation. The proposed method, known as the Single Input Fuzzy Logic Controller (SIFLC), reduces the conventional two-input FLC (CFLC) to a single input single output (SISO) controller. The SIFLC is developed for position control of cart movement. This is then extended to incorporate input shaping schemes for anti-swaying control of the system. The input shapers with different mode selection are designed based on the properties of the system. The results of the response with the controllers are presented in time and frequency domains. The performances of control schemes are examined in terms of level of input tracking capability, sway angle reduction and time response specifications in comparison to SIFLC controller. Finally, a comparative assessment of the control techniques is discussed and presented.

  16. Embodied information processing: vibrissa mechanics and texture features shape micromotions in actively sensing rats.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Jason T; Andermann, Mark L; Moore, Christopher I

    2008-02-28

    Peripheral sensory organs provide the first transformation of sensory information, and understanding how their physical embodiment shapes transduction is central to understanding perception. We report the characterization of surface transduction during active sensing in the rodent vibrissa sensory system, a widely used model. Employing high-speed videography, we tracked vibrissae while rats sampled rough and smooth textures. Variation in vibrissa length predicted motion mean frequencies, including for the highest velocity events, indicating that biomechanics, such as vibrissa resonance, shape signals most likely to drive neural activity. Rough surface contact generated large amplitude, high-velocity "stick-slip-ring" events, while smooth surfaces generated smaller and more regular stick-slip oscillations. Both surfaces produced velocities exceeding those applied in reduced preparations, indicating active sensation of surfaces generates more robust drive than previously predicted. These findings demonstrate a key role for embodiment in vibrissal sensing and the importance of input transformations in sensory representation.

  17. A minimal path searching approach for active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation of the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shengwen; Fei, Baowei

    2009-02-01

    We are developing a minimal path searching method for active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation for detection of lung boundaries on digital radiographs. With the conventional ASM method, the position and shape parameters of the model points are iteratively refined and the target points are updated by the least Mahalanobis distance criterion. We propose an improved searching strategy that extends the searching points in a fan-shape region instead of along the normal direction. A minimal path (MP) deformable model is applied to drive the searching procedure. A statistical shape prior model is incorporated into the segmentation. In order to keep the smoothness of the shape, a smooth constraint is employed to the deformable model. To quantitatively assess the ASM-MP segmentation, we compare the automatic segmentation with manual segmentation for 72 lung digitized radiographs. The distance error between the ASM-MP and manual segmentation is 1.75 +/- 0.33 pixels, while the error is 1.99 +/- 0.45 pixels for the ASM. Our results demonstrate that our ASM-MP method can accurately segment the lung on digital radiographs.

  18. Controlling the light distribution through turbid media with wavefront shaping based on volumetric optoacoustic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Estrada, Héctor; Özbek, Ali; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront shaping based on optoacoustic (photoacoustic) feedback has recently emerged as a promising tool to control the light distribution in optically-scattering media. In this approach, the phase of a short-pulsed light beam is spatially-modulated to create constructive light interference (focusing) at specific locations in the speckle pattern of the scattered wavefield. The optoacoustic signals generated by light absorption provide a convenient feedback mechanism to optimize the phase mask of the spatial light modulator in order to achieve the desired light intensity distribution. The optimization procedure can be done by directly considering the acquired signals or the reconstructed images of the light absorption distribution. Recently, our group has introduced a volumetric (three-dimensional) optoacoustic wavefront shaping platform that enables monitoring the distribution of light absorption in an entire volume with frame rates of tens of Hz. With this approach, it is possible to simultaneously control the volumetric light distribution through turbid media. Experiments performed with absorbing microparticles distributed in a three-dimensional region showcase the feasibility of enhancing the light intensity at specific points, where the size of particles is also essential to maximize the signal enhancement. The advantages provided by optoacoustic imaging in terms of spatial and temporal resolution anticipate new capabilities of wavefront shaping techniques in biomedical optics.

  19. Micro-well arrays for 3D shape control and high resolution analysis of single cells.

    PubMed

    Ochsner, Mirjam; Dusseiller, Marc R; Grandin, H Michelle; Luna-Morris, Sheila; Textor, Marcus; Vogel, Viola; Smith, Michael L

    2007-08-01

    In addition to rigidity, matrix composition, and cell shape, dimensionality is now considered an important property of the cell microenvironment which directs cell behavior. However, available tools for cell culture in two-dimensional (2D) versus three-dimensional (3D) environments are difficult to compare, and no tools exist which provide 3D shape control of single cells. We developed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates for the culture of single cells in 3D arrays which are compatible with high-resolution microscopy. Cell adhesion was limited to within microwells by passivation of the flat upper surface through 'wet-printing' of a non-fouling polymer and backfilling of the wells with specific adhesive proteins or lipid bilayers. Endothelial cells constrained within microwells were viable, and intracellular features could be imaged with high resolution objectives. Finally, phalloidin staining of actin stress fibers showed that the cytoskeleton of cells in microwells was 3D and not limited to the cell-substrate interface. Thus, microwells can be used to produce microenvironments for large numbers of single cells with 3D shape control and can be added to a repertoire of tools which are ever more sought after for both fundamental biological studies as well as high throughput cell screening assays.

  20. On a neck, on a spit: controls on the shape of free spits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, A. D.; Nienhuis, J.; Ells, K.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the controls upon the shape of freely extending spits using a one-contour-line model of shoreline evolution. In contrast to existing frameworks that suggest that spits are oriented in the direction of alongshore sediment transport and that wave refraction around the spit end is the primary cause of recurving, our results suggest that spit shoreline shapes are perhaps best understood as graded features arising from a complex interplay between distinct morphodynamic elements: the headland updrift of the spit, the erosive "neck" (which may be overwashing), and the depositional "hook". Between the neck and the hook lies a downdrift-migrating "fulcrum point" which tends towards a steady-state trajectory set by the angle of maximum alongshore sediment transport. Model results demonstrate that wave climate characteristics affect spit growth; however, we find that the rate of headland retreat exerts a dominant control on spit shape, orientation, and progradation rate. Interestingly, as a spit forms off of a headland, the rate of sediment input to the spit itself emerges through feedbacks with the downdrift spit end, and in many cases faster spit progradation may coincide with reduced sediment input to the spit itself. Furthermore, as the depositional hook rests entirely beyond the maximum in alongshore sediment transport, this shoreline reach is susceptible to high-angle wave instability throughout and, as a result, spit depositional signals may be highly autogenic.

  1. On a neck, on a spit: controls on the shape of free spits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, A. D.; Nienhuis, J.; Ells, K.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the controls upon the shape of freely extending spits using a one-contour-line model of shoreline evolution. In contrast to existing frameworks that suggest that spits are oriented in the direction of alongshore sediment transport and that wave refraction around the spit end is the primary cause of recurving, our results suggest that spit shoreline shapes are perhaps best understood as graded features arising from a complex interplay between distinct morphodynamic elements: the headland updrift of the spit, the erosive "neck" (which may be overwashing), and the depositional "hook." Between the neck and the hook lies a downdrift-migrating "fulcrum point" whose trajectory is set by the angle of maximum alongshore sediment transport. Model results demonstrate that wave climate characteristics affect spit growth; however, we find that the rate of headland retreat exerts a dominant control on spit shape, orientation, and progradation rate. Interestingly, as a spit forms off of a headland, the rate of sediment input to the spit itself emerges through feedbacks with the downdrift spit end, and in many cases faster spit progradation may coincide with reduced sediment input to the spit itself. Furthermore, as the depositional hook rests entirely beyond the maximum in alongshore sediment transport, this shoreline reach is susceptible to high-angle wave instability throughout and, as a result, spit depositional signals may be highly autogenic.

  2. Shape effect on the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized via a microwave-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuesen; Wen, Junjie; Xiong, Xuhua; Hu, Yongyou

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used as sustained-release bactericidal agents for water treatment. Among the physicochemical characteristics of AgNPs, shape is an important parameter relevant to the antibacterial activity. Three typically shaped AgNPs, nanocubes, nanospheres, and nanowires, were prepared via a microwave-assisted method and characterized by TEM, UV-vis, and XRD. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was determined by OD growth curves tests, MIC tests, and cell viability assay against Escherichia coli. The interaction between AgNPs and bacterial cells was observed by TEM. The results showed that the three differently shaped AgNPs were nanoscale, 55 ± 10 nm in edge length for nanocubes, 60 ± 15 nm in diameter for nanospheres, 60 ± 10 nm in diameter and 2-4 μm in length for nanowires. At the bacterial concentration of 10(4) CFU/mL, the MIC of nanocubes, nanospheres, and nanowires were 37.5, 75, and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Due to the worst contact with bacteria, silver nanowires exhibited the weakest antibacterial activity compared with silver nanocubes and silver nanospheres. Besides, silver nanocubes mainly covered by {100} facets showed stronger antibacterial activity than silver nanospheres covered by {111} facets. It suggests that the shape effect on the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is attributed to the specific surface areas and facets reactivity; AgNPs with larger effective contact areas and higher reactive facets exhibit stronger antibacterial activity.

  3. Shaped Gaussian Dictionaries for Quantized Networked Control Systems With Correlated Dropouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Edwin G. W.; Quevedo, Daniel E.; Ostergaard, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies fixed rate vector quantisation for noisy networked control systems (NCSs) with correlated packet dropouts. In particular, a discrete-time linear time invariant system is to be controlled over an error-prone digital channel. The controller uses (quantized) packetized predictive control to reduce the impact of packet losses. The proposed vector quantizer is based on sparse regression codes (SPARC), which have recently been shown to be efficient in open-loop systems when coding white Gaussian sources. The dictionaries in existing design of SPARCs consist of independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) Gaussian entries. However, we show that a significant gain can be achieved by using Gaussian dictionaries that are shaped according to the second-order statistics of the NCS in question. Furthermore, to avoid training of the dictionaries, we provide closed-form expressions for the required second-order statistics in the absence of quantization.

  4. Shaping femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra using optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Soroosh; Schreiber, Michael; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2008-04-21

    Optimal control theory is used to tailor laser pulses which enhance a femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectrum in a certain frequency range. For this aim the optimal control theory has to be applied to a target state distributed in time. Explicit control mechanisms are given for shaping either the Stokes or the probe pulse in the four-wave mixing process. A simple molecule for which highly accurate potential energy surfaces are available, namely molecular iodine, is used to test the procedure. This approach of controlling vibrational motion and delivering higher intensities to certain frequency ranges might also be important for the improvement of CARS microscopy.

  5. Active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Poinsot, T.; Candel, S.

    1987-12-01

    The principle of 'antisound' is used to construct a method for the suppression of combustion instabilities. This active instability control (AIC) method uses external acoustic excitation by a loudspeaker to suppress the oscillations of a flame. The excitation signal is provided by a microphone located upstream of the flame. This signal is filtered, processed, amplified, and sent to the loudspeaker. The AIC method is validated on a laboratory combustor. It allows the suppression of all unstable modes of the burner for any operating ratio. The influence of the microphone and loudspeaker locations on the performance of the AIC system is described. For a given configuration, domains of stability, i.e., domains where the AIC system parameters provide suppression of the oscillation, are investigated. Measurements of the electric input of the loudspeaker show that the energy consumption of the AIC system is almost negligible and suggest that this method could be used for industrial combustor stabilization. Finally, a simple model describing the effects of the AIC system is developed and its results compared to the experiment.

  6. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  7. Lorentz meets Fano in spectral line shapes: a universal phase and its laser control.

    PubMed

    Ott, Christian; Kaldun, Andreas; Raith, Philipp; Meyer, Kristina; Laux, Martin; Evers, Jörg; Keitel, Christoph H; Greene, Chris H; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2013-05-10

    Symmetric Lorentzian and asymmetric Fano line shapes are fundamental spectroscopic signatures that quantify the structural and dynamical properties of nuclei, atoms, molecules, and solids. This study introduces a universal temporal-phase formalism, mapping the Fano asymmetry parameter q to a phase φ of the time-dependent dipole response function. The formalism is confirmed experimentally by laser-transforming Fano absorption lines of autoionizing helium into Lorentzian lines after attosecond-pulsed excitation. We also demonstrate the inverse, the transformation of a naturally Lorentzian line into a Fano profile. A further application of this formalism uses quantum-phase control to amplify extreme-ultraviolet light resonantly interacting with He atoms. The quantum phase of excited states and its response to interactions can thus be extracted from line-shape analysis, with applications in many branches of spectroscopy.

  8. Band-selective shaped pulse for high fidelity quantum control in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yan-Chun; Xing, Jian; Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Li, Wu-Xia; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Gu, Chang-Zhi; Pan, Xin-Yu; Long, Gui-Lu

    2014-06-30

    High fidelity quantum control of qubits is crucially important for realistic quantum computing, and it becomes more challenging when there are inevitable interactions between qubits. We introduce a band-selective shaped pulse, refocusing BURP (REBURP) pulse, to cope with the problems. The electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond is flipped with high fidelity by the REBURP pulse. In contrast with traditional rectangular pulses, the shaped pulse has almost equal excitation effect in a sharply edged region (in frequency domain). So the three sublevels of host {sup 14}N nuclear spin can be flipped accurately simultaneously, while unwanted excitations of other sublevels (e.g., of a nearby {sup 13}C nuclear spin) is well suppressed. Our scheme can be used for various applications such as quantum metrology, quantum sensing, and quantum information process.

  9. Shape control of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles under different chain length of reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoi, Kuan Hoon; Chia, Chin-Hua Zakaria, Sarani; Chiu, Wee Siong

    2015-09-25

    We report on the effect of using reducing agents with different chain-length on the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in 1-octadecene. This modification allows us to control the shape of nanoparticles into spherical and cubic iron oxide nanoparticles. The highly monodisperse 14 nm spherical nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-dodecanediol and average 14 nm edge-length cubic iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-tetradecanediol. The structural characterization such as transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows similar properties between two particles with different shapes. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) shows no significant difference between spherical and cubic nanoparticles, which are 36 emu/g and 37 emu/g respectively and superparamagnetic in nature.

  10. Active Control of Noise Using Actuator/Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Winder, Patrice; Kirby, George

    1996-01-01

    Current research in smart structures is directed toward the integration of many actuators and sensors into a material. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using this instrumentation for active noise control from a vibrating structures. Current technology for reducing radiated sound is limited by the instrumentation for the control system. These control systems employ relatively small numbers of sensors and actuators. Hence, these control systems must rely on a model of the structure to estimate and control the global vibrations that contribute to the far field pressure. For complex, realistic structures the development of such a model is a formidable task. The model is a limiting factor in the continuing development of structural acoustics. In this paper we propose to increase the number of actuators and sensors of a smart material to offset the complexity of the model used for control design. The sensor arrays will be used to directly sense the shape of the structure rather than using a model of the structures to indirectly sense the shape of the structure. The actuator array is used to apply distributed forces to the structure, rather than using the structure itself as a load path. A control system for the active cancellation of sound is derived from standard control system methodologies.

  11. Segmentation of risk structures for otologic surgery using the Probabilistic Active Shape Model (PASM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Meike; Kirschner, Matthias; Sakas, Georgios

    2014-03-01

    Our research project investigates a multi-port approach for minimally-invasive otologic surgery. For planning such a surgery, an accurate segmentation of the risk structures is crucial. However, the segmentation of these risk structures is a challenging task: The anatomical structures are very small and some have a complex shape, low contrast and vary both in shape and appearance. Therefore, prior knowledge is needed which is why we apply model-based approaches. In the present work, we use the Probabilistic Active Shape Model (PASM), which is a more flexible and specific variant of the Active Shape Model (ASM), to segment the following risk structures: cochlea, semicircular canals, facial nerve, chorda tympani, ossicles, internal auditory canal, external auditory canal and internal carotid artery. For the evaluation we trained and tested the algorithm on 42 computed tomography data sets using leave-one-out tests. Visual assessment of the results shows in general a good agreement of manual and algorithmic segmentations. Further, we achieve a good Average Symmetric Surface Distance while the maximum error is comparatively large due to low contrast at start and end points. Last, we compare the PASM to the standard ASM and show that the PASM leads to a higher accuracy.

  12. Biosynthesis and recovery of rod-shaped tellurium nanoparticles and their bactericidal activities

    SciTech Connect

    Zare, Bijan; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Shakibaie, Mojtaba; Rezaie, Sassan; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Biosynthesis of rod shape tellurium nanoparticles with a hexagonal crystal structure. ► Extraction procedure for isolation of tellurium nanoparticles from Bacillus sp. BZ. ► Extracted tellurium nanoparticles have good bactericidal activity against some bacteria. -- Abstract: In this study, a tellurium-transforming Bacillus sp. BZ was isolated from the Caspian Sea in northern Iran. The isolate was identified by various tests and 16S rDNA analysis, and then used to prepare elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The isolate was subsequently used for the intracellular biosynthesis of elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The biogenic nanoparticles were released by liquid nitrogen and purified by an n-octyl alcohol water extraction system. The shape, size, and composition of the extracted nanoparticles were characterized. The transmission electron micrograph showed rod-shaped nanoparticles with dimensions of about 20 nm × 180 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction spectra respectively demonstrated that the extracted nanoparticles consisted of only tellurium and have a hexagonal crystal structure. This is the first study to demonstrate a biological method for synthesizing rod-shaped elemental tellurium by a Bacillus sp., its extraction and its antibacterial activity against different clinical isolates.

  13. Independent control of the shape and composition of ionic nanocrystals through sequential cation exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, Joseph Matthew; Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-07-06

    Size- and shape-controlled nanocrystal growth is intensely researched for applications including electro-optic, catalytic, and medical devices. Chemical transformations such as cation exchange overcome the limitation of traditional colloidal synthesis, where the nanocrystal shape often reflects the inherent symmetry of the underlying lattice. Here we show that nanocrystals, with established synthetic protocols for high monodispersity, can be templates for independent composition control. Specifically, controlled interconversion between wurtzite CdS, chalcocite Cu2S, and rock salt PbS occurs while preserving the anisotropic dimensions unique to the as-synthesized materials. Sequential exchange reactions between the three sulfide compositions are driven by the disparate solubilites of the metal ion exchange pair in specific coordinating molecules. Starting with CdS, highly anisotropic PbS nanorods are created, which serve as an important material for studying strong 2-dimensional quantum confinement, as well as for optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, interesting nanoheterostructures of CdS|PbS are obtained by precise control over ion insertion and removal.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiu-Jie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  15. Extracellular matrix and cell shape: potential control points for inhibition of angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary endothelial (CE) cells require two extracellular signals in order to switch from quiescence to growth and back to differentiation during angiogenesis: soluble angiogenic factors and insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Soluble endothelial mitogens, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), act over large distances to trigger capillary growth, whereas ECM molecules act locally to modulate cell responsiveness to these soluble cues. Recent studies reveal that ECM molecules regulate CE cell growth and differentiation by modulating cell shape and by activating intracellular chemical signaling pathways inside the cell. Recognition of the importance of ECM and cell shape during capillary morphogenesis has led to the identification of a series of new angiogenesis inhibitors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism of capillary regulation may result in development of even more potent angiogenesis modulators in the future.

