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Sample records for active site arginine

  1. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  2. A binding site for activation by the Bacillus subtilis AhrC protein, a repressor/activator of arginine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Klingel, U; Miller, C M; North, A K; Stockley, P G; Baumberg, S

    1995-08-21

    In Bacillus subtilis, the AhrC protein represses genes encoding enzymes of arginine biosynthesis and activates those mediating its catabolism. To determine how this repressor also functions as an activator, we attempted to clone catabolic genes by searching for insertions of the Tn917-lacZ transposon that express AhrC-dependent, arginine-inducible beta-galactosidase activity. One such isolate was obtained. The region upstream of lacZ was subcloned in Escherichia coli in such a way that it could be replaced in the B. subtilis chromosome after appropriate manipulation. Analysis of exonuclease III-derived deletions located an AhrC-dependent, arginine-inducible promoter to within a ca. 1.9 kb fragment. The sequence revealed: the 3' end of an ORF homologous to gdh genes encoding glutamate dehydrogenase, with highest homology to the homologue from Clostridium difficile; the 5' end of an ORF homologous to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene encoding delta 1-pyrroline 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH), an enzyme of arginine catabolism; and just upstream of the latter, a sequence with homology to known AhrC binding sites in the upstream part of the biosynthetic argCJBD-cpa-F cluster. The same region has also been sequenced by others as part of the B. subtilis genome sequencing project, revealing that the P5CDH gene is the first in a cluster termed rocABC. Restriction fragments containing the putative AhrC-binding sequence, but not those lacking it, showed retarded electrophoretic mobility in the presence of purified AhrC. A 277 bp AhrC-binding fragment also showed anomalous mobility in the absence of AhrC, consistent with its being intrinsically bent. DNAse I footprinting localized AhrC binding to bp -16/-22 to +1 (the transcription startpoint). Such a location for an activator binding site, i.e. overlapping the transcription start, is unusual.

  3. A Conserved Surface Loop in Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases Positions an Active Site Arginine and Functions in Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Peterson, Scott N.; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-04-18

    Dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the third step in the biosynthetic shikimate pathway. We present three crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica type I DHQD that address the functionality of a surface loop that is observed to close over the active site following substrate binding. Two wild-type structures with differing loop conformations and kinetic and structural studies of a mutant provide evidence of both direct and indirect mechanisms of involvement of the loop in substrate binding. In addition to allowing amino acid side chains to establish a direct interaction with the substrate, closure of the loop necessitates a conformational change of a key active site arginine, which in turn positions the substrate productively. The absence of DHQD in humans and its essentiality in many pathogenic bacteria make the enzyme a target for the development of nontoxic antimicrobials. The structures and ligand binding insights presented here may inform the design of novel type I DHQD inhibiting molecules.

  4. Detection of local polarity and conformational changes at the active site of rabbit muscle creatine kinase with a new arginine-specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujuan; Wang, Xiaochun; Shi, Wen; Wang, Ke; Ma, Huimin

    2008-02-01

    A new polarity-sensitive fluorescent probe, 3-(4-chloro-6-p-glyoxal-phenoxy-1,3,5-triazinylamino)-7-(dimethylamino)-2-methylphenazine (CGTDP), is synthesized for selective labeling of active-site arginine residues. The probe comprises a neutral red moiety as a polarity-sensitive fluorophore and a phenylglyoxal unit as an arginine-specific labeling group. The probe exhibits a sensitive response of shift of fluorescence maximum emission wavelength to solvent polarity only instead of pH or temperature, which leads to the use of the probe in detecting the local polarity and conformational changes of the active site of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (CK) denatured by pH or temperature. The polarity of the active site domain has been first found to correspond to a dielectric constant of about 44, and the conformational change of the active site directly revealed by CGTDP occurs far before that of CK as a whole disclosed by the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence during acid or thermal denaturation. The present strategy may provide a useful method to detect the local polarity and conformational changes of the active sites of many enzymes that employ arginine residues as anion recognition sites under different denaturation conditions.

  5. Arginine residues on the opposite side of the active site stimulate the catalysis of ribosome depurination by ricin A chain by interacting with the P-protein stalk.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Peter C; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Grela, Przemyslaw; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2013-10-18

    Ricin inhibits protein synthesis by depurinating the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL). Ricin holotoxin does not inhibit translation unless the disulfide bond between the A (RTA) and B (RTB) subunits is reduced. Ricin holotoxin did not bind ribosomes or depurinate them but could depurinate free RNA. When RTA is separated from RTB, arginine residues located at the interface are exposed to the solvent. Because this positively charged region, but not the active site, is blocked by RTB, we mutated arginine residues at or near the interface of RTB to determine if they are critical for ribosome binding. These variants were structurally similar to wild type RTA but could not bind ribosomes. Their K(m) values and catalytic rates (k(cat)) for an SRL mimic RNA were similar to those of wild type, indicating that their activity was not altered. However, they showed an up to 5-fold increase in K(m) and up to 38-fold decrease in kcat toward ribosomes. These results suggest that the stalk binding stimulates the catalysis of ribosome depurination by RTA. The mutated arginines have side chains behind the active site cleft, indicating that the ribosome binding surface of RTA is on the opposite side of the surface that interacts with the SRL. We propose that stalk binding stimulates the catalysis of ribosome depurination by orienting the active site of RTA toward the SRL and thereby allows docking of the target adenine into the active site. This model may apply to the translation factors that interact with the stalk.

  6. New insights into the catalytic mechanism of histidine phosphatases revealed by a functionally essential arginine residue within the active site of the Sts phosphatases.

    PubMed

    San Luis, Boris; Nassar, Nicolas; Carpino, Nick

    2013-07-01

    Sts (suppressor of T-cell receptor signalling)-1 and Sts-2 are HPs (histidine phosphatases) that negatively regulate TCR (T-cell receptor) signalling pathways, including those involved in cytokine production. HPs play key roles in such varied biological processes as metabolism, development and intracellular signalling. They differ considerably in their primary sequence and substrate specificity, but possess a catalytic core formed by an invariant quartet of active-site residues. Two histidine and two arginine residues cluster together within the HP active site and are thought to participate in a two-step dephosphorylation reaction. To date there has been little insight into any additional residues that might play an important functional role. In the present study, we identify and characterize an additional residue within the Sts phosphatases (Sts-1 Arg383 or Sts-2 Arg369) that is critical for catalytic activity and intracellular function. Mutation of Sts-1 Arg383 to an alanine residue compromises the enzyme's activity and renders Sts-1 unable to suppress TCR-induced cytokine induction. Of the multiple amino acids substituted for Arg383, only lysine partially rescues the catalytic activity of Sts-1. Although Sts-1 Arg383 is conserved in all Sts homologues, it is only conserved in one of the two sub-branches of HPs. The results of the present study highlight an essential role for Sts-1 phosphatase activity in regulating T-cell activation and add a new dimension of complexity to our understanding of HP catalytic activity.

  7. Arginine mimetic structures in biologically active antagonists and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2006-01-01

    Peptidomimetics have found wide application as bioavailable, biostable, and potent mimetics of naturally occurring biologically active peptides. L-Arginine is a guanidino group-containing basic amino acid, which is positively charged at neutral pH and is involved in many important physiological and pathophysiological processes. Many enzymes display a preference for the arginine residue that is found in many natural substrates and in synthetic inhibitors of many trypsin-like serine proteases, e.g. thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, trypsin, and in integrin receptor antagonists, used to treat many blood-coagulation disorders. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by oxidation of L-arginine in an NADPH- and O(2)-dependent process catalyzed by isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), exhibits diverse roles in both normal and pathological physiologies and has been postulated to be a contributor to the etiology of various diseases. Development of NOS inhibitors as well as analogs and mimetics of the natural substrate L-arginine, is desirable for potential therapeutic use and for a better understanding of their conformation when bound in the arginine binding site. The guanidino residue of arginine in many substrates, inhibitors, and antagonists forms strong ionic interactions with the carboxylate of an aspartic acid moiety, which provides specificity for the basic amino acid residue in the active side. However, a highly basic guanidino moiety incorporated in enzyme inhibitors or receptor antagonists is often associated with low selectivity and poor bioavailability after peroral application. Thus, significant effort is focused on the design and preparation of arginine mimetics that can confer selective inhibition for specific trypsin-like serine proteases and NOS inhibitors as well as integrin receptor antagonists and possess reduced basicity for enhanced oral bioavailability. This review will describe the survey of arginine mimetics designed to mimic the function of the

  8. Contributions of the substrate-binding arginine residues to maleate-induced closure of the active site of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Matharu, A; Hayashi, H; Kagamiyama, H; Maras, B; John, R A

    2001-03-01

    Crystallography shows that aspartate aminotransferase binds dicarboxylate substrate analogues by bonds to Arg292 and Arg386, respectively [Jager, J, Moser, M. Sauder, U. & Jansonius, J. N. (1994) J. Mol. Biol., 239, 285-305]. The contribution of each interaction to the conformational change that the enzyme undergoes when it binds ligands via these residues, is assessed by probing mutant forms of the enzyme lacking either or both arginines. The probes used are NaH(3)BCN which reduces the cofactor imine, the reactive substrate analogue, cysteine sulfinate and proteolysis by trypsin. The unreactive substrate analogue, maleate, is used to induce closure. Each single mutant reacted only 2.5-fold more slowly with NaH(3)BCN than the wild-type indicating that charge repulsion by the arginines contributes little to maintaining the open conformation. Maleate lowered the rate of reduction of the wild-type enzyme more than 300-fold but had little effect on the reaction of the mutant enzymes indicating that the ability of this dicarboxylate analogue to bridge the arginines precisely makes the major contribution to closure. The R292L mutant reacted 20 times more rapidly with cysteine sulfinate than R386L but 5 x 10(4) times more slowly than the wild-type enzyme, consistent with the proposal that enzyme's catalytic abilities are not developed unless closure is induced by bridging of the arginines. Proteolysis of the mutants with trypsin showed that, in the wild-type enzyme, the bonds most susceptible to trypsin are those contributed by Arg292 and Arg386. Proteolysis of the next most susceptible bond, at Arg25 in the double mutant, was protected by maleate demonstrating the presence of an additional site on the enzyme for binding dicarboxylates.

  9. Neisseria meningitidis Translation Elongation Factor P and Its Active-Site Arginine Residue Are Essential for Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Takehiro; Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Translation elongation factor P (EF-P), a ubiquitous protein over the entire range of bacterial species, rescues ribosomal stalling at consecutive prolines in proteins. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, the post-translational β-lysyl modification of Lys34 of EF-P is important for the EF-P activity. The β-lysyl EF-P modification pathway is conserved among only 26–28% of bacteria. Recently, it was found that the Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa EF-P proteins, containing an Arg residue at position 32, are modified with rhamnose, which is a novel post-translational modification. In these bacteria, EF-P and its Arg modification are both dispensable for cell viability, similar to the E. coli and S. enterica EF-P proteins and their Lys34 modification. However, in the present study, we found that EF-P and Arg32 are essential for the viability of the human pathogen, Neisseria meningitidis. We therefore analyzed the modification of Arg32 in the N. meningitidis EF-P protein, and identified the same rhamnosyl modification as in the S. oneidensis and P. aeruginosa EF-P proteins. N. meningitidis also has the orthologue of the rhamnosyl modification enzyme (EarP) from S. oneidensis and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, EarP should be a promising target for antibacterial drug development specifically against N. meningitidis. The pair of genes encoding N. meningitidis EF-P and EarP suppressed the slow-growth phenotype of the EF-P-deficient mutant of E. coli, indicating that the activity of N. meningitidis rhamnosyl–EF-P for rescuing the stalled ribosomes at proline stretches is similar to that of E. coli β-lysyl–EF-P. The possible reasons for the unique requirement of rhamnosyl–EF-P for N. meningitidis cells are that more proline stretch-containing proteins are essential and/or the basal ribosomal activity to synthesize proline stretch-containing proteins in the absence of EF-P is lower in this bacterium than in others. PMID:26840407

  10. Arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase has activity against primary acute myeloid leukemia cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miraki-Moud, Farideh; Ghazaly, Essam; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Hodby, Katharine A; Clear, Andrew; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Liapis, Konstantinos; Grantham, Marianne; Sohrabi, Fareeda; Cavenagh, Jamie; Bomalaski, John S; Gribben, John G; Szlosarek, Peter W; Bonnet, Dominique; Taussig, David C

    2015-06-25

    The strategy of enzymatic degradation of amino acids to deprive malignant cells of important nutrients is an established component of induction therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells from most patients with AML are deficient in a critical enzyme required for arginine synthesis, argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1). Thus, these ASS1-deficient AML cells are dependent on importing extracellular arginine. We therefore investigated the effect of plasma arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) against primary AMLs in a xenograft model and in vitro. ADI-PEG 20 alone induced responses in 19 of 38 AMLs in vitro and 3 of 6 AMLs in vivo, leading to caspase activation in sensitive AMLs. ADI-PEG 20-resistant AMLs showed higher relative expression of ASS1 than sensitive AMLs. This suggests that the resistant AMLs survive by producing arginine through this metabolic pathway and ASS1 expression could be used as a biomarker for response. Sensitive AMLs showed more avid uptake of arginine from the extracellular environment consistent with their auxotrophy for arginine. The combination of ADI-PEG 20 and cytarabine chemotherapy was more effective than either treatment alone resulting in responses in 6 of 6 AMLs tested in vivo. Our data show that arginine deprivation is a reasonable strategy in AML that paves the way for clinical trials.

  11. Anti-tumor activity of arginine deiminase via arginine deprivation in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Dong Hun; Min, Bon-Hong; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2007-12-01

    In spite of recent advances in the treatment of retinoblastoma, chemotherapy is still challenging in high-stage intraocular retinoblastoma or metastatic retinoblastoma. Here, we investigated whether arginine deprivation via arginine deiminase (ADI) could be a new anti-tumor therapy in retinoblastoma cells. Expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) was detected in human retinoblastoma tissues. Even with a high expression of ASS, ADI effectively inhibited the proliferation of retinoblastoma cells and induced retinoblastoma cell death in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that arginine deprivation via ADI could be another treatment option for retinoblastoma due to low ASS activity in retinoblastoma cells.

  12. Arginine-rich peptides are blockers of VR-1 channels with analgesic activity.

    PubMed

    Planells-Cases, R; Aracil, A; Merino, J M; Gallar, J; Pérez-Payá, E; Belmonte, C; González-Ros, J M; Ferrer-Montiel, A V

    2000-09-15

    Vanilloid receptors (VRs) play a fundamental role in the transduction of peripheral tissue injury and/or inflammation responses. Molecules that antagonize VR channel activity may act as selective and potent analgesics. We report that synthetic arginine-rich hexapeptides block heterologously expressed VR-1 channels with submicromolar efficacy in a weak voltage-dependent manner, consistent with a binding site located near/at the entryway of the aqueous pore. Dynorphins, natural arginine-rich peptides, also blocked VR-1 activity with micromolar affinity. Notably, synthetic and natural arginine-rich peptides attenuated the ocular irritation produced by topical capsaicin application onto the eyes of experimental animals. Taken together, our results imply that arginine-rich peptides are VR-1 channel blockers with analgesic activity. These findings may expand the development of novel analgesics by targeting receptor sites distinct from the capsaicin binding site.

  13. Examination of the role of arginine-143 in the human copper and zinc superoxide dismutase by site-specific mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Beyer, W F; Fridovich, I; Mullenbach, G T; Hallewell, R

    1987-08-15

    The active site arginine-143 of human Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase has been replaced by lysine or by isoleucine. The mutant proteins were expressed at high levels in yeast, purified, and the amino acid substitution explored through the use of group specific reagents. The specific activities of these enzymes, measured by the xanthine oxidase/cytochrome c method and by using dry weight determination to establish protein concentration, were: native enzyme, 6570 units/mg; Lys-substituted enzyme, 2840 units/mg, Ile-substituted enzyme, 708 units/mg. The active site arginine thus plays an important, but not an essential, role in the catalytic process.

  14. Depletion of arginine by recombinant arginine deiminase induces nNOS-activated neurotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Erh; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Wei, Ming-Feng; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Recombinant arginine deiminase (rADI) is a selective NO modulator of iNOS and eNOS in endothelial cells, and it also exhibits neuroprotective activity in an iNOS-induced neuron-microglia coculture system. However, the effect of rADI on nNOS remains unknown. Addressing this issue is important for evaluating the potential application of rADI in neurodegenerative diseases. SH-SY5Y cells were treated with N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) to activate nNOS. NMDA increased NO production by 39.7 ± 3.9% via nNOS under arginine-containing conditions, but there was no significant increase in both arginine-free and rADI pretreated arginine-containing (citrulline) buffer. Subsequently, neither NMDA nor rADI alone caused cytotoxicity, whereas cotreatment with NMDA and rADI resulted in dissipation of the cell mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased cell viability. The mechanism of rADI cytotoxicity in the presence of NMDA is caused by the inhibition of NO production via nNOS mediated by the NMDA receptor, which was abolished when extracellular arginine was absent, even in the presence of citrulline. rADI not only reduced NO production but also caused cellular toxicity in nNOS-activated SH-SY5Y cells, suggesting a dual role for rADI in NOS-mediated neurotoxicity.

  15. Staphylococcal nuclease active-site amino acids: pH dependence of tyrosines and arginines by sup 13 C NMR and correlation with kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.G.; Markley, J.L. )

    1989-03-07

    The pH and temperature dependence of the kinetic parameters of staphylococcal nuclease have been examined with three p-nitrophenyl phosphate containing DNA analogues that vary as to 3'-substituent. With wild-type (Foggi variant) nuclease (nuclease wt) and the substrates thymidine 3'-phosphate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp), thymidine 3'-methylphosphonate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp Me), and thymidine 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdT), k{sub cat} remains nearly constant at 13 min{sup {minus}1}. However, k{sub cat}/k{sub m} with nuclease wt varies considerably. The data suggests that the inflection k{sub cat}/K{sub m} with pK{sub a} at 9.67 arises from ionization of tyrosine-85, which hydrogen bonds to the divalent 3'-phosphomonester of substrates with this substituent. The enthalpy of ionization of both deprotonation steps in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} versus pH profile is 5 kcal/mol. {sup 13}C NMR has been used to determine the pK{sub a} values of the arginine and tyrosine residues. The results do not rule out arginine as a candidate for the acidic catalyst that protonates the 5'-ribose alkoxide prior to product release. The phenolic hydroxyl carbon of tyrosine-85 has been assigned by comparing the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of nuclease wt and nuclease Y85F. This correlation between pK{sub a} values along with the absence of other candidates indicates that the ionization of tyrosine-85 is the pK{sub a} seen in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} vs pH profile for substrates with a divalent 3'-phosphomonester. This conclusion is consistent with the proposed role of tyrosine-85 as a hydrogen-bond donor to the 3'-phosphomonoester of substrates poised for exonucleolytic hydrolysis.

  16. Lotus hairy roots expressing inducible arginine decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, María A; Ruiz, Oscar A; Sánchez, Diego H

    2004-05-01

    Biotechnological uses of plant cell-tissue culture usually rely on constitutive transgene expression. However, such expression of transgenes may not always be desirable. In those cases, the use of an inducible promoter could be an alternative approach. To test this hypothesis, we developed two binary vectors harboring a stress-inducible promoter from Arabidopsis thaliana, driving the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and the oat arginine decarboxylase. Transgenic hairy roots of Lotus corniculatus were obtained with osmotic- and cold-inducible beta-glucuronidase and arginine decarboxylase activities. The increase in the activity of the latter was accompanied by a significant rise in total free polyamines level. Through an organogenesis process, we obtained L. corniculatus transgenic plants avoiding deleterious phenotypes frequently associated with the constitutive over-expression of arginine decarboxylation and putrescine accumulation.

  17. A Potent, Selective and Cell-active Inhibitor of Human Type I Protein Arginine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Senisterra, Guillermo; Li, Fengling; Butler, Kyle V.; Kaniskan, H. Ümit; Speed, Brandon A.; dela Seña, Carlo; Dong, Aiping; Zeng, Hong; Schapira, Matthieu; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Liu, Jing; Vedadi, Masoud; Jin, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Overexpression of PRMTs has been implicated in various human diseases including cancer. Consequently, selective small-molecule inhibitors of PRMTs have been pursued by both academia and pharmaceutical industry as chemical tools for testing biological and therapeutic hypotheses. PRMTs are divided into three categories: type I PRMTs which catalyze mono- and asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, type II PRMTs which catalyze mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, and type III PRMT which catalyzes only monomethylation of arginine residues. Here, we report the discovery of a potent, selective and cell-active inhibitor of human type I PRMTs, MS023, and characterization of this inhibitor in a battery of biochemical, biophysical and cellular assays. MS023 displayed high potency for type I PRMTs including PRMT1, 3, 4, 6 and 8, but was completely inactive against type II and type III PRMTs, protein lysine methyltransferases and DNA methyltransferases. A crystal structure of PRMT6 in complex with MS023 revealed that MS023 binds the substrate binding site. MS023 potently decreased cellular levels of histone arginine asymmetric dimethylation. It also reduced global levels of arginine asymmetric dimethylation and concurrently increased levels of arginine monomethylation and symmetric dimethylation in cells. We also developed MS094, a close analog of MS023, which was inactive in biochemical and cellular assays, as a negative control for chemical biology studies. MS023 and MS094 are useful chemical tools for investigating the role of type I PRMTs in health and disease. PMID:26598975

  18. Specific arginine modification at the phosphatase site of muscle carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Pullan, L M; Noltmann, E A

    1985-01-29

    Mammalian carbonic anhydrase III has previously been shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate in addition to possessing the conventional CO2 hydratase and p-nitrophenylacetate esterase activities. Modification of pig muscle carbonic anhydrase III with the arginine reagent phenylglyoxal yielded two clearly distinctive results. Reaction of the enzyme with phenylglyoxal at concentrations equivalent to those of the enzyme yielded stoichiometric inactivation titration of the enzyme's phosphatase activity, approaching 100% loss of activity with the simultaneous modification of one arginine residue, the latter based on a 1:1 reaction of phenylglyoxal with arginine. At this low ratio of phenylglyoxal to enzyme, neither the CO2 hydratase activity nor the acetate esterase activity was affected. When the modification was performed with a significant excess of phenylglyoxal, CO2 hydratase and acetate esterase activities were diminished as well. That loss of activity was accompanied by the incorporation of an additional half dozen phenylglyoxals and, presumably, the modification of an equal number of arginine residues. The data in their entirety are interpreted to show that the p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity is a unique property of carbonic anhydrase III and that excessive amounts of the arginine-modifying reagent lead to unspecific structural changes of the enzyme as a result of which all of its enzymatic activities are inactivated.

  19. Citrulline Supplementation Improves Organ Perfusion and Arginine Availability under Conditions with Enhanced Arginase Activity.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, Karolina A P; Meesters, Dennis M; van Barneveld, Kevin W Y; Visschers, Ruben G J; Briedé, Jacob J; Vandendriessche, Benjamin; van Eijk, Hans M H; Bessems, Babs A F M; van den Hoven, Nadine; von Wintersdorff, Christian J H; Brouckaert, Peter; Bouvy, Nicole D; Lamers, Wouter H; Cauwels, Anje; Poeze, Martijn

    2015-06-29

    Enhanced arginase-induced arginine consumption is believed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of sickle cell disease-induced end organ failure. Enhancement of arginine availability with L-arginine supplementation exhibited less consistent results; however, L-citrulline, the precursor of L-arginine, may be a promising alternative. In this study, we determined the effects of L-citrulline compared to L-arginine supplementation on arginine-nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, arginine availability and microcirculation in a murine model with acutely-enhanced arginase activity. The effects were measured in six groups of mice (n = 8 each) injected intraperitoneally with sterile saline or arginase (1000 IE/mouse) with or without being separately injected with L-citrulline or L-arginine 1 h prior to assessment of the microcirculation with side stream dark-field (SDF)-imaging or in vivo NO-production with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Arginase injection caused a decrease in plasma and tissue arginine concentrations. L-arginine and L-citrulline supplementation both enhanced plasma and tissue arginine concentrations in arginase-injected mice. However, only the citrulline supplementation increased NO production and improved microcirculatory flow in arginase-injected mice. In conclusion, the present study provides for the first time in vivo experimental evidence that L-citrulline, and not L-arginine supplementation, improves the end organ microcirculation during conditions with acute arginase-induced arginine deficiency by increasing the NO concentration in tissues.

  20. Arginine kinase shows nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity toward deoxythymidine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Hernandez-Flores, Jose M; Lugo-Sanchez, Maria E; Sugich-Miranda, Rocio; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) (ATP: L-arginine phosphotransferase, E.C. 2.7.3.3) catalyzes the reversible transfer of ATP γ-phosphate group to L-arginine to synthetize phospho-arginine as a high-energy storage. Previous studies suggest additional roles for AK in cellular processes. Since AK is found only in invertebrates and it is homologous to creatine kinase from vertebrates, the objective of this work was to demonstrate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for shrimp AK. For this, AK from marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvAK) was purified and its activity was assayed for phosphorylation of TDP using ATP as phosphate donor. Moreover, by using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) the phosphate transfer reaction was followed. Also, LvAK tryptophan fluorescence emission changes were detected by dTDP titration, suggesting that the hydrophobic environment of Trp 221, which is located in the top of the active site, is perturbed upon dTDP binding. The kinetic constants for both substrates Arg and dTDP were calculated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Besides, docking calculations suggested that dTDP could bind LvAK in the same cavity where ATP bind, and LvAK basic residues (Arg124, 126 and 309) stabilize the dTDP phosphate groups and the pyrimidine base interact with His284 and Ser122. These results suggest that LvAK bind and phosphorylate dTDP being ATP the phosphate donor, thus describing a novel alternate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for this enzyme.

  1. Receptor-mediated activation of nitric oxide synthesis by arginine in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mahesh S; Ferguson, T Bruce; Johnson, Fruzsina K; Johnson, Robert A; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Lancaster, Jack R

    2007-06-12

    Arginine contains the guanidinium group and thus has structural similarity to ligands of imidazoline and alpha-2 adrenoceptors (alpha-2 AR). Therefore, we investigated the possibility that exogenous arginine may act as a ligand for these receptors in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and activate intracellular nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Idazoxan, a mixed antagonist of imidazoline and alpha-2 adrenoceptors, partly inhibited L-arginine-initiated NO formation as measured by a Griess reaction. Rauwolscine, a highly specific antagonist of alpha-2 AR, at very low concentrations completely inhibited NO formation. Like L-arginine, agmatine (decarboxylated arginine) also activated NO synthesis, however, at much lower concentrations. We found that dexmedetomidine, a specific agonist of alpha-2 AR was very potent in activating cellular NO, thus indicating a possible role for alpha-2 AR in L-arginine-mediated NO synthesis. D-arginine also activated NO production and could be inhibited by imidazoline and alpha-2 AR antagonists, thus indicating nonsubstrate actions of arginine. Pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G proteins, attenuated L-arginine-mediated NO synthesis, thus indicating mediation via G proteins. L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine and phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 inhibited NO formation and thus implicated participation of a second messenger pathway. Finally, in isolated rat gracilis vessels, rauwolscine completely inhibited the L-arginine-initiated vessel relaxation. Taken together, these data provide evidence for binding of arginine to membrane receptor(s), leading to the activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) NO production through a second messenger pathway. These findings provide a previously unrecognized mechanistic explanation for the beneficial effects of L-arginine in the cardiovascular system and thus provide new potential avenues for therapeutic development.

  2. Receptor-mediated activation of nitric oxide synthesis by arginine in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Mahesh S.; Ferguson, T. Bruce; Johnson, Fruzsina K.; Johnson, Robert A.; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2007-01-01

    Arginine contains the guanidinium group and thus has structural similarity to ligands of imidazoline and α-2 adrenoceptors (α-2 AR). Therefore, we investigated the possibility that exogenous arginine may act as a ligand for these receptors in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and activate intracellular nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Idazoxan, a mixed antagonist of imidazoline and α-2 adrenoceptors, partly inhibited l-arginine-initiated NO formation as measured by a Griess reaction. Rauwolscine, a highly specific antagonist of α-2 AR, at very low concentrations completely inhibited NO formation. Like l-arginine, agmatine (decarboxylated arginine) also activated NO synthesis, however, at much lower concentrations. We found that dexmedetomidine, a specific agonist of α-2 AR was very potent in activating cellular NO, thus indicating a possible role for α-2 AR in l-arginine-mediated NO synthesis. d-arginine also activated NO production and could be inhibited by imidazoline and α-2 AR antagonists, thus indicating nonsubstrate actions of arginine. Pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G proteins, attenuated l-arginine-mediated NO synthesis, thus indicating mediation via G proteins. l-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine and phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 inhibited NO formation and thus implicated participation of a second messenger pathway. Finally, in isolated rat gracilis vessels, rauwolscine completely inhibited the l-arginine-initiated vessel relaxation. Taken together, these data provide evidence for binding of arginine to membrane receptor(s), leading to the activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) NO production through a second messenger pathway. These findings provide a previously unrecognized mechanistic explanation for the beneficial effects of l-arginine in the cardiovascular system and thus provide new potential avenues for therapeutic development. PMID:17535904

  3. Control of TSC2-Rheb signaling axis by arginine regulates mTORC1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Bernadette; Maetzel, Dorothea; Maddocks, Oliver DK; Otten, Gisela; Ratcliff, Matthew; Smith, Graham R; Dunlop, Elaine A; Passos, João F; Davies, Owen R; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Tee, Andrew R; Sarkar, Sovan; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is the key signaling hub that regulates cellular protein homeostasis, growth, and proliferation in health and disease. As a prerequisite for activation of mTORC1 by hormones and mitogens, there first has to be an available pool of intracellular amino acids. Arginine, an amino acid essential during mammalian embryogenesis and early development is one of the key activators of mTORC1. Herein, we demonstrate that arginine acts independently of its metabolism to allow maximal activation of mTORC1 by growth factors via a mechanism that does not involve regulation of mTORC1 localization to lysosomes. Instead, arginine specifically suppresses lysosomal localization of the TSC complex and interaction with its target small GTPase protein, Rheb. By interfering with TSC-Rheb complex, arginine relieves allosteric inhibition of Rheb by TSC. Arginine cooperates with growth factor signaling which further promotes dissociation of TSC2 from lysosomes and activation of mTORC1. Arginine is the main amino acid sensed by the mTORC1 pathway in several cell types including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Dependence on arginine is maintained once hESCs are differentiated to fibroblasts, neurons, and hepatocytes, highlighting the fundamental importance of arginine-sensing to mTORC1 signaling. Together, our data provide evidence that different growth promoting cues cooperate to a greater extent than previously recognized to achieve tight spatial and temporal regulation of mTORC1 signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11058.001 PMID:26742086

  4. Urinary nitrate excretion in relation to murine macrophage activation. Influence of dietary L-arginine and oral NG-monomethyl-L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Granger, D L; Hibbs, J B; Broadnax, L M

    1991-02-15

    Murine macrophage oxidation of L-arginine guanidino nitrogen to nitrite/nitrate yields an intermediate effector, possibly nitric oxide, with antimicrobial activity. Total body nitrogen oxidation metabolism (NOM) was measured in vivo by determining the urinary nitrate excretion of mice ingesting a chemically defined nitrite/nitrate-free diet. As reported previously, mycobacterial infection with bacillus Calmétte-Guerin led to a large increase in urinary nitrate excretion. This increase was temporally related to macrophage activation in vivo. The substrate for macrophage nitrogen oxidation metabolism in vitro, L-arginine, was deleted from the diet without ameliorating the urinary nitrate excretion response induced by BCG. This suggested that L-arginine was synthesized endogenously because there are no other known natural substrates for NOM. A competitive inhibitor of NOM, the L-arginine analog, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine was fed to mice in their drinking water. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine ingestion blocked both basal and bacillus Calmétte-Guerin-induced urinary nitrate excretion over a 2-4 week time span. These experimental conditions should prove useful for further investigation on the role of macrophage NOM in host defense against intracellular microorganisms.

  5. Age-dependent arginine phosphokinase activity changes in male vestigial and wild-type Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Baker, G T

    1975-01-01

    The activity of arginine phosphokinase, an important muscle enzyme in insects, was investigated with age in vestigial-winged and wild-type Drosophila melanogaster. Identical patterns of age-dependent activity changes were observed in the vestigial-winged flies as in the wild-type, even though vestigial-winged flies exhibit a 50% mortality approximately two thirds that of the wild-type as well as being incapable of flight. Results indicate that the age-dependent changes in arginine phosphokinase activity are intrinsically regulated within the cells of the flight muscle.

  6. Cellular Activity of New Small Molecule Protein Arginine Deiminase 3 (PAD3) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Haya; Khan, Hasan A; Tjin, Caroline C; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-09-08

    The protein arginine deiminases (PADs) catalyze the post-translational deimination of arginine side chains. Multiple PAD isozymes have been characterized, and abnormal PAD activity has been associated with several human disease states. PAD3 has been characterized as a modulator of cell growth via apoptosis inducing factor and has been implicated in the neurodegenerative response to spinal cord injury. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and evaluation of conformationally constrained versions of the potent and selective PAD3 inhibitor 2. The cell activity of representative inhibitors in this series was also demonstrated for the first time by rescue of thapsigargin-induced cell death in PAD3-expressing HEK293T cells.

  7. Regulation of macrophage functions by L-arginine

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Sites of inflammation with prominent macrophage infiltration, such as wounds and certain tumors, are uniquely deficient in free arginine. The effects of arginine availability on macrophage physiology were investigated. When cultured in media containing less than 0.1 mM L- arginine, rat resident peritoneal macrophages exhibited enhanced spreading, tumor cytotoxicity, superoxide production, phagocytosis, and protein synthesis. Thus, arginine concentrations similar to those found in sites of inflammation can augment macrophage functions, while those found in plasma (approximately 0.1 mM) and in commonly used culture media (0.4 to 1.2 mM) are inhibitory. Culture in homoarginine, but not D-arginine, ornithine, citrulline, urea, histidine, or lysine also inhibited macrophage tumor cytotoxicity, indicating the specificity of the effect. In contrast to resident macrophages, the tumor cytotoxicity of peritoneal macrophages obtained after C. parvum injection was suppressed by culture in arginine-deficient media. However, L-arginine- deficient media enhanced all other activation-associated functions in C. parvum-elicited macrophages as in resident cells. Arginine-free wound fluid promoted resident macrophage tumoricidal activity when compared with rat serum, and again, the addition of L-arginine was inhibitory. The marked effects of L-arginine availability on macrophage functions, together with the knowledge that these cells modify the extracellular arginine concentration in sites of inflammation through arginase, provide evidence for an autoregulatory mechanism of macrophage activation. PMID:2538541

  8. PRMT11: a new Arabidopsis MBD7 protein partner with arginine methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Scebba, Francesca; De Bastiani, Morena; Bernacchia, Giovanni; Andreucci, Andrea; Galli, Alvaro; Pitto, Letizia

    2007-10-01

    Plant methyl-DNA-binding proteins (MBDs), discovered by sequence homology to their animal counterparts, have not been well characterized at the physiological and functional levels. In order better to characterize the Arabidopsis AtMBD7 protein, unique in bearing three MBD domains, we used a yeast two-hybrid system to identify its partners. One of the interacting proteins we cloned is the Arabidopsis arginine methyltransferase 11 (AtPRMT11). Glutathione S-transferase pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that the two proteins interact with each other and can be co-isolated. Using GFP fluorescence, we show that both AtMBD7 and AtPRMT11 are present in the nucleus. Further analyses revealed that AtPRMT11 acts as an arginine methyltransferase active on both histones and proteins of cellular extracts. The analysis of a T-DNA mutant line lacking AtPRMT11 mRNA revealed reduced levels of proteins with asymmetrically dimethylated arginines, suggesting that AtPRMT11, which is highly similar to mammalian PRMT1, is indeed a type I arginine methyltransferase. Further, AtMBD7 is a substrate for AtPRMT11, which post-translationally modifies the portion of the protein-containing C-terminal methylated DNA-binding domain. These results suggest the existence of a link between DNA methylation and arginine methylation.

  9. Reconstitution of an active arginine deiminase pathway in Mycoplasma pneumoniae M129.

    PubMed

    Rechnitzer, Hagai; Rottem, Shlomo; Herrmann, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Some species of the genus Mycoplasma code for the arginine deiminase pathway (ADI), which enables these bacteria to produce ATP from arginine by the successive reaction of three enzymes: arginine deiminase (ArcA), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ArcB), and carbamate kinase (ArcC). It so far appears that independently isolated strains of Mycoplasma pneumoniae encode an almost identical truncated version of the ADI pathway in which the proteins ArcA and ArcB have lost their original enzymatic activities due to the deletion of significant regions of these proteins. To study the consequences of a functional ADI pathway, M. pneumoniae M129 was successfully transformed with the cloned functional arcA, arcB, and arcC genes from Mycoplasma fermentans. Enzymatic tests showed that while the M. pneumoniae ArcAB and ArcABC transformants possess functional arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyltransferase, and carbamate kinase, they were unable to grow on arginine as the sole energy source. Nevertheless, infection of a lung epithelial cell line, A549, with the M. pneumoniae transformants showed that almost 100% of the infected host cells were nonviable, while most of the lung cells infected with nontransformed M. pneumoniae were viable under the same experimental conditions.

  10. Arginine residues in the C-terminal and their relationship with the analgesic activity of the toxin from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK AGP-SYPU1).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Song, Yong-Bo; Yang, Guang-Zhao; Cui, Yong; Zhao, Yong-Shan; Liu, Yan-Feng; Ma, Yan; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Jing-Hai

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the functional role of arginines in the C-terminal (65-67) of BmK AGP-SYPU1, an analgesic peptide from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch. Using site-directed mutagenesis, arginines at the C-terminal (65-66) were deleted or added to the C-terminal (67). The genes for three mutants of BmK AGP-SYPU1 were obtained by PCR. An analgesic activity assay was used to evaluate the role of arginine residues in the analgesic activity. The three-dimensional structure of BmK AGP-SYPU1 was established by homology modeling. As a result, we showed that the arginines in the C-terminal are crucial for the analgesic activity and may be located at analgesic functional sites. Our work has implications for further modification of scorpion toxins to obtain new analgesic peptides with enhanced activity.

  11. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  12. Modulation of arginine decarboxylase activity from Mycobacterium smegmatis. Evidence for pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-mediated conformational changes in the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Balasundaram, D; Tyagi, A K

    1989-08-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (arginine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.19) from Mycobacterium smegmatis, TMC 1546 has been purified to homogeneity. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 232 kDa and a subunit mass of 58.9 kDa. The enzyme from mycobacteria is totally dependent on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate for its activity at its optimal pH and, unlike that from Escherichia coli, Mg2+ does not play an active role in the enzyme conformation. The enzyme is specific for arginine (Km = 1.6 mM). The holoenzyme is completely resolved in dialysis against hydroxylamine. Reconstitution of the apoenzyme with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate shows sigmoidal binding characteristics at pH 8.4 with a Hill coefficient of 2.77, whereas at pH 6.2 the binding is hyperbolic in nature. The kinetics of reconstitution at pH 8.4 are apparently sigmoidal, indicating the occurrence of two binding types of differing strengths. A low-affinity (Kd = 22.5 microM) binding to apoenzyme at high pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentrations and a high-affinity (Kd = 3.0 microM) binding to apoenzyme at high pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentrations. The restoration of full activity occurred in parallel with the tight binding (high affinity) of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to the apoenzyme. Along with these characteristics, spectral analyses of holoenzyme and apoenzyme at pH 8.4 and pH 6.2 indicate a pH-dependent modulation of coenzyme function. Based on the pH-dependent changes in the polarity of the active-site environment, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate forms different Schiff-base tautomers at pH 8.4 and pH 6.2 with absorption maxima at 415 nm and 333 nm, respectively. These separate forms of Schiff-base confer different catalytic efficiencies to the enzyme.

  13. The Effect of Selective D- or Nα-Methyl Arginine Substitution on the Activity of the Proline-Rich Antimicrobial Peptide, Chex1-Arg20

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyi; Sun, Zhe; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Otvos, Laszlo; Reynolds, Eric C.; Hossain, Mohammed A.; Separovic, Frances; Wade, John D.

    2017-01-01

    In vivo pharmacokinetics studies have shown that the proline-rich antimicrobial peptide, A3-APO, which is a discontinuous dimer of the peptide, Chex1-Arg20, undergoes degradation to small fragments at positions Pro6-Arg7 and Val19-Arg20. With the aim of minimizing or abolishing this degradation, a series of Chex1-Arg20 analogs were prepared via Fmoc/tBu solid phase peptide synthesis with D-arginine or, in some cases, peptide backbone Nα-methylated arginine, substitution at these sites. All the peptides were tested for antibacterial activity against the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. The resulting activity of position-7 substitution of Chex1-Arg20 analogs showed that arginine-7 is a crucial residue for maintaining activity against K. pneumoniae. However, arginine-20 substitution had a much less deleterious effect on the antibacterial activity of the peptide. Moreover, none of these peptides displayed any cytotoxicity to HEK and H-4-II-E mammalian cells. These results will aid the development of more effective and stable PrAMPs via judicious amino acid substitutions. PMID:28154813

  14. Anti-stress and Adaptogenic Activity of l-Arginine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, oral supplementation of l-arginine in rats was evaluated for its anti-stress and adaptogenic activity using the cold (5°C)–hypoxia (428 mmHg)–restraint (C-H-R) animal model. A dose-dependent study of l-arginine was carried out at doses of 12.5, 25.0, 50.0, 100.0, 200.0 and 500.0 mg/kg body weight, administered orally 30 min prior to C-H-R exposure. The time taken by the rat to attain a rectal temperature of 23°C (Trec 23°C) during C-H-R exposure and its recovery to Trec 37°C at normal atmospheric pressure and 32 ± 1°C were used as biomarkers of anti-stress and adaptogenic activity. Biochemical parameters related to lipid peroxidation, anti-oxidants, cell membrane permeability, nitric oxide and stress, with and without administration of the least effective l-arginine dose, were measured in rats on attaining Trec 23°C and Trec 37°C. The least effective adaptogenic dose of l-arginine was 100.0 mg/kg body weight. The C-H-R exposure of control rats, on attaining Trec 23°C, resulted in a significant increase in plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), blood lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a decrease in blood catalase (CAT) and plasma testosterone levels. On recovery (Trec 37°C) of control rats, there was a further decrease in CAT and plasma testosterone, and an increase in LDH. l-Arginine supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in plasma MDA, an increase in blood superoxide dismutase (SOD), CAT levels maintained at control values and a lower increase in LDH compared with controls (45.3 versus 58.5% and 21.5 versus 105.2%) on attaining Trec 23°C during C-H-R exposure and on recovery to Trec 37°C. The results suggested that l-arginine possesses potent anti-stress activity during C-H-R exposure and recovery from C-H-R-induced hypothermia. PMID:15841283

  15. Role of Arginine 293 and Glutamine 288 in Communication between Catalytic and Allosteric Sites in Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2012-11-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 ({alpha}) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 ({beta}) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  16. Arginine-rhamnosylation as new strategy to activate translation elongation factor P

    PubMed Central

    Lassak, Jürgen; Keilhauer, Eva C; Fürst, Maximilian; Wuichet, Kristin; Gödeke, Julia; Starosta, Agata L; Chen, Jhong-Min; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Rohr, Jürgen; Wilson, Daniel N; Häussler, Susanne; Mann, Matthias; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome stalling at polyproline stretches is common and fundamental. In bacteria, translation elongation factor P (EF-P) rescues such stalled ribosomes, but only when it is post-translationally activated. In Escherichia coli, activation of EF-P is achieved by (R)-β-lysinylation and hydroxylation of a conserved lysine. Here we have unveiled a markedly different modification strategy in which a conserved arginine of EF-P is rhamnosylated by a glycosyltransferase (EarP) using dTDP-l-rhamnose as a substrate. This is to our knowledge the first report of N-linked protein glycosylation on arginine in bacteria and the first example in which a glycosylated side chain of a translation elongation factor is essential for function. Arginine-rhamnosylation of EF-P also occurs in clinically relevant bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We demonstrate that the modification is needed to develop pathogenicity, making EarP and dTDP-l-rhamnose-biosynthesizing enzymes ideal targets for antibiotic development. PMID:25686373

  17. Rapid evolution of arginine deiminase for improved anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ye; Liu, Yongmei; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Zhu, Leilei; Li, Na; Li, Lifeng; Sun, Zhihao

    2011-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), an arginine-degrading enzyme, has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors, such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas. Based on our preliminary results, it was noticed that the optimum pH of ADI from Pseudomonas plecoglossicida (PpADI) was 6.0, and less than 10% of the activity was retained at pH 7.4 (pH of human plasma). Additionally, the K(m) value for wild-type ADI (WT-ADI) was 2.88 mM (pH 6.0), which is over 20 times of the serum arginine level (100-120 μM). These are two major limitations for PpADI as a potential anti-cancer drug. A highly sensitive and efficient high-throughput screening strategy based on a modified diacetylmonoxime-thiosemicarbazide method was established to isolate ADI mutants with higher activity and lower K(m) under physiological pH. Three improved mutants was selected from 650 variants after one round of ep-PCR, among which mutant 314 (M314: A128T, H404R, I410L) exhibiting the highest activity. Interestingly, sequence alignment shows that three amino acid substitutes in M314 are coincident with corresponding residues in ADI from Mycoplasma arginini. The specific activity of M314 (9.02 U/mg) is over 20-fold higher than that of WT-ADI (0.44 U/mg) at pH 7.4, and the K(m) value was reduced to 0.65 mM (pH 7.4). Noticeably, the pH optimum was shifted from 6.0 to 6.5 in M314. Homology model of M314 was constructed to understand the molecular basis of the improved enzymatic properties. This work could provide promising drug candidate for curing arginine-auxotrophic cancers.

  18. Thermodynamic characterization of the DmsD binding site for the DmsA twin-arginine motif.

    PubMed

    Winstone, Tara M L; Turner, Raymond J

    2015-03-24

    The system specific chaperone DmsD interacts with the twin-arginine leader peptide of its substrate, DmsA, allowing for proper folding and assembly of the DmsA catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide reductase prior to translocation by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD residues important for binding the complete 45-amino acid sequence of the DmsA leader (DmsAL) peptide were previously identified and found to cluster in a pocket of the DmsD structure. In this study, we have utilized isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to determine the dissociation constant and thermodynamic parameters of 15 single-substitution DmsD variant proteins and a synthetic DmsAL peptide consisting of 27 amino acids (DmsAL₁₅₋₄₁). The stoichiometry values were determined via ITC, and the multimeric compositions of the DmsD variants in the absence and presence of peptide were characterized via size exclusion chromatography and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An up to 4-fold change in affinity was observed for DmsD variant proteins relative to that of wild-type DmsD, and variation of the entropic contribution to binding divided the binding site into two clusters: residues with either more or less favorable entropy. Substitution of hydrophobic residues along one helix face (helix 5) or prolines found on adjacent loops caused reduced binding affinity because of the increased entropic cost, which suggests that the twin-arginine motif of the DmsAL peptide binds to a preformed site on DmsD. Most DmsD variants were more than 90% monomeric in solution and bound a single peptide per protein molecule. The DmsD variant with the largest dimer population showed increased affinity and induced the formation of tetramers in the presence of peptide, suggesting that dimeric DmsD or an alternatively folded form of DmsD may play an as yet undefined role in binding.

  19. Surface functionalization of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes with octa-arginine for enhanced anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Swati; Dodwadkar, Namita S.; Deshpande, Pranali P.; Parab, Shruti; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes (commercially available as DOXIL® or Lipodox®) were surface functionalized with a cell-penetrating peptide, octa-arginine (R8). For this purpose, R8-peptide was conjugated to the polyethylene glycol–dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG–DOPE) amphiphilic co-polymer. The resultant R8–PEG–PE conjugate was introduced into the lipid bilayer of liposomes at 2 mol% of total lipid amount via spontaneous micelle-transfer technique. The liposomal modification did not alter the particle size distribution, as measured by Particle Size Analyzer and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, surface-associated cationic peptide increased zeta potential of the modified liposomes. R8-functionalized liposomes (R8-Dox-L) markedly increased the intracellular and intratumoral delivery of doxorubicin as measured by flow cytometry and visualizing by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) compared to unmodified Doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes (Dox-L). R8-Dox-L delivered loaded Doxorubicin to the nucleus, being released from the endosomes at higher efficiency compared to unmodified liposomes, which had marked entrapment in the endosomes at tested time point of 1 h. The significantly higher accumulation of loaded drug to its site of action for R8-Dox-L resulted in improved cytotoxic activity in vitro (cell viability of 58.5 ± 7% for R8-Dox-L compared to 90.6 ± 2% for Dox-L at Dox dose of 50 μg/mL for 4 h followed by 24 h incubation) and enhanced suppression of tumor growth (348 ± 53 mm3 for R8-Dox-L, compared to 504 ± 54 mm3 for Dox-L treatment) in vivo compared to Dox-L. R8-modification has the potential for broadening the therapeutic window of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin treatment, which could lead to lower non-specific toxicity. PMID:23333899

  20. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  1. Substitution of lysine for arginine at position 42 of human transforming growth factor-alpha eliminates biological activity without changing internal disulfide bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Defeo-Jones, D; Tai, J Y; Vuocolo, G A; Wegrzyn, R J; Schofield, T L; Riemen, M W; Oliff, A

    1989-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) is a growth-promoting protein that binds to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. To identify critical residues that govern TGF-alpha-EGF receptor binding, we prepared site-specific substitution mutants of TGF-alpha. Mutant proteins were tested in receptor-binding and mitogenesis assays. Semiconservative substitutions at positions 4, 12, 18, and 45 decreased biological activity 2.1- to 14-fold. The conservative substitution of lysine for arginine at position 42 completely eliminated biological activity. Amino acid composition analysis of proteolytic fragments from TGF-alpha and the Lys-42 mutant indicated that these proteins contained the same disulfide bonds. These studies suggest that arginine 42 may be a contact point for TGF-alpha-EGF receptor interaction. PMID:2506441

  2. A model study for tethering of (bio)active molecules to biomaterial surfaces through arginine.

    PubMed

    Taraballi, F; Russo, L; Battocchio, C; Polzonetti, G; Nicotra, F; Cipolla, L

    2014-06-28

    A new approach for tethering of bioactive molecules via arginine is proposed and validated on collagen 2D matrices. The method involves the introduction of a methyl ketone on arginine side-chains, followed by reaction with model alkoxyamino derivatives.

  3. Characterization of the activity and expression of arginine decarboxylase in human and animal Chlamydia pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bliven, Kimberly A; Fisher, Derek J; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2012-12-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae encodes a functional arginine decarboxylase (ArgDC), AaxB, that activates upon self-cleavage and converts l-arginine to agmatine. In contrast, most Chlamydia trachomatis serovars carry a missense or nonsense mutation in aaxB abrogating activity. The G115R missense mutation was not predicted to impact AaxB functionality, making it unclear whether AaxB variations in other Chlamydia species also result in enzyme inactivation. To address the impact of gene polymorphism on functionality, we investigated the activity and production of the Chlamydia AaxB variants. Because ArgDC plays a critical role in the Escherichia coli acid stress response, we studied the ability of these Chlamydia variants to complement an E. coli ArgDC mutant in an acid shock assay. Active AaxB was detected in four additional species: Chlamydia caviae, Chlamydia pecorum, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia muridarum. Of the C. trachomatis serovars, only E appears to encode active enzyme. To determine when functional enzyme is present during the chlamydial developmental cycle, we utilized an anti-AaxB antibody to detect both uncleaved and cleaved enzyme throughout infection. Uncleaved enzyme production peaked around 20 h postinfection, with optimal cleavage around 44 h. While the role ArgDC plays in Chlamydia survival or virulence is unclear, our data suggest a niche-specific function.

  4. Small molecule regulators of protein arginine methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Donghang; Yadav, Neelu; King, Randall W; Swanson, Maurice S; Weinstein, Edward J; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-06-04

    Here we report the identification of small molecules that specifically inhibit protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) activity. PRMTs are a family of proteins that either monomethylate or dimethylate the guanidino nitrogen atoms of arginine side chains. This common post-translational modification is implicated in protein trafficking, signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation. Most methyltransferases use the methyl donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet), as a cofactor. Current methyltransferase inhibitors display limited specificity, indiscriminately targeting all enzymes that use AdoMet. In this screen we have identified a primary compound, AMI-1, that specifically inhibits arginine, but not lysine, methyltransferase activity in vitro and does not compete for the AdoMet binding site. Furthermore, AMI-1 prevents in vivo arginine methylation of cellular proteins and can modulate nuclear receptor-regulated transcription from estrogen and androgen response elements, thus operating as a brake on certain hormone actions.

  5. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1 Interacts with and Activates p38α to Facilitate Erythroid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Wei-Kai; Chang, Yuan-I; Yao, Chao-Ling; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Chang, Chung-Yi; Lin, Wey-Jinq

    2013-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is emerging as a pivotal posttranslational modification involved in regulating various cellular processes; however, its role in erythropoiesis is still elusive. Erythropoiesis generates circulating red blood cells which are vital for body activity. Deficiency in erythroid differentiation causes anemia which compromises the quality of life. Despite extensive studies, the molecular events regulating erythropoiesis are not fully understood. This study showed that the increase in protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) levels, via transfection or protein transduction, significantly promoted erythroid differentiation in the bipotent human K562 cell line as well as in human primary hematopoietic progenitor CD34+ cells. PRMT1 expression enhanced the production of hemoglobin and the erythroid surface marker glycophorin A, and also up-regulated several key transcription factors, GATA1, NF-E2 and EKLF, which are critical for lineage-specific differentiation. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of PRMT1 suppressed erythroid differentiation. The methyltransferase activity-deficient PRMT1G80R mutant failed to stimulate differentiation, indicating the requirement of arginine methylation of target proteins. Our results further showed that a specific isoform of p38 MAPK, p38α, promoted erythroid differentiation, whereas p38β did not play a role. The stimulation of erythroid differentiation by PRMT1 was diminished in p38α- but not p38β-knockdown cells. PRMT1 appeared to act upstream of p38α, since expression of p38α still promoted erythroid differentiation in PRMT1-knockdown cells, and expression of PRMT1 enhanced the activation of p38 MAPK. Importantly, we showed for the first time that PRMT1 was associated with p38α in cells by co-immunoprecipitation and that PRMT1 directly methylated p38α in in vitro methylation assays. Taken together, our findings unveil a link between PRMT1 and p38α in regulating the erythroid differentiation program and

  6. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  7. Physicochemical characteristics and antioxidant activity of arginine-modified melanin from Lachnum YM-346.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming; Wang, Yan; Guo, Geng-yi; He, Yun-long; Lu, Ying; Ye, Ying-wang; Yang, Qing-hua; Yang, Pei-zhou

    2012-12-15

    Seven kinds of amino acids were used to modify the non-water-soluble extracellular melanin (LEM346) from Lachnum YM-346. It was found that arginine-melanin (ALEM346) had the highest solubility, being 4.55% (gg(-1)) in 30°C distilled water. Elemental analysis, infrared spectrum and mass spectrum analysis revealed that LEM346 molecule contained indole quinone structure, its molecular formula speculated to be C(18)H(8)O(6)N(2). Infrared spectrum analysis showed that ALEM346 had characteristic absorption peaks at 1672.346 and 1637.679 cm(-1). Mass spectrum analysis indicated that ALEM346 contained three types of arginine-melanin molecules. When the ALEM346 concentration was 500 mgL(-1), its total antioxidant capacity was equivalent to α-tocopherol of 46.65 mmolL(-1), the DPPH() and O(2)(-) scavenging rates and the Fe(2+) chelating rate were 89.05%, 93.81% and 80.18%, respectively, suggesting that the antioxidant activity of ALEM346 was stronger than that of LEM346.

  8. Arginine methylation promotes translation repression activity of eIF4G-binding protein, Scd6

    PubMed Central

    Poornima, Gopalakrishna; Shah, Shanaya; Vignesh, Venkadasubramanian; Parker, Roy; Rajyaguru, Purusharth I.

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of translation plays a critical role in determining mRNA fate. A new role was recently reported for a subset of RGG-motif proteins in repressing translation initiation by binding eIF4G1. However the signaling mechanism(s) that leads to spatial and temporal regulation of repression activity of RGG-motif proteins remains unknown. Here we report the role of arginine methylation in regulation of repression activity of Scd6, a conserved RGG-motif protein. We demonstrate that Scd6 gets arginine methylated at its RGG-motif and Hmt1 plays an important role in its methylation. We identify specific methylated arginine residues in the Scd6 RGG-motif in vivo. We provide evidence that methylation augments Scd6 repression activity. Arginine methylation defective (AMD) mutant of Scd6 rescues the growth defect caused by overexpression of Scd6, a feature of translation repressors in general. Live-cell imaging of the AMD mutant revealed that it is defective in inducing formation of stress granules. Live-cell imaging and pull-down results indicate that it fails to bind eIF4G1 efficiently. Consistent with these results, a strain lacking Hmt1 is also defective in Scd6-eIF4G1 interaction. Our results establish that arginine methylation augments Scd6 repression activity by promoting eIF4G1-binding. We propose that arginine methylation of translation repressors with RGG-motif could be a general modulator of their repression activity. PMID:27613419

  9. Control by Ethylene of Arginine Decarboxylase Activity in Pea Seedlings and Its Implication for Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Apelbaum, Akiva; Goldlust, Arie; Icekson, Isaac

    1985-01-01

    Activity of arginine decarboxylase in etiolated pea seedlings appears 24 hours after seed imbibition, reaches its highest level on the 4th day, and levels off until the 7th day. This activity was found in the apical and subapical tissue of the roots and shoots where intensive DNA synthesis occurs. Exposure of the seedlings to ethylene greatly reduced the specific activity of this enzyme. The inhibition was observed within 30 min of the hormone application, and maximal effect—90% inhibition—after 18 hours. Ethylene at physiological concentrations affected the enzyme activity; 50% inhibitory rate was recorded at 0.12 microliters per liter ethylene and maximal response at 1.2 microliters per liter. Ethylene provoked a 5-fold increase in the Kmapp of arginine decarboxylase for its substrate and reduced the Vmaxapp by 10-fold. However, the enzyme recovered from the inhibition and regained control activity 7 hours after transferral of the seedlings to ethylene-free atmosphere. Reducing the endogenous level of ethylene in the tissue by hypobaric pressure, or by exposure to light, as well as interfering with ethylene action by treatment with silver thiosulfate or 2,5-norbornadiene, caused a gradual increase in the specific activity of arginine decarboxylase in the apical tissue of the etiolated seedlings. On the basis of these findings, the possible control of arginine decarboxylase activity by endogenous ethylene, and its implication for the hormone effect on plant growth, are discussed. PMID:16664464

  10. Arginine vasotocin activates phosphoinositide signal transduction system and potentiates N-acetyltransferase activity in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Novotná, R; Jác, M; Hájek, I; Novotný, I

    1999-03-05

    The pineal gland is innervated by pinealopetal peptidergic fibers originating in the hypothalamic nuclei which release arginine vasopressin (AVP) and arginine vasotocin (AVT) from their endings. Since the mechanism of AVT action on the pineal signal transduction and melatonin synthesis has not been determined so far, we examined the effect of AVT on the phosphoinositide signalling system and the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity in the rat pineal gland. The effect of AVP 4-9 fragment and AVP analogue desmopressin was also tested. The phosphoinositide signalling system was studied by measuring 32P labelling of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) which reflects PI cycle activation. AVT (10(-5) and 10(-4) M) induced a significant increase in 32P labelling of PI, PIP and PIP2. The AVT mediated activation of the PI signal cascade was supressed by the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist. The desmopressin and AVP 4-9 fragment were without the effect on PI signalling. To assess the AVT role in the melatonin synthesis we studied the daily pattern of the pineal NAT activity in rats treated by AVT (10 microg/100 g b.w). AVT application in the dark period of the day significantly increased nocturnal NAT activity. It can be summarized that AVT activates PI signalling system and potentiates NAT activity in the rat pineal gland.

  11. Peptidyl Arginine Deiminase from Porphyromonas gingivalis Abolishes Anaphylatoxin C5a Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Bielecka, Ewa; Scavenius, Carsten; Kantyka, Tomasz; Jusko, Monika; Mizgalska, Danuta; Szmigielski, Borys; Potempa, Barbara; Enghild, Jan J.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Blom, Anna M.; Potempa, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of killing by the complement system, a crucial part of innate immunity, is a key evolutionary strategy of many human pathogens. A major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, produces a vast arsenal of virulence factors that compromise human defense mechanisms. One of these is peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD), an enzyme unique to P. gingivalis among bacteria, which converts Arg residues in polypeptide chains into citrulline. Here, we report that PPAD citrullination of a critical C-terminal arginine of the anaphylatoxin C5a disabled the protein function. Treatment of C5a with PPAD in vitro resulted in decreased chemotaxis of human neutrophils and diminished calcium signaling in monocytic cell line U937 transfected with the C5a receptor (C5aR) and loaded with a fluorescent intracellular calcium probe: Fura-2 AM. Moreover, a low degree of citrullination of internal arginine residues by PPAD was also detected using mass spectrometry. Further, after treatment of C5 with outer membrane vesicles naturally shed by P. gingivalis, we observed generation of C5a totally citrullinated at the C-terminal Arg-74 residue (Arg74Cit). In stark contrast, only native C5a was detected after treatment with PPAD-null outer membrane vesicles. Our study suggests reduced antibacterial and proinflammatory capacity of citrullinated C5a, achieved via lower level of chemotactic potential of the modified molecule, and weaker cell activation. In the context of previous studies, which showed crosstalk between C5aR and Toll-like receptors, as well as enhanced arthritis development in mice infected with PPAD-expressing P. gingivalis, our findings support a crucial role of PPAD in the virulence of P. gingivalis. PMID:25324545

  12. Peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 activation exacerbates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ham, Ahrom; Rabadi, May; Kim, Mihwa; Brown, Kevin M; Ma, Zhe; D'Agati, Vivette; Lee, H Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD)4 is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes the posttranslational conversion of arginine residues to citrulline. Posttranslational protein citrullination has been implicated in several inflammatory autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, colitis, and multiple sclerosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PAD4 contributes to ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) by exacerbating the inflammatory response after renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Renal I/R injury in mice increased PAD4 activity as well as PAD4 expression in the mouse kidney. After 30 min of renal I/R, vehicle-treated mice developed severe AKI with large increases in plasma creatinine. In contrast, mice pretreated with PAD4 inhibitors (2-chloroamidine or streptonigrin) had significantly reduced renal I/R injury. Further supporting a critical role for PAD4 in generating ischemic AKI, mice pretreated with recombinant human PAD4 (rPAD4) protein and subjected to mild (20 min) renal I/R developed exacerbated ischemic AKI. Consistent with the hypothesis that PAD4 regulates renal tubular inflammation after I/R, mice treated with a PAD4 inhibitor had significantly reduced renal neutrophil chemotactic cytokine (macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and keratinocyte-derived cytokine) expression and had decreased neutrophil infiltration. Furthermore, mice treated with rPAD4 had significantly increased renal tubular macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and keratinocyte-derived cytokine expression as well as increased neutrophil infiltration and necrosis. Finally, cultured mouse kidney proximal tubules treated with rPAD4 had significantly increased proinflammatory chemokine expression compared with vehicle-treated cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PAD4 plays a critical role in renal I/R injury by increasing renal tubular inflammatory responses and neutrophil infiltration after renal I/R.

  13. Peptidyl arginine deiminase from Porphyromonas gingivalis abolishes anaphylatoxin C5a activity.

    PubMed

    Bielecka, Ewa; Scavenius, Carsten; Kantyka, Tomasz; Jusko, Monika; Mizgalska, Danuta; Szmigielski, Borys; Potempa, Barbara; Enghild, Jan J; Prossnitz, Eric R; Blom, Anna M; Potempa, Jan

    2014-11-21

    Evasion of killing by the complement system, a crucial part of innate immunity, is a key evolutionary strategy of many human pathogens. A major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, produces a vast arsenal of virulence factors that compromise human defense mechanisms. One of these is peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD), an enzyme unique to P. gingivalis among bacteria, which converts Arg residues in polypeptide chains into citrulline. Here, we report that PPAD citrullination of a critical C-terminal arginine of the anaphylatoxin C5a disabled the protein function. Treatment of C5a with PPAD in vitro resulted in decreased chemotaxis of human neutrophils and diminished calcium signaling in monocytic cell line U937 transfected with the C5a receptor (C5aR) and loaded with a fluorescent intracellular calcium probe: Fura-2 AM. Moreover, a low degree of citrullination of internal arginine residues by PPAD was also detected using mass spectrometry. Further, after treatment of C5 with outer membrane vesicles naturally shed by P. gingivalis, we observed generation of C5a totally citrullinated at the C-terminal Arg-74 residue (Arg74Cit). In stark contrast, only native C5a was detected after treatment with PPAD-null outer membrane vesicles. Our study suggests reduced antibacterial and proinflammatory capacity of citrullinated C5a, achieved via lower level of chemotactic potential of the modified molecule, and weaker cell activation. In the context of previous studies, which showed crosstalk between C5aR and Toll-like receptors, as well as enhanced arthritis development in mice infected with PPAD-expressing P. gingivalis, our findings support a crucial role of PPAD in the virulence of P. gingivalis.

  14. Peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 activation exacerbates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Ahrom; Rabadi, May; Kim, Mihwa; Brown, Kevin M.; Ma, Zhe; D'Agati, Vivette

    2014-01-01

    Peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD)4 is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes the posttranslational conversion of arginine residues to citrulline. Posttranslational protein citrullination has been implicated in several inflammatory autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, colitis, and multiple sclerosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PAD4 contributes to ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) by exacerbating the inflammatory response after renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Renal I/R injury in mice increased PAD4 activity as well as PAD4 expression in the mouse kidney. After 30 min of renal I/R, vehicle-treated mice developed severe AKI with large increases in plasma creatinine. In contrast, mice pretreated with PAD4 inhibitors (2-chloroamidine or streptonigrin) had significantly reduced renal I/R injury. Further supporting a critical role for PAD4 in generating ischemic AKI, mice pretreated with recombinant human PAD4 (rPAD4) protein and subjected to mild (20 min) renal I/R developed exacerbated ischemic AKI. Consistent with the hypothesis that PAD4 regulates renal tubular inflammation after I/R, mice treated with a PAD4 inhibitor had significantly reduced renal neutrophil chemotactic cytokine (macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and keratinocyte-derived cytokine) expression and had decreased neutrophil infiltration. Furthermore, mice treated with rPAD4 had significantly increased renal tubular macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and keratinocyte-derived cytokine expression as well as increased neutrophil infiltration and necrosis. Finally, cultured mouse kidney proximal tubules treated with rPAD4 had significantly increased proinflammatory chemokine expression compared with vehicle-treated cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PAD4 plays a critical role in renal I/R injury by increasing renal tubular inflammatory responses and neutrophil infiltration after renal I/R. PMID:25164081

  15. Arginine-rich histones have strong antiviral activity for influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoeksema, Marloes; Tripathi, Shweta; White, Mitchell; Qi, Li; Taubenberger, Jeffery; van Eijk, Martin; Haagsman, Henk; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2015-10-01

    While histones are best known for DNA binding and transcription-regulating properties, they also have antimicrobial activity against a broad range of potentially pathogenic organisms. Histones are abundant in neutrophil extracellular traps, where they play an important role in NET-mediated antimicrobial killing. Here, we show anti-influenza activity of histones against both seasonal H3N2 and H1N1, but not pandemic H1N1. The arginine rich histones, H3 and H4, had greater neutralizing and viral aggregating activity than the lysine rich histones, H2A and H2B. Of all core histones, histone H4 is most potent in neutralizing IAV, and incubation with IAV with histone H4 results in a decrease in uptake and viral replication by epithelial cells when measured by qRT-PCR. The antiviral activity of histone H4 is mediated principally by direct effects on viral particles. Histone H4 binds to IAV as assessed by ELISA and co-sedimentation of H4 with IAV. H4 also induces aggregation, as assessed by confocal microscopy and light transmission assays. Despite strong antiviral activity against the seasonal IAV strains, H4 was inactive against pandemic H1N1. These findings indicate a possible role for histones in the innate immune response against IAV.

  16. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci favor conversion of arginine into ornithine despite a widespread genetic potential for nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mainar, María; Weckx, Stefan; Leroy, Frédéric

    2014-12-01

    Within ecosystems that are poor in carbohydrates, alternative substrates such as arginine may be of importance to coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). However, the versatility of arginine conversion in CNS remains largely uncharted. Therefore, a set of 86 strains belonging to 17 CNS species was screened for arginine deiminase (ADI), arginase, and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities, in view of their ecological relevance. In fermented meats, for instance, ADI could improve bacterial competitiveness, whereas NOS may serve as an alternative nitrosomyoglobin generator to nitrate and nitrite curing. About 80% of the strains were able to convert arginine, but considerable inter- and intraspecies heterogeneity regarding the extent and mechanism of conversion was found. Overall, ADI was the most commonly employed pathway, resulting in mixtures of ornithine and small amounts of citrulline. Under aerobic conditions, which are more relevant for skin-associated CNS communities, several strains shifted toward arginase activity, leading to the production of ornithine and urea. The obtained data indeed suggest that arginase occurs relatively more in CNS isolates from a dairy environment, whereas ADI seems to be more abundant in strains from a fermented meat background. With some exceptions, a reasonable match between phenotypic ADI and arginase activity and the presence of the encoding genes (arcA and arg) was found. With respect to the NOS pathway, however, only one strain (Staphylococcus haemolyticus G110) displayed phenotypic NOS-like activity under aerobic conditions, despite a wide prevalence of the NOS-encoding gene (nos) among CNS. Hence, the group of CNS displays a strain- and condition-dependent toolbox of arginine-converting mechanisms with potential implications for competitiveness and functionality.

  17. Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Favor Conversion of Arginine into Ornithine despite a Widespread Genetic Potential for Nitric Oxide Synthase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Mainar, María; Weckx, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Within ecosystems that are poor in carbohydrates, alternative substrates such as arginine may be of importance to coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). However, the versatility of arginine conversion in CNS remains largely uncharted. Therefore, a set of 86 strains belonging to 17 CNS species was screened for arginine deiminase (ADI), arginase, and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities, in view of their ecological relevance. In fermented meats, for instance, ADI could improve bacterial competitiveness, whereas NOS may serve as an alternative nitrosomyoglobin generator to nitrate and nitrite curing. About 80% of the strains were able to convert arginine, but considerable inter- and intraspecies heterogeneity regarding the extent and mechanism of conversion was found. Overall, ADI was the most commonly employed pathway, resulting in mixtures of ornithine and small amounts of citrulline. Under aerobic conditions, which are more relevant for skin-associated CNS communities, several strains shifted toward arginase activity, leading to the production of ornithine and urea. The obtained data indeed suggest that arginase occurs relatively more in CNS isolates from a dairy environment, whereas ADI seems to be more abundant in strains from a fermented meat background. With some exceptions, a reasonable match between phenotypic ADI and arginase activity and the presence of the encoding genes (arcA and arg) was found. With respect to the NOS pathway, however, only one strain (Staphylococcus haemolyticus G110) displayed phenotypic NOS-like activity under aerobic conditions, despite a wide prevalence of the NOS-encoding gene (nos) among CNS. Hence, the group of CNS displays a strain- and condition-dependent toolbox of arginine-converting mechanisms with potential implications for competitiveness and functionality. PMID:25281381

  18. Improvement of in vivo antimicrobial activity of HBcARD peptides by D-arginine replacement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heng-Li; Su, Pei-Yi; Shih, Chiaho

    2016-11-01

    We previously identified a novel antimicrobial peptide with a broad spectrum bactericidal activity from human hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) arginine-rich domain (ARD). We compared the antimicrobial activities of HBcARD peptides from different hepadnaviruses which share similar amino acid sequences. In general, mammalian HBcARD peptides exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than avian peptides. Using the strategy of D-amino acid substitutions, we improved the antimicrobial efficacy of human HBcARD peptide. This D-HBcARD peptide was much more resistant than L-HBcARD peptide to proteolytic degradation in vitro. Moreover, this D-HBcARD peptide maintained similar minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) against tested bacteria, and showed very low hemolytic activity. In the Staphylococcus aureus-infected mouse model, this D-HBcARD peptide was more protective than the L-HBcARD peptide. Repeated treatments with either L- or D-HBcARD peptides induced no significant immunogenicity. New derivatives of HBcARD peptides could serve as alternatives to the conventional antibiotics in clinical medicine in the future.

  19. Leishmania major metacaspase can replace yeast metacaspase in programmed cell death and has arginine-specific cysteine peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    González, Iveth J; Desponds, Chantal; Schaff, Cédric; Mottram, Jeremy C; Fasel, Nicolas

    2007-02-01

    The human protozoan parasite Leishmania major has been shown to exhibit several morphological and biochemical features characteristic of a cell death program when differentiating into infectious stages and under a variety of stress conditions. Although some caspase-like peptidase activity has been reported in dying parasites, no caspase gene is present in the genome. However, a single metacaspase gene is present in L. major whose encoded protein harbors the predicted secondary structure and the catalytic dyad histidine/cysteine described for caspases and other metacaspases identified in plants and yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae metacaspase YCA1 has been implicated in the death of aging cells, cells defective in some biological functions, and cells exposed to different environmental stresses. In this study, we describe the functional heterologous complementation of a S. cerevisiae yca1 null mutant with the L. major metacaspase (LmjMCA) in cell death induced by oxidative stress. We show that LmjMCA is involved in yeast cell death, similar to YCA1, and that this function depends on its catalytic activity. LmjMCA was found to be auto-processed as occurs for caspases, however LmjMCA did not exhibit any activity with caspase substrates. In contrast and similarly to Arabidopsis thaliana metacaspases, LmjMCA was active towards substrates with arginine in the P1 position, with the activity being abolished following H147A and C202A catalytic site mutations. These results suggest that metacaspases are members of a family of peptidases with a role in cell death conserved in evolution notwithstanding possible differences in their catalytic activity.

  20. Selective inhibition by dexamethasone of induction of NO synthase, but not of induction of L-arginine transport, in activated murine macrophage J774 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Baydoun, A. R.; Bogle, R. G.; Pearson, J. D.; Mann, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    1. Effects of dexamethasone on induction of nitric oxide (NO) synthase and L-arginine transport by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were examined in a murine cultured macrophage cell line J774. Metabolism of L-arginine to L-citrulline and subsequent changes in intracellular amino acids pools were correlated with changes in nitrite production. 2. Despite a high intracellular concentration of arginine in activated J774 cells, LPS (1 microgram ml-1, 8 h) induced a 2.4 fold increase in arginine transport. Treatment of cells with cycloheximide (1 microgram ml-1) inhibited the time-dependent (1-8 h) induction of NO synthase and arginine transport mediated by LPS. 3. Induction of NO synthase by LPS (1 microgram ml-1, 24 h) alone was accompanied by a marked increase in arginine utilisation leading to decreased intracellular arginine levels and elevated intracellular and extracellular L-citrulline levels. These changes were further enhanced in the presence of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma, 100 units ml-1, 24 h). 4. Dexamethasone (1 microM) abolished the increases in both nitrite and citrulline production induced by LPS alone but only partially reversed the combined effects of LPS and IFN-gamma. In contrast, treatment of cells with dexamethasone (10 microM) had no effect on the LPS-mediated induction of arginine transport or the decrease in intracellular arginine concentration. 5. We conclude that induction of arginine transporter activity in LPS-stimulated J774 cells involves de novo synthesis of carrier proteins, which increases transport of exogenous arginine during enhanced NO production.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7508326

  1. Effects of arginine supplementation on antioxidant enzyme activity and macrophage response in burned mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Ju; Shang, Huey-Fang; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2002-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of arginine (Arg) supplementation on antioxidant enzyme activities and macrophage response in burned mice. Experiment 1: 60 male BALB/c mice were assigned to two groups. One group was fed a control diet with casein as the protein source, the other group was supplemented with 2% Arg in addition to casein. The two groups were isonitrogenous. After 4 weeks, all mice received a 30% body surface area burn injury. The antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxides in the tissues were analyzed. Experiment 2: 20 mice were divided into two groups and burn injury was induced after feeding for 4 weeks as described in experiment 1. Twenty-four hours after the burn, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secreted by cultured peritoneal macrophages was measured. The results show that antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxides in tissues tended to be lower in the Arg group than in the control group after the burn. Production of TNF-alpha by peritoneal macrophages after stimulation with lipopolysacchride (LPS) was significantly elevated in the Arg group, whereas no response was observed in the control group. These results suggest that dietary Arg supplementation attenuates the oxidative stress induced by burn injury, and a better macrophage response was observed when Arg was administered.

  2. Exogenous L-arginine and HDL can alter LDL and ox-LDL-mediated platelet activation: using platelet P-selectin receptor numbers.

    PubMed

    Sener, Azize; Enc, Elif; Ozsavci, Derya; Vanizor-Kural, Birgul; Yanikkaya-Demirel, Gulderen; Oba, Rabia; Uras, Fikriye; Demir, Muzaffer

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of exogenous L-arginine and HDL on LDL and oxidized LDL (ox-LDL)-mediated platelet activation. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-activated platelets have been incubated with lipoproteins with or without L-arginine. P-selectin receptor numbers per platelet have been measured by flow cytometry. After incubation with only L-arginine (without lipoproteins), platelet nitric oxide (NO) levels and P-selectin receptor numbers significantly increased compared to the controls (P < .05). After incubation with LDL or ox-LDL, receptor numbers of P-selectin significantly increased (P < .001). However, P-selectin receptor numbers in platelets treated with L-arginine + LDL or L-arginine + ox-LDL decreased compared to the levels in platelets treated with only LDL or ox-LDL (P < .01, P < .001, respectively). Addition of HDL to L-arginine + ox-LDL caused significant reduction in P-selectin receptor numbers as in the control values (P < .001).We have concluded that L-arginine causes enhanced platelet NO levels and blocks the effects of LDL or ox-LDL on platelet P-selectin receptor numbers and HDL also strengthens this effect of L-arginine.

  3. A Potent, Selective and Cell-Active Allosteric Inhibitor of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3)**

    PubMed Central

    Kaniskan, H. Ümit; Szewczyk, Magdalena M.; Yu, Zhengtian; Eram, Mohammad S.; Yang, Xiaobao; Schmidt, Keith; Luo, Xiao; Dai, Miao; He, Feng; Zang, Irene; Lin, Ying; Kennedy, Steven; Li, Fengling; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Dong, Aiping; Smil, David; Min, Sun-Joon; Landon, Melissa; Lin-Jones, Jennifer; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L.; Schapira, Matthieu; Atadja, Peter; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Brown, Peter J.; Zhao, Kehao; Jin, Jian; Vedadi, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    PRMT3 catalyzes the asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues of various proteins. It is essential for maturation of ribosomes, may have a role in lipogenesis, and is implicated in several diseases. A potent, selective, and cell- active PRMT3 inhibitor would be a valuable tool for further investigating PRMT3 biology. Here we report the discovery of the first PRMT3 chemical probe, SGC707, by structure-based optimization of the allosteric PRMT3 inhibitors we reported previously, and thorough characterization of this probe in biochemical, biophysical, and cellular assays. SGC707 is a potent PRMT3 inhibitor (IC50 = 31 ± 2 nm, KD = 53 ± 2 nm) with outstanding selectivity (selective against 31 other methyltransferases and more than 250 non-epigenetic targets). The mechanism of action studies and crystal structure of the PRMT3-SGC707 complex confirm the allosteric inhibition mode. Importantly, SGC707 engages PRMT3 and potently inhibits its methyltransferase activity in cells. It is also bioavailable and suitable for animal studies. This well- characterized chemical probe is an excellent tool to further study the role of PRMT3 in health and disease. PMID:25728001

  4. Biochemical and biological activity of arginine deiminase from Streptococcus pyogenes M22.

    PubMed

    Starikova, Eleonora A; Sokolov, Alexey V; Vlasenko, Anna Yu; Burova, Larisa A; Freidlin, Irina S; Vasilyev, Vadim B

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is an important gram-positive extracellular bacterial pathogen responsible for a number of suppurative infections. This micro-organism has developed complex virulence mechanisms to avoid the host's defenses. We have previously reported that SDSC from GAS type M22 causes endothelial-cell dysfunction, and inhibits cell adhesion, migration, metabolism, and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting cell viability. This work aimed to isolate and characterize a component from GAS type M22 supernatant that suppresses the proliferation of endothelial cells (EA.hy926). In the process of isolating a protein possessing antiproliferative activity we identified arginine deiminase (AD). Further study showed that this enzyme is most active at pH 6.8. Calculating Km and Vmax gave the values of 0.67 mmol·L(-1) and 42 s(-1), respectively. A distinctive feature of AD purified from GAS type M22 is that its optimum activity and the maximal rate of the catalytic process is close to neutral pH by comparison with enzymes from other micro-organisms. AD from GAS type M22 suppressed the proliferative activity of endothelial cells in a dose-dependent mode. At the same time, in the presence of AD, the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase increased. When l-Arg was added at increasing concentrations to the culture medium containing AD (3 μg·mL(-1)), the enzyme's capacity to inhibit cell proliferation became partially depressed. The proportion of cells in phases S/G2 increased concomitantly, although the cells did not fully recover their proliferation activity. This suggests that AD from GAS type M22 has potential for the suppression of excessive cell proliferation.

  5. Effects of dietary arginine supplementation on antibody production and antioxidant enzyme activity in burned mice.

    PubMed

    Shang, Huey-Fang; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2003-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of arginine (Arg) supplementation on specific antibody production and antioxidant enzyme activities in burned mice vaccinated with detoxified Pseudomonas exotoxin A linked with the outer membrane proteins I and F, named PEIF. Also, the survival rate of burned mice complicated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated. Experiment 1: Thirty BALB/c mice were assigned to two groups. One group was fed a control diet with casein as the protein source, while the other group was supplemented with 2% Arg in addition to casein. The two groups were isonitrogenous. The mice were immunized twice with PEIF, and the production of specific antibodies against PEIF was measured every week. After 8 weeks, all mice received a 30% body surface area burn injury. Mice were sacrificed 24h after the burn. The antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxides in the tissues as well as the specific antibody production were analyzed. Experiment 2: Twenty-eight mice were divided into two groups and vaccinated as described in experiment 1. After the burn the mice were infected with P. aeruginosa, and the survival rate was observed for 8 days. The results demonstrated that antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxides in tissues were significantly lower in the Arg group than in the control group after the burn. The production of specific antibodies against P. aeruginosa significantly increased in the Arg group at 4 and 7 weeks after immunization, and 24h after the burn. The survival rates of vaccinated burned mice after bacterial infection did not significantly differ between the two groups. These results suggest that vaccinating mice with Arg supplementation may enhance humoral immunity and attenuate the oxidative stress induced by burn injury. However, Arg supplementation did not improve survival in vaccinated mice complicated with P. aeruginosa infection.

  6. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  7. Induction of arginosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression affects the antiproliferative activity of arginine deiminase (ADI) in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Manca, Antonella; Sini, Maria Cristina; Izzo, Francesco; Ascierto, Paolo A; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Botti, Gerardo; Gentilcore, Giusy; Capone, Marilena; Mozzillo, Nicola; Rozzo, Carla; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Palmieri, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), an arginine-degrading enzyme, has been used in the treatment of tumours sensitive to arginine deprivation, such as malignant melanoma (MM) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Endogenous production of arginine is mainly dependent on activity of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) and argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) enzymes. We evaluated the effect of ADI treatment on OTC and ASS expression in a series of melanoma cell lines. Twenty-five primary melanoma cell lines and normal fibroblasts as controls underwent cell proliferation assays and Western blot analyses in the presence or absence of ADI. Tissue sections from primary MMs (N = 20) and HCCs (N = 20) were investigated by immunohistochemistry for ASS expression. Overall, 21/25 (84%) MM cell lines presented a cell growth inhibition by ADI treatment; none of them presented constitutive detectable levels of the ASS protein. However, 7/21 (33%) ADI-sensitive melanoma cell lines presented markedly increased expression levels of the ASS protein following ADI treatment, with a significantly higher IC50 median value. Growth was not inhibited and the IC50 was not reached among the remaining 4/25 (16%) MM cell lines; all of them showed constitutive ASS expression. The OTC protein was found expressed in all melanoma cell lines before and after the ADI treatment. Lack of ASS immunostaining was observed in all analyzed in vivo specimens. Our findings suggest that response to ADI treatment in melanoma is significantly correlated with the ability of cells to express ASS either constitutively at basal level (inducing drug resistance) or after the treatment (reducing sensitivity to ADI).

  8. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 regulates herpes simplex virus replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jungeun; Shin, Bongjin; Park, Eui-Soon; Yang, Sujeong; Choi, Seunga; Kang, Misun; Rho, Jaerang

    2010-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is involved in viral infection and replication through the modulation of diverse cellular processes including RNA metabolism, cytokine signaling, and subcellular localization. It has been suggested previously that the protein arginine methylation of the RGG-box of ICP27 is required for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) viral replication and gene expression in vivo. However, a cellular mediator for this process has not yet been identified. In our current study, we show that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a cellular mediator of the arginine methylation of ICP27 RGG-box. We generated arginine substitution mutants in this domain and examined which arginine residues are required for methylation by PRMT1. R138, R148 and R150 were found to be the major sites of this methylation but additional arginine residues serving as minor methylation sites are still required to sustain the fully methylated form of ICP27 RGG. We also demonstrate that the nuclear foci-like structure formation, SRPK interactions, and RNA-binding activity of ICP27 are modulated by the arginine methylation of the ICP27 RGG-box. Furthermore, HSV-1 replication is inhibited by hypomethylation of this domain resulting from the use of general PRMT inhibitors or arginine mutations. Our data thus suggest that the PRMT1 plays a key role as a cellular regulator of HSV-1 replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation.

  9. The Role of Myeloid Cell Activation and Arginine Metabolism in the Pathogenesis of Virus-Induced Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    When an antiviral immune response is generated, a balance must be reached between two opposing pathways: the production of proinflammatory and cytotoxic effectors that drive a robust antiviral immune response to control the infection and regulators that function to limit or blunt an excessive immune response to minimize immune-mediated pathology and repair tissue damage. Myeloid cells, including monocytes and macrophages, play an important role in this balance, particularly through the activities of the arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes nitric oxide synthase 2 (Nos2; iNOS) and arginase 1 (Arg1). Nitric oxide (NO) production by iNOS is an important proinflammatory mediator, whereas Arg1-expressing macrophages contribute to the resolution of inflammation and wound repair. In the context of viral infections, expression of these enzymes can result in a variety of outcomes for the host. NO has direct antiviral properties against some viruses, whereas during other virus infections NO can mediate immunopathology and/or inhibit the antiviral immune response to promote chronic infection. Arg1 activity not only has important wound healing functions but can also inhibit the antiviral immune response during some viral infections. Thus, depending on the specific virus and the tissue(s) involved, the activity of both of these arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes can either exacerbate or limit the severity of virus-induced disease. In this review, we will discuss a variety of viral infections, including HIV, SARS-CoV, LCMV, HCV, RSV, and others, where myeloid cells influence the control and clearance of the virus from the host, as well as the severity and resolution of tissue damage, via the activities of iNOS and/or Arg1. Clearly, monocyte/macrophage activation and arginine metabolism will continue to be important areas of investigation in the context of viral infections. PMID:25250029

  10. Activated Macrophages Destroy Intracellular Leishmania Major Amastigotes by an l-Arginine-Dependent Killing Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    conversion of site from one that is supportive of replication, to one that the sandfly -adapted promastigote to the amastigote form is hostile to...Inaddiion th cometiivein-room temperature for 5 min. Absorbance at 543 om was measured.activated macrophages. In addition, t e p titi e tn- No2- was qu

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates L-arginine mediated cellular responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our prior study revealed the loss in short-term L-Arginine (ARG) therapeutic efficacy after continuous exposure; resulting in tolerance development, mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) down-regulation, secondary to oxidative stress and induced glucose accumulation. However, the potential factor regulating ARG cellular response is presently unknown. Method Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 100 μM ARG for 2 h in buffer (short-term or acute), or for 7 days in culture medium and challenged for 2 h in buffer (continuous or chronic), in the presence or absence of other agents. eNOS activity was determined by analyzing cellular nitrite/nitrate (NO2–/NO3–), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity was assayed using SAMS peptide. 13C6 glucose was added to medium to measure glucose uptake during cellular treatments, which were determined by LC-MS/MS. Cellular glucose was identified by o-toluidine method. Superoxide (O2•–) was identified by EPR-spin-trap, and peroxynitrite (ONOO–) was measured by flow-cytometer using aminophenyl fluorescein dye. Results Short-term incubation of cells with 100 μM ARG in the presence or absence of 30 μM L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 30 μM AMPK inhibitor (compound C, CMP-C) increased cellular oxidative stress and overall glucose accumulation with no variation in glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), or AMPK activity from control. The increase in total NO2–/NO3– after 2 h 100 μM ARG exposure, was suppressed in cells co-incubated with 30 μM CMP-C or L-NAME. Long-term exposure of ARG with or without CMP-C or L-NAME suppressed NO2–/NO3–, glucose uptake, GLUT-1, AMPK expression and activity below control, and increased overall cellular glucose, O2•– and ONOO–. Gluconeogenesis inhibition with 30 μM 5-Chloro-2-N-2,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonamido-benzoxazole (CDB) during ARG exposure for 2 h maintained overall cellular glucose to control, but increased

  12. Myosin phosphatase and RhoA-activated kinase modulate arginine methylation by the regulation of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Adrienn; Iván, Judit; Bécsi, Bálint; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Tamás, István; Horváth, Dániel; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Erdődi, Ferenc; Lontay, Beáta

    2017-01-11

    Myosin phosphatase (MP) holoenzyme is a protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) type Ser/Thr specific enzyme that consists of a PP1 catalytic (PP1c) and a myosin phosphatase target subunit-1 (MYPT1). MYPT1 is an ubiquitously expressed isoform and it targets PP1c to its substrates. We identified the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) enzyme of the methylosome complex as a MYPT1-binding protein uncovering the nuclear MYPT1-interactome of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. It is shown that PRMT5 is regulated by phosphorylation at Thr80 by RhoA-associated protein kinase and MP. Silencing of MYPT1 increased the level of the PRMT5-specific symmetric dimethylation on arginine residues of histone 2 A/4, a repressing gene expression mark, and it resulted in a global change in the expression of genes affecting cellular processes like growth, proliferation and cell death, also affecting the expression of the retinoblastoma protein and c-Myc. The phosphorylation of the MP inhibitory MYPT1(T850) and the regulatory PRMT5(T80) residues as well as the symmetric dimethylation of H2A/4 were elevated in human hepatocellular carcinoma and in other types of cancers. These changes correlated positively with the grade and state of the tumors. Our results suggest the tumor suppressor role of MP via inhibition of PRMT5 thereby regulating gene expression through histone arginine dimethylation.

  13. Myosin phosphatase and RhoA-activated kinase modulate arginine methylation by the regulation of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Adrienn; Iván, Judit; Bécsi, Bálint; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Tamás, István; Horváth, Dániel; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Erdődi, Ferenc; Lontay, Beáta

    2017-01-01

    Myosin phosphatase (MP) holoenzyme is a protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) type Ser/Thr specific enzyme that consists of a PP1 catalytic (PP1c) and a myosin phosphatase target subunit-1 (MYPT1). MYPT1 is an ubiquitously expressed isoform and it targets PP1c to its substrates. We identified the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) enzyme of the methylosome complex as a MYPT1-binding protein uncovering the nuclear MYPT1-interactome of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. It is shown that PRMT5 is regulated by phosphorylation at Thr80 by RhoA-associated protein kinase and MP. Silencing of MYPT1 increased the level of the PRMT5-specific symmetric dimethylation on arginine residues of histone 2 A/4, a repressing gene expression mark, and it resulted in a global change in the expression of genes affecting cellular processes like growth, proliferation and cell death, also affecting the expression of the retinoblastoma protein and c-Myc. The phosphorylation of the MP inhibitory MYPT1T850 and the regulatory PRMT5T80 residues as well as the symmetric dimethylation of H2A/4 were elevated in human hepatocellular carcinoma and in other types of cancers. These changes correlated positively with the grade and state of the tumors. Our results suggest the tumor suppressor role of MP via inhibition of PRMT5 thereby regulating gene expression through histone arginine dimethylation. PMID:28074910

  14. In vitro mutagenesis studies at the arginine residues of adenylate kinase. A revised binding site for AMP in the X-ray-deduced model.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Nishikawa, S; Tokutomi, Y; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M; Kuby, S A; Uesugi, S

    1990-02-06

    Although X-ray crystallographic and NMR studies have been made on the adenylate kinases, the substrate-binding sites are not unequivocally established. In an attempt to shed light on the binding sites for MgATP2- and for AMP2- in human cytosolic adenylate kinase (EC 2.7.4.3, hAK1), we have investigated the enzymic effects of replacement of the arginine residues (R44, R132, R138, and R149), which had been assumed by Pai et al. [Pai, E. F., Sachsenheimer, W., Schirmer, R. H., & Schulz, G. E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 37-45] to interact with the phosphoryl groups of AMP2- and MgATP2-. With use of the site-directed mutagenesis method, point mutations were made in the artificial gene for hAK1 [Kim, H. J., Nishikawa, S., Tanaka, T., Uesugi, S., Takenaka, H., Hamada, M., & Kuby, S. A. (1989) Protein Eng. 2, 379-386] to replace these arginine residues with alanyl residues and yield the mutants R44A hAK1, R132A hAK1, R138A hAK1, and R149A hAK1. The resulting large increases in the Km,app values for AMP2- of the mutant enzymes, the relatively small increases in the Km,app values for MgATP2-, and the fact that the R132A, R138A, and R149A mutant enzymes proved to be very poor catalysts are consistent with the idea that the assigned substrate binding sites of Pai et al. (1977) have been reversed and that their ATP-binding site may be assigned as the AMP site.

  15. Control of arginine utilization in Neurospora.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, R L; Davis, R H

    1977-01-01

    The response of Neurospora to changes in the availibility of exogenous arginine was investigated. Upon addition of arginine to the growth medium, catabolism is initiated within minutes. This occurs prior to expansion of the arginine pool or augmentation of catabolic enzyme levels. (Basal levels are approximately 25% of those found during growth in arginine-supplemented medium.) Catabolism of arginine is independent of protein synthesis, indicating that the catabolic enzymes are active but that arginine is not available for catabolism unless present in the medium. Upon exhaustion of the supply of exogenous arginine, catabolism ceases abruptly, despite an expanded arginine pool and induced levels of the catabolic enzymes. The arginine pool supports protein synthesis until the cells regain their normal capacity for endogenous arginine synthesis. These observations, combined with the known small level of induction of arginine catabolic enzymes, non-repressibility of most biosynthetic enzymes, and vesicular localization of the bulk of the arginine pool, suggest that compartmentation plays a significant role in controlling arginine metabolism in Neurospora. PMID:838690

  16. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  17. Effects of L-arginine immobilization on the anticoagulant activity and hemolytic property of polyethylene terephthalate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Yun; Wu, Feng

    2010-04-01

    Surface modification of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films was performed with L-arginine ( L-Arg) to gain an improved anticoagulant surface. The surface chemistry changes of modified films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The in vitro anticoagulant activities of the surface-modified PET films were evaluated by blood clotting test, hemolytic test, and the measurement of clotting time including plasma recalcification time (PRT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and prothrombin time (PT). The data of blood coagulation index (BCI) for L-arginine modified PET films (PET-Arg) was larger than that for PET at the same blood-sample contact time. The hemolysis ratio for PET-Arg was less than that for PET and within the accepted standard for biomaterials. The PRT and APTT for PET-Arg were significantly prolonged by 189 s and 25 s, respectively, compared to those for the unmodified PET. All results suggested that the currently described modification method could be a possible candidate to create antithrombogenic PET surfaces which would be useful for further medical applications.

  18. Simulated Microgravity Reduces TNF-Alpha Activity, Suppresses Glucose Uptake and Enhances Arginine Flux in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of microgravity upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF - alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-117,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). We observed a greater glucose concentration and increased disappearance of arginine in islets cultured in HARVs. While nitrogenous compound analysis indicated a ubiquitous reliance upon glutamine in all experimental groups, arginine was converted to ornithine at a two-fold greater rate in the islets cultured in the HARV microgravity paradigm (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV paradigm. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  19. Effect of dietary arginine on growth, intestinal enzyme activities and gene expression in muscle, hepatopancreas and intestine of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Chen, Gangfu; Feng, Lin; Kuang, Shengyao; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Kai; Jiang, Weidan; Li, Shuhong; Tang, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoqiu

    2012-07-01

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that dietary arginine promotes digestion and absorption capacity, and, thus, enhances fish growth. This improvement might be related to the target of rapamycin (TOR) and eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP). A total of 1200 juvenile Jian carp, Cyprinus carpio var. Jian, with an average initial weight of 6.33 (SE 0.03) g, were fed with diets containing graded concentrations of arginine, namely, 9.8 (control), 12.7, 16.1, 18.5, 21.9 and 24.5 g arginine/kg diet for 9 weeks. An real-time quantitative PCR analysis was performed to determine the relative expression of TOR and 4E-BP in fish muscle, hepatopancreas and intestine. Dietary arginine increased (P < 0.05): (1) glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activities in muscle and hepatopancreas; (2) intestine and hepatopancreas protein content, folds height, and trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and creatine kinase activities in intestine; (3) Lactobacillus counts; (4) relative expression of TOR in the muscle, hepatopancreas and distal intestine (DI); (5) relative expression of 4E-BP in proximal intestine (PI) and mid-intestine (MI), as compared with the control group. In contrast, dietary arginine reduced (P < 0.05): (1) plasma ammonia content; (2) Aeromonas hydrophila and Escherichia coli counts; (3) relative expression of TOR in PI and MI; (4) relative expression of 4E-BP in the muscle, hepatopancreas and DI. The arginine requirement estimated by specific growth rate using quadratic regression analysis was found to be 18.0 g/kg diet. These results indicate that arginine improved fish growth, digestive and absorptive ability and regulated the expression of TOR and 4E-BP genes.

  20. Benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester (BAME)-esterase activity in human plasma during the gravidic-puerperal cycle.

    PubMed

    Salles Meirelles, R

    1977-01-01

    Benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester (BAME)-esterase activity of plasma was measured in women going through the gravidic-puerperal cycle and compared with plasma of non-pregnant women. Plasma from women in the 36th to 40th week of pregnancy hydrolyzes BAME two times more rapidly than that from non-pregnant women. During pregnancy, BAME-esterase activity in plasma increases progressively up to the 40th week, decreases during labor, and after delivery reaches the same level as in non-pregnant women. The BAME-esterase activity of plasma was affected by the storage temperature, with differences demonstrable between -20 and -4 C and between pregnant and non-pregnant women.

  1. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 functions as an epigenetic activator of the androgen receptor to promote prostate cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Deng, X; Shao, G; Zhang, H-T; Li, C; Zhang, D; Cheng, L; Elzey, B D; Pili, R; Ratliff, T L; Huang, J; Hu, C-D

    2017-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an emerging epigenetic enzyme that mainly represses transcription of target genes via symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues on histones H4R3, H3R8 and H2AR3. Accumulating evidence suggests that PRMT5 may function as an oncogene to drive cancer cell growth by epigenetic inactivation of several tumor suppressors. Here, we provide evidence that PRMT5 promotes prostate cancer cell growth by epigenetically activating transcription of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of PRMT5 or inhibition of PRMT5 by a specific inhibitor reduces the expression of AR and suppresses the growth of multiple AR-positive, but not AR-negative, prostate cancer cells. Significantly, knockdown of PRMT5 in AR-positive LNCaP cells completely suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Molecular analysis reveals that PRMT5 binds to the proximal promoter region of the AR gene and contributes mainly to the enriched symmetric dimethylation of H4R3 in the same region. Mechanistically, PRMT5 is recruited to the AR promoter by its interaction with Sp1, the major transcription factor responsible for AR transcription, and forms a complex with Brg1, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, on the proximal promoter region of the AR gene. Furthermore, PRMT5 expression in prostate cancer tissues is significantly higher than that in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, and PRMT5 expression correlates positively with AR expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Taken together, our results identify PRMT5 as a novel epigenetic activator of AR in prostate cancer. Given that inhibiting AR transcriptional activity or androgen synthesis remains the major mechanism of action for most existing anti-androgen agents, our findings also raise an interesting possibility that targeting PRMT5 may represent a novel approach for prostate cancer treatment by eliminating AR expression. PMID:27546619

  3. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 functions as an epigenetic activator of the androgen receptor to promote prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Shao, G; Zhang, H-T; Li, C; Zhang, D; Cheng, L; Elzey, B D; Pili, R; Ratliff, T L; Huang, J; Hu, C-D

    2017-03-02

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an emerging epigenetic enzyme that mainly represses transcription of target genes via symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues on histones H4R3, H3R8 and H2AR3. Accumulating evidence suggests that PRMT5 may function as an oncogene to drive cancer cell growth by epigenetic inactivation of several tumor suppressors. Here, we provide evidence that PRMT5 promotes prostate cancer cell growth by epigenetically activating transcription of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of PRMT5 or inhibition of PRMT5 by a specific inhibitor reduces the expression of AR and suppresses the growth of multiple AR-positive, but not AR-negative, prostate cancer cells. Significantly, knockdown of PRMT5 in AR-positive LNCaP cells completely suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Molecular analysis reveals that PRMT5 binds to the proximal promoter region of the AR gene and contributes mainly to the enriched symmetric dimethylation of H4R3 in the same region. Mechanistically, PRMT5 is recruited to the AR promoter by its interaction with Sp1, the major transcription factor responsible for AR transcription, and forms a complex with Brg1, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, on the proximal promoter region of the AR gene. Furthermore, PRMT5 expression in prostate cancer tissues is significantly higher than that in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, and PRMT5 expression correlates positively with AR expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Taken together, our results identify PRMT5 as a novel epigenetic activator of AR in prostate cancer. Given that inhibiting AR transcriptional activity or androgen synthesis remains the major mechanism of action for most existing anti-androgen agents, our findings also raise an interesting possibility that targeting PRMT5 may represent a novel approach for prostate cancer treatment by eliminating AR expression.

  4. Cellular Uptakes, Biostabilities and Anti-miR-210 Activities of Chiral Arginine-PNAs in Leukaemic K562 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manicardi, Alex; Fabbri, Enrica; Tedeschi, Tullia; Sforza, Stefano; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Brognara, Eleonora; Gambari, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela; Corradini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    A series of 18-mer peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) targeted against micro-RNA miR-210 was synthesised and tested in a cellular system. Unmodified PNAs, R8-conjugated PNAs and modified PNAs containing eight arginine residues on the backbone, either as C2-modified (R) or C5-modified (S) monomers, all with the same sequence, were compared. Two different models were used for the modified PNAs: one with alternated chiral and achiral monomers and one with a stretch of chiral monomers at the N terminus. The melting temperatures of these derivatives were found to be extremely high and 5 m urea was used to assess differences between the different structures. FACS analysis and qRT-PCR on K562 chronic myelogenous leukaemic cells indicated that arginine-conjugated and backbone-modified PNAs display good cellular uptake, with best performances for the C2-modified series. Resistance to enzymatic degradation was found to be higher for the backbone-modified PNAs, thus enhancing the advantage of using these derivatives rather than conjugated PNAs in the cells in serum, and this effect is magnified in the presence of peptidases such as trypsin. Inhibition of miR-210 activity led to changes in the erythroid differentiation pathway, which were more evident in mithramycin-treated cells. Interestingly, the anti-miR activities differed with use of different PNAs, thus suggesting a role of the substituents not only in the cellular uptake, but also in the mechanism of miR recognition and inactivation. This is the first report relating to the use of backbone-modified PNAs as anti-miR agents. The results clearly indicate that backbone-modified PNAs are good candidates for the development of very efficient drugs based on anti-miR activity, due to their enhanced bioavailabilities, and that overall anti-miR performance is a combination of cellular uptake and RNA binding. PMID:22639449

  5. Neither arginine nor histidine can carry out the function of lysine-295 in the ATP-binding site of p60src.

    PubMed Central

    Kamps, M P; Sefton, B M

    1986-01-01

    All 15 protein kinases whose amino acid sequence is known contain a lysine residue at a position homologous to that of lysine-295 in p60src, the transforming protein of Rous sarcoma virus. The ATP analog p-fluorosulfonyl 5'-benzoyl adenosine inactivates both p60src and the catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase by modification of this lysine. We used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to examine the possible functions of this residue. Lysine-295 in p60src was replaced with a glutamic acid, an arginine, or a histidine residue, and mutant p60src proteins were characterized in chicken cells infected by mutant viruses. None of these three mutant p60src proteins had tyrosine protein kinase activity in vitro, and none induced morphological transformation of infected cells. Since neither a histidine nor an arginine residue can replace the function of lysine-295, we suggest that it carries out the specialized function of proton transfer in the phosphotransferase reaction. All three mutant viruses underwent reversion to wild type during passage in tissue culture. Because the rate with which this occurred differed significantly among the mutants, reversion appears to have resulted from errors in transcription, rather than from recombination with the cellular src gene. Images PMID:2430174

  6. Glutamine Assimilation and Feedback Regulation of L-acetyl-N-glutamate Kinase Activity in Chlorella variabilis NC64A Results in Changes in Arginine Pools.

    PubMed

    Minaeva, Ekaterina; Forchhammer, Karl; Ermilova, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine is a metabolite of central importance in nitrogen metabolism of microorganisms and plants. The Chlorella PII signaling protein controls, in a glutamine-dependent manner, the key enzyme of the ornithine/arginine biosynthesis pathway, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) that leads to arginine formation. We provide evidence that glutamine promotes effective growth of C. variabilis strain NC64A. The present study shows that externally supplied glutamine directly influences the internal pool of arginine in NC64A. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonium to glutamine. The results of this study demonstrate that glutamine acts as a negative effector of GS activity. These data emphasize the importance of glutamine-dependent coupling of metabolism and signaling as components of an efficient pathway allowing the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and sustaining growth of Chlorella.

  7. Cooperativity in the two-domain arginine kinase from the sea anemone Anthopleura japonicus. II. Evidence from site-directed mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2010-08-01

    The arginine kinase (AK) from the sea anemone Anthopleura japonicus has an unusual two-domain structure (contiguous dimer; denoted by D1-D2). In a previous report, we suggested cooperativity in the contiguous dimer, which may be a result of domain-domain interactions, using MBP-fused enzymes. To further understand this observation, we inserted six-Lys residues into the linker region of the two-domain AK (D1-K6-D2 mutant) using His-tagged enzyme. The dissociation constants, K(a) and K(ia), of the mutant were similar to those of the wild-type enzyme but the catalytic constant, k(cat), was decreased to 28% that of the wild-type, indicating that some of the domain-domain interactions are lost due to the six-Lys insertion. Y68 plays a major role in arginine binding in the catalytic pocket in Limulus AK, and introduction of mutation at the Y68 position virtually abolishes catalytic activity. Thus, the constructed D1(Y68G)-D2 and D1-D2(Y68G) mutants mimic the D1(inactive)-D2(active) and D1(active)-D2(inactive) enzymes, respectively. The k(cat) values of both Y68 mutants were decreased to 13-18% that of the wild-type enzyme, which is much less than the 50% level of the two-domain enzyme. Thus, it is clear that substrate-binding to both domains is necessary for full expression of activity. In other words, substrate-binding appears to act as the trigger of the functional cooperativity in two-domain AK.

  8. L-arginine abolishes the hypothalamic serotonergic activation induced by central interleukin-1β administration to normal rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    IL-1β-induced anorexia may depend on interactions of the cytokine with neuropeptides and neurotransmitters of the central nervous system control of energy balance and serotonin is likely to be one catabolic mediator targeted by IL-1β. In the complex interplay involved in feeding modulation, nitric oxide has been ascribed a stimulatory action, which could be of significance in counteracting IL-1β effects. The present study aims to explore the participation of the nitric oxide and the serotonin systems on the central mechanisms induced by IL-1β and the relevance of their putative interactions to IL-1β hypophagia in normal rats. Serotonin levels were determined in microdialysates of the ventromedial hypothalamus after a single intracerebroventricular injection of 10 ng of IL-1β , with or without the pre-injection of 20 μg of the nitric oxide precursor L-arginine. IL-1β significantly stimulated hypothalamic serotonin extracellular levels, with a peak variation of 130 ±37% above baseline. IL- 1β also reduced the 4-h and the 24-h food intakes (by 23% and 58%, respectively). The IL-1β-induced serotonergic activation was abolished by the pre-injection of L-arginine while the hypophagic effect was unaffected. The data showed that one central effect of IL-1β is serotonergic stimulation in the ventromedial hypothalamus, an action inhibited by nitric oxide activity. It is suggested that, although serotonin participates in IL-1β anorexia, other mechanisms recruited by IL-1β in normal rats are able to override the absence of the serotonergic hypophagic influence. PMID:24314273

  9. Modulating the activity of short arginine-tryptophan containing antibacterial peptides with N-terminal metallocenoyl groups

    PubMed Central

    Albada, H Bauke; Chiriac, Alina-Iulia; Wenzel, Michaela; Penkova, Maya; Bandow, Julia E; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Summary A series of small synthetic arginine and tryptophan containing peptides was prepared and analyzed for their antibacterial activity. The effect of N-terminal substitution with metallocenoyl groups such as ferrocene (FcCO) and ruthenocene (RcCO) was investigated. Antibacterial activity in different media, growth inhibition, and killing kinetics of the most active peptides were determined. The toxicity of selected derivatives was determined against erythrocytes and three human cancer cell lines. It was shown that the replacement of an N-terminal arginine residue with a metallocenoyl moiety modulates the activity of WRWRW-peptides against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MIC values of 2–6 µM for RcCO-W(RW)2 and 1–11 µM for (RW)3 were determined. Interestingly, W(RW)2-peptides derivatized with ferrocene were significantly less active than those derivatized with ruthenocene which have similar structural but different electronic properties, suggesting a major influence of the latter. The high activities observed for the RcCO-W(RW)2- and (RW)3-peptides led to an investigation of the origin of activity of these peptides using several important activity-related parameters. Firstly, killing kinetics of the RcCO-W(RW)2-peptide versus killing kinetics of the (RW)3 derivative showed faster reduction of the colony forming units for the RcCO-W(RW)2-peptide, although MIC values indicated higher activity for the (RW)3-peptide. This was confirmed by growth inhibition studies. Secondly, hemolysis studies revealed that both peptides did not lead to significant destruction of erythrocytes, even up to 500 µg/mL for (RW)3 and 250 µg/mL for RcCO-W(RW)2. In addition, toxicity against three human cancer cell lines (HepG2, HT29, MCF7) showed that the (RW)3-peptide had an IC50 value of ~140 µM and the RcW(RW)2 one of ~90 µM, indicating a potentially interesting therapeutic window. Both the killing kinetics and growth inhibition studies presented in this work point to

  10. Dietary L-arginine supplementation during mouse gestation enhances reproductive performance and Vegfr2 transcription activity in the fetoplacental unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regarded as one of the most versatile amino acids, arginine serves as a precursor for many molecules and has been reported to improve the reproductive performance of rats and pigs. To this end, we sought to determine if dietary L-arginine alters fetoplacental vascular endothelial growth factor recep...

  11. L-arginine independent macrophage tumor cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Klostergaard, J.; Leroux, M.E. )

    1989-12-29

    We have investigated the role of L-arginine in macrophage tumor cytotoxicity in coculture. L929, EMT-6, MCA-26, and P815 targets were all susceptible to cytolysis by activated macrophages when cocultured in medium containing L-arginine. When cocultured in arginine-free medium, these targets displayed comparable or even higher levels of lysis. L1210 targets were lytically resistant under either condition. However, 59Fe release from this target did reflect strong dependence on the presence of arginine. The structural analogue, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, was an effective inhibitor of iron-release from L1210 targets cocultured with activated macrophages, whereas it had minimal inhibitory effects on release of 51Cr from cocultured L929 cells. These results suggest that the L-arginine requiring cytotoxic pathway of activated macrophage is independent of major effector mechanisms involved in tumor cell lysis.

  12. Effect of selectively introducing arginine and D-amino acids on the antimicrobial activity and salt sensitivity in analogs of human beta-defensins.

    PubMed

    Olli, Sudar; Rangaraj, Nandini; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the antimicrobial activity of C-terminal analogs of human β-defensins HBD-1 and-3 wherein lysines have been selectively replaced by L- and D-arginines and L-isoleucine substituted with its D-enantiomer. The analogs exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. Physiological concentration of NaCl did not attenuate the activity of the peptides against Gram-negative bacteria considerably, while some attenuation of activity was observed against S. aureus. Variable attenuation of activity was observed in the presence of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺. Introduction of D-amino acids abrogated the need for a disulfide bridge for exhibiting activity. Confocal images of carboxyfluorescein (CF) labeled peptides indicated initial localization on the membrane and subsequent translocation into the cell. Analogs corresponding to cationic rich segments of human defensins substituted with L- and D-arginine, could be attractive candidates for development as future therapeutic drugs.

  13. Synthesis and Splice-Redirecting Activity of Branched, Arginine-Rich Peptide Dendrimer Conjugates of Peptide Nucleic Acid Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides have found excellent utility in cell and in vivo models for enhancement of delivery of attached charge-neutral PNA or PMO oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis of dendrimeric peptides containing 2- or 4-branched arms each having one or more R-Ahx-R motifs and their disulfide conjugation to a PNA705 splice-redirecting oligonucleotide. Conjugates were assayed in a HeLa pLuc705 cell assay for luciferase up-regulation and splicing redirection. Whereas 8-Arg branched peptide−PNA conjugates showed poor activity compared to a linear (R-Ahx-R)4−PNA conjugate, 2-branched and some 4-branched 12 and 16 Arg peptide−PNA conjugates showed activity similar to that of the corresponding linear peptide−PNA conjugates. Many of the 12- and 16-Arg conjugates retained significant activity in the presence of serum. Evidence showed that biological activity in HeLa pLuc705 cells of the PNA conjugates of branched and linear (R-Ahx-R) peptides is associated with an energy-dependent uptake pathway, predominantly clathrin-dependent, but also with some caveolae dependence. PMID:20879728

  14. Purification, immobilization, and biochemical characterization of l-arginine deiminase from thermophilic Aspergillus fumigatus KJ434941: anticancer activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S A; Hassan, Mohamed N; Nada, Hend M S

    2015-01-01

    l-Arginine deiminase (ADI) has a powerful anticancer activity against various tumors, via arginine depletion, arresting the cell cycle at G1 phase. However, the current clinically tried bacterial ADI displayed a higher antigenicity and lower thermal stability. Thus, our objective was to purify and characterize this enzyme from thermophilic fungi, to explore its catalytic and antigenic properties for therapeutic uses. ADI was purified from thermophilic Aspergillus fumigatus KJ434941 to its electrophoretic homogeneity by 5.1-fold, with molecular subunit 50 kDa. The purified ADI was PEGylated and covalently immobilized on dextran to explore its catalytic properties. The specific activity of free ADI, PEG-ADI, and Dex-ADI was 26.7, 21.5, and 18.0 U/mg, respectively. At 50°C, PEG-ADI displays twofold resistance to thermal denaturation (t1/2 13.9 h), than free ADI (t1/2 6.9 h), while at 70°C, the thermal stability of PEG-ADI was increased by 1.7-fold, with similar stability to Dex-ADI with the free one. Kinetically, free ADI had the higher catalytic affinity to arginine, followed by PEG-ADI and Dex-ADI. Upon proteolysis for 30 min, the residual activity of native ADI, PEG-ADI, and Dex-AD was 8.0, 32.0, and 20.0% for proteinase K and 10.0, 52.0, and 90.0% for acid protease, respectively. The anticancer activity of the ADIs was assessed against HCT, HEP-G2, and MCF7, in vitro. The free and PEG-ADI exhibits a similar cytotoxic efficacy for the tested cells, lower than Dex-ADI. The free ADI had IC50 value 22.0, 16.6, and 13.9 U/mL, while Dex-ADI had 3.98, 5.18, and 4.43 U/mL for HCT, MCF7, and HEPG-2, respectively. The in vitro anticancer activity of ADI against HCT, MCF7, and HEPG-2 was increased by five-, three-, and threefold upon covalent modification by dextran. The biochemical and hematological parameters of the experimented animals were not affected by ADIs dosing, with no signs of anti-ADI immunoglobulins in vivo. The in vivo half-life time of free ADI, PEG

  15. Neutralization of a single arginine residue gates open a two-pore domain, alkali-activated K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Wendy; Cid, L Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V

    2007-01-09

    Potassium channels share a common selectivity filter that determines the conduction characteristics of the pore. Diversity in K+ channels is given by how they are gated open. TASK-2, TALK-1, and TALK-2 are two-pore region (2P) KCNK K+ channels gated open by extracellular alkalinization. We have explored the mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating using molecular simulation and site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional assay. We show that the side chain of a single arginine residue (R224) near the pore senses pH in TASK-2 with an unusual pKa of 8.0, a shift likely due to its hydrophobic environment. R224 would block the channel through an electrostatic effect on the pore, a situation relieved by its deprotonation by alkalinization. A lysine residue in TALK-2 fulfills the same role but with a largely unchanged pKa, which correlates with an environment that stabilizes its positive charge. In addition to suggesting unified alkaline pH-gating mechanisms within the TALK subfamily of channels, our results illustrate in a physiological context the principle that hydrophobic environment can drastically modulate the pKa of charged amino acids within a protein.

  16. Neutralization of a single arginine residue gates open a two-pore domain, alkali-activated K+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; González-Nilo, Fernando D.; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Wendy; Cid, L. Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.

    2007-01-01

    Potassium channels share a common selectivity filter that determines the conduction characteristics of the pore. Diversity in K+ channels is given by how they are gated open. TASK-2, TALK-1, and TALK-2 are two-pore region (2P) KCNK K+ channels gated open by extracellular alkalinization. We have explored the mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating using molecular simulation and site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional assay. We show that the side chain of a single arginine residue (R224) near the pore senses pH in TASK-2 with an unusual pKa of 8.0, a shift likely due to its hydrophobic environment. R224 would block the channel through an electrostatic effect on the pore, a situation relieved by its deprotonation by alkalinization. A lysine residue in TALK-2 fulfills the same role but with a largely unchanged pKa, which correlates with an environment that stabilizes its positive charge. In addition to suggesting unified alkaline pH-gating mechanisms within the TALK subfamily of channels, our results illustrate in a physiological context the principle that hydrophobic environment can drastically modulate the pKa of charged amino acids within a protein. PMID:17197424

  17. Cationic vesicles based on biocompatible diacyl glycerol-arginine surfactants: physicochemical properties, antimicrobial activity, encapsulation efficiency and drug release.

    PubMed

    Tavano, L; Pinazo, A; Abo-Riya, M; Infante, M R; Manresa, M A; Muzzalupo, R; Pérez, L

    2014-08-01

    Physicochemical characteristics of cationic vesicular systems prepared from biocompatible diacyl glycerol-arginine surfactants are investigated. These systems form stable cationic vesicles by themselves and the average diameter of the vesicles decreases as the alkyl chain length of the surfactant increases. The addition of DPPC also modifies the physicochemical properties of these vesicles. Among the drugs these cationic formulations can encapsulate, we have considered Ciprofloxacin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). We show that the percentage of encapsulated drug depends on both the physicochemical properties of the carrier and the type of drug. The capacity of these systems to carry different molecules was evaluated performing in vitro drug release studies. Finally, the antimicrobial activity of empty and Ciprofloxacin-loaded vesicles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria has been determined. Three bacteria were tested: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vitro drug release from all formulations was effectively delayed. Empty cationic vesicles showed antimicrobial activity and Ciprofloxacin-loaded vesicles showed similar or higher antimicrobial activity than the free drug solution. These results suggest that our formulations represent a great innovation in the pharmaceutical field, due to their dual pharmacological function: one related to the nature of the vehiculated drug and the other related to the innate antibacterial properties of the surfactant-based carriers.

  18. Killing of Mycobacterium avium by Lactoferricin Peptides: Improved Activity of Arginine- and d-Amino-Acid-Containing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tânia; Magalhães, Bárbara; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Rodrigues, Pedro N.; Bastos, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes respiratory disease in susceptible individuals, as well as disseminated infections in immunocompromised hosts, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality among these populations. Current therapies consist of a combination of antibiotics taken for at least 6 months, with no more than 60% overall clinical success. Furthermore, mycobacterial antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, urging the need to develop novel classes of antimicrobial drugs. One potential and interesting alternative strategy is the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMP). These are present in almost all living organisms as part of their immune system, acting as a first barrier against invading pathogens. In this context, we investigated the effect of several lactoferrin-derived AMP against M. avium. Short peptide sequences from both human and bovine lactoferricins, namely, hLFcin1-11 and LFcin17-30, as well as variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, were evaluated. All tested peptides significantly inhibited the axenic growth of M. avium, the bovine peptides being more active than the human. Arginine residues were found to be crucial for the display of antimycobacterial activity, whereas the all-d-amino-acid analogue of the bovine sequence displayed the highest mycobactericidal activity. These findings reveal the promising potential of lactoferricins against mycobacteria, thus opening the way for further research on their development and use as a new weapon against mycobacterial infections. PMID:24709266

  19. Comparative Proteomics Analysis Reveals L-Arginine Activates Ethanol Degradation Pathways in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guokai; Lestari, Retno; Long, Baisheng; Fan, Qiwen; Wang, Zhichang; Guo, Xiaozhen; Yu, Jie; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xingya; Chen, Changqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Xiuzhi; Purnomoadi, Agung; Achmadi, Joelal; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    L-Arginine (Arg) is a versatile amino acid that plays crucial roles in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. In this study, to investigate the alteration induced by Arg supplementation in proteome scale, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based proteomic approach was employed to comparatively characterize the differentially expressed proteins between Arg deprivation (Ctrl) and Arg supplementation (+Arg) treated human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. A total of 21 proteins were identified as differentially expressed proteins and these 21 proteins were all up-regulated by Arg supplementation. Six amino acid metabolism-related proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, showed differential expressions. Intriguingly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) based pathway analysis suggested that the three ethanol degradation pathways were significantly altered between Ctrl and +Arg. Western blotting and enzymatic activity assays validated that the key enzymes ADH1C, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2, which are mainly involved in ethanol degradation pathways, were highly differentially expressed, and activated between Ctrl and +Arg in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, 10 mM Arg significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by 100 mM ethanol treatment (P < 0.0001). This study is the first time to reveal that Arg activates ethanol degradation pathways in HepG2 cells. PMID:26983598

  20. Purification of a dimeric arginine deiminase from Enterococcus faecium GR7 and study of its anti-cancerous activity.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Kaur, Rajinder

    2016-09-01

    The arginine deiminase (ADI, E.C 3.5.3.6) - a key enzyme of ADI pathway of Enterococcus faecium GR7 was purified to homogeneity. A sequential purification strategy involving ammonium sulfate fractionation, molecular sieve followed by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration was applied to the crude culture filtrate to obtain a pure enzyme preparation. The enzyme was purified with a fold of 16.92 and showed a final specific activity of 76.65IU/mg with a 49.17% yield. The dimeric ADI has a molecular mass of about 94,364.929Da, and comprises of hetrodimers of 49.1kDa and 46.5kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF and PAGE analysis. To assess anti-cancerous activity of ADI by MTT assay was carried out against cancer cell lines (MCF-7, Sp2/0-Ag14 and Hep-G2). Purified ADI exhibited the most profound antiproliferative activity against Hep-G2 cells; with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.95μg/ml. Purified ADI from E. faecium GR7 was observed to induce apoptosis in the Hep-G2 cells by DNA fragmentation assay. Our findings suggest the possibility of a future use of ADI from E. faecium GR7 as a potential anticancer drug.

  1. Amino Acid Utilization in Seeds of Loblolly Pine during Germination and Early Seedling Growth (I. Arginine and Arginase Activity).

    PubMed Central

    King, J. E.; Gifford, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    The mobilization and utilization of the major storage proteins in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seeds following imbibition were investigated. Most of the seed protein reserves were contained within the megagametophyte. Breakdown of these proteins occurred primarily following radicle emergence and correlated with a substantial increase in the free amino acid pool in the seedling; the majority of this increase appeared to be the result of export from the megagametophyte. The megagametophyte was able to break down storage proteins and export free amino acids in the absence of the seedling. Arginine (Arg) was the most abundant amino acid among the principal storage proteins of the megagametophyte and was a major component of the free amino acid pools in both the seedling and the megagametophyte. The increase in free Arg coincided with a marked increase in arginase activity, mainly localized within the cotyledons and epicotyl of the seedling. Arginase activity was negligible in isolated seedlings. Experiments with phenylphosphorodiamidate, a urease inhibitor, supported the hypothesis that arginase participates in Arg metabolism in the seedling. The results of this study indicate that Arg could play an important role in the nutrition of loblolly pine during early seedling growth. PMID:12223664

  2. Peptidylarginine deiminase 2-catalyzed histone H3 arginine 26 citrullination facilitates estrogen receptor α target gene activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesen; Bolt, Michael; Guertin, Michael J; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng; Cherrington, Brian D; Slade, Daniel J; Dreyton, Christina J; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Bicker, Kevin L; Thompson, Paul R; Mancini, Michael A; Lis, John T; Coonrod, Scott A

    2012-08-14

    Cofactors for estrogen receptor α (ERα) can modulate gene activity by posttranslationally modifying histone tails at target promoters. Here, we found that stimulation of ERα-positive cells with 17β-estradiol (E2) promotes global citrullination of histone H3 arginine 26 (H3R26) on chromatin. Additionally, we found that the H3 citrulline 26 (H3Cit26) modification colocalizes with ERα at decondensed chromatin loci surrounding the estrogen-response elements of target promoters. Surprisingly, we also found that citrullination of H3R26 is catalyzed by peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) 2 and not by PAD4 (which citrullinates H4R3). Further, we showed that PAD2 interacts with ERα after E2 stimulation and that inhibition of either PAD2 or ERα strongly suppresses E2-induced H3R26 citrullination and ERα recruitment at target gene promoters. Collectively, our data suggest that E2 stimulation induces the recruitment of PAD2 to target promoters by ERα, whereby PAD2 then citrullinates H3R26, which leads to local chromatin decondensation and transcriptional activation.

  3. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  4. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  5. Arginine Deiminase Enzyme Evolving As A Potential Antitumor Agent.

    PubMed

    Somani, Rakesh; Chaskar, Pratip K

    2016-08-17

    Some melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas have been shown to be auxotrophic for arginine. Arginine deiminase (ADI), an arginine degrading enzyme isolated from Mycoplasma, can inhibit the growth of these tumors. It is a catabolizing enzyme which catabolizes arginine to citrulline. Tumor cells do not express an enzyme called arginosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and hence, these cells becomes auxotrophic for arginine. It is found that ADI is specific for arginine and did not degrade other amino acid. This review covers various aspects of ADIs like origin, properties and chemical modifications for better antitumor activity.

  6. Effects of arginine and leucine substitutions on anti-endotoxic activities and mechanisms of action of cationic and amphipathic antimicrobial octadecapeptide from rice α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Akihito; Toyoda, Ryu; Sato, Teppei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2017-03-01

    Previously, we showed that the antimicrobial cationic and amphipathic octadecapeptide AmyI-1-18 from rice α-amylase (AmyI-1) inhibited the endotoxic activity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli. In addition, we demonstrated that several AmyI-1-18 analogs containing arginine or leucine substitutions, which were designed on the basis of the helical wheel projection of AmyI-1-18, exhibited higher antimicrobial activity against human pathogenic microorganisms than AmyI-1-18. In the present study, anti-inflammatory (anti-endotoxic) activities of five AmyI-1-18 analogs containing arginine or leucine substitutions were investigated. Two single arginine-substituted and two single leucine-substituted AmyI-1-18 analogs inhibited the production of LPS-induced nitric oxide in mouse macrophages (RAW264) more effectively than AmyI-1-18. These data indicate that enhanced cationic and hydrophobic properties of AmyI-1-18 are associated with improved anti-endotoxic activity. In subsequent chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assays, 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 ) of the three AmyI-1-18 analogs (G12R, D15R, and E9L) were 0.11-0.13 μm, indicating higher anti-endotoxic activity than that of AmyI-1-18 (IC50, 0.22 μm), and specific LPS binding activity. In agreement, surface plasmon resonance analyses confirmed direct LPS binding of three AmyI-1-18 analogs. In addition, AmyI-1-18 analogs exhibited little or no cytotoxic activity against RAW264 cells, indicating that enhancements of anti-inflammatory and LPS-neutralizing activities following replacement of arginine or leucine did not result in significant increases in cytotoxicity. This study shows that the arginine-substituted and leucine-substituted AmyI-1-18 analogs with improved anti-endotoxic and antimicrobial activities have clinical potential as dual-function host defense agents. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. PSEUDOMONAS PYOCYANEA AND THE ARGININE DIHYDROLASE SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    TAYLOR, J J; WHITBY, J L

    1964-03-01

    Non-pigmented strains of Pseudomonas pyocyanea occur frequently and this organism has only limited activity in conventional biochemical tests; 50 strains were tested for the presence of arginine dihydrolase and found positive whereas only Salmonella sp. and Enterobacter sp. among other Gram-negative species were positive. The test for arginine dihydrolase is rapid and simple and suitable for routine use.

  8. Directed arginine deiminase evolution for efficient inhibition of arginine-auxotrophic melanomas.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Zhu, Leilei; Lue, Hongqi; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a therapeutic protein for cancer therapy of arginine-auxotrophic tumors. However, ADI's application as anticancer drug is hampered by its low activity for arginine under physiological conditions mainly due to its high "K M" (S₀.₅) values which are often 1 magnitude higher than the arginine concentration in blood (0.10-0.12 mM arginine in human plasma). Previous evolution campaigns were directed by us with the aim of boosting activity of PpADI (ADI from Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, k cat = 0.18 s(-1); S₀.₅ = 1.30 mM), and yielded variant M6 with slightly reduced S₀.₅ values and enhanced k cat (S₀.₅ = 0.81 mM; k cat = 11.64 s(-1)). In order to further reduce the S₀.₅ value and to increase the activity of PpADI at physiological arginine concentration, a more sensitive screening system based on ammonia detection in 96-well microtiter plate to reliably detect ≥0.005 mM ammonia was developed. After screening ~5,500 clones with the ammonia detection system (ADS) in two rounds of random mutagenesis and site-directed mutagenesis, variant M19 with increased k cat value (21.1 s(-1); 105.5-fold higher compared to WT) and reduced S₀.₅ value (0.35 mM compared to 0.81 mM (M6) and 1.30 mM (WT)) was identified. Improved performance of M19 was validated by determining IC₅₀ values for two melanoma cell lines. The IC₅₀ value for SK-MEL-28 dropped from 8.67 (WT) to 0.10 (M6) to 0.04 μg/mL (M19); the IC₅₀ values for G361 dropped from 4.85 (WT) to 0.12 (M6) to 0.05 μg/mL (M19).

  9. FlpS, the FNR-Like Protein of Streptococcus suis Is an Essential, Oxygen-Sensing Activator of the Arginine Deiminase System

    PubMed Central

    Willenborg, Jörg; Koczula, Anna; Fulde, Marcus; de Greeff, Astrid; Beineke, Andreas; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Huber, Claudia; Seitz, Maren; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) suis is a zoonotic pathogen causing septicemia and meningitis in pigs and humans. During infection S. suis must metabolically adapt to extremely diverse environments of the host. CcpA and the FNR family of bacterial transcriptional regulators are important for metabolic gene regulation in various bacteria. The role of CcpA in S. suis is well defined, but the function of the FNR-like protein of S. suis, FlpS, is yet unknown. Transcriptome analyses of wild-type S. suis and a flpS mutant strain suggested that FlpS is involved in the regulation of the central carbon, arginine degradation and nucleotide metabolism. However, isotopologue profiling revealed no substantial changes in the core carbon and amino acid de novo biosynthesis. FlpS was essential for the induction of the arcABC operon of the arginine degrading pathway under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The arcABC-inducing activity of FlpS could be associated with the level of free oxygen in the culture medium. FlpS was necessary for arcABC-dependent intracellular bacterial survival but redundant in a mice infection model. Based on these results, we propose that the core function of S. suis FlpS is the oxygen-dependent activation of the arginine deiminase system. PMID:27455333

  10. FlpS, the FNR-Like Protein of Streptococcus suis Is an Essential, Oxygen-Sensing Activator of the Arginine Deiminase System.

    PubMed

    Willenborg, Jörg; Koczula, Anna; Fulde, Marcus; de Greeff, Astrid; Beineke, Andreas; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Huber, Claudia; Seitz, Maren; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2016-07-21

    Streptococcus (S.) suis is a zoonotic pathogen causing septicemia and meningitis in pigs and humans. During infection S. suis must metabolically adapt to extremely diverse environments of the host. CcpA and the FNR family of bacterial transcriptional regulators are important for metabolic gene regulation in various bacteria. The role of CcpA in S. suis is well defined, but the function of the FNR-like protein of S. suis, FlpS, is yet unknown. Transcriptome analyses of wild-type S. suis and a flpS mutant strain suggested that FlpS is involved in the regulation of the central carbon, arginine degradation and nucleotide metabolism. However, isotopologue profiling revealed no substantial changes in the core carbon and amino acid de novo biosynthesis. FlpS was essential for the induction of the arcABC operon of the arginine degrading pathway under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The arcABC-inducing activity of FlpS could be associated with the level of free oxygen in the culture medium. FlpS was necessary for arcABC-dependent intracellular bacterial survival but redundant in a mice infection model. Based on these results, we propose that the core function of S. suis FlpS is the oxygen-dependent activation of the arginine deiminase system.

  11. Protein arginine methylation/demethylation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poulard, Coralie; Corbo, Laura; Le Romancer, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is a common post-translational modification involved in numerous cellular processes including transcription, DNA repair, mRNA splicing and signal transduction. Currently, there are nine known members of the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family, but only one arginine demethylase has been identified, namely the Jumonji domain-containing 6 (JMJD6). Although its demethylase activity was initially challenged, its dual activity as an arginine demethylase and a lysine hydroxylase is now recognized. Interestingly, a growing number of substrates for arginine methylation and demethylation play key roles in tumorigenesis. Though alterations in the sequence of these enzymes have not been identified in cancer, their overexpression is associated with various cancers, suggesting that they could constitute targets for therapeutic strategies. In this review, we present the recent knowledge of the involvement of PRMTs and JMJD6 in tumorigenesis. PMID:27556302

  12. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  13. Arginine methylation of USP9X promotes its interaction with TDRD3 and its anti-apoptotic activities in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Nithya; Wang, Zhihao; Li, Ling; Yang, Yanzhong

    2017-01-01

    The Tudor domain-containing proteins are characterized by their specific interactions with methylated protein motifs, including methyl-arginines and methyl-lysines. The Tudor domain-containing protein 3 (TDRD3) is one of the major methyl-arginine effector molecules that recognizes methylated arginine residues on histones and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, and activates transcription. However, majority of the cellular TDRD3 localizes to the cytoplasm and its functions there are still elusive. Here, we have identified ubiquitin-specific protease 9 X-linked (USP9X) as a TDRD3-interacting protein by GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation. Detailed characterization suggests that the interaction between TDRD3 and USP9X is mediated through the Tudor domain of TDRD3 and the arginine methylation of USP9X. This interaction plays a critical role in TDRD3 protein stability, as knockdown of USP9X expression leads to increased TDRD3 ubiquitination. We also found that USP9X co-localizes with TDRD3 in cytoplasmic stress granules and this localization is diminished in Tdrd3-null mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, suggesting that TDRD3 is essential for USP9X stress granule localization. Furthermore, we found that one of the USP9X de-ubiquitination targets, myeloid cell leukemia protein 1, is regulated by TDRD3, indicating that TDRD3 potentially regulates USP9X de-ubiquitinase activity. Finally, we show that knockdown of TDRD3 expression sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis, likely due to its regulation of USP9X. This study provides a novel candidate strategy for targeting apoptosis pathways in cancer therapy. PMID:28101374

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and biological activity of poly(arginine)-derived cancer-targeting peptides in HepG2 liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Stesha C; Blackman, Brittany A; Kelly, Megan L; Phillips, Mariana; Beaury, Michael W; Martinez, Ivonne; Parronchi, Christopher J; Bitsaktsis, Constantine; Blake, Allan D; Sabatino, David

    2014-09-01

    The solid-phase synthesis, structural characterization, and biological evaluation of a small library of cancer-targeting peptides have been determined in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells. These peptides are based on the highly specific Pep42 motif, which has been shown to target the glucose-regulated protein 78 receptors overexpressed and exclusively localized on the cell surface of tumors. In this study, Pep42 was designed to contain varying lengths (3-12) of poly(arginine) sequences to assess their influence on peptide structure and biology. Peptides were effectively synthesized by 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-based solid-phase peptide synthesis, in which the use of a poly(ethylene glycol) resin provided good yields (14-46%) and crude purities >95% as analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Peptide structure and biophysical properties were investigated using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Interestingly, peptides displayed secondary structures that were contingent on solvent and length of the poly(arginine) sequences. Peptides exhibited helical and turn conformations, while retaining significant thermal stability. Structure-activity relationship studies conducted by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy revealed that the poly(arginine) derived Pep42 sequences maintained glucose-regulated protein 78 binding on HepG2 cells while exhibiting cell translocation activity that was contingent on the length of the poly(arginine) strand. In single dose (0.15 mM) and dose-response (0-1.5 mM) cell viability assays, peptides were found to be nontoxic in human HepG2 liver cancer cells, illustrating their potential as safe cancer-targeting delivery agents.

  15. Strategies for the Gas Phase Modification of Cationized Arginine via Ion/ion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; McGee, William M; Stutzman, John R; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-11-15

    The gas phase acetylation of cationized arginine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with sulfosuccinimidyl acetate (sulfo-NHS acetate) anions. Previous reports have demonstrated the gas phase modification of uncharged primary amine (the N-terminus and ε-amino side chain of lysine) and uncharged guanidine (the arginine side chain) functionalities via sulfo-NHS ester chemistry. Herein, charge-saturated arginine-containing peptides that contain sodium ions as the charge carriers, such as [ac-ARAAARA+2Na](2+), are shown to exhibit strong reactivity towards sulfo-NHS acetate whereas the protonated peptide analogues exhibit no such reactivity. This difference in reactivity is attributed to the lower sodium ion (as compared to proton) affinity of the arginine, which results in increased nucleophilicity of the cationized arginine guanidinium functionality. This increased nucleophilicity improves the arginine residue's reactivity towards sulfo-NHS esters and enhances the gas phase covalent modification pathway. No such dramatic increase in reactivity towards sulfo-NHS acetate has been observed upon sodium cationization of lysine amino acid residues, indicating that this behavior appears to be unique to arginine. The sodium cationization process is demonstrated in the condensed phase by simply spiking sodium chloride into the peptide sample solution and in the gas phase by a peptide-sodium cation exchange process with a sulfo-NHS acetate sodium-bound dimer cluster reagent. This methodology demonstrates several ways by which arginine can be covalently modified in the gas phase even when it is charged. Collisional activation of an acetylated arginine product can result in deguanidination of the residue, generating an ornithine. This gas phase ornithination exhibits similar site-specific fragmentation behavior to that observed with peptides ornithinated in solution and may represent a useful approach for inducing selective peptide cleavages.

  16. Mechanism of arginine sensing by CASTOR1 upstream of mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Robert A.; Chantranupong, Lynne; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major regulator of eukaryotic growth that coordinates anabolic and catabolic cellular processes with inputs such as growth factors and nutrients, including amino acids1–3. In mammals, arginine is particularly important and promotes diverse physiological effects including immune cell activation, insulin secretion, and muscle growth, largely through activation of mTORC14–7. Arginine activates mTORC1 upstream of the Rag GTPases8, through either the lysosomal amino acid transporter SLC38A9 or the GATOR2-interacting CASTOR1 (Cellular Arginine Sensor for mTORC1)9–12. However, the mechanism by which the mTORC1 pathway detects and transmits the arginine signal has been elusive. Here, we present the 1.8 Å crystal structure of arginine-bound CASTOR1. Homodimeric CASTOR1 binds arginine at the interface of two ACT domains, enabling allosteric control of the adjacent GATOR2-binding site to trigger dissociation from GATOR2 and the downstream activation of mTORC1. Our data reveal that CASTOR1 shares substantial structural homology with the lysine-binding regulatory domain of prokaryotic aspartate kinases, suggesting that the mTORC1 pathway exploited an ancient amino-acid-dependent allosteric mechanism to acquire arginine sensitivity. Together, these results establish a structural basis for arginine sensing by the mTORC1 pathway and provide insights into the evolution of a mammalian nutrient sensor. PMID:27487210

  17. Specific expression of optically active reporter gene in arginine vasopressin-secreting neurosecretory cells in the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal system.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Y; Fujihara, H; Dayanithi, G; Kawata, M; Murphy, D

    2008-06-01

    The anti-diuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) is synthesised in the magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus. AVP-containing MNCs that project their axon terminals to the posterior pituitary can be identified using immunohistochemical techniques with specific antibodies recognising AVP and neurophysin II, and by virtue of their electrophysiological properties. Recently, we generated transgenic rats expressing an AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion gene in AVP-containing MNCs. In this transgenic rat, eGFP mRNA was observed in the PVN and the SON, and eGFP fluorescence was seen in the PVN and the SON, and also in the posterior pituitary, indicating transport of transgene protein down MNC axons to storage in nerve terminals. The expression of the AVP-eGFP transgene and eGFP fluorescence in the PVN and the SON was markedly increased after dehydration and chronic salt-loading. On the other hand, AVP-containing parvocellular neurosecretory cells in the PVN that are involved in the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis exhibit robust AVP-eGFP fluorescence after bilateral adrenalectomy and intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide. In the median eminence, the internal and external layer showed strong fluorescence for eGFP after osmotic stimuli and stressful conditions, respectively, again indicating appropriate transport of transgene traslation products. Brain slices and acutely-dissociated MNCs and axon terminals also exhibited strong fluorescence, as observed under fluorescence microscopy. The AVP-eGFP transgenic animals are thus unique and provide a useful tool to study AVP-secreting cells in vivo for electrophysiology, imaging analysis such as intracellular Ca(2+) imaging, organ culture and in vivo monitoring of dynamic change in AVP secretion.

  18. Chemical modification of lysine and arginine residues of bovine heart 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase: effect on the enzyme activity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Ostrovtsova, S A

    1998-01-01

    Chemical modification of arginine and lysine residues of bovine heart 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase with phenylglyoxal and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate inactivated the enzyme, indicating the importance of these residues for the catalysis. Inactivation caused by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was prevented in the presence of thiamine pyrophosphate and Mg2+ allowing the assumption that lysine residues participate in binding of the cofactor.

  19. Methylglyoxal-induced modification of arginine residues decreases the activity of NADPH-generating enzymes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Philip E; Sheahan, Pamela J; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2013-08-01

    Inadequate control of plasma and cellular glucose and ketone levels in diabetes is associated with increased generation of reactive aldehydes, including methylglyoxal (MGO). These aldehydes react with protein side chains to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Arg residues are particularly susceptible to MGO glycation and are essential for binding NADP(+) in several enzymes that generate NADPH, a coenzyme for many critical metabolic and antioxidant enzymes. In most animal cells, NADPH is produced predominantly by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in the oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway and, to a lesser extent, by isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and malic enzyme (ME). In this study, the activities of isolated G6PD, IDH, and ME were inhibited by MGO (0-2.5mM, 2-3h, 37°C), in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with G6PD and IDH more sensitive to modification than ME. Significant inhibition of these two enzymes occurred with MGO levels ≥500μM. Incubation with radiolabeled MGO (0-500µM, 0-3h, 37°C) demonstrated dose- and time-dependent adduction to G6PD and IDH. HPLC analysis provided evidence for AGE formation and particularly the hydroimidazolones MG-H1 and MG-H2 from Arg residues, with corresponding loss of parent Arg residues. Peptide mass mapping studies confirmed hydroimidazolone formation on multiple peptides in G6PD and IDH, including those critical for NADP(+) binding, and substrate binding, in the case of IDH. These results suggest that modification of NADPH-producing enzymes by reactive aldehydes may result in alterations to the cellular redox environment, potentially predisposing cells to further damage by oxidants and reactive aldehydes.

  20. A role for serotonin in the antidepressant activity of NG-Nitro-L-arginine, in the rat forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Gigliucci, Valentina; Buckley, Kathleen Niamh; Nunan, John; O'Shea, Karen; Harkin, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    The present study determined regional serotonin (5-HT) synthesis and metabolism changes associated with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) and the influence of 5-HT receptor blockade in the antidepressant-like actions of L-NA in the forced swimming test (FST). Regional effects of L-NA (5,10 and 20mg/kg i.p.) on tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activity, the rate limiting enzyme for 5-HT synthesis, were determined by measuring accumulation of the transient intermediate 5-hydoxytryptophan (5-HTP) following in vivo administration of the amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor, NSD 1015 (100mg/kg). L-NA (5-20mg/kg) dose dependently increased 5-HTP accumulation, particularly in the amygdaloid cortex, following exposure to the FST. L-NA also provoked an increase in regional brain 5-HIAA concentrations and in the 5-HIAA:5-HT metabolism ratio. Co-treatment with NSD-1015 failed to consistently modify the antidepressant-like effects of L-NA in the FST. Sub-active doses of L-NA (1mg/kg) and the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor fluoxetine (2.5mg/kg) acted synergistically to increase swimming in the test. Co-treatment with the non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist metergoline (1, 2 and 4mg/kg), attenuated the L-NA (20mg/kg)-induced reduction in immobility and increase in swimming behaviours. Metergoline alone however provoked an increase in immobility and reduction in swimming behaviours in the test. A similar response was obtained following co-treatment with the preferential 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin (5mg/kg) and the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist RO-430440 (5mg/kg). Co-treatment with the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (0.3mg/kg) or the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist GR 127935 (4mg/kg) failed to influence the antidepressant-like activity of L-NA. Taken together these data provide further support for a role for 5-HT in the antidepressant-like properties of NOS inhibitors.

  1. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-10-06

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of /sup 14/C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of approx. 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA.

  2. Histone Arginine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Alessandra Di; Bedford, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM). This type of PTM occurs on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, and is particularly abundant on shuttling proteins. In this review, we will focus on one aspect of this PTM: the diverse roles that arginine methylation of the core histone tails play in regulating chromatin function. A family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze methylation reactions, and a subset target histones. Importantly, arginine methylation of histone tails can promote or prevent the docking of key transcriptional effector molecules, thus playing a central role in the orchestration of the histone code. PMID:21074527

  3. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  4. Reengineering of the feedback-inhibition enzyme N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase to enhance L-arginine production in Corynebacterium crenatum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xu, Meijuan; Ge, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Xian; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Zhenghong; Rao, Zhiming

    2017-02-01

    N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second step of L-arginine biosynthesis and is inhibited by L-arginine in Corynebacterium crenatum. To ascertain the basis for the arginine sensitivity of CcNAGK, residue E19 which located at the entrance of the Arginine-ring was subjected to site-saturated mutagenesis and we successfully illustrated the inhibition-resistant mechanism. Typically, the E19Y mutant displayed the greatest deregulation of L-arginine feedback inhibition. An equally important strategy is to improve the catalytic activity and thermostability of CcNAGK. For further strain improvement, we used site-directed mutagenesis to identify mutations that improve CcNAGK. Results identified variants I74V, F91H and K234T display higher specific activity and thermostability. The L-arginine yield and productivity of the recombinant strain C. crenatum SYPA-EH3 (which possesses a combination of all four mutant sites, E19Y/I74V/F91H/K234T) reached 61.2 and 0.638 g/L/h, respectively, after 96 h in 5 L bioreactor fermentation, an increase of approximately 41.8% compared with the initial strain.

  5. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  6. A TGFβ-PRMT5-MEP50 Axis Regulates Cancer Cell Invasion through Histone H3 and H4 Arginine Methylation Coupled Transcriptional Activation and Repression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongshan; Lorton, Benjamin; Gupta, Varun; Shechter, David

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) complexed with MEP50/WDR77 catalyzes arginine methylation on histones and other proteins. PRMT5-MEP50 activity is elevated in cancer cells and its expression is highly correlated with poor prognosis in many human tumors. We demonstrate that PRMT5-MEP50 is essential for transcriptional regulation promoting cancer cell invasive phenotypes in lung adenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma and breast carcinoma cancer cells. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis demonstrated that PRMT5 and MEP50 are required to maintain expression of metastasis and Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and to potentiate an epigenetic mechanism of the TGFβ response. We show that PRMT5-MEP50 activity both positively and negatively regulates expression of a wide range of genes. Exogenous TGFβ promotes EMT in a unique pathway of PRMT5-MEP50 catalyzed histone mono- and dimethylation of chromatin at key metastasis suppressor and EMT genes, defining a new mechanism regulating cancer invasivity. PRMT5 methylation of histone H3R2me1 induced transcriptional activation by recruitment of WDR5 and concomitant H3K4 methylation at targeted genes. In parallel, PRMT5 methylation of histone H4R3me2s suppressed transcription at distinct genomic loci. Our decoding of histone methylarginine at key genes supports a critical role for complementary PRMT5-MEP50 transcriptional activation and repression in cancer invasion pathways and in response to TGFβ stimulation and therefore and orients future chemotherapeutic opportunities. PMID:27270440

  7. Mechanisms of Catalysis and Inhibition Operative in the Arginine Deiminase from the Human Pathogen Giardia lamblia+

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhimin; Kulakova, Liudmila; Li, Ling; Galkin, Andrey; Zhao, Zhiming; Knipp, Markus; Nash, Theodore E.; Mariano, Patrick S.; Herzberg, Osnat; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Giardia lamblia arginine deiminase (GlAD), the topic of this paper, belongs to the hydrolase branch of the guanidine-modifying enzyme superfamily, whose members employ Cys-mediated nucleophilic catalysis to promote deimination of L-arginine and its naturally occurring derivatives. G. lamblia is the causative agent in the human disease giardiasis. The results of RNAi/antisense RNA gene-silencing studies reported herein indicate that GlAD is essential for G. lamblia trophozoite survival and thus, a potential target for the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of giardiasis. The homodimeric recombinant protein was prepared in E. coli for in-depth biochemical characterization. The 2-domain GlAD monomer consists of a N-terminal domain that shares an active site structure (depicted by an in-silico model) and kinetic properties (determined by steady-state and transient state kinetic analysis) with its bacterial AD counterparts, and a C-terminal domain of unknown fold and function. GlAD was found to be active over a wide pH range and to accept L-arginine, L-arginine ethyl ester, Nα-benzoyl-L-arginine, and Nω-amino-L-arginine as substrates but not agmatine, L-homoarginine, Nα-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester or a variety of arginine-containing peptides. The intermediacy of a Cys424-alkylthiouronium ion covalent enzyme adduct was demonstrated and the rate constants for formation (k1= 80 s−1) and hydrolysis (k2 = 35 s−1) of the intermediate were determined. The comparatively lower value of the steady state rate constant (kcat = 2.6 s−1), suggests that a step following citrulline formation is rate-limiting. Inhibition of GlAD using Cys directed agents was briefly explored. S-nitroso-L-homocysteine was shown to be an active site directed, irreversible inhibitor whereas Nω-cyano-L-arginine did not inhibit GlAD but instead proved to be an active site directed, irreversible inhibitor of the Bacillus cereus AD. PMID:19640561

  8. Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G; Morris, S M

    1998-01-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in animal cells, serving as a precursor for the synthesis not only of proteins but also of nitric oxide, urea, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Of the enzymes that catalyse rate-controlling steps in arginine synthesis and catabolism, argininosuccinate synthase, the two arginase isoenzymes, the three nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes and arginine decarboxylase have been recognized in recent years as key factors in regulating newly identified aspects of arginine metabolism. In particular, changes in the activities of argininosuccinate synthase, the arginases, the inducible isoenzyme of nitric oxide synthase and also cationic amino acid transporters play major roles in determining the metabolic fates of arginine in health and disease, and recent studies have identified complex patterns of interaction among these enzymes. There is growing interest in the potential roles of the arginase isoenzymes as regulators of the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Physiological roles and relationships between the pathways of arginine synthesis and catabolism in vivo are complex and difficult to analyse, owing to compartmentalized expression of various enzymes at both organ (e.g. liver, small intestine and kidney) and subcellular (cytosol and mitochondria) levels, as well as to changes in expression during development and in response to diet, hormones and cytokines. The ongoing development of new cell lines and animal models using cDNA clones and genes for key arginine metabolic enzymes will provide new approaches more clearly elucidating the physiological roles of these enzymes. PMID:9806879

  9. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia Coli Alkaline Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.J.; Lassila, J.K.; Fenn, T.D.; Zalatan, J.G.; Herschlag, D.

    2009-05-22

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by {approx}3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state.

  10. Killing of Leishmania parasites in activated murine macrophages is based on an L-arginine-dependent process that produces nitrogen derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Maul, J.R.; Ransijn, A.; Buchmueller-Rouiller, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    The experiments described in this report were aimed at determining whether L-arginine (L-arg)-derived nitrogen oxidation products (nitric oxide, nitrous acid, nitrites) are involved in the intracellular killing of Leishmania parasites by activated murine macrophages in vitro. Peritoneal or bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected with L. enriettii or L. major, then activated by exposure to recombinant murine interferon-gamma or to macrophage activating factor (MAF)-rich media in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Activation of macrophages in regular (i.e., arginine-containing) culture medium led to complete destruction of the microorganisms within 24 h (L. enriettii) or 48 h (L. major), concomitant with accumulation of nitrites (NO2-) in the culture fluids. When macrophage activation was carried out in L-arg-free medium, however, neither parasite killing nor NO2- production was obtained. A similar inhibition of macrophage leishmanicidal activity and of NO2- release was observed using media treated with arginase (which converts L-arg to urea and ornithine), or supplemented with NG-monomethyl-L-arg or guanidine (which inhibit the conversion of L-arg to nitrogen oxidation products). In all these situations, an excellent correlation between the levels of NO2- production by macrophages and intracellular killing of Leishmania was observed, whereas no strict correlation was detectable between leishmanicidal activity and superoxide production. Intracellular parasite killing by activated macrophages could be prevented by addition of iron salts to the incubation fluids. Incubation of free parasites with NaNO2 at acid pH led to immobilisation, multiplication arrest, and morphological degeneration of the microorganisms. Similarly, exposure of infected cells to NaNO2 led to killing of the intracellular parasite without affecting macrophage viability.

  11. A putative transport protein is involved in citrulline excretion and re-uptake during arginine deiminase pathway activity by Lactobacillus sakei.

    PubMed

    Rimaux, Tom; Rivière, Audrey; Hebert, Elvira María; Mozzi, Fernanda; Weckx, Stefan; De Vuyst, Luc; Leroy, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    Arginine conversion through the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway is a common metabolic trait of Lactobacillus sakei which is ascribed to an arc operon and which inquisitively involves citrulline excretion and re-uptake. The aim of this study was to verify whether a putative transport protein (encoded by the PTP gene) plays a role in citrulline-into-ornithine conversion by L. sakei strains. This was achieved through a combination of fermentation experiments, gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) and construction of a PTP knock-out mutant. Expression of the PTP gene was modulated by environmental pH and was highest in the end-exponential or mid-exponential growth phase for L. sakei strains CTC 494 and 23K, respectively. In contrast to known genes of the arc operon, the PTP gene showed low expression at pH 7.0, in agreement with the finding that citrulline-into-ornithine conversion is inhibited at this pH. The presence of additional energy sources also influenced ADI pathway activity, in particular by decreasing citrulline-into-ornithine conversion. Further insight into the functionality of the PTP gene was obtained with a knock-out mutant of L. sakei CTC 494 impaired in the PTP gene, which displayed inhibition in its ability to convert extracellular citrulline into ornithine. In conclusion, results indicated that the PTP gene may putatively encode a citrulline/ornithine antiporter.

  12. Structural characterization of the enzymes composing the arginine deiminase pathway in Mycoplasma penetrans.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Pablo; Planell, Raquel; Benach, Jordi; Querol, Enrique; Perez-Pons, Josep A; Reverter, David

    2012-01-01

    The metabolism of arginine towards ATP synthesis has been considered a major source of energy for microorganisms such as Mycoplasma penetrans in anaerobic conditions. Additionally, this pathway has also been implicated in pathogenic and virulence mechanism of certain microorganisms, i.e. protection from acidic stress during infection. In this work we present the crystal structures of the three enzymes composing the gene cluster of the arginine deiminase pathway from M. penetrans: arginine deiminase (ADI), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC) and carbamate kinase (CK). The arginine deiminase (ADI) structure has been refined to 2.3 Å resolution in its apo-form, displaying an "open" conformation of the active site of the enzyme in comparison to previous complex structures with substrate intermediates. The active site pocket of ADI is empty, with some of the catalytic and binding residues far from their active positions, suggesting major conformational changes upon substrate binding. Ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC) has been refined in two crystal forms at 2.5 Å and 2.6 Å resolution, respectively, both displaying an identical dodecameric structure with a 23-point symmetry. The dodecameric structure of OTC represents the highest level of organization in this protein family and in M.penetrans it is constituted by a novel interface between the four catalytic homotrimers. Carbamate kinase (CK) has been refined to 2.5 Å resolution and its structure is characterized by the presence of two ion sulfates in the active site, one in the carbamoyl phosphate binding site and the other in the β-phosphate ADP binding pocket of the enzyme. The CK structure also shows variations in some of the elements that regulate the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The relatively low number of metabolic pathways and the relevance in human pathogenesis of Mycoplasma penetrans places the arginine deiminase pathway enzymes as potential targets to design specific inhibitors against this human

  13. Ornithine and arginine decarboxylase activities and effect of some polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on Gigaspora rosea germinating spores.

    PubMed

    Sannazzaro, Analía I; Alvarez, Cora L; Menéndez, Ana B; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Albertó, Edgardo O; Ruiz, Oscar A

    2004-01-15

    The pathways for putrescine biosynthesis and the effects of polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on the germination and hyphal development of Gigaspora rosea spores were investigated. Incubation of spores with different radioactive substrates demonstrated that both arginine and ornithine decarboxylase pathways participate in putrescine biosynthesis in G. rosea. Spermidine and spermine were the most abundant polyamines in this fungus. The putrescine biosynthesis inhibitors alpha-difluoromethylarginine and alpha-difluoromethylornithine, as well as the spermidine synthase inhibitor cyclohexylamine, slightly decreased polyamine levels. However, only the latter interfered with spore germination. The consequences of the use of putrescine biosynthesis inhibitors for the control of plant pathogenic fungi on the viability of G. rosea spores in soil are discussed.

  14. L-arginine attenuates Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induced Nuclear Factor Kappa-Beta (NF-κB) activation in Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinghe; Cooney, Mitchell; Yepuri, Natesh; Cooney, Robert N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Specific nutrients like L-arginine (L-Arg) ameliorate intestinal inflammation, however the exact mechanisms of this effect are unclear. We hypothesized the anti-inflammatory effects of L-Arg require active transport and metabolism by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to generate nitric oxide (NO). To test this hypothesis we examined the effects of L-Arg, L-Arg transport activity, NO production and iNOS inhibitor on IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation in Caco-2 cells. Methods Caco-2 cells were cultured, transfected with a NF-κB promoter luciferase vector, incubated ± L-Arg, ± IL-1β and luciferase activity was measured. Using siRNA we inhibited the L-Arg cationic amino acid transporter system y+ (CAT1) expression and examined its effects on L-Arg transport activity and IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation. Finally, the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO donor) and Nω-nitro-L-arginine (NNA, an iNOS inhibitor) on IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation were examined. Results IL-1β increased NF-κB luciferase activity (8-fold) and NF-κB expression (mRNA and protein), both of these were significantly decreased by L-Arg. System y+ CAT1 siRNA decreased CAT1 expression, L-Arg transport activity and attenuated the inhibitory effects of L-Arg on NF- κB activity. SNP attenuated the IL-1β-induced increase in NF-κB luciferase activity and expression, whereas NNA diminished the inhibitory effects of L-Arg on IL-1β-inducible NF- κB luciferase activity. Conclusion The inhibitory effects of L-Arg on IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation in Caco-2 cells involve L-Arg transport activity by CAT1, regulation of IL-1β-mediated increases in NF-κB expression, changes in iNOS expression and NO production. Our data suggest the inhibitory effects of L-Arg on NF-κB activation are mediated in part by iNOS since SNP preserves and NNA attenuates the effects of L-Arg on IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation and expression. PMID:28334039

  15. Central action of ELABELA reduces food intake and activates arginine vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Santoso, Putra; Maejima, Yuko; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Shimomura, Kenju

    2015-09-30

    ELABELA (ELA) is a novel hormone consisting of 32 amino acid peptides found in humans as well as other vertebrates and is considered to play an important role in the circulatory system through the apelin receptor (APJ). However, whether ELA also acts in the central nervous system remains unknown. Here, we show that ELA functions as an anorexigenic hormone in adult mouse brain. An intracerebroventricular injection of ELA reduces food intake and activates arginine vasopressin (AVP) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), a hypothalamic region that regulates food intake. Cytosolic calcium ([Ca]i) measurement shows that ELA dose dependently increases [Ca]i in single AVP and CRH-immunoreactive neurons isolated from the PVN. Our data suggest that ELA functions as an anorexigenic hormone through activation of AVP and CRH neurons in the PVN.

  16. New cationic vesicles prepared with double chain surfactants from arginine: Role of the hydrophobic group on the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pinazo, A; Petrizelli, V; Bustelo, M; Pons, R; Vinardell, M P; Mitjans, M; Manresa, A; Perez, L

    2016-05-01

    Cationic double chain surfactants have attracted much interest because they can give rise to cationic vesicles that can be used in biomedical applications. Using a simple and economical synthetic approach, we have synthesized four double-chain surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths (LANHCx). The critical aggregation concentration of the double chain surfactants is at least one order of magnitude lower than the CMC of their corresponding single-chain LAM and the solutions prepared with the LANHCx contain stable cationic vesicles. Encouragingly, these new arginine derivatives show very low haemolytic activity and weaker cytotoxic effects than conventional dialkyl dimethyl ammonium surfactants. In addition, the surfactant with the shortest alkyl chain exhibits good antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The results show that a rational design applied to cationic double chain surfactants might serve as a promising strategy for the development of safe cationic vesicular systems.

  17. Expanding the yeast protein arginine methylome.

    PubMed

    Plank, Michael; Fischer, Roman; Geoghegan, Vincent; Charles, Philip D; Konietzny, Rebecca; Acuto, Oreste; Pears, Catherine; Schofield, Christopher J; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-09-01

    Protein arginine methylation is a PTM involved in various cellular processes in eukaryotes. Recent discoveries led to a vast expansion of known sites in higher organisms, indicating that this modification is more widely spread across the proteome than previously assumed. An increased knowledge of sites in lower eukaryotes may facilitate the elucidation of its functions. In this study, we present the discovery of arginine mono-methylation sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a combination of immunoaffinity enrichment and MS/MS. As detection of methylation is prone to yield false positives, we demonstrate the need for stringent measures to avoid elevated false discovery rates. To this end, we employed MethylSILAC in combination with a multistep data analysis strategy. We report 41 unambiguous methylation sites on 13 proteins. Our results indicate that, while substantially less abundant, arginine methylation follows similar patterns as in higher eukaryotes in terms of sequence context and functions of methylated proteins. The majority of sites occur on RNA-binding proteins participating in processes from transcription and splicing to translation and RNA degradation. Additionally, our data suggest a bias for localization of arginine methylation in unstructured regions of proteins, which frequently involves Arg-Gly-Gly motifs or Asn-rich contexts.

  18. Chemotactic Activity of Cyclophilin A in the Skin Mucus of Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and Its Active Site for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Dawar, Farman Ullah; Tu, Jiagang; Xiong, Yang; Lan, Jiangfeng; Dong, Xing Xing; Liu, Xiaoling; Khattak, Muhammad Nasir Khan; Mei, Jie; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Fish skin mucus is a dynamic barrier for invading pathogens with a variety of anti-microbial enzymes, including cyclophilin A (CypA), a multi-functional protein with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Beside various other immunological functions, CypA induces leucocytes migration in vitro in teleost. In the current study, we have discovered several novel immune-relevant proteins in yellow catfish skin mucus by mass spectrometry (MS). The CypA present among them was further detected by Western blot. Moreover, the CypA present in the skin mucus displayed strong chemotactic activity for yellow catfish leucocytes. Interestingly, asparagine (like arginine in mammals) at position 69 was the critical site in yellow catfish CypA involved in leucocyte attraction. These novel efforts do not only highlight the enzymatic texture of skin mucus, but signify CypA to be targeted for anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:27589721

  19. The role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during Giardia – host cell interactions in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid important in growing individuals and under non-homeostatic conditions/disease. Many pathogens interfere with arginine-utilization in host cells, especially nitric oxide (NO) production, by changing the expression of host enzymes involved in arginine metabolism. Here we used human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and three different isolates of the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis to investigate the role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during intestinal protozoan infections. Results RNA expression analyses of major arginine-metabolizing enzymes revealed the arginine-utilizing pathways in human IECs (differentiated Caco-2 cells) grown in vitro. Most genes were constant or down-regulated (e.g. arginase 1 and 2) upon interaction with Giardia, whereas inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were up-regulated within 6 h of infection. Giardia was shown to suppress cytokine-induced iNOS expression, thus the parasite has both iNOS inducing and suppressive activities. Giardial arginine consumption suppresses NO production and the NO-degrading parasite protein flavohemoglobin is up-regulated in response to host NO. In addition, the secreted, arginine-consuming giardial enzyme arginine deiminase (GiADI) actively reduces T-cell proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, the effects on NO production and T cell proliferation could be reversed by addition of external arginine or citrulline. Conclusions Giardia affects the host’s arginine metabolism on many different levels. Many of the effects can be reversed by addition of arginine or citrulline, which could be a beneficial supplement in oral rehydration therapy. PMID:24228819

  20. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Tawnya L.; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is under-expressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers have low ASS expression and therefore arginine deprivation by ADI will inhibit cell growth. ASS expression was examined in 47 malignant and 20 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues as well as a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Arginine deprivation was achieved by treatment with a recombinant form of ADI formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-ADI). Effects on caspase activation, cell growth and cell death were examined. Furthermore, the effect of PEG-ADI on the in vivo growth of pancreatic xenografts was examined. Eighty-seven percent of the tumors lacked ASS expression; 5 of 7 cell lines similarly lacked ASS expression. PEG-ADI specifically inhibited growth of those cell lines lacking ASS. PEG-ADI treatment induced caspase activation and induction of apoptosis. PEG-ADI was well tolerated in mice despite complete elimination of plasma arginine; tumor growth was inhibited by ∼50%. Reduced expression of ASS occurs in pancreatic cancer and predicts sensitivity to arginine deprivation achieved by PEG-ADI treatment. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a malignancy in which new therapy is desperately needed. PMID:18661517

  1. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Tawnya L; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J

    2008-10-15

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is underexpressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers have low ASS expression and therefore arginine deprivation by ADI will inhibit cell growth. ASS expression was examined in 47 malignant and 20 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues as well as a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Arginine deprivation was achieved by treatment with a recombinant form of ADI formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-ADI). Effects on caspase activation, cell growth and cell death were examined. Furthermore, the effect of PEG-ADI on the in vivo growth of pancreatic xenografts was examined. Eighty-seven percent of the tumors lacked ASS expression; 5 of 7 cell lines similarly lacked ASS expression. PEG-ADI specifically inhibited growth of those cell lines lacking ASS. PEG-ADI treatment induced caspase activation and induction of apoptosis. PEG-ADI was well tolerated in mice despite complete elimination of plasma arginine; tumor growth was inhibited by approximately 50%. Reduced expression of ASS occurs in pancreatic cancer and predicts sensitivity to arginine deprivation achieved by PEG-ADI treatment. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a malignancy in which new therapy is desperately needed.

  2. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  3. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  4. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. - Highlights: • Lys27 in NEDD8 is critical for protein neddylation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant impairs the NEDD8 conjugation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant significantly reduces the activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases.

  5. Structure-function relationships in the Na,K-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-111 to arginine and asparagine-122 to aspartic acid generates a ouabain-resistant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Lingrel, J.B.

    1988-11-01

    Na,K-ATPases from various species differ greatly in their sensitivity to cardiac glycosides such as ouabain. The sheep and human enzymes are a thousand times more sensitive than the corresponding ones from rat and mouse. To define the region of the ..cap alpha..1 subunit responsible for this differential sensitivity, chimeric cDNAs of sheep and rat were constructed and expressed in ouabain-sensitive HeLa cells. The construct containing the amino-terminal half of the rat ..cap alpha..1 subunit coding region and carboxyl-terminal half of the sheep conferred the ouabain-resistant phenotype to HeLa cells while the reverse construct did not. This indicates that the determinants involved in ouabain sensitivity are located in the amino-terminal half of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, the amino acid sequence of the first extracellular domain (H1-H2) of the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit was changed to that of the rat. When expressed in HeLa cells, this mutated sheep ..cap alpha..1 construct, like the rat/sheep chimera, was able to confer ouabain resistance to these cells. Furthermore, similar results were observed when HeLa cells were transfected with a sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNA containing only two amino acid substitutions. The resistant cells, whether transfected with the rat ..cap alpha..1 cDNA, the rat/sheep chimera, or the mutant sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNAs, exhibited identical biochemical characteristics including ouabain-inhibitable cell growth, /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake, and Na,K-ATPase activity. These results demonstrate that the presence of arginine and aspartic acid on the amino end and carboxyl end, respectively, of the H1-H2 extracellular domain of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit together is responsible for the ouabain-resistant character of the rat enzyme and the corresponding residues in the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit (glutamine and asparagine) are somehow involved in ouabain binding.

  6. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 6 Enhances Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Function and Toxicity in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Casci, Ian; Parodi, Sara; Lievens, Patricia M.J.; Polanco, Maria J.; Milioto, Carmelo; Chivet, Mathilde; Monaghan, John; Mishra, Ashutosh; Badders, Nisha; Aggarwal, Tanya; Grunseich, Christopher; Sambataro, Fabio; Basso, Manuela; Fackelmayer, Frank O.; Taylor, J. Paul; Pandey, Udai Bhan; Pennuto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Polyglutamine expansion in androgen receptor (AR) is responsible for spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) that leads to selective loss of lower motor neurons. Using SBMA as a model, we explored the relationship between protein structure/function and neurodegeneration in polyglutamine diseases. We show here that protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) is a specific co-activator of normal and mutant AR and that the interaction of PRMT6 with AR is significantly enhanced in the AR mutant. AR and PRMT6 interaction occurs through the PRMT6 steroid receptor interaction motif, LXXLL, and the AR activating function 2 surface. AR transactivation requires PRMT6 catalytic activity and involves methylation of arginine residues at Akt consensus site motifs, which is mutually exclusive with serine phosphorylation by Akt. The enhanced interaction of PRMT6 and mutant AR leads to neurodegeneration in cell and fly models of SBMA. These findings demonstrate a direct role of arginine methylation in polyglutamine disease pathogenesis. PMID:25569348

  7. The arginine finger of the Bloom syndrome protein: its structural organization and its role in energy coupling

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hua; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Rigolet, Pascal; Yang, Ye; Wang, Peng-Ye; Amor-Gueret, Mounira; Xi, Xu Guang

    2007-01-01

    RecQ family helicases are essential in maintaining chromosomal DNA stability and integrity. Despite extensive studies, the mechanisms of these enzymes are still poorly understood. Crystal structures of many helicases reveal a highly conserved arginine residue located near the γ-phosphate of ATP. This residue is widely recognized as an arginine finger, and may sense ATP binding and hydrolysis, and transmit conformational changes. We investigated the existence and role of the arginine finger in the Bloom syndrome protein (BLM), a RecQ family helicase, in ATP hydrolysis and energy coupling. Our studies by combination of structural modelling, site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical and biophysical approaches, demonstrate that mutations of residues interacting with the γ-phosphate of ATP or surrounding the ATP-binding sites result in severe impairment in the ATPase activity of BLM. These mutations also impair BLM's DNA-unwinding activities, but do not affect its ATP and DNA-binding abilities. These data allow us to identify R982 as the residue that functions as a BLM arginine finger. Our findings further indicate how the arginine finger is precisely positioned by the conserved motifs with respect to the γ-phosphate. PMID:17766252

  8. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  9. Arginine induces GH gene expression by activating NOS/NO signaling in rat isolated hemi-pituitaries

    PubMed Central

    Olinto, S.C.F.; Adrião, M.G.; Castro-Barbosa, T.; Goulart-Silva, F.; Nunes, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid arginine (Arg) is a recognized secretagogue of growth hormone (GH), and has been shown to induce GH gene expression. Arg is the natural precursor of nitric oxide (NO), which is known to mediate many of the effects of Arg, such as GH secretion. Arg was also shown to increase calcium influx in pituitary cells, which might contribute to its effects on GH secretion. Although the mechanisms involved in the effects of Arg on GH secretion are well established, little is known about them regarding the control of GH gene expression. We investigated whether the NO pathway and/or calcium are involved in the effects of Arg on GH gene expression in rat isolated pituitaries. To this end, pituitaries from approximately 170 male Wistar rats (∼250 g) were removed, divided into two halves, pooled (three hemi-pituitaries) and incubated or not with Arg, as well as with different pharmacological agents. Arg (71 mM), the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 1 and 0.1 mM) and a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) analogue (8-Br-cGMP, 1 mM) increased GH mRNA expression 60 min later. The NO acceptor hemoglobin (0.3 µM) blunted the effect of SNP, and the combined treatment with Arg and L-NAME (an NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 55 mM) abolished the stimulatory effect of Arg on GH gene expression. The calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine (3 µM) also abolished Arg-induced GH gene expression. The present study shows that Arg directly induces GH gene expression in hemi-pituitaries isolated from rats, excluding interference from somatostatinergic neurons, which are supposed to be inhibited by Arg. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the NOS/NO signaling pathway and calcium mediate the Arg effects on GH gene expression. PMID:22641416

  10. Brownian dynamics simulation of substrate motion near active site of enzyme entrapped inside reverse micelle.

    PubMed

    Ermakova, Elena A; Zakhartchenko, Nataliya L; Zuev, Yuri F

    2010-08-01

    Brownian dynamics simulation has been applied to analyze the influence of the electrostatic field of a reverse micelle on the enzyme-substrate complex formation inside a micelle. The probability that the enzyme-substrate complex will form from serine protease (trypsin) and the specific hydrophilic cationic substrate Nalpha-benzoyl-L: -arginine ethyl ester has been studied within the framework of the encounter complex formation theory. It has been shown that surfactant charge, dipole moments created by charged surfactant molecules and counterions, and permittivity of the inner core of reverse micelles can all be used as regulatory parameters to alter the substrate orientation near the active site of the enzyme and to change the probability that the enzyme-substrate complex will form.

  11. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (Prmt5) promotes gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2) and its target genes during adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Scott E; Konda, Silvana; Wu, Qiong; Hu, Yu-Jie; Oslowski, Christine M; Sif, Saïd; Imbalzano, Anthony N

    2012-04-01

    Regulation of adipose tissue formation by adipogenic-regulatory proteins has long been a topic of interest given the ever-increasing health concerns of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the general population. Differentiation of precursor cells into adipocytes involves a complex network of cofactors that facilitate the functions of transcriptional regulators from the CCATT/enhancer binding protein, and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) families. Many of these cofactors are enzymes that modulate the structure of chromatin by altering histone-DNA contacts in an ATP-dependent manner or by posttranslationally modifying the histone proteins. Here we report that inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (Prmt5) expression in multiple cell culture models for adipogenesis prevented the activation of adipogenic genes. In contrast, overexpression of Prmt5 enhanced adipogenic gene expression and differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Prmt5 binds to and dimethylates histones at adipogenic promoters. Furthermore, the presence of Prmt5 promoted the binding of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes and was required for the binding of PPARγ2 at PPARγ2-regulated promoters. The data indicate that Prmt5 acts as a coactivator for the activation of adipogenic gene expression and promotes adipogenic differentiation.

  12. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    PubMed Central

    Durzan, Don J

    2009-01-01

    Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors. PMID:19187550

  13. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life".

    PubMed

    Durzan, Don J

    2009-02-02

    Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors.

  14. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  15. Kinetic and Spectroscopic Studies of Bicupin Oxalate Oxidase and Putative Active Site Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moomaw, Ellen W.; Hoffer, Eric; Moussatche, Patricia; Salerno, John C.; Grant, Morgan; Immelman, Bridget; Uberto, Richard; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ceriporiopsis subvermispora oxalate oxidase (CsOxOx) is the first bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes manganese-dependent oxidation of oxalate. In previous work, we have shown that the dominant contribution to catalysis comes from the monoprotonated form of oxalate binding to a form of the enzyme in which an active site carboxylic acid residue must be unprotonated. CsOxOx shares greatest sequence homology with bicupin microbial oxalate decarboxylases (OxDC) and the 241-244DASN region of the N-terminal Mn binding domain of CsOxOx is analogous to the lid region of OxDC that has been shown to determine reaction specificity. We have prepared a series of CsOxOx mutants to probe this region and to identify the carboxylate residue implicated in catalysis. The pH profile of the D241A CsOxOx mutant suggests that the protonation state of aspartic acid 241 is mechanistically significant and that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site. The observation that the D241S CsOxOx mutation eliminates Mn binding to both the N- and C- terminal Mn binding sites suggests that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. The introduction of a proton donor into the N-terminal Mn binding site (CsOxOx A242E mutant) does not affect reaction specificity. Mutation of conserved arginine residues further support that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site and that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. PMID:23469254

  16. A novel prokaryotic L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase is involved in cylindrospermopsin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Muenchhoff, Julia; Siddiqui, Khawar S; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J; Barrow, Kevin D; Neilan, Brett A

    2010-09-01

    We report the first characterization of an L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase from a prokaryote. The enzyme, CyrA, is involved in the pathway for biosynthesis of the polyketide-derived hepatotoxin cylindrospermopsin from Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii AWT205. CyrA is phylogenetically distinct from other amidinotransferases, and structural alignment shows differences between the active site residues of CyrA and the well-characterized human L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT). Overexpression of recombinant CyrA in Escherichia coli enabled biochemical characterization of the enzyme, and we confirmed the predicted function of CyrA as an L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase by (1) H NMR. As compared with AGAT, CyrA showed narrow substrate specificity when presented with substrate analogs, and deviated from regular Michaelis-Menten kinetics in the presence of the non-natural substrate hydroxylamine. Studies of initial reaction velocities and product inhibition, and identification of intermediate reaction products, were used to probe the kinetic mechanism of CyrA, which is best described as a hybrid of ping-pong and sequential mechanisms. Differences in the active site residues of CyrA and AGAT are discussed in relation to the different properties of both enzymes. The enzyme had maximum activity and maximum stability at pH 8.5 and 6.5, respectively, and an optimum temperature of 32 °C. Investigations into the stability of the enzyme revealed that an inactivated form of this enzyme retained an appreciable amount of secondary structure elements even on heating to 94 °C, but lost its tertiary structure at low temperature (T(max) of 44.5 °C), resulting in a state reminiscent of a molten globule. CyrA represents a novel group of prokaryotic amidinotransferases that utilize arginine and glycine as substrates with a complex kinetic mechanism and substrate specificity that differs from that of the eukaryotic L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferases.

  17. Atomic-Resolution Structure of an N(5) Flavin Adduct in D-Arginine Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T.

    2011-09-06

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 {angstrom} atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct.

  18. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Arginine Repressor Protein in Complex With the DNA Operator From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, L.T.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.R.; Lu, G.J.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the L-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11{sup o} upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.

  20. Effect of substituting arginine and lysine with alanine on antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of action of a cationic dodecapeptide (CL(14-25)), a partial sequence of cyanate lyase from rice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Nobuteru; Takayanagi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Atsuo; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of analogs obtained by substituting arginine and lysine in CL(14-25), a cationic α-helical dodecapeptide, with alanine against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, varied significantly depending on the number and position of cationic amino acids. The alanine-substituted analogs had no hemolytic activity, even at a concentration of 1 mM. The antimicrobial activities of CL(K20A) and CL(K20A, K25A) were 3.8-fold and 9.1-fold higher, respectively, than that of CL(14-25). The antimicrobial activity of CL(R15A) was slightly lower than that of CL(14-25), suggesting that arginine at position 15 is not essential but is important for the antimicrobial activity. The experiments in which the alanine-substituted analogs bearing the replacement of arginine at position 24 and/or lysine at position 25 were used showed that arginine at position 24 was crucial for the antimicrobial activity whenever lysine at position 25 was substituted with alanine. Helical wheel projections of the alanine-substituted analogs indicate that the hydrophobicity in the vicinity of leucine at position 16 and alanines at positions 18 and/or 21 increased by substituting lysine at positions 20 and 25 with alanine, respectively. The degrees of diSC3 -5 release from P. gingivalis cells and disruption of GUVs induced by the alanine-substituted analogs with different positive charges were not closely related to their antimicrobial activities. The enhanced antimicrobial activities of the alanine-substituted analogs appear to be mainly attributable to the changes in properties such as hydrophobicity and amphipathic propensity due to alanine substitution and not to their extents of positive charge (cationicity).

  1. Arginine Deprivation as a Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feun, L.; You, M.; Wu, C.J.; Kuo, M.T.; Wangpaichitr, M.; Spector, S.; Savaraj, N.

    2011-01-01

    Certain cancers may be auxotrophic for a particular amino acid and amino acid deprivation is one method to treat these tumors. Arginine deprivation is a novel approach to target tumors which lack argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression. ASS is a key enzyme which converts citrulline to arginine. Tumors which usually do not express ASS include melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, some mesotheliomas and some renal cell cancers. Arginine can be degraded by several enzymes including arginine deiminase (ADI). Although ADI is a microbial enzyme from mycoplasma, it has high affinity to arginine and catalyzes arginine to citrulline and ammonia. Citrulline can be recycled back to arginine in normal cells which express ASS, whereas ASS(−) tumor cells cannot. A pegylated form of ADI (ADI-PEG20) has been formulated and has shown in vitro and in vivo activity against melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. ADI-PEG20 induces apoptosis in melanoma cell lines. However, arginine deprivation can also induce ASS expression in certain melanoma cell lines which can lead to in-vitro drug resistance. Phase I and II clinical trials with ADI-PEG20 have been conducted in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma and antitumor activity has been demonstrated in both cancers. This article reviews our laboratory and clinical experience as well as others with ADI-PEG20 as an antineoplastic agent. Future direction in utilizing this agent is also discussed. PMID:18473854

  2. Synthesis, characterization and anti-microbial activity of pure, Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped organic NLO l-arginine trifluoroacetate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanyaa, T.; Haris, M.; Jayaramakrishnan, V.; Amgalan, M.; Mathivanan, V.

    2013-10-01

    Optically transparent Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped l-arginine trifluoroacetate (LATF) single crystals were grown from its aqueous solution using the slow solvent evaporation technique. The grown crystals were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction to confirm the monoclinic crystal structure. The percentage of transmittance measured using the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrophotometer was found to be more than 80% for doped crystals. The functional group analysis of the grown crystals has been made by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis was performed for the grown crystals. An atomic absorption study was carried out to determine the presence of Cu2+ and Cd2+. The hardness of the grown crystals was assessed and the results show a significant variation in the hardness value between the pure and doped LATF crystals. The second harmonic generation measurements show that Cu2+ doped LATF is 2.8 times greater and Cd2+ doped is 2.6 times greater than KDP. The anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities of the title compound were performed using the disc diffusion method against standard bacteria Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas oryzae and against the fungus Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus.

  3. Altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Jing, Y; Collie, N D; Dean, B; Bilkey, D K; Zhang, H

    2016-01-01

    Previous research implicates altered metabolism of l-arginine, a versatile amino acid with a number of bioactive metabolites, in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The present study, for we believe the first time, systematically compared the metabolic profile of l-arginine in the frontal cortex (Brodmann's area 8) obtained post-mortem from schizophrenic individuals and age- and gender-matched non-psychiatric controls (n=20 per group). The enzyme assays revealed no change in total nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, but significantly increased arginase activity in the schizophrenia group. Western blot showed reduced endothelial NOS protein expression and increased arginase II protein level in the disease group. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assays confirmed significantly reduced levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but increased agmatine concentration and glutamate/GABA ratio in the schizophrenia cases. Regression analysis indicated positive correlations between arginase activity and the age of disease onset and between l-ornithine level and the duration of illness. Moreover, cluster analyses revealed that l-arginine and its main metabolites l-citrulline, l-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which were altered in the schizophrenia group. The present study provides further evidence of altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia, which enhances our understanding of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and may lead to the future development of novel preventions and/or therapeutics for the disease. PMID:27529679

  4. Pegylated arginine deiminase: a novel anticancer enzyme agent

    PubMed Central

    Feun, Lynn; Savaraj, Niramol

    2011-01-01

    Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) is a novel anticancer enzyme that produces depletion of arginine, which is a nonessential amino acid in humans. Certain tumours, such as malignant melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, are auxotrophic for arginine. These tumours that are sensitive to arginine depletion do not express argininosuccinate synthetase, a key enzyme in the synthesis of arginine from citrulline. ADI-PEG20 inhibits human melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas in vitro and in vivo. Phase I – II trials in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinomas have shown the drug to have antitumour activity and tolerable side effects. Large Phase II trials and randomised, controlled Phase III trials are needed to determine its overall efficacy in the treatment of these malignancies and others. PMID:16787144

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of the last step of a catalytic cycle: product release from the active site of the enzyme chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Choutko, Alexandra; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-11-01

    The protein chorismate mutase MtCM from Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes one of the few pericyclic reactions known in biology: the transformation of chorismate to prephenate. Chorismate mutases have been widely studied experimentally and computationally to elucidate the transition state of the enzyme catalyzed reaction and the origin of the high catalytic rate. However, studies about substrate entry and product exit to and from the highly occluded active site of the enzyme have to our knowledge not been performed on this enzyme. Crystallographic data suggest a possible substrate entry gate, that involves a slight opening of the enzyme for the substrate to access the active site. Using multiple molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the natural dynamic process of the product exiting from the binding pocket of MtCM. We identify a dominant exit pathway, which is in agreement with the gate proposed from the available crystallographic data. Helices H2 and H4 move apart from each other which enables the product to exit from the active site. Interestingly, in almost all exit trajectories, two residues arginine 72 and arginine 134, which participate in the burying of the active site, are accompanying the product on its exit journey from the catalytic site.

  6. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  7. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  8. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  9. Arginine deiminase inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis surface attachment.

    PubMed

    Cugini, Carla; Stephens, Danielle N; Nguyen, Daniel; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Davey, Mary E

    2013-02-01

    The oral cavity is host to a complex microbial community whose maintenance depends on an array of cell-to-cell interactions and communication networks, with little known regarding the nature of the signals or mechanisms by which they are sensed and transmitted. Determining the signals that control attachment, biofilm development and outgrowth of oral pathogens is fundamental to understanding pathogenic biofilm development. We have previously identified a secreted arginine deiminase (ADI) produced by Streptococcus intermedius that inhibited biofilm development of the commensal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis through downregulation of genes encoding the major (fimA) and minor (mfa1) fimbriae, both of which are required for proper biofilm development. Here we report that this inhibitory effect is dependent on enzymic activity. We have successfully cloned, expressed and defined the conditions to ensure that ADI from S. intermedius is enzymically active. Along with the cloning of the wild-type allele, we have created a catalytic mutant (ADIC399S), in which the resulting protein is not able to catalyse the hydrolysis of l-arginine to l-citrulline. P. gingivalis is insensitive to the ADIC399S catalytic mutant, demonstrating that enzymic activity is required for the effects of ADI on biofilm formation. Biofilm formation is absent under l-arginine-deplete conditions, and can be recovered by the addition of the amino acid. Taken together, the results indicate that arginine is an important signal that directs biofilm formation by this anaerobe. Based on our findings, we postulate that ADI functions to reduce arginine levels and, by a yet to be identified mechanism, signals P. gingivalis to alter biofilm development. ADI release from the streptococcal cell and its cross-genera effects are important findings in understanding the nature of inter-bacterial signalling and biofilm-mediated diseases of the oral cavity.

  10. Cardioprotective activity of placental growth factor combined with oral supplementation of l-arginine in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Liyun; Chen, Bairong; Huang, Yin; Liang, Zibin; Li, Songbiao; Yin, Yuelan; Chen, Jian; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Exogenous administration of placental growth factor (PlGF) stimulates angiogenesis and improves ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and supplementation with l-arginine ameliorates endothelial function. The objective of the present study was to compare the cardioprotective effects of combination therapy of PlGF and l-arginine with those of direct administration of PlGF alone in a rat model of AMI. Materials and methods Fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham group, normal saline group, l-arginine group, PlGF group, and combination group (PlGF + l-arginine). An AMI rat model was established by ligation of the left anterior descending of coronary arteries. After 4 weeks of postligation treatment, cardiac function, scar area, angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, myocardial endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and collagen I protein content, and plasma concentration of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were studied. Echocardiography, Masson’s staining, immunohistochemical analyses, Western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed. Results Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS), and capillary and arteriole densities were higher in the PlGF group than in the normal saline group (P<0.01). Scar area, collagen I protein content, and plasma concentration of BNP were decreased in the PlGF group (P<0.01). Myocardial eNOS protein level was elevated in the l-arginine group and PlGF + l-arginine group (P<0.01). Compared with the PlGF group, LVEF, LVFS, myocardial eNOS, and capillary and arteriole densities were higher in the combination group (P<0.01). Scar area, content of collagen I protein, and plasma concentration of BNP were reduced in the combination group (P<0.01). Conclusion Exogenous administration of PlGF stimulates angiogenesis and improves cardiac function. l-arginine increases the expression of the eNOS protein. PlGF and l-arginine

  11. Hexa-D-arginine treatment increases 7B2•PC2 activity in hyp-mouse osteoblasts and rescues the HYP phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Baozhi; Feng, Jian Q; Bowman, Stephen; Liu, Ying; Blank, Robert D; Lindberg, Iris; Drezner, Marc K

    2013-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the "phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome" (PHEX/Phex) underlie disease in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) and the hyp-mouse, a murine homologue of the human disorder. Although increased serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) underlies the HYP phenotype, the mechanism(s) by which PHEX mutations inhibit FGF-23 degradation and/or enhance production remains unknown. Here we show that treatment of wild-type mice with the proprotein convertase (PC) inhibitor, decanoyl-Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (Dec), increases serum FGF-23 and produces the HYP phenotype. Because PC2 is uniquely colocalized with PHEX in osteoblasts/bone, we examined if PC2 regulates PHEX-dependent FGF-23 cleavage and production. Transfection of murine osteoblasts with PC2 and its chaperone protein 7B2 cleaved FGF-23, whereas Signe1 (7B2) RNA interference (RNAi) transfection, which limited 7B2 protein production, decreased FGF-23 degradation and increased Fgf-23 mRNA and protein. The mechanism by which decreased 7B2•PC2 activity influences Fgf-23 mRNA was linked to reduced conversion of the precursor to bone morphogenetic protein 1 (proBMP1) to active BMP1, which resulted in limited cleavage of dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1 (DMP1), and consequent increased Fgf-23 mRNA. The significance of decreased 7B2•PC2 activity in XLH was confirmed by studies of hyp-mouse bone, which revealed significantly decreased Sgne1 (7B2) mRNA and 7B2 protein, and limited cleavage of proPC2 to active PC2. The expected downstream effects of these changes included decreased FGF-23 cleavage and increased FGF-23 synthesis, secondary to decreased BMP1-mediated degradation of DMP1. Subsequent Hexa-D-Arginine treatment of hyp-mice enhanced bone 7B2•PC2 activity, normalized FGF-23 degradation and production, and rescued the HYP phenotype. These data suggest that decreased PHEX-dependent 7B2•PC2 activity is central to the

  12. Purification and synergistic antibacterial activity of arginine derived cyclic dipeptides, from Achromobacter sp. associated with a rhabditid entomopathogenic nematode against major clinically relevant biofilm forming wound bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Indira; Kumar, Sasidharan N.; Sreerag, Ravikumar S.; Nath, Vishnu S.; Mohandas, Chellapan

    2015-01-01

    Skin and chronic wound infections caused by various pathogenic bacteria are an increasing and urgent health problem worldwide. In the present investigation ethyl acetate extract of an Achromobacter sp. associated with a Rhabditis entomopathogenic nematode (EPN), displayed promising antibacterial property and was further purified by silica gel column chromatography to get three different cyclic dipeptides (CDPs). Based on the spectral data and Marfey's analyses, the CDPs were identified as cyclo(D-Leu-D-Arg) (1), cyclo(L-Trp-L-Arg) (2), and cyclo(D-Trp-D-Arg) (3), respectively. Three CDPs were active against all the 10 wound associated bacteria tested. The significant antibacterial activity was recorded by CDP 3, and highest activity of 0.5 μg/ml was recorded against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The synergistic antibacterial activities of CDPs and ampicillin were assessed using the checkerboard microdilution method. The results of the current study recorded that the combined effects of CDPs and ampicillin principally recorded synergistic activity. Interestingly, the combination of CDPs and ampicillin also recorded enhanced inhibition of biofilm formation by bacteria. Moreover, CDPs significantly stimulate the production of IL-10 and IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. CDPs do not make any significant effect on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α. The three CDPs have been studied for their effect on intracellular S. aureus in murine macrophages (J774) using 24 h exposure to 0.5X, 1X, and 2X MIC concentrations. Significant decrease in intracellular S. aureus burden was recorded by CDPs. CDPs also recorded no cytotoxicity toward FS normal fibroblast, VERO, and L231 normal lung epithelial cell lines. Antimicrobial activity of the arginine containing CDPs against the wound associated bacteria is reported here for the first. Moreover, this is also the first report on the production of

  13. Mechanism of the intrinsic arginine finger in heterotrimeric G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Daniel; Teuber, Christian; Tennigkeit, Stefan A.; Schröter, Grit; Gerwert, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are crucial molecular switches that maintain a large number of physiological processes in cells. The signal is encoded into surface alterations of the Gα subunit that carries GTP in its active state and GDP in its inactive state. The ability of the Gα subunit to hydrolyze GTP is essential for signal termination. Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerates this process. A key player in this catalyzed reaction is an arginine residue, Arg178 in Gαi1, which is already an intrinsic part of the catalytic center in Gα in contrast to small GTPases, at which the corresponding GTPase-activating protein (GAP) provides the arginine “finger.” We applied time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy in combination with isotopic labeling and site-directed mutagenesis to reveal the molecular mechanism, especially of the role of Arg178 in the intrinsic Gαi1 mechanism and the RGS4-catalyzed mechanism. Complementary biomolecular simulations (molecular mechanics with molecular dynamics and coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) were performed. Our findings show that Arg178 is bound to γ-GTP for the intrinsic Gαi1 mechanism and pushed toward a bidentate α-γ-GTP coordination for the Gαi1·RGS4 mechanism. This movement induces a charge shift toward β-GTP, increases the planarity of γ-GTP, and thereby catalyzes the hydrolysis. PMID:27911799

  14. Diamidine Compounds for Selective Inhibition of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification critical for a variety of biological processes. Misregulation of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) has been linked to many pathological conditions. Most current PRMT inhibitors display limited specificity and selectivity, indiscriminately targeting many methyltransferase enzymes that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine as a cofactor. Here we report diamidine compounds for specific inhibition of PRMT1, the primary type I enzyme. Docking, molecular dynamics, and MM/PBSA analysis together with biochemical assays were conducted to understand the binding modes of these inhibitors and the molecular basis of selective inhibition for PRMT1. Our data suggest that 2,5-bis(4-amidinophenyl)furan (1, furamidine, DB75), one leading inhibitor, targets the enzyme active site and is primarily competitive with the substrate and noncompetitive toward the cofactor. Furthermore, cellular studies revealed that 1 is cell membrane permeable and effectively inhibits intracellular PRMT1 activity and blocks cell proliferation in leukemia cell lines with different genetic lesions. PMID:24564570

  15. Mechanism of the intrinsic arginine finger in heterotrimeric G proteins.

    PubMed

    Mann, Daniel; Teuber, Christian; Tennigkeit, Stefan A; Schröter, Grit; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2016-12-13

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are crucial molecular switches that maintain a large number of physiological processes in cells. The signal is encoded into surface alterations of the Gα subunit that carries GTP in its active state and GDP in its inactive state. The ability of the Gα subunit to hydrolyze GTP is essential for signal termination. Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerates this process. A key player in this catalyzed reaction is an arginine residue, Arg178 in Gαi1, which is already an intrinsic part of the catalytic center in Gα in contrast to small GTPases, at which the corresponding GTPase-activating protein (GAP) provides the arginine "finger." We applied time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy in combination with isotopic labeling and site-directed mutagenesis to reveal the molecular mechanism, especially of the role of Arg178 in the intrinsic Gαi1 mechanism and the RGS4-catalyzed mechanism. Complementary biomolecular simulations (molecular mechanics with molecular dynamics and coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) were performed. Our findings show that Arg178 is bound to γ-GTP for the intrinsic Gαi1 mechanism and pushed toward a bidentate α-γ-GTP coordination for the Gαi1·RGS4 mechanism. This movement induces a charge shift toward β-GTP, increases the planarity of γ-GTP, and thereby catalyzes the hydrolysis.

  16. Arginine-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, L E; Rendell, N B; Murray, S; Allport, J R; Lo, G; Kefalas, P; Taylor, G W; MacDermot, J

    1996-01-01

    An Arg-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes (PMNs) was confirmed by the use of diethylamino-(benzylidineamino)guanidine (DEA-BAG) as an ADP-ribose acceptor. Two separate HPLC systems were used to separate ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG from reaction mixtures, and its presence was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry. ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG was produced in the presence of PMNs, but not in their absence. Incubation of DEA-BAG with ADP-ribose (0.1-10 mM) did not yield ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG, which indicates that ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG formed in the presence of PMNs was not simply a product of a reaction between DEA-BAG and free ADP-ribose, due possibly to the hydrolysis of NAD+ by an NAD+ glycohydrolase. The assay of mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase with agmatine as a substrate was modified for intact PMNs, and the activity was found to be approx. 50-fold lower than that in rabbit cardiac membranes. The Km of the enzyme for NAD+ was 100.1 30.4 microM and the Vmax 1.4 0.2 pmol of ADP-ribosylagmatine/h per 10(6) cells. The enzyme is likely to be linked to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, since incubation of intact PMNs with phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) led to a 98% decrease in mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity in the cells. Cell surface proteins were labelled after exposure of intact PMNs to [32P]NAD+. Their molecular masses were 79, 67, 46, 36 and 26 kDa. The time course for labelling was non-linear under these conditions over a period of 4 h. The labelled products were identified as mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins by hydrolysis with snake venom phosphodiesterase to yield 5'-AMP. PMID:8615841

  17. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  18. Improved anaerobic use of arginine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Martin, Olga; Brandriss, Marjorie C; Schneider, Gisbert; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2003-03-01

    Anaerobic arginine catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was genetically modified to allow assimilation of all four rather than just three of the nitrogen atoms in arginine. This was accomplished by bypassing normal formation of proline, an unusable nitrogen source in the absence of oxygen, and causing formation of glutamate instead. A pro3 ure2 strain expressing a PGK1 promoter-driven PUT2 allele encoding Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase lacking a mitochondrial targeting sequence produced significant cytoplasmic activity, accumulated twice as much intracellular glutamate, and produced twice as much cell mass as the parent when grown anaerobically on limiting arginine as sole nitrogen source.

  19. Characterization and localization of arginine vasotocin receptors in the brain and kidney of an amphibian

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Because arginine vasotocin (AVT) activates male sexual behaviors in the rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa), quantitative autoradiography with radiolabeled arginine vasopressin (/sup 3/H-AVP) was used to localize and characterize putative AVT receptors in the brain of this amphibian. Binding of /sup 3/H-AVP to sites within the medial pallium was saturable, specific, reversible, of high affinity and low capacity. These binding sites appear to represent authentic central nervous system receptors for AVT. Furthermore, ligand specificity for the binding sites in this amphibian differs from that reported for AVP binding sites in rat brains. Dense concentrations of specific binding sites were located in the olfactory nerve as it entered the olfactory bulb within the medial pallium, dorsal pallium, and amygdala pars lateralis of the telencephalon, and in the tegmental region of the medulla. Concentrations of binding sites differed significantly among various brain regions. A comparison of male and female newts collected during the breeding season revealed no sexual dimorphism. These areas may represent site(s) of action where AVT elicits sexual behaviors in male T. granulosa.

  20. delta-Opioid receptor agonist SNC80 elicits peripheral antinociception via delta(1) and delta(2) receptors and activation of the l-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic GMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Daniela F; Reis, Gláucia M L; Francischi, Janetti N; Castro, Maria S A; Perez, Andrea C; Duarte, Igor D G

    2005-11-19

    In this study, we characterized the role of delta(1) and delta(2) opioids receptors, as well the involvement of the l-arginine/NO/cGMP pathway in the peripheral antinociception induced by delta-opioid receptor agonist (+)-4-[(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-Allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). The paw pressure test was utilized, in which pain sensitivity is increased by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E(2) (2 microg). Administration of SNC80 (20, 40 and 80 microg/paw) decreased the hyperalgesia induced by prostaglandin E(2) in a dose-dependent manner. The possibility that the higher dose of SNC80 (80 microg) has a central or systemic effect was excluded, since administration of the drug into the contralateral paw did not elicit antinociception in the right paw. 7-Benzylidenenaltrexone (BNTX), 5, 10 and 20 microg/paw, and 17-(Cyclopropylmethyl)-6,7-didehydro-3,14beta-dihydroxy-4,5alpha-epoxy-6,7-2',3'-benzo[b]furanomorphinan (naltriben), 2.5, 5 and 10 microg/paw, delta(1) and delta(2) opioid receptor antagonist respectively, elicited partial antagonism of the peripheral antinociceptive effect of the SNC80 (80 microg). The BNTX (10 microg/paw)-naltriben (5 microg/paw) combination completely antagonized the peripheral antinociception induced by SNC80 (80 microg). Further, blockers of the l-arginine/NO/cGMP pathway, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (12, 18 and 24 microg/paw) and methylene blue (125, 250 and 500 microg/paw) were observed reverting the peripheral antinociceptive effect of SNC80. This study provides evidence that the peripheral antinociception induced by SNC80 occurs via delta(1) and delta(2) receptors and may result from l-arginine/NO/cGMP pathway activation.

  1. Argininosuccinate Synthetase 1 Loss in Invasive Bladder Cancer Regulates Survival through General Control Nonderepressible 2 Kinase-Mediated Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α Activity and Is Targetable by Pegylated Arginine Deiminase.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Divya; Gupta, Sounak; Hau, Andrew M; Nakashima, Kazufumi; Leivo, Mariah Z; Searles, Stephen C; Elson, Paul; Bomalaski, John S; Casteel, Darren E; Boss, Gerry R; Hansel, Donna E

    2016-12-09

    Loss of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1), a key enzyme for arginine synthesis, occurs in many cancers, making cells dependent on extracellular arginine and targetable by the arginine-degrading enzyme pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20). We evaluated ASS1 expression and effects of ASS1 loss in bladder cancer which, despite affecting >70,000 people in the United States annually, has limited therapies. ASS1 loss was identified in conventional and micropapillary urothelial carcinoma, small cell, and squamous cell carcinoma subtypes of invasive bladder cancer, as well as in T24, J82, and UM-UC-3 but not in 5637, RT112, and RT4 cell lines. ASS1-deficient cells showed preferential sensitivity to ADI-PEG 20, evidenced by decreased colony formation, reduced cell viability, and increased sub-G1 fractions. ADI-PEG 20 induced general control nonderepressible 2-dependent eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation and activating transcription factor 4 and C/EBP homologous protein up-regulation, associated with caspase-independent apoptosis and autophagy. These effects were ablated with selective siRNA silencing of these proteins. ASS1 overexpression in UM-UC-3 or ASS1 silencing in RT112 cells reversed these effects. ADI-PEG 20 treatment of mice bearing contralateral flank UM-UC-3 and RT112 xenografts selectively arrested tumor growth in UM-UC-3 xenografts, which had reduced tumor size, reduced Ki-67, and increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining. This suggests that ASS1 loss occurs in invasive bladder cancer and is targetable by ADI-PEG 20.

  2. Antiatherogenic effects of L-arginine in the hypercholesterolemic rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, J P; Singer, A H; Tsao, P; Zera, P; Rowan, R A; Billingham, M E

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic administration of L-arginine, the precursor of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), normalizes endothelium-dependent relaxation and decreases atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic animals. Male rabbits were fed (a) normal rabbit chow; (b) 1% cholesterol diet; or (c) 1% cholesterol diet supplemented by 2.25% L-arginine HCl in drinking water. Arginine supplementation doubled plasma arginine levels without affecting serum cholesterol values. After 10 wk, the thoracic aorta was harvested for studies of vascular reactivity and histomorphometry. Endothelium-dependent relaxations (to acetylcholine and calcium ionophore A23187) were significantly impaired in thoracic aortae from animals fed a 1% cholesterol diet. By contrast, vessels from hypercholesterolemic animals receiving L-arginine supplementation exhibited significantly improved endothelium-dependent relaxations. Responses to norepinephrine or nitroglycerin were not affected by either dietary intervention. Histomorphometric analysis revealed a reduction in lesion surface area and intimal thickness in thoracic aortae from arginine-supplemented animals compared to those from untreated hypercholesterolemic rabbits. This is the first study to demonstrate that supplementation of dietary L-arginine, the EDRF precursor, improves endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. More importantly, we have shown that this improvement in EDRF activity is associated with a reduction in atherogenesis. PMID:1522225

  3. Identification of second arginine-glycine-aspartic acid motif of ovine vitronectin as the complement C9 binding site and its implication in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    T, Prasada Rao; T, Lakshmi Prasanth; R, Parvathy; S, Murugavel; Devi, Karuna; Joshi, Paritosh

    2017-02-02

    Vitronectin (Vn), a multifunctional protein of blood and extracellular matrix interacts with complement C9. This interaction may modulate innate immunity. Details of Vn-C9 interaction are limited. An assessment of Vn-C9 interaction was made employing goat homologous system. Vn binding to C9 was observed in three different assays. Using recombinant fragments, the C9 binding was mapped to the N-terminus of Vn. Site directed mutagenesis was performed to alter the second RGD sequence (RGD-2) of Vn. Change of R to G or D to A in RGD-2 caused significant decrease in Vn binding to C9 whereas change of R to G in the first RGD motif (RGD-1) had no effect on Vn binding to C9. These results imply that the RGD-2 of goat Vn is involved in C9 binding. In competitive binding assay, the presence of soluble RGD peptide inhibited Vn binding to C9 whereas heparin had no effect. Vn binding to C9 in terms of bacterial pathogenesis was also evaluated. Serum dependent inhibition of E. coli growth was significantly reverted when Vn or its N-fragment were included in the assay. The C-fragment, which did not support C9 binding, also partly nullified serum dependent inhibition of bacterial growth probably through other serum component(s).

  4. Insulin Induces Relaxation and Decreases Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Vasoconstriction in Human Placental Vascular Bed in a Mechanism Mediated by Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels and L-Arginine/Nitric Oxide Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Lissette; Saavedra, Andrea; Rojas, Susana; Cid, Marcela; Valenzuela, Cristina; Gallegos, David; Careaga, Pamela; Basualto, Emerita; Haensgen, Astrid; Peña, Eduardo; Rivas, Coralia; Vera, Juan Carlos; Gallardo, Victoria; Zúñiga, Leandro; Escudero, Carlos; Sobrevia, Luis; Wareing, Mark; González, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Short-term incubation with insulin increases the L-arginine transport in HUVECs.Short-term incubation with insulin increases the NO synthesis in HUVECs.Insulin induces relaxation in human placental vascular bed.Insulin attenuates the constriction induced by hydrogen peroxide in human placenta.The relaxation induced by insulin is dependent on BKCa channels activity in human placenta. Insulin induces relaxation in umbilical veins, increasing the expression of human amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1) and nitric oxide synthesis (NO) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Short-term effects of insulin on vasculature have been reported in healthy subjects and cell cultures; however, its mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of acute incubation with insulin on the regulation of vascular tone of placental vasculature. HUVECs and chorionic vein rings were isolated from normal pregnancies. The effect of insulin on NO synthesis, L-arginine transport, and hCAT-1 abundance was measured in HUVECs. Isometric tension induced by U46619 (thromboxane A2 analog) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were measured in vessels previously incubated 30 min with insulin and/or the following pharmacological inhibitors: tetraethylammonium (KCa channels), iberiotoxin (BKCa channels), genistein (tyrosine kinases), and wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase). Insulin increases L-arginine transport and NO synthesis in HUVECs. In the placenta, this hormone caused relaxation of the chorionic vein, and reduced perfusion pressure in placental cotyledons. In vessels pre-incubated with insulin, the constriction evoked by H2O2 and U46619 was attenuated and the effect on H2O2-induced constriction was blocked with tetraethylammonium and iberiotoxin, but not with genistein, or wortmannin. Insulin rapidly dilates the placental vasculature through a mechanism involving activity of BKCa channels and L-arginine/NO pathway in endothelial cells. This

  5. Arginine-Containing Ligands Enhance H-2 Oxidation Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Arnab; Roberts, John A.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-06-16

    In H2 fuel cells, performance depends on factors controlling turnover frequency and energy efficiency in the electrocatalytic oxidation of H2. Nature uses the hydrogenase enzymes to oxidize H2 at high turnover frequencies (up to 20,000 s-1) and low overpotentials (<100 mV), while the fastest synthetic catalyst reported to date only oxidizes H2 at 50 s-1 under 1 atm H2. Here we report a water-soluble complex incorporating the amino acid arginine, [NiII(PCy2NArg2)2]6+, that operates at 210 s-1 (180 mV overpotential) under 1 atm H2 and 144,000 s-1 (460 mV overpotential) under 133 atm H2. The complex functions from pH 0-14 with rates increasing at lower pH values. The arginine groups impart water solubility and play a critical role in enhancing turnover frequency, most consistent with an intramolecular Arg-Arg interaction that controls the structure of the catalyst active site. This work was funded by the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the US DOE, BES (AD, WJS), and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, BES (JASR). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US DOE.

  6. New kinetic parameters for rat liver arginase measured at near-physiological steady-state concentrations of arginine and Mn2+.

    PubMed Central

    Maggini, S; Stoecklin-Tschan, F B; Mörikofer-Zwez, S; Walter, P

    1992-01-01

    A cytosolic cell-free system from rat liver containing the last three enzymes of the urea cycle, a number of cofactors and the substrates aspartate and citrulline was shown to synthesize urea at near-physiological rates ranging between 0.40 and 1.25 mumol/min per g of liver. This system was used to determine the kinetic parameters for arginase. With saturating amounts of Mn2+ (30 microM), arginine remained at a steady-state concentration of 5-35 microM depending on the aspartate and citrulline supply. Vmax. at micromolar arginine concentrations was between 1.10 and 1.25 mumol/min per g of liver, the K0.5 (arginine) between 6.0 and 6.5 microM and positive co-operativity was observed (Hill coefficient 2). Omission of Mn2+ caused a significant accumulation of arginine during the incubation, suggesting a regulatory effect of arginase. Under these conditions, Vmax. was 1.10-1.65 mumol/min per g of liver and the Km (arginine) increased up to 14.4-21.1 microM. The apparent Ka for Mn2+ in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, Mg2+ and arginine was calculated to be maximally 8 microM. Initial-velocity experiments with millimolar arginine concentrations as the direct substrate gave the following results, which are in good agreement with literature data. In the absence of Mn2+, Vmax. was 71.3 mumol/min per g of liver and the Km (arginine) 1.58 mM. With 30 microM-Mn2+, Vmax. was 69.4 mumol/min per g of liver and the Km (arginine) decreased to 0.94 mM. On the basis of our results, we propose the presence of high-affinity and low-affinity sites for arginine on rat liver arginase and postulate that alterations in arginase activity arising from changes in the concentration of arginine and of the cofactor Mn2+ may contribute to the regulation of ureagenesis in vivo. PMID:1590754

  7. Interaction of arginine oligomer with model membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Dandan . E-mail: yi_dandan@yahoo.com.cn; Guoming, Li; Gao, Li; Wei, Liang

    2007-08-10

    Short oligomers of arginine (R8) have been shown to cross readily a variety of biological barriers. A hypothesis was put forward that inverted micelles form in biological membranes in the presence of arginine oligomer peptides, facilitating their transfer through the membranes. In order to define the role of peptide-lipid interaction in this mechanism, we prepared liposomes as the model membrane to study the ability of R8 inducing calcein release from liposomes, the fusion of liposomes, R8 binding to liposomes and membrane disturbing activity of the bound R8. The results show that R8 binding to liposome membrane depends on lipid compositions, negative surface charge density and interior water phase pH values of liposomes. R8 has no activity to induce the leakage of calcein from liposomes or improve liposome fusion. R8 does not permeabilize through the membrane spontaneously. These peptides delivering drugs through membranes may depend on receptors and energy.

  8. Mutational and structural analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B reveal novel active site residues for family 5 glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takuji; Schmitz, George E; Dodd, Dylan; Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity.

  9. Mutational and Structural Analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B Reveal Novel Active Site Residues for Family 5 Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity. PMID:24278284

  10. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Insights into the molecular basis for substrate binding and specificity of the wild-type L-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC

    PubMed Central

    Ilgü, Hüseyin; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Gapsys, Vytautas; Ucurum, Zöhre; de Groot, Bert L.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic enterobacteria need to survive the extreme acidity of the stomach to successfully colonize the human gut. Enteric bacteria circumvent the gastric acid barrier by activating extreme acid-resistance responses, such as the arginine-dependent acid resistance system. In this response, l-arginine is decarboxylated to agmatine, thereby consuming one proton from the cytoplasm. In Escherichia coli, the l-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC facilitates the export of agmatine in exchange of l-arginine, thus providing substrates for further removal of protons from the cytoplasm and balancing the intracellular pH. We have solved the crystal structures of wild-type AdiC in the presence and absence of the substrate agmatine at 2.6-Å and 2.2-Å resolution, respectively. The high-resolution structures made possible the identification of crucial water molecules in the substrate-binding sites, unveiling their functional roles for agmatine release and structure stabilization, which was further corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. Structural analysis combined with site-directed mutagenesis and the scintillation proximity radioligand binding assay improved our understanding of substrate binding and specificity of the wild-type l-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC. Finally, we present a potential mechanism for conformational changes of the AdiC transport cycle involved in the release of agmatine into the periplasmic space of E. coli. PMID:27582465

  12. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  13. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  14. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  15. Role of alphaArg145 and betaArg263 in the active site of penicillin acylase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Alkema, Wynand B L; Prins, Antoon K; de Vries, Erik; Janssen, Dick B

    2002-01-01

    The active site of penicillin acylase of Escherichia coli contains two conserved arginine residues. The function of these arginines, alphaArg145 and betaArg263, was studied by site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes. The mutants alphaArg145-->Leu (alphaArg145Leu), alphaArg145Cys and alphaArg145Lys were normally processed and exported to the periplasm, whereas expression of the mutants betaArg263Leu, betaArg263Asn and betaArg263Lys yielded large amounts of precursor protein in the periplasm, indicating that betaArg263 is crucial for efficient processing of the enzyme. Either modification of both arginine residues by 2,3-butanedione or replacement by site-directed mutagenesis yielded enzymes with a decreased specificity (kcat/K(m)) for 2-nitro-5-[(phenylacetyl)amino]benzoic acid, indicating that both residues are important in catalysis. Compared with the wild type, the alphaArg145 mutants exhibited a 3-6-fold-increased preference for 6-aminopenicillanic acid as the deacylating nucleophile compared with water. Analysis of the steady-state parameters of these mutants for the hydrolysis of penicillin G and phenylacetamide indicated that destabilization of the Michaelis-Menten complex accounts for the improved activity with beta-lactam substrates. Analysis of pH-activity profiles of wild-type enzyme and the betaArg263Lys mutant showed that betaArg263 has to be positively charged for catalysis, but is not involved in substrate binding. The results provide an insight into the catalytic mechanism of penicillin acylase, in which alphaArg145 is involved in binding of beta-lactam substrates and betaArg263 is important both for stabilizing the transition state in the reaction and for correct processing of the precursor protein. PMID:12071857

  16. Kinetic and structural evaluation of selected active site mutants of the Aspergillus fumigatus KDNase (sialidase).

    PubMed

    Yeung, Juliana H F; Telford, Judith C; Shidmoossavee, Fahimeh S; Bennet, Andrew J; Taylor, Garry L; Moore, Margo M

    2013-12-23

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an airborne fungal pathogen. We previously cloned and characterized an exo-sialidase from A. fumigatus and showed that it preferred 2-keto-3-deoxynononic acid (KDN) as a substrate to N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). The purpose of this study was to investigate the structure-function relationships of critical catalytic site residues. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to create three mutant recombinant enzymes: the catalytic nucleophile (Y358H), the general acid/base catalyst (D84A), and an enlargement of the binding pocket to attempt to accommodate the N-acetyl group of Neu5Ac (R171L). Crystal structures for all enzymes were determined. The D84A mutation had an effect in decreasing the activity of AfKDNase that was stronger than that of the same mutation in the structurally similar sialidase from the bacterium Micromonospora viridifaciens. These data suggest that the catalytic acid is more important in the reaction of AfKDNase and that catalysis is less dependent on nucleophilic or electrostatic stabilization of the developing positive charge at the transition state for hydrolysis. Removal of the catalytic nucleophile (Y358H) significantly lowered the activity of the enzyme, but this mutant remained a retaining glycosidase as demonstrated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis. This is a novel finding that has not been shown with other sialidases. Kinetic activity measured at pH 5.2 revealed that R171L had higher activity on a Neu5Ac-based substrate than wild-type KDNase; hence, leucine in place of arginine in the binding pocket improved catalysis toward Neu5Ac substrates. Hence, whether a sialidase is primarily a KDNase or a neuraminidase is due in part to the presence of an amino acid that creates a steric clash with the N-acetyl group.

  17. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  18. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase.

  19. Arginine consumption by the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis reduces proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Britta; Merino, María C; Persson, Lo; Svärd, Staffan G

    2012-01-01

    In the field of infectious diseases the multifaceted amino acid arginine has reached special attention as substrate for the hosts production of the antimicrobial agent nitric oxide (NO). A variety of infectious organisms interfere with this part of the host immune response by reducing the availability of arginine. This prompted us to further investigate additional roles of arginine during pathogen infections. As a model we used the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis that actively consumes arginine as main energy source and secretes an arginine-consuming enzyme, arginine deiminase (ADI). Reduced intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation is a common theme during bacterial and viral intestinal infections, but it has never been connected to arginine-consumption. Our specific question was thereby, whether the arginine-consumption by Giardia leads to reduced IEC proliferation, in addition to NO reduction. In vitro cultivation of human IEC lines in arginine-free or arginine/citrulline-complemented medium, as well as in interaction with different G. intestinalis isolates, were used to study effects on host cell replication by MTT assay. IEC proliferation was further analyzed by DNA content analysis, polyamine measurements and expressional analysis of cell cycle regulatory genes. IEC proliferation was reduced upon arginine-withdrawal and also in an arginine-dependent manner upon interaction with G. intestinalis or addition of Giardia ADI. We show that arginine-withdrawal by intestinal pathogens leads to a halt in the cell cycle in IECs through reduced polyamine levels and upregulated cell cycle inhibitory genes. This is of importance with regards to intestinal tissue homeostasis that is affected through reduced cell proliferation. Thus, the slower epithelial cell turnover helps the pathogen to maintain a more stable niche for colonization. This study also shows why supplementation therapy of diarrhea patients with arginine/citrulline is helpful and that

  20. Insights into the modulation of optimum pH by a single histidine residue in arginine deiminase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hanjing; Liu, Hui; Yin, Yan; Ding, Ying; Jia, Yan; Chen, Qingming; Zou, Guolin; Zheng, Zhongliang

    2012-09-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a potential antitumor agent for the arginine deprivation treatment of L-arginine auxotrophic tumors. The optimum pH of ADI varies significantly, yet little is known about the origin of this variety. Here, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ADI (PaADI), an enzyme that functions only at acidic pH, was utilized as the model system. The results of UV-pH titration imply that the nucleophilic Cys406 thiol group is protonated in the resting state. The H405R single mutation resulted in an altered pH optimum (from pH 5.5 to 6.5), an increased k(cat) (from 9.8 s(-1) to 101.7 s(-1) at pH 6.5), and a shifted pH rate dependence (ascending limb pK(a) from 3.6 to 4.4). Other mutants were constructed to investigate the effects of hydrogen bonding, charge distribution, and hydrophobicity on the properties of the enzyme. The pH optima of His405 mutants were all shifted to a relatively neutral pH except for the H405E mutant. The results of kinetic characterizations and molecular dynamic simulations revealed that the active site hydrogen bonding network involving Asp280 and His405 plays an important role in controlling the dependence of PaADI activity on pH. Moreover, the H405R variant showed increased cytotoxicity towards arginine auxotrophic cancer cell lines.

  1. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  2. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes 10403S Arginine Repressor ArgR Finely Tunes Arginine Metabolism Regulation under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changyong; Dong, Zhimei; Han, Xiao; Sun, Jing; Wang, Hang; Jiang, Li; Yang, Yongchun; Ma, Tiantian; Chen, Zhongwei; Yu, Jing; Fang, Weihuan; Song, Houhui

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is able to colonize human and animal intestinal tracts and to subsequently cross the intestinal barrier, causing systemic infection. For successful establishment of infection, L. monocytogenes must survive the low pH environment of the stomach. L. monocytogenes encodes a functional ArgR, a transcriptional regulator belonging to the ArgR/AhrC arginine repressor family. We aimed at clarifying the specific functions of ArgR in arginine metabolism regulation, and more importantly, in acid tolerance of L. monocytogenes. We showed that ArgR in the presence of 10 mM arginine represses transcription and expression of the argGH and argCJBDF operons, indicating that L. monocytogenes ArgR plays the classical role of ArgR/AhrC family proteins in feedback inhibition of the arginine biosynthetic pathway. Notably, transcription and expression of arcA (encoding arginine deiminase) and sigB (encoding an alternative sigma factor B) were also markedly repressed by ArgR when bacteria were exposed to pH 5.5 in the absence of arginine. However, addition of arginine enabled ArgR to derepress the transcription and expression of these two genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that ArgR binds to the putative ARG boxes in the promoter regions of argC, argG, arcA, and sigB. Reporter gene analysis with gfp under control of the argG promoter demonstrated that ArgR was able to activate the argG promoter. Unexpectedly, deletion of argR significantly increased bacterial survival in BHI medium adjusted to pH 3.5 with lactic acid. We conclude that this phenomenon is due to activation of arcA and sigB. Collectively, our results show that L. monocytogenes ArgR finely tunes arginine metabolism through negative transcriptional regulation of the arginine biosynthetic operons and of the catabolic arcA gene in an arginine-independent manner during lactic acid-induced acid stress. ArgR also appears to activate catabolism as well as sigB transcription by anti

  4. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  5. Leishmania metacaspase: an arginine-specific peptidase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Iveth; Fasel, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to give insights into metacaspase of Leishmania protozoan parasites as arginine-specific cysteine peptidase. The physiological role of metacaspase in Leishmania is still a matter of debate, whereas its peptidase enzymatic activity has been well characterized. Among the different possible expression systems, metacaspase-deficient yeast cells (Δyca1) have been instrumental in studying the activity of Leishmania major metacaspase (LmjMCA). Here, we describe techniques for purification of LmjMCA and its activity measurement, providing a platform for further identification of LmjMCA substrates.

  6. Arginine deiminase pathway genes and arginine degradation variability in Oenococcus oeni strains.

    PubMed

    Araque, Isabel; Gil, Joana; Carreté, Ramon; Constantí, Magda; Bordons, Albert; Reguant, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Trace amounts of the carcinogenic ethyl carbamate can appear in wine as a result of a reaction between ethanol and citrulline, which is produced from arginine degradation by some bacteria used in winemaking. In this study, arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway genes were evaluated in 44 Oenococcus oeni strains from wines originating from several locations in order to establish the relationship between the ability of a strain to degrade arginine and the presence of related genes. To detect the presence of arc genes of the ADI pathway in O. oeni, pairs of primers were designed to amplify arcA, arcB, arcC and arcD1 sequences. All strains contained these four genes. The same primers were used to confirm the organization of these genes in an arcABCD1 operon. Nevertheless, considerable variability in the ability to degrade arginine among these O. oeni strains was observed. Therefore, despite the presence of the arc genes in all strains, the expression patterns of individual genes must be strain dependent and influenced by the different wine conditions. Additionally, the presence of arc genes was also determined in the 57 sequenced strains of O. oeni available in GenBank, and the complete operon was found in 83% of strains derived from wine. The other strains were found to lack the arcB, arcC and arcD genes, but all contained sequences homologous to arcA, and some of them had also ADI activity.

  7. Effects of cadmium on the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis' arginine kinase: unfolding kinetics integrated with computational simulations.

    PubMed

    Si, Yue-Xiu; Lee, Jinhyuk; Zhao, Feng; Yin, Shang-Jun; Park, Yong-Doo; Qian, Guo-Ying; Jiang, Xia-Min

    2016-08-01

    Arginine kinase is closely associated with adaptation to environmental stresses such as high salinity and heavy metal ion levels in marine invertebrates. In this study, the effects of Cd(2+) on the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis' arginine kinase (SPAK) were investigated. SPAK was isolated from the muscles of S. pharaonis and upon further purification, showed a single band on SDS-PAGE. Cd(2+) effectively inactivated SPAK, and the double-reciprocal kinetics indicated that Cd(2+) induced non-competitive inhibition of arginine and ATP. Spectrofluorometry results showed that Cd(2+) induced tertiary structure changes in SPAK with the exposure of hydrophobic surfaces that directly induced SPAK aggregation. The addition of osmolytes, glycine, and proline successfully blocked SPAK aggregation and restored the conformation and activity of SPAK. