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Sample records for active shear zones

  1. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  2. Hydrothermal quartz formation during fluctuations of brittle shear-zone activity and fluid flow: grain growth and deformation structures of the Pfahl shear zone (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, T.; Prosser, G.; Liotta, D.; Kruhl, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Bavarian Pfahl shear zone is a WNW-ESE trending dextral strike-slip shear zone at the SW margin of the Bohemian Massif (Central Europe). It was discontinuously active during decreasing PT-conditions, i.e. from ductile to brittle, from the late-Carboniferous to the late-Cretaceous - Paleocene times. Triassic hydrothermal activity produced a 150 km long and 30-100 m wide quartz dyke along the main fault, surrounded by sheared basement rocks. Within a zone of >10 m metasomatism transformed the wall rocks to mostly kaolinite, chlorite and phyllosilicates. The quartz dyke exhibits a layered to lenticular and partly symmetric structure with different types of quartz masses, transected by a complex quartz vein network. This already indicates pulses of fluid flux and fragmentation during the lifetime of the shear zone. Analyses by optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence (CL) and SEM-EDX reveal at least four subsequent stages of quartz crystallization and fragmentation. (i) The oldest generation of quartz is represented by a homogeneous dark grey to reddish quartz mass made up by ~10-20 μm-sized crystals. It contains mm- to cm-sized angular wall-rock fragments, completely altered to kaolinite, indicating intense wall-rock alteration prior to the earliest event of silica precipitation. This rules out the possibility that the quartz mass developed from silicification of the wall rocks. This first type of quartz occurs as cm- to dm-large angular fragments in (ii) a light grey to pink quartz mass formed by ~10-50 μm-sized crystals. The different colours result from variable types and amounts of inclusions. Quartz of both generations shows random crystallographic orientations and complex inclusion structures. It probably developed during two fragmentation events and possibly from a silica gel precursor that crystallized after precipitation. (iii) The third quartz generation formed as a set of mm- to dm-wide veins roughly parallel to the trend of the Pfahl zone

  3. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  4. Low resistivity and permeability in actively deforming shear zones on the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Lockner, David A.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific drillhole near Parkfield, California crosses the San Andreas Fault at a depth of 2.7 km. Downhole measurements and analysis of core retrieved from Phase 3 drilling reveal two narrow, actively deforming zones of smectite-clay gouge within a roughly 200 m-wide fault damage zone of sandstones, siltstones and mudstones. Here we report electrical resistivity and permeability measurements on core samples from all of these structural units at effective confining pressures up to 120 MPa. Electrical resistivity (~10 ohm-m) and permeability (10-21 to 10-22 m2) in the actively deforming zones were one to two orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding damage zone material, consistent with broader-scale observations from the downhole resistivity and seismic velocity logs. The higher porosity of the clay gouge, 2 to 8 times greater than that in the damage zone rocks, along with surface conduction were the principal factors contributing to the observed low resistivities. The high percentage of fine-grained clay in the deforming zones also greatly reduced permeability to values low enough to create a barrier to fluid flow across the fault. Together, resistivity and permeability data can be used to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics of the fault, key to understanding fault structure and strength. The low resistivities and strength measurements of the SAFOD core are consistent with observations of low resistivity clays that are often found in the principal slip zones of other active faults making resistivity logs a valuable tool for identifying these zones.

  5. Creep Cavitation in Lower Crustal Shear Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, L. M.; Fusseis, F.; Stunitz, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Shear zones channelize fluid flow in the Earth's crust. A number of mechanisms have been suggested to control fluid migration pathways in upper- and mid-crustal shear zones, amongst them creep cavitation, which is well-known from deforming metals and ceramics. However, little is known on deep crustal fluid migration and on how fluids are channelized and distributed in actively deforming lower crustal shear zones.This study investigates the deformation mechanisms, fluid-rock interaction, and development of porosity in a monzonite ultramylonite from Lofoten, northern Norway. The rock was deformed under lower crustal conditions (T=700-730° C, P=0.65-0.8 GPa). The ultramylonite consists of feldspathic layers and of domains of amphibole + quartz + calcite, which represent the products of hydration reactions of magmatic clinopyroxene. The average grain size in both domains is <25 μm. Microstructural observations and EBSD analysis are consistent with diffusion creep as the dominant deformation mechanism in both domains. In feldspathic layers, isolated quartz grains without a crystallographic preferred orientation occur along C'-type shear bands. All microstructures suggest that quartz precipitated in cavities. The orientation of such quartz bands overlaps with the preferred orientation of pores in the ultramylonites, as evidenced from synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Such C'-type shear bands are interpreted as high-strain cavitation bands resulting from diffusion creep deformation associated with grain boundary sliding. Mass-balance calculation indicates a 2% volume increase during the protolith-ultramylonite transformation. The volume increase is consistent with a synkinematic formation of cavities. Thus, this study presents clear evidence that high-strain cavitation bands may control deep crustal porosity and fluid flow. Nucleation of new phases in cavitation bands inhibits grain growth and enhances the activity of grain-size sensitive creep, thereby maintaining

  6. Age, tectonic evolution and origin of the Aswa Shear Zone in Uganda: Activation of an oblique ramp during convergence in the East African Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, K.; Mänttäri, I.; Nyakecho, C.; Isabirye, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Aswa Shear Zone (ASZ) is a major NW-SE trending structure of over 1000 km length in East Africa. In Uganda, the ASZ is a steeply NE-dipping, up to 11 km wide mylonitic shear zone that shows multiple stage brittle reactivation. On outcrop-scale, the fabric in the ASZ is characterized by a well-developed NW-SE striking and subvertical or steeply NE or SW dipping mylonitic foliation and a subhorizontal to moderately NW- or SE-plunging stretching lineation. Sinistral kinematics and fabric are very consistent along strike. The strain is heterogeneously distributed and partitioned into lens-shaped lower strain zones dominated by folding and characterized by pure shear, which are surrounded by high strain zones, some of them thick ultramylonites, with intense simple shear combined with flattening and strong transposition of pre-existing fabrics. Ductile shearing occurred during bulk E-W shortening, commenced at amphibolite facies conditions and continued with similar kinematics at greenschist and even lower grade conditions. A number of (sub-)parallel shear zones occur to the NE and SW of the main zone at a distance of up to 20-45 km. They show similar fabrics and kinematics and are thus related to activity along ASZ reflecting strain partitioning into simple shear and pure shear domains on a regional scale. Samples of mylonitic gneisses from the shear zone have been analyzed with U-Pb LA-MC-ICPMS and show Neoarchaean crystallisation ages between 2.66 and 2.61 Ga. Timing of ductile sinistral shearing is poorly constrained by lower intercept ages of 686 ± 62 and 640 ± 44 Ma. The fabric and structural relationship of the ca. 660 Ma Adjumani Granite exposed in the northern segment of ASZ suggest that the age of shear activity can be further limited to ca. 685 and 655 Ma. The Aswa Shear Zone is interpreted as an intra-cratonic, crustal-scale structure close to the northeastern margin of the Congo Craton, possibly inherited from previous continental extension. Early Aswa

  7. Experimental shear zones and magnetic fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Alford, C.

    Magnetic fabric analysis has been used as a non-destructive means of detecting petrofabric development during experimentally produced multi-stage, transpressive deformations in 'shear zones'. Artificial, magnetic-bearing silicate sands and calcite sands, bonded with Portland cement, were deformed at room temperature and at 100 and 150 MPa confining pressure. The slip-rate for the shear zone walls was 0.73 × 10 -4 mm s -1 and the maximum shear strains were about 0.38, across zones that were initially about 5 mm thick. The magnetic fabric ellipsoid rapidly spins so that the maximum and intermediate susceptibilities tend to become parallel to the shear zone walls throughout the sheared zone. The ellipsoid becomes increasingly oblate with progressive deformation. However, in all cases, the anisotropy is strongly influenced by the pre-deformation magnetic fabric. During deformation the cement gel collapses so that cataclasis of the mineral grains is suppressed. In the quartz-feldspar aggregates the magnetite's alignment is accommodated by particulate flow (intergranular displacements) of the grains. In the calcite aggregates stronger magnetic fabrics develop due to plastic deformation of calcite grains as well as particulate flow. However, the calcite grain fabrics are somewhat linear ( L ≥ S) whereas the magnetic fabrics are planar ( S > L). The preferred dimensional orientations of magnetite are weak and it is possible that the magnetic fabrics are due to intragranular rearrangements of magnetic domains. The transpressive shear zones are much more efficient than axial-symmetric shortening in the increase of anisotropy of the magnetic fabrics, especially in the case of the calcite aggregates. This suggests that flow laws derived for axial-symmetric shortening experiments may not be appropriate for non-coaxial strain histories such as those of shear zones.

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo study of activated states and correlated shear-transformation-zone activity during the deformation of an amorphous metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homer, Eric R.; Rodney, David; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2010-02-01

    Shear transformation zone (STZ) dynamics simulations, which are based on the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm, are used to model the mechanical response of amorphous metals and provide insight into the collective aspects of the microscopic events underlying deformation. The present analysis details the activated states of STZs in such a model, as well as the statistics of their activation and how these are affected by imposed conditions of stress and temperature. The analysis sheds light on the spatial and temporal correlations between the individual STZ activations that lead to different macroscopic modes of deformation. Three basic STZ correlation behaviors are observed: uncorrelated activity, nearest-neighbor correlation, and self-reactivating STZs. These three behaviors correspond well with the macroscopic deformation modes of homogeneous flow, inhomogeneous deformation, and elastic behavior, respectively. The effect of pre-existing stresses in the simulation cell is also studied and found to have a homogenizing effect on STZ correlations, suppressing the tendency for localization.

  9. Predicting km-scale shear zone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbi, Christopher; Culshaw, Nicholas; Shulman, Deborah; Foley, Maura; Marsh, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Because km-scale shear zones play a first-order role in lithospheric kinematics, accurate conceptual and numerical models of orogenic development require predicting when and where they form. Although a strain-based algorithm in the upper crust for weakening due to faulting appears to succeed (e.g., Koons et al., 2010, doi:10.1029/2009TC002463), a comparable general rule for the viscous crust remains unestablished. Here we consider two aspects of the geological argument for a similar algorithm in the viscous regime, namely (1) whether predicting km-scale shear zone development based on a single parameter (such as strain or shear heating) is reasonable; and (2) whether lithologic variability inherent in most orogenic systems precludes a simple predictive rule. A review of tectonically significant shear zones worldwide and more detailed investigations in the Central Gneiss belt of the Ontario segment of the Grenville Province reveals that most km-scale shear zones occur at lithological boundaries and involve mass transfer, but have fairly little else in common. As examples, the relatively flat-lying Twelve Mile Bay shear zone in the western Central Gneiss belt bounds the Parry Sound domain and is likely the product of both localized anatexis and later retrograde hydration with attendant metamorphism. Moderately dipping shear zones in granitoids of the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone apparently resulted from cooperation among several complementary microstructural processes, such as grain size reduction, enhanced diffusion, and a small degree of metamorphic reaction. Localization into shear zones requires the operation of some spatially restricted processes such as stress concentration, metamorphism/fluid access, textural evolution, and thermal perturbation. All of these could be due in part to strain, but not necessarily linearly related to strain. Stress concentrations, such as those that form at rheological boundaries, may be sufficient to nucleate high strain

  10. Fluid migration in ductile shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusseis, Florian; Menegon, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Fluid migration in metamorphic environments depends on a dynamically evolving permeable pore space, which was rarely characterised in detail. The data-base behind our understanding of the 4-dimensional transport properties of metamorphic rocks is therefore fragmentary at best, which leaves conceptual models poorly supported. Generally, it seems established that deformation is a major driver of permeability generation during regional metamorphism, and evidence for metamorphic fluids being channelled in large scale shear zones has been found in all depth segments of the continental crust. When strain localizes in ductile shear zones, the microfabric is modified until a steady state mylonite is formed that supports large deformations. A dynamic porosity that evolves during mylonitisation controls the distinct transport pathways along which fluid interacts with the rock. This dynamic porosity is controlled by a limited number of mechanisms, which are intrinsically linked to the metamorphic evolution of the rock during its deformational overprint. Many mid- and lower-crustal mylonites comprise polyphase mixtures of micron-sized grains that show evidence for deformation by dissolution/precipitation-assisted viscous grain boundary sliding. The establishment of these mineral mixtures is a critical process, where monomineralic layers are dispersed and grain growth is inhibited by the heterogeneous nucleation of secondary mineral phases at triple junctions. Here we show evidence from three different mid- and lower-crustal shear zones indicating that heterogeneous nucleation occurs in creep cavities. Micro- and nanotomographic observations show that creep cavities provide the dominant form of porosity in these ultramylonites. They control a "granular fluid pump" that directs fluid migration and hence mass transport. The granular fluid pump operates on the grain scale driven by viscous grain boundary sliding, and requires only small amounts of fluid. The spatial arrangement of

  11. Geochronological and Petrological Constraints on the Evolution of the Pan African Ajjaj Shear Zone, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M.; Stuewe, K.; Abu-Alam, T. S.; Kloetzli, U. S.; Tiepolo, M.

    2014-12-01

    In the active tectonic regions, shear zones play an important role to re-configure the structure of the lithosphere. One of the largest shear zones on the Earth is the Najd Fault System of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Literature data record the main active phase of this shear zone during the last stages of the Pan-African Orogeny (ca. 630 - 540 Ma). The Najd Fault System is composed of several shear zone segments, one of them is the Ajjaj shear zone. Determination of the age of variably deformed intrusions is expected to give approximated age of deformation in Ajjaj shear zone. Six samples of intrusive rocks showing variable composition were used to illustrate the time progress and evolution of the Ajjaj shear zone. One sample is from a very coarse grained diorite lying within the Ajjaj shear zone. It has very weak deformation and produces an intercept U-Pb zircon age of 696 ± 6 Ma. Two samples are from granodiorite-tonalite intrusions to the tenant of the Ajjaj shear zones. They show conspicuous degree of deformation and define two U-Pb clusters of concordia ages at 747 ± 12 Ma - 668 ± 8 Ma and 742 ± 5 Ma - 702 ± 12 Ma. Three samples are granites from variable plutons along the Ajjaj shear zone. Two of them show mylonitic foliation of flattened quartz and platy minerals such as biotite parallel to the main deformation trend of the shear zone. They yield U-Pb ages of 601 ± 6 Ma - 584 ± 3 Ma. The third sample is undeformed and has a cross-cut contact relationship with the foliation of the Ajjaj shear zone. It yield concordia ages of 581 ± 4 Ma. These data confine the activity of the Ajjaj shear zone to a limited period between 605 Ma and 577 Ma. As the activity of the Ajjaj shear zone was responsible for the exhumation of the Hamadat metamorphic complex, we also constrained the vertical motions that occurred during the shear zone activity using mmetamorphic rocks. It is shown that peak metamorphism occurred around 505 - 700 ºC at two ranges of pressure 8 - 11

  12. Recrystallization fabrics of sheared quartz veins with a strong pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientation from a seismogenic shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Nancy A.; Song, Won Joon; Johnson, Scott E.; Gerbi, Christopher C.; Beane, Rachel J.; West, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Microstructural investigations were carried out on quartz veins in schist, protomylonite, and mylonite samples from an ancient seismogenic strike-slip shear zone (Sandhill Corner shear zone, Norumbega fault system, Maine, USA). We interpret complexities in the microstructural record to show that: (1) pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in the host rock may persist in the new CPO patterns of the shear zone and (2) the inner and outer parts of the shear zone followed diverging paths of fabric development. The host rocks bounding the shear zone contain asymmetrically-folded quartz veins with a strong CPO. These veins are increasingly deformed and recrystallized with proximity to the shear zone core. Matrix-accommodated rotation and recrystallization may position an inherited c-axis maximum in an orientation coincident with rhomb < a > or basal < a > slip. This inherited CPO likely persists in the shear zone fabric as a higher concentration of poles in one hemisphere of the c-axis pole figure, leading to asymmetric crossed girdle or paired maxima c-axis patterns about the foliation plane. Three observed quartz grain types indicate a general trend of localization with decreasing temperature: (1) large (> 100 μm), low aspect ratio (< 5) and (2) high aspect ratio ( 5-20) grains overprinted by (3) smaller (< 80 μm), low aspect ratio (< 4) grains through subgrain rotation-dominated recrystallization. In the outer shear zone, subgrain rotation recrystallization led to a well-developed c-axis crossed girdle pattern. In the inner shear zone, the larger grains are completely overprinted by smaller grains, but the CPO patterns are relatively poorly developed and are associated with distinctively different misorientation angle histogram profiles ("flat" neighbor-pair profile with similar number fraction for angles from 10 to 90°). This may reflect the preferential activation of grain size sensitive deformation processes in the inner-most part of the

  13. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, E.; Kelemen, P.; Hirth, G.; Spiegelman, M.

    2005-12-01

    Kelemen and Hirth (Fall 2004 AGU) presented a model for periodic, viscous shear heating instabilities along pre-existing, fine grained shear zones. This provides an attractive alternative to dehydration embrittlement for explaining intermediate-depth earthquakes, especially those in a narrow thermal window within the mantle section of subducting oceanic plates (Hacker et al JGR03). Ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are common in shallow mantle massifs and peridotite along oceanic fracture zones. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures exceeded the mantle solidus (Obata & Karato Tectonophys95). Olivine grain growth in shear zones is pinned by closely spaced pyroxenes; thus, once formed, these features do not `heal' on geological time scales in the absence of melt or fluid (Warren & Hirth EPSL05). Grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, in preference to host rocks with olivine grain size from 1 to 10 mm. Inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS74), we proposed that such pre-existing shear zones might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. This is not a new concept; what is new is that viscous deformation is limited to a narrow shear zone, because grain boundary sliding, sensitive to both stress and grain size, may accommodate creep even at high stress and high temperature. These new ideas yield a new result: simple models for a periodic shear heating instability. Last year, we presented a 1D numerical model using olivine flow laws, assuming that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. Stress evolves due to elastic strain and drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control T. A maximum of 1400 C (substantial melting of peridotite ) was imposed. Grain size evolves due to recrystallization and diffusion. For strain rates of E-13 to E-14 per sec and

  14. Deformation of footwall rock of Phulad Shear Zone, Rajasthan: Evidence of transpressional shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Manideepa Roy; Das, Subhrajyoti; Chatterjee, Sadhana M.; Sengupta, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    Phulad Shear Zone (PSZ) of Delhi Fold Belt in Rajasthan is a northeasterly striking ductile shear zone with a well developed mylonitic foliation (035/70E) and a downdip stretching lineation. The deformation in the PSZ has developed in a transpressional regime with thrusting sense of movement. The northeastern unit, i.e., the hanging wall contains a variety of rocks namely calc-silicates, pelites and amphibolites and the southwestern unit, i.e., the footwall unit contains only granitic rocks. Systematic investigation of the granites of the southwestern unit indicate a gradual change in the intensity of deformation from a distance of about 1 km west of the shear zone to the shear zone proper. The granite changes from weakly deformed granite to a mylonite/ultramylonite as we proceed towards the PSZ. The weakly deformed granite shows a crude foliation with the same attitude of mylonitic foliation of the PSZ. Microscopic study reveals the incipient development of C and S fabric with angle between C and S varying from 15 ∘ to 24 ∘. The small angle between the C and S fabric in the least deformed granite variety indicates that the deformation has strong pure shear component. At a distance of about 1 m away from the PSZ, there is abrupt change in the intensity of deformation. The granite becomes intensely foliated with a strong downdip lineation and the rock becomes a true mylonite. In mesoscopic scale, the granite shows stretched porphyroclasts in both XZ and YZ sections indicating a flattening type of deformation. The angle between the C and S fabric is further reduced and finally becomes nearly parallel. In most places, S fabric is gradually replaced by C fabric. Calculation of sectional kinematic vorticity number ( W n) from the protomylonitic and mylonite/ultramylonite granites varies from 0.3 ± 0.03 to 0.55 ± 0.04 indicating a strong component of pure shear. The similarity of the geometry of structures in the PSZ and the granites demonstrates that the

  15. Imaging Faults and Shear Zones Using Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Pelkum, Vera; Mahan, Kevin H.

    2014-11-01

    The geometry of faults at seismogenic depths and their continuation into the ductile zone is of interest for a number of applications ranging from earthquake hazard to modes of lithospheric deformation. Teleseismic passive source imaging of faults and shear zones can be useful particularly where faults are not outlined by local seismicity. Passive seismic signatures of faults may arise from abrupt changes in lithology or foliation orientation in the upper crust, and from mylonitic shear zones at greater depths. Faults and shear zones with less than near-vertical dip lend themselves to detection with teleseismic mode-converted waves (receiver functions) provided that they have either a contrast in isotropic shear velocity ( V s), or a contrast in orientation or strength of anisotropic compressional velocity ( V p). We introduce a detection method for faults and shear zones based on receiver functions. We use synthetic seismograms to demonstrate common features of dipping isotropic interfaces and contrasts in dipping foliation that allows determination of their strike and depth without making further assumptions about the model. We proceed with two applications. We first image a Laramide thrust fault in the western U.S. (the Wind River thrust fault) as a steeply dipping isotropic velocity contrast in the middle crust near the surface trace of the fault; further downdip and across the range, where basin geometry suggests the fault may sole into a subhorizontal shear zone, we identify a candidate shear zone signal from midcrustal depths. The second application is the use of microstructural data from exhumed ductile shear zones in Scotland and in the western Canadian Shield to predict the character of seismic signatures of present-day deep crustal shear zones. Realistic anisotropy in observed shear fabrics generates a signal in receiver functions that is comparable in amplitude to first-order features like the Moho. Observables that can be robustly constrained without

  16. Coexistence and transition between shear zones in slow granular flows.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Robabeh; Shaebani, M Reza; Maleki, Maniya; Török, János; Wolf, Dietrich E; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-10-04

    We report experiments on slow granular flows in a split-bottom Couette cell that show novel strain localization features. Nontrivial flow profiles have been observed which are shown to be the consequence of simultaneous formation of shear zones in the bulk and at the boundaries. The fluctuating band model based on a minimization principle can be fitted to the experiments over a large variation of morphology and filling height with one single fit parameter, the relative friction coefficient μ(rel) between wall and bulk. The possibility of multiple shear zone formation is controlled by μ(rel). Moreover, we observe that the symmetry of an initial state, with coexisting shear zones at both side walls, breaks spontaneously below a threshold value of the shear velocity. A dynamical transition between two asymmetric flow states happens over a characteristic time scale which depends on the shear strength.

  17. Active seismic monitoring of changes of the reflection response of a crystalline shear zone due to fluid injection in the crust at the Continental Deep Drilling Site, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilecke, T.; Kurt, B.; Stefan, B.

    2005-12-01

    In theory and in the laboratory variations of the hydraulic pressure can be detected with seismic methods: A lowering of the hydraulic pressure leads to the closure of micro-cracks within the rock (increase of the differential or effective pressure). Subsequently, the seismic velocities increase. An increase of the hydraulic pressure leads to reverse seismic effects. Consequently, seismic impedance contrasts and associated reflection amplitudes vary in the case of a propagating fluid pressure front in a rock matrix with inhomogeneous permeability - as is the case at shear zones. The largest amplitude changes can be expected with vertical ray inclination on the impedance contrast. Generally, the expected effects are small however (Kaselow, 2004). The practical utilization of active seismics for the detection of pressure changes at large scale in hard rock is currently being studied at the Continental Deep Drilling Site (KTB). The injection of water (200 l/min) in a depth of about 4000 m into the so-called SE2 shear zone in the KTB pilot hole was monitored with active seismics between May 2004 and April 2005. The core of the experiment layout is a fixed 5-arm geophone array consisting of 24 3-component geophones, buried at about 70 cm depth. The source signal is a vertical vibrator sweep of 30 s length with the spectrum 30-120 Hz. The signal is sent into the ground 32 times during each cycle, detected with the array and recorded separately for each geophone channel, without prior correlation with the source signal. This allows maximum post-processing with seismic processing and analysis tools and especially permits the use of array properties to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Critical parameters of the experiment are the repeatability of the source signal as well as the stability of the receiver properties. Another pivot is the hydraulic pressure and its distribution built up within the rock matrix. Estimations based on model calculations show that a change of

  18. The influence of water and LPO on the initiation and evolution of mantle shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Philip; Warren, Jessica M.; Hansen, Lars N.; Hirth, Greg; Kelemen, Peter B.

    2013-08-01

    We present data from the Josephine Peridotite (SW Oregon, USA) that constrain the underlying physical processes responsible for the initiation of shear localization and the evolution of ductile shear zones in Earth's mantle. Field measurements of narrow (2-60 m wide) ductile shear zones in harzburgite were used to construct strain profiles, which have maximum shear strains ranging from γ=5.25 to γ>20. Measurements of pyroxene water concentrations from harzburgite samples within and immediately adjacent to the shear zones indicate that gradients in water concentration exist on a 10-100 m scale, even after exhumation. Water concentration measurements are correlated with olivine lattice-preferred orientation (LPO), corroborating experimental results on the influence of water on slip system activity. Using empirical olivine flow laws and the diffusivity of water in olivine, we model initiation of a ductile shear zone through localized water weakening. We demonstrate that this mechanism can readily generate spatial perturbations in both effective viscosity and strain. However this model is not able to reproduce both the observed shear strain gradients and water concentration data from the Josephine shear zones. We evaluate other plausible localization mechanisms, which may amplify this initial strain perturbation. The most relevant at these conditions is the development of viscous anisotropy associated with the evolution of olivine LPO. Using recent experimental results, we demonstrate that progressive rotation of olivine LPO into the shear plane enhances deformation within a shear zone. We conclude that feedback between at least two microphysical processes is needed to account for observed outcrop-scale shear localization.

  19. Theoretical and natural strain patterns in ductile simple shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingles, Jacques

    1985-06-01

    A simple empirical model representing the variation of shear strain throughout a simple shear zone allows us to determine the evolution of finite strain as well as the progressive shape changes of passive markers. Theoretical strain patterns (intensity and orientation of finite strain trajectories, deformed shapes of initially planar, equidimensional and non-equidimensional passive markers) compare remarkably well with patterns observed in natural and experimental zones of ductile simple shear (intensity and orientation of schistosity, shape changes of markers, foliation developed by deformation of markers). The deformed shapes of initially equidimensional and non-equidimensional passive markers is controlled by a coefficient P, the product of (1) the ratio between marker size and shear zone thickness (2) the shear gradient across the zone. For small values of P (approximately P < 2), the original markers change nearly into ellipses, while large values of P lead to " retort" shaped markers. This theoretical study also allows us to predict, throughout a simple shear zone, various relationships between the principal finite strain trajectory, planar passive markers and foliations developed by deformation of initially equidimensional passive markers.

  20. Shear heating in continental strike-slip shear zones:model and field examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, Philippe Hervé; Ricard, Yannick; Battaglia, Jean; Lacassin, Robin

    1999-01-01

    A two-layer (crust and upper mantle), finite difference steady-state thermomechanical model of a long-lived (several million years) lithospheric strike-slip fault is presented, and its predictions compared with field observations from various major fault zones. In order to estimate the maximum amount of shear heating, all mechanical energy is assumed to be dissipated in heat, in ductile as well as in brittle layers. Deformation follows a friction law in the brittle layer(s), and a power-flow law in the ductile one(s). Variations of several independent parameters and their influence on the thermo-mechanical state of the fault zone and on shear heating are systematically explored. Shear heating is found to be more important in fault zones affecting an initially cold lithosphere, and increases with slip rate, friction coefficient and stiffness of materials. In extreme cases (slip rate of 10 cm yr^-1, stiff lithosphere), shear heating could lead to temperature increases close to 590 degC at the Moho, and 475 degC at 20 km depth. For more common cases, shear heating leads to smaller temperature increases, but can still explain high-grade metamorphic conditions encountered in strike-slip shear zones. However, modelled temperature conditions often fall short of those observed. This could be due to heat transport by mechanisms more efficient than conduction. Common syntectonic emplacement of granitic melts in ductile strike-slip shear zones can be explained by lower crust partial melting induced by shear heating in the upper mantle. Besides slip rate, the possibility of such melting depends mostly on the upper mantle rheology and on the fertility of the lower crust: for hard upper mantle and highly fertile lower crust, partial melting could occur at rates of 1 cm yr^-1, while in most cases it would result from the breakdown of micas for slip rates over 3 cm yr^-1. As a result of shear heating, partial melting of the upper mantle could occur in the presence of small amounts

  1. Strain distribution within a km-scale, mid-crustal shear zone: The Kuckaus Mylonite Zone, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, S. F.; Fagereng, Å.; Diener, J. F. A.

    2013-11-01

    The subvertical Kuckaus Mylonite Zone (KMZ) is a km-wide, crustal-scale, Proterozoic, dextral strike-slip shear zone in the Aus granulite terrain, SW Namibia. The KMZ was active under retrograde, amphibolite to greenschist facies conditions, and deformed felsic (and minor mafic) gneisses which had previously experienced granulite facies metamorphism during the Namaqua Orogeny. Lenses of pre- to syn-tectonic leucogranite bodies are also deformed in the shear zone. Pre-KMZ deformation (D1) is preserved as moderately dipping gneissic foliations and tightly folded migmatitic layering. Shear strain within the KMZ is heterogeneous, and the shear zone comprises anastomosing high strain ultramylonite zones wrapping around less deformed to nearly undeformed lozenges. Strain is localized along the edge of leucogranites and between gneissic lozenges preserving D1 migmatitic foliations. Strain localization appears controlled by pre-existing foliations, grain size, and compositional anisotropy between leucogranite and granulite. The local presence of retrograde minerals indicate that fluid infiltration occurred in places, but most ultramylonite in the KMZ is free of retrograde minerals. In particular, rock composition and D1 fabric heterogeneity are highlighted as major contributors to the strain distribution in time and space, with deformation localization along planes of rheological contrast and along pre-existing foliations. Therefore, the spatial distribution of strain in crustal-scale ductile shear zones may be highly dependent on lithology and the orientation of pre-existing fabric elements. In addition, foliation development and grain size reduction in high strain zones further localizes strain during progressive shear, maintaining the anastomosing shear zone network established by the pre-existing heterogeneity.

  2. Shear zones developed between extensional and compressional tectonic regimes: recent deformation of the Burdur Fethiye Shear Zone as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk; Aktuǧ, Bahadır

    2016-04-01

    The southwestern Turkey is one of the most tectonically active areas of the eastern Mediterranean and therefore is a controversial region from the geodynamic point of view. This complex tectonic regime is dominated by the westward escape of Anatolia related to North Anatolian Fault, Aegean back-arc extension regime due to roll-back of Hellenic Arc, the subduction transform edge propagator (STEP) fault zone related to the motion of Hellenic and Cyprus arcs and compressional regime of Tauride Mountains. In addition to that, an active subduction and seamounts moving towards the north determine the tectonic frame of the Eastern Mediterranean. Many researchers suggest either the existence of a single left lateral fault or the nonexistence of a fault zone between Western Anatolia and Western Taurides. According to the integration of digital elevation data, non-commercial GoogleEarth satellite images and field studies, a 300 km-long 75-90 km-wide NE-SW-trending left lateral shear zone, the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone, is located among these tectonic structures. By using GPS velocities and focal mechanism solutions of earthquakes, it is understood that most of the previous studies turn a blind eye to the hundreds of faults related to a left-lateral shear zone which will have an important role in the Mediterrenean tectonics. The Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone is like a zipper driven by the relative velocity differences due to the Aegean back-arc extensional system and Western Taurides compressional region and presents a high seismic activity. The GPS vectors reflect remarkable velocity differences on land and relatedly the significant topographic differences can be clearly observed. According to the GPS vectors, the Aegean region moves 4-12 mm/yr faster than the wesward escape of the Anatolia towards southwest and the velocities are low in the Western Taurides. The left-lateral differential motion across the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone varies from 3-4 mm/yr in the north side to 8

  3. Strain accumulation and rotation in the Eastern California Shear Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Gan, Weijun; Svarc, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Although the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) (strike ???N25??W) does not quite coincide with a small circle drawn about the Pacific-North America pole of rotation, trilateration and GPS measurements demonstrate that the motion within the zone corresponds to right-lateral simple shear across a vertical plane (strike N33??W??5??) roughly parallel to the tangent to that local small circle (strike ???N40??W). If the simple shear is released by slip on faults subparallel to the shear zone, the accumulated rotation is also released, leaving no secular rotation. South of the Garlock fault the principal faults (e.g., Calico-Blackwater fault) strike ???N40??W, close enough to the strike of the vertical plane across which maximum right-lateral shear accumulates to almost wholly accommodate that accumulation of both strain and rotation by right-lateral slip. North of the Garlock fault dip slip as well as strike slip on the principal faults (strike ???N20??W) is required to accommodate the simple shear accumulation. In both cases the accumulated rotation is released with the shear strain. The Garlock fault, which transects the ECSZ, is not offset by north-northwest striking faults nor, despite geological evidence for long-term left-lateral slip, does it appear at the present time to be accumulating left-lateral simple shear strain across the fault due to slip at depth. Rather the motion is explained by right-lateral simple shear across the orthogonal ECSZ. Left-lateral slip on the Garlock fault will release the shear strain accumulating there but would augment the accumulating rotation, resulting in a secular clockwise rotation rate ???80 nrad yr-1 (4.6?? Myr-1).

  4. Alteration-weakening leading to localized deformation in a damage aureole adjacent to a dormant shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, Nils R.; Rowe, Christie D.; Barshi, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    Deformation adjacent to faults and shear zones is traditionally thought to correlate with slip. Inherited structures may control damage geometry, localizing fluid flow and deformation in a damage aureole around structures, even after displacement has ceased. In this paper we document a post-shearing anastomosing foliation and fracture network that developed to one side of the Mesoarchean Marmion Shear Zone. This fracture network hosts the low-grade, disseminated Hammond Reef gold deposit. The shear zone juxtaposed a greenstone belt against tonalite gneiss and was locked by an intrusion that was emplaced during the final stages of suturing. After cessation of activity, fluids channeled along fault- and intrusion-related fractures led to the pervasive sericitization of feldspars. Foliated zones resulted from flattening in the weaker sericite-rich tonalite during progressive alteration without any change in the regional NW-SE shortening direction. The anastomosing pattern may have been inherited from an earlier ductile fabric, but sericite alteration and flattening fabrics all formed post-shearing. Thus, the apparent foliated fracture network adjacent to the Marmion Shear Zone is a second-order effect of shear-related damage, distinct in time from shear activity, adjacent to an effectively dormant shear zone. This phenomenon has implications for understanding the relative timing of fault zone activity, alteration and (in this case) gold mineralization related to long-term fault zone permeability.

  5. Characteristics of faults and shear zones in deep mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, R.E.; Morris, H.T.

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of fault and shear zones to depths of 2.5 km are well documented in deep mines in North America. The characteristics may be summarized as follows. (a) Fault zones usually are irregular, branched, anastomosed, and curved rather than simple and planar. (b) Faults are generally composed of one or more clay or clay-like gouge zones in a matrix of sheared and foliated rock bordered by highly fractured rock. (c) The widths of fault zones appear to be greater when faults have greater displacement, probably as a result of a long history of repeated minor movements. Fault zones with kilometers of displacement tend to be 100 m or more wide, whereas those with only a few hundred meters of displacement commonly are only 1 m or less wide. (d) Some zones represent shear distributed across hundreds of meters without local concentration in a narrow gouge zone. (e) Many fault zones are wet even above the water table, and water moves along them at various rates, but some also serve as subsurface dams, ponding ground water as much as several hundred meters higher on one side than on the other. No striking differences in the characteristics of faults over the vertical range of 2.5 km are documented. ?? 1986 Birkha??user Verlag.

  6. Deformation and metamorphism of Hamadat complex: Shear zones reshaping the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mahmoud; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Stüwe, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    In the active tectonic regions, shear zones play an important role to re-configure the structure of the lithosphere. One of the largest pre-Mesozoic shear zones on the Earth is the Najd Fault System of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Literature data record exhumation of medium-pressure metamorphic complexes due to the activity of the Najd Fault System during the Pan-African Orogeny where the shear zone surrounds the boundaries of metamorphic complexes. The Hamadat complex of Northwestern part of Saudi Arabia shows an exception where the metamorphic rocks appear to occur within the shear zone itself instead of being surrounded by branches of it. The Hamadat complex records peak metamorphic conditions of 505 - 700 °C at two ranges of pressure 8 - 11 and 12.5 - 16.5 kbar. These pressures are higher than those of most other metamorphic complexes associated and exhumed by the Najd Fault system. The higher pressure conditions of the Hamadat complex relatively to other complexes in the shield can be interpreted in two different ways. The documented pressure can be due to lithostatic pressure or shear stress (i.e. in part non-lithostatic). Assuming the lithostatic condition, these pressure ranges indicate that the Hamadat complex consists rocks from two different crustal level (i.e. 28 - 38 km and 43 - 58 km) which shows the importance of the shear zone to reshape the lithosphere by bring rocks from different crustal level into one metamorphic complex.

  7. Time constraints on faults activity in the Eastern California Shear Zone from U-Pb (SHRIMP-RG) dating of syntectonic opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriel, P.; Maher, K.; Miller, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Absolute time constraints for fault activity are of fundamental importance in active fault systems. Such constraints are necessary for estimation of long-term slip-rates and earthquake recurrence intervals required for seismic-hazard assessments. Notwithstanding, paleoseismological records are often limited to the past 1 Ma, and important information such as fault initiation and early stage displacement are seldom determined. Here we present a novel methodological approach for direct dating of brittle deformation events over a geological time scale. We use in situ U-Pb SHRIMP-RG (Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe - Reverse Geometry) analyses of opal precipitates in order to constrain the relative and absolute timing of brittle deformation events. The Mojave Desert fault segments within the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) are ideal faults to investigate the long-term history because of the need for improved constraints on the timing of fault initiation and the observed discrepancy between long-term and short-term estimates for strain accumulation rates in this area. We analyzed fault-related opal samples from ten different fault exposures within the Camp Rock, Cave Mountain, and the Cady fault systems. Millimeter size fragments of fault-related opal, occurring as fault coating, filling or fault-breccia cement, were imaged using cathodoluminescence and backscattering electron microscopy in order to identify distinct phases of opal associated with specific syntectonic microstructures. Sub-samples within each phase are then targeted with multiple SHRIMP-RG analyses (<50 μm in diameter) to allow the construction of 238U/208Pb-206Pb/208Pb and/or Tera-Wasserburg U-Pb isochrons. Of the 50 distinct phases that were identified, 20 were successfully dated and U-Pb age results range from 8.4 to 0.58 Ma. The timing of fault initiation along the Cave Mountain Fault system was previously estimated to be between 15 Ma and 5 Ma. Our results suggest that initial

  8. Rheology linked with phase changes as recorded by development of shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeřábek, Petr; Bukovská, Zita

    2015-04-01

    The South Armorican Shear Zone in France represents a major right-lateral strike slip shear zone formed in the late stages of Variscan orogeny. The active deformation in this shear zone is associated with the development of S-C fabrics in granitoids where thin shear bands (C) overprint an earlier higher grade metamorphic foliation (S). In the studied samples covering low to high intensity of shear band overprint, we identified three stages of shear band evolution associated with distinct microstructures and deformation mechanisms. The initiation of shear bands stage I is associated with the formation of microcracks crosscutting the S fabric and detected namely in the recrystallized quartz aggregates. The microcracks of suitable orientation are filled by microcline, albite, muscovite and chlorite which is a typical assemblage also for the well developed shear bands. Phase equilibrium modeling in PERPLEX indicates that this assemblage formed at pressure-temperature range of 0.1-0.4 GPa and 300-340 °C. Stage II of shear band evolution is characterized by dynamic recrystallization and grain size reduction of quartz aggregates along the microcracks and replacement of quartz by microcline along grain boundaries. This process leads to disintegration of quartz aggregate fabric and phase mixing in the shear bands. The inferred deformation mechanism for this stage is solution-precipitation creep although recrystallization of quartz is still active at the contact between quartz aggregates and shear bands. The coarse grained microstructure of quartz aggregates with ca ~250 microns average grain size reduces to ~10 microns grain size when recrystallized along extremely thin shear bands/microcracks and to ~20 microns grain size when recrystallized along the thicker shear bands. By using the flow law of Patterson and Luan (1990) for dislocation creep in quartz and the quartz piezometer of Stipp and Tullis (2003) corrected after Holyoke and Kronenberg (2010), the quartz

  9. Seismic anisotropy in the Morcles nappe shear zone: Implications for seismic imaging of crustal scale shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Hirt, Ann M.; Herwegh, Marco; Ebert, Andreas; Walter, Jens M.; Leiss, Bernd; Burlini, Luigi

    2013-09-01

    Microstructures and textures of calcite mylonites from the Morcles nappe large-scale shear zone in southwestern Switzerland develop principally as a function of 1) extrinsic physical parameters including temperature, stress, strain, strain rate and 2) intrinsic parameters, such as mineral composition. We collected rock samples at a single location from this shear zone, on which laboratory ultrasonic velocities, texture and microstructures were investigated and quantified. The samples had different concentration of secondary mineral phases (< 5 up to 40 vol.%). Measured seismic P wave anisotropy ranges from 6.5% for polyphase mylonites (~ 40 vol.%) to 18.4% in mylonites with < 5 vol.% secondary phases. Texture strength of calcite is the main factor governing the seismic P wave anisotropy. Measured S wave splitting is generally highest in the foliation plane, but its origin is more difficult to explain solely by calcite texture. Additional texture measurements were made on calcite mylonites with low concentration of secondary phases (≤ 10 vol.%) along the metamorphic gradient of the shear zone (15 km distance). A systematic increase in texture strength is observed moving from the frontal part of the shear zone (anchimetamorphism; 280 °C) to the higher temperature, basal part (greenschist facies; 350-400 °C). Calculated P wave velocities become increasingly anisotropic towards the high-strain part of the nappe, from an average of 5.8% in the frontal part to 13.2% in the root of the basal part. Secondary phases raise an additional complexity, and may act either to increase or decrease seismic anisotropy of shear zone mylonites. In light of our findings we reinterpret the origin of some seismically reflective layers in the Grône-Zweisimmen line in southwestern Switzerland (PNR20 Swiss National Research Program). We hypothesize that reflections originate in part from the lateral variation in textural and microstructural arrangement of calcite mylonites in shear

  10. Shear zones formed along long, straight traces of fault zones during the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Arvid M.; Fleming, Robert W.; Cruikshank, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    Surface rupturing during the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake, east of Los Angeles, accommodated right-lateral offsets up to about 6 m along segments of distinct, en-echelon fault zones with a total length of 80 km. The offsets were accommodated generally not by faults—distinct slip surfaces—but rather by shear zones, tabular bands of localized shearing. Along simple stretches of fault zones at Landers the rupture is characterized by telescoping of shear zones and intensification of shearing: broad shear zones of mild shearing, containing narrow shear zones of more intense shearing, containing even narrower shear zones of very intense shearing, which may contain a fault. Thus the ground ruptured across broad belts of shearing with clearly defined, subparallel walls, oriented NW. Each broad belt consists of a broad zone of mild shearing, extending across its entire width (50 to 200 m), and much narrower (a few meters wide) shear zones that accommodate most of the offset of the belt and are portrayed by en-echelon tension cracks. In response to right-lateral shearing, the slices of ground bounded by the tension cracks rotated in a clockwise sense, producing left-lateral shearing, and the slices were forced against the walls of the shear zone, producing thrusting. Even narrower shear zones formed within the narrow shear zones. Although these probably are guides to right-lateral fault segments below, the surface rupturing during the earthquake is characterized not by faulting, but by the formation of shear zones at various scales.

  11. Extensional and compressional regime driven left-lateral shear in southwestern Anatolia (eastern Mediterranean): The Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk; Aktuğ, Bahadır

    2016-10-01

    The tectonic framework of the eastern Mediterranean presented in this paper is based on an active subduction and small underwater hills/mountains on the oceanic crust moving toward the north. The Hellenic Arc, the Anaximander Mountains, the Rhodes and Finike basins, the compressional southern regions of the Western Taurides, and the extensional western Anatolian graben are the main interrelated tectonic structures that are shaped by the complex tectonic regimes. There are still heated debates regarding the structural properties and tectonic evolution of the southwestern Anatolia. GPS velocities and focal mechanisms of earthquakes demonstrate the absence of a single transform fault across the Burdur-Fethiye region; however, hundreds of small faults showing normal and left-lateral oblique slip indicate the presence of a regionally extensive shear zone in southwestern Turkey, which plays an important role in the eastern Mediterranean tectonics. The 300-km-long, 75-90-km-wide NE-SW-trending Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone developed during the formation of Aegean back-arc extensional system and the thrusting of Western Taurides. Today, the left-lateral differential motion across the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone varies from 3 to 4 mm/yr in the north to 8-10 mm/yr in the south. This finding could be attributed to the fact that while the subduction of the African Plate is relatively fast beneath the western Anatolia at the Hellenic Trench, it is slow or locked beneath the Western Taurides. Therefore, the GPS vectors and their distributions on land indicate remarkable velocity differences and enable us to determine the left-lateral shear zone located between the extensional and compressional blocks. Furthermore, this active tectonic regime creates differences in topography. This study also demonstrates how deep structures, such as the continuation of the subduction transform edge propagator (STEP) fault between the Hellenic and Cyprus arcs in the continental area, can come into play

  12. Detachment Shear Zone of the Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J.; Fruh-Green, G.; Kelley, D.; Yoerger, D.; Jakuba, M.

    2005-12-01

    Near-bottom investigations of the cross section of the Atlantis Massif exposed in a major tectonic escarpment along the Atlantis Transform Fault provide an unprecedented view of the internal structure of the footwall domain of an oceanic core complex. Integrated direct observations, photogeology, and imaging define a mylonitic, low-angle detachment shear zone (DSZ) along the crest of the massif. The shear zone may project beneath the nearby, corrugated upper surface of the massif. The DSZ and related structures are inferred to be responsible for the unroofing of lower crustal gabbros and upper mantle peridotites by extreme, localized tectonic extension during seafloor spreading over the past 2 m.y. Strongly foliated serpentinites and talc-amphibole schists of the DSZ are about 100 m thick and can be traced continuously for at least 3 km in the spreading direction. Foliated DSZ rocks grade structurally downward into more massive basement rocks that lack a pervasive low-temperature deformation fabric. The main DSZ and underlying basement rocks are cut by discrete, anastomosing normal-slip, shear zones. Widely spaced, steeply dipping, normal faults cut all the older structures and localize serpentinization-driven hydrothermal outflow at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field. A thin (few meters) sequence of sedimentary breccias grading upward into pelagic limestones directly overlies the DSZ and may record a history of progressive rotation of the shear zone from an earlier moderately dipping attitude into its present, gently dipping orientation during lateral spreading and uplift.

  13. Small scale shear zone in calcite: AMS and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxerová, Zuzana; Machek, Matěj; Kusbach, Vladimír; Racek, Martin; Silva, Pedro F.

    2016-04-01

    Two structural profiles across thin shear zone in calcite from quarry in Estremoz (Portugal) were studied to find a relationship between AMS and strain in natural rocks. The mesoscopic fabric is characterized by the change from the subhorizontal coarse-grained foliation towards the ~2cm-wide shear zone center with subvertical fine-grained foliation. In microstructure, the shear zone records dynamic recrystallization of calcite aggregate which resulted in development of porphyroclastic microstructure with increasing proportion of fine-grained recrystallized matrix towards the shear zone center. Two distinct crystallographic preferred orientations of calcite were recorded. One related with porphyroclasts, characterized by subvertical orientation of calcite axes and another associated with recrystallized matrix showing subhorizontal calcite axes orientation. The magnetic susceptibility ranges from -8e-6SI to 9e-6SI, with the average -4e-6SI. The majority of the rock mass is diamagnetic, corresponding well with the thermomagnetic curves, with local paramagnetic accumulations in form of thin bands. The AMS of the both profiles exhibits stable subvertical foliation bearing vertical lineation which is locally alternated by the medium-angle foliation. We interpret the AMS fabric pattern which is perpendicular to the mineral one as a type of inverse AMS fabric, due to high iron content in major part of calcite grains The magnetic and microstructural description of the shear zone is accompanied by numerical modeling of AMS based on CPO and different proportion of porphyroclasts, matrix and mica for purposes of deciphering the influence of present microstructural features on AMS.

  14. Structural Geology of the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone, Sutlej Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2009-04-01

    Throughout the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone (HHSZ), the northeasterly dipping main foliation planes that acted as the primary shear planes (the C-planes) are rarely sub-horizontal. S-C fabrics, sigmoid quartz veins and leucosomes, and asymmetric intrafolial folds denote a top-to-SW sense of ductile shearing. The angles between the S-planes of this shear sense and the C-planes in the shear zone are within 25-43,0which is close to the higher angular limit of 450. The axial planes of the intrafolial folds are at 12-220 to the NE direction of the C-planes. The long axes of sigmoid leucosomes and quartz veins are at very low angle 3-80 to the C-planes. The aspect ratios of these sigmoid elements show a wide variation between 3.6-9.5. Some of the S-fabrics are occasionally affected by secondary C•-shearing synthetic to the main shearing event. The angle between the C- and the C•-planes range between 15-250. This is well within the limit of 15-350 previously compiled from different shear zones. The C•-planes are straight but are shorter than the C-planes. The C•-planes are much less ubiquitous in the HHSZ. Interestingly, an additional phase of a top-to-NE sense of extensional ductile shearing, deciphered from intrafolial folds of quartz rich layers, S-C fabrics, and sigmoid-shaped quartz veins and leucosomes are found to be confined within two zones in macro-scale in the HHSZ. The top-to-NE sense of ductile shearing is restricted in two zones within the northeasterly dipping C-planes parallel to hence the same as that for the top-to-SW sense. One of these zones, designated as the STDSL, is delineated at the locality Karcham. The other zone of top-to-NE shearing occurs within the topmost level of the HHSZ and is equated with the STDS or the STDSU. Its lower boundary is demarcated between the locations Pangi- and Kashang. The upper boundary is the same as the contact between the HHSZ and the overlying Tethyan Sedimentary Zone. In these ductile extensional shear zones

  15. The Pinto shear zone; a Laramide synconvergent extensional shear zone in the Mojave Desert region of the southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Michael L.; Beyene, Mengesha A.; Spell, Terry L.; Kula, Joseph L.; Miller, David M.; Zanetti, Kathleen A.

    2005-09-01

    The Pinto shear zone is one of several Late Cretaceous shear zones within the eastern fringe of the Mesozoic magmatic arc of the southwest Cordilleran orogen that developed synchronous with continued plate convergence and backarc shortening. We demonstrate an extensional origin for the shear zone by describing the shear-zone geometry and kinematics, hanging wall deformation style, progressive changes in deformation temperature, and differences in hanging wall and footwall thermal histories. Deformation is constrained between ˜74 and 68 Ma by 40Ar/ 39Ar thermochronology of the exhumed footwall, including multi-diffusion domain modeling of K-feldspar. We discount the interpretations, applied in other areas of the Mojave Desert region, that widespread Late Cretaceous cooling results from refrigeration due to subduction of a shallowly dipping Laramide slab or to erosional denudation, and suggest alternatively that post-intrusion cooling and exhumation by extensional structures are recorded. Widespread crustal melting and magmatism followed by extension and cooling in the Late Cretaceous are most consistent with production of a low-viscosity lower crust during anatexis and/or delamination of mantle lithosphere at the onset of Laramide shallow subduction.

  16. The Pinto shear zone; a Laramide synconvergent extensional shear zone in the Mojave Desert region of the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, M.L.; Beyene, M.A.; Spell, T.L.; Kula, J.L.; Miller, D.M.; Zanetti, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Pinto shear zone is one of several Late Cretaceous shear zones within the eastern fringe of the Mesozoic magmatic arc of the southwest Cordilleran orogen that developed synchronous with continued plate convergence and backarc shortening. We demonstrate an extensional origin for the shear zone by describing the shear-zone geometry and kinematics, hanging wall deformation style, progressive changes in deformation temperature, and differences in hanging wall and footwall thermal histories. Deformation is constrained between ???74 and 68 Ma by 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of the exhumed footwall, including multi-diffusion domain modeling of K-feldspar. We discount the interpretations, applied in other areas of the Mojave Desert region, that widespread Late Cretaceous cooling results from refrigeration due to subduction of a shallowly dipping Laramide slab or to erosional denudation, and suggest alternatively that post-intrusion cooling and exhumation by extensional structures are recorded. Widespread crustal melting and magmatism followed by extension and cooling in the Late Cretaceous are most consistent with production of a low-viscosity lower crust during anatexis and/or delamination of mantle lithosphere at the onset of Laramide shallow subduction. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mid-crustal shear zone development under retrograde conditions: pressure-temperature-fluid constraints from the Kuckaus Mylonite Zone, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Johann F. A.; Fagereng, Åke; Thomas, Sukey A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Kuckaus Mylonite Zone (KMZ) forms part of the larger Marshall Rocks-Pofadder shear zone system, a 550 km-long, crustal-scale strike-slip shear zone system that is localized in high-grade granitoid gneisses and migmatites of the Namaqua Metamorphic Complex. Shearing along the KMZ occurred ca. 40 Ma after peak granulite-facies metamorphism during a discrete tectonic event and affected the granulites that had remained at depth since peak metamorphism. Isolated lenses of metamafic rocks within the shear zone allow the P-T-fluid conditions under which shearing occurred to be quantified. These lenses consist of an unsheared core that preserves relict granulite-facies textures and is mantled by a schistose collar and mylonitic envelope that formed during shearing. All three metamafic textural varieties contain the same amphibolite-facies mineral assemblage, from which calculated pseudosections constrain the P-T conditions of deformation at 2.7-4.2 kbar and 450-480 °C, indicating that deformation occurred at mid-crustal depths through predominantly viscous flow. Calculated T-MH2O diagrams show that the mineral assemblages were fluid saturated and that lithologies within the KMZ must have been rehydrated from an external source and retrogressed during shearing. Given that the KMZ is localized in strongly dehydrated granulites, the fluid must have been derived from an external source, with fluid flow allowed by local dilation and increased permeability within the shear zone. The absence of pervasive hydrothermal fractures or precipitates indicates that, even though the KMZ was fluid bearing, the fluid/rock ratio and fluid pressure remained low. In addition, the fluid could not have contributed to shear zone initiation, as an existing zone of enhanced permeability is required for fluid infiltration. We propose that, following initiation, fluid infiltration caused a positive feedback that allowed weakening and continued strain localization. Therefore, the main

  18. Study of shear banding in simulated amorphous solids in the context of shear transformation zone theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alix-Williams, Darius; Falk, Michael L.

    2015-03-01

    We examine the general framework of the effective temperature formalism of the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory of plasticity via molecular dynamics simulation of two distinct amorphous systems - Silicon and Cu-Zr. In both systems strain localization is observed during simple shear loading. The shear bands differ in the rate of broadening and the sharpness of the interface between the flowing and jammed material. We examine both systems for scaling expected to arise between effective temperature and shear rate. For each system a local dimensionless effective temperature that quantifies structural disorder is extracted by assuming a linear relation to the local potential energy per atom. Research possible through support from National Science Foundation Grant No. 0801471.

  19. The Amount and Preferred Orientation of Simple-shear in a Deformation Tensor: Implications for Detecting Shear Zones and Faults with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. M.; Griffiths, J. H.

    2007-05-01

    At the 2005 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, Griffiths and Johnson [2005] introduced a method of extracting from the deformation-gradient (and velocity-gradient) tensor the amount and preferred orientation of simple-shear associated with 2-D shear zones and faults. Noting the 2-D is important because the shear zones and faults in Griffiths and Johnson [2005] were assumed non-dilatant and infinitely long, ignoring the scissors- like action along strike associated with shear zones and faults of finite length. Because shear zones and faults can dilate (and contract) normal to their walls and can have a scissors-like action associated with twisting about an axis normal to their walls, the more general method of detecting simple-shear is introduced and called MODES "method of detecting simple-shear." MODES can thus extract from the deformation-gradient (and velocity- gradient) tensor the amount and preferred orientation of simple-shear associated with 3-D shear zones and faults near or far from the Earth's surface, providing improvements and extensions to existing analytical methods used in active tectonics studies, especially strain analysis and dislocation theory. The derivation of MODES is based on one definition and two assumptions: by definition, simple-shear deformation becomes localized in some way; by assumption, the twirl within the deformation-gradient (or the spin within the velocity-gradient) is due to a combination of simple-shear and twist, and coupled with the simple- shear and twist is a dilatation of the walls of shear zones and faults. The preferred orientation is thus the orientation of the plane containing the simple-shear and satisfying the mechanical and kinematical boundary conditions. Results from a MODES analysis are illustrated by means of a three-dimensional diagram, the cricket- ball, which is reminiscent of the seismologist's "beach ball." In this poster, we present the underlying theory of MODES and illustrate how it works by

  20. Geotechnical shear zone properties of rockslides in crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engl, D. A.; Fellin, W.; Zangerl, C.

    2009-04-01

    Crystalline rocks such as gneisses, schists and phyllites are widespread in orogens. Slopes built up of these metamorphic rocks are prone for large-scale deep-seated mass movements. Many of these mass movements are rockslides characterised by slope displacement along one or several distinct sliding zone(s). These sliding zone(s) are typically composed of disintegrated loose rock material produced by shearing and fragmentation processes. For rockslides the stability is strongly controlled by the strength of these soil-like shear products, also referred to as kakirites and fault gouges. Therefore, information about the mechanical behaviour and the strength properties is crucial when slope stability analyses and reliable landslide forecasts have to be performed. Being aware of this demand, numerous investigations dealt with this issue in the past and produced plenty of data by the geotechnical laboratory testing of these materials. Nevertheless, the data is widely dispersed among various literature sources, making it nearly impossible for the reader to gain a clear overview. The primary objective of this work was firstly to compile and re-analyse published laboratory data about frictional strength properties of shear zone materials sampled from brittle tectonical fault zones and sliding zones of rockslides and secondly to integrate them into a uniform database. Given that most of the geotechnical stability analyses are based on the Mohr-Coloumb law, the evaluation focuses on the parameters friction coefficient (friction angle) and cohesion. As a result, indicatory values for the shear strength parameters of kakirites and fault gouges for the most abundant crystalline rocks were obtained. The variable testing methods (i.e. triaxial tests and direct shear tests), different stress conditions during the tests and the inherent heterogeneity of the materials lead to a wide scatter of values. Therefore, a regression analysis was performed for each lithology and a statistical

  1. Hydrolytic weakening and penetrative deformation within a natural shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Andreas K.; Segall, Paul; Wolf, George H.

    Processes of fluid infiltration, hydrolytic weakening, and penetrative deformation within a small ductile shear zone within granitic rocks of the central Sierra Nevada have been investigated using integrated field observations, strain analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Several lines of evidence suggest that tensile fracturing accompanied by fluid infiltration preceded the ductile shearing event and that shear strains have localized on a pre-existing sealed fracture. Finite shear strains within an aplite dike and granodiorite host increase sharply from nominally O outside the shear zone to values of 10±2 near its center. Water contents of quartz grains exhibit similar spatial trends to that of strain, rising from 60 and 2000 ppm within the undeformed aplite and granodiorite, respectively, to 4000 and 11,000 ppm within their highly sheared equivalents. Infrared signatures of absorptions measured at room temperature and at 77 K show that most of the intragranular water within quartz and feldspar resides in fluid inclusions. Two distinct populations of fluid inclusions have been observed by optical and electron microscopy; one decorating healed microcracks and the second decorating dislocations. We interpret these relations to record interactions between fluids and processes of brittle failure and ductile flow. Fluid inclusions, forming planar arrays along the traces of healed microcracks, are relatively large (˜0.4-3 μm in diameter) and irregular in shape. A second set of fluid inclusions consists of extremely fine (20-140 nm in diameter), more nearly spherical inclusions which consistently lie along free dislocations and dislocation nodes, and exhibit relationships with dislocations similar to those observed in hydrolytically-weakened synthetic quartz. These observations suggest that water-related defects gained access to grain interiors and dislocation cores by fluid infiltration along open microcracks followed by pipe

  2. Shear-zone systems and melts: feedback relations and self-organization in orogenic belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael; Solar, Gary S.

    1998-03-01

    In orogenic belts, the common spatial and temporal association of granites with crustal-scale shear-zone systems suggests melt transfer from source to upper crust was the result of a feedback relation. In this relation, the presence of melt in the crust profoundly affects the rheology, and induces localization of strain within shear-zone systems. Consequently, melt is moved out of the source preferentially along high-strain zones, which helps the system to accommodate strain. Because actively deforming orogenic belts are non-equilibrium systems, they may generate dissipative structure by self-organization; we interpret crustal-scale shear-zone systems and their associated granites as the manifestation of this self-organization. The architecture and permeability structure are controlled by the type of shear-zone system (transcurrent, normal, reverse or oblique); this is the primary control on melt transfer in orogenic belts. During active deformation, movement of melt is by percolative flow and melt essentially is pumped through the system parallel to the maximum principal finite elongation direction. If a build-up of melt pressure occurs, melt-enhanced embrittlement enables tensile and dilatant shear fracturing, and transfer of melt is by channelized flow. We illustrate feedback relations between migmatites, crustal-scale shear-zone systems and granites using examples from the Cadomian belt of western France and the northern Appalachian orogen of the eastern U.S.A. In orogenic belts dominated by transcurrent shear, where the maximum principal finite elongation direction may have a shallow to subhorizontal plunge, granite arrested during ascent through the system commonly develops C- S fabrics. This suggests percolative flow is not effective in expelling melt from these systems; the resulting build-up of melt pressure enables fracturing and channelized transfer of melt, which crystallizes during persistent deformation (e.g. the St. Malo migmatite belt, Cadomian belt

  3. Empirical paths of poles to planes (eppps) constrain the kinematics of geological shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Christopher J.

    2014-09-01

    Ductile shear zones are tabular bodies of deformed rocks bound by less deformed wall rocks. This work introduces a simple empirical approach to analysing the 3D kinematics of shear zones. The orientations of pre-shear planar markers distorted across natural shear zones by local strains are systematically measured and plotted as poles on lower hemisphere equal area projections that constrain smooth empiricalpaths ofpoles toplanes (eppps). Such eppps recording local strain gradients are used to fix a reference frame to the plane of greatest shear in any homogeneous bulk strain. Assuming that space can be taken as a proxy for time, the curvatures of pre-shear planar markers across shear zones are interpreted as the records of the 3D bulk strain histories of shear zones. The sig- or zig-moidal symmetries of sheared markers record different amounts of the same general strain within the same overall movement pattern (i.e. in a constant flow field) whatever its geometry or history. In effect eppps represent the strain memories of shear zones with successively inward readings recording successively younger shearing. In planes other than the bulk XY, great circle eppps indicate simple shear while hyperbolic eppps indicate pure shear. Eppps for suites of shear zones in Proterozoic gneisses in Sweden exhibit the parabolic shapes indicative of pure rather than simple shear.

  4. Anatomy of an extensional shear zone in the mantle, Lanzo massif, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix; Tommasi, AndréA.

    2011-08-01

    Analysis of the microstructures in the km-scale mantle shear zone that separates the northern and the central parts of the Lanzo peridotite massif provides evidence of an evolution in time and space of deformation processes accommodating shearing in the shallow mantle within an extensional setting. This shear zone displays an asymmetric distribution of deformation facies. From south to north, gradual reorientation of the foliation of coarse porphyroclastic plagioclase-bearing peridotites is followed by development of protomylonites, mylonites, and mm-scale ultramylonite bands. A sharp grain size gradient marks the northern boundary. Early deformation under near-solidus conditions in the south is recorded by preservation of weakly deformed interstitial plagioclase and almost random clinopyroxene and plagioclase crystal orientations. Feedback between deformation and melt transport probably led to melt focusing and strain weakening in the shear zone. Overprint of melt-rock reaction microstructures by solid-state deformation and decrease in recrystallized grain size in the protomylonites and mylonites indicate continued deformation under decreasing temperature. Less enriched peridotite compositions and absence of ultramafic dykes or widespread melt-impregnation microstructures north of the shear zone and clinopyroxene and amphibole enrichment in the mylonites and ultramylonites suggest that the shear zone acted as both a thermal barrier and a high-permeability channel for late crystallizing fluids. These observations, together with chemical data indicating faster cooling of central Lanzo relative to the northern body, corroborate that this shear zone is a mantle detachment fault. All deformation facies have crystal preferred orientations consistent with deformation by dislocation creep with dominant activation of the (010)[100] and (100)[001] systems in olivine and orthopyroxene, respectively. Dynamic recrystallization produces dispersion of olivine CPO but not a

  5. Late Neogene kinematics of intra-arc oblique shear zones: The Petilia-Rizzuto Fault Zone (Calabrian Arc, Central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, J. P.

    1994-10-01

    The kinematics of intra-arc shear zones play a key role in the secondary shaping of orogenic arcs such as the Calabrian Arc (central Mediterranean). Comparison of the Neogene structural development of the Petilia-Rizzuto Fault Zone and the basement structure of the bordering Sila massif reveals that the fault zone is the surface expression of a deep NW-SE trending sinistral crustal oblique shear zone. This shear zone continues over a length of more than 130 km across the northern segment of the Calabrian Arc and shows a post-Eocene sinistral displacement of about 50 km. The late Neogene forearc basin development and syndepositional tectonics along the fault zone are reconstructed in great detail by analyzing the middle Miocene-Recent tectonic sequence stratigraphy. A strike-slip cycle can be recognized whereby the subsequent activity of Riedel shears, tensional faults, and P shears, positive flower structures and principle displacement wrench faults, can accurately be traced in time. Observed phenomena are discussed in terms of the activity of a conjugate system of oblique thrust zones within the growing accretionary complex. The evolution of special types of thrust belt basins is illustrated. These include oblique thin-skinned pull-apart basins, oblique rhomboidal "harmonica" basins, and "detached slab" basins (new terms introduced here), evolving one into the other. A new feature illustrated is the recurrent basin inversion which generated passive roof duplexes through back-shear motion and out-of-sequence thrusting along the wedge. The fault patterns and the style of inversion tectonics imply an E-W directed axis of effective compressive stress in this part of the arc. This resulted from an interaction of (1) local E-W directed compression related to a differential displacement of two parallel segments of the arc (generated by the migration to the southeast of the Calabrian Arc and opening of the Tyrrhenian backarc basin); (2) alternating NW-SE directed

  6. Broad belts of shear zones: The common form of surface rupture produced by the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Cruikshank, K.M. |; Fleming, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    Surface rupturing during the 28 June 1992, Landers, California earthquake, east of Los Angeles, accommodated right-lateral offsets up to about 6 m along segments of distinct, en echelon fault zones with a total length of about 80 km. The offsets were accommodated generally not by faults -- distinct slip surfaces -- but rather by shear zones, tabular bands of localized shearing. In long, straight stretches of fault zones at Landers the rupture is characterized by telescoping of shear zones and intensification of shearing: broad shear zones of mild shearing, containing narrow shear zones of more intense shearing, containing even-narrower shear zones of very intense shearing, which may contain a fault. Thus the ground ruptured across broad belts of shearing with subparallel walls, oriented NW. Each broad belt consists of a broad zone of mild shearing, extending across its entire width (50 to 200 m), and much narrower (a few m wide) shear zones that accommodate most of the offset of the belt and are portrayed by en echelon tension cracks. In response to right-lateral shearing, the slices of ground bounded by the tension cracks rotated in a clockwise sense, producing left lateral shearing, and the slices were forced against the walls of the shear zone, producing thrusting. Even narrower shear zones formed within the narrow shear zones, and some of these were faults. Although the narrower shear zones probably are indicators to right-lateral fault segments at depth, the surface rupturing during the earthquake is characterized not by faulting, but by zones of shearing at various scales. Furthermore, understanding of the formation of the shear zones may be critical to understanding of earthquake faulting because, where faulting is associated with the formation of a shear zone, the faulting occurs late in the development of the shear zone. The faulting occurs after a shear zone or a belt of shear zones forms.

  7. Shear zone evolution and timing of deformation in the Neoproterozoic transpressional Dom Feliciano Belt, Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriolo, Sebastián; Oyhantçabal, Pedro; Wemmer, Klaus; Heidelbach, Florian; Pfänder, Jörg; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Hueck, Mathias; Hannich, Felix; Sperner, Blanka; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2016-11-01

    New structural, microstructural and geochronological (U-Pb LA-ICP-MS, Ar/Ar, K-Ar, Rb-Sr) data were obtained for the Dom Feliciano Belt in Uruguay. The main phase of crustal shortening, metamorphism and associated exhumation is recorded between 630 and 600 Ma. This stage is related to the collision of the Río de la Plata and Congo cratons at ca. 630 Ma, which also involved crustal reworking of minor crustal blocks such as the Nico Pérez Terrane and voluminous post-collisional magmatism. Subsequent orogen-parallel sinistral shearing gave rise to further deformation up to ca. 584 Ma and resulted from the onset of the convergence of the Kalahari Craton and the Río de la Plata-Congo cratons. Sinistral shear zones underwent progressive strain localization and retrograde conditions of deformation during crustal exhumation. Dextral ENE-striking shear zones were subsequently active at ca. 550 Ma, coeval with further sinistral shearing along N- to NNE-striking shear zones. The tectonothermal evolution of the Dom Feliciano Belt thus recorded the collision of the Río de la Plata and Congo cratons, which comprised one of the first amalgamated nuclei of Gondwana, and the subsequent incorporation of the Kalahari Craton into Western Gondwana.

  8. The importance of strain localisation in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Finch, Melanie; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Griera, Albert; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Steinbach, Florian; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of various types of shear bands (C, C', C'') in shear zones indicate that heterogeneity of strain is common in strongly deformed rocks. However, the importance of strain localisation is difficult to ascertain if suitable strain markers are lacking, which is usually the case. Numerical modelling with the finite-element method has so far not given much insight in the development of shear bands. We suggest that this is not only because the modelled strains are often not high enough, but also because this technique (that usually assumes isotropic material properties within elements) does not properly incorporate mineral deformation behaviour. We simulated high-strain, simple-shear deformation in single- and polyphase materials with a full-field theory (FFT) model coupled to the Elle modelling platform (www.elle.ws; Lebensohn 2001; Bons et al. 2008). The FFT-approach simulates visco-plastic deformation by dislocation glide, taking into account the different available slip systems and their critical resolved shear stresses in relations to the applied stresses. Griera et al. (2011; 2013) have shown that this approach is particularly well suited for strongly anisotropic minerals, such as mica and ice Ih (Llorens 2015). We modelled single- and polyphase composites of minerals with different anisotropies and strengths, roughly equivalent to minerals such as ice Ih, mica, quartz and feldspar. Single-phase polycrystalline aggregates show distinct heterogeneity of strain rate, especially in case of ice Ih, which is mechanically close to mica (see also Griera et al. 2015). Finite strain distributions are heterogeneous as well, but the patterns may differ from that of the strain rate distribution. Dynamic recrystallisation, however, usually masks any strain and strain rate localisation (Llorens 2015). In case of polyphase aggregates, equivalent to e.g. a granite, we observe extensive localisation in both syn- and antithetic shear bands. The antithetic shear bands

  9. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Possible Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes and Slow Earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2004-12-01

    Localized ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are observed in exposures of Earth's shallow mantle (e.g., Kelemen & Dick JGR 95; Vissers et al. Tectonophys 95) and dredged from oceanic fracture zones (e.g., Jaroslow et al. Tectonophys 96). These are mylonitic (grain size 10 to 100 microns) and record mineral cooling temperatures from 1100 to 600 C. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures can exceed the mantle solidus (e.g., Obata & Karato Tectonophys 95). Simple shear, recrystallization, and grain boundary sliding all decrease the spacing between pyroxenes, so olivine grain growth at lower stress is inhibited; thus, once formed, these shear zones do not "heal" on geological time scales. Reasoning that grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, rather than host rocks (grain size 1 to 10 mm), and inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS 74), we thought these might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. In this view, as elastic stress increases, the shear zone weakens via shear heating; rapid deformation of the weak shear zone releases most stored elastic stress; lower stress and strain rate coupled with diffusion of heat into host rocks leads to cooling and strengthening, after which the cycle repeats. We constructed a simple numerical model incorporating olivine flow laws for dislocation creep, diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding, and low T plasticity. We assumed that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. We fixed the velocity along one side of an elastic half space, and calculated stress due to elastic strain. This stress drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control temperature evolution in the shear zone and host rocks. A maximum of 1400 C (where substantial melting of peridotite would occur) is imposed. Grain size evolves during dislocation

  10. Notes on some shear zones of northern Somalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchi, Rosalino; Zanferrari, Adriano

    Low-angle thrusts, displaying a well developed, stretching lineation, and west to south-west vergence, are reported from the basement of northern Somalia, and interpreted as the extreme evolution of a (Upper Proterozoic) phase of folding. This is seen as a late event, roughly coeval with gabbro emplacement, and later than the main metamorphism of the basement complex. Thrusting took place when the gabbros were still at a high temperature, as shown by 'hot' metamorphic assemblages within the zones of ductile shear. Development of abundant pegmatite and of some muscovite granite also took place, probably triggered by gabbro emplacement. Tectonic style suggests that here we may be dealing with the continuation of the collision zone with the East Gondwana Plate, recently recognized by some researchers near the eastern margin of the Saudi Arabian shield.

  11. Multi-scale analysis of Proterozoic shear zones: An integrated structural and geophysical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John R.; Betts, Peter G.; Collins, Alan S.; Schaefer, Bruce F.

    2009-11-01

    Structural mapping of poorly exposed shear zone outcrops is integrated with the analysis of aeromagnetic and Bouguer gravity data to develop a multi-scale kinematic and relative overprinting chronology for the Palaeoproterozoic Tallacootra Shear Zone, Australia. D 2 mylonitic fabrics at outcrop record Kimban-aged (ca. 1730-1690 Ma) N-S shortening and correlate with SZ 1 movements. Overprinting D 3 sinistral shear zones record the partitioning of near-ideal simple shear and initiated Riedel to regional-scale SZ 2 strike-slip on the Tallacootra Shear Zone (SZ 2). Previously undocumented NE-SW extension led to the emplacement of aplite dykes into the shear zone and can be correlated to the (ca. 1595-1575 Ma) Hiltaba magmatic event. D 4 dextral transpression during the (ca. 1470-1450 Ma) Coorabie Orogeny reactivated the Tallacootra Shear Zone (SZ 2-R4) exhuming lower crust of the northwestern Fowler Domain within a positive flower structure. This latest shear zone movement is related to a system of west-dipping shear zones that penetrate the crust and sole into a lithospheric detachment indicating wholesale crustal shortening. These methods demonstrate the value of integrating multi-scale structural analyses for the study of shear zones with limited exposure.

  12. Deriving strain from crystallographic preferred orientation for a ductile shear zone in north western Turkey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, K.; Lloyd, G. E. E.; Wallis, D.; Phillips, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the behaviour of active continental-scale fault zones at depth, and in particular how displacements observed at the Earth's surface are accommodated through the crust, is crucial to improving understanding of the earthquake cycle. This behaviour can be inferred by study of exhumed portions of ductile shear zones using methods such as recording strain profile(s) across the fault zone. However, due to the nature of mid-crustal rocks, strain markers tend to be rare and/or discontinuously distributed. The intensity (I) of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of deformed minerals provides a proxy for strain that is continuous across fault zones. CPO are collected via electron back scattered diffraction in the scanning electron microscope. The strength of the CPO can be quantified using eigenvalue-based intensity parameters. Calibration of intensity with strain is achieved via comparison with visco-plastic self-consistency models of CPO evolution, although the temperature-dependent critical resolved shear stresses of potential crystal slip systems must be known. As an example, we consider the dextral strike-slip Eskişehir shear zone, NW Turkey, which was active during the Oligocene and accommodated ~100km of displacement, including a component of late oblique-normal slip. An exhumed mid-crustal section of this fault zone is exposed in the Uludağ Massif, comprising of high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Uludağ Group, intruded by the Central and South Uludağ granites. Sample transects focussed on the pure calcic marbles that dominate the stratigraphy. Fortunately, the availability of experimental data for calcite crystal slip behaviour at different temperatures makes the application of the CPO intensity strain proxy method relatively straightforward. The Uludağ Massif and Eskişehir shear zone provide a field based analogue for the ductile shear zone beneath the currently active North Anatolian Fault. The results of our CPO intensity-based strain

  13. Late Oligocene high-temperature shear zones in the core of the Higher Himalayan Crystallines (Lower Dolpo, western Nepal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carosi, R.; Montomoli, C.; Rubatto, D.; Visonã, D.

    2010-08-01

    A high-temperature shear zone, Toijem shear zone, with a top-to-the-SW sense of shear affects the core of the Higher Himalayan Crystallines (HHC) in western Nepal. The shear zone developed during the decompression, in the sillimanite stability field, of rocks that previously underwent relatively high-pressure metamorphism deformed under the kyanite stability field. PT conditions indicate that the footwall experienced higher pressure (˜9 kbar) than the hanging wall (˜7 kbar) and similar temperatures (675°-700°C). Monazite growth constrains the initial activity of the shear zone at 25.8 ± 0.3 Ma, before the onset of the Main Central Thrust zone, whereas the late intrusion of a crosscutting granitic dike at 17 ± 0.2 Ma limits its final activity. Monazites in kyanite-bearing gneisses from the footwall record prograde metamorphism in the HHC from ˜43 to 33 Ma. The new data confirm that exhumation of the HHC started earlier in western Nepal than in other portions of the belt and before the activity of both the South Tibetan Detachment System (STDS) and Main Central Thrust (MCT) zones. As a consequence, western Nepal represents a key area where the channel-flow-driven mechanism of exhumation, supposed to be active from Bhutan to central-eastern Nepal, does terminate. In this area, exhumation of crystalline units occurred by foreland propagation of ductile and, subsequently, brittle deformation.

  14. Mineral chemistry of tourmaline from Mashak Pahar, South Purulia Shear Zone (SPSZ), eastern Indian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharjee, Santanu; Ray, Jyotisankar; Dey, Payel; Bhattacharyya, Debapriya; Banerjee, Mousumi; Chattopadhyay, Basab; Sengupta, Shyamal; Bhatt, A. K.; Chowdhury, D.; Dwivedi, A. K.; Mahato, Sanjoy; Jana, Arka Ranjan; Maithani, P. B.; Ramesh Babu, P. V.

    2016-12-01

    The area of investigation at and around Mashak Pahar, Bankura district, West Bengal, India comprises a number of rock types namely: granite gneiss, migmatized quartz tourmaline gneiss, quartz pebble conglomerate, ferruginous quartzite, quartz tourmaline veins (as veins) and graphite schists. Interestingly, the study area lies in the region extending South Purulia Shear Zone (˜Tamar-Porapahar Shear Zone) which marks the boundary between two contrasting tectonic blocks of eastern India, namely, the Chhotanagpur Gneissic Terrane (CGC) to the north and Singhbhum Group of rocks to the south. The rocks of the study area are poly-phasedly deformed by three phases of folding, namely, F1, F2 and F3. All the tourmalines are classified to be of `Alkali Group'. Chemistry of tourmalines from migmatized quartz tourmaline gneiss and those from quartz tourmaline veins are in conformity with their relation to (earthquake induced) shear system evolution in this terrain. In general, the compositional evolution of tourmaline during prograde metamorphism (˜400°-730°C) has been supported by both petrographic and chemical evidences. Assessment of mineral-chemical data of constituent tourmaline grains clearly suggests compositional variations across zonal boundaries within tourmaline that was controlled by changing metamorphic milieu in this terrane. Field and petrographic evidences clearly indicate activation of earlier and later shears in this region accompanied by infiltration of boron and formation of zoned tourmaline crystals.

  15. Pseudotachylytes of the Deep Crust: Examples from a Granulite-Facies Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, O.; Mahan, K. H.; Regan, S.; Williams, M. L.; Leite, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Athabasca Granulite Terrane is an exhumed section of deep continental crust exposed in the western Canadian shield. The terrane hosts the 1.88 Ga Cora Lake shear zone, a 3-5 km wide sinistral and extensional oblique-slip system that was active at high-pressure granulite-grade conditions ( ~1.0 GPa, >800°C to ~0.8 GPa and 700 °C). Pseudotachylyte, a glassy vein-filling substance that results from frictional melting during seismic slip, is common in ultramylonitic strands of the shear zone, where veins run for tens of meters subparallel to foliation. Some but not all PST veins have been overprinted with the Cora Lake shear zone foliation, and undeformed PST locally bears microlitic garnet. The frictional melts that quench into PST may reach >1400 °C, but are extremely localized and cool to country rock temperatures within minutes, resulting in glass and/or microlitic mineral growths. The melt itself is thought by many to be in disequilibrium with the host rock due to its rapid nature, but during cooling equilibrium is probably reached at small scales. This allows for microprobe analysis of adjacent microlites for thermobarometric calculations. Preliminary results from undeformed (e.g., youngest of multiple generations) PST suggest that quenching occurred in upper amphibolite facies ambient conditions and is compatible with later stages of Cora Lake shear zone activity. Host-rock mylonites contain abundant garnet and pyroxene sigma clasts indicating sinistral shear, and where PST-bearing slip surfaces are found at low angles to the foliation, they display sinistral offset. The host rock contains abundant macroscopic and microscopic sinistral shear fracture systems (e.g., Riedel [R], Y, and P displacement surfaces) within the immediate proximity of PST veins, indicating a complex interplay of brittle and ductile behavior that is interpreted to be genetically related to the formation of the PST. The shear fracture systems are characterized by sharply bounded

  16. Self-consistent orogenic wedge formation and shear zone propagation due to thermal softening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Duretz, Thibault; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2016-04-01

    We present two dimensional numerical simulations of orogenic wedge formation for a viscoelastoplastic lithosphere under compression. The thermo-mechanical model is based on the principle of energy conservation and includes temperature-dependent rheologies. With this approach, shear zones caused by thermal softening develop spontaneously in the absence of strain softening. The initial locus of shear localization is controlled by either lateral temperature variations (100°C) at the model base or by lateral variations in crustal thickness. The first episode of strain localization occurs after 15% bulk shortening. With ongoing strain, a series of shear zones arise and propagate towards the foreland leading to the self-consistent formation of an orogenic wedge. We investigate the impact of bulk shortening rates, erosion and rheology on the dynamics of wedge formation, the associated topography and uplift rates. The maximum topography reaches up to 10 km and the surface morphology evolves according to shear zone activation and deactivation. Uplift rates are transient and peak values are maintained only on very short time scales. A running average of the uplift rate versus time curves with a time-window of 4 My provides average uplift rates in the order of a few millimeters per year. Erosion is an important parameter for the formation and the evolution of the wedge (e.g. can control the spacing of shear zones by modifying crustal thickness). Rheological parameters, such as the friction angle or the upper crustal viscosity, control the occurrence of strain localization. Bulk shortening rates between 10-15 and 10-16 s-1 do not have a major impact on the resulting wedge structure.

  17. Granular Shear Zone Formation: Acoustic Emission Measurements and Fiber-bundle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    We couple the acoustic emissions method with conceptual models of granular material behavior for investigation of granular shear zone formation and to assess eminence of landslide hazard. When granular materials are mechanically loaded or sheared, they tend to produce discrete events of force network restructuring, and frictional interaction at grain contacts. Such abrupt perturbations within the granular lattice release part of the elastic energy stored in the strained material. Elastic waves generated by such events can be measured as acoustic emissions (AE) and may be used as surrogates for intermittent structural transitions associated with shear zone formation. To experimentally investigate the connection between granular shearing and acoustic signals we performed an array of strain-controlled shear-frame tests using glass beads. AE were measured with two different systems operating at two frequency ranges. High temporal resolution measurements of the shear stresses revealed the presence of small fluctuations typically associated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic bursts. Shear stress jumps and linked acoustic signals give account of discrete events of grain network rearrangements and obey characteristic exponential frequency-size distributions. We found that statistical features of force jumps and AE events depend on mechanical boundary conditions and evolve during the straining process. Activity characteristics of high-frequency (> 30 kHz) AE events is linked to friction between grains. To interpret failure associated AE signals, we adapted a conceptual fiber-bundle model (FBM) that describes some of the salient statistical features of failure and associated energy production. Using FBMs for the abrupt mechanical response of the granular medium and an associated grain and force chain AE generation model provides us with a full description of the mechanical-acoustical granular shearing process. Highly resolved AE may serve as a diagnostic tool not only

  18. Ductile shear zones beneath strike-slip faults: Implications for the thermomechanics of the San Andreas fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; England, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out two-dimensional (2-D) numerical experiments on the bulk flow of a layer of fluid that is driven in a strike-slip sense by constant velocities applied at its boundaries. The fluid has the (linearized) conventional rheology assumed to apply to lower crust/upper mantle rocks. The temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of the fluid and the shear heating that accompanies deformation have been incorporated into the calculations, as has thermal conduction in an overlying crustal layer. Two end-member boundary conditions have been considered, corresponding to a strong upper crust driving a weaker ductile substrate and a strong ductile layer driving a passive, weak crust. In many cases of practical interest, shear heating is concentrated close to the axial plane of the shear zone for either boundary condition. For these cases, the resulting steady state temperature field is well approximated by a cylindrical heat source embedded in a conductive half-space at a depth corresponding to the top of the fluid layer. This approximation, along with the application of a theoretical result for one-dimensional shear zones, permits us to obtain simple analytical approximations to the thermal effects of 2-D ductile shear zones for a range of assumed rheologies and crustal geotherms, making complex numerical calculations unnecessary. Results are compared with observable effects on heat flux near the San Andreas fault using constraints on the slip distribution across the entire fault system. Ductile shearing in the lower crust or upper mantle can explain the observed increase in surface heat flux southeast of the Mendocino triple junction and match the amplitude of the regional heat flux anomaly in the California Coast Ranges. Because ductile dissipation depends only weakly on slip rate, faults moving only a few millimeters per year can be important heat sources, and the superposition of effects of localized ductile shearing on both currently active and now

  19. The San-in shear zone in southwest Japan revealed by the GEONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Takada, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The most remarkable lineament of microseismicity in the Japanese Islands exists along the northern coastline in the San-in region that is a northern half of the westernmost part of Honshu in southwest Japan. Several M~7 earthquakes including the 1943 Tottori, and the 2000 Western Tottori earthquakes occurred along the lineament. However, no well-developed active fault has been identified in and around the lineament. Though several previous studies proposed a large dextral shear zone corresponding to seismicity lineament in the San-in region, none of them dealt with geodetic data. In this study, we report that a high strain rate is concentrated along the seismicity lineament from cGNSS observations. We propose to call this deformed zone "the San-in shear zone". The GNSS data used in this study are from the GEONET data operated by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan. We estimate interseismic velocities by fitting a linear function to daily GNSS coordinates estimated with both Bernese and GIPSY software. We recognize the following characteristics in the velocity distribution in the San-in region and its vicinity (Fig. 1). First, a northern limit of the observed northwestward velocity due to interplate coupling on the subducting Philippine Sea plate locates in and around the Seto Inland Sea. Second, the inland San-in region does not significantly deform though the northern coast of the San-in regions moves eastward with a velocity of 4 mm/yr relative to the inland region. The observed right-lateral shear deformation is generally localized along the lineament of seismicity and continues more than 200 km long along the coast of the Japan Sea. Velocity profile across the shear zone is roughly reproduced by a 2-dimensional dislocation model for a vertical strike-slip fault with a locking depth of 5~15 km. The San-in shear zone can be interpreted as strain portioning to accommodate strike slip component of oblique subduction along the Nankai Trough. The Median

  20. Areas of Active Tectonic Uplift Are Sensitive to Small Changes in Fold Orientations within a Broad Zone of Left-lateral Transpression and Shearing, Dominican Republic and Haiti (Hispaniola)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosius, I.; Mann, P.

    2014-12-01

    Previous GPS studies have shown that the island of Hispaniola is a 250 km-wide zone of active, east-west, left-lateral shearing along two major strike-slip zones: the Septentrional-Oriente fault zone through the northern part of the island and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) through the southern part of the island. The total interplate rate distributed on both faults is 21 mm/yr. Using a high-resolution DEM, we constructed fluvial channel profiles across transpression-related folds of late Miocene to recent age in the area of central and southern Dominican Republic and Haiti to determine controls of areas of relatively high, moderate, and slow uplift inferred from fluvial channel profiles. Fold axes in this area extend for 50-150 km and exhibit two different trends: 1) folds that occupy the area of the Sierra de Neiba-Chaine des Matheux north of the Enriquillo-Cul-de-Sac Valley and EPGFZ and folds that occupy the area of the Sierra de Bahoruco-Massif de la Selle all exhibit more east-west fold axes trending 110; 2) folds that occupy the area northwest of the EPGFZ in the western Chaine des Matheux and Sierra de Neiba all exhibit fold axes with more northwest trends of 125. River channel profiles show that the second group of more northwesterly-trending fold axes show relatively higher rates of tectonic uplift based on their convex-upward river profiles. Our interpretation for regional variations in river profiles and inferred uplift is that uplift is more pronounced on fold axes trending 15 degrees more to the northwest because their axes are more oblique to the interplate direction of east-west shearing. Longterm uplift rates previously measured from a stairstep of late Quaternary coral terraces at the plunging nose of the westernmost Chaine des Matheux have been previously shown to be occurring at a rate of 0.19 mm/yr. Onland exposures of Holocene corals are found only on one locality within the southern area of folds 30 km west of the epicenter

  1. Seismic reflection imaging of two megathrust shear zones in the northern Cascadia subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Andrew J

    2004-03-11

    At convergent continental margins, the relative motion between the subducting oceanic plate and the overriding continent is usually accommodated by movement along a single, thin interface known as a megathrust. Great thrust earthquakes occur on the shallow part of this interface where the two plates are locked together. Earthquakes of lower magnitude occur within the underlying oceanic plate, and have been linked to geochemical dehydration reactions caused by the plate's descent. Here I present deep seismic reflection data from the northern Cascadia subduction zone that show that the inter-plate boundary is up to 16 km thick and comprises two megathrust shear zones that bound a >5-km-thick, approximately 110-km-wide region of imbricated crustal rocks. Earthquakes within the subducting plate occur predominantly in two geographic bands where the dip of the plate is inferred to increase as it is forced around the edges of the imbricated inter-plate boundary zone. This implies that seismicity in the subducting slab is controlled primarily by deformation in the upper part of the plate. Slip on the shallower megathrust shear zone, which may occur by aseismic slow slip, will transport crustal rocks into the upper mantle above the subducting oceanic plate and may, in part, provide an explanation for the unusually low seismic wave speeds that are observed there.

  2. Microstructures, deformation mechanisms and seismic properties of a Palaeoproterozoic shear zone: The Mertz shear zone, East-Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarque, Gaëlle; Bascou, Jérôme; Maurice, Claire; Cottin, Jean-Yves; Riel, Nicolas; Ménot, René-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The Mertz shear zone (MSZ) is a lithospheric scale structure that recorded mid-crustal deformation during the 1.7 Ga orogeny. We performed a microstructural and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) study of samples from both mylonites and tectonic boudins that constitute relics of the Terre Adélie Craton (TAC). The deformation is highly accommodated in the MSZ by anastomosed shear bands, which become more scattered elsewhere in the TAC. Most of the MSZ amphibolite-facies mylonites display similar CPO, thermal conditions, intensity of deformation and dominant shear strain. Preserved granulite-facies boudins show both coaxial and non-coaxial strains related to the previous 2.45 Ga event. This former deformation is more penetrative and less localized and shows a deformation gradient, later affected by a major phase of recrystallization during retrogression at 2.42 Ga. Both MSZ samples and granulite-facies tectonic boudins present microstructures that reflect a variety of deformation mechanisms associated with the rock creep that induce contrasted CPO of minerals (quartz, feldspar, biotite, amphibole and orthopyroxene). In particular, we highlight the development of an "uncommon" CPO in orthopyroxene from weakly deformed samples characterized by (010)-planes oriented parallel to the foliation plane, [001]-axes parallel to the stretching lineation and clustering of [100]-axes near the Y structural direction. Lastly, we computed the seismic properties of the amphibolite and granulite facies rocks in the MSZ area in order to evaluate the contribution of the deformed intermediate and lower continental crust to the seismic anisotropy recorded above the MSZ. Our results reveal that (i) the low content of amphibole and biotite in the rock formations of the TAC, and (ii) the interactions between the CPO of the different mineralogical phases, generate a seismically isotropic crust. Thus, the seismic anisotropy recorded by the seismic stations of the TAC, including the

  3. Cavitation bands control porosity and fluid flow in lower crustal shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, Luca; Fusseis, Florian; Stunitz, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Shear zones channelize fluid flow in the Earth's crust. A number of mechanisms were suggested to control fluid migration pathways in upper- and midcrustal shear zones, amongst them creep cavitation, which is well-known from deforming metals and ceramics. Deep crustal fluid migration is hardly constrained by any observations, and so it remains unclear how fluids are channelized and distributed in an actively deforming lower crustal shear zone. This study investigates the deformation mechanisms, fluid-rock interaction and development of porosity in a mangerite ultramylonite from Lofoten, northern Norway. The synkinematic mineral assemblage consists of plagioclase, K-feldspar, hornblende, quartz, calcite and biotite, and yields P, T conditions of deformation of 700-730° C, 0.65-0.8 GPa. Mass-balance calculations indicate (1) a volume increase of 2.3%, and (2) fluid infiltration during the protolith-ultramylonite transformation. Microstructural observations and EBSD analysis are consistent with diffusion creep as the dominant deformation mechanism in the ultramylonite. The microstructure shows extensive evidence of synkinematic nucleation of new phases in dilatant sites resulting from the concomitant operation of grain boundary sliding and cavitation during grain-size sensitive creep. EBSD maps show the occurrence of isolated quartz grains along C' shear bands in feldspathic layers. Quartz does not show a crystallographic preferred orientation in these bands, suggesting that it precipitated in cavities. The occurrence of such quartz bands is consistent with the coalescence of individual pores originally formed at dilatant sites resulting from the operation of grain boundary sliding. Opening of pores implies local dilatancy. Positive volume change accompanied by fluid infiltration, as inferred from the mass balance calculations, is consistent with the precipitation of new phases in pores from intragranular fluids. We used synchrotron X-ray microtomography to analyse

  4. On the effects of thermally weakened ductile shear zones on postseismic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Christopher S.; Fialko, Yuri

    2013-12-01

    We present three-dimensional (3-D) numerical models of postseismic deformation following repeated earthquakes on a vertical strike-slip fault. Our models use linear Maxwell, Burgers, and temperature-dependent power law rheology for the lower crust and upper mantle. We consider effects of viscous shear zones that result from thermomechanical coupling and investigate potential kinematic similarities between viscoelastic models incorporating shear zones and elastic models incorporating rate-strengthening friction on a deep aseismic fault root. We find that the thermally activated shear zones have little effect on postseismic relaxation. In particular, the presence of shear zones does not change the polarity of vertical displacements in cases of rheologies that are able to generate robust postseismic transients. Stronger rheologies can give rise to an opposite polarity of vertical displacements, but the amplitude of the predicted transient deformation is generally negligible. We conclude that additional (to thermomechanical coupling) mechanisms of strain localization are required for a viscoelastic model to produce a vertical deformation pattern similar to that due to afterslip on a deep extension of a fault. We also investigate the discriminating power of models incorporating Burgers and power law rheology. These rheologies were proposed to explain postseismic transients following large (M7) earthquakes in the Mojave desert, Eastern California. Numerical simulations indicate that it may be difficult to distinguish between these rheologies even with high-quality geodetic observations for observation periods less than a decade. Longer observations, however, may potentially allow discrimination between the competing models, as illustrated by the model comparisons with available GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data.

  5. Mantle transition zone shear velocity gradients beneath USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, Brandon

    2012-11-01

    Broadband P-to-s scattering isolated by teleseismic receiver function analysis is used to investigate shear velocity (VS) gradients in the mantle transition zone beneath USArray. Receiver functions from 2244 stations were filtered in multiple frequency bands and migrated to depth through P and S tomography models. The depth-migrated receiver functions were stacked along their local 410 and 660 km discontinuity depths to reduce stack incoherence and more accurately recover the frequency-dependent amplitudes of P410s and P660s. The stacked waveforms were inverted for one-dimensional VS between 320 and 840 km depth. First, a gradient-based inversion was used to find a least-squares solution and a subsequent Monte Carlo search about that solution constrained the range of VS profiles that provide an acceptable fit to the receiver function stacks. Relative to standard references models, all the acceptable models have diminished VS gradients surrounding the 410, a local VS gradient maximum at 490-500 km depth, and an enhanced VS gradient above the 660. The total 410 VS increase of 6.3% is greater than in reference models, and it occurs over a thickness of 20 km. However, 60% of this VS increase occurs over only 6 km. The 20 km total thickness of the 410 and diminished VS gradients surrounding the 410 are potential indications of high water content in the regional transition zone. An enhanced VS gradient overlying the 660 likely results from remnants of subduction lingering at the base of the transition zone. Cool temperatures from slabs subducted since the late Cretaceous and longer-term accumulation of former ocean crust both may contribute to the high gradient above the 660. The shallow depth of the 520 km discontinuity, 490-500 km, implies that the regional mean temperature in the transition zone is 110-160 K cooler than the global mean. A concentrated Vs gradient maximum centered near 660 km depth and a low VS gradient below 675 km confirms that the ringwoodite to

  6. Multiscale model for predicting shear zone structure and permeability in deforming rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Pereira, Gerald G.; Lemiale, Vincent; Piane, Claudio Delle; Clennell, M. Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel multiscale model is proposed for the evolution of faults in rocks, which predicts their internal properties and permeability as strain increases. The macroscale model, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), predicts system scale deformation by a pressure-dependent elastoplastic representation of the rock and shear zone. Being a continuum method, SPH contains no intrinsic information on the grain scale structure or behaviour of the shear zone, so a series of discrete element method microscale shear cell models are embedded into the macroscale model at specific locations. In the example used here, the overall geometry and kinematics of a direct shear test on a block of intact rock is simulated. Deformation is imposed by a macroscale model where stresses and displacement rates are applied at the shear cell walls in contact with the rock. Since the microscale models within the macroscale block of deforming rock now include representations of the grains, the structure of the shear zone, the evolution of the size and shape distribution of these grains, and the dilatancy of the shear zone can all be predicted. The microscale dilatancy can be used to vary the macroscale model dilatancy both spatially and temporally to give a full two-way coupling between the spatial scales. The ability of this model to predict shear zone structure then allows the prediction of the shear zone permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method.

  7. Quantifying thinning and extrusion associated with an oblique subduction zone: An example from the Rosy Finch Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjee, Matty; Canada, Andrew; Fortescue, Forest Q.

    2016-12-01

    The Rosy Finch Shear Zone (RFSZ) is a NNW trending transpressional zone along the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, and the southernmost shear zone within the Sierra Crest Shear Zone. Dextral shear, resulting from oblique subduction along the western margin of the North American Plate (ca. 90 Ma), combined with subduction zone orthogonal shortening is concentrated within the RFSZ. Highly deformed metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks within the zone have a prominent foliation with a mean dip, dip direction of 79°, 236° and a steeply plunging, penetrative, stretching lineation with a trend, plunge of 178°, 73°. Here, we present both three-dimensional strain analysis and crystallographic texture data in order to determine the mean kinematic vorticity number (Wm) and the relative amounts of pure and simple shear within the RFSZ. These two independent methods, using data collected from samples along two E-W transects, both indicate that there is a significant component of pure shear within the zone, with a mean of approximately 75% pure shear. Using the vorticity data, we calculated the amount of across-the-zone thinning. Samples collected from the 0.65 km zone of interest have yielded a mean shortening of nearly 20.3%, or approximately 166 m. In addition, three-dimensional strain analysis yields a mean Lode's ratio of 0.202, and a mean Flinn's k-value of 0.585, indicate a general flattening deformation, and a mean octahedral shear strain (εs) of 0.407. Assuming no volume change, these data suggest that there was approximately 174 m of vertical extrusion within this segment of the RFSZ in response to this obliquely convergent plate margin.

  8. Gently sloping shear zones in the Belomorian Mobile Belt: Geology, structure, and P- T parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskii, V. M.; Travin, V. V.; Korpechkov, D. I.; Zaitseva, M. N.; Kurdyukov, E. B.; Travin, A. V.; Terent'eva, L. B.; Savatenkov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    The Belomorian Mobile Belt (BMB) in northern Karelia mostly consists of gently sloping shear zones, whose gneisses and migmatized amphibolites and blastomylonites are typically thinly banded, with their banding consistently dipping north- and northeastward. These gently sloping shear zones were not affected by folding after they were produced and are not cut by Paleoproterozoic metabasite dikes. Intrusive metabasites in the gently sloping shear zones make up relatively small (usually <5 m) equant or elongate bodies and occur as fragments of larger bodies. These fragments are often concentrated in stripes. Metabasites in the gently sloping shear zone are sometimes also found as lenses and tabular bodies of relatively small thickness, which are conformable with the foliation of the host rocks. The gently sloping shear zones cut across older domains of more complicated structure, which suggests that these zones are gently sloping ductile shear zones. Along these zones, the nappes were thrust south- and southwestward, and this process was the last in the origin of major structural features of BMB when the Paleoproterozoic Lapland-Kola orogen was formed. Practically identical age values were obtained for the gently sloping shear zone in the two widely separated Engonozero and Chupa segments of BMB: 1879 ± 21 Ma (40Ar/39Ar amphibole age of amphibolite whose protolith was mafic rock) and 1857 ± 13 Ma (Sm-Nd mineral isochron age of garnet amphibolites after gabbronorite). The P- T metamorphic parameters in these gently sloping shear zones are remarkably different from the metamorphic parameters outside these zones: the pressure is 3-4 kbar lower and the temperature is 60-100°C lower. Thrusting-related decompression triggered the transition from the older high-pressure episode of Paleoproterozoic metamorphism to a younger syn-thrusting higher temperature metamorphic episode. The peak metamorphic parameters corresponding to the boundary between the amphibolite and

  9. Structural setting and magnetic properties of pseudotachylyte in a deep crustal shear zone, western Canadian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, O. F.; Mahan, K. H.; Brown, L. L.; Regan, S.; Williams, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic slip commonly produces pseudotachylytes, a glassy vein-filling substance that is typically interpreted as either a frictional melt or an ultra-triturated cataclasite. In either form, pseudotachylytes are commonly magnetite enriched, even in magnetite-free host rocks, and therefore are potentially useful as high fidelity recorders of natural magnetic fields at the time of slip in a wide array of lithologies. Pseudotachylytes generally have high magnetic susceptibility and thus should preserve the dominant field present as the material passes the Curie temperatures of magnetic minerals, primarily magnetite. Two potential sources have been proposed for the dominant magnetic field recorded: the earth's magnetic field at the time of slip or the temporary and orders of magnitude more intense field created by the presence of coseismic currents along the failure plane. Pseudotachylytes of the Cora Lake shear zone (CLsz) in the Athabasca Granulite Terrain, western Canadian shield, are consistently hosted in high strain ultramylonitic orthogneiss. Sinistral and extensional oblique-slip in the CLsz occurred at high-pressure granulite-grade conditions of ~1.0 GPa and >800°C and may have persisted to somewhat lower P-T conditions (~0.8 GPa, 700 °C) during ductile deformation. Pseudotachylyte-bearing slip surfaces have sinistral offset, matching the larger shear zone, and clasts of wall rock in the more brecciated veins display field evidence for ductile shear along the same plane prior to brittle failure. The presence of undeformed pseudotachylyte in kinematically compatible fracture arrays localized in ultramylonite indicates that brittle failure may have occurred in the waning stages of shear zone activity and at similar deep crustal conditions. Field-documented occurrences of pseudotachylyte include 2 cm-thick veins that run subparallel to mylonitic foliation and contain small flow-aligned clasts and large, heavily brecciated foliation-crosscutting zones up to

  10. Active dynamics of tissue shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Marko; Nandi, Amitabha; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a generic linear constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements and we investigate a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We identify two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven topological rearrangements. We find that these two active processes can produce distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  11. FLUID EVOLUTION AND MINERAL REACTIONS DURING SHEAR ZONE FORMATION AT NUSFJORD, LOFOTEN, NORWAY (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullerud, K.

    2009-12-01

    At Nusfjord in Lofoten, Norway, three 0.3 - 3 m thick shear zones occur in a gabbro-anorthosite. During deformation, the shear zones were infiltrated by a hydrous fluid enriched in Cl. In the central parts of the shear zones, fluid-rock interaction resulted in complete break-down of the primary mafic silicates. Complete hydration of these minerals to Cl-free amphibole and biotite suggests that the hydrous fluid was present in excess during deformation in these parts of the shear zones. Along the margins of the shear zones, however, the igneous mafic silicates (Cpx, Bt, Opx) were only partly overgrown by hydrous minerals. Here, Cl-enriched minerals (Amph, Bt, Scp, Ap) can be observed. Amphibole shows compositions covering the range 0.1 - 4.0 wt % Cl within single thin sections. Mineral textures and extreme compositional variations of the Cl-bearing minerals indicate large chemical gradients of the fluid phase. Relics of primary mafic silicates and compositionally zoned reaction coronas around primary mafic silicates suggest that the free fluid was totally consumed before the alteration of the primary phases were completed. The extreme variations in the Cl-content of amphibole are inferred to monitor a gradual desiccation of the Cl-bearing grain-boundary fluid during fluid-mineral reactions accordingly: 1) The first amphibole that formed during the reactions principally extracted water from the fluid, resulting in a slight increase in the Cl content of the fluid. 2) Continued amphibole-forming reactions resulted in gradual consumption of the free fluid phase, principally by extracting water from the fluid, resulting in an increase in its Cl-content. Higher Cl-content of the fluid resulted in higher Cl-content of the equilibrium amphibole. 3) The most Cl-enriched amphibole (4 wt % Cl) formed in equilibrium with the last volumes of the grain-boundary fluid, which had evolved to a highly saline solution. Mineral reactions within a 1-2 thick zone of the host rock along

  12. The role of thermo-mechanical feedback in the generation of shear zones in the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, Thibault; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2014-05-01

    The collision between continental plates results in the development of orogenic belts. Ongoing collision is responsible for the localisation of deformation and the development of shear zones. The presence of shear zones is well documented within orogens and their importance for the exhumation of high-grade (HG) metamorphic rocks is well accepted; their role in the formation of HG units is however debated. State of the art geodynamic modelling of continental collision is often used to model the genesis and exhumation of HG rocks. Nevertheless, it is a common approach to model collision by predefining shear zones and/or by employing constitutive models that can introduce mesh dependency. Mesh size dependency leads to difficult comparison between physical models and natural data since pressure and temperature cannot be accurately computed within the modelled shear zones. In this contribution, we employ thermo-mechanical modelling to study the formation of shear zones in the lithosphere. Our approach takes into account the coupling between momentum and energy balance by including viscous dissipation and temperature/stress dependant viscosity. We show that this methodology allows for the spontaneous development of shear zones around a cylindrical weak heterogeneity. Systematic simulations showed that this approach produces mesh-insensitive results. The modelled shear zones are hence characterised by a finite-width, which is independent on the numerical mesh resolution. Additional test were performed to constrain the physical parameters that control shear band thicknesses, the results highlight the role of thermal transport properties rather than the initial heterogeneity dimensions. Moreover, we demonstrate that these results can be achieved by using two different numerical methods, which are both popular methods in the geodynamic modelling community (Lagrangian finite elements and Eulerian-Lagrangian finite differences). Such models may therefore be reliably used to

  13. Kinematics of the Snake River Plain and Centennial Shear Zone, Idaho, from GPS and earthquatte data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Suzette J.

    New horizontal Global Positioning System (GPS) velocities at 405 sites using GPS phase data collected from 1994 to 2010 along with earthquakes, faults, and volcanic features reveal how contemporary strain is accommodated in the Northern Basin and Range Province. The 1994-2010 velocity field has observable gradients arising from both rotation and strain. Kinematic interpretations are guided by using a block-model approach and inverting velocities, earthquake slip vector azimuths, and dike-opening rates to simultaneously solve for angular velocities of the blocks and uniform horizontal strain rate tensors within selected blocks. The Northern Basin and Range block model has thirteen blocks representing tectonic provinces based on knowledge of geology, seismicity, volcanism, active tectonic faults, and regions with differences in observed velocities. Ten variations of the thirteen blocks are tested to assess the statistical significance of boundaries for tectonic provinces, motions along those boundaries, and estimates of long-term deformation within the provinces. From these tests, a preferred model with seven tectonic provinces is determined by applying a maximum confidence level of ≥99% probability to F-distribution tests between two models to indicate one model with added boundaries has a better fit to the data over a second model. The preferred model is varied to test hypotheses of post-seismic viscoelastic relaxation, significance of dikes in accommodating extension, and bookshelf faulting in accommodating shear. Six variations of the preferred model indicate time-varying components due to viscoelastic relaxation from the 1959 Hebgen Lake, Montana and 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquakes have either ceased as of 2002 or are too small to be evident in the observed velocities. Inversions with dike-opening models indicate that the previously hypothesized rapid extension by dike intrusion in volcanic rift zones to keep pace with normal faulting is not currently

  14. Magma-assisted strain localization in an orogen-parallel transcurrent shear zone of southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, AndréA.; Vauchez, Alain; Femandes, Luis A. D.; Porcher, Carla C.

    1994-04-01

    . Synkinematic granitoids localize most, if not all, deformation in the studied shear zone. The regional continuity and the pervasive character of the magmatic fabric in the various synkinematic granitic bodies, consistently displaying similar plane and direction of flow, argue for accommodation of large amounts of orogen-parallel movement by viscous deformation of these magmas. Moreover, activation of high-temperature deformation mechanisms probably allowed a much easier deformation of the hot synkinematic granites than of the colder country rock and, consequently, contributed significantly to the localization of deformation. Finally, the small extent of the low-temperature deformation suggests that the strike-slip deformation ended approximately synchronously with the final cooling of the peraluminous granites. The evolution of the deformation reflects the strong influence of synkinematic magma emplacement and subsequent cooling on the thermomechanical evolution of the shear zone. Magma intrusion in an orogen-scale transcurrent shear zone deeply modifies the rheological behavior of the continental crust. It triggers an efficient thermomechanical softening localized within the fault that may subsist long enough for large displacements to be accommodated. Therefore the close association of deformation and synkinematic magmatism probably represents an important factor controlling the mechanical response of continental plates in collisional environments.

  15. Mechanics of shear rupture applied to earthquake zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanics of shear slippage and rupture in rock masses are reviewed. The essential ideas in fracture mechanics are summarized emphasizing the interpretation and relation among the fracture parameters in shear cracks. The slip-weakening model is described. The general formulation of the problem of nonuniform slip distribution in a continuum is covered.

  16. A low-temperature ductile shear zone: The gypsum-dominated western extension of the brittle Fella-Sava Fault, Southern Alps

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Esther Maria; Neubauer, Franz; Heberer, Bianca; Genser, Johann

    2014-01-01

    Based on structural and fabric analyses at variable scales we investigate the evaporitic gypsum-dominated Comeglians-Paularo shear zone in the Southern Alps (Friuli). It represents the lateral western termination of the brittle Fella-Sava Fault. Missing dehydration products of gypsum and the lack of annealing indicate temperatures below 100 °C during development of the shear zone. Despite of such low temperatures the shear zone clearly exhibits mylonitic flow, thus evidencing laterally coeval activity of brittle and viscous deformation. The dominant structures within the gypsum rocks of the Lower Bellerophon Formation are a steeply to gently S-dipping foliation, a subhorizontal stretching lineation and pure shear-dominated porphyroclast systems. A subordinate simple shear component with dextral displacement is indicated by scattered σ-clasts. Both meso- and microscale structures are characteristic of a subsimple shear type of deformation with components of both coaxial and non-coaxial strain. Shortening in a transpressive regime was accommodated by right-lateral displacement and internal pure shear deformation within the Comeglians-Paularo shear zone. The shear zone shows evidence for a combination of two stretching faults, where stretching occurred in the rheologically weaker gypsum member and brittle behavior in enveloping lithologies. PMID:26523080

  17. Reaction enhanced channelised fluid-flux along mid- crustal shear zone: An example from Mesoproterozoic Phulad Shear Zone, Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sadhana M.; Choudhury, Manideepa Roy; Das, Subhrajyoti

    2016-10-01

    Fluid infiltration at great depth during regional metamorphism plays a major role in mass transport and is responsible for significant rheological changes in the rock. Calc-silicate rocks of the Kajalbas area of Delhi Fold Belt, Rajasthan, are characterised by foliation parallel alternate bands of amphibole-rich and clinopyroxene-plagioclase feldspar-rich layers of varying thicknesses (mm to decimetre thick). Textural relation suggests that the amphibole grains formed from clinopyroxene and plagioclase in the late phase of regional deformation. Algebraic analysis of the reaction textures and mineral compositions was performed with the computer program C-Space to obtain the balanced chemical reactions that led to the formation of amphibole-rich bands. The computed balanced reaction is 70.74 Clinopyroxene + 27.23 Plagioclase + 22.018 H2O + 5.51 K++ 1.00 Mg2++ 27.15 Fe2+ = 22.02 Amphibole + 67.86 SiO2 aqueous + 36.42 Ca2++ 8.98 Na+. The constructed reaction suggests that aqueous fluid permeated the calc-silicate rock along mm to decimetre thick channels, metasomatized the clinopyroxene-plagioclase bearing rocks to form the amphibole-rich layers. The regional deformation presumably created the fluid channels thereby allowing the metasomatic fluid to enter the rock system. The above reaction has large negative volume change for solid phases indicating reaction-induced permeability. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the fluid-rock interaction occurred at 665 ±05∘C and 6.6 ±0.25 kbar (corresponding to ˜20 km depth). Textural modeling integrating the textural features and balanced chemical reaction of the calc-silicate rocks of Mesoproterozoic Phulad Shear Zone thus indicate that extremely channelled fluid flow was reaction enhanced and caused major change in the rock rheology.

  18. Shear zone nucleation and deformation transient: effect of heterogeneities and loading conditions in experimentally deformed calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. F. G.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G. H.; Kilian, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's middle to lower crust, strain is frequently localized along ductile shear zones, which commonly nucleate at structural and material heterogeneities. To investigate shear zone nucleation and development due to heterogeneities, we performed constant strain-rate (CSR) and constant stress (CS) simple shear (torsion) deformation experiments on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) inclusions. The experiments were conducted in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure and maximum bulk shear strains of 3. Peak shear stress was about 20 MPa for all the samples, followed by smooth weakening and steady state behavior. The strain is predominantly localized in the host marble within the process zone in front of the inclusion, defined by a zone of intense grain size reduction due to dynamic recrystallization. In CS tests a narrow shear zone developed in front of the inclusion, whereas in CSR experiments the deformation is more heterogeneously distributed, up to g=3.. In the later, secondary foliations oblique to the process zone and alternating thin, high-strain layers are common. In samples deformed at the same shear strain (g=1), the average recrystallized grain size in the process zone is similar for CS and CSR conditions. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements shows that different grain sizes have slightly different CPO patterns. CPO strength varies for different grain sizes, with a CPO strength peak between 40-50 μm, decreasing progressively within smaller grain size, but with secondary peaks for different coarse-grained sizes. Our observations suggest that the initial formation and transient deformation of shear zones is strongly affected by loading conditions.

  19. Indirect dating of deformation: a geochronological study from the Pan African Ajaj shear zone, Saudi Arabia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mahmoud; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Stüwe, Kurt; Klötzli, Urs

    2013-04-01

    The metamorphic complexes of the Arabian-Nubian Shield were exhumed by different exhumation mechanisms (i.e. in extension or oblique transpression regime) during the Pan African activity of Najd Fault System - the largest pre-Mesozoic shear zone on Earth. The different exhumation mechanisms could be the consequence of (i) orientation of the complexes at slightly different angles with respect to the overall orientation of the principal stresses of the Najd Fault System, (ii) exhumation from different depths, or (iii) change of the stress regime through time. In order to test the third hypothesis, geochronological work will be applied on a representative suite of complexes across the Najd Fault System. In particular we focus on three complexes in the Arabian part of the shield named Qazaz, Hamadat and Wajh. In general, the metamorphic complexes of the Arabian part of the shield exhibit left-lateral transcurrent tectonism along the NW-SE Najd faults and right-lateral movement along conjugate NE-SW striking structures. The whole unit forms an anastomosing network of planar structures that demarcate large fish-shaped bodies of high grade metamorphics. The Hamadat complex is surrounded by a left-lateral greenshist facies WNW-ESE Ajaj shear zone. The complex consists of folds that are strongly pinched to the north and more open to the south marked by a well-developed parallel stretching sub-horizontal lineation. Granite intrusions along and across the Ajaj shear zone may allow testing the timing of the deformation. Deformed and non-deformed samples of these granites will be examined by age dating to determine the absolute timing of the metamorphism and the deformation for the complex. Some 20 samples are currently being prepared for zircon dating. Whilst no results are available at the time of writing of this abstract, they will be presented at EGU 2013.

  20. Microstructural study of the Mertz shear zone, East Antarctica. Implications for deformation processes and seismic anisotropy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarque, Gaëlle; Bascou, Jérôme; Maurice, Claire; Cottin, Jean-Yves; Ménot, René-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The Mertz Shear Zone (MSZ; 146°E 67°S; East Antarctica) is one major lithospheric-scale structure which outcrops on the eastern edge of the Terre Adélie Craton (Ménot et al., 2007) and that could connected with shear zones of South Australia (e.g., Kalinjala or Coorong shear zone (Kleinschmidt and Talarico, 2000; Gibson et al., 2013)) before the Cretaceous opening of the Southern Ocean. Geochronological and metamorphic studies indicated an MSZ activity at 1.7 and 1.5 Ga respectively in amphibolite and greenschists facies conditions. The deformation affects both the intermediate and lower crust levels, without associated voluminous magma injection. Granulite crop out in the area of the MSZ. They were dated at 2.4 Ga (Ménot et al., 2005) and could represent some preserved Neoarchean tectonites. These rocks show various degrees of deformation including penetrative structures that may display comparable features with that observed in amphibolite and greenschists facies rocks, i.e. NS-striking and steeply dipping foliation with weekly plunging lineation. In the field, cinematic indicators for the MSZ argue for a dominant dextral shear sense. We proceed to optical analysis and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements using EBSD technique in order to better constrain the deformation processes. Our results highlight (1) a microstructural gradient from highly deformed rocks (mylonites), forming plurimetric large shear bands and showing evidences of plastic deformation, to slightly deformed rocks in preserved cores with no evidences of plastic deformation or with a clear strong static recrystallization; (2) CPO of minerals related with variations on deformation conditions. Feldspar and quartz CPO argue for plastic deformation at high temperature in the most deformed domains and for the absence of deformation or an important stage of static recrystallization in preserved cores; (3) uncommon CPO in orthopyroxene which are characterized by [010]-axes

  1. Using drill cutting separates to estimate the strength of narrow shear zones at SAFOD

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.; Solum, J.; Tembe, S.; Lockner, D.; Wong, T.-F.

    2007-01-01

    A technique is presented for estimating frictional strength of narrow shear zones based on hand selection of drillhole cuttings separates. Tests were conducted on cuttings from the SAFOD scientific drillhole near Parkfield, California. Since cuttings are mixed with adjacent material as they travel up the drillhole, these fault-derived separates give a better representation of the frictional properties of narrow features than measurements from the bulk material alone. Cuttings from two shear zones (one an active trace of the San Andreas fault) contain a significant weight percent of clay-rich grains that exhibit deformation-induced slickensides. In addition, cuttings from the active SAF trace contain around 1% serpentine. Coefficients of friction for clay-rich and serpentine grains were 0.3-0.5 and 0.4-0.45, respectively. These values are around 0.12 lower than the friction coefficient of the corresponding bulk cuttings, providing an improved estimate of the frictional strength of the San Andreas fault. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Midcrustal shearing and doming in a Cenozoic compressive setting along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Yin, C. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Wang, J. M.; Zhong, D. L.; Wang, Y.; Lai, Q. Z.; Yue, Y. H.; Zhou, Q. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The Cenozoic Xuelong Shan antiformal dome is located along the northern segment of the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in Yunnan, China. Subhorizontal foliation in the gneiss core is recognized, representing a broad top-to-NE shear initiated under amphibolite facies conditions and propagating into greenschist facies in the mantling schist and strike-slip shear zone. Microfabrics of crystallographic-preferred orientations (CPOs) in quartz suggest that the deformation temperatures increased with increasing structural depth from the upper crust (300-500°C) in the mantling schist to the midcrust (15 km or more, ≥650°C) in the gneissic core. This trend is mirrored by variations in the metamorphic grade of the syn-kinematic mineral assemblages and microstructures, which range from garnet + amphibole + biotite + sillimanite + rutile + feldspar in the core to garnet + staurolite + biotite + epidote + muscovite within the limb units. The dome experienced the following deformation history: (1) a broad top-to-NE shear in the subhorizontal foliation of the gneiss core during the first stage of deformation (D1); (2) opposing reverse-sense shear along the two schist limbs of the dome during contraction-related doming (D2-D3); (3) sinistral strike-slip shearing within the eastern limb (D4); and (4) extensional deformation (D5). The structural-thermal patterns suggest the antiformal dome formation was roughly coeval with top-to-NE ductile shearing in the midcrust of Tibet at 32 Ma or earlier. A major implication is that there was a phase of contractional ductile deformation in the region prior to the initiation of strike-slip deformation.

  3. Measuring Local Strain Rates In Ductile Shear Zones: A New Approach From Deformed Syntectonic Dykes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassier, C.; Leloup, P.; Rubatto, D.; Galland, O.; Yue, Y.; Ding, L.

    2006-12-01

    At the Earth surface, deformation is mostly localized in fault zones in between tectonic plates. In the upper crust, the deformation is brittle and the faults are narrow and produce earthquakes. In contrast, deformation in the lower ductile crust results in larger shear zones. While it is relatively easy to measure in situ deformation rates at the surface using for example GPS data, it is more difficult to determinate in situ values of strain rate in the ductile crust. Such strain rates can only be estimated in paleo-shear zones. Various methods have been used to assess paleo-strain rates in paleo-shear zones. For instance, cooling and/or decompression rates associated with assumptions on geothermic gradients and shear zone geometry can lead to such estimates. Another way to estimate strain rates is the integration of paleo-stress measurements in a power flow law. But these methods are indirect and imply strong assumptions. Dating of helicitic garnets or syntectonic fibres are more direct estimates. However these last techniques have been only applied in zones of low deformation and not in major shear zones. We propose a new direct method to measure local strain rates in major ductile shear zones from syntectonic dykes by coupling quantification of deformation and geochronology. We test our method in a major shear zone in a well constrained tectonic setting: the Ailao-Shan - Red River Shear Zone (ASRRsz) located in SE Asia. For this 10 km wide shear zone, large-scale fault rates, determined in three independent ways, imply strain rates between 1.17×10^{-13 s-1 and 1.52×10^{-13 s-1 between 35 and 16 Ma. Our study focused on one outcrop where different generations of syntectonic dykes are observed. First, we quantified the minimum shear strain γ for each dyke using several methods: (1) by measuring the stretching of dykes with a surface restoration method (2) by measuring the final angle of the dykes with respect to the shear direction and (3) by combining the two

  4. The Cora Lake Shear Zone: Strain Localization in an Ultramylonitic, Deep Crustal Shear Zone, Athabasca Granulite Terrain, Western Churchill Province, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S.; Williams, M. L.; Mahan, K. H.; Orlandini, O. F.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Leslie, S. R.; Holland, M.

    2012-12-01

    Ultramylonitic shear zones typically involve intense strain localization, and when developed over large regions can introduce considerable heterogeneity into the crust. The Cora Lake shear zone (CLsz) displays several 10's to 100's of meters-wide zones of ultramylonite distributed throughout its full 3-5 km mylonitized width. Detailed mapping, petrography, thermobarometry, and in-situ monazite geochronology suggest that it formed during the waning phases of granulite grade metamorphism and deformation, within one of North America's largest exposures of polydeformed lower continental crust. Anastomosing zones of ultramylonite contain recrystallized grain-sizes approaching the micron scale and might appear to suggest lower temperature mylonitization. However, feldspar and even clinopyroxene are dynamically recrystallized, and quantitative thermobarometry of syn-deformational assemblages indicate high P and T conditions ranging from 0.9 -10.6 GPa and 775-850 °C. Even at these high T's, dynamic recovery and recrystallization were extremely limited. Rocks with low modal quartz have extremely small equilibrium volumes. This is likely the result of inefficient diffusion, which is further supported by the unannealed nature of the crystals. Local carbonate veins suggests that H2O poor, CO2 rich conditions may have aided in the preservation of fine grain sizes, and may have inhibited dynamic recovery and recrystallization. The Cora Lake shear zone is interpreted to have been relatively strong and to have hardened during progressive deformation. Garnet is commonly fractured perpendicular to host rock fabric, and statically replaced by both biotite and muscovite. Pseudotachylite, with the same sense of shear, occurs in several ultramylonitized mafic granulites. Thus, cataclasis and frictional melt are interpreted to have been produced in the lower continental crust, not during later reactivation. We suggest that strengthening of rheologically stiffer lithologies led to

  5. Electrical resistivity structure of the Great Slave Lake shear zone, northwest Canada: implications for tectonic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yaotian; Unsworth, Martyn; Liddell, Mitch; Pana, Dinu; Craven, James A.

    2014-10-01

    Three magnetotelluric (MT) profiles in northwestern Canada cross the central and western segments of Great Slave Lake shear zone (GSLsz), a continental scale strike-slip structure active during the Slave-Rae collision in the Proterozoic. Dimensionality analysis indicates that (i) the resistivity structure is approximately 2-D with a geoelectric strike direction close to the dominant geological strike of N45°E and that (ii) electrical anisotropy may be present in the crust beneath the two southernmost profiles. Isotropic and anisotropic 2-D inversion and isotropic 3-D inversions show different resistivity structures on different segments of the shear zone. The GSLsz is imaged as a high resistivity zone (>5000 Ω m) that is at least 20 km wide and extends to a depth of at least 50 km on the northern profile. On the southern two profiles, the resistive zone is confined to the upper crust and pierces an east-dipping crustal conductor. Inversions show that this dipping conductor may be anisotropic, likely caused by conductive materials filling a network of fractures with a preferred spatial orientation. These conductive regions would have been disrupted by strike-slip, ductile deformation on the GSLsz that formed granulite to greenschist facies mylonite belts. The pre-dominantly granulite facies mylonites are resistive and explain why the GSLsz appears as a resistive structure piercing the east-dipping anisotropic layer. The absence of a dipping anisotropic/conductive layer on the northern MT profile, located on the central segment of the GSLsz, is consistent with the lack of subduction at this location as predicted by geological and tectonic models.

  6. A constitutive model for layer development in shear zones near the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montési, Laurent G. J.

    2007-04-01

    The microstructure of ductile shear zones differs from that of surrounding wall rocks. In particular, compositional layering is a hallmark of shear zones. As layered rocks are weaker than their isotropic protolith when loaded in simple shear, layering may hold the key to explain localization of ductile deformation onto ductile shear zones. I propose here a constitutive model for layer development. A two-level mixing theory allows the strength of the aggregate to be estimated at intermediate degrees of layering. A probabilistic failure model is introduced to control how layers develop in a deforming aggregate. This model captures one of the initial mechanism of phase interconnection identified experimentally by Holyoke and Tullis (2006a, 2006b), fracturing of load bearing grains. This model reproduces the strength evolution of these experiments and can now be applied to tectonic modeling.

  7. Metasomatism-controlled nucleation and development of paired-shear zone: an example from the Neves area (Eastern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Gaétan; Goncalves, Philippe; Lanari, Pierre; Oliot, Emilien

    2016-04-01

    garnet, only presents in the bleached zone, is made of a Mn-rich core and a Ca-rich rim. The core of atoll garnets were formed during the bleaching event, then they have been partially resorbed during the development of the paired-shear zone that is coeval with a new metasomatic event. This latter forms the rim of atoll garnets, which are similar in compositions with euhedral garnets. The center of the shear zone, located at the interface between the granodiorite and the bleached zone, shows evidences of late brittle reactivation, with breakdown of biotite into chlorite, the cataclasis of garnet with crystallization of K-feldspar (or adularia) and epidote in the cracks, and crystallization of a large amount of Fe and Ti-oxydes. The temperature conditions of this reactivation - maybe linked to a seismic event - are estimated at ~225°C. Our results demonstrate that early fluid-rock interaction is responsible for the formation of a bleached zone and the development of viscosity contrasts, within an initially isotropic rock, sufficient to localize deformation. Furthermore, the transient brittle deformation is also associated with fluid and chemical mass transfer. This contribution shows that both ductile and brittle deformations are associated with fluid-rock interactions. Thus, understanding strain localization processes requires to take into consideration not only mechanical processes, like active deformation mechanisms, but also fluid-assisted chemical processes.

  8. Low-temperature cooling histories of the Cheyenne belt and Laramie Peak shear zone, Wyoming, and the Soda Creek-Fish Creek shear zone, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Sharri A.

    The base of a fossil apatite fission-track (AFT) partial annealing zone (PAZ), which formed when the area now occupied by the central and southern Rocky Mountains was at sea level in Late Cretaceous time, has since been disrupted by Laramide and post-Laramide tectonism and denudation. New AFT data are used to identify this marker and to examine its disruption across Proterozoic boundaries in north-central Colorado and south-central Wyoming. The cooling history recorded by the AFT data in the Laramie Range is not strongly controlled by basement structures, but instead reflects either long-wavelength warping of the base of the PAZ during Laramide deformation or N-S variations in Paleozoic to Mesozoic sediment thickness across this range. In contrast, at least one structure associated with the Cheyenne belt in the Medicine Bow Mountains, the Rambler shear zone, influenced the Laramide cooling history of this range. The Rambler shear zone separates Laramide AFT cooling ages (60 to 79 Ma) to the northwest from >100 Ma AFT ages to the southeast. In the Sierra Madre, Wyoming, AFT ages from Archean rocks north of the Cheyenne belt and from Proterozoic rocks to the south are nearly equivalent (49-79 Ma); the Late Cretaceous PAZ is not preserved in this mountain range. Similarly, AFT ages north and south of the Proterozoic Soda Creek-Fish Creek shear zone the Park Range, Colorado are about the same (45-75 Ma). Thus, these shear zones apparently were not strongly reactivated during Laramide deformation.

  9. Higher Himalayan Shear Zone, Sutlej section: structural geology and extrusion mechanism by various combinations of simple shear, pure shear and channel flow in shifting modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit; Koyi, Hemin A.

    2010-09-01

    The Higher Himalayan Shear Zone (HHSZ) in the Sutlej section reveals (1) top-to-SW ductile shearing, (2) top-to-NE ductile shearing in the upper- and the lower strands of the South Tibetan Detachment System (STDSU, STDSL), and (3) top-to-SW brittle shearing corroborated by trapezoid-shaped minerals in micro-scale. In the proposed extrusion model of the HHSZ, the E1-phase during 25-19 Ma is marked by simple shearing of the upper sub-channel defined by the upper strand of the Main Central Thrust (MCTU) and the top of STDSU as the lower- and the upper boundaries, respectively. Subsequently, the E2a-pulse during 15-14 Ma was characterized by simple shear, pure shear, and channel flow of the entire HHSZ. Finally, the E2b-pulse during 14-12 Ma observed simple shearing and channel flow of the lower sub-channel defined by the lower strand of the Main Central Thrust (MCTL) and the top of the STDSL as the lower- and the upper boundaries, respectively. The model explains the constraints of thicknesses of the STDSU and the STDSL along with spatially variable extrusion rate and the inverted metamorphism of the HHSZ. The model predicts (1) shear strain after ductile extrusion to be maximum at the boundaries of the HHSZ, which crudely matches with the existing data. The other speculations that cannot be checked are (2) uniform shear strain from the MCTU to the top of the HHSZ in the E1-phase; (3) fastest rates of extrusion of the lower boundaries of the STDSU and the STDSL during the E2a- and E2b-pulses, respectively; and (4) variable thickness of the STDSL and rare absence of the STDSU. Non-parabolic shear fabrics of the HHSZ possibly indicate heterogeneous strain. The top-to-SW brittle shearing around 12 Ma augmented the ductile extruded rocks to arrive a shallower depth. The brittle-ductile extension leading to boudinage possibly did not enhance the extrusion.

  10. Modeling shear zones in geological and planetary sciences: solid- and fluid-thermal-mechanical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Yuen, D. A.

    2003-11-01

    Shear zones are the most ubiquitous features observed in planetary surfaces. They appear as a jagged network of faults at the observable brittle surface of planets and, in geological exposures of deeper rocks, they turn into smoothly braided networks of localized shear displacement leaving centimeter wide bands of "mylonitized", reduced grain sizes behind. The overall size of the entire shear network rarely exceeds kilometer scale at depth. Although mylonitic shear zones are only visible to the observer, when uplifted and exposed at the surface, they govern the mechanical behavior of the strongest part of the lithosphere below 10-15 km depth. Mylonitic shear zones dissect plates, thus allowing plate tectonics to develop on the Earth. We review the basic multiscale physics underlying mylonitic, ductile shear zone nucleation, growth and longevity and show that grain size reduction is a symptomatic cause but not necessarily the main reason for localization. We also discuss a framework for analytic and numerical modeling including the effects of thermal-mechanical couplings, thermal-elasticity, the influence of water and void-volatile feedback. The physics of ductile shear zones relies on feedback processes that turn a macroscopically homogenously deforming body into a heterogeneously slipping solid medium. Positive feedback can amplify strength heterogeneities by cascading through different scales. We define basic, intrinsic length scales of strength heterogeneity such as those associated with plasticity, grain size, fluid-inclusion and thermal diffusion length scale. For an understanding ductile shear zones we need to consider the energetics of deformation. Shear heating introduces a jerky flow phenomenon potentially accompanied by ductile earthquakes. Additional focusing due to grain size reduction only operates for a narrow parameter range of cooling rates. For the long time scale, deformational energy stored inside the shear zone through plastic dilation or

  11. Stretching lineations, shear zone kinematics and dextral transpression along the Flying Point/Norumbega fault zone, Casco Bay, Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.T. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-03-01

    Stretching lineations (L2) throughout the high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Casco Bay area are defined by the alignment of grain aggregates and elongate minerals generally parallel to subhorizontal upright F2 fold hinges. L2 lineations were developed due to regional layer-parallel shear related to dextral transpression along the Flying Point segment of the Norumbega Fault Zone during the later Paleozoic. The reorientation of boudin partings, quartz veins and pegmatite intrusions, the asymmetry of boudin pods, late vein folds and crenulations as well as a range of microscopic kinematic indicators within these rocks clearly indicate an overall dextral shear sense and a variable dip-slip component with local transport directions parallel to L2 during deformation. The distribution of L2 lineations about the trace of the NE- trending Flying Point Fault Zone shows: (a) E-plunging L2 in a broad zone on the NW side within SE-dipping, locally, pegmatite-injected, porphyroclastic schists and gneisses and; (c) sub-horizontal L2 within subordinate fault slices of folded Casco Bay Group lithologies to the SE. The Flying Point Fault zone itself consists of the straight planar gneisses and related rocks as a 2 km wide corridor of high shear strain reflected in the development of quartz-vein sheath folds parallel to L2. Variably-deformed mafic and felsic intrusions preserved as asymmetric pods and lenses within the flanking lithologies have been obliterated within this zone of high shear strain. This kinematic pattern and distribution of lineations is interpreted as an asymmetric transpressional uplift dominated by a broad NW front suffering oblique escape toward the west under dextral reverse motions and a major near-vertical zone of decoupling that developed at a restraining bend at the southwest end of the Norumbega Fault Zone.

  12. Microstructures and kinematic vorticity analysis from the mylonites along the Karakoram Shear Zone, Pangong Mountains, Karakoram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Karakoram Shear Zone is a northwest-southeast trending dextral ductile shear zone, which has affected the granitic and granodioritic bodies of the southern Asian Plate margin in three distinct episodes. The ductile shearing of the granitic bodies at Tangste and Darbuk has resulted in the development of mylonites with mylonitic foliation and stretching lineation. More intense deformation is noted in the Tangste granite grading upto orthomylonite, as compared to the Darbuk granite. Kinematic indicators include S-C foliation, synthetic C' and C" antithetic shear bands, Type A σ-mantled porphyroclasts, oblique quartz foliation, micro-shears with bookshelf gliding, mineral fishes including Group 2 mica fishes, and Type 1 and 2a pull-apart microstructures, and exhibit strong dextral sense of ductile shearing towards southeast. The textural features of the minerals especially that of quartz and feldspar, indicate temperature of mylonitisation ranging between 300° C and 500° C in the upper greenschist facies. The mylonitic rocks of the KSZ provide an opportunity for the possible utilization of the deformational structures namely that of quartz and feldspar porphyroclast as well as, well developed shear bands for kinematic vorticity studies. Well developed quartz and feldspar porphyroclasts and synthetic and antithetic shear bands from six different mylonitic samples of the mylonitic Tangste granite has been used to estimate the bulk kinematic vorticity (Wk) involved in the overall deformation of the KSZ using the Porphyroclast Hyperbolic Distribution (PHD) method and Shear band (SB) analysis. The PHD method yields Wk values that range from Wk = 0.29 to Wk =0.43, where as the Shear bands yields values ranging from Wk = 0.45 to Wk =0.93, thus indicating distinct pure and simple shear regimes at different stages of the evolution of the KSZ.

  13. Shear-wave splitting and mantle dynamics beneath the Rivera and Cocos subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon Soto, G.; Ni, J.; Grand, S.; Wilson, D.; Guzman Speziale, M.; Gomez Gonzalez, J.; Dominguez Reyes, T.

    2007-12-01

    Shear-wave splitting measurements are determined using data collected from MARS (Mapping the Rivera subduction zone) project to study the origin of seismic anisotropy in the mantle beneath the wedge of the subduction zone. The MARS project consists of the deployment of 50 broadband temporary stations in Mexico covering the Jalisco block from the coast to the Tepic-Chapala rift in the north and about 150 km to the west of the Colima rift. Results show that the fast directions are oriented in a SSW-NNE direction beneath the western Jalisco block, while the fast directions beneath the eastern Jalisco block show a predominantly N-S oriented fast direction. If the divergence of the fast direction is a measure of the mantle flow within the wedge of the subduction zone, then the overriding continental margin is being pulled apart. The Colima rift and active volcano are situated above the tear. Fast splitting directions in the vicinity of the volcano are generally trending N-S with a small delay time between the fast and slow split SKS waves.

  14. The Suruli shear zone and regional scale folding pattern in Madurai block of Southern Granulite Terrain, south India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Rajeshdurai, P.

    2010-04-01

    Through the application of remote sensing techniques followed by field checks, the exact extension and nature of Suruli shear zone in Madurai block of southern granulite terrain (SGT) in south India is brought out for the first time in this work. The dominant rock type exposed in this area is charnockite intruded by granites. The Suruli ductile shear zone extends from just west of Kadaiyanallur in the south to Ganguvarpatti in the north over a length of 150 km. Between Kadaiyanallur and Kambam, the shear zone extends roughly in N-S direction. From Kambam, it swerves towards NE and then towards ENE near Ganguvarpatti. The strongly developed transposed foliation and mylonite foliation within the shear zone dip towards east only and so the eastern block (Varushanad hills) is the hanging wall and the western block (Cardamom hills) is the footwall of the shear zone. In the eastern block, three distinct phases of regional scale folding (F1, F2 and F3) are recognized. In complete contrast, the western block recorded only the last phase (F3) regional scale folding. As the more deformed eastern block (older terrain) moved over the relatively less deformed western block (younger terrain) along the Suruli shear zone, it is proposed that this shear zone is a thrust or reverse fault, probably of Proterozoic age. As there are evidences for decreasing displacement from north to south (i.e., from Ganguvarpatti to Kadaiyanallur), the Suruli shear zone could be a rotational thrust or reverse fault with the pivot located close to Kadaiyanallur. As the pivot is located near Achankovil shear zone which trends WNW-ESE (dip towards SSW), the Suruli shear zone could be splaying (branching) out from Achankovil shear zone. In a nutshell, the Suruli shear zone could be a splay, rotational thrust or reverse fault.

  15. Pan-African shear zone-hosted gold mineralization in the Arabian-Nubian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, Tamer; Grosch, Eugene; Abd El Monsef, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    A new tectonic model of the exhumation mechanism of the Arabian-Nubian Shield will be presented at the EGU2013 by Abu-Alam and Stüwe (2013). According to this new tectonic model, the shear zones of the Arabian-Nubian Shield can be classified into two types; deep-seated and relatively shallow shear zones. The deep-seated shear zones are accompanied with deep sub-horizontal crustal channel flows which are response to the exhumation of the metamorphic complexes from the peak condition depth to a shallower crustal level (ductile-brittle transition). An example of these deep-seated shear zones is the Najd Fault System - the largest shear zone on the Earth. At the ductile-brittle transition crustal level, the deep-seated shear zones were overprinted by a greenschist facies condition or the ?2 and ?3 of the principle stresses may be flipped with each other. This flipping can produce other conjugate shallow shear zones in a greenschist facies conditions. The Egyptian gold deposits can be classified into three main types (Botros, 2004), These are stratabound deposits, non-stratabound deposits and placer gold deposits. The non-stratabound deposits are the most common (ex: Sukari, Wadi Allaqi, Abu Marawat, Atalla, El-Sid and Atud gold mines). They are found in form of vein type mineralization or as disseminated mineralization hosted in volcanics and volcaniclastic rocks (volcanogenic massive sulphides). Spatial and temporal relationships between gold veins and structures in the Arabian-Nubian Shield suggest a genetic relationship between mineralization and major tectonic events. At Sukari, Wadi Allaqi and Abu Marawat areas, the gold is hosted in quartz veins parallel to a deep-seated NW-SE to NNW-SSE shear zones. For Atud, El-Sid and Atalla area, the gold is hosted in NE-SW veins parallel to a shallow shear zone but at the conjugate point with a deep-seated NW-SE shear zone. According to the new tectonic model, we propose the following model for gold formation (non

  16. Fluid flow and polymetallic sulfide mineralization in the Kettara shear zone (Jebilet Massif, Variscan Belt, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'diaye, I.; Essaifi, A.; Dubois, M.; Lacroix, B.; Goodenough, K. M.; Maacha, L.

    2016-07-01

    The Kettara shear zone is a regional wrench shear zone within the Jebilet massif of Western Morocco, part of the Variscan orogenic belt. This massif is characterized by bimodal magmatism, largely intrusive, and by a number of polymetallic massive sulfide deposits. A syntectonic mafic-ultramafic intrusion and an adjacent, deformed pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide deposit are located within a 'compressional jog' of the shear zone. Hydrothermal alteration in both the intrusion and the wall rocks adjacent to the deposit is characterized by syntectonic replacement processes leading to formation of chlorite-schists and quartz ± calcite veins. Fluid inclusions in mineralized (pyrrhotite-bearing) quartz veins from the wall rocks adjacent to the deposit and in veins associated with chlorite-schists within the intrusion indicate a prevalence of H2O-CO2-CH4-N2 and H2O-salt fluid systems. In the mineralized veins the fluid shows reducing conditions, with gas dominated by CH4 and N2 and salinities around 7.5 wt% NaCl, whereas in the chlorite shear zones fluid is CO2 dominated and salinities are higher than 23 wt% NaCl. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of chlorite and quartz are similar and demonstrate involvement of metamorphic water in both the deposit and the intrusion. The data are consistent with a regional metamorphic fluid flow through the Kettara shear zone. The migrating metamorphic fluids were reduced in the organic matter-rich host rocks leading to deposition of sulfides in the mineralized veins. There are two possible hypotheses for the origin of these mineralized veins: either they were formed during deformation and remobilization of a syn-sedimentary massive sulfide deposit, or they were formed synchronously with the sulfide deposit during development of the Kettara shear zone.

  17. The Freyenstein Shear Zone - Implications for exhumation of the South Bohemian Batholith (Moldanubian Superunit, Strudengau, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesmeier, Gerit; Iglseder, Christoph; Konstantin, Petrakakis

    2016-04-01

    The Moldanubian superunit is part of the internal zone of the Variscan Orogen in Europe and borders on the Saxothuringian and Sudetes zones in the north. In the south, it is blanketed by the Alpine foreland molasse. Tectonically it is subdivided into the Moldanubian Nappes (MN), the South Bohemian Batholith (SBB) and the Bavarian Nappes. This work describes the ~ 500 m thick Freyenstein shear zone, which is located at the southern border of the Bohemian Massif north and south of the Danube near Freyenstein (Strudengau, Lower Austria). The area is built up by granites of Weinsberg-type, which are interlayered by numerous dikes and paragneisses of the Ostrong nappe system. These dikes include medium grained granites and finegrained granites (Mauthausen-type granites), which form huge intrusions. In addition, smaller intrusions of dark, finegrained diorites und aplitic dikes are observed. These rocks are affected by the Freyenstein shear zone und ductily deformed. Highly deformed pegmatoides containing white mica crystals up to one cm cut through the deformed rocks and form the last dike generation. The Freyenstein shear zone is a NE-SW striking shear zone at the eastern edge of the SBB. The mylonitic foliation is dipping to the SE with angles around 60°. Shear-sense criteria like clast geometries, SĆ structures as well as microstructures show normal faulting top to S/SW with steep (ca. 50°) angles. The Freyenstein shear zone records a polyphase history of deformation and crystallization: In a first phase, mylonitized mineral assemblages in deformed granitoides can be observed, which consist of pre- to syntectonic muscovite-porphyroclasts and biotite as well as dynamically recrystallized potassium feldspar, plagioclase and quartz. The muscovite porphyroclasts often form mica fishes and show top to S/SW directed shear-sense. The lack of syntectonic chlorite crystals points to metamorphic conditions of lower amphibolite-facies > than 450° C. In a later stage fluid

  18. Dextral strike-slip along the Kapıdağ shear zone (NW Turkey): evidence for Eocene westward translation of the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkoğlu, Ercan; Zulauf, Gernold; Linckens, Jolien; Ustaömer, Timur

    2016-10-01

    The northern part of the Kapıdağ Peninsula (Marmara Sea, NW Turkey) is affected by the E-W trending Kapıdağ shear zone, which cuts through calc-alkaline granitoids of the Ocaklar pluton resulting in mylonitic orthogneiss. Macroscopic and microscopic shear-sense indicators, such as SC fabrics, shear bands, σ-clasts and mica fish, unequivocally suggest dextral strike-slip for the Kapıdağ shear zone. Based on petrographic data, deformation microfabrics of quartz and feldspar, and the slip systems in quartz, the dextral shearing should have been active at T = 500-300 °C and P < 5 kbar. Published K-Ar and 39Ar-40Ar cooling ages of hornblende and biotite suggest that cooling below 500-300 °C occurred during the Eocene (ca. 45-ca. 35 Ma), meaning that the Kapıdağ shear zone should have been active during Middle to Late Eocene times. The differential stress related to the shearing was <50 MPa as is indicated by the size of recrystallized quartz grains. Based on the new and published data, it is concluded that the westward movement of the Anatolian plate might have been active almost continuously from the Middle Eocene until recent times.

  19. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2015-04-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone is located in the N-S striking Höllviken Graben and traverses the city of Copenhagen. The fault zone is a NNW-SSE striking structure in direct vicinity to the transition zone of the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent small earthquakes indicate activity in the area, although none of the mapped earthquakes appear to have occurred on the Carlsberg Fault. We examined the fault evolution by a combination of very high resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The chalk stratigraphy and the localization of the fault zone at depth was inferred from previous studies by other authors. We extrapolated the Jurassic and Triassic stratigraphy from the Pomeranian Bay to the area of investigation. The fault zone shows a flower structure in the Triassic as well as in Cretaceous sediments. The faulting geometry indicates strong influence of Triassic processes when subsidence and rifting prevailed in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. This finding contrasts the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighbouring structures, as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image structures in Quaternary layers in the Carlsberg Fault zone. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise

  20. Relationship of quartz LPO fabrics in mylonites near the Alpine Fault, New Zealand to the attitude of the shear zone boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Prior, D. J.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    The active Alpine fault self-exhumes its own ductile shear zone roots and has known kinematics. Within ~1 km of the fault, the foliation is subparallel to the shear zone boundary in which it formed at amphibolite-facies conditions. Using EBSD, we analysed quartz Lattice Preferred Orientations (LPOs) of mylonites along a central part of the fault. The samples were mostly taken from naturally outcropping rocks, complemented by a few sections from core from the DFDP-2B hole—rocks that accommodated a range of finite strains and that have diverse quartz contents. All the LPOs feature a single (or strongest) girdle of c-axes hat is inclined ~28 ±4° away from the pole to the shear zone boundary (SZB) in a sense that is synthetic to the bulk shear. A point maximum of a-axes is inclined at the same angle relative to the shearing direction. This girdle is perpendicular to C' extensional shear bands in the rock, not to the bulk shear zone boundary, whereas the maximum is parallel to the slip direction of the shear bands. These relationships prevail across large variations in quartz content and finite shear strain magnitude. We infer that quartz LPOs are not always reliable indicators of SZB attitude, and they do not necessarily undergo an obvious rotation relative to the SZB as a function of increasing finite strain. Both the C' shears and the LPOs formed as late-incremental features at orientations controlled by the instantaneous geometry of a non-simple shear flow. We suggest that that the C' planes were aligned to planes of maximum shear-strain-rate. The data can be explained by flow in a thinning and stretching shear zone that deforms in plane strain at a Wk of ~0.7 to ~0.85. In support of this, inversions of seismic focal mechanism data yield an orientation of σ1 for the brittle crust of the central Southern Alps "natural laboratory" that approximately coincides with the predicted orientation of the contractional instantaneous stretching axis for the above

  1. A Middle Paleozoic shear zone in the Sierra de Valle Fértil, Argentina: Records of a continent-arc collision in the Famatinian margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofolini, E. A.; Otamendi, J. E.; Walker, B. A.; Tibaldi, A. M.; Armas, P.; Bergantz, G. W.; Martino, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geological, petrological and structural observations were obtained along a 30-km-long traverse across a segment of the Valle Fértil shear zone, central-western Argentina. On a regional scale, the shear zone appears as numerous discontinues belts over 25 km in width and is approximately 140 km in length, extended on the western section of the Sierras Valle Fértil - La Huerta mountain range. The steeply dipping shear zone with a vertical mylonitic lineation is composed of amphibolite facies ribbon mylonites and amphibolite to greenschist facies ultramylonites derived from Early Ordovician plutonic and metasedimentary parent rocks. Locally, syn-kinematic retrogression of mylonites formed greenschist facies phyllonites. During the later stages of deformation, unstrained parent rocks, mylonites, ultramylonites and phyllonites were affected by pervasive cataclasis under low greenschist facies conditions associated with localized faulting. One new 40Ar/39Ar age on biotite and published 40Ar/39Ar ages on amphibole in the shear zone yield an average cooling rate of 6.2 °C/Ma for a time period that crosses the Silurian-Devonian boundary. Since in metasedimentary rocks the youngest zircon's rims dated at 465 Ma marks the beginning of cooling, nearly continuous uplift of rocks within the shear zone occurred over a minimum time span of 55 Ma. During the period of active deformation, dip-slip movement can explain uplift of several kilometers of the Early Ordovician arc crust. The Valle Fértil shear zone, which was formed near above the inferred suture zone between the Famatinian arc and Cuyania microcontinent, is a major structural boundary nucleated within the Early Ordovician crust. The simplest geodynamic model to explain the evolution of the Valle Fértil shear zone involves the collision of the composite Cuyania/Precodillera microcontinent against the Famatinian arc.

  2. Seismicity, shear failure and modes of deformation in deep subduction zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul R.; Giardini, Domenico

    1992-01-01

    The joint hypocentral determination method is used to relocate deep seismicity reported in the International Seismological Center catalog for earthquakes deeper than 400 km in the Honshu, Bonin, Mariannas, Java, Banda, and South America subduction zones. Each deep seismic zone is found to display planar features of seismicity parallel to the Harvard centroid-moment tensor nodal planes, which are identified as planes of shear failure. The sense of displacement on these planes is one of resistance to deeper penetration.

  3. Creep cavitation bands control porosity and fluid flow in lower crustal shear zones

    SciTech Connect

    Menegon, Luca; Fusseis, Florian; Stunitz, Holger; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-03-01

    Shear zones channelize fluid flow in Earth’s crust. However, little is known about deep crustal fluid migration and how fluids are channelized and distributed in a deforming lower crustal shear zone. This study investigates the deformation mechanisms, fluid-rock interaction, and development of porosity in a monzonite ultramylonite from Lofoten, northern Norway. The rock was deformed and transformed into an ultramylonite under lower crustal conditions (temperature = 700–730 °C, pressure = 0.65–0.8 GPa). The ultramylonite consists of feldspathic layers and domains of amphibole + quartz + calcite, which result from hydration reactions of magmatic clinopyroxene. The average grain size in both domains is <25 mm. Microstructural observations and electron backscatter diffraction analysis are consistent with diffusion creep as the dominant deformation mechanism in both domains. Festoons of isolated quartz grains define C'-type bands in feldspathic layers. These quartz grains do not show a crystallographic preferred orientation. The alignment of quartz grains is parallel to the preferred elongation of pores in the ultramylonites, as evidenced from synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Such C'-type bands are interpreted as creep cavitation bands resulting from diffusion creep deformation associated with grain boundary sliding. Mass-balance calculation indicates a 2% volume increase during the protolith-ultramylonite transformation, which is consistent with synkinematic formation of creep cavities producing dilatancy. Thus, this study presents evidence that creep cavitation bands may control deep crustal porosity and fluid flow. Nucleation of new phases in creep cavitation bands inhibits grain growth and enhances the activity of grain size–sensitive creep, thereby stabilizing strain localization in the polymineralic ultramylonites.

  4. Quantification of progressive deformation localization below the STD shear zone (Himalaya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, P. H.; Liu, X. B.; Mahéo, G.; Paquette, J. L.; Liu, X. H.

    2012-04-01

    In low angle fault systems it is generally assumed that deformation, initially distributed in the footwall, ultimately localizes along the brittle detachment [e.g., Lister et al., 1989]. However, few studies have demonstrated and / or quantified this hypothesis. The Nyalam Detachment (ND) is a part of the South Tibet Detachment (STD), a major fault zone that separates the un-metamorphosed Tethyan sedimentary series of Tibet from the underlying gneisses of the Upper Himalayan crystalline series UHCS. West of Ruji series have been tilted to the west, giving the opportunity to observe an exceptionally thick (~3.5 km) continuous section of the UHCS below the detachment. Intense top to the NNE simple shear is restricted to the ~300 m thick Nyalam mylonitic shear zone immediately below the ND. Further below deformation is closer to pure shear and is absorbed in a more distributed way. In this zone, many leucocratic dykes are stretched and transposed parallel to the schistosity, while some are only slightly deformed or are undeformed. At a given location, dating of sets of deformed and undeformed dykes allow us to constrain the timing for the end of deformation. Deformation ended at ~15.5 and prior to 17.2 Ma, ~1400 m and ~3500 m structurally below the ND respectively. Within the Nyalam shear zone, ductile deformation lasted after 17 Ma, but footwall cooling history implies that the ND stopped at ~13 Ma. These data imply that deformation stopped first at depth, before to end in the shear zone. The same data suggest that the end of deformation migrated regularly towards the STD (upward) at a rate of 0.8±0.33 mm/yr. We interpret this migration as a progressive localisation of the deformation from a ≥3.5 km zone within a ~300m thick shear zone. This example shows that it is possible to quantify the rate at which deformation localizes in natural shear zones. This parameter should be taken into account when discussing the localization mechanisms.

  5. Kinematics of the Torcal Shear Zone: transpressional tectonics shaping orogenic curves in the northern Gibraltar Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, Leticia; Balanyá, Juan Carlos; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Expósito, Inmaculada; Jiménez-Bonilla, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    Structural trend line patterns of orogenic arcs depict diverse geometries resulting from multiple factors such as indenter geometry, thickness of pre-deformational sequences and rheology of major decollement surfaces. Within them, salient-recess transitions often result in transpressive deformation bands. The Gibraltar Arc results from the Neogene collision of a composite metamorphic terrane (Alboran Domain, acting as a relative backstop) against two foreland margins (Southiberian and Maghrebian Domains). Within it, the Western Gibraltar Arc (WGA) is a protruded salient, 200 km in length cord, closely coinciding with the apex zone of the major arc. The WGA terminates at two transpressional zones. The main structure in the northern (Betic) end zone is a 70 km long and 4-5 km wide brittle deformation band, the so-called Torcal Shear Zone (TSZ). The TSZ forms a W-E topographic alignment along which the kinematic data show an overall dextral transpression. Within the TSZ strain is highly partitioned into mainly shortening, extensional and strike-slip structures. The strain partitioning is heterogeneous along the band and, accordingly, four distinct sectors can be identified. i) The Peñarrubia-Almargen Transverse Zone (PATZ), located at the W-end of the TSZ presents WNW-ESE folds and dextral faults, together with normal faults that accommodate extension parallel to the dominant structural trend. WNW ESE dextral faults might be related with synthetic splays at the lateral end of the TSZ. ii) The Sierra del Valle de Abdalajís (SVA) is characterized by WSW-ENE trending folds and dextral-reverse faults dipping to SSE, and NW-SE normal faults. The southern boundary of the SVA is a dextral fault zone. iii) The Torcal de Antequera Massif (TAM) presents two types of structural domains. Two outer domains located at both margins characterized by E-W trending, dextral strike-slip structures, and an inner domain, characterized by en echelon SE-vergent open folds and reverse shear

  6. Initiation and propagation of shear zones in a heterogeneous continental lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasi, A.; Vauchez, A.

    1995-11-10

    Numerical methods were used to investigate the deformation of a continental plate in northeastern Brazil. Of particular interest are the perturbations induced by a stiff compressional deformation of a highly heterogeneous continental lithosphere on the development of a shear zone formed at the termination of a stiff block.

  7. Joints, shear fractures and ductile shear zones in a cooling pluton: the example of the Lake Edison Granodiorite (Sierra Nevada, California)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    In the Lake Edison (LE) granodiorite (88Ma) of the Bear Creek area (Cretaceous Mono Pass intrusive suite, Sierra Nevada, CA) different sets of fractures developed during the high temperature stages of post-magmatic cooling. These fractures strongly localized successive ductile and later brittle shear deformation, but many pristine fractures do not show any shear offset (i.e. are joints). Away from the contact with the younger (86Ma) Mono Creek granite, the LE granodiorite mainly show a single dominant set of steeply dipping fractures striking around E-W to ENE-WSW which were exploited as left-handed strike-slip ductile shear zones and later as faults with identical kinematics. In the proximity of the contact, a second (dominant) set of steeply dipping fractures is present, striking about NNE-SSW, with a right-handed ductile shear reactivation and forming a conjugate array with the E-W set; many leucocratic dykes (including pegmatite) also localized the shear deformation within the granodiorite. Left-handed shear zones and the precursory joint/fractures commonly overprint the right-handed ones, but the opposite is also observed. The two conjugate sets of ductile shear zones are associated with a background solid state foliation in the host granodiorite which is mainly developed towards the pluton contact and which has been referred to the Rosy Finch Shear Zone in the area. The attitude of the foliation is orthogonal to the bisector of the small angle between the two sets of joints/fractures/ductile shears. The mineral fabric along the foliation and along both the left- and right-handed localized shear zones indicate deformation T>500°C. This suggests that all the structures are coeval developing under the same stress field and that joints actually develop in an orientation typical of shear fractures.

  8. Timescales of ductility in an extensional shear zone recorded as diffusion profiles in deformed quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachlas, William; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna

    2015-04-01

    We document rutile needles that were in the process of exsolving from quartz during ductile shearing, and we apply the Arrhenius parameters for Ti diffusion in quartz to extract the timescales over which diffusion transpired. By constraining temperature conditions of deformation using multiple independent thermometers in the same rocks (Ti-in-quartz, Zr-in-rutile, quartz fabrics and microstructures), we estimate the longevity of a ductile shear zone that accommodated extensional collapse in the North American Cordillera. Eocene exhumation of the Pioneer core complex, Idaho, USA, was accommodated by the brittle-ductile Wildhorse detachment system that localized in a zone of sheared metasediments and juxtaposes lower crustal migmatite gneisses with upper crustal Paleozoic sedimentary units. Deformation in the Wildhorse detachment was partly accommodated within a continuous sequence (~200 m) of quartzite mylonites, wherein quartz grains are densely rutilated with microscopic rutile needles that are pervasively oriented into the lineation direction. We apply high-resolution spectroscopic CL analysis to map the Ti concentration field in quartz surrounding rutile needles, revealing depletion halos that indicate exsolution as Ti unmixes from quartz. Linear transects through depletion halos show that concentration profiles exhibit a characteristic diffusion geometry. We apply an error-function diffusion model to fit the measured profiles to extract the temperature or time recorded in the profile. Assuming modest temperature estimates from our combined thermometry analysis, results of diffusion modeling suggest that the quartzite shear zone was deforming over an integrated 0.8 - 3.1 Myr. If samples are permitted to have deformed in discrete intervals, our results suggest deformation of individual samples for timescales as short as 100 kyr. By comparing samples from different levels of the shear zone, we find that deformation was sustained in higher levels of the shear zone

  9. Evolution of Continental Lower Crust Recorded By an Exhumed Deep Crustal Intracontinental Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumond, G.; Mahan, K. H.; Regan, S. P.; Williams, M. L.; Goncalves, P.; Wood, V. R.

    2014-12-01

    Exposures of deep crustal shear zones are fundamental records of strain localization and the temporal evolution of ductile to brittle behavior as these tectonites were exhumed to the surface. We present results from a decade of field-based research on a deeply exhumed (~35 km-paleodepths) strike-slip shear zone in the western Churchill province of the Canadian Shield. The Grease River shear zone is a >400 km-long and 7 km-thick structure that cuts the Athabasca granulite terrane, North America's largest exposure of continental lower crust (>20,000 km2). The shear zone is dominated by granulite- to amphibolite-grade L-S and L>S tectonites characterized by penetrative NE-striking steeply-dipping foliations with gently-plunging to sub-horizontal stretching and intersection lineations. These fabrics are locally overprinted by pseudotachylyte and narrow (<500 m-thick) greenschist-grade zones of cataclasite. Dextral kinematics are defined by deflected foliation trajectories, C' shear bands, and well-developed σ- and δ-type porphyroclasts of Kfs + Pl + Opx + Grt + Hb in felsic to intermediate granulite paragneisses and orthogneisses. Data collected along a well-exposed, nearly 150 km-long segment of the shear zone documents a >100 m.y. episodic record of transpressive to strike-slip intracontinental strain accumulation that coincided with two oppositely convergent orogenies: the east-vergent arc-continent collision of the 1.94-1.90 Ga Taltson orogen and the west-vergent continent-continent collision of the 1.9-1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson orogen. Deformation mechanisms evolved from distributed ductile dynamic recrystallization and grain-size reduction to localized pseudotachylyte development, cataclastic flow, and brittle faulting. Lower crustal behavior during strain localization was dynamic. Melt-weakened mono-cyclic crust was juxtaposed against strong isobarically-cooled poly-cyclic crust along the shear zone at 1.92-1.90 Ga. Brittle-ductile reactivation of the structure

  10. Viscoelastic shear zone model of a strike-slip earthquake cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2001-01-01

    I examine the behavior of a two-dimensional (2-D) strike-slip fault system embedded in a 1-D elastic layer (schizosphere) overlying a uniform viscoelastic half-space (plastosphere) and within the boundaries of a finite width shear zone. The viscoelastic coupling model of Savage and Prescott [1978] considers the viscoelastic response of this system, in the absence of the shear zone boundaries, to an earthquake occurring within the upper elastic layer, steady slip beneath a prescribed depth, and the superposition of the responses of multiple earthquakes with characteristic slip occurring at regular intervals. So formulated, the viscoelastic coupling model predicts that sufficiently long after initiation of the system, (1) average fault-parallel velocity at any point is the average slip rate of that side of the fault and (2) far-field velocities equal the same constant rate. Because of the sensitivity to the mechanical properties of the schizosphere-plastosphere system (i.e., elastic layer thickness, plastosphere viscosity), this model has been used to infer such properties from measurements of interseismic velocity. Such inferences exploit the predicted behavior at a known time within the earthquake cycle. By modifying the viscoelastic coupling model to satisfy the additional constraint that the absolute velocity at prescribed shear zone boundaries is constant, I find that even though the time-averaged behavior remains the same, the spatiotemporal pattern of surface deformation (particularly its temporal variation within an earthquake cycle) is markedly different from that predicted by the conventional viscoelastic coupling model. These differences are magnified as plastosphere viscosity is reduced or as the recurrence interval of periodic earthquakes is lengthened. Application to the interseismic velocity field along the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault suggests that the region behaves mechanically like a ???600-km-wide shear zone accommodating 50 mm/yr fault

  11. Seismogenic Shear Zones In The Upper Mantle: Some Evidences From Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creati, N.; Boncio, P.; Lavecchia, G.

    The presence of brittle, brittle-ductile and ductile shear zones down to the upper man- tle is rather well known in the literature and testified by both geophysical (seismic lines) and geological (milonyte fault rocks in exumated lherzolites) data. Moreover, the occurrence of intermediate earthquakes (down to a depth about 150-200 km) which cannot be easily interpreted as Wadati-Benioff zones (High Atlas, Romania, Hindukush, Tibet and Burma) suggests the existence of intra-lithosphere seismogenic shear zones. In this paper, we will illustrate preliminary evidences about a possible seismogenic intra-lithosphere shear zone in Northern-Central Italy. Up to now, the oc- currence in this area of earthquakes down to a depth of about 90 km has been linked to the westward subduction of the Adriatic lithosphere. As a matter of fact, the loca- tion of the deep earthquakes does not fit well with the location of the Apennine Moho doubling zone, that, as classically recognized, would sign the location of the slab. In order to better address the problem, we have performed a detailed analysis of the deep seismicity along two regional sections coinciding with the traces of the deep crust CROP 03 (Punta Ala-Gabicce) and DSS 1978 (Piombino-Ancona) seismic profiles. In both sections, the earthquake distribution defines a seismic area 30 km wide and 100 km long, deepening westward at about 30 and reaching a maximum depth of about 75 km. This area substantially overlaps on the easternmost SW-dipping reverse shear zone shown by the DSS 78 and CROP 03 profiles. This shear zone, named Adriatic Shear Zone (ASZ), emerges in the Adriatic Sea and deepens westward dislocating the base of the crust. The ASZ along-dip distribution of the seismicity is not homogeneous and four main clusters are observed at depths of 5-10 km, 18-25 km, 35-40 km and 60-70 km. The distribution of seismicity has been compared with the rheological strat- ification and structure of the lithosphere. Adopting a not

  12. Relating rheology to geometry in large-scale natural shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    The geometry and width of the ductile roots of plate boundary scale faults are very poorly understood. Some field and geophysical data suggests widths of tens of km in the lower crust, possibly more in the upper mantle. Other observations suggest they are much narrower. Dip slip shear zones may flatten out and merge into zones of subhorizontal lower crustal or asthenospheric flow. The width of a ductile shear zone is simply related to relative velocity and strain rate. Strain rate is related to stress through the constitutive relationship. Can we constrain the stress, and do we understand the rheology of materials in ductile shear zones? A lot depends on how shear zones are initiated. If they are localized by pre-existing structures, width and/or rheology may be inherited, and we have too many variables. If shear zones are localized primarily by shear heating, initial shear stress has to be very high (> 1 GPa) to overcome conductive heat loss, and very large feedbacks (both positive and negative) make the system highly unstable. Microstructural weakening requires a minimum level of stress to cause deformation and damage in surrounding rock, thereby buffering the stress. Microstructural weakening leads to grain-size sensitive creep, for which we have constitutive laws, but these are complicated by phase mixing in polyphase materials, by viscous anisotropy, by hydration, and by changes in mineral assemblage. Here are some questions that need to be addressed. (1) If grain-size reduction by dynamic recrystallization results in a switch to grain-size sensitive creep (GSSC) in a stress-buffered shear zone, does dynamic recrystallization stop? Does grain growth set in? If grain-size is still controlled by dislocation processes, then the effective stress exponent for GSSC is 4-5, even though the dominant mechanism may be diffusion and/or grain-boundary sliding (GBS). (2) Is phase mixing in ultramylonites primarily a result of GBS + neighbour switching, creep cavitation and

  13. Strain localization in a shear transformation zone model for amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Manning, M L; Langer, J S; Carlson, J M

    2007-11-01

    We model a sheared disordered solid using the theory of shear transformation zones (STZs). In this mean-field continuum model the density of zones is governed by an effective temperature that approaches a steady state value as energy is dissipated. We compare the STZ model to simulations by Shi [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 185505 (2007)], finding that the model generates solutions that fit the data, exhibit strain localization, and capture important features of the localization process. We show that perturbations to the effective temperature grow due to an instability in the transient dynamics, but unstable systems do not always develop shear bands. Nonlinear energy dissipation processes interact with perturbation growth to determine whether a material exhibits strain localization. By estimating the effects of these interactions, we derive a criterion that determines which materials exhibit shear bands based on the initial conditions alone. We also show that the shear band width is not set by an inherent diffusion length scale but instead by a dynamical scale that depends on the imposed strain rate.

  14. Fluid assisted shearing at the depth of the Brittle-Ductile Transition: an integrated structural, petrological, fluid inclusions study of the Erbalunga shear zone, Schistes Lustrés Nappe, Alpine Corsica (France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, M.; Rossetti, F.; Tecce, F.; Vignaroli, G.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we present structural, petrological and fluid inclusion studies performed in a major retrogressive shear zone (the Erbalunga shear zone), which occurs within the HP/LT domain of the Schistes Lustrés Nappe of eastern Alpine Corsica. This shear zone is part of the post-orogenic network of shear zones that favoured the exhumation of the HP core of Alpine Corsica (Daniel et al., 1996) during Late Oligocene/Early Miocene times (Brunet et al., 2000). The shear zone is characterised by a progressive ductile-to-brittle top-to-the-E shearing, starting at greenschist facies conditions (ca. 600 MPa, 400-450 °C). Evidence for vigorous fluid flow through the shear zone is documented by widespread quartz and quartz-calcite vein segregations, which accompanied the progressive evolution of shearing. Textural characteristics of three main generations of veins record the incremental evolution of the shear zone tracing the continuum transition from ductile- to brittle-dominated deformation environments. Regardless of the vein generation, fluid inclusions hosted in quartz grains hosted within the three different sets of veins document a low-salinity (<5% NaCl eq.) fluid circulation. Fluid trapping occurred under pore pressure conditions fluctuating from lithostatic to hydrostatic values, as also attested by the crack-sealing textures preserved in most of the veins. The findings of this study suggest that the main source of fluid was of meteoric origin and argue for fluid percolation and infiltration at the brittle-ductile depths. Such a fluid supply cause the availability of a higher amount of fluids in the deforming rock volume, working against ductile deformation and tendency to pore space reduction by recovery during progressive deformation. This impose definition of the (i) mechanism through which superficial fluids infiltrate the mid-lower crust; and (ii) the modes (fracturing vs. ductile creep) of creation and maintenance of the structural permeability moving from

  15. Ductile shear zone rheology: the viewpoint of experimentally crept lower crustal rocks and analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, Alexandre; Raphanel, Jean; Bornert, Michel; Bourcier, Mathieu; Gaye, Ababacar; Ludwig, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    With respect to lithosphere rheology, we are especially interested in the mechanical behavior and evolution of ductile shear zones at depth, which present polyphase and heterogeneous character and multi-scale strain localization patterns. According to structural geology, most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit along with metamorphism overprinted or concomitant microstructural signatures from several deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (crystal slip plasticity and dislocation recovery processes), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding, phase transformations and solution mass transfer). Because all of these contribute to the drastic evolution of microstructures with respect to the wall rock and the protomylonite, and because the chronology of their activation and their interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology from these microstructural records seems illusory. Therefore, since more than a decade we investigate experimentally and numerically the rheology of synthetic rocks representative of lower crustal mineralogy (namely plagioclases and clinopyroxenes). Samples are elaborated with different microstructures and with variable phases, fluid and melt contents for the purpose of being representative of diverse geodynamical contexts. Experiments were performed either at constant stress or strain rate, in co-axial compression or in torsion. For macroscopic non-Newtonian flow we clearly identified dislocation glide and creep mechanisms. That is to say that power law rheology relates to dominant crystal slip plasticity accommodated by recovery processes, including dislocation climb and pile-up, sub-grain rotation and marginal recrystallization. We further refer to this regime as RCSP (recovery crystal slip plasticity). Conversely, Newtonian (linear viscous) behavior mostly involves grain boundary sliding (GBS) accommodated by diffusional mass transfer and grain boundary dislocation

  16. Development of a deep-crustal shear zone in response to syntectonic intrusion of mafic magma into the lower crust, Ivrea-Verbano zone, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snoke, A.W.; Kalakay, T.J.; Quick, J.E.; Sinigoi, S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1 to 1.5 km-thick, high-temperature shear zone is localized in wall rocks subparallel to the eastern intrusive contact of the Permian Mafic Complex of the Ivrea-Verbano zone (IVZ), Italy. The shear zone is characterized by concentrated ductile deformation manifested by a penetrative foliation subparallel to the intrusive contact and a northeast-plunging sillimanite lineation. Evidence of noncoaxial strain and transposition is widespread in the shear zone including such features as rootless isoclinal folds, dismemberment of competent layers, and scattered kinematic indicators. The metasedimentary rocks in the shear zone are migmatitic, and the accumulation of leucosome is variable within the shear zone. Near the intrusive contact with the Mafic Complex leucosome forms ~20 vol% of the wall rock, whereas leucosome concentrations may locally reach ~60 vol% of the wall rock near the outer limits of the shear zone. This variation in vol% leucosome suggests melt/magma migration from the inferred site of anatexis along the intrusive contact to lower-strain regions within and near the margins of the shear zone. The leucosome accumulations chiefly occur as layer-parallel concentrations, but are also folded and boudined, and locally are associated with tension gashes and fracture arrays. Networks of granitic dikes and small plutons in the eastern IVZ suggest that some magmas migrated out of the high-temperature shear zone. Some magma apparently migrated laterally along the strike of the shear zone and concentrated in areas of lower strain where the intrusive contact takes a major westward bend. The high-temperature shear zone is interpreted as a 'stretching fault' (or stretching shear zone) after Means [W.D. Means, Stretching faults, Geology 17 (1989) 893-896], whereupon the metasedimentary wall rocks and associated leucosome deformed synchronously with the multistage emplacement and deformation flow of the Mafic Complex. The recognition of a high-temperature shear zone

  17. The Pliny-Strabo trench region: A large shear zone resulting from slab tearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özbakır, Ali D.; Şengör, A. M. C.; Wortel, M. J. R.; Govers, R.

    2013-08-01

    The eastern part of the Hellenic subduction zone is composed of the Pliny and Strabo "trenches" that have been regarded as a zone of convergence between the subducting African lithosphere and the overriding Anatolian-Aegean plate. In the Pliny and Strabo "trenches", the oblique relative plate motion is generally thought to be accommodated by a typical strain partitioning consisting of strike-slip and convergence components. Notwithstanding the occurrence of strike-slip motion parallel with the Pliny-Strabo "trenches", trench-normal thrusting is not observed so far. Therefore, we conducted a detailed analysis to investigate the deformation mechanisms of the eastern part of the Hellenic Trench system. Our analyses of offshore faulting and mechanisms of earthquakes in the overriding Aegean lithosphere show that the region of the Pliny and Strabo "trenches" obeys the mechanics of the sinistral shear zone model of Tchalenko (1970). We propose that the trench perpendicular convergence is taken up by the Rhodes fold and thrust belt, which has been postulated off the southeast coast of Rhodes. Several regional P-wave tomography results give indications of a slow seismic anomaly under this zone, which is interpreted as a tear between the Hellenic and Cyprus subduction zones. The primary reason for such tear and its propagation is the ongoing rollback of the subducted part of the African lithosphere, also referred to as "the Aegean slab". Our work elucidates the surface expression of this tearing process in the form of the development of a shear zone between the Aegean lithosphere in the NW and the African lithosphere in the SE, the Pliny-Strabo Shear Zone.

  18. Creep cavitation can establish a dynamic granular fluid pump in ductile shear zones.

    PubMed

    Fusseis, F; Regenauer-Lieb, K; Liu, J; Hough, R M; De Carlo, F

    2009-06-18

    The feedback between fluid migration and rock deformation in mid-crustal shear zones is acknowledged as being critical for earthquake nucleation, the initiation of subduction zones and the formation of mineral deposits. The importance of this poorly understood feedback is further highlighted by evidence for shear-zone-controlled advective flow of fluids in the ductile lower crust and the recognition that deformation-induced grain-scale porosity is a key to large-scale geodynamics. Fluid migration in the middle crust cannot be explained in terms of classical concepts. The environment is considered too hot for a dynamic fracture-sustained permeability as in the upper crust, and fluid pathways are generally too deformed to be controlled by equilibrium wetting angles that apply to hotter, deeper environments. Here we present evidence that mechanical and chemical potentials control a syndeformational porosity generation in mid-crustal shear zones. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography and scanning electron microscopy observations allow us to formulate a model for fluid migration in shear zones where a permeable porosity is dynamically created by viscous grain-boundary sliding, creep cavitation, dissolution and precipitation. We propose that syndeformational fluid migration in our 'granular fluid pump' model is a self-sustained process controlled by the explicit role of the rate of entropy production of the underlying irreversible mechanical and chemical microprocesses. The model explains fluid transfer through the middle crust, where strain localization in the creep regime is required for plate tectonics, the formation of giant ore deposits, mantle degassing and earthquake nucleation. Our findings provide a key component for the understanding of creep instabilities in the middle crust.

  19. Surface and Shear Wave Analysis of the Critical Zone in Betasso Catchment, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, A. B.; Befus, K. M.; Sheehan, A. F.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic surface waves, once considered an inhibitor to the interpretation of active source seismic data, have become useful in determining shear wave velocity (Vs) structure of the shallow subsurface. We employed three seismic methods to characterize the shallow subsurface of the Betasso catchment, west of Boulder, Colorado. As part of a multidisciplinary study of the weathered and weathering hydrologically active near surface environment, shallow geophysical data provide an essential, noninvasive subsurface image of the critical zone. In general, weathered rock (saprolite) overlies granitic bedrock with soils and transported material above. Shear wave-derived velocity structure offer an independent confirmation of compressional wave (Vp) profiles and allow us to calculate Poisson's ratio and Vp/Vs as indicators of material properties, porosity, and water content. We obtained Vs structure using three seismic collection methods: (1) S-refraction with horizontal component geophones, (2) Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW), and (3) Refraction Microtremor (ReMi) surface wave analysis. Based upon this field test, the S-refraction method is preferred based on data quality. The MASW technique produces Vs images with lower resolution than S-refraction, but has the distinct advantage that MASW data can be collected simultaneously with our standard P-refraction data acquisition. The Vs techniques all result in similar velocity structures to the Vp profile with roughly half the velocity for corresponding layers. Bedrock Vp values appear in the 2400-4400 m/s range while Vs values are 1200-2000 m/s. S-refraction yields bedrock Vs values 0-40% higher than MASW. Additionally, the depth to layer interfaces remains generally within 1 m (approx. 2-5%) between results from each survey method. Profiles showing Poisson's ratio and Vp/Vs across each survey line show reasonable values for the expected subsurface materials. In general, for the three-layer structure of soil

  20. Properties of Ductile Shear Zones Below Strike-Slip Faults: Insights From Numerical Experiments Incorporating Laboratory-Derived Rheologies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, Y. A.; Takeuchi, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution of stress and strain in a ductile substrate driven by far-field plate motion and slip on a vertical transform fault cutting through the brittle crust. Numerical models that incorporate laboratory-derived power-law rheologies with Arrhenius temperature dependence, viscous dissipation, and conductive heat transfer give rise to long-lived fault "roots" that localize deformation below the brittle-ductile transition. Strain localization in the viscoelastic medium in this case results from thermomechanical coupling and power law dependence of strain rate on stress. For conditions corresponding to the San Jacinto and San Andreas Faults in Southern California, the predicted width of the shear zone in the lower crust is a few kilometers; this shear zone accommodates more than 50% of the far-field plate motion. Coupled thermomechanical models predict a single-layer lithosphere in case of "dry" composition of the lower crust and upper mantle, and a "jelly sandwich" lithosphere in case of "wet" composition. Deviatoric stress in the lithosphere in our models is relatively insensitive to the water content, the far-field loading rate, and the fault strength, and is of the order of 102 MPa. Furthermore, stress in the lithosphere is found to inversely correlate with the velocity of relative plate motion. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that the thermally-activated shear zones have little effect on postseismic relaxation. In particular, the presence of such zones does not change the polarity of vertical displacements in cases of rheologies that are able to generate robust postseismic transients. We conclude that additional (to thermomechanical coupling) mechanisms of strain localization are required for a viscoelastic model to produce a vertical deformation pattern similar to that due to afterslip on a deep extension of a fault. Possible candidates include dynamic grain re-crystallization, and fabric development (mylonitization).

  1. Cambrian-Mississippian reactivation history of the Homestake shear zone, central Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Homestake shear zone (HSZ) is an anastomosing swarm of northeast-striking, subvertical basement shear strands that are localized in Proterozoic metasedimentary biotite gneiss and migmatized biotite gneiss of the northeastern Sawatch Range in central Colorado. Brittle steep faults that project upward from some cataclasized ductile shear strands into Paleozoic cover rocks indicate that at least part of the HSZ was brittly reactivated during Phanerozoic time. A survey of the literature reveals that approximately nine temporally separate episodes of fault reactivation have been inferred for the Cambrian to Mississippian interval; however, the results of a detailed stratigraphic analysis of cover rocks across the HSZ along the northeastern flank of the Sawatch Range suggest that as few as two episodes are necessarily structural events. Cambrian to Mississippian strata consist of [approximately]155 m of cratonic shallow-shelf and peritidal carbonate and clastic units, bounded and punctuated by significant unconformities. Abrupt southeastward thinning (67 to 36 m) of the Upper Cambrian Sawatch Quartzite across the shear zone is indicative of paleotopography on the crystalline basement that may be related to pre-Sawatch fault reactivation. The Upper Devonian Chaffee Group and Lower Mississippian Leadville Formation exhibit subtle thickness and facies variations previously interpreted to indicate fault reactivation; however, variations appear non-systematic with relation to mapped basement structures and may reflect nontectonic depositional processes.

  2. Rheology, microstructure, and fabric in a large scale mantle shear zone, Ronda Peridotite, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanesen, Katharine E.; Platt, John P.

    2015-04-01

    The Ronda peridotite massif of southern Spain is a slice of mantle peridotite that records in its mineral assemblages several stages of its thermal and textural evolution during exhumation to crustal levels. The uppermost zone is a garnet- and spinel-bearing mylonite that grades downward into spinel-bearing tectonites. Overall grain-size increases downward, while the proportion of dynamically recrystallized olivine grains decreases downward. Olivine recrystallized grain-size throughout these two upper zones is ˜130 μm. Olivine neoblasts are relatively free of substructure and have curved or lobate grain boundaries, suggesting recrystallization by grain boundary migration. Crystallographic orientations of stretched orthopyroxene porphyroclasts indicate a top-SW sense of shear for the marginal mylonites. Crystallographic lattice-preferred orientations (LPO) of olivine grains indicate a dominant slip system of (010)[100]. We propose that these upper two zones of the Ronda peridotite massif represent two stages in the evolution of the shear zone that exhumed the peridotite body through the spinel stability field (˜2.0-1.0 GPa) at a differential stress of ˜40 MPa. We estimate a strain rate of ˜5 × 10-13 based on the rheology of wet olivine at 1500 MPa and 860 °C. Under these conditions olivine is likely to deform by a grain-size sensitive creep mechanism, which explains the progressive localization of strain into the mylonite zone.

  3. Alpine crustal shear zones and pre-Alpine basement terranes in the Romanian Carpathians and Apuseni Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panã, Dinu; Erdmer, Phillippe

    1994-09-01

    The Carpathian orocline formed by complex suturing of small continental fragments to the East European (and Moesian) plate. Remnants of continental fragments belong to three pre-Alpine lithotectonic assemblages: a "greenstone-granite" association and two gneissic assem blages. During Alpine collision, pieces of crust were repeatedly fragmented and welded to accommodate heterogeneous strain along the irregular East European plate boundary. Shallow structural levels of Alpine tectonic discontinuities in which the locus of most intense strain migrated over time are now exposed as wide retrograde greenschist grade belts. Repeated, mainly transpressive deformation resulted in early ductile fabrics being overprinted by local brittle shear strain. Igneous intrusion accompanied different phases of tectonic activity. The age of shearing initiation is probably late Paleozoic, and the configuration of the zones and their Alpine internal structures are consistent with the geometry of the Carpathian arc.

  4. Mechanical anisotropy control on strain localization in upper mantle shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwegh, Marco; Mercolli, Ivan; Linckens, Jolien; Müntener, Othmar

    2016-05-01

    Mantle rocks at oceanic spreading centers reveal dramatic rheological changes from partially molten to solid-state ductile to brittle deformation with progressive cooling. Using the crustal-scale Wadi al Wasit mantle shear zone (SZ, Semail ophiolite, Oman), we monitor such changes based on quantitative field and microstructural investigations combined with petrological and geochemical analyses. The spatial distribution of magmatic dikes and high strain zones gives important information on the location of magmatic and tectonic activity. In the SZ, dikes derived from primitive melts (websterites) are distributed over the entire SZ but are more abundant in the center; dikes from more evolved, plagioclase saturated melts (gabbronorites) are restricted to the SZ center. Accordingly, harzburgite deformation fabrics show a transition from protomylonite (1100°C), mylonite (900-800°C) to ultramylonite (<700°C) and a serpentine foliation (<500°C) from the SZ rim to the center. The spatial correlation between solid-state deformation fabrics and magmatic features indicates progressive strain localization in the SZ on the cooling path. Three stages can be discriminated: (i) Cycles of melt injection (dunite channels and websterite dikes) and solid-state deformation (protomylonites-mylonites; 1100-900°C), (ii) dominant solid-state deformation in harzburgite mylonites (900-800°C) with some last melt injections (gabbronorites) and ultramylonites (<700°C), and (iii) infiltration of seawater inducing a serpentine foliation (<500°C) followed by cataclasis during obduction. The change of these processes in space and time indicates that early dike-related ridge-parallel deformation controls the onset of the entire strain localization history promoting nucleation sites for different strain weakening processes as a consequence of changing physicochemical conditions.

  5. Structural evolution of the Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone, Uruguay: kinematics, deformation conditions and tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriolo, S.; Oyhantçabal, P.; Heidelbach, F.; Wemmer, K.; Siegesmund, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone is a crustal-scale shear zone that separates the Piedra Alta Terrane from the Nico Pérez Terrane and the Dom Feliciano Belt in southern Uruguay. It represents the eastern margin of the Río de la Plata Craton and, consequently, one of the main structural features of the Precambrian basement of Western Gondwana. This shear zone first underwent dextral shearing under upper to middle amphibolite facies conditions, giving rise to the reactivation of pre-existing crustal fabrics in the easternmost Piedra Alta Terrane. Afterwards, pure-shear-dominated sinistral shearing with contemporaneous magmatism took place under lower amphibolite to upper greenschist facies conditions. The mylonites resulting from this event were then locally reactivated by a cataclastic deformation. This evolution points to strain localization under progressively retrograde conditions with time, indicating that the Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone represents an example of a thinning shear zone related to the collisional to post-collisional evolution of the Dom Feliciano Belt that occurred between the Meso- to Neoproterozoic (>600 Ma) and late Ediacaran-lower Cambrian times.

  6. Crustal anisotropy along the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone from shear wave splitting measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syuhada, Syuhada; Hananto, Nugroho D.; Abdullah, Chalid I.; Puspito, Nanang T.; Anggono, Titi; Yudistira, Tedi; Ramdhan, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    We analyse shear wave splitting derived from the local earthquakes recorded at 13 seismic stations to investigate crustal anisotropy over varied geological regimes of the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone. We determine high-quality splitting measurements for 262 event-station pairs. The orientations of fast polarisation for the stations located in the oceanic regime are generally parallel or sub-parallel to the directions of the principal compressional strain-rate axes with a lack of dependency of delay time δt on increasing depth. The results suggest that anisotropy in this domain is primarily due to the influence of stress induced anisotropy on the upper crust. On the other hand, the average fast polarisations show more scattered for the stations located around Sumba Island and in the collision regime, implying a mix of anisotropy causes. Thus, anisotropy in this region is not only controlled by preferentially aligned cracks due to tectonic stress, but also by preferential mineral alignment and macro-scale faults associated with the regional tectonic deformation. We also perform further analysis to search possible temporal variations of splitting parameters associated with the stress changes excited by large earthquakes. The association between variation in splitting parameters and earthquake activity observed in this study might provide useful information about accumulation of stress before large events, and thus might be considered as an earthquake-forecasting tool in the future.

  7. Extensional orogenic collapse captured by strike-slip tectonics: Constraints from structural geology and Usbnd Pb geochronology of the Pinhel shear zone (Variscan orogen, Iberian Massif)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rubén Díez; Pereira, Manuel Francisco

    2016-11-01

    The late Paleozoic collision between Gondwana and Laurussia resulted in the polyphase deformation and magmatism that characterizes the Iberian Massif of the Variscan orogen. In the Central Iberian Zone, initial continental thickening (D1; folding and thrusting) was followed by extensional orogenic collapse (D2) responsible for the exhumation of high-grade rocks coeval to the emplacement of granitoids. This study presents a tectonometamorphic analysis of the Trancoso-Pinhel region (Central Iberian Zone) to explain the processes in place during the transition from an extension-dominated state (D2) to a compression-dominated one (D3). We reveal the existence of low-dipping D2 extensional structures later affected by several pulses of subhorizontal shortening, each of them typified by upright folds and strike-slip shearing (D3, D4 and D5, as identified by superimposition of structures). The D2 Pinhel extensional shear zone separates a low-grade domain from an underlying high-grade domain, and it contributed to the thermal reequilibration of the orogen by facilitating heat advection from lower parts of the crust, crustal thinning, decompression melting, and magma intrusion. Progressive lessening of the gravitational disequilibrium carried out by this D2 shear zone led to a switch from subhorizontal extension to compression and the eventual cessation and capture of the Pinhel shear zone by strike-slip tectonics during renewed crustal shortening. High-grade domains of the Pinhel shear zone were folded together with low-grade domains to define the current upright folded structure of the Trancoso-Pinhel region, the D3 Tamames-Marofa-Sátão synform. New dating of syn-orogenic granitoids (SHRIMP Usbnd Pb zircon dating) intruding the Pinhel shear zone, together with the already published ages of early extensional fabrics constrain the functioning of this shear zone to ca. 331-311 Ma, with maximum tectonomagmatic activity at ca. 321-317 Ma. The capture and apparent cessation

  8. Kinematics of the Eastern California shear zone: Evidence for slip transfer from Owens and Saline Valley fault zones to Fish Lake Valley fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Dixon, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Late Quaternary slip rates and satellite-based geodetic data for the western Great Basin constrain regional fault-slip distribution and evolution. The geologic slip rate on the Fish Lake Valley fault zone (the northwest extension of the Furnace Creek fault zone) increases northward from about 3 to 5 mm/yr, in agreement with modeled geodetic data. The increase coincides with the intersections of the Deep Springs fault, connected to the Owens Valley fault zone, and of other faults connected to the Saline Valley fault. The combined geologic and geodetic data suggest that (1) the northwest-striking faults of the Eastern California shear zone north of the Garlock fault are connected by north- to northeast-striking normal faults that transfer slip in a series of right steps, and (2) the amount and distribution of slip among the many faults of this broad, complex plate boundary have changed through time.

  9. Metamorphic signature of the Gneiss Canyon Shear Zone, Lower Granite Gorge, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Williams, M.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1992-01-01

    The Proterozoic orogen in Arizona consists of structural blocks separated by NE trending shear zones. The Gneiss Canyon Shear Zone (GCSZ) is important because it appears to define in part the boundary between the amphibolite facies Yavapai Province and the granulite facies Mojave Province. An early NW striking foliation is clearly visible in many samples from the Lower Granite Gorge (LGG). In Travertine Canyon, east of the GCSZ, pelitic schists contain And-Sil-Crd-Bi and Gar-Sil-Sta-Bi. Mafic rocks exhibit complex phase relations between cummingtonite, anthophyllite, gedrite, garnet, and cordierite. The coexistence of cordierite-cummingtonite is indicative of low pressure metamorphism. Microprobe analyses of garnets reveal prograde growth zoning profiles. Temperature and pressure estimates of peak metamorphism are 550--600 C and 3 kb. Just east of the GCSZ, pelitic assemblages contain Gar-Bi [+-] Sil [+-] Mus, and garnet zoning profiles are flat in the cores. In Spencer Canyon, west of the GCSZ, samples commonly contain Gar-Bi-Sil-Crd, and in many samples cordierite is being replaced by sillimanite. Thermobarometric calculations yield temperature and pressure estimates of 650 C and 3.5 kb. Mineral assemblages and quantitative thermobarometry suggest higher peak metamorphic temperature west of the GCSZ but relatively constant pressures across the LGG. On the east side of the GCSZ, temperatures increase toward the Shear Zone, probably due to the presence of extensive dikes, pods, and veins of variably deformed granite. Peak mineral assemblages are syntectonic with respect to the NE-striking GCSZ fabric. If a suture exists in the LGG, the GCSZ fabrics apparently reflect post-accretionary tectonism, with accretion occurring prior to the peak of metamorphism.

  10. Deep resistivity sounding studies in detecting shear zones: A case study from the southern granulite terrain of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. B.; Stephen, Jimmy

    2006-10-01

    The resistivity signatures of the major crustal scale shear zones that dissect the southern granulite terrain (SGT) of South India into discrete geological fragments have been investigated. Resistivity structures deduced from deep resistivity sounding measurements acquired with a 10 km long Schlumberger spreads yield significant insights into the resistivity distribution within the E-W trending shear system comprising the Moyar-Bhavani-Salem-Attur shear zone (MBSASZ) and Palghat-Cauvery shear zone (PCSZ). Vertical and lateral extensions of low resistivity features indicate the possible existence of weak zones at different depths throughout the shear zones. The MBSASZ characterized by very low resistivity in its deeper parts (>2500 m), extends towards the south with slightly higher resistivities to encompass the PCSZ. A major resistivity transition between the northern and southern parts is evident in the two-dimensional resistivity images. The northern Archaean granulite terrain exhibits a higher resistivity than the southern Neoproterozoic granulite terrain. Though this resistivity transition is not clear at greater depths, the extension of low resistivity zones has been well manifested. It is speculated here that a network of crustal scale shear zones in the SGT may have influenced the strength of the lithosphere.

  11. Miocene to Quaternary tectonostratigraphic evolution of the middle section of the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone, south-western Turkey: Implications for the wide inter-plate shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk

    2016-10-01

    The Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone (BFSZ) is a 75- to 90- km wide and 300-km-long transtensional left-lateral shear zone which is located in one of the most tectonically active regions in south-western Turkey. A considerable number of studies suggested contradictory models of the evolution and Neogene stratigraphy of the BFSZ and in most cases, the local river and alluvial fan deposits were mapped together with the lacustrine sediments and assigned a Pliocene age. We present new field data, fault kinematic analyses, and DEM and earthquake data to characterize the tectonic controls and extent of the middle section of the BFSZ including Acıpayam, Çameli and Gölhisar basins. Our field observations revealed two distinct sedimentary sequences that unconformably overlie the pre-Neogene basement. The first sequence begins with middle-upper Miocene meandering- and braided-river sediments of the Gölhisar Formation, which transition upward into lacustrine sediments of the upper Miocene-lower Pliocene İbecik Formation. This sequence is overlain by upper Pliocene-lower Quaternary alluvial fan conglomerates, mudstones and claystones of the Dirmil Formation. The basin deposits located in the middle section of the BFSZ consist of lacustrine sediments of a late Miocene lake that likely evaporated due to the Messinian salinity crisis. Fault kinematic analysis and DEM and earthquake data indicate that the middle BFSZ can be characterized as a heterogeneous left-lateral transtensional shear zone rather than a major fault system. Our findings suggest that the middle section of the BFSZ developed under the influence of progressive counter clockwise rotation of south-western Turkey, the Aegean graben system and the Cyprus and Hellenic arcs since the middle Miocene.

  12. Structural mapping and analysis of a Madagascar Precambrian shear zone using enhanced Landsat Thematic Mapper Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kilmer, D.S.; Duncan, I.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Recently, the west coast of Madagascar has become a frontier region for petroleum exploration. Major structures in the Precambrian shield of Madagascar may have a strong control on the development of sedimentary basins, as has been documented in the Morondava basin. The 2.5-3.0+ Ga shield of Madagascar is an amphibolite- to granulite-grade metamorphic gneiss terrain, intruded by anorthosites and 550-Ma granites and pegmatites. Landsat Thematic Mapper data provides a cost-effective method for regional-scale structural mapping of this poorly known terrain. A five-component linear mixing model has been used to enhance the lithologic information in this six-band data. Lithologic component images thus produced utilize the full geologic spectral range of the data. A preliminary structural geologic map compiled from the component images has greater detail than existing maps at 1:100,000 scale, to which it has been compared. The Ankafotra-Saririaky shear zone has been identified as a north-northeast-trending, 15- to 20-km-wide region of appressed folds, attenuated layering, and subparallel faults on the western side of the shield. Two anorthosite massifs that occur within this shear zone have the structural characteristics of boudins in a ductile matrix. The shear deformed a preexisting terrain of poly-phase folding, characterized by tight folds and complex fold interference structures displayed by basins and domes on a scale of 10 km. Enhanced remote sensing data can be used to characterize the nature and mechanism of shear deformation in such zones.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Lithospheric Shear Zones Associated with Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, C. S.; Fialko, Y.; Sclater, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Models of earthquake cycles typically range between two idealized end members. The first holds that seismogenic faults are loaded by bottom tractions due to localized shear in the underlying aseismic medium (e.g., the Savage-Burford dislocation model). The second holds that seismogenic faults are loaded by side tractions on the elastic-brittle layer and postseismic transfer of stress from a relaxing viscoelastic substrate back to the brittle crust. Geologic and seismic observations indicate that localized shear zones do exist well below the brittle-ductile transition as deep roots of major crustal faults. We study the development of lithospheric shear zones using finite element simulations. In particular, we investigate the degree of strain localization in a ductile substrate as a function of the total fault offset. Our models incorporate quasi-periodic earthquakes in the brittle crust underlain by a viscoelastic medium with a temperature-dependent power law rheology. We use these models to test the hypothesis that young and/or infrequently slipping faults are more likely to generate broad “viscoelastic” postseismic transients whereas mature and fast-slipping faults are more likely to generate “afterslip-like” transients. We recognize that strain localization in lithospheric shear zones underlying major faults can be produced via several processes. We use thermo-mechanical coupling as a proxy for all strain-softening mechanisms by adjusting the preexponential factor in the constitutive equation for the temperature-dependent power law creep. We compare the results of our models to the postseismic transient observed following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake to place constraints on the effective rheologic parameters of the ductile substrate.

  14. Structure, Mineralogy and Geomechanical Properties of Shear Zones of Deep-Seated Rockslides in Metamorphic Rocks (Tyrol, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauhal, Thomas; Zangerl, Christian; Fellin, Wolfgang; Holzmann, Michael; Engl, Daniela Anna; Brandner, Rainer; Tropper, Peter; Tessadri, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Deep-seated rockslides, which are characterised by slow to extremely slow rates of movement, frequently occur in foliated metamorphic rock masses (schists, phyllites, paragneiss series). Many case studies indicate that slope displacement is predominantly localised at basal and internal shear zones. Thus, the deformation and stability behaviour of rockslides is influenced primarily by the properties of these soil-like shear zones. In this study, new findings concerning the structure, mineralogical composition and geomechanical characteristics (residual friction angle, grain size distribution) of the shear zones of deep-seated rockslides are presented. The characteristics of these shear zones are shown by case studies in paragneissic rock masses of the polymetamorphic Austroalpine Ötztal-Stubai crystalline complex in Tyrol, Austria. Differences between the laboratory scale and the in situ scale are discussed, as well as the evolution of the shear zones. Within the framework of this study, structural investigations of the shear zones were performed from surface and subsurface surveys and core logs, as well as mineralogical laboratory analyses, grain size analyses and ring shear tests. The shear zones are characterised by a complex fabric of lensoid-shaped layers of clayey-silty fault gouges embedded in sandy-gravelly fault breccias and block-in-matrix structures. The mineralogical analyses indicated high amounts of phyllosilicates, such as mica and chlorite. Swelling clay minerals were observed in small amounts in very few instances. The ring shear tests of the rockslide fault gouge samples, performed under various normal stress conditions, resulted in residual friction angles in a wide range between 19° and 28°, reached after rather short displacements.

  15. Evolution of a calcite marble shear zone complex on Thassos Island, Greece: microstructural and textural fabrics and their kinematic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestmann, Michel; Kunze, Karsten; Matthews, Alan

    2000-11-01

    The deformation history of a monophase calcite marble shear zone complex on Thassos Island, Northern Greece, is reconstructed by detailed geometric studies of the textural and microstructural patterns relative to a fixed reference system (shear zone boundary, SZB). Strain localization within the massive marble complex is linked to decreasing P- T conditions during the exhumation process of the metamorphic core complex. Solvus thermometry indicates that temperatures of 300-350°C prevailed during part of the shear zone deformation history. The coarse-grained marble protolith outside the shear zone is characterized by symmetrically oriented twin sets due to early coaxial deformation. A component of heterogeneous non-coaxial deformation is first recorded within the adjacent protomylonite. Enhanced strain weakening by dynamic recrystallization promoted strong localization of plastic deformation in the ultramylonite of the calcite shear zone, where high strain was accommodated by non-coaxial flow. This study demonstrates that both a pure shear and a simple shear strain path can result in similar crystallographic preferred orientations (single c-axis maximum perpendicular to the SZB) by different dominant deformation mechanisms. Separated a-axis pole figures (+ a- and - a-axis) show different density distributions with orthorhombic texture symmetry in the protolith marble and monoclinic symmetry in the ultramylonite marble consistently with the observed grain fabric symmetry.

  16. The Descent Rates of the Shear Zones of the Equatorial QBO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnersley, Jonathan S.; Pawson, Steven

    1996-07-01

    The influence of vertical advection on the descent rate of the zero-wind line in both phases of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is investigated with the help of the `THIN AIR' stratosphere two-and-a-half-dimensional model. The model QBO is forced by two symmetric easterly and westerly waves, and yet the model reproduces qualitatively the observed asymmetry in the descent rates of the two shear zones due to the enhanced heating during easterly descent combined with the equatorial heating induced by the extratropical planetary waves. Observations show that the maximum easterly accelerations occur predominantly from May until July, which is when the modeled equatorial planetary-wave-induced heating rates are weakest. Hence, model results are consistent with the theory that vertical advection induced by extratropical planetary waves slows significantly the descent of the easterly shear zone. The model also shows the observed increase in vertical wind shear during stalling of the easterly descent (which increases the impact of vertical advection). In the model, the effect of cross-equatorial advection of momentum by the mean flow is negligible compared to the vertical advection. Changes in the propagation of planetary waves depending on the sign of the equatorial zonal wind have a small effect on the modeled equatorial heating rates and therefore do not play a large part in producing the modeled asymmetry in descent rates.

  17. Deformation coupling between the Archean Pukaskwa intrusive complex and the Hemlo shear zone, Superior Province, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liodas, Nathaniel T.; Gébelin, Aude; Ferré, Eric C.; Misgna, Girmay M.

    2013-11-01

    Archean greenstone belts typically form narrow sheared basins separating bulbous tonalo-trondjhemo-granodioritic (TTG) intrusive complexes. The role played by gravity in the development of such dome-and-keel structures constitutes a key question in Archean tectonics. The Pukaskwa intrusive complex (PIC)-Hemlo greenstone belt system stands as a remarkable example of the dome-and-keel architecture that commonly occurs in Archean terrains. Abundant strain markers in the greenstone belt and in the Hemlo shear zone (HSZ) attest of late sinistral strike-slip kinematics (D2) whereas, in general, the quartzofeldspathic coarse-grained rocks of the Pukaskwa intrusive complex bear little macroscopically visible kinematic indicators, most likely due to pervasive recrystallization. The PIC consists dominantly of a heterogeneous assemblage of TTG plutonic rocks and gneisses, which overall are less dense than the greenstone rocks. The study of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), based on 120 stations and 1947 specimens from the PIC, reveals east-west trending prolate and plano-linear fabrics across the northern margin of the complex, i.e., along the HSZ. Since geotherms were higher in the Archean than in the present, the effective viscosity of the TTG units would have been sufficiently low to allow their diapiric ascent through denser greenstone rocks. Here we propose an alternative model where thrust tectonics is responsible for the early structuration of the PIC. Later transpressive tectonics causes strain localization along internal strike-slip shear zones and along lithological boundaries.

  18. Scaling of the critical slip distance for seismic faulting with shear strain in fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marone, C.; Kilgore, B.

    1993-01-01

    THEORETICAL and experimentally based laws for seismic faulting contain a critical slip distance1-5, Dc, which is the slip over which strength breaks down during earthquake nucleation. On an earthquake-generating fault, this distance plays a key role in determining the rupture nucleation dimension6, the amount of premonitory and post-seismic slip7-10, and the maximum seismic ground acceleration1,11. In laboratory friction experiments, Dc has been related to the size of surface contact junctions2,5,12; thus, the discrepancy between laboratory measurements of Dc (??? 10-5 m) and values obtained from modelling earthquakes (??? 10-2 m) has been attributed to differences in roughness between laboratory surfaces and natural faults5. This interpretation predicts a dependence of Dc on the particle size of fault gouge 2 (breccia and wear material) but not on shear strain. Here we present experimental results showing that Dc scales with shear strain in simulated fault gouge. Our data suggest a new physical interpretation for the critical slip distance, in which Dc is controlled by the thickness of the zone of localized shear strain. As gouge zones of mature faults are commonly 102-103 m thick13-17, whereas laboratory gouge layers are 1-10 mm thick, our data offer an alternative interpretation of the discrepancy between laboratory and field-based estimates of Dc.

  19. High strength semi-active energy absorbers using shear- and mixedmode operation at high shear rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becnel, Andrew C.

    This body of research expands the design space of semi-active energy absorbers for shock isolation and crash safety by investigating and characterizing magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) at high shear rates ( > 25,000 1/s) under shear and mixed-mode operation. Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) work well as adaptive isolators due to their ability to quickly and controllably adjust to changes in system mass or impact speed while providing fail-safe operation. However, typical linear stroking MREAs using pressure-driven flows have been shown to exhibit reduced controllability as impact speed (shear rate) increases. The objective of this work is to develop MREAs that improve controllability at high shear rates by using pure shear and mixed shear-squeeze modes of operation, and to present the fundamental theory and models of MR fluids under these conditions. A proof of concept instrument verified that the MR effect persists in shear mode devices at shear rates corresponding to low speed impacts. This instrument, a concentric cylinder Searle cell magnetorheometer, was then used to characterize three commercially available MRFs across a wide range of shear rates, applied magnetic fields, and temperatures. Characterization results are presented both as flow curves according to established practice, and as an alternate nondimensionalized analysis based on Mason number. The Mason number plots show that, with appropriate correction coefficients for operating temperature, the varied flow curve data can be collapsed to a single master curve. This work represents the first shear mode characterization of MRFs at shear rates over 10 times greater than available with commercial rheometers, as well as the first validation of Mason number analysis to high shear rate flows in MRFs. Using the results from the magnetorheometer, a full scale rotary vane MREA was developed as part of the Lightweight Magnetorheological Energy Absorber System (LMEAS) for an SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

  20. An empirical method to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, B.-Z.; Pezeshk, S.; Chang, T.-S.; Hall, K.H.; Liu, Huaibao P.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, a set of charts are developed to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), using the standard penetration test (SPT) N values and soil depths. Laboratory dynamic test results of soil samples collected from the NMSZ showed that the shear wave velocity of soils is related to the void ratio and the effective confining pressure applied to the soils. The void ratio of soils can be estimated from the SPT N values and the effective confining pressure depends on the depth of soils. Therefore, the shear wave velocity of soils can be estimated from the SPT N value and the soil depth. To make the methodology practical, two corrections should be made. One is that field SPT N values of soils must be adjusted to an unified SPT N??? value to account the effects of overburden pressure and equipment. The second is that the effect of water table to effective overburden pressure of soils must be considered. To verify the methodology, shear wave velocities of five sites in the NMSZ are estimated and compared with those obtained from field measurements. The comparison shows that our approach and the field tests are consistent with an error of less than of 15%. Thus, the method developed in this study is useful for dynamic study and practical designs in the NMSZ region. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Limited.

  1. Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of the Raft River detachment and footwall shear zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.L. . Dept. of Geosciences); Snee, L.W. )

    1993-04-01

    The Raft River Mountains of northwestern Utah expose a detachment fault that separates a hanging wall of Paleozoic rocks from Proterozoic ( ) and Archean rocks of the footwall. Beneath the detachment lies a 100 to 300m-thick top-to-the-east extensional shear zone. Geologic mapping, strain and kinematic analysis, and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar thermochronology suggest that the shear zone and detachment fault had an initial low-angle regional dip(<20[degree]). Along a 27 km, E-W transect across the south flank of the range, the base of the shear zone everywhere lies 20 to 60 m beneath the Archean/Proterozoic( ) unconformity, despite an eastward-increasing lateral strain gradient. Strain analyses of mylonite coupled with the regional relationship between the unconformity and the shear zone boundary indicates that the unconformity and overlying Proterozoic( ) metasediments were not rotated into parallelism with the shear zone boundary, but were initially subparallel (0--2[degree]). Constraints on the initial orientation and crustal position of the shear zone have been derived from [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39] thermochronology of mineral suites (hornblende, muscovite, biotite, and k-feldspar) collected within and beneath the shear zone along a 27 km transect parallel to the transport direction. Prior to the middle Eocene, the unconformity was between hornblende and muscovite closure across the E-W extent of the range. The western end of the range was uplifted to temperatures below muscovite and biotite closure at 44--47 Ma. This Eocene uplift is inferred to be related to footwall flexure resulting from tectonic denudation along a top-to-the-west extensional shear system exposed in the western Raft River, northern Grouse Creek, and southern Albion mountains. The unconformity in the central and eastern Raft River Mountain was uplifted to temperatures below muscovite and biotite closure from [approximately]24 to 14 Ma, during top-to-the-east tectonic denudation.

  2. Shear-transformation-zone theory of yielding in athermal amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, J. S.

    2015-07-22

    Yielding transitions in athermal amorphous materials undergoing steady-state shear flow resemble critical phenomena. Historically, they have been described by the Herschel-Bulkley rheological formula, which implies singular behaviors at yield points. In this paper, I examine this class of phenomena using an elementary version of the thermodynamic shear-transformation-zone (STZ) theory, focusing on the role of the effective disorder temperature, and paying special attention to scaling and dimensional arguments. I find a wide variety of Herschel-Bulkley-like rheologies but, for fundamental reasons not specific to the STZ theory, conclude that the yielding transition is not truly critical. Specifically, for realistic many-body models with short-range interactions, there is a correlation length that grows rapidly but ultimately saturates near the yield point.

  3. Shear-transformation-zone theory of yielding in athermal amorphous materials

    DOE PAGES

    Langer, J. S.

    2015-07-22

    Yielding transitions in athermal amorphous materials undergoing steady-state shear flow resemble critical phenomena. Historically, they have been described by the Herschel-Bulkley rheological formula, which implies singular behaviors at yield points. In this paper, I examine this class of phenomena using an elementary version of the thermodynamic shear-transformation-zone (STZ) theory, focusing on the role of the effective disorder temperature, and paying special attention to scaling and dimensional arguments. I find a wide variety of Herschel-Bulkley-like rheologies but, for fundamental reasons not specific to the STZ theory, conclude that the yielding transition is not truly critical. Specifically, for realistic many-body models withmore » short-range interactions, there is a correlation length that grows rapidly but ultimately saturates near the yield point.« less

  4. Strain accumulation across the Eastern California Shear Zone at latitude 36°30'N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gan, Weijun; Svarc, Jerry L.; Savage, J.C.; Prescott, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    The motion of a linear array of monuments extending across the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) has been measured from 1994 to 1999 with the Global Positioning System. The linear array is oriented N54°E, perpendicular to the tangent to the local small circle drawn about the Pacific-North America pole of rotation, and the observed motion across the ECSZ is approximated by differential rotation about that pole. The observations suggest uniform deformation within the ECSZ (strike N23°W) (26 nstrain yr−1 extension normal to the zone and 39 nstrain yr−1 simple right-lateral shear across it) with no significant deformation in the two blocks (the Sierra Nevada mountains and southern Nevada) on either side. The deformation may be imposed by right-lateral slip at depth on the individual major fault systems within the zone if the slip rates are: Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault 3.2±0.9 mm yr−1, Hunter Mountain-Panamint Valley fault 3.3±1.6 mm yr−1, and Owens Valley fault 6.9±1.6 mm yr−1. However, this estimate of the slip rate on the Owens Valley fault is 3 times greater than the geologic estimate.

  5. Simultaneous inversion for mantle shear velocity and the topography of transition zone discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    2001-05-01

    A method is presented for the simultaneous inversions of shear velocity in the mantle and the topography of transition zone discontinuities. Each travel time residual, corrected for crust and free surface topography, is modeled as resulting from contributions from three-dimensional shear velocity perturbations to a spherical Earth model and boundary undulations to the 410 and 660 km discontinuities. This approach minimizes tradeoffs between velocity and topography. We expand the lateral variations in velocity and the topography of each discontinuity using 362 spherical B-splines; we expand the radial variations using 14 cubic B-splines. To increase the reliability of the measurements, particularly in the undersampled southern hemisphere, we re-examine the topography of the 410- and 660 km discontinuities from more than 21,000 SH-component records. This new data set is significantly larger than those used earlier studies of SS precursors. The long-wavelength features of our new topography maps of the 410- and 660-km discontinuities are compatible with results of earlier studies: the large-scale patterns are dominated by low degree spherical harmonics, particularly at degrees 1 and 2. We also include an independent measurement of the global transition zone thickness for additional constraints on the structure in the transition zone. The best-fit model from the joint inversion reduces the variance of the absolute and differential travel times of S, SS and ScS by 40 to 70 %, and the differential travel times of SS precursors by up to 90%.

  6. Rheological control on the initial geometry of the Raft River detachment fault and shear zone, western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Michael L.

    2001-08-01

    The strain, exhumation history, and field orientation of a well-exposed shear zone and detachment fault in the Raft River Mountains of northwestern Utah, a Cordilleran metamorphic core complex, have been studied to determine the kinematics of ductile shearing and initial orientations of the shear zone and detachment fault. Mapping and strain and kinematic analysis indicate that the top-to-the-east Raft River shear zone initially developed parallel to an unconformity separating Archean rocks from overlying Proterozoic quartzite and schist for at least 24 km in the shear direction. Experimental rock deformation data from lithologies similar to the Archean and Proterozoic rocks suggest the unconformity represented a significant rheological boundary at the deformation temperatures; the base of the shear zone was localized along the boundary between relatively weak quartzite above and stronger monzogranite below. An extensive thermochronological database is used to reconstruct the position of the basement unconformity in temperature-lateral distance coordinates. The initial average dip of the shear zone and basement unconformity is estimated between 7° and 30°, assuming subhorizontal isotherms and geothermal gradients of 20°-40°C/km. The east dip of the unconformity at the onset of Miocene extension is interpreted to have resulted from late Eocene unroofing and flexure beneath a top-to-the-WNW extensional shear zone in the western Raft River, Grouse Creek, and Albion Mountains. The observations from the Raft River shear zone suggest that the orientation of some midcrustal shear zones may not reflect the predicted orientation for ductile faults according to ductile failure criteria but, rather, the orientation of rheological boundaries along which deformation is localized. Furthermore, detachment faults that are superimposed on mylonite during progressive displacement and footwall unroofing may use an inherited mechanical anisotropy from the mylonite, and their

  7. Constraints on strain rates during large-scale mid-crustal shearing: An example from the basal Vaddas shear zone, northern Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, Deta; Stünitz, Holger; Nasipuri, Pritam; Menegon, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The Caledonian orogen in Scandinavia is characterized by large-scale crustal nappe stacks which were emplaced east-/southeast-wards onto the Baltica shield. Whereas original thrust relationships are generally obscured by syn- to post-collisional extensional deformation in the southern and central Scandinavian Caledonides, several large-scale thrust systems are well-preserved in the northern Scandinavian Caledonides in Troms and Finnmark. One example is the mid-crustal Vaddas shear zone, which emplaced the Vaddas nappe on top of the Kalak nappe complex. In this contribution we present a structural, petrological and geochronological analysis of the rocks under- and overlying the Vaddas shear zone in northern Troms, in order to estimate the strain rate associated with thrusting along this major shear zone. The Vaddas nappe above the investigated shear zone consists mainly of Upper Ordovician to Silurian metasediments, which were deposited in a marine environment and which were intruded by voluminous gabbroic intrusions, before they were sheared off from their substratum and transported on top of the Kalak nappe complex during the Caledonian orogeny. PT conditions from one of these gabbroic bodies indicate that the body intruded the metasediments at ~9 kbar (Getsinger et al., subm to G3), which corresponds to a depth of ~34 km. U-Pb SIMS dating of zircons from this gabbro indicate that intrusion occurred at 439±2 Ma. The Vaddas nappe is separated from the Kalak nappe by an at least ~150 m thick, amphibolite-facies shear zone with a subhorizontal fabric and top-to-the-SE shear sense. It has developed within the lowest part of the Vaddas nappe as well as the upper part of the Kalak nappe complex and PT calculations indicate that final shearing occurred at ~450° C and ~6 kbar (depth of ~23 km). U-Pb TIMS dating of titanites, which grow parallel to the shear fabric in the Kalak nappe complex, gives 206Pb/238U ages ranging from 442±1 to 429±1 Ma, indicating that

  8. The influence of metasomatic reactions on distributed vs. localized slip in ultramafic shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarling, Matthew S.; Tulley, Chris J.; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The Livingstone Fault is a >1000 km long terrane boundary in New Zealand that juxtaposes ultramafic rocks of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt against quartzofeldspathic rocks of the continental Caples Terrane. The fault is characterized by a zone of sheared serpentinite mélange tens to several hundreds of meters wide with a generally well-defined scaly fabric, containing entrained pods of massive serpentinite, volcanic rocks and quartzofeldspathic rocks. Talc- and tremolite- forming metasomatic reactions occurred frequently within the mélange zone, along the margins of the mélange and at the edges of entrained pods. These reactions were the result of the interaction between the serpentine minerals and silica bearing fluids derived from the quartzofeldspathic Caples Terrane. In the bulk of the mélange, structures such as distributed scaly fabrics, S-C fabrics, and networks of fibrous serpentine veins suggest a broad delocalization of strain, likely accommodated by pressure-solution mechanisms along the serpentinite- and talc-bearing fabrics. However, at the margins of the mélange zone and the edges of pods, layers of tremolite tens of centimeters thick are characterized by a highly indurated microstructure consisting of networks of tightly interwoven, acicular tremolite crystals forming a semi-nephritic to nephritic texture. In these metasomatic regions, discrete cataclastic slip zones associated with well-polished slickenlined surfaces are observed at the interfaces of the serpentinite and Caples Terrane quartzofeldspathics. In the Livingstone Fault, this style of highly-localized slip is uniquely associated withthe development of the indurated nephritic textures. Because tremolite is a frictionally-strong and generally velocity-weakening calc-silicate, we speculate that the tremolite-forming metasomatic reactions may have promoted localized and unstable fault slip within a shear zone that was otherwise deforming by creep. Employing scanning and transmission

  9. Shear wave anisotropy in textured phase D and constraints on deep water recycling in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Angelika D.; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Nisr, Carole; Evans, Shaun R.; Debord, Regis; Merkel, Sébastien

    2013-09-01

    Regions of low seismic velocity and high shear anisotropies in cold subducted slabs have often been related to anisotropic fabrics in hydrous phases mainly induced by slab deformation. The interpretation of these seismic anomalies in terms of hydration thus relies on a better knowledge of the elasticity and plastic deformation mechanisms of candidate hydrous phases. Here we investigate the development of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) in phase D [MgSi2H2O6, 10-18 wt% H2O], the ultimate water carrier in hydrous subducted peridotite. The samples were deformed non-hydrostatically up to 48 GPa in a diamond anvil cell and the texture and strength were obtained from analysis of the X-ray diffraction patterns collected in radial diffraction geometry. We find that at low strains the layered structure of phase D displays strong 0001 texture, where the stacking fault axis (c-axis) preferentially align parallel to the compression axis. A subsidiary 101¯0 texture develops at higher strains. Plasticity simulations in polycrystalline aggregates using a viscoplastic self-consistent model suggest that these LPO patterns are consistent with shape preferred orientation mechanism during the first compaction steps and, with dominant easy glide on basal planes and harder first order pyramidal slip, respectively, upon further compression. We find that phase D displays the lowest strength and the highest anisotropy among phases in hydrous peridotite in the uppermost lower mantle and might thus control the shear wave anisotropy generated in subducted slabs below the transition zone. We further evaluate the effect of textured phase D on the seismic velocity structure and shear wave anisotropy of deformed hydrous peridotite and compare the results to seismic observations in Tonga subduction. We show that 16 vol% of phase D in hydrous subducted peridotite is required to explain the negative velocity anomalies of 3%, the extent of shear wave splitting (0.9±0.3%) and the shear wave ray

  10. Theory of activated-rate processes under shear with application to shear-induced aggregation of colloids.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Gentili, Daniele; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Using an approximation scheme within the convective diffusion (two-body Smoluchowski) equation framework, we unveil the shear-driven aggregation mechanism at the origin of structure formation in sheared colloidal systems. The theory, verified against numerics and experiments, explains the induction time followed by explosive (irreversible) rise of viscosity observed in charge-stabilized colloidal and protein systems under steady shear. The Arrhenius-type equation with shear derived here, extending Kramers' theory in the presence of shear, clearly demonstrates the important role of shear drive in activated-rate processes as they are encountered in soft condensed matter.

  11. Deep heterogeneity of the stress state in the horizontal shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebetsky, Yu. L.; Mikhailova, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The formation structures of brittle destruction in a rock layer above an active strike-slip fault in the crystalline basement is studied. The problem is analyzed from the standpoint of loading history, when after the stage of pure gravitational loading, an additional strain state of uniform horizontal shear of both the layer and underlying basement develops, which is further followed by a vertically nonuniform shear caused by the activation of the deep fault. For the studied object, irreversible fracture deformations on macro- and microlevels arise as early as the initial stage of loading under the action of gravitational stresses. These deformations continue evolving on the megascopic level in the course of horizontal shearing that is quasi-uniform both along the depth and laterally. The final formation of the structural ensemble occurs after a long stage of horizontal displacement of the blocks of the crystalline basement—the stage of localized shear. The theoretical analysis of the evolution of the stress state and morphology of the failure structures established the presence of numerous fractures with the normal dip-slip components in the intermediate-depth part of the rock mass, which are formed at the stages of uniform and localized horizontal shearing. The fractures with a strike-slip component mainly arise in the upper and near-axial deep parts of the section.

  12. Crustal shortening, exhumation, and strain localization in a collisional orogen: The Bajo Pequeño Shear Zone, Sierra de Pie de Palo, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, Joshua M.; Roeske, Sarah M.; Warren, Jessica; Mulcahy, Sean R.; McClelland, William C.; Austin, Lauren J.; Renne, Paul R.; Vujovich, Graciela I.

    2014-07-01

    The Bajo Pequeño Shear Zone (BPSZ) is a lower-crustal shear zone that records shortening and exhumation associated with the establishment of a new plate boundary, and its placement in a regional structural context suggests that local- to regional-scale strain localization occurred with progressive deformation. A kilometer-scale field and analytical cross section through the ~80 m thick BPSZ and its adjacent rocks indicates an early Devonian (405-400 Ma) phase of deformation on the western margin of Gondwanan continental crust. The earliest stages of the BPSZ, recorded by metamorphic and microstructural data, involved thrusting of a hotter orthogneiss over a relatively cool pelitic unit, which resulted in footwall garnet growth and reset footwall white mica 40Ar/39Ar ages in proximity to the shear zone. Later stages of BPSZ activity, as recorded by additional microstructures and quartz c-axis opening angles, were characterized by strain localization to the center of the shear zone coincident with cooling and exhumation. These and other data suggest that significant regional tectonism persisted in the Famatinian orogenic system for 60-70 million years after one microplate collision (the Precordillera) but ceased 5-10 million years prior to another (Chilenia). A survey of other synchronous structures shows that strain was accommodated on progressively narrower structures with time, indicating a regional pattern of strain localization and broad thermal relaxation as the Precordillera collision evolved.

  13. Shear-wave splitting in Quaternary sediments: Neotectonic implications in the central New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Determining the extent and location of surface/near-surface structural deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) is very important for evaluating earthquake hazards. A shallow shear-wave splitting experiment, located near the crest of the Lake County uplift (LCU) in the central NMSZ, shows the presence of near-surface azimuthal anisotropy believed to be associated with neotectonic deformation. A shallow fourcomponent data set, recorded using a hammer and mass source, displayed abundant shallow reflection energy on records made with orthogonal source-receiver orientations, an indicator of shear-wave splitting. Following rotation of the data matrix by 40??, the S1 and S2 sections (principal components of the data matrix) were aligned with the natural coordinate system at orientations of N35??W and N55??E, respectively. A dynamic mis-tie of 8 ms at a two-way traveltime of 375 ms produced an average azimuthal anisotropy of ???2% between the target reflector (top of Quaternary gravel at a depth of 35 m) and the surface. Based on the shear-wave polarization data, two explanations for the azimuthal anisotropy in the study area are (1) fractures/cracks aligned in response to near-surface tensional stress produced by uplift of the LCU, and (2) faults/fractures oriented parallel to the Kentucky Bend scarp, a recently identified surface deformation feature believed to be associated with contemporary seismicity in the central NMSZ. In addition to increased seismic resolution by the use of shear-wave methods in unconsolidated, water-saturated sediments, measurement of near-surface directional polarizations, produced by shear-wave splitting, may provide valuable information for identifying neotectonic deformation and evaluating associated earthquake hazards.

  14. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of driven amorphous materials. III. Shear-transformation-zone plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bouchbinder, Eran; Langer, J S

    2009-09-01

    We use the internal-variable, effective-temperature thermodynamics developed in two preceding papers to reformulate the shear-transformation-zone (STZ) theory of amorphous plasticity. As required by the preceding analysis, we make explicit approximations for the energy and entropy of the STZ internal degrees of freedom. We then show that the second law of thermodynamics constrains the STZ transition rates to have an Eyring form as a function of the effective temperature. Finally, we derive an equation of motion for the effective temperature for the case of STZ dynamics.

  15. The role of discrete intrabasement shear zones during multiphase continental rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Thomas B.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Duffy, Oliver B.; Fossen, Haakon

    2016-04-01

    Rift systems form within areas of relatively weak, heterogeneous lithosphere, containing a range of pre-existing structures imparted from previous tectonic events. The extent to which these structures may reactivate during later rift phases, and therefore affect the geometry and evolution of superposed rift systems, is poorly understood. The greatest obstacle to understanding how intrabasement structures influence the overlying rift is obtaining detailed constraints on the origin and 3D geometry of structures within crystalline basement. Such structures are often deeply buried beneath rift systems and therefore rarely sampled directly. In addition, due to relatively low internal acoustic impedance contrasts and large burial depths, crystalline basement typically appears acoustically transparent on seismic reflection data showing no resolvable internal structure. However, offshore SW Norway, beneath the Egersund Basin, intrabasement structures are exceptionally well-imaged due to large impedance contrasts within a highly heterogeneous and shallow basement. We use borehole-constrained 2D and 3D seismic reflection data to constrain the 3D geometry of these intrabasement reflections, and examine their interactions with the overlying rift system. Two types of intrabasement structure are observed: (i) thin (c. 100 m) reflections displaying a characteristic trough-peak-trough wavetrain; and (ii) thick (c. 1 km), sub-parallel reflection packages dipping at c. 30°. Through 1D waveform modelling we show that these reflection patterns arise from a layered sequence as opposed to a single interface. Integrating this with our seismic mapping we correlate these structures to the established onshore geology; specifically layered mylonites associated with the Caledonian thrust belt and cross-cutting extensional Devonian shear zones. We observe multiple phases of reactivation along these structures throughout multiple rift events, in addition to a range of interactions with

  16. Aspirin Has Limited Ability to Modulate Shear-Mediated Platelet Activation Associated with Elevated Shear Stress of Ventricular Assist Devices

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Lorenzo; Tran, Phat L.; Sheriff, Jawaad; Brengle, William; Ghosh, Ram; Chiu, Wei-Che; Redaelli, Alberto; Fiore, Gianfranco B.; Pappalardo, Federico; Bluestein, Danny; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flow ventricular assist devices (cfVADs) while effective in advanced heart failure, remain plagued by thrombosis related to abnormal flows and elevated shear stress. To limit cfVAD thrombosis, patients utilize complex anti-thrombotic regimens built upon a foundation of aspirin (ASA). While much data exists on ASA as a modulator of biochemically-mediated platelet activation, limited data exists as to the efficacy of ASA as a means of limiting shear-mediated platelet activation, particularly under elevated shear stress common within cfVADs. We investigated the ability of ASA (20, 25 and 125 μM) to limit shear-mediated platelet activation under conditions of: 1) constant shear stress (30 dyne/cm2 and 70 dyne/cm2); 2) dynamic shear stress, and 3) initial high shear exposure (70 dyne/cm2) followed by low shear exposure – i.e. a platelet sensitization protocol, utilizing a hemodynamic shearing device providing uniform shear stress in vitro. The efficacy of ASA to limit platelet activation mediated via passage through a clinical cfVAD system (DeBakey Micromed) in vitro was also studied. ASA reduced platelet activation only under conditions of low shear stress (38% reduction compared to control, n = 10, p < 0.004), with minimal protection at higher shear stress and under dynamic conditions (n = 10, p > 0.5) with no limitation of platelet sensitization. ASA had limited ability (25.6% reduction in platelet activation rate) to modulate shear-mediated platelet activation induced via cfVAD passage. These findings, while performed under “deconstructed” non-clinical conditions by utilizing purified platelets alone in vitro, provide a potential contributory mechanistic explanation for the persistent thrombosis rates experienced clinically in cfVAD patients despite ASA therapy. An opportunity exists to develop enhanced pharmacologic strategies to limit shear-mediated platelet activation at elevated shear levels associated with mechanical circulatory support

  17. Neoproterozoic structural evolution of the NE-trending Ad-Damm Shear Zone, Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamimi, Zakaria; El-Sawy, El-Sawy K.; El-Fakharani, Abdelhamid; Matsah, Mohamed; Shujoon, Abdulrahman; El-Shafei, Mohamed K.

    2014-11-01

    The Ad-Damm Shear Zone (AdSZ) is a major NE- (to NNE-) trending fault zone separating Jiddah and Asir tectonic terranes in the Neoproterozoic Juvenile Arabian Shield (AS). AdSZ is characterized by the development of dextral transcurrent shear-sense indicators and moderately to steeply NW plunging stretching lineations. It is mainly developed under high amphibolite-to greenschist-facies conditions and extends ∼380 km, with an average width ∼2-4 km, from the conspicuous Ruwah Fault Zone in the eastern shield to the Red Sea Coastal plain. It was believed to be one of the conjugate shears of the NW- to NNW-trending sinistral Najd Shear System. This assumption is, based on the noteworthy dextral shear criteria recorded within the 620 Ma mylonitic granite of No'man Complex. A total shear-zone strike length exceeding 117 km is carefully investigated during this study to reconstruct its structural evolution. Shear-sense indicators and other field observations including overprinting relations clearly demonstrate a complicated Neoproterozoic history of AdSZ, involving at least three phases of deformations (D1-D3). Both D1 and D2 phases were of contractional regime. During D1 phase a NW-SE compression led to the formation of NE-oriented low-angle thrusts and tight-overturned folds. D2 is represented by a NE-SW stress oriented that led to the development of an open folding. D3 is expressed by the NE-SW intensive dextral transcurrent brittle-ductile shearing. It is overprinting the early formed fabrics and played a significant role in the creation of AdSZ and the mega-scale related folds. Such deformation history reflects the same Neoproterozoic deformation regime recognized in the NE-trending shear zones in the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS).

  18. Fabric evidence for granodiorite emplacement with extensional shear zones in the Variscan Gredos massif (Spanish Central System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Alvarado, Juan; Fernández, Carlos; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Castro, Antonio; Moreno-Ventas, Ignacio

    2012-09-01

    Three granitoid bodies in the central part of the Gredos massif (Spanish Central System batholith) are tabular, around 1 km in thickness, and intruded into a migmatitic middle crust during the D3 deformation phase of the Variscan Orogeny. Petrologically, they are composed of Bt-granodiorite and Crd-monzogranite, and they show varying abundance of large (cm-scale) feldspar megacrysts. A detailed study of the shape preferred orientation (SPO) magmatic fabric defined by these megacrysts, together with a kinematic analysis of the structures due to interactions between them, and the measurement of quartz c-axis fabrics in migmatites and granitoids, suggests that granitic magma and country rocks were mechanically coupled during deformation. The emplacement took place along large-scale, extensional shear zones active during the first stages of the D3 phase. The shape of the SPO ellipsoids varies from constrictional at the centre of the granitic bodies, to flattening or even oblate at their external contacts with the migmatitic host rocks. The favoured interpretation of this spatial fabric variation is the overprinting of the emplacement fabrics by a constrictional tectonic regime associated with the growth of tabular magma chambers along extensional detachments, followed by shear zone development commonly at the top of the granitic bodies. The entire structure was later folded during the last stages of the D3 phase.

  19. Two-stage fluid flow and element transfers in shear zones during collision burial-exhumation cycle: Insights from the Mont Blanc Crystalline Massif (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Y.; Rossi, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Mont-Blanc Massif was intensely deformed during the Alpine orogenesis: in a first stage of prograde underthrusting at c. 30 Ma and in a second stage of uplift and exhumation at 22-11 Ma. Mid-crustal shear zones of 1 mm-50 m size, neighbouring episyenites (quartz-dissolved altered granite) and alpine veins, have localised intense fluid flow, which produced substantial changes in mineralogy and whole-rock geochemistry. Four main metamorphic zones are oriented parallel to the strike of the massif: (i) epidote, (ii) chlorite, (iii) actinolite-muscovite ± biotite and (iv) muscovite ± biotite. In addition, phlogopite-bearing shear zones occur in the chlorite zone, and calcite-bearing shear zones are locally found in the muscovite zone. The initial chemical composition of the granitic protolith is relatively constant at massif scale, which allows investigating compositional changes related to shear zone activity, and subsequent volume change and elements mobility. The variations of whole-rock composition and mineral chemistry in shear zones reflect variations in fluid/rock ratios and fluid's chemistry, which have produced specific mineral reactions. Estimated time-integrated fluid fluxes are of the order of 106 m3/m2. The mineral assemblages that crystallised upon these fluid-P-T conditions are responsible for specific major and trace element enrichments. The XFe (Fe/Fe + Mg) pattern of shear zone phyllosilicates and the δ13C pattern of vein calcite both show a bell-type pattern across the massif with high values on the massif rims and low values in the centre of the massif. These low XFe and δ13C values are explained by down temperature up-flow of a Fe-Mg-CO2-rich and silica-depleted fluid during stage 1, while the massif was underthrusting. These produced phlogopite, chlorite and actinolite precipitation and quartz hydrolysis, resulting in strong volume losses. In contrast, during stage 2 (uplift), substantial volume gains occurred on the massif rims due to the

  20. High temperature pseudotachylytes and ductile shear zones in dry rocks from the continental lower crust (Lofoten, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, Luca; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Harris, Katherine; Wood, Elliot

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of initiation and growth of shear zones under lower crustal conditions is of fundamental importance when assessing lithosphere rheology and strength. In this study we investigate brittle-ductile shear zones developed under lower crustal conditions in anorthosites from Nusfjord, Lofoten (northern Norway). Steep ductile shear zones trend E-W to ESE-WSW and have a stretching lineation plunging steeply to the SSW or SSE. The shear sense is normal (south block down to the south) as indicated by SC and SC' fabrics and sigmoidal foliations. The shear zone show a mylonitic to ultramylonitic fabric, sharp boundaries to the host anorthosites, and abundant anastomosing dark fine-grained layers along the main foliation. The fine-grained layers localized much of the strain. Relatively lower strain domains within or adjacent to shear zones indicate that the fine dark bands of mylonites represent transposed pseudotachylyte which still locally preserve the pristine structures such as chilled margins, breccia textures with angular clasts of the host rock and injection veins; intersecting veins of pseudotachylyte record multiple stages of seismic slip. The orientation of injection veins and marker offset along the most preserved pseudotachylyte fault veins indicate approximately a sinistral strike slip kinematic during faulting event responsible for the friction-induced melting. These observations indicate that ductile shear zones exploited pre-existing brittle fault zones including a network of pseudotachylytes, and that the fine-grained "ultramylonites" derive from former fine-grained pseudotachylytes. The pseudotachylyte microstructure is dominated by plagioclase microlites dispersed in a groundmass of fine-grained clinopyroxene. Clinopyroxene recrystallizes in the damage zone flanking the pseudotachylytes, indicating high metamorphic grade during pseudotachylyte formation. Small idioblastic or cauliflower garnet are scattered through the matrix and

  1. Shear Wave Splitting from Local Earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we investigate crustal anisotropy in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), by analyzing shear wave splitting from local earthquake data. The NMSZ is centrally located in the United States, spanning portions of western Tennessee, northeastern Arkansas, and southeastern Missouri. The NMSZ is also the location in which three of the largest known earthquakes took place in North America, occurring in 1811-1812. Although many seismic studies have been performed in this region, there is no consensus about which driving mechanism could satisfy both the current observations, as well as the historically observed seismicity. Therefore, it is important to continue investigating the NMSZ, to gain a better understanding of its seismicity, and the possible mechanisms that drive it. The automated technique developed by Savage et al. (2010) is used to perform the shear wave splitting measurements at 120 seismic stations within the NMSZ. The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis provided data for 1151 earthquakes spanning the years 2003-2011. The initial event selection was reduced to 245 earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 2.0 to 4.6, which fell within the shear wave window of one or more of the stations. The results of this study provide information about orientation of microcracks in the upper portion of the crust; future work will include analysis for temporal and spatial variations in order to assess the state of stress in the region.

  2. Ductile extensional shear zones in the lower crust of a passive margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, Camille; Jolivet, Laurent; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2015-12-01

    We describe and interpret an unpublished set of ION Geophysical seismic reflection profile showing strong organized seismic reflectors at the base of the continental crust of the Uruguayan volcanic rifted margin. We distinguish two main groups of reflectors in the lowermost continental crust. A first group, at depths ranging from 32 km below the continent to 16 km in the continent-ocean transition, comprises reflectors continuous over tens of kilometers, peculiarly visible near the mantle-crust boundary. A second group of reflectors dipping toward the ESE (oceanward) is widely distributed in the lower crust. These reflectors are slightly curved and tend to merge and become sub-parallel with the first group of reflectors. Together they draw the pattern of thick shallow-dipping top-to-the continent shear zones affecting the lower continental crust. Such sense of shear is also consistent with the continentward dip of the normal faults that control the deposition of the thick syn-tectonic volcanic formations (SDR). A major portion of the continental crust behaved in a ductile manner and recorded a component of top-to-the continent penetrative simple shear during rifting indicative of a lateral movement between the upper crust and the mantle.

  3. Preliminary Investigation of the Footwall Transition of the Borrego Spring Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadman, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Borrego Springs Shear Zone in the Peninsular Range Batholith, California, is an eastover west thrusting regime that is part of the Eastern Peninsular Ranges Mylonite Zone. Tothe west, undeformed tonalite is dominant. Moving east, tonalite becomes foliated andmylonitized in places. Further east, the full transition to the footwall is unclear as it is coveredby Quaternary deposits. While roughly continuous on a regional level, there is no clear cutband of mylonite that can be followed locally for greater than several hundred meters. Themylonitized tonalite shows lower amphibolite to upper greenschist facies metamorphism,which may indicate why there is no local uninterrupted band of mylonitization, as itmetamorphosed at the brittle/ductile transition. Dated at ~92MA, it is surmised thatdeformation ended no later than 65-70MA due to 40Ar/40K dates from biotite in themylonitized tonalite. Felsic pegmatite dikes also cut through the area, showing evidence ofductile shear in some places, but again, not consistently throughout the region. Detailed mapping of the area shows a synformal structure of tonalitic mylonite betweenundeformed tonalite. Foliations are roughly perpendicular to the hinge line of the synform.This evidence, along with intermittent mylonitization, indicates non-uniform deformation. Noevidence of overprinting was seen in the synform, suggesting that the fold formed after themajority of ductile deformation.

  4. An apparent shear zone trending north-northwest across the Mojave Desert into Owens Valley, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, J. C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W. H.

    1990-11-01

    Strain rates measured at four geodetic networks in eastern California situated between northern Owens Valley and the Transverse Ranges along a small circle drawn about the Pacific-North America pole of rotation are remarkably consistent. Each exhibits 0.14 μrad/yr simple right-lateral engineering-shear-strain accumulation across the local vertical plane tangent to the small circle. Local faults (e.g., Owens Valley, Garlock, Helendale) traversing these networks are not as closely aligned with the vertical planes of maximum shear-strain accumulation as is the local tangent to the small circle. A fifth network slightly east of the small circle shows no significant strain accumulation. Thus, a shear zone trending N35° W from near the eastern end of the big bend of the San Andreas fault to northern Owens Valley is indicated by these data. This corresponds to the Eastern California shear zone proposed on geological evidence by Dokka and Travis. The shear zone carries ˜8 mm/yr of the Pacific-North America relative plate motion from the San Andreas fault north-northwest across the Mojave Desert into Owens Valley and the northern Basin and Range province. The shear zone observed at the surface may be a manifestation of a through-going subcrustal fault.

  5. Active shear flow control for improved combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Schadow, K. C.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical and fluid dynamic facets of an excited premixed flame were studied experimentally to evaluate possibilities for development of a stabilizing closed-loop control system. The flame was analyzed as a nonlinear system which includes different subcomponents: acoustics, fluid dynamics, and chemical reaction. Identification of the acoustical and fluid dynamics subsystems is done by analyzing the transfer function, which was obtained by driving the system with both white-noise and a frequency-sweeping sine-wave. The features obtained by this analysis are compared to results of flow visualization and hot-wire flow-field and spectral measurements. The acoustical subsystem is determined by the resonant acoustic modes of the settling chamber. These modes are subsequently filtered and amplified by the flow shear layer, whose instability characteristics are dominated by the preferred mode frequency.

  6. Mapping of Crustal Anisotropy in the New Madrid Seismic Zone with Shear Wave Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2013-12-01

    Crustal anisotropy in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) is investigated by analyzing shear wave splitting measurements from local earthquake data. For the initial data set, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) provided over 3000 events, along with 900 seismograms recorded by the Portable Array for Numerical Data Acquisition (PANDA) network. Data reduction led to a final data set of 168 and 43 useable events from the CERI and PANDA data, respectively. From this, 186 pairs of measurements were produced from the CERI data set as well as 49 from the PANDA data set, by means of the automated shear wave splitting measurement program MFAST. Results from this study identified two dominant fast polarization directions, striking NE-SW and WNW-ESE. These are interpreted to be due to stress aligned microcracks in the upper crust. The NE-SW polarization direction is consistent with the maximum horizontal stress orientation of the region and has previously been observed in the NMSZ, while the WNW-ESE polarization direction has not. Path normalized time delays from this study range from 1-33 ms/km for the CERI network data, and 2-31 ms/km for the PANDA data, giving a range of estimated differential shear wave anisotropy between 1% and 8%, with the majority of large path normalized time delays (>20 ms/km) located along the Reelfoot fault segment. The estimated differential shear wave anisotropy values from this study are higher than those previously determined in the region, and are attributed to high crack densities and high pore fluid pressures, which agree with previous results from local earthquake tomography and microseismic swarm analysis in the NMSZ.

  7. Advantage of a Broad Focal Zone in SWL: Synergism Between Squeezing and Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Maxwell, Adam D.; MacConaghy, Brian; Cleveland, Robin O.; McAteer, James A.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2007-04-01

    Objective: The focal zone width appears to be a critical factor in lithotripsy. Narrow focus machines have a higher occurrence of adverse effects, and arguably no greater comminution efficiency. Manufacturers have introduced new machines and upgrades to broaden the focus. Still, little data exists on how focal width plays a role in stone fracture. Thus, our aim was to determine if focal width interacts with established mechanisms known to contribute to stone fracture. Method: A series of experiments were undertaken with changes made to the stone in an effort to determine which is most important, the shock wave (SW) reflected from the back end of the stone (spallation), the SW ringing the stone (squeezing), the shear wave generated at surface of the stone and concentrated in the bulk of it (shear), or SWs generated from bubble collapse (cavitation). Shock waves were generated by a Dornier HM3-style lithotripter, and stones were made from U30 cement. Baffles were used to block specific waves that contribute to spallation, shear, or squeezing, and glycerol was used to suppress cavitation. Numerical simulation and high-speed imaging allowed for visualization of specific waves as they traveled within the stone. Results: For brevity, one result is explained. A reflective baffle was placed around the front edge of a cylindrical stone. The proximal baffle prevented squeezing by preventing the SW from traveling over the stone, but permitted the SW entering the stone through the proximal face and did not affect the other mechanisms. The distal baffle behaved the same as no baffle. The proximal baffle dramatically reduced the stress, and the stone did not break (stone broke after 45±10 SWs without the baffle and did not break after 400 SWs when the experiment stopped). The result implies that since removing squeezing halted comminution, squeezing is dominant. However, there is much more to the story. For example, if the cylindrical stone was pointed, it broke with the point

  8. A brittle (normal?) shear zone cored in Site C0002 of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (IODP Expedition 348)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Sample, James; Brown, Kevin; Otsubo, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuzuru

    2016-04-01

    Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348, which belongs to the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment, conducted riser-drilling to make deeper an existing hole at Site C0002, up to 3058.5 meters below seafloor (mbsf). This site is located 80 km SE of the Kii Peninsula (Japan) in the Kumano forearc basin, in turn situated on top of the Nankai accretionary prism. Cuttings (875.5-3058.5 mbsf) and cores (2163.0-2217.5 mbsf) were collected in the upper Miocene to Pliocene turbiditic silty claystone with few intercalations of sandstone which characterize the accretionary prism lithological units. A remarkably preserved fault zone has been cored around 2205 mbsf (core section Hole C0002P-348-5R-4). It is characterized by 34 cm of fault breccia, in which an anastomosed cataclastic foliation is present. The rocks of the damaged zone are formed by silty claystone with an incipient scaly fabric and scarce levels of sandstones. Extra-large thin sections were made along the whole core section. In the brittle shear zone, they reveal a catalogue of deformation structures characteristic of a high structural level. In particular, almond-type structures and arrays of microfaults cutting the stratification are the most common structures and outline the cataclastic foliation. The occurrence of calcite veins in the recovered cores is limited to this fault zone, which is indicative of its role as fluid path, accompanied by carbonate cementation. Generally fault veins have lower δ18O values than carbonate cements in the sedimentary matrix, consistent with veins forming at higher temperatures and/or from a fluid more strongly depleted in 18O. A continuum of the relationships between calcite veins and cataclastic deformation is observed, from veins that precipitated early in the fault history, with calcite grains broken during subsequent deformation, to late veins which seal the almond-type structures within the claystones. The geometry of the calcite grains within the

  9. Flow-activated chloride channels in vascular endothelium. Shear stress sensitivity, desensitization dynamics, and physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Shen, Yue; Thirkill, Twanda L; Douglas, Gordon C; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-12-01

    Although activation of outward rectifying Cl(-) channels is one of the fastest responses of endothelial cells (ECs) to shear stress, little is known about these channels. In this study, we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to characterize the flow-activated Cl(-) current in bovine aortic ECs (BAECs). Application of shear stress induced rapid development of a Cl(-) current that was effectively blocked by the Cl(-) channel antagonist 5-nitro-2-(3-phenopropylamino)benzoic acid (100 microM). The current initiated at a shear stress as low as 0.3 dyne/cm(2), attained its peak within minutes of flow onset, and saturated above 3.5 dynes/cm(2) approximately 2.5-3.5-fold increase over pre-flow levels). The Cl(-) current desensitized slowly in response to sustained flow, and step increases in shear stress elicited increased current only if the shear stress levels were below the 3.5 dynes/cm(2) saturation level. Oscillatory flow with a physiological oscillation frequency of 1 Hz, as occurs in disturbed flow zones prone to atherosclerosis, failed to elicit the Cl(-) current, whereas lower oscillation frequencies led to partial recovery of the current. Nonreversing pulsatile flow, generally considered protective of atherosclerosis, was as effective in eliciting the current as steady flow. Measurements using fluids of different viscosities indicated that the Cl(-) current is responsive to shear stress rather than shear rate. Blocking the flow-activated Cl(-) current abolished flow-induced Akt phosphorylation in BAECs, whereas blocking flow-sensitive K(+) currents had no effect, suggesting that flow-activated Cl(-) channels play an important role in regulating EC flow signaling.

  10. Shear zones in the upper mantle - relation between geochemical enrichment and deformation in mantle peridotites

    SciTech Connect

    Downes, H. )

    1990-04-01

    Textural variations in mantle-derived spinel peridotites have previously been interpreted as evidence of the existence of asthenospheric mantle diapirs, indicating deformational heterogeneity on a large lateral scale (kilometers to tens of kilometers). However, many volcanic vents entrain both deformed and undeformed xenoliths, and field relations in peridotite massifs show the scale of alternation between deformed and undeformed peridotite to be small (centimeters to meters) because of the presence of numerous lithospheric shear zones. Some rare xenoliths contain both deformed and undeformed peridotite. These is also an apparent relation between deformation and the growth of metasomatic minerals; amphibole is often concentrated in strongly deformed zones in peridotite massifs and deformed xenoliths, although it is also found in crosscutting veins and aureoles around such veins. A relation can also be seen between deformation and indicators of geochemical enrichment. Clinopyroxenes from many deformed spinel peridotites show light rate earth element (REE) enrichment, whereas clinopyroxenes from undeformed spinel peridotites commonly have mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-type light REE-depleted patterns. Sr and Nd radiogenic isotopic compositions of undeformed peridotites are generally MORB-like, and have low {epsilon}Sr and high {epsilon}Nd. In contrast, deformed peridotites, with or without amphibole, often have higher {epsilon}Sr and low {epsilon}Nd values, indicating geochemical enrichment by large ion lithophile (LIL)- and light REE-enriched fluids or melts. These observations can be used to infer that the shallow mantle contains lithospheric ductile shear zones in which metasomatic fluids precipitated amphibole and clinopyroxene.

  11. Geophysical characterization of transtensional fault systems in the Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M.; Keranen, K. M.; Stockli, D. F.; Feldman, J. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) and Walker Lane belt (WL) accommodate ~25% of plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates. Faults within the Mina deflection link the ECSZ and the WL, transferring strain from the Owens Valley and Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley fault systems to the transcurrent faults of the central Walker Lane. During the mid to late Miocene the majority of strain between these systems was transferred through the Silver Peak-Lone Mountain (SPLM) extensional complex via a shallowly dipping detachment. Strain transfer has since primarily migrated north to the Mina Deflection; however, high-angle faults bounding sedimentary basins and discrepancies between geodetic and geologic models indicate that the SPLM complex may still actively transfer a portion of the strain from the ECSZ to the WL on a younger set of faults. Establishing the pattern and amount of active strain transfer within the SPLM region is required for a full accounting of strain accommodation, and provides insight into strain partitioning at the basin scale within a broader transtensional zone. To map the active structures in and near Clayton Valley, within the SPLM region, we collected seismic reflection and refraction profiles and a dense grid of gravity readings that were merged with existing gravity data. The primary goals were to determine the geometry of the high-angle fault system, the amount and sense of offset along each fault set, connectivity of the faults, and the relationship of these faults to the Miocene detachment. Seismic reflection profiles imaged the high-angle basin-bounding normal faults and the detachment in both the footwall and hanging wall. The extensional basin is ~1 km deep, with a steep southeastern boundary, a gentle slope to the northwest, and a sharp boundary on the northwest side, suggestive of another fault system. Two subparallel dip-slip faults bound the southeast (deeper) basin margin with a large lateral velocity change (from ~2

  12. Imaging Water in Deformed Quartzites: Examples from Caledonian and Himalayan Shear Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Andreas; Ashley, Kyle; Hasnan, Hasnor; Holyoke, Caleb; Jezek, Lynna; Law, Richard; Thomas, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Infrared IR measurements of OH absorption bands due to water in deformed quartz grains have been collected from major shear zones of the Caledonian and Himalayan orogens. Mean intragranular water contents were determined from the magnitude of the broad OH absorption at 3400 cm-1 as a function of structural position, averaging over multiple grains, using an IR microscope coupled to a conventional FTIR spectrometer with apertures of 50-100 μm. Images of water content were generated by scanning areas of up to 4 mm2 of individual specimens with a 10 μm synchrotron-generated IR beam and contouring OH absorptions. Water contents vary with structural level relative to the central cores of shear zones and they vary at the grain scale corresponding to deformation and recrystallization microstructures. Gradients in quartz water content expressed over structural distances of 10 to 400 m from the centers of the Moine Thrust (Stack of Glencoul, NW Scotland), the Main Central Thrust (Sutlej valley of NW India), and the South Tibetan Detachment System (Rongbuk valley north of Mount Everest) indicate that these shear zones functioned as fluid conduits. However, the gradients differ substantially: in some cases, enhanced fluid fluxes appear to have increased quartz water contents, while in others, they served to decrease water contents. Water contents of Moine thrust quartzites appear to have been reduced during shear at greenschist facies by processes of regime II BLG/SGR dislocation creep. Intragranular water contents of the protolith 70 m below the central fault core are large (4078 ± 247 ppm, H/106 Si) while mylonites within 5 mm of the Moine hanging wall rocks have water contents of only 1570 (± 229) ppm. Water contents between these extremes vary systematically with structural level and correlate inversely with the extent of dynamic recrystallization (20 to 100%). Quartz intragranular water contents of Himalayan thrust and low-angle detachment zones sheared at upper

  13. Role of the Western Anatolia Shear Zone (WASZ) in Neotectonics Evolution of the Western Anatolia Extended Terrain, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cemen, I.; Gogus, O. H.; Hancer, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Neotectonics period in western Anatolia Extended Terrain, Turkey (WAET) may have initiated in late Oligocene following the Eocene Alpine collision which produced the Izmir-Ankara suture zone. The Western Anatolia Shear Zone (WASZ) bounds the WAET to the east. The shear zone contains mostly normal faults in the vicinity of the Gulf of Gokova. However, its movement is mostly oblique slip from the vicinity of Tavas towards the Lake of Acigol where it makes a northward bend and possibly joins the Eskisehir fault zone to the north of the town of Afyon. The shear zone forms the southern and eastern margins of the Kale-Tavas, Denizli and Acigol basins. The shear zone is similar in its structural/tectonics setting to the Eastern California Shear zone (ECSZ) of the Basins and Ranges of North America Extended terrain which is also composed of many normal to oblique-slip faults and separates two extended terrains with different rates of extension. Western Anatolia experienced many devastating earthquakes within the last 2000 years. Many of the ancient Greek/Roman city states, including Ephesus, Troy, and Hierapolis were destroyed by large historical earthquakes. During the second half of the 20th century, the region experienced two major large earthquake giving normal fault focal mechanism solutions. They are the 1969, M=6.9 Alasehir and the 1970, M=7.1 Gediz earthquakes. These earthquakes had caused substantial damage and loss of life in the region. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the kinematics of the Cenozoic extensional tectonics and earthquake potential of the WASZ in the region, is very important, especially since the fault zone is very close to the major towns in eastern part of western Turkey, such as Mugla, Denizli, Sandikli, Dinar and Afyon.

  14. Implications of channel flow analogue models for extrusion of the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone with special reference to the out-of-sequence thrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit; Koyi, Hemin A.; Talbot, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The Higher Himalayan Shear Zone (HHSZ) contains a ductile top-to-N/NE shear zone—the South Tibetan detachment system-lower (STDSL) and an out-of-sequence thrust (OOST) as well as a top-to-N/NE normal shear at its northern boundary and ubiquitously distributed compressional top-to-S/SW shear throughout the shear zone. The OOST that was active between 22 Ma and the Holocene, varies in thickness from 50 m to 6 km and in throw from 1.4 to 20 km. Channel flow analogue models of this structural geology were performed in this work. A Newtonian viscous polymer (PDMS) was pushed through a horizontal channel leading to an inclined channel with parallel and upward-diverging boundaries analogous to the HHSZ and allowed to extrude to the free surface. A top-to-N/NE shear zone equivalent to the STDSU developed spontaneously. This also indirectly connotes an independent flow confined to the southern part of the HHSZ gave rise to the STDSL. The PDMS originally inside the horizontal channel extruded at a faster rate through the upper part of the inclined channel. The lower boundary of this faster PDMS defined the OOST. The model OOST originated at the corner and reached the vent at positions similar to the natural prototype some time after the channel flow began. The genesis of the OOST seems to be unrelated to any rheologic contrast or climatic effects. Profound variations in the flow parameters along the HHSZ and the extrusive force probably resulted in variations in the timing, location, thickness and slip parameters of the OOST. Variation in pressure gradient within the model horizontal channel, however, could not be matched with the natural prototype. Channel flow alone presumably did not result in southward propagation of deformation in the Himalaya.

  15. Channelized Fluid Flow and Eclogite-Facies Metasomatism Along the Subduction Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angiboust, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Monviso ophiolite Lago Superiore Unit (LSU; Western Alps) constitutes a well-preserved, largely coherent fragment of eclogitic upper oceanic lithosphere subducted to ca. 80 km depth (between 50 and 40 Ma) and exhumed along the subduction interface. Within-slab, 10 to 100 m thick, eclogite-facies shear zones cut this section; the Intermediate Shear Zone (ISZ) follows the boundary between gabbroic and basaltic eclogites (associated with minor calcschist lenses), and the Lower Shear Zone (LSZ) marks the contact between gabbroic eclogites and the antigorite serpentinite sole. Up to 10 m fragments of mylonitic gabbroic eclogites were transported within serpentinite schists from the LSZ during eclogite-facies deformation. Metasomatic rinds, formed on these fragments during peak to early retrograde lawsonite-eclogite facies metamorphism (ca. 550 °C / 2.6 GPa), document episodic, prominent rock-fluid interaction along intra-slab, channelized fluid migration pathways associated with deformation. We present new petrological and geochemical data on hydrous eclogites (talc-, chlorite-, lawsonite- and phengite-bearing eclogites) and serpentinite-derived ultrabasic schists from block rinds. Bulk-rock compositions, LA-ICP-MS mineral analyses and X-ray Cr/Mg maps of garnet and clinopyroxene demonstrate that these samples underwent significant enrichments in Mg, Cr, Ni, ± Large Ion Lithophile Elements and prominent depletions in Fe and V during eclogite-facies metasomatism. Boron isotopic data of phengite, clinopyroxene and chlorite, and antigorite suggest that metasomatic block rinds formed during interaction with serpentinite-derived fluids. These compositional patterns point to focused, fluid-mediated element transfer through the subducted slab. Serpentinite-derived fluids via antigorite breakdown some 15-20 km deeper than the maximum depth reached by these eclogites thereby equilibrate with fluids derived from oceanic crust and/or sedimentary material. While slab

  16. Characterizing fractures and shear zones in crystalline rock using seismic and GPR methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Jordi, Claudio; Laaksonlaita, Niko; Gischig, Valentin; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the natural or artificially created hydraulic conductivity of a rock mass is critical for the successful exploitation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The hydraulic response of fractured crystalline rock is largely governed by the spatial organization of permeable fractures. Defining the 3D geometry of these fractures and their connectivity is extremely challenging, because fractures can only be observed directly at their intersections with tunnels or boreholes. Borehole-based and tunnel-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic measurements have the potential to image fractures and other heterogeneities between and around boreholes and tunnels, and to monitor subtle time-lapse changes in great detail. We present the analysis of data acquired in the Grimsel rock laboratory as part of the In-situ Stimulation and Circulation (ISC) experiment, in which a series of stimulation experiments have been and will be performed. The experiments in the granitic rock range from hydraulic fracturing to controlled fault-slip experiments. The aim is to obtain a better understanding of coupled seismo-hydro-mechanical processes associated with high-pressure fluid injections in crystalline rocks and their impact on permeability creation and enhancement. GPR and seismic data have been recorded to improve the geological model and characterize permeable fractures and shear zones. The acquired and processed data include reflection GPR profiles measured from tunnel walls, single-borehole GPR images, and borehole-to-borehole and tunnel-to-tunnel seismic and GPR tomograms. The reflection GPR data reveal the geometry of shear zones up to a distance of 30 m from the tunnels and boreholes, but the interpretation is complicated by the geometrical ambiguity around tunnels and boreholes and by spurious reflections from man-made structures such as boreholes. The GPR and seismic traveltime tomography results reveal brittle fractured rock between two ductile shear zones. The

  17. Grainsize evolution in ductile shear zones: Implications for strain localization and the strength of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. P.; Behr, W. M.

    2011-04-01

    At high stresses and low temperatures, grainsize reduction by dynamic recrystallization profoundly modifies rock rheology. Strain energy driven grain-boundary migration (ρGBM) is involved both in the nucleation of new grains by the grain-boundary bulging mechanism (BLG), and in the subsequent evolution of the microstructure. Above the Dmin line, which is a line in stress/grainsize space that defines the minimum size of nucleus that can form by BLG, ρGBM dominates the microstructure, and grain growth by surface energy driven grain-boundary migration (γGBM) is inhibited. The recrystallized grainsize is therefore dominated by the nucleation process, possibly controlled by the size of subgrains or dislocation cells within the old grains. This provides a first-order explanation for the experimentally observed grainsize-stress relationship. ρGBM is an important agent of recovery in rocks deformed by dislocation creep, sweeping out dislocations and counteracting work-hardening. We have derived a new flow law (DRX-assisted dislocation creep) based on this process, which exhibits grainsize sensitivity as a result of the role of ρGBM. If grainsize obeys the empirically-determined grainsize-stress relationship, DRX creep has an effective stress exponent of a little over 4, consistent with experimental observations and inferences from naturally deformed rocks. DRX creep may be an important agent in weakening quartz at low temperatures, whereas current flow law data suggest it may not be important in olivine. Rocks deformed and dynamically recrystallized above the Dmin line may switch from climb-assisted dislocation creep to grainsize-sensitive creep (Coble creep, DRX creep, or creep dominated by grain-boundary sliding), resulting in weakening. Lithospheric-scale shear zones are likely to evolve at approximately constant stress; under these conditions weakening results in an increase in strain rate, not a stress drop. The rate of dislocation motion, the dislocation density

  18. Evolution of permeability and microstructure of experimentally-created shear zones in Neogene siliceous mudstones from Horonobe, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Miki

    2014-03-01

    We report experimental measurements of bulk permeability changes due to a shear zone that is induced in siliceous mudstones collected from the Koetoi and Wakkanai Formations, northern Hokkaido, which are known to show different relationships between fault/fracture distribution and groundwater flow. We evaluate distributions of volumetric deformation in the induced shear zones by using micro-focus X-ray computed tomography. Measured permeability evolution while achieving the peak axial stress for specimens differed for the samples of the two formations. Permeability did not change obviously during shear for the Koetoi Fm. specimens, but in the Wakkanai Fm. specimens, the bulk permeability increased by a factor of 2.5 after reaching the peak stress. The difference in permeability change in these experiments can explain the differences in relationships between in situ groundwater flow and fracture distribution for the two formations. Analyses of the X-ray images reveal that this difference should reflect the differences of the volumetric deformation in the induced shear zones. Pore collapse occurred in the shear zone in the Koetoi Fm. specimen, which leads to porosity reduction, whereas fracture damages developed in the Wakkanai Fm. specimen, increasing porosity. These differences in the microstructure may reflect differences in yielding criteria for these host rocks.

  19. Shear wave velocity variation across the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, from receiver function inversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bannister, S.; Bryan, C.J.; Bibby, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand is a region characterized by very high magma eruption rates and extremely high heat flow, which is manifest in high-temperature geothermal waters. The shear wave velocity structure across the region is inferred using non-linear inversion of receiver functions, which were derived from teleseismic earthquake data. Results from the non-linear inversion, and from forward synthetic modelling, indicate low S velocities at ???6- 16 km depth near the Rotorua and Reporoa calderas. We infer these low-velocity layers to represent the presence of high-level bodies of partial melt associated with the volcanism. Receiver functions at other stations are complicated by reverberations associated with near-surface sedimentary layers. The receiver function data also indicate that the Moho lies between 25 and 30 km, deeper than the 15 ?? 2 km depth previously inferred for the crust-mantle boundary beneath the TVZ. ?? 2004 RAS.

  20. Implications of Shear Heating and Fracture Zones for Ridge Formation on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lijie; Showman, A. P.

    2007-10-01

    Ridges are ubiquitous on Europa; parts of the satellite are covered solely by multiple generations of overprinted ridge pairs. Typically, ridges are 100-300 m in height, a few kilometers in width, and contain a central trough. Many ridge-formation scenarios have been suggested, including runaway frictional heating along fractures, which causes a temperature increase and leads to buoyant uplift along the fracture. Here we present 2D and 3D numerical simulations of ice-shell convection to test the role of shear heating and weakening by fractures on Europan ridge formation. We used the finite-element codes ConMan and CitCom to solve the equations governing thermal convection in Europa's ice shell in two- and three- dimensional Cartesian geometry. Our simulations show that a pre-existing fracture zone promotes upwelling and lithospheric thinning, leading to topographic uplift of 50 m; although promising, this is insufficient to explain the topography of Europan ridges. Shear heating also promotes lithospheric thinning and buoyant ascent, producing a linear feature with topography up to 120 m. Topography remains linear along strike even under the influence of heterogeneous 3D convection within the ice shell. Our simulated topography broadly resembles that of Europan ridges, including (in most simulations) the shallow marginal troughs on either side of the ridge, although the central trough is not reproduced. Despite this deficiency, our simulations support the idea that shear heating can produce Europa's ridges. Although the simulations presented here assumed a pure-ice composition, compositional effects could play an important role in ridge formation, and these effects will be considered in a future study.

  1. CLMSZ, Garnet Mountain area, southern California: A collisionally generated contractional shear zone

    SciTech Connect

    Bracchi, K.A.; Girty, G.H.; Girty, M.S. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Harper Creek gneiss (HCg) and Oriflamme Canyon unit (OCu) underlie the central portion of the Cuyamaca Laguna Mountains shear zone (CLMSZ) in and around Garnet Mountain, Peninsular Ranges, California, and may have been deformed during Cretaceous arc-continent collision. U-Pb zircon work and petrological and geochemical analyses suggest that in the Garnet Mountain area, the 140 Ma HCg is derived from granite and granodiorite, whereas the 122 [+-] 1 Ma OCu is a protomylonite derived from a granite. Both units appear to be per aluminous calc-alkaline magmatic arc granitoids. Mineral assemblages suggest uppermost greenschist to lower amphibolite grade conditions during deformation. In the HCg, S-1hc is a mylonitic gneissosity with a mean attitude of N11W, 60 NE. A mineral streaking lineation lies within the plane of S-1hc and has a mean attitude of 61[degree] N76E. In the OCu, S-1oc strikes about N13W and dips 52 NE and contains a mineral streaking lineation with an attitude of 49 N52E. Dextral and sinistral shear bands, S-2d and S-2s (looking NW), transect S-1hc and S-1oc. S-2d and S-2s strike subparallel to S-1. In the HCg S-2s is weakly developed and dips about 32 NE, whereas S-2d is more dominant and dips about 76 NE. On the OCu these relationships are reversed. S-2d does not cross cut S-2s: hence, the two sets of shear bands are interpreted to be conjugates reflecting NE-SW contraction and subvertical extension during collisional development of the CLMSZ.

  2. 40Ar-39Ar laser dating of ductile shear zones from central Corsica (France): Evidence of Alpine (middle to late Eocene) syn-burial shearing in Variscan granitoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Grande, Antonietta; Prosser, Giacomo; Cavazza, William; DeCelles, Peter G.

    2016-10-01

    The island of Corsica (France) plays a central role in any reconstruction of Western Mediterranean geodynamics and paleogeography but several key aspects of its geological evolution are still uncertain. The most debated topics include the interpretation of the Corsican orogen as the result of an east- or west-directed subduction, and the actual involvement of the Variscan basement of Corsica in the Alpine orogenic cycle. This study integrates 40Ar-39Ar laserprobe, mesostructural, microtextural, and microchemical analyses and places relevant constraints on the style, P-T conditions, and timing of Alpine-age, pervasive ductile shear zones which affected the Variscan basement complex of central Corsica, a few kilometers to the west of the present-day front of the Alpine nappes. Shear zones strike NNE-SSW, dip at a high angle, and are characterized by a dominant sinistral strike-slip component. Two of the three investigated shear zones contain two texturally and chemically resolvable generations of white mica, recording a prograde (burial) evolution: (1) deformed celadonite-poor relicts are finely overgrown by (2) a celadonite-rich white mica aligned along the main foliation. White mica from a third sample of another shear zone, characterized by a significantly lower porphyroclast/matrix ratio, exhibits a nearly uniform high-celadonite content, compositionally matching the texturally younger phengite from the nearby shear zones. Mineral-textural analysis, electron microprobe data, and pseudosection modeling constrain P-T conditions attained during shearing at 300 °C and minimum pressures of 0.6 GPa. In-situ 40Ar-39Ar analyses of coexisting low- and high-celadonite white micas from both shear zones yielded a relatively wide range of ages, 45-36 Ma. Laser step-heating experiments gave sigmoidal-shaped age profiles, with step ages in line with in-situ spot dates. By contrast, the apparently chemically homogenous high-celadonite white mica yielded concordant in-situ ages

  3. Rare earth and trace element mobility in mid-crustal shear zones: insights from the Mont Blanc Massif (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Yann; Cox, Stephen; Boullier, Anne-Marie; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Mancktelow, Neil

    2003-09-01

    The behaviour of rare earth elements (REE) during fluid-rock interaction in mid-crustal shear zones has received little attention, despite their potential for mass balance calculation and isotopic tracing during deformation. In this study, several cases of large REE mobility during Alpine fluid-driven shear zone development in the pre-Alpine granitic basement of the Mont Blanc Massif are considered. On a regional scale, the undeformed granite compositions range within 5 wt% SiO 2 (70.5-75.3 wt%) and magmatic chemical variations are of the order of 10-20%, ascribed to minor effects of crystal fractionation. Major and trace element mobility observed in shear zones largely exceeds these initial variations. Shear zones developed a range of mineral assemblages as a result of shearing at mid-crustal depths (at ˜0.5 GPa, 400°C). Five main shear zone assemblages involve muscovite, chlorite, epidote, actinolite and calcite, respectively, as major phases. In most cases, selective enrichments of light or heavy REE (and Y, Ta, Hf) are observed. REE mobility is unrelated to deformation style (cataclastic, mylonitic), the intensity of strain, and to the shear zone's major metamorphic mineral assemblages. Instead, the changes in REE concentrations are ascribed to the alteration of pre-existing magmatic REE-bearing minerals during deformation-related fluid-rock interaction and to the syntectonic precipitation of metamorphic REE-bearing minerals (mainly monazite, bastnäsite, aeschynite and tombarthite). Minor proportions (<2%) of these accessory phases, with grain sizes mostly <20 μm, account for enrichments of up to 5:1 compared to the initial granite whole-rock REE budget. The stability of the REE phases appears to be largely dependent on the altering fluid composition. REE mobility is ascribed to changes in pH and to the availability of CO 32-, PO 42-, and SO 42-ligands in the fluid. Such processes are likely to influence the mobility of REE, Y, Hf and Ta in shear zones.

  4. Investigation of the Maule, Chile rupture zone using seismic attenuation tomography and shear wave splitting methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpey, Megan Elizabeth

    The Maule, Chile 2010 Mw 8.8 earthquake afforded the opportunity to study the rupture zone (33°S-38°S) in detail using aftershocks recorded by the rapid-response IRIS CHAMP seismic network. We used measurements of differential S to P seismic attenuation to characterize the attenuation structure of the South American crust and upper mantle wedge. We implemented an evolving time window to determine Qs-1 values using a spectral ratio method and incorporated these measurements into a bounded linear inequality least squares inversion to solve for Qs -1 in a 3D volume. On a large-scale, we observe an east-dipping low attenuation feature, consistent with the location of the Nazca oceanic slab, and image progressively greater attenuation as we move towards the surface of our model. A dramatic feature in our model is a large, low-attenuation body in the same location where Hicks et al. (2014) resolved a high P wave velocity anomaly in their velocity tomography model. We calculated the shear wave splitting intensity of the Maule rupture zone by implementing the multichannel method of Chevrot (2000) which calculates the splitting intensity of teleseismic SK(K)S phases and splitting parameters, ϕ and deltat. The results we obtained show an overall fast direction with a strong component of trench parallel splitting and very few trench normal splits. The fast directions do not parallel the Nazca APM, but are instead dominated by splits rotated 40°-50° counter-clockwise from Nazca APM. Based on these data, we see little evidence for sub-slab entrained mantle flow and invoke the trench-parallel retrograde flow model as an explanation for our measurements. We developed an extended splitting intensity method to allow for use of the upgoing S phase from Maule aftershocks, utilizing the initial event polarization. For this local dataset, we observe three dominant fast directions oriented N20°W, N40°E, and N10°W-20°E and a subset of fast directions trending N60°-90°E which

  5. Applicability of Channel flow as an extrusion mechanism of the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone from Sutlej, Zanskar, Dhauliganga and Goriganga Sections, Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit

    2010-05-01

    Applicability of Channel flow as an extrusion mechanism of the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone from Sutlej, Zanskar, Dhauliganga and Goriganga Sections, Indian Himalaya Soumyajit Mukherjee Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay Powai, Mumbai- 400076, INDIA, e-mail: soumyajitm@gmail.com Mukherjee & Koyi (1,2) evaluated the applicability of channel flow extrusion of the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone (HHSZ) in the Zanskar and the Sutlej sections based on field- and micro-structural studies, analytical- and analog models. Further work on the Dhauliganga and the Goriganga sections of the HHSZ reveal complicated structural geology that is untenable to explain simply in terms of channel flow. For example, in the former section, flexure slip folds exist in a zone spatially separated from the upper strand of the South Tibetan Detachment System (STDSU). On the other hand, in the later section, an STDSU- in the sense of Mukherjee and Koyi (1)- is absent. Instead, a steep extensional shear zone with northeasterly dipping shear plane cuts the pre-existing shear fabrics throughout the HHSZ. However, the following common structural features in the HHSZ were observed in these sections. (1) S-C fabrics are the most ubiquitous ductile shear sense indicators in field. (2) Brittle shearing along the preexisting ductile primary shear planes in a top-to-SW sense. (3) Less ubiquitous ductile compressional shearing in the upper part of the shear zone including the STDSU. (4) A phase of local brittle-ductile extension throughout the shear zone as revealed by boudins of various morphologies. (5) The shear zone is divisible into a southern non-migmatitic and a northern migmatitic zone. No special structural dissimilarity is observed across this lithological boundary. Keywords: Channel flow, Extrusion, Higher Himalaya, Structural Geology, Shear zone, Deformation References 1. Mukherjee S, Koyi HA (in press) Higher Himalayan Shear Zone, Sutlej section: structural geology

  6. Magmatic and meteoric fluid flow in the Bitterroot extensional detachment shear zone (MT, USA) from ductile to brittle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilichini, Antoine; Siebenaller, Luc; Teyssier, Christian; Vennemann, Torsten W.

    2016-11-01

    The Bitterroot shear zone developed as a rolling-hinge detachment system where a syntectonic granodiorite in the footwall was progressive exhumed beneath a detachment shear zone, providing a record of deformation and fluid-rock interaction during progressive exhumation and cooling. The shear zone displays a high strain gradient over ∼1 km of structural section from the relatively undeformed footwall, where the granodiorite contains a magmatic foliation and lineation, through a mylonite sequence that culminates upward in the fine interlayering of ultramylonite layers and the development of a breccia zone. We measured the stable isotope composition of quartz, muscovite, biotite, chlorite, and epidote across the shear zone and estimated equilibrium temperatures using oxygen isotope thermometry based on mineral pairs. We also measured the hydrogen isotope ratios of hydrous minerals and of quartz fluid inclusions. The main results are: (1) The relatively undeformed footwall granodiorite interacted with magmatic fluids at 500-600 °C; (2) the mylonitic fabric defined by muscovite, biotite, and chlorite developed between 500 and 300 °C and interacted with a fluid system that was connected to the Earth's surface (meteoric fluids), as indicated by the low δD values of hydrous mineral phases, including muscovite; (3) the fluxes of surface fluids were not sufficient to shift the δ18O values of muscovite significantly, but were sufficient to control the δ18O composition of biotite and chlorite during deformation-induced recrystallization and chloritization, and (4) the isotopic composition of fluid inclusions in quartz as well as the δD values of late quartz veins track the mixing of fluid sources between the magmatic and meteoric reservoirs. The distribution of stable isotope compositions in the various tectonites of the granodioritic Bitterroot shear zone, from ductile to brittle, provides a rich spatial and temporal record of the interaction between deformation and

  7. Analogue modelling of inclined, brittle-ductile transpression: Testing analytical models through natural shear zones (external Betics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, L.; Díaz-Azpiroz, M.; Balanyá, J. C.; Expósito, I.; Jiménez-Bonilla, A.; Faccenna, C.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of analytical and analogue models gives new opportunities to better understand the kinematic parameters controlling the evolution of transpression zones. In this work, we carried out a set of analogue models using the kinematic parameters of transpressional deformation obtained by applying a general triclinic transpression analytical model to a tabular-shaped shear zone in the external Betic Chain (Torcal de Antequera massif). According to the results of the analytical model, we used two oblique convergence angles to reproduce the main structural and kinematic features of structural domains observed within the Torcal de Antequera massif (α = 15° for the outer domains and α = 30° for the inner domain). Two parallel inclined backstops (one fixed and the other mobile) reproduce the geometry of the shear zone walls of the natural case. Additionally, we applied digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) method to calculate the velocity field of the incremental deformation. Our results suggest that the spatial distribution of the main structures observed in the Torcal de Antequera massif reflects different modes of strain partitioning and strain localization between two domain types, which are related to the variation in the oblique convergence angle and the presence of steep planar velocity - and rheological - discontinuities (the shear zone walls in the natural case). In the 15° model, strain partitioning is simple and strain localization is high: a single narrow shear zone is developed close and parallel to the fixed backstop, bounded by strike-slip faults and internally deformed by R and P shears. In the 30° model, strain partitioning is strong, generating regularly spaced oblique-to-the backstops thrusts and strike-slip faults. At final stages of the 30° experiment, deformation affects the entire model box. Our results show that the application of analytical modelling to natural transpressive zones related to upper crustal deformation

  8. Major softening at brittle-ductile transition due to interplay between chemical and deformation processes: An insight from evolution of shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukovská, Zita; Jeřábek, Petr; Morales, Luiz F. G.

    2016-02-01

    The formation of S-C/C' fabrics in the South Armorican Shear Zone has been evaluated by detailed microstructural study where the focus was given to initiation and early evolution of the C/C' fabric shear bands. Our observations suggest that the S-C/C' fabrics formed at distinct temperature conditions indicating >550°C for the S fabric and 300-350°C at 100-400 MPa for the C/C' fabric shear bands. The evolving microstructure within shear bands documents switches in deformation mechanisms related to positive feedbacks between deformation and chemical processes and imposes mechanical constraints on the evolution of the brittle-ductile transition in the continental transform fault domains. Three stages of shear band evolution have been identified. Stage I corresponds to initiation of shear bands via formation of microcracks with possible yielding differential stress of up to 250 MPa. Stage II is associated with subgrain rotation recrystallization and dislocation creep of quartz and coeval dissolution-precipitation creep of microcline. Recrystallized quartz grains show continual increase in size and decrease in stress and strain rates from 94 MPa to 17-26 MPa and 1.8 × 10-1 s-1-9 × 10-17 s-1 associated with deformation partitioning into weaker microcline layer and shear band widening. The quartz mechanical data allowed us to set some constrains for coeval dissolution-precipitation of microcline which at our estimated pressure-temperature conditions suggests creep at 17-26 MPa differential stress and 1.8 × 10-15 s-1 strain rate. Stage III is characterized by localized slip along white mica bands accommodated by dislocation creep at strain rate 1.8 × 10-14 s-1 and stress 5.75 MPa. Our mechanical data point to dynamic evolution of the studied brittle-ductile transition characterized by major weakening to strengths >10 MPa. Such nonsteady state evolution may be common in crustal shear zones especially when phase transformations are involved.

  9. The Hurd Peak gneiss of the Long Lake shear zone, eastern Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, K.S.; Reed, W.E. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Hurd Peak gneiss is located within the Long Lake valley of the east-central Sierra Nevada, California. This unit is the principle orthogneiss in Hathaway's (1993) Long Lake shear zone. The rock shows porphyroclasts of plagioclase and quartz, abundant mafic enclaves, and cross-cutting field associations which suggest that the gneiss had a plutonic protolith. The gneiss varies from biotite-poor nearest the contact with the Lamarck to biotite-rich nearest Long Lake. The contact zone between the gneiss and the Lamarck pluton ranges from sharp to gradational and from migmatitic to mixed, i.e., the mixed zone being greater than 50% intermingled dikes of 10 cm or greater thickness. In places this contact is marked by a quartz-free biotite hornfels approximately 5 m thick. Based on their relative deformation, at least 3 suites of aplite dikes cross-cut the gneiss, and 5 other lithologies, including basaltic, mixed, composite, andesitic, and quartz dioritic compositions, also cross-cut the gneiss. The Rb-Sr whole rock isochron age of the Hurd Peak gneiss has been determined to be 90.2 Ma. The authors interpret this isochron to be the result of mobilization of the Rb-Sr isotopic system during intrusion of the Lamarck Granodiorite (90 Ma); this may represent a regional cooling age. The initial [sup 87]/Sr[sup 86]Sr ratio of the gneiss is 0.7098, i.e., much more evolved than the surrounding plutons which have [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios near 0.706. Sr model ages indicate that the protolith of the gneiss is considerably older than 90 Ma, one such calculation suggests an age of approximately 250 Ma. Single crystals of zircon have been isolated from the gneiss for U-Pb dating, and analytical work on the zircons is presently on-going.

  10. Strain localization in brittle-ductile shear zones: fluid abundant vs fluid limited conditions (an example from Wyangala area, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruzeniece, L.; Piazolo, S.

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on physiochemical processes occurring in a brittle-ductile shear zone at both fluid-present and fluid-limited conditions. In the studied shear zone (Wyangala, SE Australia), a coarse-grained two feldspar-quartz-biotite granite is transformed into a medium grained orthogneiss at the shear zone margins and a fine-grained quartz-muscovite phyllonite in the central parts. The orthogneiss displays cataclasis of feldspar and crystal-plastic deformation of quartz. Quartz accommodates most of the deformation and is extensively recrystallized showing distinct crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Feldspar-to-muscovite, biotite-to-muscovite and albitization reactions occur locally at porphyroclasts' fracture surfaces and margins. However, the bulk rock composition shows very little change in respect to the wall rock composition. In contrast, in the shear zone centre quartz occurs as large, weakly deformed porphyroclasts, in sizes similar to that in the wall rock, suggesting that it has undergone little deformation. Feldspars and biotite are almost completely reacted to muscovite, which is arranged in a fine-grained interconnected matrix. Muscovite-rich layers contain significant amounts of fine-grained intermixed quartz with random CPO. These domains are interpreted to have accommodated most of the strain. Bulk rock chemistry data shows a significant increase in SiO2 and depletion in NaO content compared to the wall rock composition. We suggest that the high and low strain fabrics represent markedly different scenarios and cannot be interpreted as a simple sequential development with respect to strain. We suggest that the fabrics and mineralogical changes in the shear zone centre have formed due to fluid influx probably along an initially brittle fracture. Here, hydration reactions dramatically changed the rheological properties of the rock. In the newly produced muscovite-quartz layers creep cavitation associated with grain boundary sliding and

  11. Modeling Spatial Structure of Rock Fracture Surfaces Before and After Shear Test: A Method for Estimating Morphology of Damaged Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanouri, Nima; Karimi Nasab, Saeed

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with the structural analysis of rock fracture roughness, and accordingly, a method is developed for estimating/predicting the post-shearing 3D geometry of the fracture surface. For this purpose, surfaces of three natural rock fractures were digitized and studied before and after the direct shear test. The variogram analysis of the surfaces indicated a strong non-linear trend in the topography data. Hence, the spatial variability of the rock fracture surfaces was decomposed to: one deterministic component, characterized by a high-order polynomial representing the large-scale undulations, and one stochastic component, described by the variogram of residuals representing the small-scale roughness. Using an image-processing technique, a total of 343 damage zones with different sizes, shapes, initial roughness characteristics, local stress fields, and/or asperity strength values were spatially located and clustered. In order to characterize the overall spatial structure of the degraded zones, the concept of the `pseudo-zonal variogram' was introduced. The results showed that the spatial continuity at the damage zones increases due to the asperity degradation. The increase in the variogram range is anisotropic and tends to be higher along the shearing. Consequently, the direction of maximum continuity rotates towards the shear direction. After modeling the evolution of the spatial structure with shearing and detecting boundaries of the degraded areas, a methodology was presented to provide a regression-kriging estimate of the morphology of sheared surfaces. The proposed method can be considered as a cost-free and reasonably accurate alternative to expensive techniques of scanning the rock fracture surface after the shear test.

  12. Probing the shear viscosity of an active nematic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillamat, Pau; Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Shankar, Suraj; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Sagués, Francesc

    2016-12-01

    In vitro reconstituted active systems, such as the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-driven microtubule bundle suspension developed by the Dogic group [T. Sanchez, D. T. Chen, S. J. DeCamp, M. Heymann, and Z. Dogic, Nature (London) 491, 431 (2012), 10.1038/nature11591], provide a fertile testing ground for elucidating the phenomenology of active liquid crystalline states. Controlling such novel phases of matter crucially depends on our knowledge of their material and physical properties. In this Rapid Communication, we show that the shear viscosity of an active nematic film can be probed by varying its hydrodynamic coupling to a bounding oil layer. Using the motion of disclinations as intrinsic tracers of the flow field and a hydrodynamic model, we obtain an estimate for the shear viscosity of the nematic film. Knowing this now provides us with an additional handle for robust and precision tunable control of the emergent dynamics of active fluids.

  13. Timing of the end of motion along the South Tibet Detachment shear zone. An important constraint on collision models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé Leloup, Philippe; Mahéo, Gweltaz; Arnaud, Nicolas; Kali, Elise; Boutonnet, Emmanuelle; Liu, Dunyi; Xiaohan, Liu; Haibing, Li

    2010-05-01

    The South Tibet detachment system (STDS) is a major normal fault system that runs parallel to the Himalayan range for more than 1500km, and that is fundamental to the major models proposed the belt tectonic evolution. The STDS is a fossil structure, as it has no clear morphological expression, is crosscut by perpendicular (N-S) active normal faults (Gurla Mandata, Thakhola, Ama Drime, Yadong), and no crustal earthquake indicative of ~N-S extension has ever been documented in the South Tibetan crust. It has long been proposed that the STDS and the MCT slips where coeval during the Miocene, however the timing of the STDS all along its length has rarely been investigated. Near Dinggye (~ 28°10'N, 87°40'E), the South Tibet Detachment, main branch of the STDS, dips ~10±5° to the North and separates Paleozoic Tethyan series from Upper Himalayan Crystalline Series (UHCS). Immediately below the STD, the UHCS is highly deformed in the STD shear zone, stretching lineations trend NNE and the shear senses are top to the NE. In micaschist, P-T path constrained by pseudosection and garnet chemistry, shows successive metamorphic conditions of ~0.6 GPa and ~550°C and 0.5 GPa and 625°C. U/Pb dating of Monazite and zircons in deformed and undeformed leucogranites suggest that ductile deformation lasted until at least ~16 Ma but ended prior to ~15Ma in the STD shear zone ~100 meters below the detachment. Ar/Ar micas ages in the footwall span between ~14.6 and 13.6 Ma, indicating rapid cooling down to ~320°C, and suggesting persistence of normal faulting, at that time. The STDS is cut and offset by the N-S trending Dinggye active normal fault which initiated prior to 11Ma thus providing a minimum bound for the end of STDS motion. These data are interpreted as reflecting 0.3 GPa (11km) to 0.6 GPa (22km) of exhumation along the STDS starting prior to ~16 Ma and ending between 13.6 and 11 Ma. On both side of the Ama Drime, analysis of structural and geochronological constraints

  14. The South Tibet detachment shear zone in the Dinggye area. Time constraints on extrusion models of the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, P. H.; Mahéo, G.; Arnaud, N.; Kali, E.; Boutonnet, E.; Liu, Dunyi; Xiaohan, Liu; Haibing, Li

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the timing of end of motion along the South Tibet Detachment System (STDS), a major normal fault system that runs parallel to the Himalayan range for more than 1500 km. Near Dinggye (˜ 28°10'N, 87°40'E), the STD dips ˜ 10 ± 5° to the North and separates Paleozoic Tethyan series from Upper Himalayan Crystalline Series (UHCS). Immediately below the STD, the UHCS is highly deformed in the STD shear zone, lineations trend NNE and the shear senses are top to the NE. In micaschist, the P-T path constrained by pseudosection and garnet chemistry, shows successive metamorphic conditions of ˜ 0.6 GPa and ˜ 550 °C and 0.5 GPa and 625 °C. U/Pb dating of monazites and zircons in deformed and undeformed leucogranites suggests that ductile deformation lasted until at least ˜ 16 Ma but ended prior to ˜ 15 Ma in the STD shear zone ˜ 100 m below the detachment. Ar/Ar micas ages in the footwall span between ˜ 14.6 and 13.6 Ma, indicating rapid cooling down to ˜ 320 °C, and suggesting persistence of normal faulting, at that time. The STDS is cut and offset by the N-S trending Dinggye active normal fault which initiated prior to 11 Ma thus providing a minimum bound for the end of STDS motion. These data are interpreted as reflecting 0.3 GPa (11 km) to 0.6 GPa (22 km) of exhumation along the STDS starting prior to ˜ 16 Ma, ending between 13.6 and 11 Ma. The 1000 km long stretch of the STDS east of the Gurla Mandata probably stopped almost synchronously between 13 and 11 Ma ago, coevally with a sudden switch from NNE-SSW to E-W extension at the top of the accretionary prism, with a jump of the major thrust from the lower Main Central Thrust (MCTl) to the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT), and with a change in the India and Asia convergence direction. This synchronism is probably better explained in the frame of a thrust wedge or thrust system model than a lower channel flow model. West of the Gurla Mandata the STDS appears to stop 5 to 3 Ma earlier, possibly

  15. Shear Wave Splitting Beneath the New Madrid Seismic Zone and Adjacent Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moidaki, M.; Liu, K. H.; Gao, S. S.; Hogan, J. P.; Abdelsalam, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    Teleseismic shear-wave splitting parameters are determined at 15 permanent and portable broadband stations within and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in order to map the direction and strength of mantle fabrics and to explore the origin of seismic anisotropy. Both the splitting times and fast polarization directions of the fast shear-wave show significant spatial variations. The observed splitting times range from 0.7 to 1.7s with a mean value of 1.0s which is the same as the global average. The resulting fast directions range from 34 to 118 degrees from north with a mean of 65 degrees which is consistent with the motion direction of the North American plate in a hot-spot frame. Fast directions with ray-piercing points in the NMSZ are oblique to the rift axis. In the vicinity of the Ozarks Plateau, the split times range from 0.7s to 1.1s with a mean of 0.9s. The observed fast directions show a striking clockwise rotating pattern in which these change systematically from nearly N-S in the St. Francois Mountains to approximately NE-SW further north to be concordant to that of North American Craton. The area with anomalous fast directions has recently been suggested to be a downward asthenospheric flow as a result of the sinking of the Farallon slab in the lower mantle (Forte et al 2007). The observed anisotropy will be discussed in relation to the lower mantle flow, and the recently-proposed two-layer model of Marone and Romanowicz (2007).

  16. Metagabbro associated with the shear zone on Prins Karls Forland (Svalbard, Arctic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraszewska, Maria; Manecki, Maciej; Czerny, Jerzy; Schneider, David; Myhre, Per Inge; Faehnrich, Karol; Barnes, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Prins Karls Forland (PKF) is a N-S elongated island situated west of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard archipelago, High Arctic. The northern part of the island is dominated by siliciclastic metasediments regionally metamorphosed to greenshist facies assemblages during one distinct stage of tectonism. Amphibolite facies garnet-mica schists, mica schists, quartzites and carbonate-silicate rocks exhibiting evidence of at least two distinct, strong deformation episodes (including mylonitization) locally outcrop on the east coast of PKF, termed the Pinkie Unit. A ~1 km wide shear zone containing ductile to brittle structures and distinct outcrops of greenstones (metagabbros and greenschists), associated with magnetite ore, separates these two contrasting tectonic units. Ten samples of greenstones were collected on the slopes of Lauratzonfjellet and Boureefjellet for petrologic and geochemical analyses. Despite intense localized shearing, the metagabbros are undeformed and preserve coarse crystalline, magmatic texture, which is locally poikilitic. The primary magmatic assemblage consists of brown hornblende, plagioclase, biotite and opaque minerals, with accessory apatite and titanite. No relicts of pyroxenes are preserved. Formation of secondary uralite, sericite and chlorite is observed. Metamorphic assemblage consists of actinolite pseudomorhs after hornblende, epidote, and second generation biotite. Blue amphibole is observed in one sample from Boureefjellet; greenschists from Boureefjellet also contain fibrous blue amphibole, as well as garnets, actinolite, epidote and biotite. Some rocks sampled on Boureefjellet are more strongly deformed and exhibit probably two stages of metamorphism: amphibolite facies metamorphism resulting in blue amphibole-garnet assemblage followed by greenschist facies metamorphism resulting in actinolite-epidote-biotite paragenesis. Parallel and overlapping patterns on chondrite-normalized REE diagrams and spider diagrams indicate that these

  17. Investigation of Mantle Kinematics beneath Hellenic-Subduction Zone by using Teleseismic Direct Shear Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confal, Judith; Eken, Tuna; Tilmann, Frederik; Yolsal-evikbilen, Seda; Çubuk, Yeşim; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2016-04-01

    Direct shear-wave splitting measurements based on the Reference Station Technique in the southern Aegean Sea revealed significant seismic anisotropy. The technique overcomes possible contamination from the source-side anisotropy on direct S-wave signals recorded at a station pair by maximizing the correlation between the seismic traces at reference and target stations after correcting the reference stations for known receiver-side anisotropy and the target stations for arbitrary splitting parameters probed via a grid search. We initially determined receiver-side anisotropy derived from SKS splitting measurements performed at four broadband stations. Following the bootstrap approach, in which only these four stations with well-constrained SKS splitting parameters are used as seeds to determine the splitting parameters of seismic stations of the EGELADOS temporary network in an iterative manner, we obtained splitting parameters at 35 stations with good-quality S-wave signals extracted from 82 teleseismic events. The fast polarization directions (φ) show a general trend of NNE-SSW orientation that ranges from 5.8° to 51.8°. Two stations in the west close to the Hellenic Trench and one in the east show N-S oriented fast polarizations. In the back-arc region three stations exhibit NE-SW orientation. Split time delays (δt) vary between 1.0s and 1.6s. Employing direct S-waves enabled more stable and reliable splitting measurements, with an average of 46 individual measurements. The overall fast polarization variations tend to be similar to those obtained from previous SKS splitting studies in the region but indicate a more consistent pattern. Splitting analyses on direct shear waves resulted in larger split time delays compared to the previous studies, possibly because they travel along a longer path in the same anisotropic structure. Observed differences between direct shear waves-derived (this study) and previous SKS splitting measurements could be due to the fact

  18. Gabbro layering induced by simple shear in the Oman ophiolite Moho transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousselin, David; Morales, Luiz F. G.; Nicolle, Marie; Stephant, Aurore

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the origin of modal layering in gabbro lenses of the Moho transition zone in the Oman ophiolite with a microstructural study. Gabbro lenses exhibit a shape preferred orientation of plagioclase crystals, that are euhedral and devoid of any intracrystalline deformation. This texture and field kinematic indicators show a strong simple shear deformation in magmatic conditions. The parallelism of the lineation in gabbros and the plastic lineation of the host dunite indicate that their development is contemporaneous, and that the magmatic features are passively coupled to the solid-plastic flow of the host mantle. We also found undeformed-isotropic and weakly deformed-roughly layered gabbros. The host rock is plagioclase and clinopyroxene impregnated dunite; it contains euhedral plagioclase suggesting that some grains crystallized in suspension. There is no clear boundary between the gabbro and the host rock; on the contrary, the limit is diffuse, with increasing plagioclase and clinopyroxene content from the dunite to the gabbro over tens of meters. This suggests that the gabbro corresponds to melt impregnated dunite. We defined 4 gabbro types, from unlayered (type 1) to well layered (type 4) with progressively more continuous and distinct layers. We characterized deformation with crystal shape and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements. Unlayered samples have a random fabric; type 2 have a very weak shape fabric and planar CPO, defined by olivine and plagioclase (010) planes; type 3 have a weak fabric, with a lineation defined by the [001] olivine axis and the [100] plagioclase axis, which reflects the shape fabric; type 4 have a strong shape fabric and CPO, with a lineation defined by the [100] olivine and plagioclase axis. We interpret the progression from isotropic to clear S-L fabrics as a result of increasing deformation imposed by the flowing host mantle. The type 2 gabbros must result from compaction; with increasing simple

  19. Re-Os molybdenite, pyrite and chalcopyrite geochronology, Lupa Goldfield, SW Tanzania: Implications for metallogenic time scales and shear zone reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawley, Christopher; Selby, David; Imber, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Fault zone reactivation is a well-documented deformation processes that is related, in part, to long-term fault weakening induced by fluid-rock interaction. However, the dearth of suitable geochronometers means very little data has been available to constrain the absolute timing of fault reactivation. Thus the time scales of fault processes remain unclear for most ancient fault networks. Gold occurrences in the western portion of the Lupa goldfield, SW Tanzania are associated with pyrite ± chalcopyrite ± molybdenite bearing quartz veins and a brittle-ductile shear zone network at the Tanzanian cratonic margin. The laminated appearance of auriferous quartz veins records evidence for a complex hydrothermal history which, coupled with complex relative-timing relationships between brittle and ductile deformation mechanisms within the mylonitic shear zones, suggests that these gold occurrences are best interpreted within a progressive deformation context characterized by repeated shear zone reactivation events. As a result, Au occurrences from the western Lupa goldfield are typical of the orogenic gold deposit type and represent an ideal natural laboratory to investigate the time scale of metallogenesis and shear zone processes operating at mid-crustal levels. Re-Os molybdenite, pyrite and chalcopyrite ages from five gold occurrences record a protracted hydrothermal history (1.95-1.87 Ga) comprising at least three temporally distinct sulphidation events (ca. 1.95, 1.94 and 1.88 Ga), which are each represented in detail by a complex vein history that occurred at a time scale less than the resolution of the Re-Os method. Together these Re-Os ages provide the first constraints on the absolute age of mineralization for gold occurrences in the western Lupa goldfield and also record a broad period of deformation and mineralization spanning ca. 70 Myr. This time period is also concurrent with felsic-mafic magmatic activity (1.96-1.88 Ga) and suggests mineralization

  20. The lateral boundary of a metamorphic core complex: The Moutsounas shear zone on Naxos, Cyclades, Greece☆

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred; Liu, Junlai

    2013-01-01

    We describe the structure, microstructures, texture and paleopiezometry of quartz-rich phyllites and marbles along N-trending Moutsounas shear zone at the eastern margin of the Naxos metamorphic core complex (MCC). Fabrics consistently indicate a top-to-the-NNE non-coaxial shear and formed during the main stage of updoming and exhumation between ca. 14 and 11 Ma of the Naxos MCC. The main stage of exhumation postdates the deposition of overlying Miocene sedimentary successions and predates the overlying Upper Miocene/Pliocene conglomerates. Detailed microstructural and textural analysis reveals that the movement along the Moutsounas shear zone is associated with a retrograde greenschist to subgreenschist facies overprint of the early higher-temperature rocks. Paleopiezometry on recrystallized quartz and calcite yields differential stresses of 20–77 MPa and a strain rate of 10−15–10−13 s−1 at 350 °C for quartz and ca. 300 °C for calcite. Chlorite geothermometry of the shear zone yields two temperature regimes, 300–360 °C, and 200–250 °C. The lower temperature group is interpreted to result from late-stage hydrothermal overprint. PMID:26523079

  1. The lateral boundary of a metamorphic core complex: The Moutsounas shear zone on Naxos, Cyclades, Greece.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred; Liu, Junlai

    2013-09-01

    We describe the structure, microstructures, texture and paleopiezometry of quartz-rich phyllites and marbles along N-trending Moutsounas shear zone at the eastern margin of the Naxos metamorphic core complex (MCC). Fabrics consistently indicate a top-to-the-NNE non-coaxial shear and formed during the main stage of updoming and exhumation between ca. 14 and 11 Ma of the Naxos MCC. The main stage of exhumation postdates the deposition of overlying Miocene sedimentary successions and predates the overlying Upper Miocene/Pliocene conglomerates. Detailed microstructural and textural analysis reveals that the movement along the Moutsounas shear zone is associated with a retrograde greenschist to subgreenschist facies overprint of the early higher-temperature rocks. Paleopiezometry on recrystallized quartz and calcite yields differential stresses of 20-77 MPa and a strain rate of 10(-15)-10(-13) s(-1) at 350 °C for quartz and ca. 300 °C for calcite. Chlorite geothermometry of the shear zone yields two temperature regimes, 300-360 °C, and 200-250 °C. The lower temperature group is interpreted to result from late-stage hydrothermal overprint.

  2. The Eastern California Shear Zone as the northward extension of the southern San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, Wayne R.; Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Cluster analysis offers an agnostic way to organize and explore features of the current GPS velocity field without reference to geologic information or physical models using information only contained in the velocity field itself. We have used cluster analysis of the Southern California Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field to determine the partitioning of Pacific-North America relative motion onto major regional faults. Our results indicate the large-scale kinematics of the region is best described with two boundaries of high velocity gradient, one centered on the Coachella section of the San Andreas Fault and the Eastern California Shear Zone and the other defined by the San Jacinto Fault south of Cajon Pass and the San Andreas Fault farther north. The ~120 km long strand of the San Andreas between Cajon Pass and Coachella Valley (often termed the San Bernardino and San Gorgonio sections) is thus currently of secondary importance and carries lesser amounts of slip over most or all of its length. We show these first order results are present in maps of the smoothed GPS velocity field itself. They are also generally consistent with currently available, loosely bounded geologic and geodetic fault slip rate estimates that alone do not provide useful constraints on the large-scale partitioning we show here. Our analysis does not preclude the existence of smaller blocks and more block boundaries in Southern California. However, attempts to identify smaller blocks along and adjacent to the San Gorgonio section were not successful.

  3. Simulations of a stretching bar using a plasticity model from the shear transformation zone theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Gibou, Frederic

    2010-06-05

    An Eulerian simulation is developed to study an elastoplastic model of amorphous materials that is based upon the shear transformation zone theory developed by Langer and coworkers. In this theory, plastic deformation is controlled by an effective temperature that measures the amount of configurational disorder in the material. The simulation is used to model ductile fracture in a stretching bar that initially contains a small notch, and the effects of many of the model parameters are examined. The simulation tracks the shape of the bar using the level set method. Within the bar, a finite difference discretization is employed that makes use of the essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme. The system of equations is moderately stiff due to the presence of large elastic constants, and one of the key numerical challenges is to accurately track the level set and construct extrapolated field values for use in boundary conditions. A new approach to field extrapolation is discussed that is second order accurate and requires a constant amount of work per gridpoint.

  4. Geophysical constraints on the location and geometry of the Las Vegas Shear Zone, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Grow, J.A.; Jachens, R.C.; Dixon, G.L.; Miller, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    We model the basin configuration beneath Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, on the basis of gravity, drillhole, and seismic reflection data. We locate and characterize the various strands of the Las Vegas Valley Shear Zone (LVVSZ) by variations in basin thickness beneath the valley. The pre-Tertiary bedrock surface is complex, with subbasins buried beneath the flat alluvial surface of the valley. We suggest that these basins are formed from transtensional strain. Subbasins elongated N70??W and N50??W are interpreted as strike-slip basins. The deepest subbasin is 5 km west of Frenchman Mountain and strikes N40??E. This basin probably formed by combined movement on nonparallel strands of the LVVZ and an earlier episode of normal faulting. The basin thickness map constrains the minimum depth of the inferred detachment fault beneath Las Vegas Valley to at least 4 km. Seismic reflection data do not image a detachment fault in the upper 10 km beneath Las Vegas Valley. Our results also illustrate the utility of gravity in determining basinal structures and providing a three-dimensional perspective in areas with limited seismic reflection control.

  5. Formation of left-lateral fractures within the Summit Ridge shear zone, 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Fleming, R.W. |

    1993-12-01

    The 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake is characterized by the lack of major, throughgoing, coseismic, right-lateral faulting along strands of the San Andreas fault zone in the epicentral area. Instead, throughout the Summit Ridge area there are zones of tension cracks and left-lateral fracture zones oriented about N45 deg W, that is, roughly parallel to the San Andreas fault in this area. The left-lateral fractures zones are enigmatic because their left-lateral slip is opposite to the right-lateral sense of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. We suggest that the enigmatic fractures can be understood if we assume that coesiesmic deformation was by right-lateral shear across a broad zone, about 0.5 km wide and 4 km long, beneath Summit Ridge. Contrary to most previous reports on the Loma Prieta earthquake, which assert that coseismic, right-lateral ground rupture was restricted to considerable (greater than 4 km) depths in the epicentral area, we find that nearly all the right-lateral offset is represented at the ground surface by the Summit Ridge shear zone.

  6. A review of porosity-generating mechanisms in crustal shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusseis, F.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Revets, S.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the spatiotemporal characteristics of permeability is critical for the understanding of fluid migration in rocks. In diagenetic and metamorphic rocks different porosity-generating mechanisms contribute to permeability and so influence fluid migration and fluid/rock interaction. However, little is known about their relative contributions to the porosity architecture of a rock in a tectono-metamorphic environment. This presentation reviews porosity-generating mechanisms that affect fluid migration in shear zones, the most important crustal fluid conduits, in the context of the tectonometamorphic evolution of rocks. Mechanisms that generate porosity can be classified in a) those that involve the direct action of a fluid, b) processes in which a fluid partakes or that are supported by a fluid or c) mechanism that do not involve a fluid. a) Hydraulic fracturing, where it happens through the formation of tensile fractures, occurs where pore fluid pressures equalize the combined lithostatic pressure and strength of the rock (Etheridge et al., 1984, Cox & Etheridge, 1989, Oliver, 1996). Here an internally released (devolatilisation reactions, e.g., Rumble, 1994, Hacker, 1997, Yardley, 1997 and references therein) or externally derived (infiltrating from metamorphic, magmatic or meteoric sources, Baumgartner et al., 1997, Jamtveit et al., 1997, Thompson, 1997, Gleeson et al., 2003) fluid directly causes the mechanical failure of a rock. Where a fluid is in chemical disequilibrium with a rock (undersaturated with regard to a chemical species) minerals will be dissolved, generating dissolution porosity. Rocks ‘leached' by the removal of chemical components by vast amounts of fluid are reported to lose up to 60% of their original volume (e.g., Kerrich et al., 1984, McCaig 1988). Dissolution porosity is probably an underrated porosity-generating mechanism. It can be expected along the entire metamorphic evolution, including diagenesis (Higgs et al., 2007) and

  7. Duration of exposure to high fluid shear stress is critical in shear-induced platelet activation-aggregation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-ning; Bergeron, Angela L; Yu, Qinghua; Sun, Carol; McBride, Latresha; Bray, Paul F; Dong, Jing-fei

    2003-10-01

    Platelet functions are increasingly measured under flow conditions to account for blood hydrodynamic effects. Typically, these studies involve exposing platelets to high shear stress for periods significantly longer than would occur in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrate that the platelet response to high shear depends on the duration of shear exposure. In response to a 100 dyn/cm2 shear stress for periods less than 10-20 sec, platelets in PRP or washed platelets were aggregated, but minimally activated as demonstrated by P-selectin expression and binding of the activation-dependent alphaIIbbeta3 antibody PAC-1 to sheared platelets. Furthermore, platelet aggregation under such short pulses of high shear was subjected to rapid disaggregation. The disaggregated platelets could be re-aggregated by ADP in a pattern similar to unsheared platelets. In comparison, platelets that are exposed to high shear for longer than 20 sec are activated and aggregated irreversibly. In contrast, platelet activation and aggregation were significantly greater in whole blood with significantly less disaggregation. The enhancement is likely via increased collision frequency of platelet-platelet interaction and duration of platelet-platelet association due to high cell density. It may also be attributed to the ADP release from other cells such as red blood cells because increased platelet aggregation in whole blood was partially inhibited by ADP blockage. These studies demonstrate that platelets have a higher threshold for shear stress than previously believed. In a pathologically relevant timeframe, high shear alone is likely to be insufficient in inducing platelet activation and aggregation, but acts synergistically with other stimuli.

  8. Pan-African granulite facies reworking along Moyar shear zone, south India: Implications for Gondwanaland assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Subhadip; Nasipuri, Pritam

    2014-05-01

    The present study documents metamorphic evolution of garnetiferrous quartzo-feldspathic gneiss from the Moyer shear zone (MSZ), southern granulite terrain (SGT). Quartz (Qtz), plagioclase feldspar (Pl) and biotite (Bt1) constitute the pre-metamorphic mineral assemblage in the rock, where as porphyroblastic garnet (Grt) and second generation biotite (Bt2) characterize the metamorphic mineral paragenesis. Mylonitic fabric in the rock is defined by biotite (Bt1) and poly-crystalline quartz ribbons that wraps garnet porphyroblast. Core compositions of the porphyroblastic garnets lie in almandine-pyrope-grossular ternary (Alm62Prp23Grs14Spss01). In the core to rim traverses within the garnet display variation in major element zoning patterns that depend on the neighboring mineral phase/phases. Along traverses where garnet rim shares contact with quartz, a flat Fe, rimwardly decreasing Mg, flat Mn and rimwardly increasing Ca (referred as Fe0Mg-Ca+Mn0) profile was observed. Embayed garnet sharing boundary with randomly oriented Bt2, displays rimwardly increasing Fe, rimwardly-decreasing Mg, rimwardly increasing Ca and flat Mn (referred as Fe+Mg-Ca+Mn0) profile. Bt2 shows complementary decrease of Fe and increase of Mg towards the interface with garnet. Garnet sharing contact with both Bt1 and plagioclase-feldspar displays rimwardly increasing Fe, rimwardly decreasing Mg, rimwardly increasing Ca and rimwardly increasing Mn (referred as Fe+Mg-Ca+Mn+) profile. Adjacent biotites show an increase of Fe and Mg towards the interface with garnet. Anorthite content of plagioclase decreases towards the interface. While Fe0Mg-Ca+Mn0profile can be interpreted with garnet growth (Bt1 + Pl → Grt) and compositional homogenization (flat Fe, Mn) during peak metamorphism, Fe+Mg-Ca+Mn+and Fe+Mg-Ca+Mn0 profiles can be linked with post-peak compositional modifications respectively via retrograde net-transfer (ReNTR: Grt + Ca-rich ± Qtz → BtII + Ca-poor Plag) and retrograde exchange (Re

  9. Exhumation of the Greater Himalayan Sequence Along the Zanskar Shear Zone, NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basta, S.; Beck, E.; Burlick, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Zanskar Shear Zone (ZSZ), the western extent of the South Tibetan Detachment System, exposes high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS) in its footwall. Granites and metapelites collected along the the ZSZ in the Suru River valley provide how and when the GHS rocks exhumed and were deformed. There are two suits of Paleozoic granites deformed within the ZSZ: Pan-African Cambrian-Ordovician granites at the cores of gneiss domes and Mississippian-Permian granites related to Panjal Traps magmatism. Age of Himalayan granites indicates 28-16 Ma which is concurrent with anatectic leucogranite crystallization. The metamorphic mineral assemblage indicates increasing metamorhic grade from NE to SW and comprises Qtz × Kfs + Pl + Bt × Ms × Sil × Ky × Grt × St × Chl × Tur × Rt. In addition to macroscopic evidence, strongly deformed quartz grains, deformation twins, pressure shadows, and kink bands have been observed to demonstrate micro-tectonics evidence. There are two different method to explain exhumation and deformation of the GHS metapelites: Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) crystallographic mapping and pseudosection modeling. While EBSD indicates the potential temperature of deformation, pseudosection modeling with Perple_X specifically presents the exhumation path of the GHS rocks. Pseudosection modeling with Perple_X , based on whole-rock geochemical analysis, is set pressure and temperature to 0.4-1.2 GPa and 300-900°C, and uses specific solution models, Bio(TCC), Chl(HP), St(HP), feldspar, Mica(CHA), Gt(HP), and hCrd, namely. These two methods are used by combining with geo/thermochronology data from U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, and (U-Th)/He, constraining the age of metamorphism, the cooling and exhumation time of the GHS rocks, and the end of shearing of deformation, respectively. 40Ar/39Ar dating on muscovite and biotite constrains cooling and exhumation ages of the GHS as ~20-19 Ma and 15 Ma, respectively. A metamorphic pressure

  10. Shear stress activation of nuclear receptor PXR in endothelial detoxification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Fang, Xi; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Beilei; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Ao; Li, Yi-Shuan J; Shyy, John Y-J; Guan, Youfei; Chien, Shu; Wang, Nanping

    2013-08-06

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to xenobiotics and endobiotics or their metabolites, which perturb EC function, as well as to shear stress, which plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor and a key regulator of the detoxification of xeno- and endobiotics. Here we show that laminar shear stress (LSS), the atheroprotective flow, activates PXR in ECs, whereas oscillatory shear stress, the atheroprone flow, suppresses PXR. LSS activation of PXR in cultured ECs led to the increased expression of a PXR target gene, multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1). An in vivo study using rats showed that the expression of MDR1 was significantly higher in the endothelium from the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is mostly laminar, than from the inner curvature of aortic arch, where flow is disturbed. Functionally, LSS-activated PXR protects ECs from apoptosis triggered by doxorubicin via the induction of MDR1 and other detoxification genes. PXR also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in response to TNF-α and lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in rat carotid arteries potently attenuated proinflammatory responses. In addition, cDNA microarray revealed a large number of the PXR-activated endothelial genes whose products are responsible for major steps of detoxification, including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and transporters. These detoxification genes in ECs are induced by LSS in ECs in a PXR-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that PXR represents a flow-activated detoxification system to protect ECs against damage by xeno- and endobiotics.

  11. Shear stress activation of nuclear receptor PXR in endothelial detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Fang, Xi; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Beilei; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Ao; Li, Yi-Shuan J.; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Guan, Youfei; Chien, Shu; Wang, Nanping

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to xenobiotics and endobiotics or their metabolites, which perturb EC function, as well as to shear stress, which plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor and a key regulator of the detoxification of xeno- and endobiotics. Here we show that laminar shear stress (LSS), the atheroprotective flow, activates PXR in ECs, whereas oscillatory shear stress, the atheroprone flow, suppresses PXR. LSS activation of PXR in cultured ECs led to the increased expression of a PXR target gene, multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1). An in vivo study using rats showed that the expression of MDR1 was significantly higher in the endothelium from the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is mostly laminar, than from the inner curvature of aortic arch, where flow is disturbed. Functionally, LSS-activated PXR protects ECs from apoptosis triggered by doxorubicin via the induction of MDR1 and other detoxification genes. PXR also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in response to TNF-α and lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in rat carotid arteries potently attenuated proinflammatory responses. In addition, cDNA microarray revealed a large number of the PXR-activated endothelial genes whose products are responsible for major steps of detoxification, including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and transporters. These detoxification genes in ECs are induced by LSS in ECs in a PXR-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that PXR represents a flow-activated detoxification system to protect ECs against damage by xeno- and endobiotics. PMID:23878263

  12. Using Local Second Gradient Model and Shear Strain Localisation to Model the Excavation Damaged Zone in Unsaturated Claystone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, Benoît; Levasseur, Séverine; Collin, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    The drilling of galleries induces damage propagation in the surrounding medium and creates, around them, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The prediction of the extension and fracture structure of this zone remains a major issue, especially in the context of underground nuclear waste storage. Experimental studies on geomaterials indicate that localised deformation in shear band mode usually appears prior to fractures. Thus, the excavation damaged zone can be modelled by considering the development of shear strain localisation bands. In the classical finite element framework, strain localisation suffers a mesh-dependency problem. Therefore, an enhanced model with a regularisation method is required to correctly model the strain localisation behaviour. Among the existing methods, we choose the coupled local second gradient model. We extend it to unsaturated conditions and we include the solid grain compressibility. Furthermore, air ventilation inside underground galleries engenders a rock-atmosphere interaction that could influence the damaged zone. This interaction has to be investigated in order to predict the damaged zone behaviour. Finally, a hydro-mechanical modelling of a gallery excavation in claystone is presented and leads to a fairly good representation of the EDZ. The main objectives of this study are to model the fractures by considering shear strain localisation bands, and to investigate if an isotropic model accurately reproduces the in situ measurements. The numerical results provide information about the damaged zone extension, structure and behaviour that are in very good agreement with in situ measurements and observations. For instance, the strain localisation bands that develop in chevron pattern during the excavation and rock desaturation, due to air ventilation, are observed close to the gallery.

  13. Jurassic Cordilleran dike swarm-shear zones: Implications for the Nevadan orogeny and North American plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.B.; Saleeby, J.B. )

    1992-08-01

    A cogenetic and coeval tonalitic and mafic dike swarm has been identified within a southern fragment (the Owens Mountain area) of the western Foothills terrane (California). The dikes were mylonitized and transposed (rotated into subparallel orientation) during emplacement, from 155 to 148 Ma (U-Pb zircon data), which coincides in time with the Nevadan orogeny. Steeply southeast-plunging fold axes and S-fold geometries indicate a sinistral-sense of shear, possibly with some dip-slip motion as well. This shear zone may be the southern and possibly deeper extension of the Bear Mountains fault zone. This and other Late Jurassic Cordilleran dike swarms record a complex pattern of sinistral-sense transtension-transpression that developed at the apparent-polar-wander J2 cusp ([approximately] 150 Ma) and during subsequent, rapid, northwestward acceleration of North America. The Late Jurassic Nevadan orogeny is a manifestation of these dramatic changes in magnitude and direction of North American motion.

  14. Sutures, Sinkers, Shear zones and Sills: Cryptic Targets and Explicit Strategies for EARTHSCOPE FlexArray in the East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. D.

    2006-05-01

    Given the 3D framework represented by EarthScope's USArray as it scans eastward, the strategic challenge falls to defining cost-effective deployments of FlexArray to address specific lithospheric targets. Previous deep geophysical surveys (e.g. COCORP, USGS, GLIMPCE, et al.) provide guidance not only in framing the geological issues involved, but in designing field experiments that overcome the limitations of previous work. Opportunities highlighted by these precursor studies include: a) Collisional sutures (e.g. Brunswick Anomaly/Suwannee terrane) which lie buried beneath overthrust terranes/ younger sedimentary covers. Signal penetration in previous controlled source surveys has been insufficient. High resolution passive surveys designed to map intralithospheric detachments, Moho, and mantle subduction scars is needed to validate the extrapolations of the existing upper crustal information; b) Intracratonic basins and domes (e.g. Michigan Basin, Adirondack Dome) are perhaps the greatest geological mystery hosted in the east. Previous geophysical studies have lacked the resolution or penetration needed to identify the buoyancy drivers presumed to be responsible for such structures. It is likely that these drivers lie in the upper mantle and will require detailed velocity imaging to recognized. c) Distributed shear fabrics are a defining characteristic of the deep crust in many deformation zones (e.g. Grenville Front). Detailed mapping of crustal anisotropy associated with such shear zones should help delineate ductile flow directions associated with the orogenies that accreted the eastern U.S. 3 component, 3D active+passive surveys are needed to obtain definitive remote measures of such vector characteristics in the deep crust. d) Extensive reflectors in the central U.S. may mark important buried Precambrian basins and/or sill complexes. If the latter, the magmatic roots of those systems remain unrecognized, as does their volumetric contribution to crustal growth

  15. Presynaptic active zones in invertebrates and vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Frauke; Waites, Clarissa L; Garner, Craig C

    2015-01-01

    The regulated release of neurotransmitter occurs via the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane called active zones (AZs). These regions are defined by a cytoskeletal matrix assembled at AZs (CAZ), which functions to direct SVs toward docking and fusion sites and supports their maturation into the readily releasable pool. In addition, CAZ proteins localize voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at SV release sites, bringing the fusion machinery in close proximity to the calcium source. Proteins of the CAZ therefore ensure that vesicle fusion is temporally and spatially organized, allowing for the precise and reliable release of neurotransmitter. Importantly, AZs are highly dynamic structures, supporting presynaptic remodeling, changes in neurotransmitter release efficacy, and thus presynaptic forms of plasticity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the study of active zones, highlighting how the CAZ molecularly defines sites of neurotransmitter release, endocytic zones, and the integrity of synapses. PMID:26160654

  16. Detachment shear zone of the Atlantis Massif core complex, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.; Früh-Green, G. L.; Kelley, D. S.; Williams, E. A.; Yoerger, D. R.; Jakuba, M.

    2006-06-01

    Near-bottom investigations of the cross section of the Atlantis Massif exposed in a major tectonic escarpment provide an unprecedented view of the internal structure of the footwall domain of this oceanic core complex. Integrated direct observations, sampling, photogeology, and imaging define a mylonitic, low-angle detachment shear zone (DSZ) along the crest of the massif. The shear zone may project beneath the nearby, corrugated upper surface of the massif. The DSZ and related structures are inferred to be responsible for the unroofing of upper mantle peridotites and lower crustal gabbroic rocks by extreme, localized tectonic extension during seafloor spreading over the past 2 m.y. The DSZ is characterized by strongly foliated to mylonitic serpentinites and talc-amphibole schists. It is about 100 m thick and can be traced continuously for at least 3 km in the tectonic transport direction. The DSZ foliation arches over the top of the massif in a convex-upward trajectory mimicking the morphology of the top of the massif. Kinematic indicators show consistent top-to-east (toward the MAR axis) tectonic transport directions. Foliated DSZ rocks grade structurally downward into more massive basement rocks that lack a pervasive outcrop-scale foliation. The DSZ and underlying basement rocks are cut by discrete, anastomosing, normal-slip, shear zones. Widely spaced, steeply dipping, normal faults cut all the older structures and localize serpentinization-driven hydrothermal outflow at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field. A thin (few meters) sequence of sedimentary breccias grading upward into pelagic limestones directly overlies the DSZ and may record a history of progressive rotation of the shear zone from a moderately dipping attitude into its present, gently dipping orientation during lateral spreading and uplift.

  17. Constitutive modeling of large inelastic deformation of amorphous polymers: Free volume and shear transformation zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyiadjis, George Z.; Samadi-Dooki, Aref

    2016-06-01

    Due to the lack of the long-range order in their molecular structure, amorphous polymers possess a considerable free volume content in their inter-molecular space. During finite deformation, these free volume holes serve as the potential sites for localized permanent plastic deformation inclusions which are called shear transformation zones (STZs). While the free volume content has been experimentally shown to increase during the course of plastic straining in glassy polymers, thermal analysis of stored energy due to the deformation shows that the STZ nucleation energy decreases at large plastic strains. The evolution of the free volume, and the STZs number density and nucleation energy during the finite straining are formulated in this paper in order to investigate the uniaxial post-yield softening-hardening behavior of the glassy polymers. This study shows that the reduction of the STZ nucleation energy, which is correlated with the free volume increase, brings about the post-yield primary softening of the amorphous polymers up to the steady-state strain value; and the secondary hardening is a result of the increased number density of the STZs, which is required for large plastic strains, while their nucleation energy is stabilized beyond the steady-state strain. The evolutions of the free volume content and STZ nucleation energy are also used to demonstrate the effect of the strain rate, temperature, and thermal history of the sample on its post-yield behavior. The obtained results from the model are compared with the experimental observations on poly(methyl methacrylate) which show a satisfactory consonance.

  18. Neoproterozoic Structural Evolution of the NE-trending 620-540 Ma Ad-Damm Shear Zone, Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamimi, Z.; El-Sawy, E. K.; El-Fakharan, A. S.; Shujoon, A.; Matsah, M.; El-Shafei, M.

    2012-04-01

    Ad-Damm Shear Zone (ASZ) is a NE-trending fault zone separating Jeddah and Asir tectonostratigraphic terranes in the Neoproterozoic juvenile Arabian Shield. ASZ extends ~380 km, with an average width ~2-3 km, from the eye-catching Ruwah Fault Zone in the eastern shield to the Red Sea Coastal plain. It was believed to be one of the conjugate shears of the NW- to NNW- trending sinistral Najd Shear System based on noteworthy dextral shear criteria recorded within the 620 Ma sheared granites of Numan Complex, as well as right-lateral offsets within quartz veins and dikes transected by the shear zone. The present study is an integrated field-based structural analysis and remote sensing. We utilized the ASTER data for lithologic discrimination and automatic structural lineament extraction and analysis of the Neoproterozoic basement lithologies encountered along and within the vicinity of ASZ. Various false color composite images were generated and evaluated for lithological mapping and structural lineaments. The obtained map was analyzed using GIS techniques to interpret the behavior of the existing lineaments and their spatial distribution. Based on the results of the ASTER data, two significant areas; around Bir Ad-Damm and to the south of Wadi Numan, are selected for detailed field investigation. Shear-sense indicators and overprinting relations clearly show a complicated Neoproterozoic history of ASZ, involving at least three deformations: (1) an early attenuated NE-SW sinistral shearing; followed by (2) a SE-directed thrusting phase resulted in the formation SE-verging thrusts and associated thrust-related folds; and (3) late NE-SW intensive dextral transcurrent shearing played a significant role in the creation of mesoscopic shear-zone related folds, particularly in the area near Bir Ad-Damm. Such deformation history demonstrates the same episode of Neoproterozoic deformation exhibited in the NE-trending shear zones in the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS).

  19. GPS deformation rates in the Bajo Segura Basin (NE of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesús Borque, María; Sánchez-Alzola, Alberto; Estévez, Antonio; García-Tortosa, Francisco J.; Martín-Rojas, Iván; Molina, Sergio; Alfaro, Pedro; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracia; de Lacy, Clara; García-Armenteros, Juan Antonio; Avilés, Manuel; Herrera, Antonio; Rosa-Cintas, Sergio; Gil, Antonio J.

    2014-05-01

    The Bajo Segura Basin, located in the NE end of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, is one of the areas with highest seismic activity of the Iberian Peninsula. It is bounded by the Crevillente Fault to the north and the Bajo Segura Fault to the south, and it is characterized by a Late Miocene to Quaternary folded cover. We estimate the present-day deformation of the study area from a GPS network with 11 sites. Observation campaigns were carried out four times (June 1999, September 2001, September 2002 and September 2013). We used the 6.2 version of GIPSY-OASIS software to process GPS data in Precise Point Positioning mode (PPP). In order to obtain the position time series in the whole period of these episodic campaigns, all the GPS observations from 1999 to 2013 campaigns were processed with an identical standard procedure. We compared our velocity field estimation with respect to GEODVEL tectonic model to obtain the residual velocity field of the Bajo Segura Basin. We estimated a ~N-S shortening with deformation rates varying between 0.2 and 0.6 mm/yr. These results are consistent with local geological deformation rates although slightly higher. They also fit well with regional geodetic data estimated for the Western Mediterranean.

  20. Strain localization on different scales and the importance of brittle precursors during deformation in the lower crust (Davenport Shear Zone, Central Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawemann, Friedrich; Mancktelow, Neil; Wex, Sebastian; Camacho, Alfredo; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    High strain rocks in the Musgrave Ranges (Central Australia) provide a rather unique insight into the development of lower crustal shear zones during the 550 Ma Petermann Orogeny, allowing common models for lower crustal deformation to be critically evaluated. The observed structures in the study area are, from south to north: (1) The Mann Fault, which is poorly exposed but evident on airborne geomagnetic maps. This regional scale fault with a component of dextral shear shows a step-over resulting in the formation of a pull-apart basin. (2) The Davenport Shear Zone, accommodating the horizontal extension in a 7 km wide WNW-ESE-trending mylonitic zone developed under subeclogitic, lower crustal conditions. This high strain zone is bounded to the north by a more than 50 km long, continuous, sheared dolerite dyke. North of this dyke, the ~1200 Ma Musgravian fabric is still preserved, only slightly rotated and typically N-S trending. (3) The Woodroffe Thrust, marking the northern boundary of the Musgrave Ranges, brings these lower crustal rocks on top of amphibolite facies units, with a top-to-north sense of movement. Strain in the Davenport Shear Zone is very heterogeneously distributed, with localization and partitioning from the kilometre down to the millimetre scale. Pseudotachylyte is commonly associated with dykes, especially on the boundaries, and is often sheared. The orientation of sheared dykes and localized shear zones is typically at a high angle to either side of the shortening direction, resulting in a variable sense of shear and a major component of flattening, with a nearly horizontal extension direction. Detailed outcrop-scale mapping shows that compositional inhomogeneities, such as quartz veins, are generally not exploited, even when favourably oriented for shear reactivation. Ultramylonitic shear zones are sometimes only a few millimetres wide but extend for several metres and are generally oblique to the background foliation. Pseudotachylyte often

  1. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase maintains active zone structure by stabilizing Bruchpilot

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Shaoyun; Ali, Yousuf O; Ruan, Kai; Zhai, R Grace

    2013-01-01

    Active zones are specialized presynaptic structures critical for neurotransmission. We show that a neuronal maintenance factor, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), is required for maintaining active zone structural integrity in Drosophila by interacting with the active zone protein, Bruchpilot (BRP), and shielding it from activity-induced ubiquitin–proteasome-mediated degradation. NMNAT localizes to the peri-active zone and interacts biochemically with BRP in an activity-dependent manner. Loss of NMNAT results in ubiquitination, mislocalization and aggregation of BRP, and subsequent active zone degeneration. We propose that, as a neuronal maintenance factor, NMNAT specifically maintains active zone structure by direct protein–protein interaction. PMID:23154466

  2. Metamorphic and structural evidence for significant vertical displacement along the Ross Lake fault zone, a major orogen-parallel shear zone in the Cordillera of western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, J.A.; Whitney, D.L.; Hurlow, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the petrology and structure of the Skymo complex and adjacent terranes constrain the amount, timing, and sense of motion on a segment of the > 600-km-long Late Cretaceous - early Tertiary Ross Lake fault zone (RLFZ), a major orogen-parallel shear zone in the Cordillera of western North America. In the study area in the North Cascades, Washington state, the RLFZ accommodated significant pre-middle Eocene vertical displacement, and it juxtaposes the Skymo complex with upper amphibolite facies (650??-690??C and 6-7 kbar) Skagit Gneiss of the North Cascades crystalline core to the SW and andalusite-bearing phyllite of the Little Jack terrane (Intermontane superterrane) to the NE. The two main lithologic units of the Skymo complex, a primitive mafic intrusion and a fault-bounded block of granulite facies metasedimentary rocks, are unique in the North Cascades. Granulite facies conditions were attained during high-temperature (> 800??C), low pressure (??? 4 kbar) contact metamorphism associated with intrusion of the mafic magma. P-T estimates and reaction textures in garnet-orthopyroxene gneiss suggest that contact metamorphism followed earlier, higher pressure regional metamorphism. There is no evidence that the Skagit Gneiss experienced high-T - low-P contact metamorphism. In the Little Jack terrane, however, texturally late cordierite ?? spinel and partial replacement of andalusite by sillimanite near the terrane's fault contact with Skymo gabbro suggest that the Little Jack terrane experienced high-T (??? 600??C) - low-P (??? 4 kbar) contact metamorphism following earlier low-grade regional metamorphism. Similarities in the protoliths of metasedimentary rocks in the Skymo and Little Jack indicate that they may be part of the same terrane. Differences in pressure estimates for the Little Jack versus Skymo for regional metamorphism that preceded contact metamorphism indicate vertical displacement of ??? 10 km (west side up) on the strand

  3. Timing of deformation in the Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone, Uruguay: Implications for the amalgamation of western Gondwana during the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano-Pan-African Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriolo, Sebastián.; Oyhantçabal, Pedro; Wemmer, Klaus; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Benowitz, Jeffrey; Pfänder, Jörg; Hannich, Felix; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2016-03-01

    U-Pb and Hf zircon (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe -SHRIMP- and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry -LA-ICP-MS-), Ar/Ar hornblende and muscovite, and Rb-Sr whole rock-muscovite isochron data from the mylonites of the Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone, Uruguay, were obtained in order to assess the tectonothermal evolution of this crustal-scale structure. Integration of these results with available kinematic, structural, and microstructural data of the shear zone as well as with geochronological data from the adjacent blocks allowed to constrain the onset of deformation along the shear zone at 630-625 Ma during the collision of the Nico Pérez Terrane and the Río de la Plata Craton. The shear zone underwent dextral shearing up to 596 Ma under upper to middle amphibolite facies conditions, which was succeeded by sinistral shearing under lower amphibolite to upper greenschist facies conditions until at least 584 Ma. After emplacement of the Cerro Caperuza granite at 570 Ma, the shear zone underwent only cataclastic deformation between the late Ediacaran and the Cambrian. The Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone is thus related to the syncollisional to postcollisional evolution of the amalgamation of the Río de la Plata Craton and the Nico Pérez Terrane. Furthermore, the obtained data reveal that strain partitioning and localization with time, magmatism emplacement, and fluid circulation are key processes affecting the isotopic systems in mylonitic belts, revealing the complexity in assessing the age of deformation of long-lived shear zones.

  4. Two-zone heterogeneous structure within shear bands of a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yang; Yao, Kefu; Liu, Xue; Li, Mo

    2013-10-21

    Shear bands, the main plastic strain carrier in metallic glasses, are severely deformed regions often considered as disordered and featureless. Here we report the observations of a sandwich-like heterogeneous structure inside shear bands in Pd{sub 40.5}Ni{sub 40.5}P{sub 19} metallic glass sample after plastic deformation by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results suggest a two-step plastic deformation mechanism with corresponding microstructure evolution at atomic scale, which may intimately connected to the stability of the shear band propagation and the overall plastic deformability.

  5. Block and shear-zone architecture of the Minnesota River Valley subprovince: Implications for late Archean accretionary tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southwick, D.L.; Chandler, V.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Minnesota River Valley subprovince of the Superior Province is an Archean gneiss terrane composed internally of four crustal blocks bounded by three zones of east-northeast-trending linear geophysical anomalies. Two of the block-bounding zones are verified regional-scale shears. The geological nature of the third boundary has not been established. Potential-field geophysical models portray the boundary zones as moderately north-dipping surfaces or thin slabs similar in strike and dip to the Morris fault segment of the Great Lakes tectonic zone at the north margin of the subprovince. The central two blocks of the subprovince (Morton and Montevideo) are predominantly high-grade quartzofeldspathic gneiss, some as old as 3.6 Ga, and late-tectonic granite. The northern and southern blocks (Benson and Jeffers, respectively) are judged to contain less gneiss than the central blocks and a larger diversity of syntectonic and late-tectonic plutons. A belt of moderately metamorphosed mafic and ultramafic rocks having some attributes of a dismembered ophiolite is partly within the boundary zone between the Morton and Montevideo blocks. This and the other block boundaries are interpreted as late Archean structures that were reactivated in the Early Proterozoic. The Minnesota River Valley subprovince is interpreted as a late accretionary addition to the Superior Province. Because it was continental crust, it was not subductible when it impinged on the convergent southern margin of the Superior Craton in late Archean time, and it may have accommodated to convergent-margin stresses by dividing into blocks and shear zones capable of independent movement.

  6. The Cora Lake Shear Zone, an Exhumed Deep Crustal Lithotectonic Discontinuity, Western Churchill Province, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S.; Leslie, S.; Holland, M. E.; Williams, M. L.; Mahan, K. H.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Deep crustal flow is a fundamental tectonic process that may serve to reduce topographic gradients, especially in overthickened collisional orogens. Recent studies have utilized numerical models and seismic interpretations, but generally in two dimensions. Although useful, two dimensional models can not fully characterize lower crustal flow or coupling of crustal layers because they cannot fully incorporate lateral heterogeneity in the flow field. The Athabasca Granulite terrane, in northern Saskatchewan, is an exposed deep crustal terrane that underwent granulite grade deformation during the Neoarchean (ca. 2.55), then cooled isobarically for 600 m.y., and then was reactivated during the Paleoproterozoic (ca. 1.9 Ga). Regional exhumation occurred at roughly 1.85 Ga. This exposure, is a field laboratory for studying lower crustal flow, stabilization, and reactivation. Recent work suggests that the northwestern domain, dominated by the multiphase, opx-bearing, Mary batholith, underwent top-to-the-east lower crustal flow during the Neoarchean. The Chipman domain, to the SE , is primarily underlain by the 3.2 Ga, Chipman tonalite straight gneiss, which was likely restitic, and rheologically strong during the 2.6 Ga flow event. The Cora Lake shear zone (CLsz), which divides the two domains, is interpreted to represent a lithotectonic, compositional, and rheologic boundary within the deep crust. Recent mapping of the western gradient of the CLsz has provided insight into the role and evolution of the rheologic discontinuity and its relationship to crustal flow. The Mary granite (gneiss) contains excellent assemblages for P-T and pseudosection analysis. Interlayered felsic granulite contain abundant monazite for in-situ geochronology. An intense subhorizontal tectonic fabric (S1), interpreted to be the product of crustal flow, is present in both units. This early fabric was locally crenulated, folded, and transposed, by a sub-vertical S2 fabric. Current work involves

  7. Surface temperature estimation in Singhbhum Shear Zone of India using Landsat-7 ETM+ thermal infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Majumdar, T. J.; Bhattacharya, Amit K.

    2009-05-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important factor in global change studies, heat balance and as control for climate change. A comparative study of LST over parts of the Singhbhum Shear Zone in India was undertaken using various emissivity and temperature retrieval algorithms applied on visible and near infrared (VNIR), and thermal infrared (TIR) bands of high resolution Landsat-7 ETM+ imagery. LST results obtained from satellite data of October 26, 2001 and November 2, 2001 through various algorithms were validated with ground measurements collected during satellite overpass. In addition, LST products of MODIS and ASTER were compared with Landsat-7 ETM+ and ground truth data to explore the possibility of using multi-sensor approach in LST monitoring. An image-based dark object subtraction (DOS3) algorithm, which is yet to be tested for LST retrieval, was applied on VNIR bands to obtain atmospheric corrected surface reflectance images. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was estimated from VNIR reflectance image. Various surface emissivity retrieval algorithms based on NDVI and vegetation proportion were applied to ascertain emissivities of the various land cover categories in the study area in the spectral range of 10.4-12.5 μm. A minimum emissivity value of about 0.95 was observed over the reflective rock body with a maximum of about 0.99 over dense forest. A strong correlation was established between Landsat ETM+ reflectance band 3 and emissivity. Single channel based algorithms were adopted for surface radiance and brightness temperature. Finally, emissivity correction was applied on 'brightness temperature' to obtain LST. Estimated LST values obtained from various algorithms were compared with field ground measurements for different land cover categories. LST values obtained after using Valor's emissivity and single channel equations were best correlated with ground truth temperature. Minimum LST is observed over dense forest as about 26 °C and

  8. Seismogenic deformation field in the Mojave block and implications for tectonics of the eastern California shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Jeffrey R.; Twiss, Robert J.; Hauksson, Egill

    1996-04-01

    From the aftershocks of the 1992 Landers earthquake, we infer the orientation of the principal strain rate axes (d1 > d2 > d3; d1 lengthening), their relative magnitude, and the relative spin of fault blocks by using a micropolar continuum model to invert the seismic P and T axes. The seismogenic deformation is consistent with the geodetic measurements of the coseismic displacement and with the secular deformation of the central Mojave block. Regionally, the aftershock data define two major domains within the central Mojave block: (1) the western Mojave block, including the San Bernardino Mountains and the epicentral area of the Big Bear earthquake, which is characterized by E-W d1 (lengthening) and N-S d3 (shortening); and (2) the central Mojave block, including the Landers surface rupture zone, which is characterized by NW-SE d1 and NE-SW d3. Inversion for the principal strain axes of geodetically measured coseismic displacements across the Big Bear and Landers seismogenic zones gives results similar to the aftershock inversions for those areas, indicating that the aftershocks accommodate a deformation similar to the main rupture and do not reflect elastic rebound or residual stresses. The background seismicity for 1981 to 1991 shows the same characteristic d1 and d3 orientations for the two domains, indicating that the secular seismogenic strain has the same regional geometry as the 1992 coseismic deformation. The micropolar inversion also provides values of the relative vorticity parameter W, which reflects a difference between the vorticity of a shearing continuum and the vorticity of fault-bounded blocks rotating within tabular seismogenic shear zones. The observed fault geometry along the Kickapoo fault suggests a pinned-block model for the local block rotation that is consistent with the values of W obtained from our inversions. We interpret the regional NW-SE orientation of d1 in the central Mojave block to be characteristic of the dextral eastern

  9. Analecta of structures formed during the 28 June 1992 Landers-Big Bear, California earthquake sequence (including maps of shear zones, belts of shear zones, tectonic ridge, duplex en echelon fault, fault elements, and thrusts in restraining steps)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Johnson, N.A.; Johnson, K.M.; Wei, W.; Fleming, R.W.; Cruikshank, K.M.; Martosudarmo, S.Y.

    1997-12-31

    The June 28, 1992, M{sub s} 7.5 earthquake at Landers, California, which occurred about 10 km north of the community of Yucca Valley, California, produced spectacular ground rupturing more than 80 km in length (Hough and others, 1993). The ground rupturing, which was dominated by right-lateral shearing, extended along at least four distinct faults arranged broadly en echelon. The faults were connected through wide transfer zones by stepovers, consisting of right-lateral fault zones and tension cracks. The Landers earthquakes occurred in the desert of southeastern California, where details of ruptures were well preserved, and patterns of rupturing were generally unaffected by urbanization. The structures were varied and well-displayed and, because the differential displacements were so large, spectacular. The scarcity of vegetation, the aridity of the area, the compactness of the alluvium and bedrock, and the relative isotropy and brittleness of surficial materials collaborated to provide a marvelous visual record of the character of the deformation zones. The authors present a series of analecta -- that is, verbal clips or snippets -- dealing with a variety of structures, including belts of shear zones, segmentation of ruptures, rotating fault block, en echelon fault zones, releasing duplex structures, spines, and ramps. All of these structures are documented with detailed maps in text figures or in plates (in pocket). The purpose is to describe the structures and to present an understanding of the mechanics of their formation. Hence, most descriptions focus on structures where the authors have information on differential displacements as well as spatial data on the position and orientation of fractures.

  10. Brittle grain-size reduction of feldspar, phase mixing and strain localization in granitoids at mid-crustal conditions (Pernambuco shear zone, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, Gustavo; Menegon, Luca; Archanjo, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The Pernambuco shear zone (northeastern Brazil) is a large-scale strike-slip fault that, in its eastern segment, deforms granitoids at mid-crustal conditions. Initially coarse-grained (> 50 µm) feldspar porphyroclasts are intensively fractured and reduced to an ultrafine-grained mixture consisting of plagioclase and K-feldspar grains (< 15 µm) localized in C' shear bands. Detailed microstructural observations and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis do not show evidence of intracrystalline plasticity in feldspar porphyroclasts and/or fluid-assisted replacement reactions. Quartz occurs either as thick (˜ 1-2 mm) monomineralic veins transposed along the shear zone foliation or as thin ribbons ( ≤ 25 µm width) dispersed in the feldspathic mixture. The microstructure and c axis crystallographic-preferred orientation are similar in the thick monomineralic veins and in the thin ribbons, and they suggest dominant subgrain rotation recrystallization and activity of prism < a > and rhomb < a > slip systems. However, the grain size in monophase recrystallized domains decreases when moving from the quartz monomineralic veins to the thin ribbons embedded in the feldspathic C' bands (14 µm vs. 5 µm respectively). The fine-grained feldspar mixture has a weak crystallographic-preferred orientation interpreted as the result of shear zone parallel-oriented growth during diffusion creep, as well as the same composition as the fractured porphyroclasts, suggesting that it generated by mechanical fragmentation of rigid porphyroclasts with a negligible role of chemical disequilibrium. Once C' shear bands were generated and underwent viscous deformation at constant stress conditions, the polyphase feldspathic aggregate would have deformed at a strain rate 1 order of magnitude faster than the monophase quartz monomineralic veins, as evidenced by applying experimentally and theoretically calibrated flow laws for dislocation creep in quartz and diffusion creep in

  11. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  12. On the evolution of the Arabian-Nubian Shield and the largest shear zone on the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. M.; Abu-Alam, T. S.; Stuewe, K.; Meyer, S.; Passchier, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Najd Fault System is known to be the largest pre-Mesozoic shear zone on the Earth. It developed in the context of the Pan African orogeny during the closure of the Mozambique Ocean and the subsequent collision between East- and West-Gondwanaland. The fault system crosses the entire Arabian Nubain Shield of northern Africa from northwest to southeast. During its activity, middle crustal level rocks were exhumed as a series of metamorphic complexes that are located in the Proterozoic rocks of Egypt and Saudi Arabia. It is now known that some of these complexes were exhumed as classical core complexes in extension regime. However, recent studies have shown that others (i.e those of Sinai) exhumed in oblique compression regime. Recent published age-dating data showed that this difference in exhumation mechanism is not only in a tectonic context but in the exhumation's age: Exhumation of the metamorphic complexes of the eastern part of the shield is much older than the exhumation of the western part. One way to test this new concept is to study the mid-crustal rocks of Saudi Arabia (eastern part of the shield). Preliminary work shows that all the metamorphic complexes of the Arabian-Nubian Shield exhumed due to the activity of the Najd Fault System over an interval of some tens of millions years (≈ 690 - 530 Ma). Early metamorphic complexes were exhumed in compression regime due to the collision between East- and West-Gondwanaland, while the later ones exhumed in extension setting due to the relaxation that follows the collision.

  13. Crevasse Extent and Lateral Shearing of the McMurdo Shear Zone, Antarctica, Using GPR and GPS Observations, and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluzienski, L. M.; Hamilton, G. S.; Koons, P. O.; Arcone, S. A.; Ray, L.; Lever, J.; Fastook, J.; Walker, B.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-ice-shelf circulation plays a fundamental role in ice shelf mass budget. The shape of the underside of an ice shelf is important, such that the presence of basal crevasses can significantly modulate the transfer of heat at the ice-ocean interface. In situ observations of basal crevasses are challenging to obtain, but surface-based ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys can be used to determine crevasse location and orientation. Here, we use GPR methods to map the internal structures in the McMurdo Shear Zone (SZ) which marks the boundary between the Ross Ice Shelf and the slower-moving McMurdo Ice Shelf. Radar surveys with 200 MHz and 400 MHz antennas reveal the presence of crevasses both in the upper firn and within a zone of accreted marine ice at a depth of approximately 170 meters. A spatial correspondence between near-surface and basal crevasses suggests that both are formed locally by lateral shearing. A combination of three dimensional higher order and Shallow Shelf Approximation ice flow equations within the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) are used to test this hypothesis. This model estimates the detailed velocity field of the SZ and is constrained by GPS-derived observations of surface motion. The distribution and orientations of surface crevasses is consistent with the gradients in velocity field predicted by the model. Though a wider range of orientation angles exists for crevasses within the basal regime, the average strike angle is consistent with firn crevassing and we conclude that the marine ice coevally fractured with the firn layer.

  14. Deformation assisted by fluids in quartz veins of shear zones: an example from Iron Formations of Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Paola; Lagoeiro, Leonardo

    2013-04-01

    The evidences of fluid activity in rocks are well recognized. In many cases, the fluid is responsible to remobilize many elements (e.g. Au, Mn, Si) that may be transported over a long distance and precipitated as new minerals in regions of low stress of the rock. In many deformed rocks, the origin of a large number of structures (veins, pressure shadows, dissolved grain boundaries, etc) may be correlated to the fluid activity. However, the fluids are important not only during the crack-and-seal process but also after the sealing ceases. As an example of how the fluids are responsible to rearrange the structure of the rock, we studied many quartz veins of one iron-formation from Brazil. The rocks were collected in Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF), Brazil, that is one of the most important metalogenetic provinces in the world. It is assumed the existence of a deformational and metamorphic gradient in the rocks of QF, increasing the occurrence of penetrative structures from southwest to northeast. However, the effects of the local shear zones in the deformation pattern of QF may not be neglected. Shear zones are generally recognized as structures that accommodate deformation, eventually with intense fluid percolation. It is indubitable that there is a relationship between the fluid activity and the deformation accommodation in shear zones. So, to investigate how the fluid activity can affect the mechanisms of accommodation of deformation in rocks of shear zones from QF, we characterized the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of some quartz vein by EBSD (electron backscattering diffraction). All the samples came from the same outcrop and from the same dextral shear zone, localized in the low-deformation region of QF, under greenschist metamorphic conditions. The samples were oriented according to the XYZ reference system, with X parallel to the foliation and Z normal to the XY plane. The veins are quartz-rich layers parallel to the rock foliation. They do not

  15. Fe-Ti-oxide textures and microstructures in shear zones from oceanic gabbros at Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, Jessica; Morales, Luiz F. G.; Rybacki, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Ocean drilling expeditions at several oceanic core complexes formed at slow- and ultra-slow-spreading ridges have recovered cores containing numerous zones of oxide-rich gabbros containing ilmenite and magnetite. In these cores, high modal concentrations of Fe-Ti-oxides are systematically associated with high-temperature plastic deformation features in silicates. We present observations of Fe-Ti-oxide mineral structures and textural characteristics from a series of oxide-rich shear zones from Atlantis Bank (ODP Site 735B) on the Southwest Indian Ridge aimed at determining how oxide mineral abundances relate to strain localization. Fe-Ti-oxide minerals in undeformed oxide gabbros and in highly deformed samples from natural shear zones generally have morphologies characteristic of crystallized melt, including highly cuspate grains and low dihedral angles. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in oxide-rich shear zones is very strong, with fabrics mainly characterized by strong magnetic foliations parallel to the macroscopic foliation. Crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in magnetite are generally weak, with occasionally well-defined textures. Ilmenite typically displays well-developed CPOs, however, the melt-like ilmenite grain shapes indicate that at least part of the crystallographic texture results from oriented ilmenite growth during post-deformation crystallization. The oxides are hypothesized to have initially been present as isolated pockets of trapped melt (intercumulus liquid) in a load-bearing silicate framework. Progressive plastic deformation of silicate phases at high-temperature mainly produced two features: (i) elongated melt pockets, which crystallized to form strings of opaque minerals and (ii), interconnected networks of melt regions. The latter lead to intense strain localization of the rock, which appears as oxide-rich mylonites in the samples. In some samples, abundant low-angle grain boundaries in both magnetite and ilmenite suggest

  16. Influence of initial fabric on fractures developed in shear zones in clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahasky, C.; Hudleston, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that a layer of clay placed on two horizontal rigid boards or plates, one of which slides past the other develops fractures or shears at an angle to the underlying 'fault.' The commonest such structures are Riedel or R shears, which make an angle of about 15 degrees with the fault trace, in a clockwise sense measured from a dextral fault. A second less well developed set of fractures, known as Riedel primes or R' shears, form at an angle of about 75 degrees. Together, R and R' shears are interpreted as conjugate fractures representing Mohr-Coulomb failure, symmetric about a maximum compressive stress at 45 degrees to the fault trace. We examine the influence of initial fabric in kaolinite clay on the development of fractures in experiments using clay over two horizontal base plates that move past each other in wrench-fault motion. The material used was 69% clay mixed with water, molded into slabs that were 1.9 cm thick and 20-30 cm in horizontal dimensions. The displacement rate on the plates was constant in a given experiment. Varying displacement rate and thickness did not significantly affect the basic pattern and sequence of structural development. An anisotropic fabric in the Kaolinite was produced during the preparation of the clay cakes for these experiments. To produce the fabric, the clay was either screeded perpendicular to the direction of shearing, screeded parallel to the direction of shearing, or molded to develop no fabric in the horizontal plane. Regardless of the anisotropy, there were several characteristics noted in all of the experiments. First, in all of the experiments a ductile phase precedes brittle failure. Second, the R shears are relatively stable in orientation as displacement increases. The high-angle R' shears on the other hand rotate with increasing displacement on the fault. Finally, in all of the experiments, the fracture pattern becomes more complex with increasing displacement, and both ductile deformation and

  17. Multi-system geochronological and isotopic constraints on age and evolution of the Gaoligongshan metamorphic belt and shear zone system in western Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroğlu, Sümeyya; Siebel, Wolfgang; Danišík, Martin; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Chen, Fukun

    2013-09-01

    The Gaoligongshan metamorphic belt, located east of the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis (EHS) in the Yunnan province, southwestern China, is a compelling region in which to determine temporal constrains on crustal dynamic processes related to the Himalayan orogeny. We applied multi-system geo- and thermochronology (900 °C to <50 °C) to orthogneiss and mylonites from a major shear zone in the southern Gaoligongshan in order to elucidate the magmatic, cooling and exhumation history of this belt. Zircon U/Pb data reveal three magmatic events at ∼486 Ma, ∼136 Ma and ∼76 Ma. Similar ages are found in orthoderivative rocks of the neighboring Tengchong and Baoshan blocks, and the Gangdese batholith, suggesting that the southern Gaoligongshan is composed of an assemblage of Lhasa and Qiangtang terrane derived rocks. Muscovite Rb/Sr ages of 35-21 Ma are coeval with the onset of lateral crustal displacement along major shear zones in Eastern Tibet and Indochina, and with the post-collision volcanic activity in western Yunnan. Biotite Rb/Sr and mica 40Ar/39Ar ages provide evidence that mylonitization along the Gaoligongshan shear zone and crustal rotation of the Tengchong and Baoshan blocks proceeded during the Miocene, between 19 and 12 Ma, when the rocks rapidly cooled through the 350-280 °C temperature range. Almost identical 40Ar/39Ar ages reported for the Karakorum-Jiali-Parlung Fault system in Western Tibet suggest that the Gaoligongshan shear zone is the southeastern continuation of this fault, recording the eastward extrusion of Tibet and crustal movement around the EHS. The final stage of exhumation of the Gaoligongshan occurred between 8 and 5 Ma at an average exhumation rate of ∼3 km/Ma as documented by apatite fission-track and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He data. This rapid exhumation was triggered by crustal root delamination and opening of the Andaman sea. Our results clearly show that the complex tectonothermal evolution of the Gaoligongshan was influenced by

  18. Field and Microstructure Study of Transpressive Jogdadi shear zone near Ambaji, Aravalli- Delhi Mobile Belt, NW India and its tectonic implication on the exhumation of granulites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sudheer Kumar; Biswal, Tapas Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Aravalli- Delhi mobile belt is situated in the northwestern part of Indian shield. It comprises tectono- magmatic histories from Archean to Neoproterozoic age. It possesses three tectono- magmatic metamorphic belts namely Bhilwara Supergroup (3000 Ma), Aravalli Supergorup (1800 Ma) and Delhi Supergroup (1100 -750Ma). The Delhi Supergroup is divided in two parts North Delhi and South Delhi; North Delhi (1100 Ma to 850 Ma) is older than South Delhi (850 Ma to 750 Ma). The study area falls in the South Delhi terrane; BKSK granulites are the major unit in this terrane. BKSK granulites comprise gabbro- norite-basic granulite, pelitic granulite, calcareous granulite and occur within the surrounding of low grade rocks as meta- rhyolite, quartzite, mica schist and amphibolites. The high grade and low grade terranes share a sheared margin. Granulites have undergone three phases of folding, intruded by three phases of granites and traversed by many shear zones. One of the shear zones is Jogdadi shear zone which consists of granitic mylonites and other sheared rocks. Jogdadi shear zone carries the evidence of both ductile as well as brittle shearing. It strikes NW- SE; the mylonitic foliation dip moderately to SW or NE and stretching lineations are oblique towards SE. The shear zone is folded and gabbro- norite - basic granulite occurs at the core. One limb of fold passes over coarse grained granite while other limb occurs over gabbro- norite- basic granulite. Presence of mylonitic foliation, asymmetric folding, S-C fabrics, porphyroclasts, mica fishes and book shelf- gliding are indicative of ductile deformation. Most of the porphyroclasts are sigmoidal and delta types but there are also some theta and phi type porphyroclasts. Book shelf-gliding structures are at low angle to the C plane. The shear zone successively shows protomylonite, mylonite and ultramylonites from margin to the centre. As the mylonitization increases recrystallized quartz grains appear. Porphyroclasts

  19. Crustal Anisotropy Beneath the Western Segment of North Anatolian Fault Zone from Local Shear-Wave Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuncu Poyraz, S.; Teoman, U.; Kahraman, M.; Turkelli, N.; Rost, S.; Thompson, D. A.; Houseman, G.

    2014-12-01

    Shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes provides valuable knowledge on anisotropy of the upper crust. Upper-crustal anisotropy is widely interpreted as due to aligned fluid-filled cracks or pores. Differential stress is thought to close cracks aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal stress and leaves cracks open that are aligned perpendicular to the minimum horizontal compressional stress. In other cases local shear-wave splitting has been found to be aligned with regional faulting. Temporal variations in local splitting patterns might provide hints of changes in stress orientation related to earthquakes or volcanoes. North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) is a large-scale continental strike slip fault system originating at the Karlıova Junction in the east where it intersects the East Anatolian Fault (EAF) and extends west cutting across the entire Northern Turkey towards the Aegean Sea and the mainland Greece. Our primary focus is to provide constraints on the crustal anisotropy beneath the western segment of the North Anatolian Fault Zone with the use of a data set collected from a dense temporary seismic network consisting of 70 stations that was deployed in early May 2012 and operated for 18 months in the Sakarya region and the surroundings during the Faultlab experiment. For the local shear wave splitting analysis, out of 1344 events, we extracted 90 well located earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 2.0. Local shear-wave splitting makes use of earthquakes close to and nearly directly below the recording station. Incidence angles of less than 45 degrees were used to avoid the free-surface effect and resulting non-linear particle motion. Basically, two essential parameters for each station-event pair is needed for shear wave splitting calculations. One of them is fast polarization direction (ɸ) and the other is delay time (δt) between the fast and slow components of the shear wave. In this study, delay times vary between 0,02 and 0,25 seconds

  20. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangliang; Lavier, Luc L.

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  1. Interactions between extensional shear zones and syn-tectonic granitic intrusions: the example of Ikaria Island (Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Valentin; Beaudoin, Alexandre; Jolivet, Laurent; Arbaret, Laurent; Augier, Romain; Rabillard, Aurelien

    2014-05-01

    The Aegean domain is an ideal place to investigate the development of Metamorphic Core Complex (MCC) and to study the role of syn-tectonic granites on their development. MCCs of the Aegean domain are dynamically associated with a few major detachments, especially the North Cycladic Detachment System (NCDS) and the West Cycladic Detachment System (WCDS), which have accommodated a large part of the crustal thinning during the Oligocene and Miocene. The NCDS extends toward the East within the Simav Detachment that has exhumed the northern high-temperature part of the Menderes massif. The transition between the NCDS and the Simav Detachments is located above a major tear in the Aegean slab whose effects on lithospheric deformation are far from understood. The Aegean granitoids were emplaced during the Middle Miocene within a zone of high-temperature during the episode of slab tearing and recorded increments of extensional tectonics within this complex zone. Ikaria Island (Cyclades, Greece) is a metamorphic dome intruded by three Miocene granitoid plutons (one I-type intrusion, two S-type ones) including the largest pluton of the Aegean domain. However, geometry, structures and kinematics are still debated with several recent yet conflicting studies. We have reconsidered the geology of Ikaria to settle the geological and structural context of these plutons. The intrusion depth of the Raches granite has been estimated at 10-15 km by the Al-in-hornblende barometer. Our field study has led to the identification of two major structures: the Gialiskari and Kalamos detachments, which we interpret as belonging to the NCDS. A study of deformation in the granites has highlighted a continuum during cooling that can be described in three stages: i) magmatic deformation, ii) high-temperature ductile deformation from late magmatic stage until complete crystallization of the granite, iii) low-temperature brittle deformation. Throughout this evolution, the same top-to-the-NE shearing

  2. Geometry and subsidence history of the Dead Sea basin: A case for fluid-induced mid-crustal shear zone?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Flores, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Pull-apart basins are narrow zones of crustal extension bounded by strike-slip faults that can serve as analogs to the early stages of crustal rifting. We use seismic tomography, 2-D ray tracing, gravity modeling, and subsidence analysis to study crustal extension of the Dead Sea basin (DSB), a large and long-lived pull-apart basin along the Dead Sea transform (DST). The basin gradually shallows southward for 50 km from the only significant transverse normal fault. Stratigraphic relationships there indicate basin elongation with time. The basin is deepest (8-8.5 km) and widest (???15 km) under the Lisan about 40 km north of the transverse fault. Farther north, basin depth is ambiguous, but is 3 km deep immediately north of the lake. The underlying pre-basin sedimentary layer thickens gradually from 2 to 3 km under the southern edge of the DSB to 3-4 km under the northern end of the lake and 5-6 km farther north. Crystalline basement is ???11 km deep under the deepest part of the basin. The upper crust under the basin has lower P wave velocity than in the surrounding regions, which is interpreted to reflect elevated pore fluids there. Within data resolution, the lower crust below ???18 km and the Moho are not affected by basin development. The subsidence rate was several hundreds of m/m.y. since the development of the DST ???17 Ma, similar to other basins along the DST, but subsidence rate has accelerated by an order of magnitude during the Pleistocene, which allowed the accumulation of 4 km of sediment. We propose that the rapid subsidence and perhaps elongation of the DSB are due to the development of inter-connected mid-crustal ductile shear zones caused by alteration of feldspar to muscovite in the presence of pore fluids. This alteration resulted in a significant strength decrease and viscous creep. We propose a similar cause to the enigmatic rapid subsidence of the North Sea at the onset the North Atlantic mantle plume. Thus, we propose that aqueous fluid flux

  3. Are quartz LPOs predictably oriented with respect to the shear zone boundary?: A test from the Alpine Fault mylonites, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy A.; Prior, David J.; Toy, Virginia G.

    2016-03-01

    The Alpine fault self-exhumes its own ductile shear zone roots and has a known slip kinematics. Within ˜1 km of the fault, the mylonitic foliation is subparallel to the boundary of the amphibolite-facies ductile shear zone in which it formed. Using EBSD, we analyzed quartz Lattice Preferred Orientations [LPOs) of mylonites along a central part of the Alpine Fault. All LPOs feature a strongest girdle of [c]-axes that is forward-inclined ˜28 ± 4° away from the pole to the fault. A maximum of axes is inclined at the same angle relative the fault. The [c]-axis girdle is perpendicular to extensional (C') shear bands and the maximum is parallel to their slip direction. [c]-axis girdles do not form perpendicular to the SZB. Schmid factor analysis suggests that σ1 was arranged at 60-80° to the Alpine Fault. These observations indicate ductile transpression in the shear zone. The inclined arrangement of [c]-axis girdles, axes, and C' planes relative to the fault can be explained by their alignment relative to planes of maximum shear-strain-rate in a general shear zone, a significant new insight regarding shear zones and how LPO fabrics may generally develop within them. For the Alpine mylonite zone, our data imply a kinematic vorticity number (Wk) of ˜0.7 to ˜0.85. Inversions of seismic focal mechanisms in the brittle crust of the Southern Alps indicate that σ1 is oriented ˜60° to the Alpine Fault; that shear bands form at ˜30° to this direction, and that σ2 and σ3 flip positions between the brittle and ductile parts of the crust.

  4. Shear-wave splitting and mantle anisotropy in the southern South American subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, J. G.; Fischer, K. M.; Anderson, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this study is to constrain mantle flow above and below the subducting Nazca plate at latitudes of 30°-41° S. In this segment of the South American subduction zone, slab dip varies dramatically, including a region of flat slab subduction in the north and greater dip angles (~30°) in the south, where the segment ends at a slab gap associated with Chile Ridge. We measured shear-wave splitting in over 200 S arrivals from local earthquakes at permanent stations PLCA (USGS/GTSN) and PEL (Geoscope) and 14 stations of the 2000-2002 CHARGE (Chile Argentina Geophysical Experiment) PASSCAL array. We also made splitting measurements in 17 SKS and SKKS phases recorded by PLCA and permanent station TRQA (IRIS/GSN). Splitting parameters for a sub-set of local S, SKS and SKKS phases were determined using a range of filters from 0.05-0.2 to 0.05-2, and were generally stable as a function of frequency; frequency-dependence was observed in a small number of cases, and will be investigated further. The results reported below correspond to a 0.05-2 Hz bandpass filter. Local S splitting times range from 0.1-0.9 seconds, and for back-arc stations, splitting times correlate with path length in the mantle wedge. These results indicate that wedge anisotropy is a dominant factor in the observed splitting, although shallower anisotropy also appears to be present. Splitting fast polarizations at back-arc stations show a coherent variation with latitude. Fast polarizations vary from NE at 40°-41°S, to N (roughly slab-strike parallel) at 35°-36°S, to NE-ESE at 30°-33°S, curving as the slab flattens where the Juan Fernandez Ridge is subducting beneath the South American lithosphere. For SKS and SKKS phases at PLCA (in the western back-arc at 41°S), fast directions are predominantly ENE-ESE and splitting times range from 1.0-2.3 s. At TRQA (much farther to the east and at 38°S), teleseismic fast polarizations are E-SE and splitting times vary from 0.8-2.4 s. At PLCA, because

  5. Metamorphic conditions in the Nilgiri Granulite Terrane and the adjacent Moyar and Bhavani Shear Zones: A reevaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raith, M.; Hengst, C.; Nagel, B.; Bhattacharya, A.; Srikantappa, C.

    1988-01-01

    Data were presented on pressure and temperature determinations from the Nilgiri Hills. About 70 samples were analyzed by probe and several calibrations of garnet-pyroxene thermometry and barometry applied. Most calibrations gave considerable scatter; however, a new calibration by Bhattacharya, Raith, Lal, and others, accounting for nonideality in both garnet and orthopyroxene, gave consistent results of 754 + or - 52 C and 9.2 + or - 0.7 kbar. On the regional scale, a pressure increase of 6.5 to 7 kbar in the SW to 11 kbar in the NE was related to block tilting. A continuous pressure gradient into the Moyar shear zone suggests that the zone is not a suture juxtaposing unrelated blocks.

  6. Irreversible shear-activated aggregation in non-Brownian suspensions.

    PubMed

    Guery, J; Bertrand, E; Rouzeau, C; Levitz, P; Weitz, D A; Bibette, J

    2006-05-19

    We have studied the effect of shear on the stability of suspensions made of non-Brownian solid particles. We demonstrate the existence of an irreversible transition where the solid particles aggregate at remarkably low volume fractions (phi approximately 0.1). This shear-induced aggregation is dramatic and exhibits a very sudden change in the viscosity, which increases sharply after a shear-dependent induction time. We show that this induction time is related exponentially to the shear rate, reflecting the importance of the hydrodynamic forces in reducing the repulsive energy barrier that prevents the particles from aggregating.

  7. Cell-matrix adhesion characterization using multiple shear stress zones in single stepwise microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Doh, Il; Bae, Gab-Yong; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Cho, Young-Ho

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a cell chip capable to characterize cell-matrix adhesion by monitoring cell detachment rate. The proposed cell chip can supply multiple levels of shear stress in single stepwise microchannel. As epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), one of hallmarks of cancer metastasis is closely associated to the interaction with extracelluar matrix (ECM), we took advantage of two lung cancer cell models with different adhesion properties to ECM depending their epithelial or mesenchymal properties, including the pair of lung cancer cells with (A549sh) or without E-cadherin expression (A549sh-Ecad), which would be optimal model to examine the alteration of adhesion properties after EMT induction. The cell-matrix adhesion resisting to shear stress appeared to be remarkably differed between lung cancer cells. The detachment rate of epithelial-like H358 and mesenchymal-like H460 cells was 53%-80% and 25%-66% in the shear stress range of 34-60 dyn/cm2, respectively. A549sh-Ecad cells exhibits lower detachment rate (5%-9%) compared to A549sh cells (14%-40%). By direct comparison of adhesion between A549sh and A549sh-Ecad, we demonstrated that A549shE-cad to mimic EMT were more favorable to the ECM attachment under the various levels of shear stress. The present method can be applied to quantitative analysis of tumor cell-ECM adhesion.

  8. Fluid-rock interactions during the initiation and widening of a shear zone: an example from the Roffna metarhyolite (Eastern Central Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poilvet, Jean-Charles; Goncalves, Philippe; Oliot, Emilien; Marquer, Didier

    2013-04-01

    The formation of shear zones in a homogeneous granitic host-rock may be subdivided into two distinct stages: (1) nucleation on a new or pre-existing brittle structure and (2) lateral widening during ductile deformation (e.g. Mancktelow & Pennacchioni, 2005). During these two stages, the presence of pressure, temperature and chemical potential gradients across the shear zone will induce mass transfer either by fluid infiltration and/or diffusion in a static pore fluid. With material transport, metasomatic reactions produce new assemblages, textures and microstructures that affect the rheology of the shear zone and therefore its behavior. A shear zone developed in a magmatic host-rock is probably the case where the mineralogical changes are the most dramatic, and therefore the easiest to characterize, because deformation and fluid infiltration affect magmatic assemblages that are metastable at the P-T conditions of deformation. The ability of predicting the mineralogical and geochemical evolution during syn-deformation fluid-rock interactions is critical to either estimate PT conditions of deformation or better understand the processes of shear zone formation. The goal of this contribution is to determine the effects of the fluid-rock interactions, and more generally the role chemical processes, on the formation of the shear zone. A major difficulty is that with increasing deformation, the mineralogical and textural evidences of fluid-rock interactions are continuously overprinted, which prevent discussions on the precursor stages. The only way to overcome this difficulty is to study a suite of shear zones at different stages of formation, from the precursor to the most mature ductile shear zone, that were developed in the same host-rock and P-T conditions. The Roffna metarhyolite from the Suretta nappe (eastern central Alps) provides the unique opportunity to study shear zones at different stages of development. The Roffna ryolite is an early Permian massif that

  9. Contrasts in sillimanite deformation in felsic tectonites from anhydrous granulite- and hydrous amphibolite-facies shear zones, western Canadian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, S. R.; Mahan, K. H.; Regan, S.; Williams, M. L.; Dumond, G.

    2015-02-01

    The deformation behavior of crustal materials in variably hydrated metamorphic environments can significantly influence the rheological and seismic properties of continental crust. Optical observations and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses are used to characterize sillimanite deformation behavior in felsic tectonites from two deformation settings in the Athabasca granulite terrane, western Canadian Shield. Under estimated conditions of 0.8-1.0 GPa, 725-850 °C in the Cora Lake shear zone, the data suggest that sillimanite deformed by dislocation creep with slip in the [001] direction accompanied by subgrain rotation recrystallization. Where sillimanite locally remained undeformed, strain was concentrated in surrounding weaker phases. Under hydrated conditions of 0.4-0.6 GPa, 550-650 °C in the Grease River shear zone, textures and cathodoluminescence imaging point to dissolution-precipitation creep as the major deformation mechanism for sillimanite, resulting in synkinematic growth of foliation-parallel euhedral sillimanite in a preferred orientation with [001] parallel to the lineation. The results suggest that temperature, fluid content, and modal mineralogy of the surrounding phases may all have significant influence on sillimanite deformation but that preferential alignment of sillimanite [001] parallel to the lineation persists regardless of contrasts in the conditions or mechanisms of deformation.

  10. Analysis of thrust shear zones in curve-shaped belts: Deformation mode and timing of the Olevano-Antrodoco-Sibillini thrust (Central/Northern Apennines of Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamita, F.; Satolli, S.; Turtù, A.

    2012-11-01

    This work reports the results of our analysis of the brittle-ductile shear zone associated with the Olevano-Antrodoco-Sibillini (OAS) curved-shape thrust in the Central/Northern Apennines of Italy. Its southern sector is characterized by NNW-SSE trending footwall anticlines, which also affect the OAS thrust surface. S tectonites in the NNE-SSW trending sector are crenulated by conjugate extensional surfaces (extensional crenulation cleavage). The NW-SE trending segment of the OAS thrust is characterized by SC tectonites developed along the thrust-related shear zone. Both the SC and S tectonites are consistent with a top-to-the N60-70°E direction of tectonic transport. The SC tectonites are associated with a simple-shear-dominated deformation (Wn = 0.86-0.98). On the other hand, the S tectonites and their related extensional shear planes document two stages of strain: (i) sub-simple shear (Wn = 0.34-0.50, related to OAS thrusting contemporaneous to growing incipient footwall anticlines, and (ii) pure-shear-dominated deformation (Wn = 0.17-0.00), subsequent to the OAS thrusting and caused by the definitive growth of footwall anticlines within an in-sequence deformation context. The present study proposes the analysis of shear zones to: (i) discriminate in-sequence against out-of-sequence evolution, and (ii) use as a tool to constrain the modes and timing of the curved belt's development.

  11. Review of the Senegalo-Malian shear zone system - Timing, kinematics and implications for possible Au mineralisation styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diene, M.; Fullgraf, T.; Diatta, F.; Gloaguen, E.; Gueye, M.; Ndiaye, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Kédougou Kénieba Inlier (KKI) of eastern Senegal forms a typical Paleoproterozoic greenstone belt characterised by low-metamorphic sequences of volcanic rocks and volcano-sediments that have been intruded at various stages by gabbroic suites and calc-alkaline granitoids. The main structures of the KKI comprise two anastomosing structures about N-S trending shear belts that are distinguished into the western Main Transcurrent Zone (MTZ) and the eastern Senegalo-Malian shear zone system (SMSZ). These shear belts are taken to define the limits between the western Mako, the central Diale-Kéniebandi and the eastern Daléma-Kofi domains even though transitions exist between their characteristic deposition sequences. Remote sensing analysis of airborne geophysics and satellite data (Landsat, ENVI, SRTM) in combination with geological field mapping, structural analysis and geochronology suggests that the SMSZ represents a Birimian structure that records a main stage of deformation that could characterise the major transcurrent Eburnean tectonics (D2) dated from 2105 Ma (Feybesse et al., 2006a-e). This sinistral transpressive deformation marked by a major constraint oriented NNW-SSE, is accompanied by a NNE-SSW extension leading to the opening of dilational areas such as small pull-apart basins marked by local calk-alkaline volcanic sequences and several coeval intrusions of the Boboti Suite dated 2080 ± 0.9 Ma (Hirdes and Davis, 2002). A post-Birimian to pre-Neoproterozoic deformation post dates the transcurrent phase and is marked by regional N-S extension. Review of the existing Au-mineralisation models in combination with the spatial analysis of soil geochemical data suggest seven possible mineralisation styles that are related to the transpressional tectonics and coeval magmatism.

  12. Evolution of the Sibişel Shear Zone (South Carpathians): A study of its type locality near Răşinari (Romania) and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducea, Mihai N.; Negulescu, Elena; Profeta, Lucia; Sǎbǎu, Gavril; Jianu, Denisa; Petrescu, Lucian; Hoffman, Derek

    2016-09-01

    The Sibişel Shear Zone is a 1-3 km wide, ductile shear zone located in the South Carpathian Mountains, Romania. In the Rășinari area, the ductile shear zone juxtaposes amphibolite facies rocks of the Lotru Metamorphic Suite against greenschist facies rocks of the Râuşorul Cisnădioarei Formation. The first represents the eroded remnants of Peri-Gondwanan arcs formed between the Neoproterozoic-Silurian (650-430 Ma), regionally metamorphosed to amphibolite facies during the Variscan orogeny (350-320 Ma). The second is composed of metasedimentary and metavolcanic Neoproterozoic-Ordovician (700-497 Ma) assemblages of mafic to intermediate bulk composition also resembling an island arc metamorphosed during the Ordovician (prior to 463 Ma). Between these lie the epidote amphibolite facies mylonitic and ultramylonitic rocks of the Sibișel Formation, a tectonic mélange dominated by mafic actinolite schists attenuated into a high strain ductile shear zone. Mineral Rb-Sr isochrons document the time of juxtaposition of the three domains during the Permian to Early Triassic ( 290-240 Ma). Ductile shear sense indicators suggest a right lateral transpressive mechanism of juxtaposition; the Sibişel shear zone is a remnant Permo-Triassic suture between two Early Paleozoic Gondwanan terranes. A zircon and apatite U-Th/He age transect across the shear zone yields Alpine ages (54-90 Ma apatite and 98-122 Ma zircon); these data demonstrate that the exposed rocks were not subjected to Alpine ductile deformation. Our results have significant implications for the assembly of Gondwanan terranes and their docking to Baltica during Pangea's formation. Arc terranes free of Variscan metamorphism existed until the Early Triassic, emphasizing the complex tectonics of terrane amalgamation during the closure of Paleotethys.

  13. The integrated analyses of digital field mapping techniques and traditional field methods: implications from the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone, SW Turkey as a case-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk; Zabcı, Cengiz; Şahin, Murat

    2015-04-01

    The precise geological mapping is one of the most important issues in geological studies. Documenting the spatial distribution of geological bodies and their contacts play a crucial role on interpreting the tectonic evolution of any region. Although the traditional field techniques are still accepted to be the most fundamental tools in construction of geological maps, we suggest that the integration of digital technologies to the classical methods significantly increases the resolution and the quality of such products. We simply follow the following steps in integration of the digital data with the traditional field observations. First, we create the digital elevation model (DEM) of the region of interest by interpolating the digital contours of 1:25000 scale topographic maps to 10 m of ground pixel resolution. The non-commercial Google Earth satellite imagery and geological maps of previous studies are draped over the interpolated DEMs in the second stage. The integration of all spatial data is done by using the market leading GIS software, ESRI ArcGIS. We make the preliminary interpretation of major structures as tectonic lineaments and stratigraphic contacts. These preliminary maps are controlled and precisely coordinated during the field studies by using mobile tablets and/or phablets with GPS receivers. The same devices are also used in measuring and recording the geologic structures of the study region. Finally, all digitally collected measurements and observations are added to the GIS database and we finalise our geological map with all available information. We applied this integrated method to map the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone (BFSZ) in the southwest Turkey. The BFSZ is an active sinistral 60-to-90 km-wide shear zone, which prolongs about 300 km-long between Suhut-Cay in the northeast and Köyceğiz Lake-Kalkan in the southwest on land. The numerous studies suggest contradictory models not only about the evolution but also about the fault geometry of this

  14. Spinel + quartz assemblage in granulites from the Achankovil Shear Zone, southern India: Implications for ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hisako; Tsunogae, Toshiaki; Santosh, M.

    2009-09-01

    We report the finding of equilibrium spinel + quartz assemblage enclosed within garnet in garnet-orthopyroxene-cordierite granulites from Pakkandom within the Achankovil Shear Zone, a region which is considered as the trace of an accretionary suture in recent tectonic models on southern India. The spinel + quartz bearing granulites are composed of poikiloblastic garnet and subidioblastic orthopyroxene in the matrix of quartz, plagioclase, biotite, cordierite, and Fe-Ti oxides. Garnet contains numerous inclusions of sillimanite and biotite as well as spinel and quartz. The spinel in direct contact with quartz has moderate XMg (= Mg/(Fe 2+ + Mg) = 0.44-0.47), and is Zn and Fe 3+ poor ( XZn = Zn/(Fe 2+ + Mg + Zn) = 0.027-0.036, Fe 3+/(Fe 2+ + Fe 3+) = 0.12-0.17). Spinel is also present in the matrix surrounded by magnetite, but the matrix spinel contains more Zn( XZn = 0.067-0.072) and does not show any contact relationship with quartz. Such Zn- and Fe 3+-poor spinel in direct contact with quartz has been regarded as a diagnostic evidence of ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) metamorphism. The high-temperature stability of the spinel + quartz is also supported by the results of geothermobarometric calculation of garnet-orthopyroxene assemblages that provides robust evidence for peak UHT metamorphism at 920-980 °C and 8-10 kbar, which was further confirmed by Al-in-Opx and magnetite-ilmenite geothermometers (900-950 °C and ˜1000 °C, respectively). The peak UHT event was followed by decompression down to 4.0-4.2 kbar and 640-670 °C toward the stability of cordierite along a clockwise P-T path. Similar spinel + quartz assemblage enclosed in poikiloblastic garnet has also been reported from the Palghat-Cauvery Shear Zone system, the trace of a major suture zone within the Gondwana amalgam with evidence for prograde high-pressure ( P up to 20 kbar) metamorphism followed by UHT event. The fine-grained spinel + quartz may thus indicate decompression from higher pressure

  15. Structural analysis and tectonic implications of a shallow layer-parallel shear zone in the central Apennines (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, S.; Cifelli, F.

    2009-04-01

    The central Apennines is a Neogenic NE verging fold-and-thrust belt, characterized by inherited lower Liassic structures and by different paleogeographic domains (with different rheological behaviours), which played a first order role in the tectonic evolution of the belt. The N-S trending Olevano-Antrodoco, one of the major thrusts of this area, is commonly interpreted as an oblique out-of-sequence structure, along which the Sabina slope domain (to the west) overthrusted the Latium-Abruzzi carbonate platform domain (to the East), reactivating the original Liassic to Miocenic boundary. Paleomagnetic data indicate that the Sabina domain and the Latium-Abruzzi domain were characterized by the occurrence of opposite vertical-axis rotations, clockwise and counterclockwise, respectively, in the two domains, suggesting a different tectonic evolution of these sectors. However, paleomagnetic data can provide only partial information on the kinematic evolution of this area because rocks suitable for paleomagnetic analysis are not widespread in the Latium-Abruzzi domain. Moreover, rocks exposed in the two domains do not allow performing analyses on sediments of the same ages. In this work, in order to provide additional kinematic and geometric constraints to the tectonic evolution of this part of Central Apennines, a mesostructural study was carried out in a decollement level, exposed in both Sabina and Latium-Abruzzi domains and located at the top of the meso-cenozoic carbonatic sequence. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) analysis was integrated with the structural analysis, representing an additional rock fabric indicator used to unravel the deformational history of the studied rocks. The analysed decollement was active in the early stages of the belt evolution and consists of a thick shear zone dominated by pressure solution cleavage oblique to bedding. The widespread exposition of this level, allows using the pressure solution cleavage as a regional

  16. Role of glypican-1 in endothelial NOS activation under various steady shear stress magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Jingxia

    2016-11-01

    Blood flow patterns in proatherogenic and antiatherogenic regions are rather different. We hypothesize that the laminar flow with steady shear stress increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability while disturbed flow with low shear stress reduced it, which is mediating by glypican-1. Thus, we detected the expression of glypican-1 under different shear stress magnitudes, and tested whether the magnitude of shear stress determines the level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) via glypican-1 by using phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Results revealed that the expression of glypican-1 depends on the magnitude and duration of shear stress loading. Activation of eNOS in HUVECs is downregulated by 4dyn/cm(2) of shear stress, but is upregulated by 15dyn/cm(2). Removal of glypican-1 significantly suppressed the 15dyn/cm(2) shear stress-induced eNOS activity, and further reduced the 4dyn/cm(2)-inhibited eNOS activity. Therefore, eNOS activation depends on shear stress magnitudes and is mediated by glypican-1. The role of glypican-1 in mediating the eNOS activation under shear stress might involve in protecting the endothelial function against disturbed flow and enhancing the sensitive of the endothelial cell to laminar flow, supporting a potential role of glypican-1 against atherosclerosis.

  17. Timing of initiation of left-lateral shearing along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone: microstructural and geochronological constraints from high temperature mylonites in Diancang Shan, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Liu, J.; Leiss, B.; Neubauer, F.; Genser, J.

    2009-04-01

    The high grade metamorphic massifs (e.g. Xuelong Shan, Diancang Shan, Ailao Shan in China and Day Nui Con Voi metamorphic massif in Vietnam) along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in Southwestern China bear much information on the large-scale left-lateral strike-slip shearing in eastern Tibet during Indian-Eurasian plate collision and post-collisional accommodation process in late Oligocene-early Miocene. The metamorphic massifs are narrow zones bounded by brittle faults. Low-grade metamorphic rocks are lying on the west and sedimentary rocks to the east. Rocks in these massifs are partly sheared with widespread occurrence of high temperature mylonites that have subhorizontal stretching lineations. Left-lateral shearing is indicated by mesoscale and microscale shear indicators in the mylonites. Debates exist on the timing of initiation and duration of left-lateral shearing, and mechanism of exhumation of the high grade metamorphic rocks along Ailao Shan Red River shear zone. The Diancang Shan complex, a typical metamorphic massif, is constituted by three units, i.e. a central high strain shear zone, a western low-grade metamorphic volcanic-sedimentary sequence in the Lanping basin, and an eastern superimposed retrograde metamorphic belt. The central high grade metamorphic complex consists of metamorphic rocks of amphibolite facies conditions. High-grade metamorphic mineral assemblages and structural elements indicate a deep level crustal metamorphism and deformation of the rocks. L-tectonites are typical indicators of high-temperature deformation in the highly sheared granitic mylonites. Widespread occurrence of different shear criteria (e.g. sheared veins, sigmoid and delta -porphyroclasts) suggests that these gneisses experienced very intensive high-temperature progressive left-lateral strike-slip shearing. A large synkinematic augen monzogranitic intrusion is recognized in the central belt by the present work. The intrusion has an obvious porphyritic texture

  18. Entrainment-Zone Restratification and Flow Structures in Stratified Shear Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, B. Anders Pettersson; Werne, Joseph; Andreassen, Oyvind; Meyer, Christian; Davis-Mansour, Melissa

    2002-01-01

    Late-time dynamics and morphology of a stratified turbulent shear layer are examined using 1) Reynolds-stress and heat-flux budgets, 2) the single-point structure tensors introduced by Kassinos et al. (2001), and 3) flow visualization via 3D volume rendering. Flux reversal is observed during restratification in the edges of the turbulent layer. We present a first attempt to quantify the turbulence-mean-flow interaction and to characterize the predominant flow structures. Future work will extend this analysis to earlier times and different values of the Reynolds and Richardson numbers.

  19. Geology of Precambrian rocks and isotope geochemistry of shear zones in the Big Narrows area, northern Front Range, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abbott, Jeffrey T.

    1970-01-01

    Rocks within the Big Narrows and Poudre Park quadrangles located in the northern Front Range of Colorado are Precambrian metasedimentary and metaigneous schists and gneisses and plutonic igneous rocks. These are locally mantled by extensive late Tertiary and Quaternary fluvial gravels. The southern boundary of the Log Cabin batholith lies within the area studied. A detailed chronology of polyphase deformation, metamorphism and plutonism has been established. Early isoclinal folding (F1) was followed by a major period of plastic deformation (F2), sillimanite-microcline grade regional metamorphism, migmatization and synkinematic Boulder Creek granodiorite plutonism (1.7 b.y.). Macroscopic doubly plunging antiformal and synformal structures were developed. P-T conditions at the peak of metamorphism were probably about 670?C and 4.5 Kb. Water pressures may locally have differed from load pressures. The 1.4 b.y. Silver Plume granite plutonism was post kinematic and on the basis of petrographic and field criteria can be divided into three facies. Emplacement was by forcible injection and assimilation. Microscopic and mesoscopic folds which postdate the formation of the characteristic mineral phases during the 1.7 b.y. metamorphism are correlated with the emplacement of the Silver Plume Log Cabin batholith. Extensive retrograde metamorphism was associated with this event. A major period of mylonitization postdates Silver Plume plutonism and produced large E-W and NE trending shear zones. A detailed study of the Rb/Sr isotope geochemistry of the layered mylonites demonstrated that the mylonitization and associated re- crystallization homogenized the Rb87/Sr 86 ratios. Whole-rock dating techniques applied to the layered mylonites indicate a probable age of 1.2 b.y. Petrographic studies suggest that the mylonitization-recrystallization process produced hornfels facies assemblages in the adjacent metasediments. Minor Laramide faulting, mineralization and igneous activity

  20. Strain localization in brittle-ductile shear zones: fluid-abundant vs. fluid-limited conditions (an example from Wyangala area, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruzeniece, L.; Piazolo, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study focuses on physiochemical processes occurring in a brittle-ductile shear zone at both fluid-present and fluid-limited conditions. In the studied shear zone (Wyangala, SE Australia), a coarse-grained two-feldspar-quartz-biotite granite is transformed into a medium-grained orthogneiss at the shear zone margins and a fine-grained quartz-muscovite phyllonite in the central parts. The orthogneiss displays cataclasis of feldspar and crystal-plastic deformation of quartz. Quartz accommodates most of the deformation and is extensively recrystallized, showing distinct crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Feldspar-to-muscovite, biotite-to-muscovite and albitization reactions occur locally at porphyroclasts' fracture surfaces and margins. However, the bulk rock composition shows very little change in respect to the wall rock composition. In contrast, in the shear zone centre quartz occurs as large, weakly deformed porphyroclasts in sizes similar to that in the wall rock, suggesting that it has undergone little deformation. Feldspars and biotite are almost completely reacted to muscovite, which is arranged in a fine-grained interconnected matrix. Muscovite-rich layers contain significant amounts of fine-grained intermixed quartz with random CPO. These domains are interpreted to have accommodated most of the strain. Bulk rock chemistry data show a significant increase in SiO2 and depletion in NaO content compared to the wall rock composition. We suggest that the high- and low-strain microstructures in the shear zone represent markedly different scenarios and cannot be interpreted as a simple sequential development with respect to strain. Instead, we propose that the microstructural and mineralogical changes in the shear zone centre arise from a local metasomatic alteration around a brittle precursor. When the weaker fine-grained microstructure is established, the further flow is controlled by transient porosity created at (i) grain boundaries in fine

  1. Governing the Himalaya from first collision to orogenic collapse - the long-lasting shear zone that we call the Southern Tibet Detachment System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. A.; Kidd, W. S. F.

    2003-04-01

    Major shear zones govern crustal failure and thereby the architecture of major mountain belts. The central layer of the Himalayan orogen is an exhumed, 10-30 km thick, gently N-dipping mid-crustal section of extensively migmatised metamorphic and/or crystalline rock that is geometrically bounded by coeval normal- and thrust-sense shear zones, termed the Southern Tibet Detachment System (STDS) and the Main Central Thrust System (MCT), above and below the layer, respectively. These shear zones have accommodated the exhumation of the mid-crustal layer all along the ~2000 km orogen for the youngest third of the ca. 60 m.y. since collision began. Our work in southern Tibet shows that the STDS is a 100s m to few km thick, normal sense shear zone that has operated at a range of deformation conditions, and has often incorporated coalesced melt products and much fluid. These phases in particular have dynamically interacted with the existing shear zone rocks to alter the STDS constituent properties through time. Exposed today are little- to un-metamorphosed sedimentary rocks of the former Indian passive margin (Tethyan zone) juxtaposed by the STDS above sillimanite grade gneisses or mid-crustal leucogranites. In the eastern Himalaya, the predominant STDS hanging wall rock type in actual contact with the crystallines is a unit of regionally distinctive black phyllite. The STDS thus accounts for 10s or 100s of km of exhumation and represents, in a sense, orogenic "collapse" (but is likely only a "passive" upper boundary of dominantly pure shear accompanying wedge extrusion). The STDS is, however, a contemporary re-utilisation (D2) of a shear zone that developed as a primary thrust detachment during thin-skinned fold &thrust contraction accompanying early collision (D1) in the initial F&T belt convergence, good evidence for which is preserved. Locally, the major shear zone of STDS has been further reworked (D3) as discrete listric detachment horizons for the various N

  2. Application of strain analysis to estimate pressure solution processes in regional shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytenko, V. N.; Khlebalin, I. Yu.; Senotrusov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the basic principles of the strain analysis method based on the analysis of antitaxial regeneration fibrous fringes around linear rigid inclusions in a low-viscosity rock matrix. This method has been developed for pressure shadows composed of fibrous minerals, whose orientation is controlled by the major elongation direction rather than the orientation of rigid inclusions. This approach is applicable only for rocks exposed to uniform coaxial straining. The strain ellipse is calculated in two ways: for three variably oriented strain markers, it is calculated using Mohr's circles, and for numerous strain markers by average body ellipse. The strain ellipsoid is calculated using the parameters of a few strain ellipses calculated with three and more non-parallel planes. This paper provides the data on the method testing in reference sites of Dora-Pil' ore field in the Upper Indigirka district and Vangash area in the Yenisei Range. Regeneration fibrous fringes around fragments of fern fossils and linear rutile metacrystals were used as markers. The results of strain analysis obtained for the reference sites in the Upper Indigirka district made it possible to describe the signs of variable strain stages of developing strike-slip zones making up the Adycha-Taryn Fault Zone. Sublatitudinal ore-bearing strike-slip zones are characterized by a subvertical orientation of the elongation axes X of elongated strain ellipsoids, which are subperpendicular to quartz-carbonate veins and slope kink zones. NW-trending strike-slip zones are characterized by subhorizontal orientation of the Z shortening axes of flattened strain ellipsoids, which are subparallel to the normals of quartz-carbonate veins and veinlets. The results of strain analysis obtained for reference sites in the Vangash area made it possible to describe the thrust strain environment following the metamorphism stage and to reveal specific features in the formation of the strain textures of ore

  3. Clast Rotation and the Origin of Thick Ultramylonites: the El Pichao Shear Zone (Sierra de Quilmes), NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, N. J.; Hasalova, P.; Weinberg, R. F.; Finch, M.

    2012-12-01

    The El Pichao shear zone in the Sierra de Quilmes, NW Argentina is a 3-7km thick, ductile shear zone between high grade migmatites and low grade metamorphic sequences of an exhumed basement. In the low grade metasediments deformation fabrics vary from protomylonite via mylonite to ultramylonite. These two sequences are separated by a granitic intrusion and intensely intruded by pegmatite dykes. The shear zone overprints all three main rock sequences. The ultramylonite fabrics can reach extreme thicknesses of 1km, which has been seldom observed elsewhere. Thus, the El Pichao Shear Zone provides a unique opportunity to understand differences in strain accommodation at the mylonite-ultramylonite transition, and the nature of thick ultramlyonite sequences. The mylonite sequences contain an anisotropic matrix comprising Bt + Qtz + Ms + Plg + Kfs, with coarse Qtz ribbons, mica bands and feldspar porphyroclasts up to 5 cm in diameter. Qtz ribbons have undergone grain boundary migration recrystallization and have been folded around feldspar clasts. Feldspar clasts have been variably rotated, demonstrated by the orientation of dynamically recrystallized material around the clasts. Three types of deformation behaviour occur simultaneously amongst the feldspar clasts: (i) brittle fracturing, (ii) partial recrystallization, (iii) complete recrystallization. The ultramylonite sequences contain a fine-grained equigranular matrix of Qtz + Ms + Bt + Plg + Kfs with feldspar porphyroclasts. Rotation-induced strain accommodation is demonstrated by the presence of δ-style porphyroclasts and the orientation of micas around clast boundaries. Qtz ribbons or strong S-C fabrics are lacking and the matrix tends to be homogeneous with only weak foliation defined by the preferred orientation of micas. The bulk connectivity of phases in the matrix decreases toward ultramylonite, which suggests a homogenization of the matrix between mylonite and ultramylonite. Quartz c-axis data demonstrates a

  4. Representation and Management of the Knowledge of Brittle Deformation in Shear Zones Using Microstructural Data From the SAFOD Core Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaie, H. A.; Broda, C. M.; Kumar, A.; Hadizadeh, J.

    2010-12-01

    Web access to data that represent knowledge acquired by investigators studying the microstructures in the core samples of the SAFOD (San Andreas Observatory at Depth) project can help scientists efficiently integrate and share knowledge, query the data, and update the knowledge base on the Web. To achieve this, we have used OWL (Web Ontology Language) to build the brittle deformation ontology for the microstructures observed in the SAFOD core samples, by explicitly formalizing the knowledge about deformational processes, geological objects undergoing deformation, and the underlying mechanical and environmental conditions in brittle shear zones. The developed Web-based ‘SAFOD Brittle Microstructure and Mechanics Knowledge base’ (SAFOD BM2KB), which instantiates this ontology and is available at http://codd.cs.gsu.edu:9999/safod/index.jsp, will host and serve data that pertains to spatial objects, such as microstructure, gouge, fault, and SEM image, acquired by the SAFOD investigators through the studies of the SAFOD core samples. Deformation in shear zones involves complex brittle and ductile processes that alter, create, and/or destroy a wide variety of one- to three-dimensional, multi-scale spatial entities such as rocks and their constituent minerals and structure. These processes occur through a series of sub-processes that happen in different time intervals, and affect the spatial objects at granular to regional scales within shear zones. The processes bring about qualitative change to the spatial entities over time intervals that start and end with events. Processes, such as mylonitization and cataclastic flow, change the spatial location, distribution, dimension, size, shape, and orientation of some objects through translation, rotation and strain. These processes may also result in newly formed entities, such as a new mineral, gouge, vein, or fault, during one or more phases of deformation. Deformation processes may also destroy entities, such as a

  5. Quartz preferred orientation in naturally deformed mylonitic rocks (Montalto shear zone-Italy): a comparison of results by different techniques, their advantages and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Eugenio; Punturo, Rosalda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Kern, Hartmut; Pezzino, Antonino; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Goswami, Shalini; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2016-12-01

    In the geologic record, the quartz c-axis patterns are widely adopted in the investigation of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) of naturally deformed rocks. To this aim, in the present work, four different methods for measuring quartz c-axis orientations in naturally sheared rocks were applied and compared: the classical universal stage technique, the computer-integrated polarization microscopy method (CIP), the time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction analysis , and the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Microstructural analysis and CPO patterns of quartz, together with the ones obtained for feldspars and micas in mylonitic granitoid rocks, have been then considered to solve structural and geological questions related to the Montalto crustal scale shear zone (Calabria, southern Italy). Results obtained by applying the different techniques are discussed, and the advantages as well as limitations of each method are highlighted. Importantly, our findings suggest that patterns obtained by means of different techniques are quite similar. In particular, for such mylonites, a subsimple shear (40% simple shear vs 60% pure shear) by shape analysis of porphyroclasts was inferred. A general tendency of an asymmetric c-maximum near to the Z direction (normal to foliation) suggesting dominant basal slip, consistent with fabric patterns related to dynamically recrystallization under greenschist facies, is recognized. Rhombohedral slip was likely active as documented by pole figures of positive and negative rhombs (TOF), which reveal also potential mechanical Dauphiné twinning. Results showed that the most complete CPO characterization on deformed rocks is given by the TOF (from which also other quartz crystallographic axes can be obtained as well as various mineral phases may be investigated). However, this use is restricted by the fact that (a) there are very few TOF facilities around the world and (b) there is loss of any domainal reference, since TOF is a

  6. Constraints regarding gold deposition in episyenites: the Permian episyenites associated with the Villalcampo Shear Zone, central western Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Moro, Francisco Javier; Moro, María Candelas; Timón, Susana María; Cembranos, María Luisa; Cózar, Juan

    2013-04-01

    The Villalcampo Shear Zone (around 307 Ma) shows second-order shear zones (420-390 °C) with gold ore bodies hosted by episyenites, which consist of albite episyenites (albitites) and albite-Kfs episyenites, both types with different contents in sulphides and gold. Mass transfer modelling supports higher fluid/rock ratios in albitites than in albite-Kfs episyenites. The study of worldwide barren and gold-bearing episyenites reveals abundant sulphides in the latter as a distinguishing feature. The electrochemical processes at the surface of sulphide would have enhanced gold precipitation, sulphides working as a gold trap. A complex fluid history occurred in gold ore bodies hosted by episyenites, although in essence, it was similar to quartz-sealed faults hosting late Variscan gold deposits: (a) an early fluid equilibrated with the metamorphic pile with sulphides or with a metamorphic fingerprint, resulted in a sulphide deposition and (b) a shallower fluid reservoir of meteoric origin provided gold deposition. In contrast to earlier claims regarding episyenite fluid flow, a down temperature and probably an upwards fluid flow are proposed for the episyenitization process, also in keeping with the early stages of fluid flow in quartz-sealed faults. Fluid inclusions in albite confirm that the striking coupled quartz leaching albitization processes occurred around 400 °C and 60 MPa, crosscutting the retrograde solubility field of silica and yielding a vuggy rock. Initially, albite, and later quartz and sulphide, filled the vugs from the same or a very similar fluid. Uraninites deposited during the albitization and probably the onset of the sulphide deposition afforded the same age (270 ± 12 Ma) as other Spanish episyenites, confirming a synchronous and a regional-scale process and ruling out a relationship with the granite cooling history (324 ± 11 Ma).

  7. Investigation of mantle kinematics beneath the Hellenic-subduction zone with teleseismic direct shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confal, Judith M.; Eken, Tuna; Tilmann, Frederik; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Çubuk-Sabuncu, Yeşim; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2016-12-01

    The subduction and roll-back of the African plate beneath the Eurasian plate along the arcuate Hellenic trench is the dominant geodynamic process in the Aegean and western Anatolia. Mantle flow and lithospheric kinematics in this region can potentially be understood better by mapping seismic anisotropy. This study uses direct shear-wave splitting measurements based on the Reference Station Technique in the southern Aegean Sea to reveal seismic anisotropy in the mantle. The technique overcomes possible contamination from source-side anisotropy on direct S-wave signals recorded at a station pair by maximizing the correlation between the seismic traces at reference and target stations after correcting the reference stations for known receiver-side anisotropy and the target stations for arbitrary splitting parameters probed via a grid search. We obtained splitting parameters at 35 stations with good-quality S-wave signals extracted from 81 teleseismic events. Employing direct S-waves enabled more stable and reliable splitting measurements than previously possible, based on sparse SKS data at temporary stations, with one to five events for local SKS studies, compared with an average of 12 events for each station in this study. The fast polarization directions mostly show NNE-SSW orientation with splitting time delays between 1.15 s and 1.62 s. Two stations in the west close to the Hellenic Trench and one in the east show N-S oriented fast polarizations. In the back-arc region three stations exhibit NE-SW orientation. The overall fast polarization variations tend to be similar to those obtained from previous SKS splitting studies in the region but indicate a more consistent pattern, most likely due to the usage of a larger number of individual observations in direct S-wave derived splitting measurements. Splitting analysis on direct shear waves typically resulted in larger split time delays compared to previous studies, possibly because S-waves travel along a longer path

  8. Relationships between deformation and magmatism in the Pan-African Kandi Shear Zone: Microstructural and AMS studies of Ediacaran granitoid intrusions in central Bénin (West Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adissin Glodji, L.; Bascou, J.; Yessoufou, S.; Ménot, R.-P.; Villaros, A.

    2014-09-01

    Relationships between the metamorphic basement, granitic intrusions and the Kandi Shear Zone (KSZ) in central Bénin have been investigated using petrological and structural approaches, in order to better understand the space and time parameters of the Pan-African shear deformation and the Ediacaran magmatism. In central Bénin, metamorphic rocks from the KSZ display a steep to vertical N-S trending foliation, a sub-horizontal mineral lineation together with kinematic indicators in agreement with a dextral transcurrent mega-shear zone. Four granitic intrusions (Dassa, Tré, Gobada and Tchetti) show many petrological similarities. They are biotite ± amphibole - ilmenite ± magnetite monzogranites with ferrous and metaluminous I-type features derived from high-K calk-alkaline magma. A fifth intrusion (Fita) is an alkali-feldspar, biotite, magnetite and ilmenite bearing granite crystallized from an alkaline magma. Moreover, high K2O, Zr, Y, Nb and low CaO, MgO and Al2O3 contents together with high (FeOt/MgO) and low LIL/HFS elements ratios suggesting an A-type granite affinity. Microstructural and AMS investigations presented in this paper show (i) solid-state deformation evidence for Dassa pluton and (ii) a magmatic deformation for the Tré, Tchetti, Gobada and Fita granitoids. Foliation in Dassa is parallel to the mesoscopic planar mylonitic foliation of the metamorphic basement. In the Tré, Tchetti, Gobada and Fita granitoids, magmatic textures and magnetic fabrics are coherent with the KSZ activity. These data suggest (i) a syn-kinematic nature for most of the intrusions (Tré, Gobada, Tchetti and Fita), except Dassa which correspond to an earlier event (ii) the succession of high-K calk-alkaline (Dassa, Tré, Gobada, Tchetti) evolves toward alkaline magmas (Fita) during the KSZ strike-slip tectonics. These observations highlight the changing nature of magma composition, magmatic processes and the different sources during KSZ activity in the Bénin Nigerian

  9. Correlation of fingertip shear force direction with somatosensory cortical activity in monkey

    PubMed Central

    Fortier-Poisson, Pascal; Langlais, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To examine the activity of somatosensory cortex (S1) neurons to self-generated shear forces on the index and thumb, two monkeys were trained to grasp a stationary metal tab with a key grip and exert forces without the fingers slipping in one of four orthogonal directions for 1 s. A majority (∼85%) of slowly adapting and rapidly adapting (RA) S1 neurons had activity modulated with shear force direction. The cells were recorded mainly in areas 1 and 2 of the S1, although some area 3b neurons also responded to shear direction or magnitude. The preferred shear vectors were distributed in every direction, with tuning arcs varying from 50° to 170°. Some RA neurons sensitive to dynamic shear force direction also responded to static shear force but within a narrower range, suggesting that the direction of the shear force may influence the adaptation rate. Other neurons were modulated with shear forces in diametrically opposite directions. The directional sensitivity of S1 cortical neurons is consistent with recordings from cutaneous afferents showing that shear direction, even without slip, is a powerful stimulus to S1 neurons. PMID:26467520

  10. Effect of length-scale on localization of shear zones along precursor fractures and layers during deformation of middle to lower crustal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancktelow, Neil; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Hawemann, Friedrich; Wex, Sebastian; Camacho, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Deformation of high grade rocks at middle to lower crustal levels involves both distributed and more highly localized ductile strain, with localized shear zones developing on elongate near-planar rheological precursors. These planar heterogeneities may be compositional layers (e.g. dykes) or pre-existing or newly developed fractures, with or without pseudotachylyte. Usual rheological models for viscous rock deformation are scale independent. The geometry of developing localized shear zones should therefore be scalable and depend only on the pre-existing geometry and imposed boundary conditions, as shown in numerical and analogue models. However, this is not what is observed in natural examples. Shear zones preferentially or exclusively develop on long fractures and dykes, typically on the scales of many (tens of) metres to (tens of) kilometres, whereas smaller-scale healed fractures, basic enclaves and short layers or inclusions are less prone to reactivation and locally may be largely ignored. Preferential localization of strain on these longer structures means that the intervening rock volumes remain low-strain domains, so that the smaller-scale planar heterogeneities are effectively shielded during progressive deformation. Any localized deformation of these intervening low-strain domains requires the formation of new elongate fractures acting as a necessary precursor for subsequent localization. These field observations suggest that ductile shear zone localization is more effective with increasing length of the approximately planar precursor. Localized shear zones do not develop by propagation away from an initial small heterogeneity. Instead, their length is largely predetermined by the length of the controlling precursor structure and in-plane propagation of the tips appears to be very limited. Preferential shear reactivation of longer precursors introduces a length-scale dependence from the very initiation of localized "viscous" or "ductile" shear zones

  11. Tectonic evolution of the Allaqi shear zone and implications for Pan-African terrane amalgamation in the south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kazzaz, Y. A. H. A.; Taylor, W. E. G.

    2001-08-01

    The complex major Allaqi shear zone occurs within the meta-volcanic and meta-sedimentary Neoproterozoic rocks of the central Wadi Allaqi and is important for our understanding of the development of the Arabian-Nubian Shield within the evolution of the East African (Pan-African) Orogeny (950—550 Ma). Early-formed northerly-facing complex thrust duplex systems, with attendant west-northwest—east-southeast orientated recumbent folds, dominate the area. Early ductile structural phases are superseded by more brittle structures, and the intrusion of four granitoid plutons punctuates the development history. The Allaqi shear zone is interpreted as the most northerly major dislocation of a fault-duplex zone of regional significance but an interpretation of the zone as a palæo-suture is not proven despite the presence of an allochthonous ophiolitic unit (the Gebel Taylor Wedge), which has undergone blueschist-facies metamorphism.

  12. The Sundance fault: A newly recognized shear zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, R.W.; Braun, C.A.; Martin, L.G.; Weisenberg, C.W.

    1994-04-01

    Ongoing detailed mapping at a scale of 1:240 of structural features within the potential repository area indicates the presence of several previously unrecognized structural features. Minor north-trending west-side-down faults occur east and west of the Ghost Dance fault and suggest a total width of the Ghost Dance fault system of nearly 366 m (1200 ft). A zone of near-vertical N30{degrees} {minus} 40{degrees}W {minus} trending faults, at least 274 m (900 ft) wide, has been identified in the northern part of our study area and may traverse across the proposed repository area. On the basis of a preliminary analysis of available data, we propose to name this zone the ``Sundance fault system`` and the dominant structure, occurring near the middle of the zone, the ``Sundance fault.`` Some field relations suggest left-stepping deflections of north-trending faults along a preexisting northwest-trending structural fabric. Other field observations suggest that the ``Sundance fault system`` offsets the Ghost Dance fault system in an apparent right lateral sense by at least 52 m (170 ft). Additional detailed field studies, however, are needed to better understand structural complexities at Yucca Mountain.

  13. Structural evolution of the Irtysh Shear Zone (northwestern China) and implications for the amalgamation of arc systems in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Sun, Min; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Cai, Keda; Yu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    The NW-SE Irtysh Shear Zone is a major tectonic boundary in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), which supposedly records the amalgamation history between the peri-Siberian orogenic system and the Kazakhstan/south Mongolia orogenic system. However, the tectonic evolution of the Irtysh Shear Zone is not fully understood. Here we present new structural and geochronological data, which together with other constraints on the timing of deformation suggests that the Irtysh Shear Zone was subjected to three phases of deformation in the late Paleozoic. D1 is locally recognized as folded foliations in low strain areas and as an internal fabric within garnet porphyroblasts. D2 is represented by a shallowly dipping fabric and related ˜ NW-SE stretching lineations oriented sub-parallel to the strike of the orogen. D2 foliations are folded by ˜ NW-SE folds (F3) that are bounded by a series of mylonite zones with evidence for sinistral/reverse kinematics. These fold and shear structures are kinematically compatible, and thus interpreted to result from a transpressional deformation phase (D3). Two samples of mica schists yielded youngest detrital zircon peaks at ˜322 Ma, placing a maximum constraint on the timing of D1-D3 deformation. A ˜ NE-SW granitic dyke swarm (˜252 Ma) crosscuts D3 fold structures and mylonitic fabrics in the central part of the shear zone, but is displaced by a mylonite zone that represents the southern boundary of the Irtysh Shear Zone. This observation indicates that the major phase of D3 transpressional deformation took place prior to ˜252 Ma, although later phases of reactivation in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic are likely. The late Paleozoic deformation (D1-D3 at ˜322-252 Ma) overlaps in time with the collision between the Chinese Altai and the intra-oceanic arc system of the East Junggar. We therefore interpret that three episodes of late Paleozoic deformation represent orogenic thickening (D1), collapse (D2), and transpressional deformation (D3

  14. Multi-surface Earthquake Rupture Recorded in Pseudotachylyte Vein Geometries, Norumbega Shear Zone, southern Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C.; Rowe, C. D.; Pollock, S. G.; Swanson, M.; Tarling, M.; Backeberg, N. R.; Coulson, S.; Barshi, N.; Bate, C.; Dascher-Cousineau, K.; Scibek, J.; Harrichhausen, N.; Timofeev, A.; Rakoczy, P.; Nisbet, H.; Castro, A.; Smith, H.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake rupture surfaces are typically treated as single rupture planes. However, the observation of four linked, non-parallel to sub-parallel slip surfaces on a mining induced earthquake in 2004 shows that rupture geometries may be more complicated (Heesakkers et al., 2011). Multiple pseudotachylyte-bearing fault surfaces are exposed within a 1.1 km wide mylonite zone of the Paleozoic Norumbega fault system. The pseudotachylytes are present in two juxtaposed mylonite zones: the Ray Corner mylonite and a mylonite derived from Scarboro Formation metavolcanics. The Ray Corner mylonite crosscuts pelitic schists of the Cape Elizabeth Formation, at upper greenschist-facies conditions (quartz + feldspar + chlorite + muscovite ± titanite ± pyrite). The pseudotachylyte veins formed late in the deformational history, during a period of predominantly brittle dextral offset. The pseudotachylytes are cryptocrystalline and have rounded porphyroclasts of quartz and feldspar. Microstructural observations show evidence for static and dynamic recrystallization overprinting the primary quench textures, suggesting that previous generations of rupture surfaces have been recycled into the mylonitic fabric (Price et al., 2012). Many of the pseudotachylyte veins have a sharp boundary on one side and are poorly defined on the other, providing insight to the propagation direction. This confirms that the paleo-earthquake ruptures occurred at conditions where quartz and feldspar were able to deform plastically, near the base of the seismogenic zone. Using differential GPS, we mapped the geometry of pseudotachylyte fault veins, injection veins, and slip surface intersections. At Ray Corner, there are 7 layer-parallel pseudotachylytes in a 4 m wide zone with linking and subsequent oblique pseudotachylytes. Some intersections between pseudotachylytes are dilational, depending on the intersection angle and relative displacement on the two faults. At these sites, pseudotachylyte melt sourced

  15. P-T-t-d History of the Greater Himalaya Sequence metapelites in the Zanskar Shear Zone, NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, E.; Leech, M. L.; Basta, S.

    2013-12-01

    Greater Himalaya Sequence (GHS) metapelites deformed in the Zanskar Shear Zone (ZSZ) record geochemical and structural evidence of a complex history. This study applies a multi-component approach to understanding the metamorphic and deformational evolution of the high-grade metapelites in western Himalaya. Samples collected from NE to SW from the ZSZ, along Malung Takpo, record increasing metamorphic grade and decreasing mylonitization with increased distance from the shear zone. Microscopic evidence for variable degrees of deformation includes: change in crystal size, foliation development, pressure shadows, and kink bands. The dominant mineralogy is Qz+Kfs+Pl+Bt+Ms+Grt+Ky×Sil×St+opaques. Advanced isochemical phase diagrams (pseudosections) are calculated in Perple_X using whole-rock geochemical (XRF) data for six samples. The pseudosection conditions range 3-15 kbar and 300-800°C and use the solution models Bio(TCC), Chl(HP), St(HP), hCrd, feldspar, Mica(CHA), and Gt(HP) with modifications made to increase the models' accuracy. The generated phase equilibria diagrams, in conjunction with observed mineral growth relationships, are used to determine the P-T paths and illustrate peak and retrograde metamorphic events. Three dating techniques [U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, and (U-Th)/He] are incorporated to constrain timing along the P-T paths. U-Pb SHRIMP dating of monazite constrains the timing of regional metamorphism to ~27 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar dating of muscovite and biotite yields ages of ~20-19 Ma and 15 Ma, respectively, for cooling and exhumation through the middle crust. Dates acquired from (U-Th)/He analyses of monazite and zircon will indicate the timing of the end of movement along the ZSZ. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps crystallographic orientation of minerals and is used to determine their responses to deformation. Crystallographic responses in quartz and feldspar are used to constrain the conditions during deformation. This will be supplemented by

  16. On the geometric relationship between deformation microstructures in zircon and the kinematic framework of the shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Klötzli, Urs; Habler, Gerlinde

    2016-10-01

    We present novel microstructural analyses of zircon from a variety of strained rocks. For the first time, multiple plastically deformed zircon crystals were analyzed in a kinematic context of the respective host shear zones. Our aim was to derive how the orientation of zircon grains in a shear zone affects their deformation, based on careful in situ observations. For sampling, we selected zircon-bearing rocks that were deformed by simple shear. Samples covered a range of P-T conditions and lithologies, including various meta-igneous and meta-sedimentary gneisses. Microstructural analyses of zircon crystals in situ with scanning electron backscatter diffraction mapping show strong geometrical relationships between orientations of: (i) the long axes of plastically deformed zircon crystals, (ii) the crystallographic orientation of misorientation axes in plastically deformed zircon crystals and (iii) the foliation and lineation directions of the respective samples. We assume that zircon crystals did not experience post-deformation rigid body rotation, and thus the true geometric link can be observed. The relationships are the following: (a) plastically deformed zircon crystals usually have long axes parallel to the mylonitic foliation plane; (b) crystals with < c > axes oriented at an angle > 15° to the foliation plane are undeformed or fractured. Zircon crystals that have < c > axes aligned parallel or normal to the stretching lineation within the foliation plane develop misorientation and rotation axes parallel to the [001] crystallographic direction. Zircon grains with the < c > axis aligned at 30-60° to the lineation within the foliation plane often develop either two low Miller indices misorientation axes or one high Miller indices misorientation axis. Host phases have a significant influence on deformation mechanisms. In a relatively soft matrix, zircon is more likely to develop low Miller indices misorientation axes than in a relatively strong matrix. These

  17. Predicting active slip systems in β-Sn from ideal shear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Y.; Matsushima, H.; Ohno, N.

    2012-04-01

    We analyse the ideal shear resistances of 15 nonequivalent slip systems in β-Sn using first-principles density functional theory. From the ideal shear resistance and Schmid's law, the orientation dependence of active slip systems in a β-Sn single crystal subjected to uniaxial tension is investigated. We find that (1\\,0\\,1)[\\bar{1}\\,0\\,1] has the lowest ideal shear resistance among the 15 slip systems. Our calculations indicate that, depending on crystal orientation, uniaxial tension activates seven nonequivalent groups of slip systems. The active slip systems for [1 0 0] and [1 1 0] orientations determined in this study agree with the experimental results.

  18. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  19. Microstructures and crystallographic fabric evolution during melt-present and melt-absent conditions in the partially molten middle crust: the Patos shear zone (Borborema Province, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Viegas, Luís Gustavo; Archanjo, Carlos; Vauchez, Alain

    2013-04-01

    The Patos shear zone is an exposed segment of the partially molten middle crust characterized by a 600 km long, E-trending transcurrent structure that deforms the Precambrian rocks of the Borborema Province. High-temperature (HT) mylonites with low melt fractions (~ 5%) constitute most of the shear belt, while a narrow strip of highly strained mylonites to ultramylonites outlines its southern margin. Migmatites and "transitional" mylonites occur sandwiched between these tectonites. A progressive microfabric development is recorded from melt-bearing mylonites to high-strain ultramylonites. A microstructural study was carried out to understand the fabric evolution from melt-assisted to melt-absent deformation. Fabrics were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and crystallographic preferred orientations were measured by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). Melt-bearing HT-mylonites display solid-state microstructures with coarse quartz ribbons and sutured grain boundaries. K-feldspar clasts are often fractured and show peripheral myrmekite. Towards the contact with anatexites the microfabric becomes typically magmatic with abundant interstitial quartz. Transitional mylonites, located immediately south of the migmatites, are marked by progressive grain size reduction of recrystallized felsic phases. High-strain mylonites have a fine-grained quartz-feldspar matrix with relics of quartz ribbons and fractured K-feldspar. Melt-bearing mylonites display quartz [0001] axes forming maxima mainly on Y, while quartz fabrics in the anatexite are weaker and diffuse, suggesting deformation in the magmatic state. In transitional and high-strain mylonites the measured quartz CPOs show [0001] concentrations between Z and Y. K-feldspar and plagioclase fabrics record mainly the activity of (010)[001] and (010)[100] slip systems in all rock types, with local activity of the (100)[010] slip system in the transitional mylonites. These data suggest that the

  20. Splay fault branching from the Hikurangi subduction shear zone: Implications for slow slip and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Faverola, A.; Henrys, S.; Pecher, I.; Wallace, L.; Klaeschen, D.

    2016-12-01

    Prestack depth migration data across the Hikurangi margin, East Coast of the North Island, New Zealand, are used to derive subducting slab geometry, upper crustal structure, and seismic velocities resolved to ˜14 km depth. We investigate the potential relationship between the crustal architecture, fluid migration, and short-term geodetically determined slow slip events. The subduction interface is a shallow dipping thrust at <7 km depth near the trench and steps down to 14 km depth along an ˜18 km long ramp, beneath Porangahau Ridge. This apparent step in the décollement is associated with splay fault branching and coincides with a zone of maximum slip (90 mm) inferred on the subduction interface during slow slip events in June and July 2011. A low-velocity zone beneath the plate interface, updip of the plate interface ramp, is interpreted as fluid-rich overpressured sediments capped with a low permeability condensed layer of chalk and interbedded mudstones. Fluid-rich sediments have been imbricated by splay faults in a region that coincides with the step down in the décollement from the top of subducting sediments to the oceanic crust and contribute to spatial variation in frictional properties of the plate interface that may promote slow slip behavior in the region. Further, transient fluid migration along splay faults at Porangahau Ridge may signify stress changes during slow slip.

  1. The influence of strain localisation on the rotation behaviour of rigid objects in experimental shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Grotenhuis, Saskia M.; Passchier, Cees W.; Bons, Paul D.

    2002-03-01

    Mica fish and tourmaline fish from natural mylonites were analysed in thin section to determine their orientation distribution. They are oriented with their long axes tilted with respect to the mylonitic foliation, and fish with a small aspect ratio exhibit a slightly larger angle than fish with a large aspect ratio. This orientation seems to be a stable orientation for the mica and tourmaline fish. Analogue experiments with two rheologically different matrix materials were performed to explain the data. One material was PDMS, a linear viscous polymer. The other was tapioca pearls, a granular material with low cohesion and Mohr-Coulomb type behaviour. In contrast to a fairly homogeneous strain distribution in PDMS, distinct small-scale shear bands developed in tapioca pearls during deformation. Experiments modelled different vorticity numbers and parallelogram-shaped rigid objects with different aspect ratios were used. Rotation rates of objects in a viscous matrix are very similar to analytical solutions for ellipses in viscous flow, but stable orientations differ from data of natural examples. In all experiments with a Mohr-Coulomb matrix elongated objects had a stable orientation due to small-scale strain localisation. We therefore suggest that small-scale strain localisation (≤mm) that might be hidden by ongoing deformation and recrystallisation processes, is an important characteristic of the rheology of mylonites.

  2. Microstructural evolution and rheology of quartz in a mid-crustal shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahl, Jeffrey M.; Skemer, Philip

    2016-06-01

    We present microstructural and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) data on quartz deformed in the middle crust to explore the interaction and feedback between dynamic recrystallization, deformation processes, and CPO evolution. The sample investigated here is a moderately deformed quartz-rich mylonite from the Blue Ridge in Virginia. We have created high-resolution crystallographic orientation maps using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) of 51 isolated quartz porphyroclasts with recrystallized grain fractions ranging from 10 to 100%. Recrystallized grains are internally undeformed and display crystallographic orientations dispersed around the orientation of the associated parent porphyroclast. We document a systematic decrease in fabric intensity with recrystallization, suggesting that progressive deformation of the recrystallized domains involves processes that can weaken a pre-existing CPO. Relationships between recrystallization fraction and shear strain suggest that complete microstructural re-equilibration requires strains in excess of γ = 5. Variation in the degree of recrystallization implies that strain was accumulated heterogeneously, and that a steady-state microstructure and rheology were not achieved.

  3. Thermal evolution of the Sisters shear zone, southern New Zealand; Formation of the Great South Basin and onset of Pacific-Antarctic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, Joseph; Tulloch, Andy J.; Spell, Terry L.; Wells, Michael L.; Zanetti, Kathleen A.

    2009-10-01

    The separation of Zealandia from West Antarctica was the final stage in the Cretaceous breakup of the Gondwana Pacific margin. Continental extension resulting in formation of the Great South Basin and thinning of the Campbell Plateau leading to development of the Pacific-Antarctic spreading ridge was partially accommodated along the Sisters shear zone. This east-northeast striking brittle-ductile structure exposed along the southeast coast of Stewart Island, New Zealand, is a greenschist facies extensional shear zone that separates a hanging wall of chloritic, brecciated granites, and undeformed conglomerate from a footwall of mylonitic Carboniferous and Early Cretaceous granites. This complex structure exhibits bivergent kinematics and can be subdivided into a northern and southern segment. The 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology indicates that cooling of the shear zone footwall began at ˜94 Ma with accelerated cooling over the interval ˜89-82 Ma. Structural and thermochronological data indicate a spatial and temporal link between the Sisters shear zone, initial sedimentation within the offshore Great South Basin, extension of the Campbell Plateau, and initiation of the Pacific-Antarctic spreading ridge.

  4. Cleaveage domains control the orientation of mylonitic shear zones at the brittle-viscous transition (Cap de Creus, NE Spain) - a combined field and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, T.; Fusseis, F.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    Propagation of greenschist-facies shear zones is often preceded by the formation of fractures in their tip process zones. These fractures tend to have a tensile nature and are generally considered as having triggered the formation of mylonites by focusing fluid flow and locally accelerating strain softening. The often-observed parallelism between the tensile fractures and the mylonitic shear zones indicates that the fractures not only control the position but also the orientation of the shear zones. The mechanical antagonism in this parallelism is usually resolved with a reorientation of the stress field between fracture formation and mylonitic shearing. Where fractures were clearly shown to form parallel to the shear zone in the same deformation, this might be due to the influence of mechanical anisotropies in the host rock. In our combined numerical and field study, we test the potential of a foliation to influence the orientation of a microfracture. We designed a numerical experiment using the finite element code Abaqus® (Hibbit et al. 2003) to simulate strain localization in metapelitic and metapsammitic rocks at greenschist-facies conditions. The experimental setup comprises a 2D parametric model with two rheological phases (‘cleavage domains' and ‘microlithons' consisting of muscovite and quartz respectively). The geometry of the model is described in terms of probability distributions which allow us to quickly generate different realizations of 2D sections with prescribed muscovite content, cleavage domains size, orientation and distribution. We consider the specific heat, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of both materials, as well as anisotropic elastic properties for the muscovite. The plasticity flow laws used consider the temperature, pressure and strain rate dependencies. Our models are deformed under simple shear applied with velocity boundary conditions on a thin buffer zone surrounding the sample, at 450°C and under a confining

  5. Triclinic Transpression in brittle shear zones evaluated via combined numerical and analogue modeling: the case of The Torcal de Antequera Massif, SE Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, Leticia; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Faccenna, Claudio; Balanyá, Juan Carlos; Expósito, Inmaculada; Giménez-Bonilla, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Numerical kinematic models have been widely used to understand the parameters controlling the generation and evolution of ductile transpression zones. However, these models are based on continuum mechanics and therefore, are not as useful to analyse deformation partitioning and strain within brittle-ductile transpression zones. The combination of numerical and analogue models will potentially provide an effective approach for a better understanding of these processes and, to a broader extent, of high strain zones in general. In the present work, we follow a combined numerical and analogue approach to analyse a brittle dextral transpressive shear zone. The Torcal de Antequera Massif (TAM) is part of a roughly E-W oriented shear zone at the NE end of the Western Gibraltar Arc (Betic Cordillera). This shear zone presents, according to their structural and kinematic features, two types of domains i) Domain type 1 is located at both TAM margins, and is characterized by strike-slip structures subparallel to the main TAM boundaries (E-W). ii) Domain type 2 corresponds to the TAM inner part, and it presents SE-vergent open folds and reverse shear zones, as well as normal faults accommodating fold axis parallel extension. Both domains have been studied separately applying a model of triclinic transpression with inclined extrusion. The kinematic parameters obtained in this study (?, ? and Wk) allows us to constrain geometrical transpression parameters. As such, the angle of oblique convergence (α, the horizontal angle between the displacement vector and the strike of the shear zone) ranges between 10-17° (simple shear dominated) for domain type 1 and between 31-35° (coaxial dominated) for domain type 2. According to the results obtained from the numerical model and in order to validate its possible utility in brittle shear zones we develop two analogue models with α values representative of both domains defined in the TAM: 15° for type 1 and 30° for type 2. In the

  6. Activation and shedding of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa under non-physiological shear stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Mondal, Nandan K; Ding, Jun; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of non-physiological high shear stress on activation and shedding of platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptors. The healthy donor blood was exposed to three levels of high shear stresses (25, 75, 125 Pa) from the physiological to non-physiological status with three short exposure time (0.05, 0.5, 1.5 s), created by a specific blood shearing system. The activation and shedding of the platelet GPIIb/IIIa were analyzed using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, platelet P-selectin expression of sheared blood, which is a marker for activated platelets, was also analyzed. The results from the present study showed that the number of activated platelets, as indicated by the surface GPIIb/IIIa activation and P-selectin expression, increased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. However, the mean fluorescence of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface, decreased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. The reduction of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface was further proved by the reduction of further activated platelet GPIIb/IIIa surface expression induced by ADP and the increase in GPIIb/IIIa concentration in microparticle-free plasma with increasing the applied shear stress and exposure time. It is clear that non-physiological shear stress induce a paradoxical phenomenon, in which both activation and shedding of the GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface occur simultaneously. This study may offer a new perspective to explain the reason of both increased thrombosis and bleeding events in patients implanted with high shear blood-contacting medical devices.

  7. Anisotropic shear zones revealed by backazimuthal harmonics of teleseismic receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Levin, V.

    2016-11-01

    Backazimuth-dependent Ps conversion, observed in seismic receiver functions (RFs) is generated by acute{SV} and acute{SH} waves that help match the shear-polarized displacement of hybrid Ṕ at the interfaces of an anisotropic layer. The effect of elliptical anisotropy with a tilted or horizontal symmetry axis hat{w} on body-wave propagation in horizontal layers can be expressed in terms of the first-order hybridization of upgoing and downgoing P, SV and SH plane waves with a common horizontal slowness p. The first-order perturbations to the upgoing P wave involve hybridization of its polarization eigenvector with the addition of the shear wave polarizations acute{SV},grave{SV},acute{SH},grave{SH}. Although the hybridization of plane waves in an anisotropic layer is only one factor in the complicated reflection and transmission problem, these perturbations suggest that the influence of P anisotropy on RFs is much larger than the influence of S anisotropy. Perturbation terms for hybrid Ṕ can be grouped into functional dependencies on the tilt angle ψ of the symmetry axis hat{w} from the vertical. Terms proportional to sin2 ψ include four-lobed variation (cos 2θ, sin 2θ) with backazimuth θ, encompassing the effect of a horizontal axis of symmetry. Terms proportional to sin 2ψ have two-lobed variation (cos θ, sin θ) with backazimuth θ, encompassing the effects of a tilted symmetry axis. In the perturbation formula (33) for the hybrid Ṕ polarization, the four-lobed terms have pre-factor αp, and the two-lobed terms have pre-factor ανP, leading potentially to larger amplitude in the two-lobed pattern in Ps for the same amount of P anisotropy. For a dipping interface between two isotropic media, the out-of-plane deflections of the P-SV converted wave lead to a two-lobed pattern of P-SV and P-SH amplitudes that resembles the effects of anisotropy with a tilted axis of symmetry. The birefringence of the Moho-converted Ps phase influences the backazimuth

  8. Dependence of shear wave seismoelectrics on soil textures: a numerical study in the vadose zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyserman, F. I.; Monachesi, L. B.; Jouniaux, L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we study seismoelectric conversions generated in the vadose zone, when this region is traversed by a pure SH wave. We assume that the soil is a one-dimensional partially saturated lossy porous medium and we use the van Genuchten's constitutive model to describe the water saturation profile. Correspondingly, we extend Pride's formulation to deal with partially saturated media. In order to evaluate the influence of different soil textures we perform a numerical analysis considering, among other relevant properties, the electrokinetic coupling, coseismic responses and interface responses (IR). We propose new analytical transfer functions, modified from Bordes et al. (2015) and Garambois and Dietrich (2001), for the electrical and magnetic field as a function of the water saturation. Further, we introduce two substantially different saturation dependent functions into the electrokinetic (EK) coupling linking the poroelastic and the electromagnetic wave equations. The numerical results show that the electric field IR markedly depend on the soil texture and the chosen EK coupling model, and are several orders of magnitude stronger than the electric field coseismic ones. We also found that the IR of the water table for the silty and clayey soils are stronger than those for the sandy soils, assuming a non monotonous saturation dependence of the EK coupling, which takes into account the charged air-water interface. These IR have been interpreted as the result of the jump in the viscous electric current density at the water table. The amplitude of the IR is obtained using a plane SH wave, neglecting both the spherical spreading and the restriction of its origin to the first Fresnel zone, effects that could lower the predicted values. However, we made an estimation of the expected electric field IR amplitudes detectable in the field by means of the analytical transfer functions, accounting for spherical spreading of the SH seismic waves. This prediction yields a

  9. Dependence of shear wave seismoelectrics on soil textures: a numerical study in the vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyserman, F. I.; Monachesi, L. B.; Jouniaux, L.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we study seismoelectric conversions generated in the vadose zone, when this region is traversed by a pure SH wave. We assume that the soil is a 1-D partially saturated lossy porous medium and we use the van Genuchten's constitutive model to describe the water saturation profile. Correspondingly, we extend Pride's formulation to deal with partially saturated media. In order to evaluate the influence of different soil textures we perform a numerical analysis considering, among other relevant properties, the electrokinetic coupling, coseismic responses and interface responses (IRs). We propose new analytical transfer functions for the electric and magnetic field as a function of the water saturation, modifying those of Bordes et al. and Garambois & Dietrich, respectively. Further, we introduce two substantially different saturation-dependent functions into the electrokinetic (EK) coupling linking the poroelastic and the electromagnetic wave equations. The numerical results show that the electric field IRs markedly depend on the soil texture and the chosen EK coupling model, and are several orders of magnitude stronger than the electric field coseismic ones. We also found that the IRs of the water table for the silty and clayey soils are stronger than those for the sandy soils, assuming a non-monotonous saturation dependence of the EK coupling, which takes into account the charged air-water interface. These IRs have been interpreted as the result of the jump in the viscous electric current density at the water table. The amplitude of the IR is obtained using a plane SH wave, neglecting both the spherical spreading and the restriction of its origin to the first Fresnel zone, effects that could lower the predicted values. However, we made an estimation of the expected electric field IR amplitudes detectable in the field by means of the analytical transfer functions, accounting for spherical spreading of the SH seismic waves. This prediction yields a value

  10. Evidence for partial melting at northern Tavan Har and relationship to Late Triassic sinistral shear in the East Gobi Fault Zone, southeastern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stypula, M.; Webb, L. E.; Hagen-Peter, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    We present preliminary data and interpretations from an ongoing study focused on the timing, extent, and significance of partial melting at northern Tavan Har in southeastern Mongolia. Tavan Har is a basement block within the East Gobi Fault Zone. Regional studies of the East Gobi Fault Zone reveal at least three phases of reactivation during the Mesozoic, including the formation of a Late Triassic sinistral ductile shear zone that can be traced for ~250 km along strike. The metamorphic tectonites of the shear zone exposed in the northern Tavan Har block are dominated by steeply-dipping, NE-striking foliations and subhorizontal lineations. The lithologies of northern Tavan Har consist of mylonite, ultramylonite, amphibolite-facies gneiss, granitic gneiss, and migmatite. The suite of lithologies is observed to extend to the northern margin of the study region where they are overprinted at greenschist-facies conditions and ultimately truncated by the Northern Zuunbayan Fault. The granitic gneiss is a synkinematic pluton that truncates the western margin of Tavan Har and includes vestiges of amphibolite and mylonite lithologies. The amphibolite grade tectonites represent the highest metamorphic grade in relation to the shear zone. Mylonites located throughout the shear zone exhibit WNW plunging lineations. Many generations of dikes and veining are apparent throughout the field area, revealing variable degrees of folding and cross cutting relationships. The southern margin of the migmatite zone is in fault contact with Lower Cretaceous rift basin strata. Previous argon dating determined that the timing of ductile sinistral shear at amphibolite-facies conditions occurred c. 225 Ma. The same study obtained an age of 240 Ma for hornblende from a melanosome within the migmatite unit, giving significance to the question of the timing of partial melting and its relationship to the shear zone. New mapping and structural analysis of the southern margin of the northern Tavan

  11. Constraining Quaternary offset of the Cady fault, eastern California shear zone, southern California, with geologic mapping, luminescence dating, and geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K. M.; Mahan, S.; Langenheim, V. E.

    2012-12-01

    We interpreted bedrock and surficial geologic mapping in conjunction with potential-field anomalies and recently acquired luminescence dates of alluvial sediment to constrain offset along the east-striking sinistral Cady fault within the Mojave block of the eastern California shear zone. Previous research, new field mapping of Quaternary deposits, and analysis of aeromagnetic data indicate that the Cady fault forms a significant structural boundary separating northwest-striking dextral faults to the south, from east-northeast-striking faults to the north. We estimated total sinistral offset of ~6 km along the Cady fault based upon reconstruction of displaced bedrock outcrops and magnetic anomalies. Assuming extensional strain in the region began ~10 Ma, as recorded by interbedded sediments and volcanics of the Ricardo Group exposed along the Garlock fault, the long-term offset rate is ~0.6 mm/yr. Assuming that onset of strain is dated by the opening of the Gulf of California to marine incursions by rifting associated with the San Andreas fault system at ~ 6 Ma, the long-term offset rate is roughly 1 mm/yr. Time-averaged sinistral offset rates through the Quaternary, estimated from field mapping of displaced alluvial deposits and from regional age constraints obtained through luminescence and radiocarbon dating techniques, decrease with older deposit age. Deposits from the late Pleistocene/Holocene transition yield rates exceeding 1 mm/yr whereas minimum rates for middle to early Pleistocene deposits may be as low as 0.02 mm/yr, assuming this time-averaged fault offset ensued immediately following deposit formation. At one Holocene-Pleistocene deposit beheaded by the Cady fault, we dated two horizons below the Bk horizon to preclude sampling of illuviated post-deposition fines. New infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dates were used to estimate numeric ages of alluvial sediment and an aggradation rate. For illustration purposes, we assumed that sediment

  12. Microfluidic Emulation of Mechanical Circulatory Support Device Shear-Mediated Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dimasi, A.; Rasponi, M.; Sheriff, J.; Chiu, W.-C.; Bluestein, D.; Tran, P.L.; Slepian, M. J.; Redaelli, A.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of ventricular assist devices (VADs) compromises their performance, with associated risks of systemic embolization, stroke, pump stop and possible death. Anti-thrombotic (AT) drugs, utilized to limit thrombosis, are largely dosed empirically, with limited testing of their efficacy. Further, such testing, if performed, typically examines efficacy under static conditions, which is not reflective of actual shear-mediated flow. Here we adopted our previously developed Device Thrombogenicity Emulation methodology to design microfluidic platforms able to emulate representative shear stress profiles of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. Our long-term goal is to utilize these systems for point-of-care (POC) personalized testing of AT efficacy under specific, individual shear profiles. First, we designed different types of microfluidic channels able to replicate sample shear stress patterns observed in MCS devices. Second, we explored the flexibility of microfluidic technology in generating dynamic shear stress profiles by modulating the geometrical features of the channels. Finally, we designed microfluidic channel systems able to emulate the shear stress profiles of two commercial VADs. From CFD analyses, the VAD-emulating microfluidic systems were able to replicate the main characteristics of the shear stress waveforms of the macroscale VADs (i.e. shear stress peaks and duration). Our results establish the basis for development of a lab-on-chip POC system able to perform device-specific and patient-specific platelet activation state assays. PMID:26578003

  13. Correlation between the shear-speed structure and thickness of the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Chevrot, Sébastien; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2003-04-01

    The 410 and 660 km seismic discontinuities that bound the mantle transition zone (TZ) are attributed to phase transformations in olivine structure. This implies that variations in TZ thickness ( HTZ) should correlate with those in TZ temperature. Pertinent seismic evidence has so far been ambiguous, however. We measure converted-wave ( Pd s) differential times tdiff= tP660 s- tP410 s in SE Asia and Australia and compare them with S-velocity ( βTZ) estimates from regional tomographic models. Both tdiff and βTZ vary on a scale of a few hundred kilometers. Inferred variations in HTZ are up to ±30 km over length scales larger than 500 km, implying ±200 K thermal heterogeneity if the effect of composition can be neglected. tdiff and βTZ correlate strongly; the linear dependence of HTZ on the average temperature within the TZ is consistent with olivine Clapeyron slopes. We also show that this relationship holds on a global-scale as well, provided that the scalelengths and uncertainties of the variations in tdiff and βTZ are taken into account. These results confirm that the transformations in olivine structure give rise to the 410 and 660 km discontinuities globally.

  14. The Fluid Evolution of a Ductile-To Dextral Shear Zone in the Central Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holk, G. J.; Lojasiewicz, I.; Hartman, S. M.; Compton, K.; Paterson, S. R.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The application of stable isotopes in conjunction with detailed mapping of the dextral Steelhead Lake shear zone (SLSZ) in the central Sierra Nevada reveals a complex fluid history as the system transitioned from ductile-to-brittle behavior at shallow crustal depth in response to cooling of the adjacent Tuolumne Batholith (TB) at ~85 Ma. This system has a multi-stage alteration history that includes: (1) ductiley deformed tourmaline-bearing leucogranite dikes, (2) ductile-to-brittle quartz+tourmaline veins, (3) brittle calc-silicate-rich leach zones, and (4) 1-10-m-thick quartz veins with crack-seal textures. High and variable quartz δ18O values (> +13‰) from metasedimentary rocks belonging to the Saddlebag pendant outside the SLSZ indicate metamorphic fluids at low water/rock ratio. Leucogranite dikes associated with the TB have δ18O (plagioclase = +9.5±0.3‰) and δD (~ -80‰) values consistent with magmatic fluids. Quartz+tourmaline veins that record the ductile-to-brittle transition display a range of δ18O values (quartz: +3.4 to +16.4‰; tourmaline: +8.0‰) that indicate a complex fluid system involving magmatic, metamorphic, and meteoric-hydrothermal fluids. Variable mineral δ18O (-1.5 to +11.3‰) and δD (-140 to -77‰) values from the Sawmill Sequence calc-silicates and Koip Sequence metavolcanics are the product of a fluid system with magmatic (TB) and meteoric-hydrothermal end-member sources, with lowest values found within a pull-apart zone and the highest values are outside this zone. Quartz δ18O (-3.2 to +14.5‰) and fluid inclusion δD values (-137 to -79‰) define a mixing line with magmatic (TB) and meteoric-hydrothermal water end members for the crack-seal veins. Detailed studies of one 10-m-thick vein reveal a trend of decreasing isotope values from the margin to the median plane. Most mineral pairs failed to reach isotopic equilibrium, indicating a very complex and short-lived fluid evolution for this system. This study documents

  15. Shear Wave Velocity Estimates through Combined Use of Passive Techniques in a Tectonically Active Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rajib; Baruah, Saurabh

    2016-12-01

    We made an attempt to assess the shear wave velocity values VSand, to a lesser extent, the VP values from ambient noise recordings in an array configuration. Five array sites were situated in the close proximity to borehole sites. Shear wave velocity profiles were modeled at these five array sites with the aid of two computational techniques, viz. spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) and H/V ellipticity. Out of these five array sites, velocity estimates could be reliably inferred at three locations. The shear wave velocities estimated by these methods are found to be quite consistent with each other. The computed VS values up to 30 m depth are in the range from 275 to 375 m/s in most of the sites, which implies prevalence of a low velocity zone at some pocket areas. The results were corroborated by evidence of site geology as well as geotechnical information.

  16. Anomalous shear band characteristics and extra-deep shock-affected zone in Zr-based bulk metallic glass treated with nanosecond laser peening

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yanpeng; Xu, Guangyue; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Zhe; Guo, Yacong; Huang, Chenguang; Wei, Bingchen

    2017-01-01

    The effects of nanosecond laser peening on Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 metallic glass were investigated in this study. The peening treatment produced an extra-deep shock-affected zone compared to crystal metal. As opposed to the conventional shear bands, numerous arc shear bands appeared and aggregated in the vertical direction of the laser beam, forming basic units for accommodating plastic deformation. The arc shear bands exhibited short and discrete features near the surface of the material, then grew longer and fewer at deeper peened layer depths, which was closely related to the laser shock wave attenuation. An energy dissipation model was established based on Hugoniot Elastic Limit and shear band characteristics to represent the formation of an extra-deep shock-affected zone. The results presented here suggest that the bulk modification of metallic glass with a considerable affected depth is feasible. Further, they reveal that nanosecond laser peening is promising as an effective approach to tuning shear bands for improved MGs ductility. PMID:28266649

  17. Application of kinematic vorticity and gold mineralization for the wall rock alterations of shear zone at Dungash gold mining, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassem, Osama M. K.; Abd El Rahim, Said H.; El Nashar, EL Said R.; AL Kahtany, Kaled M.

    2016-11-01

    The use of porphyroclasts rotating in a flowing matrix to estimate mean kinematic vorticity number (Wm) is important for quantifying the relative contributions of pure and simple shear in wall rocks alterations of shear zone at Dungash gold mine. Furthermore, it shows the relationship between the gold mineralization and deformation and also detects the orientation of rigid objects during progressive deformation. The Dungash gold mine area is situated in an EW-trending quartz vein along a shear zone in metavolcanic and metasedimentary host rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. These rocks are associated with the major geologic structures which are attributed to various deformational stages of the Neoproterozoic basement rocks. We conclude that finite strain in the deformed rocks is of the same order of magnitude for all units of metavolcano-sedimentary rocks. The kinematic vorticity number for the metavolcanic and metasedimentary samples in the Dungash area range from 0.80 to 0.92, and together with the strain data suggest deviations from simple shear. It is concluded that nappe stacking occurred early during the underthrusting event probably by brittle imbrication and that ductile strain was superimposed on the nappe structure during thrusting. Furthermore, we conclude that disseminated mineralization, chloritization, carbonatization and silicification of the wall rocks are associated with fluids migrating along shearing, fracturing and foliation of the metamorphosed wall rocks.

  18. Anomalous shear band characteristics and extra-deep shock-affected zone in Zr-based bulk metallic glass treated with nanosecond laser peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yanpeng; Xu, Guangyue; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Zhe; Guo, Yacong; Huang, Chenguang; Wei, Bingchen

    2017-03-01

    The effects of nanosecond laser peening on Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 metallic glass were investigated in this study. The peening treatment produced an extra-deep shock-affected zone compared to crystal metal. As opposed to the conventional shear bands, numerous arc shear bands appeared and aggregated in the vertical direction of the laser beam, forming basic units for accommodating plastic deformation. The arc shear bands exhibited short and discrete features near the surface of the material, then grew longer and fewer at deeper peened layer depths, which was closely related to the laser shock wave attenuation. An energy dissipation model was established based on Hugoniot Elastic Limit and shear band characteristics to represent the formation of an extra-deep shock-affected zone. The results presented here suggest that the bulk modification of metallic glass with a considerable affected depth is feasible. Further, they reveal that nanosecond laser peening is promising as an effective approach to tuning shear bands for improved MGs ductility.

  19. Structure, age, and tectonic setting of a multiply reactivated shear zone in the piedmont in Washington, D.C., and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, A.H.; Drake, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Rock Creek shear zone is the dominant tectonic feature in the Piedmont in Washington, D.C. and adjacent parts of Maryland, has an exposed length of 25 km, and a width of up to 3 km. The shear zone is characterized by a complicated composite fabric produced by the imposition of both ductile and brittle structures as well as the reactivation, transposition, and folding of older structures during subsequent antithetic displacement. At least five main types of structural elements are discernible and include: 1) relict, medium- to coarse-grained mylonitic foliation and related structures produced by sinistral shearing under at least middle amphibolite facies conditions; 2) a ductile fault zone having an apparent sinistral displacement of at least several km and an unknown, but possibly significant component of upward throw of the east wall; 3) pervasive, fine-grained ultramylonitic foliation associated with quartz ribbons and late oblique shear bands, generated by dextral shearing under thermal conditions that appear to have progressed from middle greenschist to sub-greenschist (semi-brittle); 4) a system of oblique-(west wall up) and dextralship faults localized chiefly within a tectonic me??lange at the junction of two major strands, and whose motion spanned the ductile-brittle transition; and 5) a system of post-Cretaceous thrust faults that cut Coastal Plain rocks as young as Quaternary as well as the previously deformed crystalline rocks. The first two sets of structures are of probable Ordovician age and are thus believed to coincide with the Taconic event, which produced regional middle to upper amphibolite facies metamorphism, widespread plutonism, and extensive southwest-vergent fold phases in this area. In contrast, the dextral shearing and faulting were generated during final thermal cooling and represent the latest Paleozoic penetrative deformation that affected this area. They are very likely Alleghanian because of their great similarity to other better

  20. The effect of shear on in vitro platelet and leukocyte material-induced activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojian; Gorbet, Maud

    2013-09-01

    The failure to understand the mechanisms of biomaterial-associated thrombosis prevents us from improving the blood compatibility of stents and mechanical heart valves. Blood-material interactions trigger a complex series of events and anticoagulant and anti-platelet therapies are needed to reduce the risks of thrombotic complications with most cardiovascular materials. While material interaction with platelets has been widely studied, little is currently known on material-induced leukocyte activation in the presence of shear. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the effect of flow on blood cell activation induced by medical grade metals, ST316L and TiAl6V4. Blood was circulated in flow chambers preloaded with or without metal wires at shear rates of 100, 500, and 1500 s⁻¹. Platelet and leukocyte activation, leukocyte-platelet aggregation, and tissue factor expression on monocytes were measured by flow cytometry. Metal surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Under physiological shear rates, no significant platelet microparticle formation was observed. However, significant CD11b up-regulation, leukocyte-platelet aggregates, and tissue factor expression were observed at 100 s⁻¹. As shear rate increased to 1500 s⁻¹, leukocyte activation reduced to control values. TiAl6V4-induced leukocyte activation was generally lower than that of ST316L. Adhesion significantly decreased with increasing shear rate to 1500 s⁻¹. In blood, increase within physiological shear rates led to a significant reduction in in vitro material-induced leukocyte activation, suggesting that difference between material biocompatibility may be better identified at low shear rates or under pathological shear conditions.

  1. Petrological and geochemical studies of ultramafic-mafic rocks from the North Puruliya Shear Zone (eastern India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Aditi; Ray, Arijit

    2015-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic rocks occur within a linear belt, trending nearly E-W along North Puruliya Shear Zone of the Chhotanagpur Gneissic Complex (CGC). These rocks are classified as gabbro, norite, gabbro-norite, dolerite, diorite, olivine-websterite and lherzolite. Mafic rocks (Group 1) often occur in association with ultramafic variants (Group 2) and sometimes in isolation. A genetic link has been established between these mafic and ultramafic rocks using disposition of ultramafic and mafic rocks in the outcrop, systematic variation in modal mineralogy, co-linearity of plots in biaxial chemical variation diagram. Chemical composition of biotite and clinopyroxene reveal calc-alkaline nature and arc signature in these mafic-ultramafic rocks and whole rock geochemical characters indicate similarity with arc magma in subduction zone setting. The high values of Mg no. (47-81) and Al 2 O 3 (5.5-17.9) of mafic rocks indicate primitive, aluminous nature of the parental melt and presence of amphibole and biotite indicate its hydrous nature. The parent mafic melt evolved through fractionation of olivine, spinel, clinopyroxene and plagioclase. The crystal cumulates gave rise to the ultramafic rocks and the associated mafic rocks formed from residual melt. Crustal contamination played an important role in magmatic evolution as evident from variation in abundance of Rb in different lithomembers. Mafic-ultramafic rocks of the present study have been compared with intra-cratonic layered complexes, mafic-ultramafic rocks of high grade terrain, Alaskan type ultramafic-mafic complex and ophiolites. It is observed that the ultramafic-mafic rocks of present study have similarity with Alaskan type complex.

  2. First local seismic tomography for Red River shear zone, northern Vietnam: Stepwise inversion employing crustal P and Pn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsin-Hua; Xu, Zhen J.; Wu, Yih-Min; Song, Xiaodong; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Nguyen, Le Minh

    2013-01-01

    The 900-km-long Red River shear zone (RRSZ) lends a compelling support to the continental extrusion model for the tectonic evolution of southeastern Asia, but has been challenged by many of views, as some new records mainly from northern Vietnam, suspecting the dimensions of RRSZ neither in depth nor in displacement are as large as we expected before. However, compared to the northwestern half of the RRSZ in Yunnan province better studied by many fields, the southeastern half in northern Vietnam is relatively poorly constrained by seismic study, due to insufficient stations and data in the past. This study, using a newly deployed portable broadband seismic network, obtained the first local seismic tomography with a stepwise inversion using P and Pn phases. Surface geology, major structures, and rock properties are well correlated and identified in our model, suggesting the RRSZ is a lithospheric structure at least penetrating to the uppermost mantle with mantle thermal anomalies. In general, the crust of northern Vietnam appears to be weak and sits on a relatively hot uppermost mantle, showing a long and complex thermo tectonic history. A mid-lower crustal segmentation of RRSZ is also proposed to compromise the discrepancies recently observed between Yunnan province and northern Vietnam.

  3. Fabric-related velocity anisotropy and shear wave splitting in rocks from the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, H. ); Wenk, H.R. )

    1990-07-10

    The directional dependence of P and S wave velocities have been measured at pressures (up to 600 MPa) and temperatures (up to 700C) in rocks from the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone (southern California). During tectonism, these were progressively deformed from granodiorite protolith to mylonite and ultimately phyllonite. The mineralogical and chemical composition of protolith and mylonite is nearly identical. Thus these rocks provide excellent material for documenting the effect of microstructural and textural changes on rock anisotropy. Velocity anisotropy increases significantly with the degree of deformation, whereas average velocities and densities do not change. At low pressure (50 MPa) the velocity anisotropy ranges from 1.7% in granodiorite up to 19% in phyllonite and is due to both oriented microfractures and crystallographic preferred orientation. At high pressure (600 MPa), the residual anisotropy up to 12% is mainly due to preferred mineral orientation, in particular of biotite. Significant shear wave splitting is measured parallel to the foliation plane and shows a good correlation with the biotite texture. These observations confirm that oriented microcracks and preferred orientation of minerals should be taken into account in the interpretation of seismic reflection and refraction data in terranes with deformed rocks.

  4. Characterization of transpressive deformation in shear zones of the Archean North Caribou greenstone belt (NW Superior Province) and the relationship with regional metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Émilie; Schneider, David A.; Kalbfleisch, Tash; Habler, Gerlinde; Biczok, John

    2016-12-01

    The 2.7-3.0 Ga North Caribou greenstone belt (NCGB), host to the Musselwhite BIF-hosted gold deposit, possesses abundant shear zones on its northern margins, which appear to have formed under amphibolite facies conditions. Protracted deformation and regional metamorphism are coeval with widespread magmatism and accretion events during crustal amalgamation of the Western Superior Province, and are responsible for folding the ore-hosting BIF and channeling fluids. The importance of shear zones in behaving as conduits for fluids during the tectonic evolution of the NCGB is not well known and their relationship with metamorphism is equivocal, yet higher-grade, syn- to post-tectonic metamorphic minerals seem to correlate with loci of higher strain. Structural analyses support oblique transpressive collision that produced steeply-dipping planar and shallowly-plunging linear fabrics with dominant dextral kinematics, that trend broadly parallel to the doubly arcuate shape of the belt. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses were conducted on strategic samples across one shear zone in order to characterize crustal conditions during transpressive deformation. The Dinnick Lake shear zone cuts through mafic metavolcanics and at its core is an L-tectonite granite composed of recrystallized quartz. Whole rock geochemistry shows little variation in Ca, Na, Mg and K (often used as indicators of hydrothermal alteration) from surrounding less deformed units, suggesting deformation in a dry environment. Microstructural analysis indicates subgrain rotation recrystallization and deformation by prism a- and c-slip in quartz, as well as aligned hornblende that suggest deformation temperatures above 500 °C. Quartz in mafic rocks along the margins of the shear zone also exhibits a basal a-slip component, indicating a slight decrease in strain or temperature. Although the NCGB exhibits some first-order evidence of vertical tectonism (dome and keel geometries), the dominant strain record

  5. Seismic anisotropy beneath the Mississippi Embayment and the New Madrid Seismic Zone: A study of shear wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamwandha, Cecilia A.; Powell, Christine A.

    2016-11-01

    Shear wave splitting associated with the Mississippi Embayment (ME) is determined using teleseismic SKS phases recorded by the Northern Embayment Lithosphere Experiment (NELE), the USArray Transportable Array (TA), and the New Madrid seismic network for the period 2005-2016. Our data set consists of 5900 individual splitting measurements from 257 earthquakes recorded at 151 stations within and outside the ME. Stations outside of the ME exhibit significant shear wave splitting, with average delay times between 0.4 s and 1.8 s. To the northeast and east of the ME, nearly all observed fast orientations are approximately oriented northeast-southwest, in agreement with absolute plate motion (APM) predicted by HS3-Nuvel-1A. The homogeneity of the fast orientations in this region suggests that the splitting is due to active flow in the asthenosphere. A counterclockwise rotation in the splitting orientation is observed moving northeast to northwest across the study area. Inside the ME, some stations show large and systematic deviations of the measured fast orientations from the APM. The delay times within the entire ME range from 0.9 s to 2.1 s. Splitting complexity is attributed to relic lithospheric fabrics formed during past tectonic events including passage of a hot spot in mid-Cretaceous time. The anisotropy may also be linked to the presence of a southwest dipping region of low P and S wave velocities below the ME or to deeper flow in the asthenosphere.

  6. Cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl geochronology of offset alluvial fans along the northern Death Valley fault zone: Implications for transient strain in the eastern California shear zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, K.L.; Brantley, K.S.; Dolan, J.F.; Finkel, R.C.; Klinger, R.E.; Knott, J.R.; Machette, M.N.; Owen, L.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Slate, J.L.; Wernicke, B.P.

    2007-01-01

    The northern Death Valley fault zone (NDVFZ) has long been recognized as a major right-lateral strike-slip fault in the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). However, its geologic slip rate has been difficult to determine. Using high-resolution digital topographic imagery and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating, we present the first geochronologically determined slip rate for the NDVFZ. Our study focuses on the Red Wall Canyon alluvial fan, which exposes clean dextral offsets of seven channels. Analysis of airborne laser swath mapping data indicates ???297 ?? 9 m of right-lateral displacement on the fault system since the late Pleistocene. In situ terrestrial cosmogenic 10Be and 36C1 geochronology was used to date the Red Wall Canyon fan and a second, correlative fan also cut by the fault. Beryllium 10 dates from large cobbles and boulders provide a maximum age of 70 +22/-20 ka for the offset landforms. The minimum age of the alluvial fan deposits based on 36Cl depth profiles is 63 ?? 8 ka. Combining the offset measurement with the cosmogenic 10Be date yields a geologic fault slip rate of 4.2 +1.9/-1.1 mm yr-1, whereas the 36Cl data indicate 4.7 +0.9/-0.6 mm yr-1 of slip. Summing these slip rates with known rates on the Owens Valley, Hunter Mountain, and Stateline faults at similar latitudes suggests a total geologic slip rate across the northern ECSZ of ???8.5 to 10 mm yr-1. This rate is commensurate with the overall geodetic rate and implies that the apparent discrepancy between geologic and geodetic data observed in the Mojave section of the ECSZ does not extend north of the Garlock fault. Although the overall geodetic rates are similar, the best estimates based on geology predict higher strain rates in the eastern part of the ECSZ than to the west, whereas the observed geodetic strain is relatively constant. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Alternations in burial and exhumation along the Selimiye (Kayabükü) shear zone in the Menderes Massif from detailed garnet pressure-temperature paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, E. D.; Atakturk, K. R.; Catlos, E. J.; Lizzadro-McPherson, D. J.; Cemen, I.; Lovera, O. M.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure-temperature (P-T) paths derived from garnet chemical zoning and supported by thermal modeling record alternating burial and exhumation during Main Menderes Metamorphism in western Turkey. We studied six rocks along the Selimiye (Kayabükü) shear zone, three from the footwall (Çine nappe) and three from the hanging wall (Selimiye nappe). The shear zone bounds the southern Menderes Massif metamorphic core complex and has been suggested to record compression followed by extension. The rocks are lower-amphibolite facies garnet-bearing metapelites with nearly identical mineral suites. Retrograde overprinting hinders classical thermobarometry; to overcome this, preserved chemical zoning in garnet combined with a G-minimization approach was used to construct detailed P-T paths (e.g., 50 points in some paths). During continuous temperature increase, the Çine nappe paths show increasing, decreasing, and then increasing pressure (an N-shaped path) ending at 7-8 kbar and ~565-590 °C. The Selimiye nappe paths show a single increase in P-T ending at ~7.3 kbar and ~580 °C. Similar bulk-rock compositions in all samples and the separation by the shear zone suggest that garnets grew during distinct events in each nappe. The timing of garnet growth, and thus the P-T paths, is currently undetermined, as monazite inclusions in garnet appear secondary and complicated by excess common Pb. The Çine nappe N-shaped path describes alternations in burial and exhumation, possibly due to thrust motion along the shear zone. To demonstrate the physical plausibility of the P-T paths, a 2-D finite difference solution to the diffusion-advection equation was applied. The results of the thermal modeling suggest that thrusting, denudation, and renewed thrusting would produce similar changes in P-T to the N-shaped path. Thus, the Çine nappe N-shaped P-T path appears to record a gap in thrust motion along the Selimiye (Kayabükü) shear zone prior to ultimate unroofing of the massif.

  8. Late Neoproterozoic metamorphic assemblages along the Pan-African Hamisana Shear Zone, southeastern Egypt: Metamorphism, geochemistry and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Bik, Mohamed W.; Sadek, Mohamed F.; Ghabrial, Doris Sadek

    2014-11-01

    A variety of Late Neoproterozoic gneisses and amphibolites are distributed along the N-S trending Hamisana Shear Zone (HSZ), in southeastern Egypt. The HSZ originated after the accretion of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) and covers an area of about 1500 km2 in southeastern Egypt and northeastern Sudan. The architecture of the northern part of the HSZ is best explained as a tectono-stratigraphic column, in which allochthonous ophiolitic mélange was thrusted onto metamorphosed island-arc assemblages (gneisses and amphibolites). The latter rock units were generally subjected to two successive phases of amphibolite facies metamorphism, followed by a thermal phase and retrograde overprint. The early penetrative, low- to medium-pressure metamorphism (M1) was synchronous with D1-gneissosity and N-S trending lineation, demarcating the high strain HSZ. The mineral assemblages formed during the M1 phase include quartz + andesine + hornblende (I) + biotite (I) in hornblende-biotite gneiss, quartz + andesine + pargasitic hornblende (I) + ferroan pargasitic hornblende (I) + edenitic hornblende (I) in hornblende-schist, quartz + plagioclase + biotite + muscovite in psammopelitic gneiss, and diopside + tremolite + calcite + sphene ± garnet in calc-silicates, being characteristic for amphibolite facies with metamorphic conditions of 600 ± 50 °C and 5-6.5 kbar. The second metamorphic phase (M2) is related to the crystallization of biotite and/or hornblende in S2 foliation demarcating the NE-SW trending dextral shear deformation (D2). The calculated temperature for this M2 phase is about 592 °C. Subsequent thermal events are documented by growth of spinel and scapolite in calc-silicate rocks and of cordierite in psammopelitic gneiss in response to uplift, decomposition and heat provided by the nearby late-formed igneous intrusions. Finally, the rocks reached a temperature of about 530 °C during the cooling retrogressive stage. Based on geological, petrological and geochemical

  9. Frictional Properties of Experimentally Sheared Gouges from the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittempergher, S.; Smith, S. A. F.; Remitti, F.; Gualtieri, A.; Di Toro, G.

    2014-12-01

    Smectite-rich fault gouge recovered during IODP exp. 343 (J-FAST project) from the plate-boundary slip zone of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake was deformed at slip velocities of 10 -5 - 3 m s -1 with theSlow to High Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA) at INGV, Rome. Experiments were performed "room-dry" (40-60% humidity, 8.5 -12.5 MPa normal stress) or "water-dampened" (0.5 ml distilled water, 3.5 MPa normal stress), with displacements up to 1m. Mineralogy and microstructures of pre and post-experiment material was investigated by quantitative X Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The starting material is composed of smectite (beidellite, 55.8 wt.%), illite (17.2 wt.%), quartz (8.5 wt.%), plagioclase (7.4 wt.%), K-feldspar (7.1 wt.%) and kaolinite (5 wt.%). At all investigated slip velocities, water-dampened gouges have peak and steady state frictional strengths (0.04<μ<0.1) lower than room dry gouges and are velocity-neutral to velocity-weakening. Under room-dry conditions, the gouges are velocity-strengthening at intermediate velocities (0.001 - 0.1 m s -1 , 0.25<μ<0.35) and strongly velocity-weakening at slip velocities > 0.1 m s -1 (μ<0.1). A detectable amount of amorphous material formed in room-dry experiments at low and high-slip velocities, likely by comminution and disordering of smectite.Room-dry gouges deformed at low slip velocities are foliated (P foliation) and cut by a series of shear bands lying either sub-parallel (Y) or at low angles to gouge layer boundaries (R). At high slip velocities, room-dry gouges contain a weak P foliation and a single, prominent Y shear. Deformed water-dampened gouges display homogeneous internal texture, lacking foliation or systematically organized fracture sets. In room-dry gouges, velocity strengthening at intermediate slip velocities and a pronounced peak friction at high slip velocities, represent an energy barrier to seismic rupture

  10. Crystallographically controlled crystal-plastic deformation of zircon in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Klötzli, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Plastically-deformed zircons from various types of strained natural metamorphic rocks have been investigated in-situ by electron backscatter diffraction analysis (EBSD), allowing crystallographic orientation mapping at high spatial resolution. Plastic deformation often forms under the control of grain-internal heterogeneities. At the crystal structure scale deformation is controlled by the physical anisotropy of the lattice. Three most common slip systems in zircon are [100]{010}, [010]{001} and [001]{010} (Leroux et. al., 1999; Reddy et. al., 2007). They are genetically connected with the main zircon crystallographic directions: [001] (c-axis), [100] and [010] (a and b axes). Atomic models show weak planes normal to these directions that preferably evolve to glide planes in the deforming crystal. The visualization of seismic (elastic) properties of zircon with the MATLAB toolbox MTEX shows a similar pattern. The slowest S-wave velocities are observed in directions parallel to [100], [010] and [001] crystallographic directions. The highest Young's modulus values lie in the same directions. In natural zircon grains, the common slip systems are preferably activated when zircon is hosted by rheologically comparatively weaker phases or a fine-grained matrix. In these cases zircon behaves as a rigid clast. During progressive deformation high deviatoric stresses together with high strain rates concentrate at crystal tips, as shown by numerical modeling. Softer host phases allow more degrees of freedom for zircon to be deformed according to its crystallographic and internal properties. These conclusions are supported by the misorientation axes density distribution maps, derived with MTEX. Deformed zircon hosted by a relatively soft phase (mostly biotite) develops a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), which has not been documented for zircon before. At the same time deformation of zircon hosted by a rheologically stronger matrix causes the activation of less

  11. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  12. Tectonothermal evolution of a garnet-bearing quartzofeldspathic gneiss from the Moyar shear zone, south India and its bearing on the Neoarchean accretionary tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Subhadip; Nasipuri, Pritam

    2017-03-01

    We present mesoscale structural development across the Nilgiri Block and the flanking Moyar and Bhavani shear zones in south India, and detailed mineral-chemical and geothermobarometric studies of a garnet-bearing quartzofeldspathic gneiss from the easternmost part of the Moyar shear zone. Barring a narrow (< 100 μm) rim domain, major element distribution within garnet porphyroblasts reveals complete chemical homogenization. The absence of growth zoning in garnet porphyroblasts may suggest a protracted post-garnet growth residence period of the rock at elevated temperatures. Chemical zoning near garnet rim reflects the signature of both retrograde net-transfer (ReNTR) and retrograde exchange (ReER) equilibria. The ReNTR-equilibrium is recognized by prominent Mn kick-up in garnet, whereas the ReER-equilibrium is identified by divergence of Fe and Mg between garnet and biotite. Diffusion modelling, though qualitative, of the observed chemical zoning in garnet suggests an initial phase of rapid ( 150 °C/Ma) cooling, which may have been achieved by tectonic-extrusion-induced exhumation. Pressure-temperature conditions for peak, ReNTR and ReER are constrained, respectively, at 900 °C; 9-11 kbar, 735 °C; 8 kbar and 685 °C; 7.8 kbar. Analyses of structural fabrics establish oppositely verging nature of the Moyar and Bhavani shear zone and may suggest a doubly vergent orogenic development, with the former as prowedge and the latter as retrowedge. The presence of the Nilgiri Block as a topographically elevated region between these oppositely dipping thrust faults indeed corroborates a doubly vergent orogenic setup. The tectonic scenario is comparable with a continent-continent collision type accretionary tectonics. Peak high-P granulite facies metamorphism and post-peak long residence period of the studied quartzofeldspathic gneiss at deep crustal level suitably fit into the Neoarchean crustal dynamics resulting in crustal thickening, in the order of 41 km, within the

  13. New structural and seismological evidence and interpretation of a lithospheric-scale shear zone at the southern edge of the Ionian subduction system (central-eastern Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreca, G.; Scarfı, L.; Cannavò, F.; Koulakov, I.; Monaco, C.

    2016-06-01

    Geological, gravimetric, and seismological data from the central-eastern Sicily (Italy) provide evidences of a NW-SE oriented shear zone at the southern edge of the Ionian subduction system. This structure consists of a near 100 km long lithospheric-scale structural and seismic boundary. In the near-surface, it shows Plio-Pleistocene vertical-axis structural rotations, kilometer-scale topographic imprint, progressive wrenching, and large down-faulting. All these features, together with its location south-west of the subduction system, allow us to interpret the shear zone as the upper plate expression of an abandoned Subduction Transform Edge Propagator fault, working before slab detachment, currently reactivated by elastic rebound or mantle upwelling mechanism triggered by slab detachment, to form an incipient transform belt separating compartments characterized by different motion in the modern context of Africa-Europe convergence.

  14. Orbital fluid shear stress promotes osteoblast metabolism, proliferation and alkaline phosphates activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aisha, M D; Nor-Ashikin, M N K; Sharaniza, A B R; Nawawi, H; Froemming, G R A

    2015-09-10

    Prolonged disuse of the musculoskeletal system is associated with reduced mechanical loading and lack of anabolic stimulus. As a form of mechanical signal, the multidirectional orbital fluid shear stress transmits anabolic signal to bone forming cells in promoting cell differentiation, metabolism and proliferation. Signals are channeled through the cytoskeleton framework, directly modifying gene and protein expression. For that reason, we aimed to study the organization of Normal Human Osteoblast (NHOst) cytoskeleton with regards to orbital fluid shear (OFS) stress. Of special interest were the consequences of cytoskeletal reorganization on NHOst metabolism, proliferation, and osteogenic functional markers. Cells stimulated at 250 RPM in a shaking incubator resulted in the rearrangement of actin and tubulin fibers after 72 h. Orbital shear stress increased NHOst mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation, simultaneously preventing apoptosis. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was reduced, suggesting that orbital shear stress has the potential to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity. Increase in ALP activity and OCN protein production suggests that stimulation retained osteoblast function. Shear stress possibly generated through actin seemed to hold an anabolic response as osteoblast metabolism and functional markers were enhanced. We hypothesize that by applying orbital shear stress with suitable magnitude and duration as a non-drug anabolic treatment can help improve bone regeneration in prolonged disuse cases.

  15. Evolution of metamorphic fluids in shear zones: The record from the emeralds of Habachtal, Tauern Window, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwe, Y. Y.; Grundmann, G.

    1990-11-01

    Fluid inclusions in emeralds from the Habachtal, Central Tauern Window, have been studied by microthermometry. Results allow a detailed reconstruction of trapping history and evolution of the metamorphic fluids during the Middle Alpine Tauernkristallisation metamorphic event and some of the subsequent cooling period. Five different types of fluid inclusions, corresponding to at least five trapping periods, have been distinguished. In general, the earliest primary (type 1) inclusions, which occur as negative crystals or thin long tubes, are represented by low salinity ( < 10 wt. % NaCl equivalent) aqueous fluids with or without CO 2 with up to XCO 2 ≈ 0.04. Later primary type 2 inclusions are distinguished by different morphologies and distribution patterns. Lower salinity CO 2-free brines and CO 2-bearing denser inclusions with higher CO 2 contents (up to XCO 2 ≈ 0.11) are characteristic of this stage. The type 2 inclusions may also occur as pseudosecondary arrays. The effects of necking have been studied, and found to be considerable in the type 1 primary inclusions. This mechanism has occasionally resulted in the appearance of almost pure CO 2 fluids. The possibility of fluid immiscibility has been examined, and rejected, for the apparent "coexistence" of primary brine and CO 2-bearing inclusions. Instead, mixing of fluids which fluctuated between two different compositions is proposed. The fluctuation was probably due to the sequence of hydration reactions during the Tauernkristallisation. Maximum trapping pressures (3.6 kbar) obtained for stage 1 of the Tauernkristallisation are thought to represent a situation where sublithostatic fluid pressures exested in shear zones during the crystallisation period of many of the emerald cores and coexisting biotite and actinolite. Maximum fluid pressures of 7 kbar were obtained from the type 2 inclusions. This is similar to pressure estimates obtained from mineral equilibria. At least four phases of deformation are

  16. Rock mechanics observations pertinent to the rheology of the continental lithosphere and the localization of strain along shear zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    the general phenomenon of ductile faulting in which ductile strains are localized into shear zones. Ductile faults have been produced in experiments of five different rock types and is generally expressed as strain softening in constant-strain-rate tests or as an accelerating-creep-rate stage at constant differential stress. A number of physical mechanisms have been identified that may be responsible for ductile faulting, including the onset of dynamic recrystallization, phase changes, hydrothermal alteration and hydrolytic weakening. Microscopic evidence for these processes as well as larger-scale geological and geophysical observations suggest that ductile faulting in the middle to lower crust and upper mantle may greatly influence the distribution and magnitudes of differential stresses and the style of deformation in the overlying upper continental lithosphere. ?? 1985.

  17. Inferences about Shear Zone Flow Pathways between CFM 06.002i2 and Pinkel from Tracer Tests 10-01 to 12-02

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul W.

    2012-06-26

    This presentation provides an analysis of several tracer tests conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, between 2010 and early 2012, with the objective of testing a conceptual model of flow through the shear zone in which the tracer tests were conducted. The analysis includes predictions of tracer residence times in each of two flow pathways in the shear zone as a function of injection and extraction flow rates in the tracer tests. Conclusions are: (1) Separation of shear zone flow between CFM 06.002i2 and Pinkel into two predominant flow pathways seems reasonable; (2) Conceptual model is that travel time in pathway 1 is dependent on injection flow rate, and travel time in pathway 2 is dependent on extraction flow rate; (3) Predict residence time (in hours) in Pathway 1 equal to {approx}9.9/(Injection Flow Rate, ml/min), provided injection interval flow is greater than about 0.15 ml/min (which is not reliably achieved under natural flow/dilution conditions after installation of CFM 11.00X holes); and (4) Predict residence time of {approx}8 hrs in Pathway 2 with extraction flow rate of 25 ml/min.

  18. Pressure solution in rocks: focused ion beam/transmission electron microscopy study on orthogneiss from South Armorican Shear Zone, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukovská, Zita; Wirth, Richard; Morales, Luiz F. G.

    2015-09-01

    In order to characterize the µm-to-nm structures related to operation of pressure solution on phase boundaries in naturally deformed rocks, we have performed a detailed focused ion beam/transmission electron microscopy study in ultramylonite samples from South Armorican Shear Zone (France) that focused on grain boundary scale. We have studied phase boundaries between quartz, K-feldspar and white mica in both 2D and 3D and compare our evidences with theoretical dissolution precipitation models in the current literature. The dissolution (re)precipitation processes lead to the development of different features at different phase boundaries. In both quartz-white mica and quartz-K-feldspar phase boundaries, voids were ubiquitously observed. These voids have different shapes, and the development of some of them is crystallographically controlled. In addition, part of these voids might be filled with vermiculite. Amorphous leached layers with kaolinite composition were observed at the boundaries of K-feldspar-quartz and K-feldspar-white mica. The development of different features along the phase boundaries is mainly controlled by the crystallography of the phases sharing a common interface, together with the presence of fluids that either leaches or directly dissolve the mineral phases. In addition, the local dislocation density in quartz may play an important role during pressure solution. We suggest that the nanoscale observations of the quartz-white mica phase boundaries show direct evidence for operation of island-and-channel model as described in Wassmann and Stockhert (Tectonophysics 608:1-29, 2013), while K-feldspar-quartz phase boundaries represents amorphous layers formed via interface-coupled dissolution reprecipitation as described by Hellmann et al. (Chem Geol 294-295:203-216, 2012).

  19. High-resolution shear-wave seismics across the Carlsberg Fault zone south of Copenhagen - Implications for linking Mesozoic and late Pleistocene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone (CFZ) is a NNW-SSE striking structure close to the transition zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. We examine the fault evolution by combining very-high-resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The faulting geometry indicates a strong influence of Triassic subsidence and rifting in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the CFZ surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the Lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. These findings contrast the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, such as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image faulting in Quaternary and Danian layers in the CFZ. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the uppermost 30 m of the western part of CFZ. The complex fault zone comprises normal block faults and one reverse block fault. The observed faults cut through the Danian as well as the Quaternary overburden. Hence, there are strong indicators for ongoing faulting, like mapped faulting in Quaternary sediments and ongoing subsidence of the eastern block of the CFZ as interpreted by other authors. The lack of earthquakes localized in the fault zone implies that either the frequency of occurring earthquakes is too small to be recorded in the observation time-span, or that the movement of the shallow sub-surface layers may be due to other sources than purely tectonic processes.

  20. Spatial Evolution of Neogene Normal Faults, Northern Owens Valley: Constraints on Oblique-slip Partioning Within the Eastern California Shear Zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, T. P.; Dawers, N.

    2005-05-01

    Simple geometric constraints can be used to predict fault interaction at depth. Such interaction within crustal scale fault populations plays an important role in the tectonic evolution of extensional tectonic settings. Here we use a theoretical relationship between fault dip, horizontal fault spacing, and depth to the base of the seismogenic zone to explain the late Cenozoic temporal and spatial evolution of faulting within the Eastern California shear zone, including the northern extent of Owens Valley, California. Our results show that during its evolution, the east-dipping Sierra Nevada frontal fault in northern Owens Valley became inactive due to intersection with the larger west-dipping range-bounding fault of the White Mountains. The horizontal spacing of 10 km between these two conjugate faults is such that they intersect within the brittle seismic layer resulting in the locking of this segment of Sierra Nevada frontal fault. Continued accumulation of normal displacement along the White Mountains fault zone has since resulted in the present-day half-graben basement structure of northern Owens Valley. This down-dropping along the eastern margin of the valley imposes a flexural tension across the surface of the Coyote Warp, which can be considered a large relay zone between the Sierra Nevada frontal fault and the Round Valley fault further west. It is suggested that this tension is responsible for the formation of west-dipping antithetic normal faults that are distributed locally around the Coyote Warp. This extensional fault geometry has imposed a kinematic restraint on the development and distribution of right-lateral shear within this part of the Eastern California shear zone, including northeastward transfer of right-lateral slip from the Owens Valley fault to the White Mountains fault.

  1. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  2. Neutral-Line Magnetic Shear and Enhanced Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Gary, G. A.; Shimizu, T.

    1997-01-01

    By examining the magnetic structure at sites in the bright coronal interiors of active regions that are not flaring but exhibit persistent strong coronal heating, we establish some new characteristics of the magnetic origins of this heating. We have examined the magnetic structure of these sites in five active regions, each of which was well observed by both the Yohkoh SXT and the Marshall Space Flight Center Vector Magnetograph and showed strong shear in its magnetic field along part of at least one neutral line (polarity inversion). Thus, we can assess whether this form of nonpotential field structure in active regions is a characteristic of the enhanced coronal heating and vice versa. From 27 orbits' worth of Yohkoh SXT images of the five active regions, we have obtained a sample of 94 persistently bright coronal features (bright in all images from a given orbit), 40 long (greater than or approximately equals 20,000 km) neutral-line segments having strong magnetic shear throughout (shear angle greater than 45 deg), and 39 long neutral-line segments having weak magnetic shear throughout (shear angle less than 45 deg). From this sample, we find that: (1) all of our persistently bright coronal features are rooted in magnetic fields that are stronger than 150 G; (2) nearly all (95%) of these enhanced coronal features are rooted near neutral lines (closer than 10,000 km); (3) a great majority (80%) of the bright features are rooted near strong-shear portions of neutral lines; (4) a great majority (85%) of long strong-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; (5) a large minority (40%) of long weak-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; and (6) the brightness of a persistently bright Coronal feature often changes greatly over a few hours. From these results, we conclude that most persistent enhanced heating of coronal loops in active regions: (1) requires the

  3. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by shear alone: Characteristics, activity and stability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Nan; Du, Xin-Ying; Xing, Jin-Feng; Ge, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Catalase is a promising therapeutic enzyme; however, it carries risks of inactivation and rapid degradation when it is used in practical bioprocess, such as delivery in vivo. To overcome the issue, we made catalase-only nanoparticles using shear stress alone at a moderate shear rate of 217s(-1) in a coaxial cylinder flow cell. Properties of nanoparticles, including particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential, were characterized. The conformational changes of pre- and post-sheared catalase were determined using spectroscopy techniques. The results indicated that the conformational changes of catalase and reduction in α-helical content caused by shear alone were less significant than that by desolvation method. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by single shear retained over 90% of its initial activity when compared with the native catalase. Catalase nanoparticles lost only 20% of the activity when stored in phosphate buffer solution for 72h at 4°C, whereas native catalase lost 53% under the same condition. Especially, the activity of nanogranulated catalase was decreased only slightly in the simulated intestinal fluid containing α-chymotrypsin during 4h incubation at 37°C, implying that the catalase nanoparticle was more resistant to the degradation of proteases than native catalase molecules. Overall, catalase-only nanoparticles offered a great potential to stabilize enzymes for various pharmaceutical applications.

  4. The Origin of Olivine B-Type Fabric in Naturally Deformed Peridotite: Insight from the Ronda Large-Scale Mantle Shear Zone (spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Précigout, J.; Hirth, G.

    2011-12-01

    Strain-induced olivine Lattice Preferred Orientation (LPO) mostly controls the propagation of seismic waves in the mantle. Hence, it strongly affects the imaging of mantle structures through analyzing of elastic waves coming from deep earthquakes (Ismaïl and Mainprice, 1998). Understanding the relationships between mantle deformation and olivine LPO is thus crucial to objectively interpret the deep mantle structures. Here, based on detailed documentation of olivine LPOs in the Ronda peridotite (southern Spain), we provide evidences of flow-normal a-axis LPO, i.e., B-type fabric, within a kilometer-scale ductile shear zone. This fabric occurs upon entering the shear zone and describes a progressive transition from A-type fabric (parallel-flow a-axis LPO) to B-type fabric. While B-type fabrics have been described from several localities, to our knowledge this is the first olivine fabric transition ever observed in naturally deformed peridotites. Furthermore, while the olivine fabric strength (Jindex) increases in the A-type fabric domain towards the center of the shear zone, the Jindex progressively decreases in the B-type fabric domain. Based on deformation experiments, A-type fabric occurs during high-temperature/low-stress deformation of anhydrous olivine aggregates (Jung and Karato, 2001). In contrast, the B-type fabrics have been observed under a wide range of conditions: 1) at high-temperature/low stress conditions in the presence of melt (Kohlstedt and Holtzman, 2009); 2) at high-stress in the presence of water (Jung and Karato, 2001); 3) under dry conditions at very high pressure (> 3 GPa; Jung et al., 2009); and 4) during diffusion-creep in the presence of orthopyroxene (Sundberg and Cooper, 2008). In our natural example, we conclude that the B-type fabric arises from enhancing diffusion creep at the expense of dislocation creep, because: 1) the B-type fabric is observed to overprint the typical fabric of anhydrous peridotite (A-type), 2) the Ronda

  5. The Black Mountain tectonic zone--a reactivated northeast-trending crustal shear zone in the Yukon-Tanana Upland of east-central Alaska: Chapter D in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Day, Warren C.; Alienikoff, John N.; Saltus, Richard W.; Gough, Larry P.; Day, Warren C.

    2007-01-01

    The Black Mountain tectonic zone in the YukonTanana terrane of east-central Alaska is a belt of diverse northeast-trending geologic features that can been traced across Black Mountain in the southeast corner of the Big Delta 1°×3° degree quadrangle. Geologic mapping in the larger scale B1 quadrangle of the Big Delta quadrangle, in which Black Mountain is the principal physiographic feature, has revealed a continuous zone of normal and left-lateral strikeslip high-angle faults and shear zones, some of which have late Tertiary to Quaternary displacement histories. The tectonic zone includes complexly intruded wall rocks and intermingled apophyses of the contiguous mid-Cretaceous Goodpaster and Mount Harper granodioritic plutons, mafic to intermediate composite dike swarms, precious metal mineralization, early Tertiary volcanic activity and Quaternary fault scarps. These structures define a zone as much as 6 to 13 kilometers (km) wide and more than 40 km long that can be traced diagonally across the B1 quadrangle into the adjacent Eagle 1°×3° quadrangle to the east. Recurrent activity along the tectonic zone, from at least mid-Cretaceous to Quaternary, suggests the presence of a buried, fundamental tectonic feature beneath the zone that has influenced the tectonic development of this part of the Yukon-Tanana terrane. The tectonic zone, centered on Black Mountain, lies directly above a profound northeast-trending aeromagnetic anomaly between the Denali and Tintina fault systems. The anomaly separates moderate to strongly magnetic terrane on the northwest from a huge, weakly magnetic terrane on the southeast. The tectonic zone is parallel to the similarly oriented left-lateral, strike-slip Shaw Creek fault zone 85 km to the west.

  6. Geochemical and isotopic characterization of the granitic magmatism along the Remígio - Pocinhos shear zone, Borborema Province, NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, Jefferson V.; Guimarães, Ignez de P.; Santos, Lucilene; Amorim, José Victor A.; Farias, Douglas José S.

    2017-04-01

    Two granitoid plutons (Pilõezinhos and Curral de Cima) intruded along the Remígio - Pocinhos shear zone, eastern part of the Borborema Province. The Pilõezinhos and Curral de Cima granites were dated at 566 ± 3 Ma and 618 ± 5 Ma respectively. The granitoids from both plutons have distinct initial 143Nd/144Nd ratios, expressed by εNd(t) values, i.e. the granitoids of Pilõezinhos pluton have lower εNd(t) values (-15.47 to -15.81) and negative εHf (t = 570 Ma) values (-16.0 to -18.6), while the granitoids of the Curral de Cima pluton have εNd(t) values between -1.12 and -5.23. The granitoids of the Curral de Cima pluton are epidote bearing, magnesian calcalkaline I-type granitoids, crystallized under high fO2 conditions. The granitoids of the Pilõezinhos pluton are alkaline, low-fO2, ferroan, ilmenite-series, A2-type granite intrusions. The geochemical and isotopic signatures suggest that the origin of magma of the Curral de Cima granitoids involved mixing/mingling at depth between crustal and mantle magmas, associated to decompression (lateral escape) during the convergent stage of Brasiliano/Pan/African orogeny, which lead the asthenosphere melts to rise into the lower crust. The source of magma of the granitoids of the Pilõezinhos pluton involved a strong crustal component with geochemical and isotopic signatures similar to the orthogneisses of the Serrinha-Pedro Velho Complex, and small mantle component. The emplacement of the Pilõezinhos pluton is associated to an extensional space formed during high-T strike-slip shearing developed by the synchronic movement of the Matinhas sinistral shear zone and Remígio - Pocinhos dextral shear zone.

  7. Fault Slip Partitioning in the Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane Belt: Pliocene to Late Pleistocene Contraction Across the Mina Deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Stockli, D.; Gosse, J.

    2007-12-01

    Two different mechanisms have been proposed for fault slip transfer between the subparallel NW-striking dextral- slip faults that dominant the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ)-Walker Lane Belt (WLB). In the northern WLB, domains of sinistral-slip along NE-striking faults and clockwise block rotation within a zone of distributed deformation accommodated NW-dextral shear. A somewhat modified version of this mechanism was also proposed for the Mina deflection, southern WLB, whereby NE-striking sinistral faults formed as conjugate faults to the primary zone of NW-dextral shear; clockwise rotation of the blocks bounding the sinistral faults accommodated dextral slip. In contrast, in the northern ECSZ and Mina deflection, domains of NE-striking pure dip-slip normal faults, bounded by NW-striking dextral-slip faults, exhibited no rotation; the proposed mechanism of slip transfer was one of right-stepping, high angle normal faults in which the magnitude of extension was proportional to the amount of strike-slip motion transferred. New geologic mapping, tectonic geomorphologic, and geochronologic data from the Queen Valley area, southern Mina deflection constrain Pliocene to late Quaternary fault geometries, slip orientations, slip magnitudes, and slip rates that bear on the mechanism of fault slip transfer from the relatively narrow northern ECSZ to the broad deformation zone that defines the Mina deflection. Four different fault types and orientations cut across the Queen Valley area: (1) The NE-striking normal-slip Queen Valley fault; (2) NE-striking sinistral faults; (3) the NW-striking dextral Coyote Springs fault, which merges into (4) a set of EW-striking thrust faults. (U-Th)/He apatite and cosmogenic radionuclide data, combined with magnitude of fault offset measurements, indicate a Pliocene to late Pleistocene horizontal extension rate of 0.2-0.3 mm/yr across the Queen Valley fault. Our results, combined with published slip rates for the dextral White Mountain

  8. Kinematic Implications of New Paleomagnetic Data From the Northern Walker Lane, Western Nevada: Counterintuitive Anticlockwise Vertical-Axis Rotation in an Incipient Dextral Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulds, J. E.; Henry, C. D.; Hinz, N. H.; Delwiche, B.; Cashman, P. H.

    2004-12-01

    The Walker Lane/eastern California shear zone is a major dextral fault system that splays from the San Andreas fault in southern California and shunts 20-25% of the Pacific-North America transform motion east of the Sierra Nevada block. In NW Nevada and NE California, the north end of the system has developed in the past 3-6 Ma and is propagating northwestward in the wake of the retreating Cascade arc. This rapidly evolving region, known as the northern Walker Lane (NWL), is one of the youngest parts of the Pacific-North America transform margin and therefore affords an opportunity to analyze the incipient development of a major strike-slip fault system. The NWL consists of kinematically linked NW-striking, left-stepping right-lateral faults, N-striking normal faults, and subordinate ENE-striking sinistral faults. Major dextral faults terminate in arrays of northerly striking normal faults in the western Great Basin. The en echelon left-stepping pattern of dextral faults is a curious geometry. Although small left steps on individual faults are associated with local shortening, the broad left steps between major dextral faults accommodate little, if any, shortening and are therefore unlike typical restraining bends. One possible model is that the left-stepping dextral faults are primary Riedel shears developing above a dextral shear zone at depth. The ENE-striking sinistral faults may be secondary, conjugate Riedel shears. Paleomagnetic data from the 25.1 Ma Nine Hill Tuff indicate slight anticlockwise rotation of blocks between the overlapping, NW-striking dextral faults. Our work has established a new reference direction (D=341, I=55, a95=4, 11 sites; 83 samples) for Nine Hill Tuff in the presumably unrotated Sierra Nevada. Data from the Nine Hill Tuff in the NWL suggest about 15 deg of anticlockwise rotation of the Virginia Mts, Dogskin Mt, and Seven Lakes Mt (D=326, I=52, a95=7, 12 sites) but negligible rotation of the Fort Sage Mts (D=342, I=55, a95=13, 5 sites

  9. Structural evolution of the Day Nui Con Voi metamorphic complex: Implications on the development of the Red River Shear Zone, Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Meng-Wan; Lee, Tung-Yi; Lo, Ching-Hua; Chung, Sun-Lin; Lan, Ching-Ying; Anh, Tran Tuan

    2008-12-01

    The Day Nui Con Voi (DNCV) metamorphic complex in North Vietnam is the southernmost high-grade metamorphic zone along the NW-SE trending Red River Shear Zone (RRSZ) in Indochina. The RRSZ was considered as a classical large-scale continental strike-slip fault that had played a significant role in the continental extrusion of Southeast Asia since the collision of India and Eurasia. Earlier ideas determined the RRSZ as a steep shear zone that penetrated the entire lithosphere. Both metamorphism and structures within rocks along the DNCV metamorphic complex have been previously thought to be formed syn-tectonically by left-lateral shearing of the RRSZ during the Oligocene-Miocene continental escape tectonics. However, our meso- and microstructural re-examination of this region shows that these metamorphic rocks were formed during earlier tectonic episodes unrelated to strike-slip shearing. High angle to near orthogonal overprinting fabrics indicated that this region recorded three episodes of ductile deformation followed by brittle faulting events with different intensity spanning from the Triassic to the Tertiary. D 1 is preserved as NW-SE striking upright folds under garnet grade regional metamorphism during the Triassic Indosinian orogeny as South China block amalgamated with the Indochina block. The large-scale horizontal D 2 folds with a dominant top to N-NW bottom to S-SW sense of shear, and sub-horizontal fold axial planes suggest that the DNCV metamorphic complex remained at midcrustal depths since the Indosinian orogeny. The youngest ductile deformation event, D 3, refolded D 2 recumbent folds into a dome, and uplifted the DNCV as lower-temperature fabrics, S 3, indicated. Steep mylonite zones with left-lateral kinematic indicators and brittle faulting were developed on both limbs of the dome along the steep Song Hong and Song Chay faults during left-lateral movement of the RRSZ. Our new spatial, temporal and kinematic correlations of metamorphic fabrics

  10. Structural setting of gold deposits in the Oudalan-Gorouol volcano-sedimentary belt east of the Markoye Shear Zone, West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshibubudze, Asinne; Hein, Kim A. A.

    2013-04-01

    The Oudalan-Gorouol volcano-sedimentary belt (OGB) of Burkina Faso and Niger hosts meta-volcanic and metasedimentary sequences of the Birimian Supergroup that were folded and deformed during emplacement of the Dori Batholith (D1-x), the Tangaean Event (D1) and the Eburnean Orogeny (D2). The emplacement of the Dori Batholith accompanied aureole deformation (D1-x) and the development of proto-mylonite, migmatite, gneiss and schist on the northern margin of the batholith. Contact metamorphic grade reached granulite facies with partial melting of the supracrustal sequences. Emplacement of the Dori Batholith was succeeded by emplacement of monzonite dykes and sills through the OGB. The Tangaean Event (D1) accompanied formation of (a) the Saoga Branch of the Markoye Shear Zone (MSZ), (b) the Mukosi and Billiata mylonite zones that are hosted in the MSZ, (c) the Afu Branch of the Kargouna Shear Zone Complex (KSZC), and (d) northwest-trending thrust-folds (F1) that crosscut the OGB and coalesce with the MSZ. Metamorphic grade attained amphibolite facies in mylonite or proto-mylonite zones in the Saoga and Afu branches. D1 was succeeded by emplacement of alkali-granite plutons of the Dolbel Batholith. The Eburnean Orogeny, D2, accompanied formation of (a) the Korizéna Branch of the MSZ, (b) the Waho Branch of the KSZC, and (c) northeast-trending shear-faults that crosscut the OGB. D2 is manifested by refolding of F1 by northeast-trending F2, and development of a pervasive northeast-trending S2 to S2-C. Metamorphic grade attained greenschist facies during D2 with development of the mineral assemblage quartz-chlorite-muscovite ± actinolite. D2 was succeeded by emplacement of northwest-trending gabbro and dolerite dykes. The OGB hosts structurally-controlled gold deposits that are sited along five metallogenic corridors and include the Essakane, Tin-Fal, Bom Kodjelé, Kossa and Tassiri Trends. Gold mineralisation is preferentially located where northeast-trending faults and

  11. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  12. Measuring the activities of higher organisms in activated sludge by means of mechanical shearing pretreatment and oxygen uptake rate.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-07-01

    A pretreatment method was developed to assess the activities of higher organisms. The method is based on mechanical shearing to damage the large cells of the protozoan and metazoan community in activated sludge. The procedure was confirmed through experimentation to be effective in determining the activities of higher organisms by comparing oxygen uptake rates (OURs) before and after the higher organisms were eradicated. Shearing led to disintegration of flocs, which could be effectively reconstituted by centrifugation. The reconstitution of the sludge flocs was essential since otherwise the activity of the floc mass would be too high due to lack of diffusion limitation. Mechanical shearing had no influence on the morphology, quantity and specific activity of yeasts, and it was inferred that bacteria smaller than yeasts in size would also not be influenced by the applied shearing procedure. Moreover, the effect of filamentous organisms on the measured activities of higher organisms was experimentally demonstrated and analyzed, and determined to be so weak that it could be ignored. Based on these tests, five typical activated sludge processes were selected to measure the contribution of higher organisms to the original OUR. The measured activities of higher organisms ranged from 9.4 to 25.0% of the original OURs.

  13. Orbital fluid shear stress promotes osteoblast metabolism, proliferation and alkaline phosphates activity in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Aisha, M.D.; Nor-Ashikin, M.N.K.; Sharaniza, A.B.R.; Nawawi, H.; Froemming, G.R.A.

    2015-09-10

    Prolonged disuse of the musculoskeletal system is associated with reduced mechanical loading and lack of anabolic stimulus. As a form of mechanical signal, the multidirectional orbital fluid shear stress transmits anabolic signal to bone forming cells in promoting cell differentiation, metabolism and proliferation. Signals are channeled through the cytoskeleton framework, directly modifying gene and protein expression. For that reason, we aimed to study the organization of Normal Human Osteoblast (NHOst) cytoskeleton with regards to orbital fluid shear (OFS) stress. Of special interest were the consequences of cytoskeletal reorganization on NHOst metabolism, proliferation, and osteogenic functional markers. Cells stimulated at 250 RPM in a shaking incubator resulted in the rearrangement of actin and tubulin fibers after 72 h. Orbital shear stress increased NHOst mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation, simultaneously preventing apoptosis. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was reduced, suggesting that orbital shear stress has the potential to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity. Increase in ALP activity and OCN protein production suggests that stimulation retained osteoblast function. Shear stress possibly generated through actin seemed to hold an anabolic response as osteoblast metabolism and functional markers were enhanced. We hypothesize that by applying orbital shear stress with suitable magnitude and duration as a non-drug anabolic treatment can help improve bone regeneration in prolonged disuse cases. - Highlights: • OFS stress transmits anabolic signals to osteoblasts. • Actin and tubulin fibers are rearranged under OFS stress. • OFS stress increases mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation. • Reduced RANKL/OPG ratio in response to OFS inhibits osteoclastogenesis. • OFS stress prevents apoptosis and stimulates ALP and OCN.

  14. In vitro shear stress-induced platelet activation: sensitivity of human and bovine blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijin; Hofferbert, Bryan V; Koo, Grace; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    As platelet activation plays a critical role in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis, it is important in the overall hemocompatibility evaluation of new medical devices and biomaterials to assess their effects on platelet function. However, there are currently no widely accepted in vitro test methods to perform this assessment. In an effort to develop effective platelet tests for potential use in medical device evaluation, this study compared the sensitivity of platelet responses to shear stress stimulation of human and bovine blood using multiple platelet activation markers. Fresh whole blood samples anticoagulated with heparin or anticoagulant citrate dextrose, solution A (ACDA) were exposed to shear stresses up to 40 Pa for 2 min using a cone-and-plate rheometer model. Platelet activation was characterized by platelet counts, platelet surface P-selectin expression, and serotonin release into blood plasma. The results indicated that exposure to shear stresses above 20 Pa caused significant changes in all three of the platelet markers for human blood and that the changes were usually greater with ACDA anticoagulation than with heparin. In contrast, for bovine blood, the markers did not change with shear stress stimulation except for plasma serotonin in heparin anticoagulated blood. The differences observed between human and bovine platelet responses suggest that the value of using bovine blood for in vitro platelet testing to evaluate devices may be limited.

  15. Integrating GIS-based geologic mapping, LiDAR-based lineament analysis and site specific rock slope data to delineate a zone of existing and potential rock slope instability located along the grandfather mountain window-Linville Falls shear zone contact, Southern Appalachian Mountains, Watauga County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillon, K.A.; Wooten, R.M.; Latham, R.L.; Witt, A.W.; Douglas, T.J.; Bauer, J.B.; Fuemmeler, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Landslide hazard maps of Watauga County identify >2200 landslides, model debris flow susceptibility, and evaluate a 14km x 0.5km zone of existing and potential rock slope instability (ZEPRSI) near the Town of Boone. The ZEPRSI encompasses west-northwest trending (WNWT) topographic ridges where 14 active/past-active rock/weathered rock slides occur mainly in rocks of the Grandfather Mountain Window (GMW). The north side of this ridgeline is the GMW / Linville Falls Fault (LFF) contact. Sheared rocks of the Linville Falls Shear Zone (LFSZ) occur along the ridge and locally in the valley north of the contact. The valley is underlain principally by layered granitic gneiss comprising the Linville Falls/Beech Mountain/Stone Mountain Thrust Sheet. The integration of ArcGIS??? - format digital geologic and lineament mapping on a 6m LiDAR (Light Detecting and Ranging) digital elevation model (DEM) base, and kinematic analyses of site specific rock slope data (e.g., presence and degree of ductile and brittle deformation fabrics, rock type, rock weathering state) indicate: WNWT lineaments are expressions of a regionally extensive zone of fractures and faults; and ZEPRSI rock slope failures concentrate along excavated, north-facing LFF/LFSZ slopes where brittle fabrics overprint older metamorphic foliations, and other fractures create side and back release surfaces. Copyright 2009 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association.

  16. Pseudotachylyte in the Bench Canyon Shear Zone, central Sierra Nevada, California: Frictional melting in the brittle and semi-brittle fields

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, B.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Many aspects of pseudotachylyte are controversial, particularly whether it is the product of intense comminution (e.g. ultracataclasite'') or frictional melting. Ubiquitous exposures of pseudotachylyte in the Bench Canyon shear Zone (BCSZ), central Sierra Nevada, California, provide an excellent opportunity for further study. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals vesicles, amygdules, crystallites and embayments of microxenocrysts, textures which are supportive of a melt origin for pseudotachylyte in the BCAZ. EDS and microprobe analyses indicate strong compositional contrasts between pseudotachylyte and granodiorite host; one explanation for this is preferential melting in order of individual mineral melting points.

  17. In-situ tracer tests and models developed to understand flow paths in a shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blechschmidt, I.; Martin, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Grimsel Test Site (www.grimsel.com) is an international underground research laboratory excavated at a depth of 450m below the surface in the crystalline Aare Massif of southern Switzerland in 1984. It is operated and owned by the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland (NAGRA) which is the organization responsible for managing and researching the geological disposal of all types of radioactive wastes originating in Switzerland. One experiment, the Colloid Formation and Migration test (CFM*), is an ongoing in-situ migration test started in 2004 to study colloid facilitated transport behavior of radionuclides through a shear zone. The importance of colloid transport in the context of a radioactive waste repository is that it provides a mechanism for potentially enhancing the advective transport of radionuclides. The montmorillonite clays that are planned to be used as an engineered barrier around the radioactive waste in many repository concepts may be a source of such colloids under specific hydraulic and/or chemical boundary conditions. The CFM project includes an integrated programme of field testing, laboratory studies and modelling/interpretation. The field tests are performed in a shear zone where the natural outflow has been controlled by a tunnel packer system and flow is monitored with an array of boreholes drilled for CFM and previous experiments at the site. The flow field is controlled by a low-rate extraction from a surface packer. The controlled low-rate extraction creates a region of low hydraulic gradients and fluid velocity within the shear zone, suitable for study under repository-relevant or other geo-resource relevant conditions. Here we present a summary of the migration tracer tests carried out so far to understand the hydraulic properties and transport characteristics of the shear zone using both stable and radioactive (Na-22, Cs-137, Ba-133, Th-232, Np-237, Am-243, Pu-242) tracers as well as colloids, and

  18. Extensions of the Ferry shear wave model for active linear and nonlinear microrheology

    PubMed Central

    Mitran, Sorin M.; Forest, M. Gregory; Yao, Lingxing; Lindley, Brandon; Hill, David B.

    2009-01-01

    The classical oscillatory shear wave model of Ferry et al. [J. Polym. Sci. 2:593-611, (1947)] is extended for active linear and nonlinear microrheology. In the Ferry protocol, oscillation and attenuation lengths of the shear wave measured from strobe photographs determine storage and loss moduli at each frequency of plate oscillation. The microliter volumes typical in biology require modifications of experimental method and theory. Microbead tracking replaces strobe photographs. Reflection from the top boundary yields counterpropagating modes which are modeled here for linear and nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive laws. Furthermore, bulk imposed strain is easily controlled, and we explore the onset of normal stress generation and shear thinning using nonlinear viscoelastic models. For this paper, we present the theory, exact linear and nonlinear solutions where possible, and simulation tools more generally. We then illustrate errors in inverse characterization by application of the Ferry formulas, due to both suppression of wave reflection and nonlinearity, even if there were no experimental error. This shear wave method presents an active and nonlinear analog of the two-point microrheology of Crocker et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85: 888 - 891 (2000)]. Nonlocal (spatially extended) deformations and stresses are propagated through a small volume sample, on wavelengths long relative to bead size. The setup is ideal for exploration of nonlinear threshold behavior. PMID:20011614

  19. Cell-Activation by Shear Stresses in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Sparks, Steven; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2003-11-01

    Increasing experimental evidence indicates that low and oscillatory shear stresses promote proliferative, thrombotic, adhesive and inflammatory-mediated degenerative conditions throughout the wall of the aorta. These degenerative conditions have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of AAAs, a permanent, localized dilatation of the abdominal aorta. The purpose of this study is to measure both the magnitude and the duration of the shear stresses acting on both the arterial walls and on the blood cells inside AAAs, and to characterize their changes as the AAA enlarges. We conducted a parametric in-vitro study of the pulsatile blood flow in elastic models of AAAs while systematically varying the blood flow parameters, and the geometry of the aneurysm's bulging. The instantaneous flow characteristic inside the AAA was measured using DPIV at a sampling rate of 15 Hertz. A "cell-activation parameter" defined as the integral of the product of the magnitude of the shear stress and the time during which the stress acts was computed along each of the blood cell pathlines. The Lagrangian tracking of the blood cells shows that a large majority of them are subjected first to very high level of shear-induced "cell-activation" while later on they are entrained in regions of stasis where their residence time can increase up to several cardiac cycles. This cell-activation followed by the entrainment in low shear regions creates the optimal cell-adhesive and inflammatory-mediated degenerative conditions that are postulated to play an important role in the etiology and progressive enlargement of AAAs.

  20. Strain-dependent evolution of garnets in a high pressure ductile shear zone using Synchroton x-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macente, Alice; Fusseis, Florian; Menegon, Luca; John, Timm

    2016-04-01

    Synkinematic reaction microfabrics carry important information on the kinetics, timing and rheology of tectonometamorphic processes. Despite being routinely interpreted in metamorphic and structural studies, reaction and deformation microfabrics are usually described in two dimensions. We applied Synchrotron-based x-ray microtomography to document the evolution of a pristine olivine gabbro into a deformed omphacite-garnet eclogite in 3D. In the investigated samples, which cover a strain gradient into a shear zone from the Western Gneiss Region (Norway) previously described by John et al., (2009), we focused on the spatial transformation of garnet coronas into elongated clusters of garnets. Our microtomographic data allowed us to quantify changes to the garnet volume, their shapes and their spatial arrangement. We combined microtomographic observations with light microscope- and backscatter electron images as well as electron microprobe- (EMPA) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses to correlate mineral composition and orientation data with the x-ray absorption signal of the same mineral grains. This allowed us to extrapolate our interpretation of the metamorphic microfabric evolution to the third dimension, effectively yielding a 4-dimensional dataset. We found that: - The x-ray absorption contrast between individual mineral phases in our microtomographic data is sufficient to allow the same petrographic observations than in light- and electron microscopy, but extended to 3D. - Amongst the major constituents of the synkinematic reactions, garnet is the only phase that can be segmented confidently from the microtomographic data. - With increasing deformation, the garnet volume increases from about 9% to 25%. - Garnet coronas in the gabbros never completely encapsulate olivine grains. This may indicate that the reaction progressed preferentially in some directions, but also leaves pathways for element transport to and from the olivines that are

  1. Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul W.

    2012-08-30

    In February and March 2012, a tracer test involving the injection of a radionuclide-colloid cocktail was conducted in the MI shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, as part of the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) project. The colloids were derived from FEBEX bentonite, which is mined in Spain and is being considered as a potential waste package backfill in a Spanish nuclear waste repository. The tracer test, designated test 12-02 (second test in 2012), involved the injection of the tracer cocktail into borehole CFM 06.002i2 and extraction from the Pinkel surface packer at the main access tunnel wall approximately 6.1 m from the injection interval. The test configuration is depicted in Figure 1. This configuration has been used in several conservative tracer tests and two colloid-homologue tracer tests since 2007, and it is will be employed in an upcoming test involving the emplacement of a radionuclide-doped bentonite plug into CFM 06.002i2 to evaluate the swelling and erosion of the bentonite and the transport of bentonite colloids and radionuclides from the source to the extraction point at the tunnel wall. Interpretive analyses of several of the previous tracer tests, from 09-01 through 12-02 were provided in two previous Used Fuel Disposition Program milestone reports (Arnold et al., 2011; Kersting et al., 2012). However, only the data for the conservative tracer Amino-G Acid was previously analyzed from test 12-02 because the other tracer data from this test were not available at the time. This report documents the first attempt to quantitatively analyze the radionuclide and colloid breakthrough curves from CFM test 12-02. This report was originally intended to also include an experimental assessment of colloid-facilitated transport of uranium by bentonite colloids in the Grimsel system, but this assessment was not conducted because it was reported by German collaborators at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that neither uranium nor

  2. LAR, liprin alpha and the regulation of active zone morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Emily; Johnson, Karl G

    2007-11-01

    Active zones are protein-rich regions of neurons that act as sites of synaptic vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release at the pre-synaptic terminus. Although the discovery that the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase LAR and its cytoplasmic binding partner liprin alpha are essential for proper active zone formation is nearly a decade old, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Recent studies have identified a number of binding partners for both LAR and liprin alpha, several of which play key roles in active zone assembly. These include nidogen, dallylike and syndecan--extracellular ligands for LAR that regulate synapse morphogenesis. In addition, liprin-alpha-interacting proteins such as ERC2, RIM and the MALS/Veli-Cask-Mint1 complex cooperate to form a dense molecular scaffold at the active zone that is crucial for proper synaptic function. These studies allow us to propose testable models of LAR and liprin alpha function, and provide insights into the fundamental molecular mechanisms of synapse formation and stabilization.

  3. The Proteome of the Murine Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Volknandt, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The proteome of the presynaptic active zone controls neurotransmitter release and the short- and long-term structural and functional dynamics of the nerve terminal. The proteinaceous inventory of the presynaptic active zone has recently been reported. This review will evaluate the subcellular fractionation protocols and the proteomic approaches employed. A breakthrough for the identification of the proteome of the presynaptic active zone was the successful employment of antibodies directed against a cytosolic epitope of membrane integral synaptic vesicle proteins for the immunopurification of synaptic vesicles docked to the presynaptic plasma membrane. Combining immunopurification and subsequent analytical mass spectrometry, hundreds of proteins, including synaptic vesicle proteins, components of the presynaptic fusion and retrieval machinery, proteins involved in intracellular and extracellular signaling and a large variety of adhesion molecules, were identified. Numerous proteins regulating the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton are indicative of the functional and structural dynamics of the presynapse. This review will critically discuss both the experimental approaches and prominent protein candidates identified. Many proteins have not previously been assigned to the presynaptic release sites and may be directly involved in the short- and long-term structural modulation of the presynaptic compartment. The identification of proteinaceous constituents of the presynaptic active zone provides the basis for further analyzing the interaction of presynaptic proteins with their targets and opens novel insights into the functional role of these proteins in neuronal communication. PMID:28250380

  4. Development of discrete aggregates of recrystallization along micro-shear zones in quartz ribbons during multistage ductile evolution of a quartz vein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, Alberto; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Bestmann, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The post-magmatic ductile deformation of the Rieserferner pluton (Eastern Alps) includes localized ductile shear zones exploiting a set of joint-filling quartz veins. These deformed veins show different stages of evolution, from coarse grained vein quartz to the fine grained recrystallized aggregates of ultramylonites, locally recorded in different domains of heterogeneously sheared veins. The microstructural evolution includes, with increasing strain: (i) Development of ribbon mylonites consisting of elongated grains, oblique to the shear zone boundary, derived from different quartz veins crystals. The individual ribbons have different crystallographic orientations and aspect ratios. (ii) Dismantling of ribbons along a fracture-like network of fine grained recrystallized quartz aggregates, that commonly represent micro-shear zones (μSZ). These discrete recrystallization zones are preferentially developed in ribbons whose crystallographic axis is oriented either parallel or normal to ribbon elongation. (iii) Extensive dynamic recrystallization to fine-grained (10-20 μm) aggregates leading to quartz ultramylonites. Typically ultramylonites show a layered texture with bands having different crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) that probably reflect the original heterogeneity in crystallographic orientations of the vein. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis indicates that the μSZ within quartz ribbons are mainly parallel to {r} or {z} planes of the host grain, and the new grain inside μSZ show a weak CPO with their basal plane parallel to the μSZ boundary. There is no systematic relationships between the Dauphiné twinning and the μSZ. Misorientation analysis suggests that in the host grain dislocation creep is dominant on {m} slip system, whereas it is probably a minor mechanism within μSZ. Subgrains and low-angle boundaries (LAB) are heterogeneously developed at the border of the μSZ, and more commonly occur around the tips of

  5. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  6. Fluid shear stress stimulates MATE2-K expression via Nrf2 pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yasunori; Kaishima, Misato; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Tohyama, Kimio; Chisaki, Ikumi; Nakayama, Yusuke; Ogasawara-Shimizu, Mari; Kawamata, Yuji

    2017-03-04

    Accurate prediction of drug-induced renal toxicity is necessary for development of safer drugs for patients. Cellular assay systems that recapitulate physiologically relevant microenvironments have been proposed for correct estimation of drug responses in the human body. However, establishment of such assay systems for accurate prediction of renal toxicity is challenging because of the lack of readily available in vitro assay systems. In this study, we investigated the cellular response to fluid shear stress, which is a characteristic of the environment in the kidney proximal tubules, using microfluidic devices. The global gene expression profiles of human primary proximal tubule cells under the fluidic conditions revealed upregulation of MATE2-K and activation of Nrf2 signaling in response to fluid shear stress. Network and cell biological analysis additionally showed that expression of MATE2-K is regulated by Nrf2 signaling. These results strongly suggest that fluid shear stress is involved in the expression and maintenance of function of tissue-specific drug transporters in the proximal tubule, where the cells are exposed to continuous shear stress by primary urine. Furthermore, the microfluidic culture of human proximal tubules was demonstrated to be a useful system to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in physiologically relevant cell conditions.

  7. Increase in Mechanical Resistance to Force in a Shear-Activated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botello, Eric; Harris, Nolan; Choi, Huiwan; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela; Dong, Jing-Fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2009-03-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is the largest multimeric adhesion ligand found in human blood. Plasma VWF (pVWF) must be exposed to shear stress, like at sites of vascular injury, to be activated to bind platelets to induce blood clotting. In addition, adhesion activity of VWF is related to its polymer size, with the ultra-large form of VWF (ULVWF) being hyper-active, and forming fibers even without exposure to shear stress. We used the AFM to stretch pVWF, sheared VWF (sVWF) and ULVWF, and monitor the forces as a function of molecular extension. We showed a similar increase in force resistance to unfolding for sVWF and ULVWF when compared to pVWF. The increase in force is reduced when other molecules that are known to disrupt their fibril formation are present. Our results provide evidence that the common higher order structure of sVWF and ULVWF may affect the domain structure that causes difference in their adhesion activity compared to pVWF.

  8. Shear zones at the base of the lowermost known unit of the Cretan nappe pile in the Talea Ori, northern central Crete - the long-time deformation record during burial and exhumation from HP-LT metamorphic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepmann, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    The structural characteristics and microfabrics of shear zones at the base of the lowermost known level of the Cretan nappe pile, exposed at the northern central coast of the Talea Ori Mountains, are presented. There, the high pressure - low temperature (HP-LT) metamorphic sediments provide information on the long-term geological history from the pre-Alpine basement and the Alpine stages of detachment, burial to and exhumation from HP-LT conditions. Information on the unknown pre-Alpine basement of the metasedimentary unit is obtained by the components in low-strain metaconglomerates, where deformation microstructures from the source rocks are preserved or quasi-statically overprinted during the later geological history. Information on the deformation mechanisms and stress history during detachment, burial and exhumation is obtained by high-strain shear zones surrounding the low-strain metasediments. A gradual transition from the low-strain metaconglomerates and associated black shales and metacherts to shear zones characterized by a scaly foliation, shear bands and associated quartz veins is observed. Shear bands occur likewise in black shales, metaquartzites and metaconglomerates and are inclined at various angles to the sedimentary layering or the scaly foliation, respectively. They generally indicate down-faulting of the respective northern block. Associated quartz veins taper wedge-shaped at a high angle to the foliation, decorating the shear band boundaries and showing shear offsets. Microstructures in rocks from these shear bands and related vein quartz show indication of dislocation glide-controlled deformation of quartz by the presence of deformation lamellae, deformation bands, short-wavelength undulatory extinction and localized strings of recrystallized grains. The shear zones document at least two different deformation stages: A first stage of deformation is characterized mainly by dissolution precipitation creep generating the scaly cleavage and

  9. A mechanism for fluid transport within oceanic shear zones: An experimental study on the role and fate of fluid inclusions in olivine aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. J.; Zimmerman, M. E.; Teyssier, C.; Warren, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Studies have investigated hydrothermal circulation in the oceanic lithosphere and the role of water on mantle rheology. Yet, the role and fate of fluid inclusions (FIs) in the ductilely deforming oceanic lithosphere is poorly known. Fluid-filled fractures may transport fluids from the brittle upper lithosphere into mantle shear zones within the seismogenic zone of transform systems and oceanic core complexes. Based on mylonite thermometry, and the maximum observed depth of earthquakes, these conditions are estimated as >600-700°C and > ~15 km depth - where olivine deforms in the ductile regime. Abundant, homogeneously distributed primary FIs were produced in olivine aggregates by adding 1-2 μl of liquid water to San Carlos olivine powders prior to hot pressing the sample at 1200 °C and 300 MPa confining pressure (Pc) for 2-3 hours. A torsion experiment of this sample was run at a strain rate of 2.5 x 10-4 s-1 to a finite shear strain of γ = 3 at 1200 °C and 300 MPa (Pc). Peak shear stress (180 MPa) was achieved at γ = 0.5. Axial and tangential thin sections reveal an S-C'-type foliation. A penetrative, low angle foliation is defined by aligned FIs and pores and is evenly spaced 5-10 μm (same as the grain size) throughout the sample (Fig. 1). Another foliation is defined by the alignment of recrystallized olivine grains (Fig. 1). EBSD data indicate that [100] axes are sub-parallel to the shear direction and (010) planes are sub-parallel to the shear plane. Observations from the axial thin section reveal that foliations and CPO patterns are weakly developed at the center and strongly developed toward the edge (γ > 1). Our experiment provides an analogue for naturally deformed peridotite mylonites from transform faults and core complexes where we observe FIs and syn-deformational amphiboles. These preliminary results indicate that FIs segregate and orient into channelized bands along grain boundaries with increasing strain. This organization has strong

  10. Shear-wave Velocity Structure and Inter-Seismic Strain Accumulation in the Up-Dip Region of the Cascadia Subduction Zone: Similarities to Tohoku?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. A.; McGuire, J. J.; Wei, M.

    2013-12-01

    The up-dip region of subduction zone thrusts is difficult to study using land-based seismic and geodetic networks, yet documenting its ability to store and release elastic strain is critical for understanding the mechanics of great subduction earthquakes and tsunami generation. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake produced extremely large slip in the shallowest portion of the subduction zone beneath a region of the fore-arc that is comprised of extremely low-velocity, unconsolidated sediments [Tsuru et al. JGR 2012]. The influence of the sediment material properties on the co-seismic slip distribution and tsunami generation can be considerable through both the effects on the dynamic wavefield during the rupture [Kozdon and Dunham, BSSA 2012] and potentially the build up of strain during the inter-seismic period. As part of the 2010-2011 SeaJade experiment [Scherwath et al, EOS 2011], we deployed 10 ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) on the continental slope offshore of Vancouver Island in the region of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory. One goal of the experiment is to measure the shear modulus of the sediments lying above the subducting plate using the seafloor compliance technique. Using seafloor acceleration measured by broadband seismometer and seafloor pressure measured by Differential Pressure Gauge (DPG), we estimate the compliance spectrum in the infra-gravity wave band (~0.002-0.04 Hz) at 9 sites following the methodology of Crawford et al. [JGR, 1991]. We calibrated DPG sensitivities using laboratory measurements and by comparing teleseismic Rayleigh arrivals recorded on the seismometer and DPG channels [Webb, pers. comm]. We correct the vertical-component seismometer data for tilt using the procedure of Crawford and Webb [BSSA, 2000], Corrections for the gravitational attraction of the surface gravity waves [Crawford et al., JGR, 1998] are important at frequencies of 0.003-0.006 Hz only. Typically, the coherences are high (>0.7) in the 0.006 to 0.03 Hz range. We invert

  11. A joint local, regional and teleseismic tomography study and shear wave splitting beneath the Mississippi Embayment and New Madrid seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamwandha, Cecilia Anyango

    Part 1: We have determined detailed crust and upper mantle 3-D P wave and S wave velocity models to a depth of 400 km for the Mississippi Embayment (ME) and the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ). This study incorporates data from three networks; the New Madrid Seismic Network (CNMSN) operated by the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI), the Earthscope Transportable Array (TA), and the FlexArray (FA) Northern Embayment Lithospheric Experiment (NELE) project stations to aid in constructing the most detailed velocity images for the NMSZ to date. For the crust we observe a separation of velocity highs from velocity lows along the axis of the Mississippi Valley Graben (MVG). For the upper mantle, we image a significant low velocity anomaly of ˜ -3% to -5 % at depths of 100 - 250 km. A high velocity anomaly of ˜ +3% to +4% is observed at depths of 80 - 160 km and it occurs along the sides and top of the low velocity anomaly. The Vp and Vs solutions in the upper mantle show a remarkable similarity both in shape and anomaly magnitude. We propose that the observed low velocity features in the upper mantle are as a result of various tectonic activities in the area, which could result in: 1) Rejuvenated/primitive mantle, 2) Elevated temperatures, and 3) Increased fluid content. A combination of elevated temperatures and increased fluid content reduce P wave velocity (Vp) whereas the three effects combined significantly reduce S wave velocity (Vs). The high velocity anomalies observed are associated with mafic rocks emplaced in the lithosphere beneath the ME during initial rifting in the early Paleozoic and/or remnants of the depleted, lower portion of the lithosphere. Part 2: Using teleseismic SKS phases recorded with the Northern Embayment Lithosphere Experiment (NELE), and the USArray Transportable Array (TA), we apply the SplitLab processing environment to measure shear wave splitting within and outside the Mississippi Embayment (ME) for the period 2011

  12. Phase of shear vibrations within cochlear partition leads to activation of the cochlear amplifier.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Jessica S; Chadwick, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Since Georg von Bekesy laid out the place theory of the hearing, researchers have been working to understand the remarkable properties of mammalian hearing. Because access to the cochlea is restricted in live animals, and important aspects of hearing are destroyed in dead ones, models play a key role in interpreting local measurements. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) models are attractive because they are analytically tractable, appropriate to the oblong geometry of the cochlea, and can predict wave behavior over a large span of the cochlea. Interest in the role the tectorial membrane (TM) plays in cochlear tuning led us to develop models that directly interface the TM with the cochlear fluid. In this work we add an angled shear between the TM and reticular lamina (RL), which serves as an input to a nonlinear active force. This feature plus a novel combination of previous work gives us a model with TM-fluid interaction, TM-RL shear, a nonlinear active force and a second wave mode. The behavior we get leads to the conclusion the phase between the shear and basilar membrane (BM) vibration is critical for amplification. We show there is a transition in this phase that occurs at a frequency below the cutoff, which is strongly influenced by TM stiffness. We describe this mechanism of sharpened BM velocity profile, which demonstrates the importance of the TM in overall cochlear tuning and offers an explanation for the response characteristics of the Tectb mutant mouse.

  13. The Interfacial Transition Zone in Alkali-Activated Slag Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Provis, John

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is known to strongly influence the mechanical and transport properties of mortars and concretes. This paper studies the ITZ between siliceous (quartz) aggregates and alkali activated slag binders in the context of mortar specimens. Backscattered electron images (BSE) generated in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) are used to identify unreacted binder components, reaction products and porosity in the zone surrounding aggregate particles, by composition and density contrast. X-ray mapping is used to exclude the regions corresponding to the aggregates from the BSE image of the ITZ, thus enabling analysis of only the binder phases, which are segmented into binary images by grey level discrimination. A distinct yet dense ITZ region is present in the alkali-activated slag mortars, containing a reduced content of unreacted slag particles compared to the bulk binder. The elemental analysis of this region shows that it contains a (C,N)-A-S-H gel which seems to have a higher content of Na (potentially deposited through desiccation of the pore solution) and a lower content of Ca than the bulk inner and outer products forming in the main binding region. These differences are potentially important in terms of long-term concrete performance, as the absence of a highly porous interfacial transition zone region is expected to provide a positive influence on the mechanical and transport properties of alkali-activated slag concretes.

  14. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  15. Thrust exhumation of the Southern Marginal Zone of the Limpopo Complex in the Neoarchaean: link of distinct high-grade shear zones with DC and IC P-T-t paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, C. Andre; van Reenen, Dirk D.

    2010-05-01

    The Limpopo Complex is a ~750km long E-W trending zone of predominantly granulite facies rocks situated between the Archaean Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons of southern Africa. Large ductile shear zones are an integral part of the Limpopo architecture, defining the boundaries between the belt and the adjacent cratons and are interpreted to have been responsible for uplift (exhumation) of over thickened crust during the Neoarchaean [10 and references therein; 1]. The Hout River Shear Zone forms the terrane boundary between the granite-greenstone terrane of the Kaapvaal craton in the south and the high-grade Southern Marginal Zone (SMZ) of the Limpopo Complex in the north. Integrated structural, metamorphic, magmatic and age data collected over a period of more than 30 years provide convincing evidence for a Neoarchean high-grade tectono-metamorphic event that affected the SMZ in the interval ~2.72 - 2.60 Ga [4; 5, 6; 7; 2; 8; 9; 11]. The thrust-controlled exhumation of the SMZ is demonstrated by the convergence of a retrograde P-T path in the hanging wall (SMZ) and a prograde P-T loop in the footwall (Kaapvaal Craton) of the steeply SW-verging Hout River Shear Zone [4; 5]. The coeval ages (~2.69 Ga) of the two contrasting metamorphic histories are indicated by geochronological data [2; 3]. In addition, the establishment of a retrograde isograd and zone of rehydrated granulites in the hanging wall by hydrous CO2-rich fluids derived by dehydration of the low-grade rocks in the footwall provides another convincing link between the two contrasting metamorphic environments [10]. Distinct retrograde P-T paths [4; 6; 8] linked to distinct shear deformational events document evidence for a two-stage post-peak exhumation history of the SMZ: (i) granulites sampled far from the contact with the cool rocks of the Kaapvaal Craton are characterized by P-T paths with two distinct decompression-cooling (DC) stages (DC=>DC paths), (ii) granulites sampled close to this contact are

  16. Correlation between Electron Transport and Shear Alfven Activity in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Gorelenkov, N.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaye, S.; Mazzucato, E.

    2009-03-20

    We report the observation of a correlation between shear Alfven eigenmode activity and electron transport in plasma regimes where the electron temperature gradient is flat, and thus the drive for temperature gradient microinstabilities is absent. Plasmas having rapid central electron transport show intense, broadband global Alfven eigenmode (GAE) activity in the 0.5-1.1 MHz range, while plasmas with low transport are essentially GAE-free. The first theoretical assessment of a GAE-electron transport connection indicates that overlapping modes can resonantly couple to the bulk thermal electrons and induce their stochastic diffusion.

  17. Surface morphology of platelet adhesion influenced by activators, inhibitors and shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Melanie Groan

    Platelet activation involves multiple events, one of which is the generation and release of nitric oxide (NO), a platelet aggregation inhibitor. Platelets simultaneously send and receive various agents that promote a positive and negative feedback control system during hemostasis. Although the purpose of platelet-derived NO is not fully understood, NO is known to inhibit platelet recruitment. NO's relatively large diffusion coefficient allows it to diffuse more rapidly than platelet agonists. It may thus be able to inhibit recruitment of platelets near the periphery of a growing thrombus before agonists have substantially accumulated in those regions. Results from two studies in our laboratory differed in the extent to which platelet-derived NO decreased platelet adhesion. Frilot studied the effect of L-arginine (L-A) and NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA) on platelet adhesion to collagen under static conditions in a Petri dish. Eshaq examined the percent coverage on collagen-coated and fibrinogen-coated microchannels under shear conditions with different levels of L-A and Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). Frilot's results showed no effect of either L-A or L-NMMA on surface coverage, thrombus size or serotonin release, while Eshaq's results showed a decrease in surface coverage with increased levels of L-A. A possible explanation for these contrasting results is that platelet-derived NO may be more important under flow conditions than under static conditions. For this project, the effects of L-A. ADP and L-NMMA on platelet adhesion were studied at varying shear stresses on protein-coated glass slides. The surface exposed to platelet-rich-plasma in combination with each chemical solution was observed under AFM, FE-SEM and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons of images obtained with these techniques confirmed the presence of platelets on the protein coatings. AFM images of fibrinogen and collagen-coated slides presented characteristic

  18. Effects of muscle activation on shear between human soleus and gastrocnemius muscles.

    PubMed

    Finni, T; Cronin, N J; Mayfield, D; Lichtwark, G A; Cresswell, A G

    2017-01-01

    Lateral connections between muscles provide pathways for myofascial force transmission. To elucidate whether these pathways have functional roles in vivo, we examined whether activation could alter the shear between the soleus (SOL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles. We hypothesized that selective activation of LG would decrease the stretch-induced shear between LG and SOL. Eleven volunteers underwent a series of knee joint manipulations where plantar flexion force, LG, and SOL muscle fascicle lengths and relative displacement of aponeuroses between the muscles were obtained. Data during a passive full range of motion were recorded, followed by 20° knee extension stretches in both passive conditions and with selective electrical stimulation of LG. During active stretch, plantar flexion force was 22% greater (P < 0.05) and relative displacement of aponeuroses was smaller than during passive stretch (P < 0.05). Soleus fascicle length changes did not differ between passive and active stretches but LG fascicles stretched less in the active than passive condition when the stretch began at angles of 70° and 90° of knee flexion (P < 0.05). The activity-induced decrease in the relative displacement of SOL and LG suggests stronger (stiffer) connectivity between the two muscles, at least at flexed knee joint angles, which may serve to facilitate myofascial force transmission.

  19. Megakaryocytic Maturation in Response to Shear Flow Is Mediated by the Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) Transcription Factor via Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Luff, Stephanie A; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2016-04-08

    Megakaryocytes (MKs) are exposed to shear flow as they migrate from the bone marrow hematopoietic compartment into circulation to release pro/preplatelets into circulating blood. Shear forces promote DNA synthesis, polyploidization, and maturation in MKs, and platelet biogenesis. To investigate mechanisms underlying these MK responses to shear, we carried out transcriptional analysis on immature and mature stem cell-derived MKs exposed to physiological shear. In immature (day (d)9) MKs, shear exposure up-regulated genes related to growth and MK maturation, whereas in mature (d12) MKs, it up-regulated genes involved in apoptosis and intracellular transport. Following shear-flow exposure, six activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcripts (ATF4,JUNB,JUN,FOSB,FOS, andJUND) were up-regulated at d9 and two AP-1 proteins (JunD and c-Fos) were up-regulated both at d9 and d12. We show that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling is linked to both the shear stress response and AP-1 up-regulation. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation increased significantly following shear stimulation, whereas JNK inhibition reduced shear-induced JunD expression. Although p38 phosphorylation did not increase following shear flow, its inhibition reduced shear-induced JunD and c-Fos expression. JNK inhibition reduced fibrinogen binding and P-selectin expression of d12 platelet-like particles (PLPs), whereas p38 inhibition reduced fibrinogen binding of d12 PLPs. AP-1 expression correlated with increased MK DNA synthesis and polyploidization, which might explain the observed impact of shear on MKs. To summarize, we show that MK exposure to shear forces results in JNK activation, AP-1 up-regulation, and downstream transcriptional changes that promote maturation of immature MKs and platelet biogenesis in mature MKs.

  20. Peridotites from a ductile shear zone within back-arc lithospheric mantle, southern Mariana Trench: Results of a Shinkai 6500 dive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michibayashi, K.; Ohara, Y.; Stern, R. J.; Fryer, P.; Kimura, J.-I.; Tasaka, M.; Harigane, Y.; Ishii, T.

    2009-05-01

    Two N-S fault zones in the southern Mariana fore arc record at least 20 km of left-lateral displacement. We examined the eastward facing slope of one of the fault zones (the West Santa Rosa Bank fault) from 6469 to 5957 m water depth using the submersible Shinkai 6500 (YK06-12 Dive 973) as part of a cruise by the R/V Yokosuka in 2006. The dive recovered residual but still partly fertile lherzolite, residual lherzolite, and dunite; the samples show mylonitic, porphyroclastic, and coarse, moderately deformed secondary textures. Crystal-preferred orientations of olivine within the peridotites show a typical [100](010) pattern, with the fabric intensity decreasing from rocks with coarse secondary texture to mylonites. The sampled peridotites therefore represent a ductile shear zone within the lithospheric mantle of the overriding plate. Peridotites were probably exposed in association with a tear in the subducting slab, previously inferred from bathymetry and seismicity. Furthermore, although the dive site is located in the fore arc close to the Mariana Trench, spinel compositions within the sampled peridotites are comparable to those from the Mariana Trough back arc, suggesting that back-arc basin mantle is exposed along the West Santa Rosa Bank fault.

  1. Crossover from shear-driven to thermally activated drainage of liquid-infused microscale capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Wexler, Jason S.; Liu, Ying; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-10-01

    The shear-driven drainage of capillary grooves filled with viscous liquid is a dynamic wetting phenomenon relevant to numerous industrial processes and lubricant-infused surfaces for drag reduction and antifouling. Prior work has reported that a finite length L∞ of the capillary groove can remain indefinitely filled with liquid even when large shear stresses are applied. The mechanism preventing full drainage is attributed to a balance between the shear-driven flow and a counterflow driven by capillary pressures caused by deformation of the free surface. In this work, we examine closely the approach to the final equilibrium length L∞ and report a crossover to a slow drainage regime that cannot be described by conventional dynamic models considering solely hydrodynamic and capillary forces. The slow drainage regime observed in experiments can be instead modeled by a kinetic equation describing a sequence of random thermally activated transitions between multiple metastable states caused by surface defects with nanoscale dimensions. Our findings provide insights on the critical role that natural or engineered surface roughness with nanoscale dimensions can play in the imbibition and drainage of capillaries and other dynamic wetting processes in microscale systems.

  2. Rheological signatures in limit cycle behaviour of dilute, active, polar liquid crystalline polymers in steady shear

    PubMed Central

    Forest, M. Gregory; Phuworawong, Panon; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Ruhai

    2014-01-01

    We consider the dilute regime of active suspensions of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs), addressing issues motivated by our kinetic model and simulations in Forest et al. (Forest et al. 2013 Soft Matter 9, 5207–5222 (doi:10.1039/c3sm27736d)). In particular, we report unsteady two-dimensional heterogeneous flow-orientation attractors for pusher nanorod swimmers at dilute concentrations where passive LCP equilibria are isotropic. These numerical limit cycles are analogous to longwave (homogeneous) tumbling and kayaking limit cycles and two-dimensional heterogeneous unsteady attractors of passive LCPs in weak imposed shear, yet these states arise exclusively at semi-dilute concentrations where stable equilibria are nematic. The results in Forest et al. mentioned above compel two studies in the dilute regime that complement recent work of Saintillan & Shelley (Saintillan & Shelley 2013 C. R. Physique 14, 497–517 (doi:10.1016/j.crhy.2013.04.001)): linearized stability analysis of the isotropic state for nanorod pushers and pullers; and an analytical–numerical study of weakly and strongly sheared active polar nanorod suspensions to capture how particle-scale activation affects shear rheology. We find that weakly sheared dilute puller versus pusher suspensions exhibit steady versus unsteady responses, shear thickening versus thinning and positive versus negative first normal stress differences. These results further establish how sheared dilute nanorod pusher suspensions exhibit many of the characteristic features of sheared semi-dilute passive nanorod suspensions. PMID:25332387

  3. Linking Plagioclase Zoning Patterns to Active Magma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; Neill, O. K.; Shcherbakov, V.; Plechov, P.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Plagioclase, one of the most common and abundant mineral phases in volcanic products, will vary in composition in response to changes in temperature, pressure, composition of the ambient silicate melt, and melt H2O concentration. Changes in these parameters may cause dissolution or growth of plagioclase crystals, forming characteristic textural and compositional variations (zoning patterns), the complete core-to-rim sequence of which describes events experienced by an individual crystal from its nucleation to the last moments of its growth. Plagioclase crystals in a typical volcanic rock may look drastically dissimilar despite their spatial proximity and the fact that they have erupted together. Although they shared last moments of their growth during magma ascent and eruption, their prior experiences could be very different, as plagioclase crystals often come from different domains of the same magma system. Distinguishing similar zoning patterns, correlating them across the entire population of plagioclase crystals, and linking these patterns to specific perturbations in the magmatic system may provide additional perspective on the variety, extent, and timing of magma processes at active volcanic systems. Examples of magma processes, which may be distinguished based on plagioclase zoning patterns, include (1) cooling due to heat loss, (2) heating and/or pressure build up due to an input of new magmatic material, (3) pressure drop in response to magma system depressurization, and (4) crystal transfer between different magma domains/bodies. This review will include contrasting examples of zoning patters from recent eruptions of Karymsky, Bezymianny, and Tolbachik Volcanoes in Kamchatka, Augustine and Cleveland Volcanoes in Alaska, as well as from the drilling into an active magma body at Krafla, Iceland.

  4. 77 FR 71167 - Foreign-Trade Zone 59-Lincoln, Nebraska, Authorization of Production Activity, Novartis Consumer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 59--Lincoln, Nebraska, Authorization of Production Activity, Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. (Pharmaceutical and Related Preparations Production), Lincoln, Nebraska Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. submitted a notification of proposed production activity for the...

  5. Character of High Temperature Mylonitic Shear Zones Associated with Oceanic Detachment Faults at the Ultra-Slow Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, C.; John, B. E.; Cheadle, M. J.; German, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Two well-preserved core complexes at the Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR), Mt Dent and Mt Hudson, provide an opportunity to examine the deformation history and rheology of detachment faults at an ultra-slow spreading ridge. Samples from the CAYTROUGH (1976-77) project and the Nautilus NA034 cruise (2013) were selected for detailed petrographic and microstructural study. Surface samples from Mt. Dent (near the center of the MCR) provide insight into lateral variation in footwall rock type and deformation history across a core complex in both the across and down dip directions. In contrast, sampling of Mt. Hudson (SE corner of the MCR) focuses on a high-angle, crosscutting normal fault scarp, which provides a cross section of the detachment fault system. Sampling across Mt Dent reveals that the footwall is composed of heterogeneously-distributed gabbro (47%) and peridotite (20%) with basaltic cover (33%) dominating the top of the core complex. Sampling of Mt Hudson is restricted to the normal fault scarp cutting the core complex and suggests the interior is dominated by gabbro (85% gabbro, 11% peridotite, 4% basalt). At Mt. Dent, peridotite is exposed within ~4km of the breakaway indicating that the Mt. Dent detachment does not cut Penrose-style oceanic crust. The sample set provides evidence of a full down-temperature sequence of detachment related-fault rocks, from possible granulite and clear amphibolite mylonitizatization to prehnite-pumpellyite brittle deformation. Both detachments show low-temperature brittle deformation overprinting higher temperature plastic fabrics. Fe-Ti oxide gabbro mylonites dominate the sample set, and plastic deformation of plagioclase is recorded in samples collected as near as ~4km from the inferred breakaway along the southern flank of Mt. Dent, suggesting the brittle-plastic transition was initially at ~3km depth. Recovered samples suggest strain associated with both detachment systems is localized into discrete mylonitic shear zones (~1-10cm

  6. Electron Thermal Transport Barrier and Magnetohydrodynamic Activity Observed in Tokamak Plasmas with Negative Central Shear

    SciTech Connect

    de Baar, M.R.; Hogeweij, G.M.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Oomens, A.A.; Schueller, F.C.

    1997-06-01

    In the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, plasmas with steady-state negative central shear (NCS) are made with off-axis electron cyclotron heating. Shifting the power deposition by 2mm results in a sharp transition of confinement. The good confinement branch features a transport barrier at the off-axis minimum of the safety factor (q) , where q{le}3, and two magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, where one is localized at the off-axis minimum of q and one covers the entire NCS region. The low confinement branch has q{gt}3 everywhere, no transport barrier, and no MHD activity. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. 78 FR 28801 - Foreign-Trade Zone 117-Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 117--Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Shipbuilding), Orange, TX On January 10, 2013, the Foreign Trade Zone of Southeast...-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Signal International Texas GP, LLC, in Orange, Texas....

  8. Kinematics of syn- and post-exhumational shear zones at Lago di Cignana (Western Alps, Italy): constraints on the exhumation of Zermatt-Saas (ultra)high-pressure rocks and deformation along the Combin Fault and Dent Blanche Basal Thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirst, Frederik; Leiss, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Kinematic analyses of shear zones at Lago di Cignana in the Italian Western Alps were used to constrain the structural evolution of units from the Piemont-Ligurian oceanic realm (Zermatt-Saas and Combin zones) and the Adriatic continental margin (Dent Blanche nappe) during Palaeogene syn- and post-exhumational deformation. Exhumation of Zermatt-Saas (U)HP rocks to approximately lower crustal levels at ca. 39 Ma occurred during normal-sense top-(S)E shearing under epidote-amphibolite-facies conditions. Juxtaposition with the overlying Combin zone along the Combin Fault at mid-crustal levels occurred during greenschist-facies normal-sense top-SE shearing at ca. 38 Ma. The scarcity of top-SE kinematic indicators in the hanging wall of the Combin Fault probably resulted from strain localization along the uppermost Zermatt-Saas zone and obliteration by subsequent deformation. A phase of dominant pure shear deformation around 35 Ma affected units in the direct footwall and hanging wall of the Combin Fault. It is interpreted to reflect NW-SE crustal elongation during updoming of the nappe stack as a result of underthrusting of European continental margin units and the onset of continental collision. This phase was partly accompanied and followed by ductile bulk top-NW shearing, especially at higher structural levels, which transitioned into semi-ductile to brittle normal-sense top-NW deformation due to Vanzone phase folding from ca. 32 Ma onwards. Our structural observations suggest that syn-exhumational deformation is partly preserved within units and shear zones exposed at Lago di Cignana but also that the Combin Fault and Dent Blanche Basal Thrust experienced significant post-exhumational deformation reworking and overprinting earlier structures.

  9. Phoretic drag reduction of chemically active homogeneous spheres under force fields and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Kaynan, Uri

    2017-01-01

    Surrounded by a spherically symmetric solute cloud, chemically active homogeneous spheres do not undergo conventional autophoresis when suspended in an unbounded liquid domain. When exposed to external flows, solute advection deforms that cloud, resulting in a generally asymmetric distribution of diffusio-osmotic slip which, in turn, modifies particle motion. Inspired by classical forced-convection analyses [Acrivos and Taylor, Phys. Fluids 5, 387 (1962), 10.1063/1.1706630; Frankel and Acrivos, Phys. Fluids 11, 1913 (1968), 10.1063/1.1692218] we illustrate this phoretic phenomenon using two prototypic configurations, one where the particle sediments under a uniform force field and one where it is subject to a simple shear flow. In addition to the Péclet number Pe associated with the imposed flow, the governing nonlinear problem also depends upon α , the intrinsic Péclet number associated with the chemical activity of the particle. As in the forced-convection problems, the small-Péclet-number limit is nonuniform, breaking down at large distances away from the particle. Calculation of the leading-order autophoretic effects thus requires use of matched asymptotic expansions, the outer region being at distances that scale inversely with Pe and Pe1 /2 in the respective sedimentation and shear problems. In the sedimentation problem we find an effective drag reduction of fractional amount α /8 ; in the shear problem we find that the magnitude of the stresslet is decreased by a fractional amount α /4 . For a dilute particle suspension the latter result is manifested by a reduction of the effective viscosity.

  10. The incorporation of a zone of calcified cartilage improves the interfacial shear strength between in vitro-formed cartilage and the underlying substrate.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Gan, Lu; Wang, Jian; Pilliar, Robert M; Grynpas, Marc D; Kandel, Rita A

    2012-04-01

    A major challenge for cartilage tissue engineering remains the proper integration of constructs with surrounding tissues in the joint. Biphasic osteochondral constructs that can be anchored in a joint through bone ingrowth partially address this requirement. In this study, a methodology was devised to generate a cell-mediated zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC) between the in vitro-formed cartilage and a porous calcium polyphosphate (CPP) bone substitute in an attempt to improve the mechanical integrity of that interface. To do so, a calcium phosphate (CaP) film was deposited on CPP by a sol-gel process to prevent the accumulation of polyphosphates and associated inhibition of mineralization as the substrate degrades. Cartilage formed in vitro on the top surface of CaP-coated CPP by deep-zone chondrocytes was histologically and biochemically comparable to that formed on uncoated CPP. Furthermore, the mineral in the ZCC was similar in crystal structure, morphology and length to that formed on uncoated CPP and native articular cartilage. The generation of a ZCC at the cartilage-CPP interface led to a 3.3-fold increase in the interfacial shear strength of biphasic constructs. Improved interfacial strength of these constructs may be critical to their clinical success for the repair of large cartilage defects.

  11. Microfabrics of calcite ultramylonites as records of coaxial and non-coaxial deformation kinematics: Examples from the Rocher de l'Yret shear zone (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trullenque, Ghislain; Kunze, Karsten; Heilbronner, Renee; Stünitz, Holger; Schmid, Stefan M.

    2006-09-01

    Microfabrics were analysed in calcite mylonites from the rim of the Pelvoux massif (Western Alps, France). WNW-directed emplacement of the internal Penninic units onto the Dauphinois domain produced intense deformation of an Eocene-age nummulitic limestone under lower anchizone metamorphic conditions (slightly below 300 °C). Two types of microfabrics developed primarily by dislocation creep accompanied by dynamic recrystallisation in the absence of twinning. Coaxial kinematics are inferred for samples exhibiting grain shape fabrics and textures with orthorhombic symmetry. Their texture (crystallographic preferred orientation, CPO) is characterised by two c-axis maxima, symmetrically oriented at 15° from the normal to the macroscopic foliation. Non-coaxial deformation is evident in samples with monoclinic shape fabrics and textures characterised by a single oblique c-axis maximum tilted with the sense of shear by about 15°. From the analysis of suitably oriented slip systems for the main texture components under given kinematics it is inferred that the orthorhombic textures, which developed in coaxial kinematics, favour activity of <10-11> and <02-21> slip along the f and r planes, respectively, with minor contributions of basal-< a> slip. In contrast, the monoclinic textures, which developed during simple shear, are most suited for duplex < a> slip along the basal plane. The transition between the dominating slip systems for the orthorhombic and monoclinic microfabrics is interpreted to be due to the effects of dynamic recrystallisation upon texture development. Since oblique c-axis maxima documented in the literature are most often rotated not with but against the shear sense, calcite textures alone should not be used as unequivocal shear sense indicators, but need to be complemented by microstructural criteria such as shape preferred orientations, grain size estimates and amount of twinning.

  12. The active zone T-bar--a plasticity module?

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Carolin; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2010-09-01

    The synaptic active zone, the site where Ca(2+)-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles takes place, is commonly associated with protein-rich, electron-dense cytomatrices. The molecular composition and functional role of active zones, especially in the context of vesicular exo- and endocytosis, are under intense investigation. Per se, Drosophila synapses, which display so-called T-bars as electron-dense specializations, should be a highly suitable model system, as they allow for a combination of efficient genetics with ultrastructural and electrophysiological analyses. However, it needed a biochemical approach of the Buchner laboratory to "molecularly" access the T-bar by identification of the CAST/ERC-family member Bruchpilot as the first T-bar-residing protein. Genetic elimination of Bruchpilot revealed that the protein is essential for T-bar formation, calcium channel clustering, and hence proper vesicle fusion and patterned synaptic plasticity. Recently, Bruchpilot was shown to directly shape the T-bar, likely by adopting an elongated conformation. Moreover, first mechanisms that control the availability of Bruchpilot for T-bar assembly were described. This review seeks to summarize the information on T-bar structure, as well as on functional aspects, formulating the hypothesis that T-bars are genuine "plasticity modules."

  13. Effect of activation mode on shear bond strength of metallic brackets.

    PubMed

    Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Costa, Ana Rosa; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Vedovello Filho, Mário; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic orthodontic brackets bonded to bovine teeth using light-activated or chemically activated composite resins. One hundred and twenty bovine mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups (n=20), according to the bonding materials: Transbond XT (T); Enforce Dual (ED); Enforce chemical (EC); Enforce Light-activated (EL); Concise Orthodontic (C); and RelyX Unicem Capsule (UN). Metallic brackets were positioned and firmly bonded to the teeth. Light-activation for T, ED, EL and UN was carried out with four exposures on each side of the bracket with 20 s total exposure times using XL2500 (3M ESPE). EC and C were chemically cured. Next, all specimens were stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength was carried out at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated at 8× magnification. C (17.72 ± 4.45) presented significantly higher SBS means (in MPa) than the other groups (p<0.05), followed by EC (11.97 ± 5.77) and ED (10.57 ± 1.32). EL (5.39 ± 1.06) and UN (4.32 ± 1.98) showed the lowest SBS means, while T (9.09 ± 2.56) showed intermediate values. For ARI, there was a predominance of score 0 for EC, C and UN, and score 3 for T, ED and EL. In conclusion, the activation mode influenced the SBS.

  14. Solar wind control of auroral zone geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Searls, C.; Kivelson, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    Solar wind magnetosphere energy coupling functions are analyzed using linear prediction filtering with 2.5 minute data. The relationship of auroral zone geomagnetic activity to solar wind power input functions are examined, and a least squares prediction filter, or impulse response function is designed from the data. Computed impulse response functions are observed to have characteristics of a low pass filter with time delay. The AL index is found well related to solar wind energy functions, although the AU index shows a poor relationship. High frequency variations of auroral indices and substorm expansions are not predictable with solar wind information alone, suggesting influence by internal magnetospheric processes. Finally, the epsilon parameter shows a poorer relationship with auroral geomagnetic activity than a power parameter, having a VBs solar wind dependency.

  15. Characterizing a large shear-zone with seismic and magnetotelluric methods: The case of the Dead Sea Transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maercklin, N.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Haberland, C.; Ritter, O.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M.; Weckmann, U.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic tomography, imaging of seismic scatterers, and magnetotelluric soundings reveal a sharp lithologic contrast along a ???10 km long segment of the Arava Fault (AF), a prominent fault of the southern Dead Sea Transform (DST) in the Middle East. Low seismic velocities and resistivities occur on its western side and higher values east of it, and the boundary between the two units coincides partly with a seismic scattering image. At 1-4 km depth the boundary is offset to the east of the AF surface trace, suggesting that at least two fault strands exist, and that slip occurred on multiple strands throughout the margin's history. A westward fault jump, possibly associated with straightening of a fault bend, explains both our observations and the narrow fault zone observed by others. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  17. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  18. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  19. Metamorphic history of garnet-rich gneiss at Ktiš in the Lhenice shear zone, Moldanubian Zone of the southern Bohemian Massif, inferred from inclusions and compositional zoning of garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Hirajima, Takao; Kawakami, Tetsuo; Svojtka, Martin

    2011-05-01

    Multiple equilibrium stages were identified from garnet-rich gneiss at Ktiš in the Lhenice shear zone of the southern Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic. The matrix of the rock mainly comprises cordierite (Crd), sillimanite (Sil), biotite (Bt), garnet (Grt), quartz (Qtz), K-feldspar (Kfs) and plagioclase (Pl) along with accessory minerals such as spinel (Spl), apatite (Ap), monazite (Mnz) and zircon (Zrn). Bt, Sil, kyanite (Ky) and Pl occur as inclusion phases in Grt. Crd occurs only in the matrix both as isolated grains and as reaction coronas developed around Grt. Spl is closely correlated with the Crd corona. Some coarse-grained (> 3 mm) Grts show chemical heterogeneity both in major and trace elements. Grossular (Grs)-content is homogeneous and high {Xgrs = Ca / (Ca + Mg + Fe + Mn) = 0.27} in a center of the grain and smoothly decreases towards the grain margin (Xgrs = 0.02). However, pyrope (Prp)-content shows an inverse pattern against Grs-content; i.e., Prp-content is low and constant {Xprp = Mg / (Ca + Mg + Fe + Mn) = 0.03} in the center of the grain and gradually increases towards the margin (up to Xprp = 0.28). The contours of Grs- and Prp-contents show symmetrical hexagonal shapes. The distribution pattern of phosphorus, however, shows a striking contrast against Grs-content. The core of the grain is characterized by low-phosphorus content almost below the detection limit of the EPMA analysis but it is armored by the high-phosphorus rim accompanying with local development of phosphorus-poor outermost rim. The outline of phosphorus-poor core shows a hexagonal shape, which is symmetrical to those of Grs- and Prp-content contours, but it is located outside of higher-Grs (Xgrs = 0.27)- and lower-Prp (Xprp = 0.03)-content contours. These observations suggest that the outline of phosphorus-poor core should indicate the original shape of Grs-rich garnet developed during an early stage of the metamorphism. The zoning pattern of major/trace elements in garnet and

  20. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active ]region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main ]sequence path bordering the free ]energy ]limit line in (flux content, free ]energy proxy) phase space. Here we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic ]shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of order 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core ]field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  1. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  2. 78 FR 55057 - Foreign-Trade Zone 134-Chattanooga, Tennessee; Authorization of Production Activity; Komatsu...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 134--Chattanooga, Tennessee; Authorization of Production Activity; Komatsu America Corporation, (Construction and Forestry Equipment), Chattanooga, Tennessee On...

  3. 77 FR 61381 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7-Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Authorization of Production Activity, Baxter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 7--Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Authorization of Production Activity, Baxter Healthcare of Puerto Rico, (Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Intravenous Bags...

  4. 78 FR 36523 - Foreign-Trade Zone 84-Houston, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Toshiba International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 84--Houston, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Toshiba International Corporation; (Hybrid Electric Vehicle Motors and Generators Production);...

  5. Triassic fluid mobilization and epigenetic lead-zinc sulphide mineralization in the Transdanubian Shear Zone (Pannonian Basin, Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkó, Zsolt; Molnár, Ferenc; Lespinasse, Marc; Billström, Kjell; Pécskay, Zoltán; Németh, Tibor

    2014-06-01

    A combined fluid inclusion, fluid inclusion plane, lead isotope and K/Ar radiometric age dating work has been carried out on two lead-zinc mineralizations situated along the Periadriatic-Balaton Lineament in the central part of the Pannonian Basin, in order to reveal their age and genetics as well as temporal-spatial relationships to other lead-zincfluorite mineralization in the Alp-Carpathian region. According to fluid inclusion studies, the formation of the quartzfluorite- galena-sphalerite veins in the Velence Mts is the result of mixing of low (0-12 NaCl equiv. wt. %) and high salinity (10-26 CaCl2 equiv. wt. %) brines. Well-crystallized (R3-type) illite associated with the mineralized hydrothermal veins indicates that the maximum temperature of the hydrothermal fluids could have been around 250 °C. K/Ar radiometric ages of illite, separated from the hydrothermal veins provided ages of 209-232 Ma, supporting the Mid- to Late-Triassic age of the hydrothermal fluid flow. Fluid inclusion plane studies have revealed that hydrothermal circulation was regional in the granite, but more intensive around the mineralized zones. Lead isotope signatures of hydrothermal veins in the Velence Mts (206Pb/204Pb = 18.278-18.363, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.622-15.690 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.439-38.587) and in Szabadbattyán (206Pb/204Pb = 18.286-18.348, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.667-15.736 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.552-38.781) form a tight cluster indicating similar, upper crustal source of the lead in the two mineralizations. The nature of mineralizing fluids, age of the fluid flow, as well as lead isotopic signatures of ore minerals point towards a genetic link between epigenetic carbonate-hosted stratiform-stratabound Alpine-type lead-zinc-fluorite deposits in the Southern and Eastern Alps and the studied deposits in the Velence Mts and at Szabadbattyán. In spite of the differences in host rocks and the depth of the ore precipitation, it is suggested that the studied deposits along the Periadriatic

  6. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of