  16. Input-Shaped Link Motion Control of Planar Space Robot Equipped with Flexible Appendage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Shinya; Kojima, Hirohisa

    Control of a space robot without actuators on the main body is an underactuated control problem. Various stabilization methods, such as the time-varying feedback control method, discontinuous feedback control method, center manifold-based method, zero-dynamics method and sliding-mode control method have been proposed. However, past studies have not considered underactuated space robots equipped with a flexible appendage, such as solar panels. If the manipulators are simply controlled to achieve the target state for the robot using the past controllers without taking a flexible appendage into consideration, residual vibration remains even after the link motion has finished. In order to suppress the residual vibration on the flexible appendage, we apply the input-shaping technique to the link motion of an underactuated planar space robot. Numerical and experimental studies are carried out to validate the proposed method for a planar dual-link space robot with a flexible appendage. The results show that the proposed method is capable of not only controlling the link angles and the main body attitude to the goal angles, but also suppressing the residual vibration on the flexible appendage.

  17. Distance, shape and more: recognition of object features during active electrolocation in a weakly electric fish.

    PubMed

    von der Emde, Gerhard; Fetz, Steffen

    2007-09-01

    In the absence of light, the weakly electric fish Gnathonemus petersii detects and distinguishes objects in the environment through active electrolocation. In order to test which features of an object the fish use under these conditions to discriminate between differently shaped objects, we trained eight individuals in a food-rewarded, two-alternative, forced-choice procedure. All fish learned to discriminate between two objects of different shapes and volumes. When new object combinations were offered in non-rewarded test trials, fish preferred those objects that resembled the one they had been trained to (S+) and avoided objects resembling the one that had not been rewarded (S-). For a decision, fish paid attention to the relative differences between the two objects they had to discriminate. For discrimination, fish used several object features, the most important ones being volume, material and shape. The importance of shape was demonstrated by reducing the objects to their 3-dimensional contours, which sufficed for the fish to distinguish differently shaped objects. Our results also showed that fish attended strongly to the feature ;volume', because all individuals tended to avoid the larger one of two objects. When confronted with metal versus plastic objects, all fish avoided metal and preferred plastic objects, irrespective of training. In addition to volume, material and shape, fish attended to additional parameters, such as corners or rounded edges. When confronted with two unknown objects, fish weighed up the positive and negative properties of these novel objects and based their decision on the outcome of this comparison. Our results suggest that fish are able to link and assemble local features of an electrolocation pattern to construct a representation of an object, suggesting that some form of a feature extraction mechanism enables them to solve a complex object recognition task.

  18. Overview of Langley activities in active controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active controls technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. The activities of the Langley Research Center (laRC) in advancing active controls technology. Activities are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  19. Unsupervised Cardiac Image Segmentation via Multiswarm Active Contours with a Shape Prior

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Aceves, I.; Avina-Cervantes, J. G.; Lopez-Hernandez, J. M.; Garcia-Hernandez, M. G.; Ibarra-Manzano, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new unsupervised image segmentation method based on particle swarm optimization and scaled active contours with shape prior. The proposed method uses particle swarm optimization over a polar coordinate system to perform the segmentation task, increasing the searching capability on medical images with respect to different interactive segmentation techniques. This method is used to segment the human heart and ventricular areas from datasets of computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, where the shape prior is acquired by cardiologists, and it is utilized as the initial active contour. Moreover, to assess the performance of the cardiac medical image segmentations obtained by the proposed method and by the interactive techniques regarding the regions delineated by experts, a set of validation metrics has been adopted. The experimental results are promising and suggest that the proposed method is capable of segmenting human heart and ventricular areas accurately, which can significantly help cardiologists in clinical decision support. PMID:24198850

  20. Optimal input shaping for Fisher identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberger, Michael J.

    This dissertation examines the fundamental challenge of optimally shaping input trajectories to maximize parameter identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models. Identifiability is a property from information theory that determines the solvability of parameter estimation for mathematical models using input-output measurements. This dissertation creates a framework that exploits the Fisher information metric to quantify the level of battery parameter identifiability, optimizes this metric through input shaping, and facilitates faster and more accurate estimation. The popularity of lithium-ion batteries is growing significantly in the energy storage domain, especially for stationary and transportation applications. While these cells have excellent power and energy densities, they are plagued with safety and lifespan concerns. These concerns are often resolved in the industry through conservative current and voltage operating limits, which reduce the overall performance and still lack robustness in detecting catastrophic failure modes. New advances in automotive battery management systems mitigate these challenges through the incorporation of model-based control to increase performance, safety, and lifespan. To achieve these goals, model-based control requires accurate parameterization of the battery model. While many groups in the literature study a variety of methods to perform battery parameter estimation, a fundamental issue of poor parameter identifiability remains apparent for lithium-ion battery models. This fundamental challenge of battery identifiability is studied extensively in the literature, and some groups are even approaching the problem of improving the ability to estimate the model parameters. The first approach is to add additional sensors to the battery to gain more information that is used for estimation. The other main approach is to shape the input trajectories to increase the amount of information that can be gained from input

  1. Use of Soybean Lecithin in Shape Controlled Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Benjamin Robert

    The work presented in this dissertation is a composite of experiments in the growth of gold nanoparticles with specific optical properties of interest. The goal is to synthesize these gold nanoparticles using soybean extract for not only shape control, but for propensity as a biocompatible delivery system. The optical properties of these nanoparticles has found great application in coloring glass during the Roman empire and, over the centuries, has grown into its own research field in applications of nanoparticulate materials. Many of the current functions include use in biological systems as biosensors and therapeutic applications, thus making biocompatibility a necessity. Current use of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide leads to rod-shaped gold nanoparticles, however, the stability of these gold nanoparticles does not endure for extended periods of time in aqueous media. In my research, two important components were found to be necessary for stable, anisotropic growth of gold nanoparticles. In the first experiments, it was found that bromide played a key role in shape control. Bromide exchange on the gold atoms led to specific packing of the growing crystals, allowing for two-dimensional growth of gold nanoparticles. It was also discerned that soybean lecithin contained ligands that blocked specific gold facets leading to prismatic gold nanoparticle growth. These gold nanoprisms give a near infrared plasmon absorption similar to that of rod-shaped gold nanoparticles. These gold nanoprisms are discovered to be extremely stable in aqueous media and remain soluble for extended periods of time, far longer than that of gold nanoparticles grown using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Since soy lecithin has a plethora of compounds present, it became necessary to discover which compound was responsible for the shape control of the gold nanoprisms in order to optimize the synthesis and allow for a maximum yield of the gold nanoprisms. Many of these components were identified

  2. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  3. Controlled Heterogeneous Stem Cell Differentiation on a Shape Memory Hydrogel Surface

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yanjiao; Bai, Tao; Liu, Wenguang

    2014-01-01

    The success of stem cell therapies is highly dependent on the ability to control their programmed differentiation. So far, it is commonly believed that the differentiation behavior of stem cells is supposed to be identical when they are cultured on the same homogeneous platform. However, in this report, we show that this is not always true. By utilizing a double-ion-triggered shape memory effect, the pre-seeded hMSCs were controllably located in different growth positions. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the differentiation behavior of hMSCs is highly sensitive to their growth position on a hydrogel scaffold. This work will not only enrich the mechanisms for controlling the differentiation of stem cells, but also offer a one-of-a-kind platform to achieve a heterogeneously differentiated stem cell-seeded hydrogel scaffold for complex biological applications. PMID:25068211

  4. Directional control of lamellipodia extension by constraining cell shape and orienting cell tractional forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Kevin Kit; Brock, Amy Lepre; Brangwynne, Cliff; Mannix, Robert J.; Wang, Ning; Ostuni, Emanuele; Geisse, Nicholas A.; Adams, Josephine C.; Whitesides, George M.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for tissue morphogenesis and wound healing, but the mechanism of directional control is poorly understood. Here we show that the direction in which cells extend their leading edge can be controlled by constraining cell shape using micrometer-sized extracellular matrix (ECM) islands. When cultured on square ECM islands in the presence of motility factors, cells preferentially extended lamellipodia, filopodia, and microspikes from their corners. Square cells reoriented their stress fibers and focal adhesions so that tractional forces were concentrated in these corner regions. When cell tension was dissipated, lamellipodia extension ceased. Mechanical interactions between cells and ECM that modulate cytoskeletal tension may therefore play a key role in the control of directional cell motility.

  5. Aerodynamic shape optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for wing and wing-body design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for airfoils and wings in which the shape and the surrounding body-fitted mesh are both generated analytically, and the control is the mapping function. Recently, the method has been implemented for both potential flows and flows governed by the Euler equations using an alternative formulation which employs numerically generated grids, so that it can more easily be extended to treat general configurations. Here results are presented both for the optimization of a swept wing using an analytic mapping, and for the optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using a general mesh.

  6. PATH OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF A SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATED CATHETER FOR ENDOCARDIAL RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Jennifer H.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a real-time path optimization and control strategy for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated cardiac ablation catheters, potentially enabling the creation of more precise lesions with reduced procedure times and improved patient outcomes. Catheter tip locations and orientations are optimized using parallel genetic algorithms to produce continuous ablation paths with near normal tissue contact through physician-specified points. A nonlinear multivariable control strategy is presented to compensate for SMA hysteresis, bandwidth limitations, and coupling between system inputs. Simulated and experimental results demonstrate efficient generation of ablation paths and optimal reference trajectories. Closed-loop control of the SMA-actuated catheter along optimized ablation paths is validated experimentally. PMID:25684857

  7. Synthesis of half-sphere/half-funnel-shaped silica structures by reagent localization and the role of water in shape control

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, Panos; Polizos, Georgios; Cullen, David A.; Bhandari, Mahabir; Sharma, Jaswinder

    2016-11-11

    Role of water and ammonium hydroxide is investigated in evolution of shape of silica structures in the polyvinylpyrrolidone-pentanol emulsion droplet system. Shape control of silica structures is demonstrated by localization of the reagents. A uniform dispersion of reagents provided straight silica rods, while localization of the reagents at the emulsion droplet periphery provided a new type of structures half sphere-half funnel. The absence of water in the initial stages prompted a different nucleation process for the structure growth compared to when water was present in the intial stages. Effect of effective water concentration appeared to be related to the ease of diffusion of silica percursor inside the emulsion droplet,i.e., the higher the water concentration, the lower the silica precursor diffusion. Additionally, mixing the reagents in different combinations before adding to the reaction mixture also affected the silica structure thickness, length, and shape.

  8. Synthesis of half-sphere/half-funnel-shaped silica structures by reagent localization and the role of water in shape control

    DOE PAGES

    Datskos, Panos; Polizos, Georgios; Cullen, David A.; ...

    2016-11-11

    Role of water and ammonium hydroxide is investigated in evolution of shape of silica structures in the polyvinylpyrrolidone-pentanol emulsion droplet system. Shape control of silica structures is demonstrated by localization of the reagents. A uniform dispersion of reagents provided straight silica rods, while localization of the reagents at the emulsion droplet periphery provided a new type of structures half sphere-half funnel. The absence of water in the initial stages prompted a different nucleation process for the structure growth compared to when water was present in the intial stages. Effect of effective water concentration appeared to be related to the easemore » of diffusion of silica percursor inside the emulsion droplet,i.e., the higher the water concentration, the lower the silica precursor diffusion. Additionally, mixing the reagents in different combinations before adding to the reaction mixture also affected the silica structure thickness, length, and shape.« less

  9. Shape-controlled growth of indium and aluminum nanostructures on MoS2(0001).

    PubMed

    Kushvaha, S S; Xu, H; Zhang, H L; Wee, A T S; Wang, X S

    2008-05-01

    The growth of indium and aluminum nanostructures on molybdenum disulphide (MoS2)(0001) substrate has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy in ultra-high vacuum. At low coverage and room temperature (RT), mostly ultra-thin (approximately 1.2-2 nm) triangular In islands were observed on MoS2. With increasing coverage or high flux, large coalesced irregular islands along with triangular and round-shaped ones of increased average height were found. Triangular and round-shaped islands were obtained after annealing the RT-deposited In on MoS2 sample at 450 K. At approximately 375 K, exclusively triangular In islands were observed. Al nanoparticles with diameter in 4-16 nm range were obtained after a low-flux deposited whereas ramified islands were observed in a high flux at RT. Ultra-thin (approximately 1.20-2 nm) Al islands and films were obtained on MoS2 after deposition at 500 K. These results demonstrate that the shape of In and Al nanostructures grown on MoS2 can be controlled in self-assembly by adjusting substrate temperature, deposition flux and amount.

  10. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-09-07

    Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical interest to develop simple methods controlling the emergence and the positions of QI effects like anti-resonances or Fano line shapes in conductance spectra. In this work, starting from a well-known generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecule), we propose a simple graphical method to visualize the conditions for the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti-resonances, in the conductance spectrum. By introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic diagram), we can easily visualize the relation between the electronic parameters and the positions of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. This parabolic model not only can predict the emergence and energetic position of quantum interference from a few electronic parameters but also can enable one to know the coupling between the side group and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions.

  11. Drivers shaping the diversity and biogeography of total and active bacterial communities in the South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Zihao; Dai, Minhan; Jiao, Nianzhi; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that different drivers shape the diversity and biogeography of the total and active bacterial community, we examined the bacterial community composition along two transects, one from the inner Pearl River estuary to the open waters of the South China Sea (SCS) and the other from the Luzon Strait to the SCS basin, using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (V1-3 regions) and thereby characterizing the active and total bacterial community, respectively. The diversity and biogeographic patterns differed substantially between the active and total bacterial communities. Although the composition of both the total and active bacterial community was strongly correlated with environmental factors and weakly correlated with geographic distance, the active bacterial community displayed higher environmental sensitivity than the total community and particularly a greater distance effect largely caused by the active assemblage from deep waters. The 16S rRNA vs. rDNA relationships indicated that the active bacteria were low in relative abundance in the SCS. This might be due to a high competition between active bacterial taxa as indicated by our community network models. Based on these analyses, we speculate that high competition could cause some dispersal limitation of the active bacterial community resulting in a distinct distance-decay relationship. Altogether, our results indicated that the biogeographic distribution of bacteria in the SCS is the result of both environmental control and distance decay. PMID:24684298

  12. Shape control of high degree-of-freedom variable geometry trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, R. J.; Reinholtz, C. F.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    Common static trusses are constrained to permit no relative motion between truss elements. A Variable Geometry Truss (VGT), however, is a truss which contains some number of variable length links. The extensible links allow the truss to change shape in a precise, controllable manner. These changes can also be used to control the vibrational response of a truss structure or to perform robotic tasks. Many geometric configurations, both planar and spatial, are possible candidates for VGT manipulators. Here, only two geometries are discussed; the three degree-of-freedom (DOF) spatial octahedral/octahedral truss and the three DOF planar tetrahedral truss. These truss geometries are used as the fundamental element in a repeating chain of trusses. This results in a highly dexterous manipulator with perhaps 30 to 60 degrees of freedom that retains the favorable stiffness properties of a conventional truss. From a fixed base, this type of manipulator could perform shape or vibration control while extending and snaking through complex passageways or moving around obstacles to perform robotic tasks. The approach taken here is to first concentrate on fully understanding the forward and inverse kinematics of the fundamental elements and then utilizing the insight thus gained to solve the more complex problem of the kinematic chains.

  13. Controlled wettability based on reversible micro-cracking on a shape memory polymer surface.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Liu, Yuxuan; Wang, Wenxin; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Peng

    2016-03-14

    Wettability modification on a polymer surface is of immense importance for flexible electronics and biomedical applications. Herein, controlled wettability of a styrene-based shape memory polymer has been realized by introducing micro-cracks on the polymer surface for the first time. The cracks were purposely prepared by thin metal film constrained deformation on the polymer. After the removal of the metallic film, wettability was dramatically enhanced by showing a remarkable reduction in the contact angle with water droplets from 85° to 25°. Subsequent systematic characterization techniques like XPS and SEM revealed that such observation could be attributed to the increased density of hydrophilic groups and the roughened surface. In addition, by controlling the temperature for annealing the treated polymer, the surface could be switched reversely to water-repellent. Therefore, this paper offers a smart tactic to manipulate the surface wettability of a shape memory polymer freely. The features of the controlled wettability surface such as high tenability, high stability and easy fabrication are promising for microfluidic switching and molecule/cell capture-release.

  14. Active Shielding and Control of Environmental Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project supported by NASA under grant # NAG-1-01064, we have studied the mathematical aspects of the problem of active control of sound, i.e., time-harmonic acoustic disturbances. The foundations of the methodology are described in our paper [1]. Unlike. many other existing techniques, the approach of [1] provides for the exact volumetric cancellation of the unwanted noise on a given predetermined region airspace, while leaving unaltered those components of the total acoustic field that are deemed as friendly. The key finding of the work is that for eliminating the unwanted component of the acoustic field in a given area, one needs to know relatively little; in particular, neither the locations nor structure nor strength of the exterior noise sources need to be known. Likewise, there is no need to know the volumetric properties of the supporting medium across which the acoustic signals propagate, except, maybe, in a narrow area of space near the perimeter of the protected region. The controls are built based solely on the measurements performed on the perimeter of the domain to be shielded; moreover, the controls themselves (i.e., additional sources) are concentrated also only on or near this perimeter. Perhaps as important, the measured quantities can refer to the total acoustic field rather than to its unwanted component only, and the methodology can automatically distinguish between the two. In [1], we have constructed the general solution for controls. The apparatus used for deriving this general solution is closely connected to the concepts of generalized potentials and boundary projections of Calderon's type. For a given total wave field, the application of a Calderon's projection allows one to definitively tell between its incoming and outgoing components with respect to a particular domain of interest, which may have arbitrary shape. Then, the controls are designed so that they suppress the incoming component for the domain

  15. A shape constrained parametric active contour model for breast contour detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhun; Muralidhar, Gautam S; Reece, Gregory P; Markey, Mia K

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative measures of breast morphology can help a breast cancer survivor to understand outcomes of reconstructive surgeries. One bottleneck of quantifying breast morphology is that there are only a few reliable automation algorithms for detecting the breast contour. This study proposes a novel approach for detecting the breast contour, which is based on a parametric active contour model. In addition to employing the traditional parametric active contour model, the proposed approach enforces a mathematical shape constraint based on the catenary curve, which has been previously shown to capture the overall shape of the breast contour reliably. The mathematical shape constraint regulates the evolution of the active contour and helps the contour evolve towards the breast, while minimizing the undesired effects of other structures such as, the nipple/areola and scars. The efficacy of the proposed approach was evaluated on anterior posterior photographs of women who underwent or were scheduled for breast reconstruction surgery including autologous tissue reconstruction. The proposed algorithm shows promising results for detecting the breast contour.

  16. Achievements and tasks for active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Jiri

    This short survey attempted to highlight some achievements of the latest active control applications. Except for the active control of a one-dimensional sound field in ducts and active headphones, the applications for active control technology are still being developed. Although the principles of active control are simple, their applications still require substantial research and modeling of the sound fields to find optimal solutions. There is no doubt that active control of sound field triggered extensive research of the fundamental properties of the sound field which goes beyond the textbook simplifications. Also, new hardware, particularly actuators, are under development. As more realism is brought into assessment of applicability of active control, we will see in the future increasing confidence of industry to adopt this new technology.

  17. Shape-Controlled Metal-Metal and Metal-Polymer Janus Structures by Thermoplastic Embossing.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Molla; Kahler, Niloofar; Kumar, Golden

    2016-05-04

    We report the fabrication of metal-metal and metal-polymer Janus structures by embossing of thermoplastic metallic glasses and polymers. Hybrid structures with controllable shapes and interfaces are synthesized by template-assisted embossing. Different manufacturing strategies such as co-embossing and additive embossing are demonstrated for joining the materials with diverse compositions and functionalities. Structures with distinct combinations of properties such as hydrophobic-hydrophilic, opaque-transparent, insulator-conductor, and nonmagnetic-ferromagnetic are produced using this approach. These anisotropic properties are further utilized for selective functionalization of Janus structures.

  18. Non-contact start/stop motion control of HDD suspension using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soo-Cheol; Park, Jong-Sung; Choi, Seung-Bok; Park, Young-Pil

    2001-10-01

    In hard disk drives (HDD), an important issue related to increased storage density is the tribological problem of the head/disk interface. The conventional head gimbal assembly (HGA) of the HDD is used in a contact start/stop mode which results in wear particles and debris. This may cause a serious problem for the read/write function. In this paper, we propose a new type of suspension featuring a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator in order to prevent friction between the head (slider) and disk. As a first step, a finite element analysis is undertaken to investigate modal characteristics of the proposed HGA. Using the principal modal parameters, such as natural frequency, a control system model is established and a sliding mode control algorithm to achieve a non-contact start/stop (non-CSS) mode is formulated. The key control principle for accomplishing the non-CSS mode is that the control input is to be employed in the SMA actuator before the disk rotates, and is disconnected when the angular velocity of the disk is fully developed to achieve a certain flying height. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control system, a conventional HGA is modified to integrate the SMA actuator. The control algorithm is experimentally realized and controlled motions for the non-CSS mode are presented in the time domain.

  19. Noncontact start/stop motion control of HDD suspension using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, SooCheol; Park, Jong-Sung; Choi, Seung-Bok; Park, Young-Pil

    2001-08-01

    In hard disk drive (HDD), and important issue related to increased storage density is the tribological problem of the head/disk interface. The conventional head gimbal assembly (HGA) of the HDD is contact start/stop (CSS) mode which results in wear particles and debris. This may cause a serious problem for read/write function. In this work, we propose a new type of suspension featuring shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator in order to prevent the friction between the slider and the dksi. As a first step, a finite element analysis is undertaken to investigate modal characteristics of the proposed SMA-HGA. Using the principal modal parameters such as natural frequency, a control system model is established and sliding mode control algorithm to achieve non-contact start/stop (Non-CSS) mode is formulated. The control principle for accomplishing the Non-CSS mode is briefly discussed as follows. The control input is employed to SMA actuator before the disk rotates, and disconnected when the angular velocity of the disk is fully developed to have a certain flying height. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control system, one of conventional HGA is modified to integrate the SMA actuator. The control algorithm is experimentally realized and controlled motions for Non-CSS mode are presented in time domain.

  20. Tools for active control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.; Newsom, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Efficient control law analysis and design tools which properly account for the interaction of flexible structures, unsteady aerodynamics and active controls are developed. Development, application, validation and documentation of efficient multidisciplinary computer programs for analysis and design of active control laws are also discussed.

  1. COVARIANCE SHRINKING IN ACTIVE SHAPE MODELS WITH APPLICATION TO GYRAL LABELING OF THE CEREBRAL CORTEX.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    Active shape models (ASMs) have been widely used in segmentation tasks in medical image analysis. Complex structures and a limited number of training samples can, however, result in the failure to capture the complete range of shape variations. Various modifications to the point distribution model (PDM) have been proposed to increase the flexibility of the model. Still model parameters are often determined empirically without respect to the underlying data structure. We explore shrinkage covariance estimation in building a PDM by combining the sample covariance matrix with a target covariance matrix estimated from a low-dimensional constrained model. Instead of using a global shrinkage intensity, we apply a spatially varying shrinkage intensity field to better adapt to the spatially varying characteristic of a complex shape. The parameters of the constrained model and the amount of shrinkage are determined in a data-driven fashion, so that the resulting distribution is optimized in representing the underlying data. The PDM, which we call SC-PDM, shows an increased flexibility in fitting new shapes and at the same time, is robust to noise. We demonstrate the effectiveness of using SC-PDM to label gyral regions on the human cerebral cortex.

  2. The relationship between three-dimensional knee MRI bone shape and total knee replacement—a case control study: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Andrew J.; Dube, Bright; Hensor, Elizabeth M. A.; Kingsbury, Sarah R.; Peat, George; Bowes, Mike A.; Sharples, Linda D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is growing understanding of the importance of bone in OA. Our aim was to determine the relationship between 3D MRI bone shape and total knee replacement (TKR). Methods. A nested case-control study within the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort identified case knees with confirmed TKR for OA and controls that were matched using propensity scores. Active appearance modelling quantification of the bone shape of all knee bones identified vectors between knees having or not having OA. Vectors were scaled such that −1 and +1 represented the mean non-OA and mean OA shapes. Results. Compared to controls (n = 310), TKR cases (n = 310) had a more positive mean baseline 3D bone shape vector, indicating more advanced structural OA, for the femur [mean 0.98 vs −0.11; difference (95% CI) 1.10 (0.88, 1.31)], tibia [mean 0.86 vs −0.07; difference (95% CI) 0.94 (0.72, 1.16)] and patella [mean 0.95 vs 0.03; difference (95% CI) 0.92 (0.65, 1.20)]. Odds ratios (95% CI) for TKR per normalized unit of 3D bone shape vector for the femur, tibia and patella were: 1.85 (1.59, 2.16), 1.64 (1.42, 1.89) and 1.36 (1.22, 1.50), respectively, all P < 0.001. After including Kellgren–Lawrence grade in a multivariable analysis, only the femur 3D shape vector remained significantly associated with TKR [odds ratio 1.24 (1.02, 1.51)]. Conclusion. 3D bone shape was associated with the endpoint of this study, TKR, with femoral shape being most associated. This study contributes to the validation of quantitative MRI bone biomarkers for OA structure-modification trials. PMID:27185958

  3. Microbial Controls on the Size, Shape and Porosity of Hot Spring CaCO3 Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P. A.; Fouke, B. W.; Dwyer, S. E.; Sivaguru, M.; Kandianis, M. T.

    2008-12-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting vent drainage systems at Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park, exert strong controls on the size, shape and porosity of CaCO3 (travertine) mineral deposits at a nanometer to micron scale. Our controlled in situ kinetic experiment (ISKA) has shown that: (1) the natural steady state aragonite precipitation rate is more than twice that when microbial biomass is depleted by 80% via 0.2 um filtration; and (2) ultraviolet (UV) irradiation only slightly reduces the mean aragonite precipitation rate, while keeping all other experimental parameters held constant. An integrated petrographic (plane-light and cathodoluminscence [CL]) and high-resolution inverted fluorescence microscopy (200 nm resolution petrography) were completed on travertine samples collected from the ISKA experiment. Results indicate that, under all experimental conditions, an initial layer of dogtooth to blocky calcite cement (less than 30um) was followed by aragonite needle cement growth (10-50um). The untreated natural control experiment produced an initial layer of small calcite crystals interspersed with densely packed clusters of aragonite needles, which significantly reduced the porosity in this first layer of authigenic crystal growth. The ensuing aragonite needle clusters in the natural control were also present, but in lower concentrations, in the UV- irradiated experiments. The filtration experiment produced the largest calcite crystals with few to no aragonite needles. However, the aragonite needles were on average 40 µm long and are not arranged in dense clusters, producing a higher porosity layer composed of lower crystal densities. Early calcite crystals in both the filtration and UV-irradiation samples exhibit bright orange concentric crystal zonations under CL that were absent in the natural control. Aragonite needles in all samples exhibit no CL. Further, no clear petrographic evidence of diagenesis or mineralogical inversion were observed in

  4. Neural activations are related to body-shape, anxiety, and outcomes in adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Harper, Jessica A; Van Enkevort, Erin A; Latimer, Kelsey; Kelley, Urszula; McAdams, Carrie J

    2017-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an illness that frequently begins during adolescence and involves weight loss. Two groups of adolescent girls (AN-A, weight-recovered following AN) and (HC-A, healthy comparison) completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging task involving social evaluations, allowing comparison of neural activations during self-evaluations, friend-evaluations, and perspective-taking self-evaluations. Although the two groups were not different in their whole-brain activations, anxiety and body shape concerns were correlated with neural activity in a priori regions of interest. A cluster in medial prefrontal cortex and the dorsal anterior cingulate correlated with the body shape questionnaire; subjects with more body shape concerns used this area less during self than friend evaluations. A cluster in medial prefrontal cortex and the cingulate also correlated with anxiety such that more anxiety was associated with engagement when disagreeing rather than agreeing with social terms during self-evaluations. This data suggests that differences in the utilization of frontal brain regions during social evaluations may contribute to both anxiety and body shape concerns in adolescents with AN. Clinical follow-up was obtained, allowing exploration of whether brain function early in course of disease relates to illness trajectory. The adolescents successful in recovery used the posterior cingulate and precuneus more for friend than self evaluations than the adolescents that remained ill, suggesting that neural differences related to social evaluations may provide clinical predictive value. Utilization of both MPFC and the precuneus during social and self evaluations may be a key biological component for achieving sustained weight-recovery in adolescents with AN.

  5. An automated tool for face recognition using visual attention and active shape models analysis.

    PubMed

    Faro, A; Giordano, D; Spampinato, C

    2006-01-01

    An entirely automated approach for the recognition of the face of a people starting from her/his images is presented. The approach uses a computational attention module to find automatically the most relevant facial features using the Focus Of Attentions (FOA) These features are used to build the model of a face during the learning phase and for recognition during the testing phase. The landmarking of the features is performed by applying the active contour model (ACM) technique, whereas the active shape model (ASM) is adopted for constructing a flexible model of the selected facial features. The advantages of this approach and opportunities for further improvements are discussed.

  6. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  7. Active and passive control of zinc phthalocyanine photodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Huijser, Annemarie; Savolainen, Janne; Steen, Gerwin; Herek, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report on the ultrafast photodynamics of the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and manipulation thereof. Two approaches are followed: active control via pulse shaping and passive control via strategic manipulation in the periphery of the molecular structure. The objective of both of these control experiments is the same: to enhance the yield of the functional pathway and to minimize loss channels. The aim of the active control experiments is to increase the intersystem crossing yield in ZnPc, which is important for application in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Pulse shaping allowed an improvement in triplet to singlet ratio of 15% as compared to a transform-limited pulse. This effect is ascribed to a control mechanism that utilizes multiphoton pathways to higher-lying states from where intersystem crossing is more likely to occur. The passive control experiments are performed on ZnPc derivatives deposited onto TiO2, serving as a model system of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Modification of the anchoring ligand of the molecular structure resulted in an increased rate for electron injection into TiO2 and slower back electron transfer, improving the DSSC efficiency.

  8. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  9. Hysteresis Analysis and Positioning Control for a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys (MSM alloys), a new kind of smart materials, have become a potential candidate in many engineering fields. MSMs have the advantage of bearing a huge strain, much larger than other materials. In addition, they also have fast response. These characteristics make MSM a good choice in micro engineering. However, MSMs display the obvious hysteresis phenomenon of nonlinear behavior. Thus the difficulty in using the MSM element as a positioning actuator is increased due to the hysteresis. In this paper, the hysteresis phenomenon of the MSM actuator is analyzed, and the closed-loop positioning control is also implemented experimentally. For that, a modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) is proposed. The MFSMC and the PID control are used to design the controllers for realizing the positioning control. The experimental results are compared under different experimental conditions, such as different frequency, amplitude, and loading. The experimental results show that the precise positioning control of MFSMC can be achieved satisfactorily. PMID:25853405

  10. Location optimization of a long T-shaped acoustic resonator array in noise control of enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ganghua; Cheng, Li

    2009-11-01

    Acoustic resonators are widely used in various noise control applications. In the pursuit of better performance and broad band control, multiple resonators or a resonator array are usually needed. The interaction among resonators significantly impacts on the control performance and leads to the requirement for a systematic design tool to determine their locations. In this work, simulated annealing (SA) algorithm is employed to optimize the locations of a set of long T-shaped acoustic resonators (TARs) for noise control inside an enclosure. Multiple optimal configurations are shown to exist. The control performance in terms of sound pressure level reduction, however, seems to be independent of the initial resonator-locations. Optimal solutions obtained from the SA approach are shown to outperform other existing methods for a TAR array design. Numerical simulations are systematically verified by experiments. Optimal locations are then synthesized, leading to a set of criteria, applicable to the present configuration, to guide engineering applications. It is concluded that the proposed optimization approach provides a systematic and effective tool to optimize the locations of TARs in noise control inside enclosures.

  11. Electrostatic shape control of single crystal silicon (SCS), free standing, thin plate deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, Terry L.

    This research involved the creation and investigation of a low cost design for a MEMS platform capable of controlled shape morphing using very simple mechanical design and manufacturing processes. The platform is made of single crystal silicon and loaded with multiple in-plane forces and moments from three fixed positions on the plate boundary, and with distributed electrostatic forces across the platform surface. This work is important because such a platform could be used as a deformable mirror for adaptive optics systems used in laser communications, vision science, precision beam shaping, and many other important applications. The work involved the development and experimental validation of analytical models that can map the displacement field of a thin flat SCS plate subject to complex loading on the boundary and distributed electrostatic forces. The achievement of these goals included experimentally mapping the platform surface after deformation into three-dimensional geometries defined by the Zernike polynomials. These are relatively large elastic deflections requiring a highly nonlinear analysis. The current analysis applies to circular plates supported on buckled flexures, which have been designed based an model results, fabricated using common microelectronic fabrication processes, and characterized using optical and interference microscopy. Of special interest is the investigation of post-buckling behavior which enhances the range and robustness of operation of the device by providing local upward motion for some modes. The prototypes have been tested and the results compared well with the theoretical results. The first 15 Zernike modes were examined with successful mode shape generation of 13, and fitting errors less than unity were achieved for all 15. From continued analysis of the experimental results the models can be further enhanced to create a commercially viable real time control algorithm for the device.

  12. Real-time Equilibrium Reconstruction and Isoflux Control of Plasma Shape and Position in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mueller; D.A. Gates; J.E. Menard; J.R. Ferron; S.A. Sabbagh

    2004-08-11

    The implementation of the rtEFIT-isoflux algorithm in the digital control system for NSTX has led to improved ability to control the plasma shape. In particular, it has been essential for good gap control for radio-frequency experiments, for control of drsep in H-mode studies, and for X-point height control and {kappa} control in a variety of experiments.

  13. H∞ Loop Shaping Control for Plasma Vertical Position Instability on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaolong; Kazuo, Nakamura; Tatsuya, Yoshisue; Osamu, Mitarai; Makoto, Hasegawa; Kazutoshi, Tokunaga; Xue, Erbing; Hideki, Zushi; Kazuaki, Hanada; Akihide, Fujisawa; Hiroshi, Idei; Shoji, Kawasaki; Hisatoshi, Nakashima; Aki, Higashijima; Kuniaki, Araki

    2013-03-01

    QUEST has a divertor configuration with a high and a negative n-index, and the problem of plasma vertical position instability control in QUEST is still under extensive study for achieving high efficiency plasma. The instability we considered is that the toroidal plasma moves either up or down in the vacuum chamber until it meets the vessel wall and is extinguished. The actively controlled coils (HCU and HCL) outside the vacuum vessel are serially connected in feedback with a measurement of the plasma vertical position to provide stabilizing control. In this work, a robust controller is employed by using the loop synthesis method, and provides robust stability over a wide range of n-index. Moreover, the gain of the robust controller is lower than that of a typical proportional derivative (PD) controller in the operational frequency range; it indicates that the robust controller needs less power consumption than the PD controller does.

  14. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  15. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  16. Controlling the growth and shape of chiral supramolecular polymers in water

    PubMed Central

    Besenius, Pol; Portale, Giuseppe; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Janssen, Henk M.; Palmans, Anja R. A.; Meijer, E. W.

    2010-01-01

    A challenging target in the noncovalent synthesis of nanostructured functional materials is the formation of uniform features that exhibit well-defined properties, e.g., precise control over the aggregate shape, size, and stability. In particular, for aqueous-based one-dimensional supramolecular polymers, this is a daunting task. Here we disclose a strategy based on self-assembling discotic amphiphiles that leads to the control over stack length and shape of ordered, chiral columnar aggregates. By balancing out attractive noncovalent forces within the hydrophobic core of the polymerizing building blocks with electrostatic repulsive interactions on the hydrophilic rim we managed to switch from elongated, rod-like assemblies to small and discrete objects. Intriguingly this rod-to-sphere transition is expressed in a loss of cooperativity in the temperature-dependent self-assembly mechanism. The aggregates were characterized using circular dichroism, UV and 1H-NMR spectroscopy, small angle X-ray scattering, and cryotransmission electron microscopy. In analogy to many systems found in biology, mechanistic details of the self-assembly pathways emphasize the importance of cooperativity as a key feature that dictates the physical properties of the produced supramolecular polymers. PMID:20921365

  17. Optimization of ultra-fast interactions using laser pulse temporal shaping controlled by a deterministic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan-Sosa, M.; Portilla, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Moreno, L.; Ruiz de la Cruz, A.; Solis, J.

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond laser pulse temporal shaping techniques have led to important advances in different research fields like photochemistry, laser physics, non-linear optics, biology, or materials processing. This success is partly related to the use of optimal control algorithms. Due to the high dimensionality of the solution and control spaces, evolutionary algorithms are extensively applied and, among them, genetic ones have reached the status of a standard adaptive strategy. Still, their use is normally accompanied by a reduction of the problem complexity by different modalities of parameterization of the spectral phase. Exploiting Rabitz and co-authors' ideas about the topology of quantum landscapes, in this work we analyze the optimization of two different problems under a deterministic approach, using a multiple one-dimensional search (MODS) algorithm. In the first case we explore the determination of the optimal phase mask required for generating arbitrary temporal pulse shapes and compare the performance of the MODS algorithm to the standard iterative Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. Based on the good performance achieved, the same method has been applied for optimizing two-photon absorption starting from temporally broadened laser pulses, or from laser pulses temporally and spectrally distorted by non-linear absorption in air, obtaining similarly good results which confirm the validity of the deterministic search approach.

  18. Optimization of ultra-fast interactions using laser pulse temporal shaping controlled by a deterministic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan-Sosa, M.; Portilla, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Moreno, L.; Ruiz de la Cruz, A.; Solis, J.

    2013-04-01

    Femtosecond laser pulse temporal shaping techniques have led to important advances in different research fields like photochemistry, laser physics, non-linear optics, biology, or materials processing. This success is partly related to the use of optimal control algorithms. Due to the high dimensionality of the solution and control spaces, evolutionary algorithms are extensively applied and, among them, genetic ones have reached the status of a standard adaptive strategy. Still, their use is normally accompanied by a reduction of the problem complexity by different modalities of parameterization of the spectral phase. Exploiting Rabitz and co-authors' ideas about the topology of quantum landscapes, in this work we analyze the optimization of two different problems under a deterministic approach, using a multiple one-dimensional search (MODS) algorithm. In the first case we explore the determination of the optimal phase mask required for generating arbitrary temporal pulse shapes and compare the performance of the MODS algorithm to the standard iterative Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. Based on the good performance achieved, the same method has been applied for optimizing two-photon absorption starting from temporally broadened laser pulses, or from laser pulses temporally and spectrally distorted by non-linear absorption in air, obtaining similarly good results which confirm the validity of the deterministic search approach.

  19. Preparation of ring-shaped composite bonded magnets with continuously controlled anisotropy distribution for internal space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, F.; Yamada, O.; Ohya, S.; Kobayashi, O.; Nakano, M.; Fukunaga, H.

    2010-01-01

    We have already reported an advanced method for producing a radially-anisotropic rare earth composite bonded magnet with continuously controlled direction of anisotropy. The magnet has been applied to an inner rotor as a practical usage. In this study, the outstanding preparation method was adopted into the preparation of a magnet applied for an outer rotor. An optimized condition of extrusion and compaction at an elevated temperature could be obtained. In addition, a low pressure configuration to the ring-shaped magnet from plural preformed magnets was carried out, which had specific distribution of magnetic anisotropy for internal space for a small motor, by using self recoverability based on the viscous deformation without an alignment field. No deterioration of magnetic properties was detected through the process even if those magnets were miniaturized. Resultantly, the (BH)max of a ring-shaped magnet with the continuously controlled direction of magnetic anisotropy attained the value of 186 kJ/m3, and we obtained sine-wave magnetic anisotropy distribution, even if those magnets were miniaturized.

  20. Controlled manipulation of flexible carbon nanotubes through shape-dependent pushing by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Cheol; Qian, Xiaoping

    2013-09-17

    A systematic approach to manipulating flexible carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been developed on the basis of atomic force microscope (AFM) based pushing. Pushing CNTs enables efficient transport and precise location of individual CNTs. A key issue for pushing CNTs is preventing defective distortion in repetitive bending and unbending deformation. The approach presented here controls lateral movement of an AFM tip to bend CNTs without permanent distortion. The approach investigates possible defects caused by tensile strain of the outer tube under uniform bending and radial distortion by kinking. Using the continuum beam model and experimental bending tests, dependency of maximum bending strain on the length of bent CNTs and radial distortion on bending angles at a bent point have been demonstrated. Individual CNTs are manipulated by limiting the length of bent CNTs and the bending angle. In our approach, multiwalled CNTs with 5-15 nm diameter subjected to bending deformation produce no outer tube breakage under uniform bending and reversible radial deformation with bending angles less than 110°. The lateral tip movement is determined by a simple geometric model that relies on the shape of multiwalled CNTs. The model effectively controls deforming CNT length and bending angle for given CNT shape. Experimental results demonstrate successful manipulation of randomly dispersed CNTs without visual defects. This approach to pushing can be extended to develop a wide range of CNT based nanodevice applications.

  1. Shape- and Interface-Induced Control of Spin Dynamics of Two-Dimensional Bicomponent Magnonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Samiran; Saha, Susmita; Mandal, Ruma; Barman, Saswati; Otani, YoshiChika; Barman, Anjan

    2016-07-20

    Controlled fabrication of periodically arranged embedded nanostructures with strong interelement interaction through the interface between the two different materials has great potential applications in spintronics, spin logic, and other spin-based communication devices. Here, we report the fabrication of two-dimensional bicomponent magnonic crystals in form of embedded Ni80Fe20 nanostructures in Co50Fe50 thin films by nanolithography. The spin wave (SW) spectra studied by a broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy showed a significant variation as the shape of the embedded nanostructure changes from circular to square. Significantly, in both shapes, a minimum in frequency is obtained at a negative value of bias field during the field hysteresis confirming the presence of a strong exchange coupling at the interface between the two materials, which can potentially increase the spin wave propagation velocity in such structures leading to faster gigahertz frequency magnetic communication and logic devices. The spin wave frequencies and bandgaps show bias field tunability, which is important for above device applications. Numerical simulations qualitatively reproduced the experimental results, and simulated mode profiles revealed the spatial distribution of the SW modes and internal magnetic fields responsible for this observation. Development of such controlled arrays of embedded nanostructures with improved interface can be easily applied to other forms of artificial crystals.

  2. A smooth multimode waveform command shaping control with selectable command length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Ziyad N.; Alhazza, Khaled A.

    2017-06-01

    Input and command shapers are great open-loop control strategies in reducing residual vibration in rest-to-rest maneuvers. The generation of such command usually contains multiple impulses and jerks. Multiple impulses usually degrade the performance due to actuation delay and mismatch timing while jerks reduce the life expectancy of actuator and increase maintenance. In this work, a smooth single multimode command shaping control is proposed and tested numerically and experimentally to eliminate residual vibration in rest-to-rest maneuvers. The advantages of the technique are summarized as, the proposed technique has an adjustable maneuvering time, can eliminate all vibration modes regardless of the number, the required parameters are found analytically which eliminate the need of complex or lengthy calculation needed for most multimode shaper, smooth command profile to eliminate jerks i.e. inrush current, and it is continuous with single actuation to eliminate inaccurate timing and delay. The technique performance is validated numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations prove that the shaped commands are capable of completely eliminating residual vibrations of multimode systems. Furthermore, the proposed technique is utilized to reduce the sensitivity of the shaper to modeling errors. Unlike other shaper the proposed reduction in the sensitivity can be implemented for all modes with no added complexity.

  3. Shaped Plasma Lenses for Optical Beam Control at High Laser Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, R. F.; Palastro, J. P.; Johnson, L. A.; Hafizi, B.; Gordon, D. F.; Penano, J. R.; Helle, M. H.; Kaganovich, D.

    2016-10-01

    A plasma channel is a cylindrical plasma column with an on-axis density minimum. A short plasma channel can focus a laser pulse in much the same manner as a conventional lens or off-axis parabola. If the plasma has an off-axis density maximum (``inverse channel''), it behaves like a negative lens and acts to defocus the pulse. In either case, a shaped plasma lens (SPL) may be placed in the beamline at locations where the laser intensity or fluence is orders of magnitude above the damage threshold for conventional solid optics. When placed after an off-axis parabola, SPLs may provide additional flexibility and spot size control and may also be useful in suppressing laser prepulse. For high power, ultrashort laser pulses, the broad laser bandwidth and extreme intensities produce chromatic and phase aberrations and amplitude distortions that degrade the lens focusing or defocusing performance. Although there have been a few experiments that demonstrate laser pulse focusing by a shaped plasma lens, generation and control of the plasma present significant challenges. Potential applications of SPLs to laser-plasma accelerators will be discussed. Supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  4. Active Control of Open Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    UKeiley, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Open loop edge blowing was demonstrated as an effective method for reducing the broad band and tonal components of the fluctuating surface pressure in open cavities. Closed loop has been successfully applied to low Mach number open cavities. Need to push actuators that are viable for closed loop control in bandwidth and output. Need a better understanding of the effects of control on the flow through detailed measurements so better actuation strategies can be developed.

  5. Fabrication of shape controlled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y.Y.; Wang, X.B.; Shang, L.; Li, C.R.; Cui, C.; Dong, W.J.; Tang, W.H.; Chen, B.Y.

    2010-04-15

    Shape-controlled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructure has been successfully prepared using polyethylene glycol as template in a water system at room temperature. Different morphologies of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures, including spherical, cubic, rod-like, and dendritic nanostructure, were obtained by carefully controlling the concentration of the Fe{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 2+}, and the molecular weight of the polyethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope images, X-ray powder diffraction patterns and magnetic properties were used to characterize the final product. This easy procedure for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructure fabrication offers the possibility of a generalized approach to the production of single and complex nanocrystalline oxide with tunable morphology.

  6. Inverse problem for shape control of flexible space reflectors using distributed solar pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggräfe, A.; Heiligers, J.; Ceriotti, M.; McInnes, C. R.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates controlled elastic deflection of thin circular space reflectors using an inverse problem approach to non-linear thin membrane theory. When changing the surface reflectivity across the membrane, the distributed loads due to ambient solar radiation pressure can be manipulated optically, thus controlling the surface shape without using mechanical or piezo-electric systems. The surface reflectivity can in principle be modulated using uniformly distributed thin-film electro-chromic coatings. We present an analytic solution to the inverse problem of finding the necessary reflectivity distribution that creates a specific membrane deflection, for example that of a parabolic reflector. Importantly, the reflectivity distribution across the surface is found to be independent of membrane size, thickness and solar distance, enabling engineering of the reflectivity distribution directly during the manufacture of the membrane.

  7. Shape-Controlled Fabrication of the Polymer-Based Micromotor Based on the Polydimethylsiloxane Template.

    PubMed

    Su, Miaoda; Liu, Mei; Liu, Limei; Sun, Yunyu; Li, Mingtong; Wang, Dalei; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin

    2015-11-03

    We report the utilization of the polydimethylsiloxane template to construct polymer-based autonomous micromotors with various structures. Solid or hollow micromotors, which consist of polycaprolactone and platinum nanoparticles, can be obtained with controllable sizes and shapes. The resulting micromotor can not only be self-propelled in solution based on the bubble propulsion mechanism in the presence of the hydrogen peroxide fuel, but also exhibit structure-dependent motion behavior. In addition, the micromotors can exhibit various functions, ranging from fluorescence, magnetic control to cargo transportation. Since the current method can be extended to a variety of organic and inorganic materials, we thus believe it may have great potential in the fabrication of different functional micromotors for diverse applications.

  8. Assessing sustainability of InSHAPE participants' fitness activities in a community mental health setting.

    PubMed

    Lesley, Marsha L; Livingood, Kristi; Livingwood, Kristi

    2015-02-01

    InSHAPE (Self Help Action Plan for Empowerment), an exercise and nutrition wellness program, is gaining national recognition for its success in helping individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) improve physical fitness and dietary habits. Although gains have been reported in objective measures of fitness as participants progressed through the year-long program, there is little information about what happens with participants after program completion. To address this gap in knowledge, the authors conducted a longitudinal qualitative study in which 11 InSHAPE participants were interviewed both near the end of their year in the program and 9 months later. Participants identified the trainer's ability to contain their initial feelings of distress and form a working alliance as factors that contributed to their exercise persistence. Current findings suggest that individuals with SMI may need a longer period of time working closely with fitness trainers to sustain physical activity levels achieved during the program.

  9. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J; Schowengerdt, Robert A; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-09-07

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking.

  10. Electrocatalysis on shape-controlled titanium nitride nanocrystals for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Youzhen; Wu, Yongmin; Liu, Mengjia; Li, Jinghong

    2013-10-01

    The high price of platinum (Pt)-based cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have slowed down the practical application of fuel cells. Thanks to their low cost, and outstanding, stable catalytic properties, titanium nitrides (TiN) are among the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalysts for replacing Pt. However, the shape-activity relationships of TiN electrocatalysts have not been well-studied or understood up to now. In this work, by simply adjusting the shape of TiO2 precursor, we are able to tailor the morphology of the TiN catalysts from nanoparticles to nanotubes. We have synthetized uniform carbon-coated titanium nitride nanotubes (carbon-coated TiN NTs) through a nitridation reaction in NH3 flow using a TiO2 nanotubes/melamine mixture as precursor. The carbon-coated TiN NTs hybrids exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity for the ORR, coupled with superior methanol tolerance and long-term stability in comparison to commercial Pt/C, through an efficient four-electron-dominant ORR process. Compared with nanoparticles, the one-dimensional and hollow structure of the nanotubes result in greater diffusion of electrolyte and superior electrical conductivity, and contribute to the greatly improved electrocatalytic performance of the carbon-coated TiN NTs nanocomposites.

  11. Identification of a Neuropeptide S Responsive Circuitry Shaping Amygdala Activity via the Endopiriform Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Meis, Susanne; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge Ricardo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Stork, Oliver; Munsch, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor are thought to define a set of specific brain circuits involved in fear and anxiety. Here we provide evidence for a novel, NPS-responsive circuit that shapes neural activity in the mouse basolateral amygdala (BLA) via the endopiriform nucleus (EPN). Using slice preparations, we demonstrate that NPS directly activates an inward current in 20% of EPN neurons and evokes an increase of glutamatergic excitation in this nucleus. Excitation of the EPN is responsible for a modulation of BLA activity through NPS, characterized by a general increase of GABAergic inhibition and enhancement of spike activity in a subset of BLA projection neurons. Finally, local injection of NPS to the EPN interferes with the expression of contextual, but not auditory cued fear memory. Together, these data suggest the existence of a specific NPS-responsive circuitry between EPN and BLA, likely involved in contextual aspects of fear memory. PMID:18628994

  12. Student Activity Funds: Procedures & Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    Student activity funds may create educational opportunities for students, but they frequently create problems for business administrators. The first part of this work reviews the types of organizational issues and transactions an organized student group is likely to encounter, including establishing a constitution, participant roles,…

  13. Design, modelling and control of a micro-positioning actuator based on magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minorowicz, Bartosz; Leonetti, Giuseppe; Stefanski, Frederik; Binetti, Giulio; Naso, David

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an actuator based on magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) suitable for precise positioning in a wide range (up to 1 mm). The actuator is based on the spring returned operating mode and uses a Smalley wave spring to maintain the same operating parameters of a classical coil spring, while being characterized by a smaller dimension. The MSMA element inside the actuator provides a deformation when excited by an external magnetic field, but its behavior is characterized by an asymmetric and saturated hysteresis. Thus, two models are exploited in this work to represent such a non-linear behavior, i.e., the modified and generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii models. These models are particularly suitable for control purposes due to the existence of their analytical inversion that can be easily exploited in real time control systems. To this aim, this paper investigates three closed-loop control strategies, namely a classical PID regulator, a PID regulator with direct hysteresis compensation, and a combined PID and feedforward compensation strategy. The effectiveness of both modelling and control strategies applied to the designed MSMA-based actuator is illustrated by means of experimental results.

  14. Noise control for a ChamberCore cylindrical structure using long T-shaped acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2003-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate has developed a new advanced composite launch vehicle fairing (referred to as ``ChamberCore''). The ChamberCore is sandwich-type structure fabricated from multi-layered composite face sheets separated by channels that form passive acoustic chambers. These acoustic chambers have a potential to create an acoustic resonator network that can be used to attenuate noise inside the closed ChamberCore cylindrical structure. In this study, first, the feasibility of using cylindrical Helmholtz resonators to control noise in a mock-scale ChamberCore composite cylinder is investigated. The targeted frequencies for noise control are the first four acoustic cavity resonances of the ChamberCore cylinder. The optimal position of the Helmholtz resonators for controlling each targeted cavity mode is discussed, and the effects of resonator spacing on noise attenuation are also experimentally evaluated. Next, six long T-shaped acoustic resonators are designed and constructed within the acoustic chambers of the structure and investigated. Several tests are conducted to evaluate the noise control ability of the resonators in the ChamberCore cylinder. Reductions ranging from 3.2 to 6.0 dB were observed in the overall mean-square noise reduction spectrum at the targeted inner cavity resonance frequencies. [Work supported by AFRL/DV.

  15. Investigating Energetic X-Shaped Flares on the Outskirts of A Solar Active Region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai

    2016-09-28

    Typical solar flares display two quasi-parallel, bright ribbons on the chromosphere. In between is the polarity inversion line (PIL) separating concentrated magnetic fluxes of opposite polarity in active regions (ARs). Intriguingly a series of flares exhibiting X-shaped ribbons occurred at the similar location on the outskirts of NOAA AR 11967, where magnetic fluxes were scattered, yet three of them were alarmingly energetic. The X shape, whose center coincided with hard X-ray emission, was similar in UV/EUV, which cannot be accommodated in the standard flare model. Mapping out magnetic connectivities in potential fields, we found that the X morphology was dictated by the intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers, i.e., a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), within which a separator connecting a double null was embedded. This topology was not purely local but regulated by fluxes and flows over the whole AR. The nonlinear force-free field model suggested the formation of a current layer at the HFT, where the current dissipation can be mapped to the X-shaped ribbons via field-aligned heat conduction. These results highlight the critical role of HFTs in 3D magnetic reconnection and have important implications for astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  16. Investigating Energetic X-Shaped Flares on the Outskirts of A Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai

    2016-09-01

    Typical solar flares display two quasi-parallel, bright ribbons on the chromosphere. In between is the polarity inversion line (PIL) separating concentrated magnetic fluxes of opposite polarity in active regions (ARs). Intriguingly a series of flares exhibiting X-shaped ribbons occurred at the similar location on the outskirts of NOAA AR 11967, where magnetic fluxes were scattered, yet three of them were alarmingly energetic. The X shape, whose center coincided with hard X-ray emission, was similar in UV/EUV, which cannot be accommodated in the standard flare model. Mapping out magnetic connectivities in potential fields, we found that the X morphology was dictated by the intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers, i.e., a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), within which a separator connecting a double null was embedded. This topology was not purely local but regulated by fluxes and flows over the whole AR. The nonlinear force-free field model suggested the formation of a current layer at the HFT, where the current dissipation can be mapped to the X-shaped ribbons via field-aligned heat conduction. These results highlight the critical role of HFTs in 3D magnetic reconnection and have important implications for astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  17. Investigating Energetic X-Shaped Flares on the Outskirts of A Solar Active Region

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Typical solar flares display two quasi-parallel, bright ribbons on the chromosphere. In between is the polarity inversion line (PIL) separating concentrated magnetic fluxes of opposite polarity in active regions (ARs). Intriguingly a series of flares exhibiting X-shaped ribbons occurred at the similar location on the outskirts of NOAA AR 11967, where magnetic fluxes were scattered, yet three of them were alarmingly energetic. The X shape, whose center coincided with hard X-ray emission, was similar in UV/EUV, which cannot be accommodated in the standard flare model. Mapping out magnetic connectivities in potential fields, we found that the X morphology was dictated by the intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers, i.e., a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), within which a separator connecting a double null was embedded. This topology was not purely local but regulated by fluxes and flows over the whole AR. The nonlinear force-free field model suggested the formation of a current layer at the HFT, where the current dissipation can be mapped to the X-shaped ribbons via field-aligned heat conduction. These results highlight the critical role of HFTs in 3D magnetic reconnection and have important implications for astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. PMID:27677354

  18. Optimisation of polarization controlled colour tuning using nanoscale cross-shaped apertures in silver films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaur, Eugeniu; Sadatnajafi, Catherine; Langley, Daniel; Abbey, Brian

    2016-12-01

    Nanofabrication of metamaterials based on thin metallic films have resulted in a host of different designs that support Extraordinary Optical Transmission (EOT). In contrast to the more widely studied circular-shaped apertures, cross-shaped apertures have characteristics which can be modified in response to linearly polarized light, opening up new pathways for light manipulation at the nanoscale. Here we present a systematic study of the influence of device geometry and composition on the functional characteristics of polarisation controlled optical plasmonic devices. We also discuss some issues that arise using the focused ion beam (FIB) milling technique to fabricate optical metamaterials. In particular, we show that producing high-quality patterns lead to a significant over-deposition of the substrate material. This effect significantly alters the metal surface chemistry, which poses a considerable obstacle for applications involving molecular and bio sensing. This work lays the foundation for the optimisation of the properties of optical plasmonic devices for a wide-range of applications including colour filtering and bio-sensing.

  19. Adiabat shape Laser Pulses for ablation front instability control and high fuel compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, Jose; Jones, O. S.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Macphee, A. G.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    At the end of the NIC campaign a large body of experimental evidence showed that the point-design implosions driven by low-adiabat pulses had a high degree of mix. To reduce instability a high-adiabat (~3 × higher picket drive) design was fielded in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experimental results from this campaign have shown considerable improvement in performance (10 × neutron yields) over the point design with little evidence of mix. However, the adiabat of the implosions may be too high to achieve ignition for the available laser energy. To overcome this difficulty, and to take advantage of the high-picket drives, we have developed hybrid laser pulses that combined the virtue of both designs. These pulses can be thought of achieving adiabat shaping, where the ablator is set in a higher adiabat for instability control, while the fuel is maintained at a lower adiabat favoring higher fuel compression. Using these pulses, recent experiments at the NIF have indeed shown reduced growth rates. In this talk we will present the design of high-yield low-growth DT ignition experiments using these adiabat-shaped pulses. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Bio-inspired bending actuator for controlling conical nose shape using piezoelectric patches.

    PubMed

    Na, Tae-Won; Jung, Jin-Young; Oh, Ii-Kwon

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a bio-inspired bending actuator was designed and fabricated using piezoelectric patches and cantilever-shaped beam for controlling nose shape. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of the bending actuator. PZT and single crystal PMN-PT actuators were used to generate translational strain and shear stress. The piezoelectric patches were attached on the clamped cantilever beam to convert their translational strains to bending motion of the beam. First, finite element analysis was performed to identify and to make an accurate estimate of the feasibility on the bending actuation by applying various voltages and frequencies. Based on the results of the FEM analysis, the experiments were also performed. Static voltages and dynamic voltages with various frequencies were applied to the bending actuators with PZTs and PMN-PTs, and the rotation angles of the nose connected to the top of bending actuators were measured, respectively. As the results, the bending actuator using PMN-PT patches showed better performances in all cases. With the increases of signal frequency and input voltage, the rotation angle also found to be increased. Especially at the frequency of 5 Hz and input voltage of 600 V, the nose generated the maximum rotation angle of 3.15 degree.

  1. Focal adhesions control cleavage furrow shape and spindle tilt during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Nilay; Fenix, Aidan M.; Rathbun, Lindsay; Millis, Bryan A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Hehnly, Heidi; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    The geometry of the cleavage furrow during mitosis is often asymmetric in vivo and plays a critical role in stem cell differentiation and the relative positioning of daughter cells during development. Early observations of adhesive cell lines revealed asymmetry in the shape of the cleavage furrow, where the bottom (i.e., substrate attached side) of the cleavage furrow ingressed less than the top (i.e., unattached side). This data suggested substrate attachment could be regulating furrow ingression. Here we report a population of mitotic focal adhesions (FAs) controls the symmetry of the cleavage furrow. In single HeLa cells, stronger adhesion to the substrate directed less ingression from the bottom of the cell through a pathway including paxillin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vinculin. Cell-cell contacts also direct ingression of the cleavage furrow in coordination with FAs in epithelial cells—MDCK—within monolayers and polarized cysts. In addition, mitotic FAs established 3D orientation of the mitotic spindle and the relative positioning of mother and daughter centrosomes. Therefore, our data reveals mitotic FAs as a key link between mitotic cell shape and spindle orientation, and may have important implications in our understanding stem cell homeostasis and tumorigenesis. PMID:27432211

  2. First-order metal-insulator transition and infrared identification of shape-controlled magnetite nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lei; Su, Wei; Qi, Zeming; Xu, Yang; Zhou, Min; Xie, Yi

    2011-12-01

    The first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT) in magnetite has been known for a long time but is still controversial in its nature. In this study, well-defined magnetite nanocrystals (NCs) with controllable size, shape and terminated surface are first employed to elucidate this important issue, and new discoveries such as a highly suppressed phase transition temperature are identified by monitoring the variable-temperature electric resistance and infrared spectroscopy. Significantly, by carefully comparing the infrared vibrational bands of the as-prepared magnetite NCs with octahedral and cubic shapes, respectively, we found that these two forms of magnetite NCs exhibited different transmittance changes and frequency shifts of the infrared characteristics, presumably due to the differences in the lattice distortions on the corresponding {001} and {111} terminal surfaces. This result produced evidence in support of the charge ordering of Fe atoms along the low dimensionality at octahedral B sites undergoing the MIT. Taken together, infrared identification was proposed to be an available characterization strategy for MIT, which can reflect more information on the elusive lattice distortion of crystallographic structure or exposed surfaces.

  3. Formation and shape-control of hierarchical cobalt nanostructures using quaternary ammonium salts in aqueous media

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Ruchi; Mehra, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    Aggregation and self-assembly are influenced by molecular interactions. With precise control of molecular interactions, in this study, a wide range of nanostructures ranging from zero-dimensional nanospheres to hierarchical nanoplates and spindles have been successfully synthesized at ambient temperature in aqueous solution. The nanostructures reported here are formed by aggregation of spherical seed particles (monomers) in presence of quaternary ammonium salts. Hydroxide ions and a magnetic moment of the monomers are essential to induce shape anisotropy in the nanostructures. The cobalt nanoplates are studied in detail, and a growth mechanism based on collision, aggregation, and crystal consolidation is proposed based on a electron microscopy studies. The growth mechanism is generalized for rods, spindles, and nearly spherical nanostructures, obtained by varying the cation group in the quaternary ammonium hydroxides. Electron diffraction shows different predominant lattice planes on the edge and on the surface of a nanoplate. The study explains, hereto unaddressed, the temporal evolution of complex magnetic nanostructures. These ferromagnetic nanostructures represent an interesting combination of shape anisotropy and magnetic characteristics. PMID:28326240

  4. Cell shape and Wnt signaling redundantly control the division axis of C. elegans epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wildwater, Marjolein; Sander, Nicholas; de Vreede, Geert; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2011-10-01

    Tissue-specific stem cells combine proliferative and asymmetric divisions to balance self-renewal with differentiation. Tight regulation of the orientation and plane of cell division is crucial in this process. Here, we study the reproducible pattern of anterior-posterior-oriented stem cell-like divisions in the Caenorhabditis elegans seam epithelium. In a genetic screen, we identified an alg-1 Argonaute mutant with additional and abnormally oriented seam cell divisions. ALG-1 is the main subunit of the microRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) and was previously shown to regulate the timing of postembryonic development. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of developing larvae revealed that reduced alg-1 function successively interferes with Wnt signaling, cell adhesion, cell shape and the orientation and timing of seam cell division. We found that Wnt inactivation, through mig-14 Wntless mutation, disrupts tissue polarity but not anterior-posterior division. However, combined Wnt inhibition and cell shape alteration resulted in disordered orientation of seam cell division, similar to the alg-1 mutant. Our findings reveal additional alg-1-regulated processes, uncover a previously unknown function of Wnt ligands in seam tissue polarity, and show that Wnt signaling and geometric cues redundantly control the seam cell division axis.

  5. A biomechanical research of growth control of spine by shape memory alloy staples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yonggang; Zheng, Guoquan; Zhang, Ruyi; Wang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) staples in nickel titanium with shape memory effect are effective for spinal growth control. This study was designed to evaluate the biomechanical properties of the staples and observe the stability of the fixed segments spine after the staples were implanted. According to the vertical distance of the vertebrae, SMA staples of 5, 6.5, and 8 mm were designed. The recovery stress of 24 SMA staples in three groups was measured. The pullout strength of SMA staples and stainless steel staples in each functional spinal unit was measured. Each of the six fresh specimens was divided into three conditions: normal, single staple, and double staples. Under each condition, the angle and torque of spinal movements in six directions were tested. Results show that the differences in recovery stress and maximum pullout strength between groups were statistically significant. In left and right bending, flextion, and extention, the stability of spine was decreased in conditions of single staple and double staples. Biomechanical function of SMA staples was superior to stainless steel staple. SMA staples have the function of hemiepiphyseal compression and kyphosis and scoliosis model of thoracic vertebrae in goat could be successfully created by the fusionless technique.

  6. Shape and phase control of CdS nanocrystals using cationic surfactant in noninjection synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Monodispersed CdS nanocrystals with controllable shape and phase have been successfully synthesized in this study by adding cationic surfactant in noninjection synthesis system. With the increase of the amount of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) added, the shape of the CdS nanocrystals changed from spherical to multi-armed, and the phase changed from zinc-blende to wurtzite. It was found that halide ion Cl- plays a key role in the transformation, and other halide ions such as Br- can also induce similar transformation. We proposed that the strong binding between Cd2+ and halide ions reduced the reactivity of the precursors, decreased the nuclei formed in the nucleation stage, and led to the high concentration of precursor in the growth stage, resulting in the increase of size and phase transformation of CdS nanocrystals. In addition, it was found that the multi-armed CdS nanocrystals lost quantum confinement effect because of the increase of the size with the increase of the concentration of CTAC. PMID:21711888

  7. Do informal musical activities shape auditory skill development in preschool-age children?

    PubMed Central

    Putkinen, Vesa; Saarikivi, Katri; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2013-01-01

    The influence of formal musical training on auditory cognition has been well established. For the majority of children, however, musical experience does not primarily consist of adult-guided training on a musical instrument. Instead, young children mostly engage in everyday musical activities such as singing and musical play. Here, we review recent electrophysiological and behavioral studies carried out in our laboratory and elsewhere which have begun to map how developing auditory skills are shaped by such informal musical activities both at home and in playschool-type settings. Although more research is still needed, the evidence emerging from these studies suggests that, in addition to formal musical training, informal musical activities can also influence the maturation of auditory discrimination and attention in preschool-aged children. PMID:24009597

  8. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Actively controlled mechanical seals have recently been developed for industrial use. This study investigates the feasibility of using such seals for aerospace applications. In a noncontacting mechanical seal, the film thickness depends on the geometry of the seal interface. The amount of coning, which is a measure of the radial convergence or divergence of the seal interface, has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the coning with a piezoelectric material. A mathematical model has been formulated to predict the performance of an actively controlled mechanical seal.

  9. Chimeric Protein Template-Induced Shape Control of Bone Mineral Nanoparticles and Its Impact on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Du, Yinying; Liu, Haoming; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin; Zhang, Shengmin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-mediated molecular self-assembly has become a powerful strategy to fabricate biomimetic biomaterials with controlled shapes. Here we designed a novel chimeric molecular template made of two proteins, silk fibroin (SF) and albumin (ALB), which serve as a promoter and an inhibitor for hydroxyapatite (HA) formation, respectively, to synthesize HA nanoparticles with controlled shapes. HA nanospheres were produced by the chimeric ALB-SF template, whereas HA nanorods were generated by the SF template alone. The success in controlling the shape of HA nanoparticles allowed us to further study the effect of the shape of HA nanoparticles on the fate of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We found that the nanoparticle shape had a crucial impact on the cellular uptake and HA nanospheres were internalized in MSCs at a faster rate. Both HA nanospheres and nanorods showed no significant influence on cell proliferation and migration. However, HA nanospheres significantly promoted the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs in comparison to HA nanorods. Our work suggests that a chimeric combination of promoter and inhibitor proteins is a promising approach to tuning the shape of nanoparticles. It also sheds new light into the role of the shape of the HA nanoparticles in directing stem cell fate. PMID:26079683

  10. Modelling and predicting hidden solder joint shape using active thermography and parametric numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giron Palomares, Jose Benjamin; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen

    2014-05-01

    A methodology based on active infrared thermography to study and characterize hidden solder joint shapes on a multi cover PCB assembly was investigated. A numerical model was developed to simulate the active thermography methodology and was proven to determine the grand average cooling rates with maximum errors of 8.85% (one cover) and 13.36% (two covers). A parametric analysis was performed by varying the number of covers, heat flux provided, and the amount of heating time. Grand average cooling rate distances among contiguous solder joint shapes, as well as solder joints discriminability, were determined to be directly proportional to heat flux, and inversely proportional to the number of covers and heating time. Finally, a mathematical model was developed to determine the appropriate total amount of energy needed to discriminate among hidden solder joints with a "good" discriminability for one and two covers, and a "regular" discriminability for up to five covers. The mathematical model was proven to predict the total amount of energy to achieve a "good" discriminability for one cover within a 10% of error with respect to the experimental active thermography model.

  11. Activation of shape and semantic information during ambiguous homophone processing: eye tracking evidence from Hindi.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Siddharth

    2014-11-01

    In two visual world eye tracking studies, we examined the activation of subordinate meanings of ambiguous homophones in Hindi and particularly when the sentence context is biased towards the dominant meaning. Participants listened to sentences that were either neutral or biased towards the dominant meaning of the homophone and saw a display containing four pictures. In experiment 1, the display had a shape competitor of the subordinate meaning of the homophone in both neutral and biased conditions along with three unrelated distractors. Experiment 2 had semantic competitors of the subordinate meaning of the homophones along with three distractors. Proportion of fixations to different objects overtime suggested that participants activated the subordinate meanings and oriented their attention to the shape and semantic competitors even when the prior context was biased towards the dominant meaning. Overall, these data from Hindi provide further support to those models of lexical access that assume exhaustive access of both the meanings of an ambiguous homophone. These data suggest even a dominant bias does not eliminate the activation of perceptual and conceptual features of the subordinate meaning.

  12. Study on the activation of styrene-based shape memory polymer by medium-infrared laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinsong; Zhang, Dawei; Liu, Yanju; Yu, Kai; Lan, Xin

    2010-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of shape memory polymer (SMP) activation by medium-infrared laser light. Medium-infrared light is transmitted by an optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, and the shape recovery process and temperature distribution are recorded by an infrared camera. Light-induced SMP exhibits potential applications in biomedicines and flexible displays.

  13. Object discrimination through active electrolocation: Shape recognition and the influence of electrical noise.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sarah; Burt de Perera, Theresa; von der Emde, Gerhard

    2016-12-12

    The weakly electric fish Gnathonemus petersii can recognise objects using active electrolocation. Here, we tested two aspects of object recognition; first whether shape recognition might be influenced by movement of the fish, and second whether object discrimination is affected by the presence of electrical noise from conspecifics. (i) Unlike other object features, such as size or volume, no parameter within a single electrical image has been found that encodes object shape. We investigated whether shape recognition might be facilitated by movement-induced modulations (MIM) of the set of electrical images that are created as a fish swims past an object. Fish were trained to discriminate between pairs of objects that either created similar or dissimilar levels of MIM of the electrical images. As predicted, the fish were able to discriminate between objects up to a longer distance if there was a large difference in MIM between the objects than if there was a small difference. This supports an involvement of MIMs in shape recognition but the use of other cues cannot be excluded. (ii) Electrical noise might impair object recognition if the noise signals overlap with the EODs of an electrolocating fish. To avoid jamming, we predicted that fish might employ pulsing strategies to prevent overlaps. To investigate the influence of electrical noise on discrimination performance, two fish were tested either in the presence of a conspecific or of playback signals and the electric signals were recorded during the experiments. The fish were surprisingly immune to jamming by conspecifics: While the discrimination performance of one fish dropped to chance level when more than 22% of its EODs overlapped with the noise signals, the performance of the other fish was not impaired even when all its EODs overlapped. Neither of the fish changed their pulsing behaviour, suggesting that they did not use any kind of jamming avoidance strategy.

  14. In situ surface characterization and oxygen reduction reaction on shape-controlled gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hernández, J; Solla-Gullón, J; Herrero, E; Feliu, J M; Aldaz, A

    2009-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles of different shapes/surface structures were synthesized and electrochemically characterized. An in-situ surface characterization of the Au nanoparticles, which was able to obtain qualitative information about the type and relative sizes of the different facets present in the surface of the Au nanoparticles, was carried out by using Pb Under Potential Deposition (UPD) in alkaline solutions as a surface sensitive tool. The results obtained show that the final atomic arrangement on the surface can be different from that expected from the bulk structure of the well-defined shape Au nanoparticles. In this way, the development of precise in-situ methods to measure the distribution of the different sites on the nanoparticle surface, as lead UPD on gold surfaces, is highlighted. Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) was performed on the different Au nanoparticles. In agreement with the particular sensitivity of the oxygen reduction to the presence of Au(100) surface domains, cubic Au nanoparticles show much better electrocatalytic activity for ORR than small spherical particles and long nanorods, in agreement with the presence of a great fraction of (100) terrace sites on the surface of cubic gold nanoparticles.

  15. P-type nitrogen-doped ZnO nanostructures with controlled shape and doping level by facile microwave synthesis.

    PubMed

    Herring, Natalie P; Panchakarla, Leela S; El-Shall, M Samy

    2014-03-04

    We report herein the development of a facile microwave irradiation (MWI) method for the synthesis of high-quality N-doped ZnO nanostructures with controlled morphology and doping level. We present two different approaches for the MWI-assisted synthesis of N-doped ZnO nanostructures. In the first approach, N-doping of Zn-poor ZnO prepared using zinc peroxide (ZnO2) as a precursor is carried out under MWI in the presence of urea as a nitrogen source and oleylamine (OAm) as a capping agent for the shape control of the resulting N-doped ZnO nanostructures. Our approach utilizes the MWI process for the decomposition of ZnO2, where the rapid transfer of energy directly to ZnO2 can cause an instantaneous internal temperature rise and, thus, the activation energy for the ZnO2 decomposition is essentially decreased as compared to the decomposition under conductive heating. In the second synthesis method, a one-step synthesis of N-doped ZnO nanostructures is achieved by the rapid decomposition of zinc acetate in a mixture of urea and OAm under MWI. We demonstrate, for the first time, that MWI decomposition of zinc acetate in a mixture of OAm and urea results in the formation of N-doped nanostructures with controlled shape and N-doping level. We report a direct correlation between the intensity of the Raman scattering bands in N-doped ZnO and the concentration of urea used in the synthesis. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate the successful synthesis of stable p-type N-doped ZnO nanostructures using the one-step MWI synthesis and, therefore, allow us to investigate, for the first time, the relationship between the doping level and morphology of the ZnO nanostructures. The results provide strong evidence for the control of the electrical behavior and the nanostructured shapes of ZnO nanoparticles using the facile MWI synthesis method developed in this work.

  16. Coral-Shaped MoS2 Decorated with Graphene Quantum Dots Performing as a Highly Active Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Li, Honglin; Qi, Ruijuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Song, Haili; Tang, Zheng; Zhu, Ziqiang; Chen, Mingwei

    2017-02-01

    We report a new CVD method to prepare coral-shaped monolayer MoS2 with a large amount of exposed edge sites for catalyzing hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrocatalytic activities of the coral-shaped MoS2 can be further enhanced by electronic band engineering via decorated with graphene quantum dot (GQD) decoration. Generally, GQDs improve the electrical conductivity of the MoS2 electrocatalyst. First-principles calculations suggest that the coral MoS2@GQD is a zero-gap material. The high electric conductivity and pronounced catalytically active sites give the hybrid catalyst outstanding electrocatalytic performance with a small onset overpotential of 95 mV and a low Tafel slope of 40 mV/dec as well as excellent long-term electrocatalytic stability. The present work provides a potential way to design two-dimensional hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts through controlling the shape and modulating the electric conductivity.

  17. Shape-controlled growth of In(OH)3/In2O3 nanostructures by electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dewei; Masuda, Yoshitake; Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2010-09-21

    In(OH)(3) nanostructures with controllable shapes were successfully synthesized using indium nitrate as an indium source by one-step electrodeposition process. The influences of the reaction temperature, time, indium nitrate concentration, and the applied potential on the morphology of the obtained products were discussed in detail. The results revealed that the growth behavior of In(OH)(3) was mainly determined by the indium nitrate concentration and applied potential, and well-defined ellipsoids, cubes, and rods could be prepared under suitable conditions. Their possible growth mechanisms as well as photocatalytic applications were addressed. Furthermore, In(2)O(3) nanostructures were obtained from In(OH)(3) upon heating, while size and morphology can be maintained during this process.

  18. Optical boundary reconstruction of tokamak plasmas for feedback control of plasma position and shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommen, G.; de Baar, M.; Nuij, P.; McArdle, G.; Akers, R.; Steinbuch, M.

    2010-11-01

    A new diagnostic is developed to reconstruct the plasma boundary using visible wavelength images. Exploiting the plasma's edge localized and toroidally symmetric emission profile, a new coordinate transform is presented to reconstruct the plasma boundary from a poloidal view image. The plasma boundary reconstruction is implemented in MATLAB and applied to camera images of Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak discharges. The optically reconstructed plasma boundaries are compared to magnetic reconstructions from the offline reconstruction code EFIT, showing very good qualitative and quantitative agreement. Average errors are within 2 cm and correlation is high. In the current software implementation, plasma boundary reconstruction from a single image takes 3 ms. The applicability and system requirements of the new optical boundary reconstruction, called OFIT, for use in both feedback control of plasma position and shape and in offline reconstruction tools are discussed.

  19. Optical boundary reconstruction of tokamak plasmas for feedback control of plasma position and shape.

    PubMed

    Hommen, G; de Baar, M; Nuij, P; McArdle, G; Akers, R; Steinbuch, M

    2010-11-01

    A new diagnostic is developed to reconstruct the plasma boundary using visible wavelength images. Exploiting the plasma's edge localized and toroidally symmetric emission profile, a new coordinate transform is presented to reconstruct the plasma boundary from a poloidal view image. The plasma boundary reconstruction is implemented in MATLAB and applied to camera images of Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak discharges. The optically reconstructed plasma boundaries are compared to magnetic reconstructions from the offline reconstruction code EFIT, showing very good qualitative and quantitative agreement. Average errors are within 2 cm and correlation is high. In the current software implementation, plasma boundary reconstruction from a single image takes 3 ms. The applicability and system requirements of the new optical boundary reconstruction, called OFIT, for use in both feedback control of plasma position and shape and in offline reconstruction tools are discussed.

  20. Optical boundary reconstruction of tokamak plasmas for feedback control of plasma position and shape

    SciTech Connect

    Hommen, G.; Baar, M. de; Nuij, P.; Steinbuch, M.; McArdle, G.; Akers, R.

    2010-11-15

    A new diagnostic is developed to reconstruct the plasma boundary using visible wavelength images. Exploiting the plasma's edge localized and toroidally symmetric emission profile, a new coordinate transform is presented to reconstruct the plasma boundary from a poloidal view image. The plasma boundary reconstruction is implemented in MATLAB and applied to camera images of Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak discharges. The optically reconstructed plasma boundaries are compared to magnetic reconstructions from the offline reconstruction code EFIT, showing very good qualitative and quantitative agreement. Average errors are within 2 cm and correlation is high. In the current software implementation, plasma boundary reconstruction from a single image takes 3 ms. The applicability and system requirements of the new optical boundary reconstruction, called OFIT, for use in both feedback control of plasma position and shape and in offline reconstruction tools are discussed.

  1. The effects of pattern shape, subliminal stimulation, and voluntary control on multistable visual perception.

    PubMed

    Taddei-Ferretti, C; Radilova, J; Musio, C; Santillo, S; Cibelli, E; Cotugno, A; Radil, T

    2008-08-15

    Spontaneous figure reversal of ambiguous patterns was analyzed in humans. A) With Necker-"cube"-like, or "drum"-like figures, having square or round shaped "front" and "rear" surfaces, and either large or small "depth", the perceptual intervals corresponding to both interpretations of "drum" were longer than those of "cube"; the perceived "depth" of the figures was less relevant for reversal timing (inter-reversal intervals were only slightly longer for the "deeper" figures). Although the shape of "front" and "rear" surfaces is not a crucial geometrical feature for figure reversal, it did influence its timing. More, or longer information-processing steps should probably be needed for perceptual representations of curvilinear patterns in comparison with rectangular ones. The underlying neural mechanisms are probably located at a relatively peripheral level in the visual system. B) With a modified Necker "cube"-like figure, having the two internal vertices coincident, and the long axis of the figure aligned horizontally, the effect of voluntary control on perception-reversal timing overcomes opposite effects due to either fixation-attention to pattern's focal zones, or subliminal stimulation by the pattern's biased versions, suggesting one or the other perception's possibility, while it is enhanced by concordant imagery. Voluntary control should intervene downward at a high-level processing, and should probably affect both a decision-making and a perception-stabilizing mechanism in the process of the pattern's unconscious interpretation. Results A and B are confronted with other results on both perceptual and binocular rivalry of up-to-date literature, in the frame of discussions on low-level bottom-up automatic stimulus-driven processing vs high-level top-down covert attention-driven processing.

  2. Caudal fin shape modulation and control during acceleration, braking and backing maneuvers in bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus.

    PubMed

    Flammang, B E; Lauder, G V

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary patterns of intrinsic caudal musculature in ray-finned fishes show that fine control of the dorsal lobe of the tail evolved first, followed by the ability to control the ventral lobe. This progression of increasing differentiation of musculature suggests specialization of caudal muscle roles. Fine control of fin elements is probably responsible for the range of fin conformations observed during different maneuvering behaviors. Here, we examine the kinematics of the caudal fin and the motor activity of the intrinsic caudal musculature during kick-and-glide, braking and backing maneuvers, and compare these data with our previous work on the function of the caudal fin during steady swimming. Kick-and-glide maneuvers consisted of large-amplitude, rapid lateral excursion of the tail fin, followed by forward movement of the fish with the caudal fin rays adducted to reduce surface area and with the tail held in line with the body. Just before the kick, the flexors dorsalis and ventralis, hypochordal longitudinalis, infracarinalis and supracarinalis showed strong activity. During braking, the dorsal and ventral lobes of the tail moved in opposite directions, forming an ;S'-shape, accompanied by strong activity in the interradialis muscles. During backing up, the ventral lobe initiated a dorsally directed wave along the distal edge of the caudal fin. The relative timing of the intrinsic caudal muscles varied between maneuvers, and their activation was independent of the activity of the red muscle of the axial myomeres in the caudal region. There was no coupling of muscle activity duration and electromyographic burst intensity in the intrinsic caudal muscles during maneuvers, as was observed in previous work on steady swimming. Principal-component analysis produced four components that cumulatively explained 73.6% of the variance and segregated kick-and-glide, braking and backing maneuvers from each other and from steady swimming. The activity patterns of the

  3. Global shape estimates and GIS cartography of Io and Enceladus using new control point network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhdina, I.; Patraty, V.; Shishkina, L.; Zhukov, D.; Zubarev, A.; Karachevtseva, I.; Oberst, J.

    2012-04-01

    analysis for small planetary bodies by means of the software «PHOTOMOD» is fast and efficient. Using the new control points and shape models of the satellites we are currently preparing new maps of Io and Enceladus using GIS tools. For parts of the surface for which we have quality stereo-images we will produce DEMs and orthoimages, which will be shown at the conference. Acknowledgments: This research was funded by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation (MEGA-GRANT, Project name: "Geodesy, cartography and the study of planets and satellites", contract No. 11.G34.31.0021).

  4. Shape memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles

    DOEpatents

    Buckley, Patrick R [New York, NY; Maitland, Duncan J [Pleasant Hill, CA

    2012-05-29

    A shape memory material with integrated actuation using embedded particles. One embodiment provides a shape memory material apparatus comprising a shape memory material body and magnetic pieces in the shape memory material body. Another embodiment provides a method of actuating a device to perform an activity on a subject comprising the steps of positioning a shape memory material body in a desired position with regard to the subject, the shape memory material body capable of being formed in a specific primary shape, reformed into a secondary stable shape, and controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape; including pieces in the shape memory material body; and actuating the shape memory material body using the pieces causing the shape memory material body to be controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape and perform the activity on the subject.

  5. Shape memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles

    DOEpatents

    Buckley, Patrick R; Maitland, Duncan J

    2014-04-01

    A shape memory material with integrated actuation using embedded particles. One embodiment provides a shape memory material apparatus comprising a shape memory material body and magnetic pieces in the shape memory material body. Another embodiment provides a method of actuating a device to perform an activity on a subject comprising the steps of positioning a shape memory material body in a desired position with regard to the subject, the shape memory material body capable of being formed in a specific primary shape, reformed into a secondary stable shape, and controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape; including pieces in the shape memory material body; and actuating the shape memory material body using the pieces causing the shape memory material body to be controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape and perform the activity on the subject.

  6. Shape memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles

    DOEpatents

    Buckley, Patrick R.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2009-09-22

    A shape memory material with integrated actuation using embedded particles. One embodiment provides a shape memory material apparatus comprising a shape memory material body and magnetic pieces in the shape memory material body. Another embodiment provides a method of actuating a device to perform an activity on a subject comprising the steps of positioning a shape memory material body in a desired position with regard to the subject, the shape memory material body capable of being formed in a specific primary shape, reformed into a secondary stable shape, and controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape; including pieces in the shape memory material body; and actuating the shape memory material body using the pieces causing the shape memory material body to be controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape and perform the activity on the subject.

  7. Active Control of Transition and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1987-01-01

    Two active means of manipulating boundary-layer flow developed, one controlling laminar-to-turbulent transition, other controlling amplitude of turbulent fluctuation. Purpose to control skin-friction drag over surfaces inside inlets and ducts. Resulting turbulence downstream has lower skin-friction drag than equivalent flow developing over same surfaces in absence of intervention. Heating strips trigger turbulence while transition amplitude and bandwidth controlled by acoustic signal.

  8. Accurate measurement of volume and shape of resting and activated blood platelets from light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A.; Chikova, Elena D.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for determination of volume and shape of individual blood platelets modeled as an oblate spheroid from angle-resolved light scattering with flow-cytometric technique. The light-scattering profiles (LSPs) of individual platelets were measured with the scanning flow cytometer and the platelet characteristics were determined from the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem using the precomputed database of theoretical LSPs. We revealed a phenomenon of parameter compensation, which is partly explained in the framework of anomalous diffraction approximation. To overcome this problem, additional a priori information on the platelet refractive index was used. It allowed us to determine the size of each platelet with subdiffraction precision and independent of the particular value of the platelet aspect ratio. The shape (spheroidal aspect ratio) distributions of platelets showed substantial differences between native and activated by 10 μM adenosine diphosphate samples. We expect that the new approach may find use in hematological analyzers for accurate measurement of platelet volume distribution and for determination of the platelet activation efficiency.

  9. CAN WE REPRODUCE THE X-RAY BACKGROUND SPECTRAL SHAPE USING LOCAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Ranjan V.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Gandhi, Poshak

    2013-06-20

    The X-ray background (XRB) is due to the aggregate of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which peak in activity at z {approx} 1 and is often modeled as the sum of different proportions of unabsorbed, moderately, and heavily absorbed AGN. We present the summed spectrum of a complete sample of local AGN (the Northern Galactic Cap of the 58 month Swift/BAT catalog, z < 0.2) using 0.4-200 keV data and directly determine the different proportions of unabsorbed, moderately and heavily absorbed AGN that make up the summed spectrum. This stacked low redshift AGN spectrum is remarkably similar in shape to the XRB spectrum (when shifted to z {approx} 1), but the observed proportions of different absorption populations differ from most XRB synthesis models. AGN with Compton-thick absorption account for only {approx}12% of the sample, but produce a significant contribution to the overall spectrum. We confirm that Compton reflection is more prominent in moderately absorbed AGN and that the photon index differs intrinsically between unabsorbed and absorbed AGN. The AGN in our sample account for only {approx}1% of the XRB intensity. The reproduction of the XRB spectral shape suggests that strong evolution in individual AGN properties is not required between z {approx} 0 and 1.

  10. Control of grating-coupled ultrafast surface plasmon pulse and its nonlinear emission by shaping femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kazunori; Masaki, Yuta; Kusaba, Miyuki; Hirosawa, Kenichi; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-09-01

    Spatiotemporal nanofocusing of ultrafast surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) coupled on a metal Au tapered tip with a curvature radius of a few tens of nanometers is deterministically controlled based on the measured plasmon response function. We control the SPP pulse shape and the second harmonic generation at the apex of the Au tapered tip by shaping the excitation femtosecond laser pulses based on the response function. We also adapted a similar control scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and achieved selective CARS excitation of a single Raman mode of carbon nanotubes with only a single excitation laser pulse at the apex of the tip.

  11. Optimizing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by genetic algorithm controlled pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenlong; Sokolov, Alexei

    2010-10-01

    The hybrid coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has been successful applied to fast chemical sensitive detections. As the development of femto-second pulse shaping techniques, it is of great interest to find the optimum pulse shapes for CARS. The optimum pulse shapes should minimize the non-resonant four wave mixing (NRFWM) background and maximize the CARS signal. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to make a heuristic searching for optimized pulse shapes, which give the best signal the background ratio. The GA is shown to be able to rediscover the hybrid CARS scheme and find optimized pulse shapes for customized applications by itself.

  12. Reliable and Affordable Control Systems Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Bob; Tomondi, Chris; McGinley, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Active, closed-loop control of combustor pattern factor is a cooperative effort between Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal) Engines and Systems and the NASA Glenn Research Center to reduce emissions and turbine-stator vane temperature variations, thereby enhancing engine performance and life, and reducing direct operating costs. Total fuel flow supplied to the engine is established by the speed/power control, but the distribution to individual atomizers will be controlled by the Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control (ACPFC). This system consist of three major components: multiple, thin-film sensors located on the turbine-stator vanes; fuel-flow modulators for individual atomizers; and control logic and algorithms within the electronic control.

  13. Shape memory alloy-based biopsy device for active locomotive intestinal capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Le, Viet Ha; Hernando, Leon-Rodriguez; Lee, Cheong; Choi, Hyunchul; Jin, Zhen; Nguyen, Kim Tien; Go, Gwangjun; Ko, Seong-Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-03-01

    Recently, capsule endoscopes have been used for diagnosis in digestive organs. However, because a capsule endoscope does not have a locomotive function, its use has been limited to small tubular digestive organs, such as small intestine and esophagus. To address this problem, researchers have begun studying an active locomotive intestine capsule endoscope as a medical instrument for the whole gastrointestinal tract. We have developed a capsule endoscope with a small permanent magnet that is actuated by an electromagnetic actuation system, allowing active and flexible movement in the patient's gut environment. In addition, researchers have noted the need for a biopsy function in capsule endoscope for the definitive diagnosis of digestive diseases. Therefore, this paper proposes a novel robotic biopsy device for active locomotive intestine capsule endoscope. The proposed biopsy device has a sharp blade connected with a shape memory alloy actuator. The biopsy device measuring 12 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length was integrated into our capsule endoscope prototype, where the device's sharp blade was activated and exposed by the shape memory alloy actuator. Then the electromagnetic actuation system generated a specific motion of the capsule endoscope to extract the tissue sample from the intestines. The final biopsy sample tissue had a volume of about 6 mm(3), which is a sufficient amount for a histological analysis. Consequently, we proposed the working principle of the biopsy device and conducted an in-vitro biopsy test to verify the feasibility of the biopsy device integrated into the capsule endoscope prototype using the electro-magnetic actuation system.

  14. Requirements for Vertically Installed Runoff Control Boards for the “Paddy Field Dam” and Appropriate Orifice Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsuki, Yoshikawa; Hideyuki, Koide; Shin-Ichi, Misawa

    While the “Paddy Field Dam” project has been recognized as an effective flood control measure, there are some cases in which the runoff control boards are vertically installed on the opening of the drainage boxes without careful consideration of the orifice shape and size. The important criteria for the runoff control boards to be satisfied are: 1. to maintain a sufficient peak runoff control function, 2. to avoid excessive ponding causing overflow, 3. to minimize the influence to the ordinary water management, and 4. to reserve sufficient orifice area to avoid blockage of the orifice with floating litters. The purpose of this study is to examine proper shapes and sizes of the orifice to satisfy the criteria for the vertically installed runoff control boards through experiments and simulations. Given the condition that the orifice has sufficient area to avoid overflow with 10 and 20 year return period rainfall event (criteria 2), the simulation results show that the orifice with horizontally wider shapes has advantages over the square or circular shapes in terms of the criteria 1 and 3. The disadvantage of the horizontally wider shapes is the blockage of the orifice with floating litters (criteria 4). In conclusion, we proposed to secure sufficient vertical distance to avoid this problem by setting a lower limit on the vertical distance and then determine the widest horizontal distance to optimize all the criteria. In addition, we have constructed the “Orifice Design Assist Tool” on the basis of the examinations in this study.

  15. Shape-Controllable Synthesis of Peroxidase-Like Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Catalytic Removal of Organic Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Dong; Li, Wenbing; Wang, Guanghua; Wei, Xiaobi

    2016-10-01

    The shape of Fe3O4 nanoparticles is controlled using a simple oxidation-precipitation method without any surfactant. The morphology and structure of the obtained Fe3O4 nanoparticles were characterized by using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 physisorption and vibrating sample magnetometer. As-prepared Fe3O4 samples showed octahedron, cube, hexagonal plate and sphere morphologies. Peroxidase-like activity of the four nanostructures was evaluated for catalytic removal of organic pollutants in the presence of H2O2, using rhodamine B as a model compound. The results showed that the H2O2-activating ability of the Fe3O4 nanocrystals was structure dependent and followed the order sphere > cube > octahedron > hexagonal plate, which was closely related to their surface FeII/FeIII ratios or crystal planes. The reusability of Fe3O4 spheres was also investigated after five successive runs, which demonstrated the promising application of the catalyst in the degradation of organic pollutants. This investigation is of great significance for the heterogeneous catalysts with enhanced activity and practical application.

  16. Active Control by Conservation of Energy Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Three unrelated experiments are discussed; each was extremely sensitive to initial conditions. The initial conditions are the beginnings of the origins of the information that nonlinearity displays. Initial conditions make the phenomenon unstable and unpredictable. With the knowledge of the initial conditions, active control requires far less power than that present in the system response. The first experiment is on the control of shocks from an axisymmetric supersonic jet; the second, control of a nonlinear panel response forced by turbulent boundary layer and sound; the third, control of subharmonic and harmonics of a panel forced by sound. In all three experiments, control is achieved by redistribution of periodic energy response such that the energy is nearly preserved from a previous uncontrolled state. This type of active control improves the performance of the system being controlled.

  17. Active control of buildings during earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, Vicki L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an overview of the different types of control systems used in buildings, to discuss the problems associated with current active control mechanisms, and to show the cost-effectiveness of applying active control to buildings. In addition, a small case study investigates the feasibility and benefits of using embedded actuators in buildings. Use of embedded actuators could solve many of the current problems associated with active control by providing a wider bandwidth of control, quicker speed of response, increased reliability and reduced power requirement. Though embedded actuators have not been developed for buildings, they have previously been used in space structures. Many similarities exist between large civil and aerospace structures indicating that direct transfer of concepts between the two disciplines may be possible. In particular, much of the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology currently being developed could be beneficially applied to civil structures. While several buildings with active control systems have been constructed in Japan, additional research and experimental verification are necessary before active control systems become widely accepted and implemented.

  18. Shape and size controlled synthesis of MOF nanocrystals with the assistance of ionic liquid mircoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Shang, Wenting; Kang, Xinchen; Ning, Hui; Zhang, Jianling; Zhang, Xiaogang; Wu, Zhonghua; Mo, Guang; Xing, Xueqing; Han, Buxing

    2013-10-29

    In this work, the La-metal-organic frameworks (La-MOFs) were synthesized using lanthanum(III) nitrate and 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (BTC) in H2O-in-1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (bmimPF6), bmimPF6-in-water, and the bicontinuous microemulsions stabilized by surfactant TX-100. The MOFs prepared were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and FT-IR methods, and the microstructures of the microemulsions in the H2O/bmimPF6/TX-100 system were studied by small-angle X-ray scattering (SXAS) technique. It was shown that the dispersed droplets in the water-in-bmimPF6, bicontinuous and bmimPF6-in-water microemulsions were spherical, lamellar, and cylindrical, respectively. The shapes of the La-MOFs synthesized were similar to that of the droplets in the corresponding microemulsions. This indicated that the morphology of MOFs could be controlled by the microstructures of the microemulsions. On the basis of the systematic experimental results, the mechanism for controlling the morphology of the MOFs was proposed.

  19. Controls on fire activity over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, S.; Brücher, T.; Brovkin, V.; Wilkenskjeld, S.

    2014-11-01

    Changes in fire activity over the last 8000 years are simulated with a global fire model driven by changes in climate and vegetation cover. The changes were separated into those caused through variations in fuel availability, fuel moisture or wind speed which react differently to changes in climate. Disentangling these controlling factors helps to understand the overall climate control on fire activity over the Holocene. Globally the burned area is simulated to increase by 2.5% between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP with larger regional changes compensating on a global scale. Despite the absence of anthropogenic fire ignitions, the simulated trends in fire activity agree reasonably well with continental scale reconstructions from charcoal records, with the exception of Europe. For some regions the change in fire activity is predominantly controlled through changes in fuel availability (Australia-Monsoon, American Tropics/Subtropics). For other regions changes in fuel moisture are more important for the overall trend in fire activity (North America, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia-Monsoon). In Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, changes in fuel moisture alone lead to an increase in fire activity between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, while changes in fuel availability lead to a decrease. Overall, the fuel moisture control is dominating the simulated fire activity for Sub-Saharan Africa. The simulations clearly demonstrate that both changes in fuel availability and changes in fuel moisture are important drivers for the fire activity over the Holocene. Fuel availability and fuel moisture do, however, have different climate controls. As such observed changes in fire activity can not be related to single climate parameters such as precipitation or temperature alone. Fire models, as applied in this study, in combination with observational records can help to understand the climate control on fire activity, which is essential to project future fire activity.

  20. Controls on fire activity over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, S.; Brucher, T.; Brovkin, V.; Wilkenskjeld, S.

    2015-05-01

    Changes in fire activity over the last 8000 years are simulated with a global fire model driven by changes in climate and vegetation cover. The changes were separated into those caused through variations in fuel availability, fuel moisture or wind speed, which react differently to changes in climate. Disentangling these controlling factors helps in understanding the overall climate control on fire activity over the Holocene. Globally the burned area is simulated to increase by 2.5% between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, with larger regional changes compensating nearly evening out on a global scale. Despite the absence of anthropogenic fire ignitions, the simulated trends in fire activity agree reasonably well with continental-scale reconstructions from charcoal records, with the exception of Europe. For some regions the change in fire activity is predominantly controlled through changes in fuel availability (Australia monsoon, Central America tropics/subtropics). For other regions changes in fuel moisture are more important for the overall trend in fire activity (North America, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia monsoon). In Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, changes in fuel moisture alone lead to an increase in fire activity between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, while changes in fuel availability lead to a decrease. Overall, the fuel moisture control is dominating the simulated fire activity for Sub-Saharan Africa. The simulations clearly demonstrate that both changes in fuel availability and changes in fuel moisture are important drivers for the fire activity over the Holocene. Fuel availability and fuel moisture do, however, have different climate controls. As such, observed changes in fire activity cannot be related to single climate parameters such as precipitation or temperature alone. Fire models, as applied in this study, in combination with observational records can help in understanding the climate control on fire activity, which is essential to project future fire

  1. The Shape of Uterine Contractions and Labor Progress in the Spontaneous Active Labor

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh Zagami, Samira; Golmakani, Nahid; Saadatjoo, Seyyed Ali-Reza; Ghomian, Nayyereh; Baghbani, Behjat

    2015-01-01

    Background Dystocia is the most common indication of primary cesarean section. The most common cause of dystocia is uterine dysfunction. In prolonged labor, more attention is usually paid to the fetus and pelvis rather than to the role of uterine contractions in a delivery. Therefore, we decided to determine the relationship between the labor progress and uterine contractions shapes. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 200 primiparous women participated having a single pregnancy and cephalic presentation. Uterus contractions were recorded using electronic fetal monitoring at the beginning of the active phase of labor (dilatation 3-5 cm) for 30 min. Fall to rise (F:R) ratio was calculated by determining the duration of returning from a contraction peak to its baseline (fall) and the duration of the rise time from baseline to peak (rise) in two groups. The data were analyzed using t-test and Chi-square test. Results In this study, 162 women had a normal delivery and 38 women had a cesarean (CS) delivery due to the lack of labor progress. The average F:R ratio was 1.13±0.193 seconds in the vaginal delivery group and 1.64±0.301 seconds in the CS group. This difference was statistically significant (P<0.001). The frequency of contractions in the vaginal delivery group was more than the CS group (P=0.008). Conclusion Our findings demonstrated that uterine contractions shapes change; and F:R ratio was higher in the group that lacked labor progress. Therefore, contraction shapes can be used to predict the labor progress.   PMID:25821288

  2. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  3. Active control of turbomachine discrete tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, Sanford

    This paper was directed at active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the blade row interaction generated propagating acoustic waves. First discrete frequency noise generated by a rotor and stator in a duct was analyzed to determine the propagating acoustic pressure waves. Then a mathematical model was developed to analyze and predict the active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the propagating acoustic waves, accomplished by utilizing oscillating airfoil surfaces to generate additional control propagating pressure waves. These control waves interact with the propagating acoustic waves, thereby, in principle, canceling the acoustic waves and thus, the far field discrete frequency tones. This model was then applied to a fan exit guide vane to investigate active airfoil surface techniques for control of the propagating acoustic waves, and thus the far field discrete frequency tones, generated by blade row interactions.

  4. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  5. Approximate active fault detection and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škach, Jan; Punčochář, Ivo; Šimandl, Miroslav

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with approximate active fault detection and control for nonlinear discrete-time stochastic systems over an infinite time horizon. Multiple model framework is used to represent fault-free and finitely many faulty models. An imperfect state information problem is reformulated using a hyper-state and dynamic programming is applied to solve the problem numerically. The proposed active fault detector and controller is illustrated in a numerical example of an air handling unit.

  6. Active Polymer Microfiber with Controlled Polarization Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongyan; Wang, Ruxue; Liu, Yingying; Cheng, Junjie; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin; Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Controlled Polarization Sensitivity of an active polymer microfiber has been proposed and realized with the electrospun method. The fluorescence intensity guiding through this active polymer microfiber shows high sensitivity to the polarization state of the excitation light. What is more, the fluorescence out-coupled from tip of the microfiber can be of designed polarization state. Principle of these phenomena lies on the ordered and controlled orientation of the polydiacetylene (PDA) main chains inside polymer microfiber. PMID:27099828

  7. An extended active control for chaos synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rong-An; Liu, Ya-Li; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2009-04-01

    By introducing a control strength matrix, the active control theory in chaotic synchronization is developed. With this extended method, chaos complete synchronization can be achieved more easily, i.e., a much smaller control signal is enough to reach synchronization in most cases. Numerical simulations on Rossler, Liu's four-scroll, and Chen system confirmed this and show that the synchronization result depends on the control strength significantly. Especially, in the case of Liu and Chen systems, the response systems' largest Lyapunov exponents' variation with the control strength is not monotone and there exist minima. It is novel for Chen system that the synchronization speed with a special small strength is higher than that of the usual active control which, as a special case of the extended method, has a much larger control strength. All these results indicate that the control strength is an important factor in the actual synchronization. So, with this extended active control, one can make a better and more practical synchronization scheme by adjusting the control strength matrix.

  8. Evaluating and Refining the Conceptual Model Used in the Study of Health and Activity in Preschool Environments (SHAPES) Intervention.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Ruth P; Pfeiffer, Karin; Brown, William H; Howie, Erin K; Dowda, Marsha; O'Neill, Jennifer R; McIver, Kerry; Pate, Russell R

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the utility of the Study of Health and Activity in Preschool Environments (SHAPES) conceptual model, which targeted physical activity (PA) behavior in preschool children, by examining the relationship between implementation monitoring data and child PA during the school day. We monitored implementation completeness and fidelity based on multiple elements identified in the conceptual model. Comparing high-implementing, low-implementing, and control groups revealed no association between implementation and outcomes. We performed post hoc analyses, using process data, to refine our conceptual model's depiction of an effective preschool PA-promoting environment. Results suggest that a single component of the original four-component conceptual model, providing opportunities for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity through recess for 4-year-old children in preschool settings, may be a good starting place for increasing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Interventions that are implemented with optimal levels of completeness and fidelity are more likely to achieve behavior change if they are based on accurate conceptual models. Examining the mechanisms through which an intervention produces its effects, as articulated in the conceptual model that guides it, is particularly important for environmentally focused interventions because they are guided by emerging frameworks. The results of this study underscore the utility of using implementation monitoring data to examine the conceptual model on which the intervention is based.

  9. Transient stability and control of renewable generators based on Hamiltonian surface shaping and power flow control. Part II, analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinett, Rush D., III; Wilson, David Gerald

    2010-11-01

    The swing equations for renewable generators connected to the grid are developed and a wind turbine is used as an example. The swing equations for the renewable generators are formulated as a natural Hamiltonian system with externally applied non-conservative forces. A two-step process referred to as Hamiltonian Surface Shaping and Power Flow Control (HSSPFC) is used to analyze and design feedback controllers for the renewable generators system. This formulation extends previous results on the analytical verification of the Potential Energy Boundary Surface (PEBS) method to nonlinear control analysis and design and justifies the decomposition of the system into conservative and non-conservative systems to enable a two-step, serial analysis and design procedure. The first step is to analyze the system as a conservative natural Hamiltonian system with no externally applied non-conservative forces. The Hamiltonian surface of the swing equations is related to the Equal-Area Criterion and the PEBS method to formulate the nonlinear transient stability problem. This formulation demonstrates the effectiveness of proportional feedback control to expand the stability region. The second step is to analyze the system as natural Hamiltonian system with externally applied non-conservative forces. The time derivative of the Hamiltonian produces the work/rate (power flow) equation which is used to ensure balanced power flows from the renewable generators to the loads. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is applied to the power flow equations to determine the stability boundaries (limit cycles) of the renewable generators system and enable design of feedback controllers that meet stability requirements while maximizing the power generation and flow to the load. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of renewable generators systems are determined based on the concepts of Hamiltonian systems, power flow, exergy (the maximum work that can be extracted from an energy flow) rate

  10. Self-assembled shape- and orientation-controlled synthesis of nanoscale Cu3Si triangles, squares, and wires.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhou; Wong, Lai Mun; Ong, Hock Guan; Wang, Xin Jiao; Wang, Jun Ling; Wang, Shi Jie; Chen, Hongyu; Wu, Tom

    2008-10-01

    Controlling shape and orientation is important for the synthesis of functional nanomaterials. In this work, nanoscale Cu3Si triangles, squares, and wires have been grown on Si(111), (100), and (110) substrates, respectively, through a template-free Au-nanoparticle-assisted vapor transport method. The sides of nanotriangles and nanosquares and the growth direction of the nanowires are all along Si <110>, giving rise to long-range ordering of the nanostructures. Au nanoparticles absorb Cu vapor and facilitate the rate-limited diffusion of Si, which is critical for the shape-controlled growth of Cu3Si. This bottom-up approach to synthesize shape- and orientation-controlled Cu3Si nanostructures might be applicable to the tailored growth of other materials.

  11. Precision Control of the Electron Longitudinal Bunch Shape Using an Emittance-Exchange Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, G.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.; Power, J. G.; Doran, D. S.; Wisniewski, E. E.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Liu, W.; Whiteford, C.; Gao, Q.; Kim, K.-J.; Zholents, A.; Sun, Y.-E.; Jing, C.; Piot, P.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the experimental generation of relativistic electron bunches with a tunable longitudinal bunch shape. A longitudinal bunch-shaping (LBS) beam line, consisting of a transverse mask followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX) beam line, is used to tailor the longitudinal bunch shape (or current profile) of the electron bunch. The mask shapes the bunch's horizontal profile, and the EEX beam line converts it to a corresponding longitudinal profile. The Argonne wakefield accelerator rf photoinjector delivers electron bunches into a LBS beam line to generate a variety of longitudinal bunch shapes. The quality of the longitudinal bunch shape is limited by various perturbations in the exchange process. We develop a simple method, based on the incident slope of the bunch, to significantly suppress the perturbations.

  12. Transitioning Active Flow Control to Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Chen, Fang-Jenq

    1999-01-01

    Active Flow Control Programs at NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and DARPA have been initiated with the goals of obtaining revolutionary advances in aerodynamic performance and maneuvering compared to conventional approaches. These programs envision the use of actuators, sensors, and controllers on applications such as aircraft wings/tails, engine nacelles, internal ducts, nozzles, projectiles, weapons bays, and hydrodynamic vehicles. Anticipated benefits of flow control include reduced weight, part count, and operating cost and reduced fuel burn (and emissions), noise and enhanced safety if the sensors serve a dual role of flow control and health monitoring. To get from the bench-top or laboratory test to adaptive distributed control systems on realistic applications, reliable validated design tools are needed in addition to sub- and large-scale wind-tunnel and flight experiments. This paper will focus on the development of tools for active flow control applications.

  13. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  14. Student Activity Funds: Procedures and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    An effective internal-control system can help school business administrators meet the challenges of accounting for student activity funds. Such a system should include appropriate policies and procedures, identification of key control points, self-assessments, audit trails, and internal and external audits. (MLH)

  15. Compensatory motor control after stroke: an alternative joint strategy for object-dependent shaping of hand posture.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Preeti; Santello, Marco; Gordon, Andrew M; Krakauer, John W

    2010-06-01

    Efficient grasping requires planned and accurate coordination of finger movements to approximate the shape of an object before contact. In healthy subjects, hand shaping is known to occur early in reach under predominantly feedforward control. In patients with hemiparesis after stroke, execution of coordinated digit motion during grasping is impaired as a result of damage to the corticospinal tract. The question addressed here is whether patients with hemiparesis are able to compensate for their execution deficit with a qualitatively different grasp strategy that still allows them to differentiate hand posture to object shape. Subjects grasped a rectangular, concave, and convex object while wearing an instrumented glove. Reach-to-grasp was divided into three phases based on wrist kinematics: reach acceleration (reach onset to peak horizontal wrist velocity), reach deceleration (peak horizontal wrist velocity to reach offset), and grasp (reach offset to lift-off). Patients showed reduced finger abduction, proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) flexion, and metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) extension at object grasp across all three shapes compared with controls; however, they were able to partially differentiate hand posture for the convex and concave shapes using a compensatory strategy that involved increased MCP flexion rather than the PIP flexion seen in controls. Interestingly, shape-specific hand postures did not unfold initially during reach acceleration as seen in controls, but instead evolved later during reach deceleration, which suggests increased reliance on sensory feedback. These results indicate that kinematic analysis can identify and quantify within-limb compensatory motor control strategies after stroke. From a clinical perspective, quantitative study of compensation is important to better understand the process of recovery from brain injury. From a motor control perspective, compensation can be considered a model for how joint redundancy is exploited

  16. Compensatory Motor Control After Stroke: An Alternative Joint Strategy for Object-Dependent Shaping of Hand Posture

    PubMed Central

    Santello, Marco; Gordon, Andrew M.; Krakauer, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient grasping requires planned and accurate coordination of finger movements to approximate the shape of an object before contact. In healthy subjects, hand shaping is known to occur early in reach under predominantly feedforward control. In patients with hemiparesis after stroke, execution of coordinated digit motion during grasping is impaired as a result of damage to the corticospinal tract. The question addressed here is whether patients with hemiparesis are able to compensate for their execution deficit with a qualitatively different grasp strategy that still allows them to differentiate hand posture to object shape. Subjects grasped a rectangular, concave, and convex object while wearing an instrumented glove. Reach-to-grasp was divided into three phases based on wrist kinematics: reach acceleration (reach onset to peak horizontal wrist velocity), reach deceleration (peak horizontal wrist velocity to reach offset), and grasp (reach offset to lift-off). Patients showed reduced finger abduction, proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) flexion, and metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) extension at object grasp across all three shapes compared with controls; however, they were able to partially differentiate hand posture for the convex and concave shapes using a compensatory strategy that involved increased MCP flexion rather than the PIP flexion seen in controls. Interestingly, shape-specific hand postures did not unfold initially during reach acceleration as seen in controls, but instead evolved later during reach deceleration, which suggests increased reliance on sensory feedback. These results indicate that kinematic analysis can identify and quantify within-limb compensatory motor control strategies after stroke. From a clinical perspective, quantitative study of compensation is important to better understand the process of recovery from brain injury. From a motor control perspective, compensation can be considered a model for how joint redundancy is exploited

  17. Mechanical Control of Whole Body Shape by a Single Cuticular Protein Obstructor-E in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2017-01-01

    Body shapes are much more variable than body plans. One way to alter body shapes independently of body plans would be to mechanically deform bodies. To what extent body shapes are regulated physically, or molecules involved in physical control of morphogenesis, remain elusive. During fly metamorphosis, the cuticle (exoskeleton) covering the larval body contracts longitudinally and expands laterally to become the ellipsoidal pupal case (puparium). Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster Obstructor-E (Obst-E) is a protein constituent of the larval cuticle that confers the oriented contractility/expandability. In the absence of obst-E function, the larval cuticle fails to undergo metamorphic shape change and finally becomes a twiggy puparium. We present results indicating that Obst-E regulates the arrangement of chitin, a long-chain polysaccharide and a central component of the insect cuticle, and directs the formation of supracellular ridges on the larval cuticle. We further show that Obst-E is locally required for the oriented shape change of the cuticle during metamorphosis, which is associated with changes in the morphology of those ridges. Thus, Obst-E dramatically affects the body shape in a direct, physical manner by controlling the mechanical property of the exoskeleton. PMID:28076349

  18. Systems Cancer Biology and the Controlling Mechanisms for the J-Shaped Cancer Dose Response: Towards Relaxing the LNT Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lou, In Chio; Zhao, Yuchao; Wu, Yingjie; Ricci, Paolo F

    2012-01-01

    The hormesis phenomena or J-shaped dose response have been accepted as a common phenomenon regardless of the involved biological model, endpoint measured and chemical class/physical stressor. This paper first introduced a mathematical dose response model based on systems biology approach. It links molecular-level cell cycle checkpoint control information to clonal growth cancer model to predict the possible shapes of the dose response curves of Ionizing Radiation (IR) induced tumor transformation frequency. J-shaped dose response curves have been captured with consideration of cell cycle checkpoint control mechanisms. The simulation results indicate the shape of the dose response curve relates to the behavior of the saddle-node points of the model in the bifurcation diagram. A simplified version of the model in previous work of the authors was used mathematically to analyze behaviors relating to the saddle-node points for the J-shaped dose response curve. It indicates that low-linear energy transfer (LET) is more likely to have a J-shaped dose response curve. This result emphasizes the significance of systems biology approach, which encourages collaboration of multidiscipline of biologists, toxicologists and mathematicians, to illustrate complex cancer-related events, and confirm the biphasic dose-response at low doses.

  19. Integrating research, policy, and practice in school-based physical activity prevention programming: the School Health Action, Planning, and Evaluation System (SHAPES) Physical Activity Module.

    PubMed

    Leatherdale, Scott T; Manske, Steve; Wong, Suzy L; Cameron, Roy

    2009-04-01

    The School Health Action, Planning, and Evaluation System (SHAPES) is a data collection and feedback system designed to support population-based intervention planning, evaluation, and field research related to youth. The Physical Activity Module of SHAPES consists of: (a) a machine readable questionnaire to collect physical activity data from all students (grades 6 to 12) in a school, (b) a school administrator questionnaire to assess school policies, programs, and resources related to physical activity, and (c) a school-specific feedback report documenting student behavior and school programs and policies. This SHAPES module provides schools with feedback that enables them to take stock of patterns of activity and obesity within their school, recognize what is (and what is not) in place to support physical activity, and how to plan and evaluate their own prevention efforts. SHAPES enables researchers and stakeholders to identify what interventions work, in what contexts, with what students.

  20. Efficient Thermolysis Route to Monodisperse Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystals with Controlled Shape and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Guobiao; Ji, Cheng; Huang, Kai; Zha, Chenyang; Wang, Yifeng; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2014-01-01

    Monodisperse Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals with tunable shape, crystalline phase, and composition are synthesized by efficient thermolysis of a single source precursor of mixed metal-oleate complexes in hot organic solvents with dissolved sulfur sources. Suitable tuning of the synthetic conditions and the Cu/(Zn + Sn) ratio of the precursor has enabled precise control of the crystalline phase in the form of kesterite, or a newly observed wurtzite structure. Nanocrystals with morphology in the form of spherical, rice-like, or rod-like shapes are obtained over a wide range of compositions (0.5 ≤ Cu/(Zn + Sn) ≤ 1.2). Both the final products and intermediates for each shape exhibit consistent composition and structure, indicating homogenous nucleation and growth of single-phase nanocrystals. Thin films prepared from colloidal nanocrystal suspensions display interesting shape-dependent photoresponse behavior under white light illumination from a solar simulator. PMID:24866987

  1. Knee cartilage segmentation using active shape models and local binary patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Germán.; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Segmentation of knee cartilage has been useful for opportune diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). This paper presents a semiautomatic segmentation technique based on Active Shape Models (ASM) combined with Local Binary Patterns (LBP) and its approaches to describe the surrounding texture of femoral cartilage. The proposed technique is tested on a 16-image database of different patients and it is validated through Leave- One-Out method. We compare different segmentation techniques: ASM-LBP, ASM-medianLBP, and ASM proposed by Cootes. The ASM-LBP approaches are tested with different ratios to decide which of them describes the cartilage texture better. The results show that ASM-medianLBP has better performance than ASM-LBP and ASM. Furthermore, we add a routine which improves the robustness versus two principal problems: oversegmentation and initialization.

  2. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

    2014-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function.

  3. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  4. Boundary Layer Flow Control by an Array of Ramp-Shaped Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Hirt, S. M.; Bencic, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for the effect of ramp-shaped vortex generators (VG) on a turbulent boundary layer are presented. The experiments are carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel and the data are acquired primarily by hot-wire anemometry. Distributions of mean velocity and turbulent stresses as well as streamwise vorticity, on cross-sectional planes at various downstream locations, are obtained. These detailed flow field properties, including the boundary layer characteristics, are documented with the primary objective of aiding possible computational investigations. The results show that VG orientation with apex upstream, that produces a downwash directly behind it, yields a stronger pair of streamwise vortices. This is in contrast to the case with apex downstream that produces a pair of vortices of opposite sense. Thus, an array of VG s with the former orientation, usually considered for film-cooling application, may also be superior for mixing enhancement and boundary layer separation control. (See CASI ID 20120009374 for Supplemental CD-ROM.)

  5. The surface structure of silver-coated gold nanocrystals and its influence on shape control

    PubMed Central

    Padmos, J. Daniel; Personick, Michelle L.; Tang, Qing; Duchesne, Paul N.; Jiang, De-en; Mirkin, Chad A.; Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the surface structure of metal nanocrystals with specific facet indices is important due to its impact on controlling nanocrystal shape and functionality. However, this is particularly challenging for halide-adsorbed nanocrystals due to the difficulty in analysing interactions between metals and light halides (for example, chloride). Here we uncover the surface structures of chloride-adsorbed, silver-coated gold nanocrystals with {111}, {110}, {310} and {720} indexed facets by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory modelling. The silver–chloride, silver–silver and silver–gold bonding structures are markedly different between the nanocrystal surfaces, and are sensitive to their formation mechanism and facet type. A unique approach of combining the density functional theory and experimental/simulated X-ray spectroscopy further verifies the surface structure models and identifies the previously indistinguishable valence state of silver atoms on the nanocrystal surfaces. Overall, this work elucidates the thus-far unknown chloride–metal nanocrystal surface structures and sheds light onto the halide-induced growth mechanism of anisotropic nanocrystals. PMID:26153854

  6. Ion-track membranes of fluoropolymers: Toward controlling the pore size and shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaki, T.; Nuryanthi, N.; Koshikawa, H.; Asano, M.; Sawada, S.; Hakoda, T.; Maekawa, Y.; Voss, K.-O.; Severin, D.; Seidl, T.; Trautmann, C.; Neumann, R.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of varying the beam parameters and applying the effect of a pre-etching treatment for poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) ion-track membranes was investigated with the goal of achieving enhanced track etching for effective control of the pore size and shape. Commercially available 25 μm-thick PVDF films were irradiated at room temperature with swift heavy ions from the JAEA's TIARA cyclotron and GSI's UNILAC linear accelerator. Irradiation with a higher linear energy transfer (LET) beam gave faster track etching and larger pores, suggesting that the LET could be the most crucial factor determining the pore size. In-situ infra-red absorption and residual gas analyses shed light on the detailed chemistry of not only the ion-induced degradation, but also post-irradiation reactions. The pre-etching treatment effect involved oxidation of the unsaturated bonds within the latent track, which accelerated the chemical dissolution for efficient pore evolution. In other words, exposure to a gaseous oxidant, i.e., ozone, shortened the breakthrough time.

  7. JAGGED Controls Arabidopsis Petal Growth and Shape by Interacting with a Divergent Polarity Field

    PubMed Central

    Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Schiessl, Katharina; Bangham, Andrew; Sablowski, Robert; Coen, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    A flowering plant generates many different organs such as leaves, petals, and stamens, each with a particular function and shape. These types of organ are thought to represent variations on a common underlying developmental program. However, it is unclear how this program is modulated under different selective constraints to generate the diversity of forms observed. Here we address this problem by analysing the development of Arabidopsis petals and comparing the results to models of leaf development. We show that petal development involves a divergent polarity field with growth rates perpendicular to local polarity increasing towards the distal end of the petal. The hypothesis is supported by the observed pattern of clones induced at various stages of development and by analysis of polarity markers, which show a divergent pattern. We also show that JAGGED (JAG) has a key role in promoting distal enhancement of growth rates and influences the extent of the divergent polarity field. Furthermore, we reveal links between the polarity field and auxin function: auxin-responsive markers such as DR5 have a broader distribution along the distal petal margin, consistent with the broad distal organiser of polarity, and PETAL LOSS (PTL), which has been implicated in the control of auxin dynamics during petal initiation, is directly repressed by JAG. By comparing these results with those from studies on leaf development, we show how simple modifications of an underlying developmental system may generate distinct forms, providing flexibility for the evolution of different organ functions. PMID:23653565

  8. The surface structure of silver-coated gold nanocrystals and its influence on shape control.

    PubMed

    Padmos, J Daniel; Personick, Michelle L; Tang, Qing; Duchesne, Paul N; Jiang, De-en; Mirkin, Chad A; Zhang, Peng

    2015-07-08

    Understanding the surface structure of metal nanocrystals with specific facet indices is important due to its impact on controlling nanocrystal shape and functionality. However, this is particularly challenging for halide-adsorbed nanocrystals due to the difficulty in analysing interactions between metals and light halides (for example, chloride). Here we uncover the surface structures of chloride-adsorbed, silver-coated gold nanocrystals with {111}, {110}, {310} and {720} indexed facets by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory modelling. The silver-chloride, silver-silver and silver-gold bonding structures are markedly different between the nanocrystal surfaces, and are sensitive to their formation mechanism and facet type. A unique approach of combining the density functional theory and experimental/simulated X-ray spectroscopy further verifies the surface structure models and identifies the previously indistinguishable valence state of silver atoms on the nanocrystal surfaces. Overall, this work elucidates the thus-far unknown chloride-metal nanocrystal surface structures and sheds light onto the halide-induced growth mechanism of anisotropic nanocrystals.

  9. Tripolyphosphate cross-linked macromolecular composites for the growth of shape- and size-controlled apatites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shu-Huei; Wu, Shao-Jung; Wu, Jui-Yu; Peng, Chih-Kang; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2012-12-20

    Bioactive composites that enable the formation of calcium phosphates have received increased attention over the last decade, in the development of osteoconductive biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. In this work, tripolyphosphate (TPP)-cross-linked chitosan/gelatin composites (TPP-CG) were prepared for the growth of shape- and size-controlled calcium phosphates on/in the composites. The mineralization pattern of the composites, after soaking in the Ca(OH)(2) aqueous solution, clearly demonstrated oriented, needle-like nanocrystallites of calcium phosphates in the matrix with especially high Ca/P molar ratio (3.98) as detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. Subsequent to mineralization in a simulated body fluid (SBF), the mineralized composites showed micro-scaled spherical aggregates deposited on the surface and granule-like nanocrystallites grew in the matrix. The Ca/P molar ratio (1.72) and X-ray diffraction pattern of the nanocrystallites grown in the composites were similar to those of hydroxyapatite (HAp). Osteoblastic differentiation of ROS cells cultured on the mineralized composites allowed an enhanced expression of the chosen osteogenic marker (alkaline phosphatase, ALPase). These results indicated that the composites mineralized with micro- and nano-scaled calcium phosphates with various structural features make them attractive for bone tissue engineering applications.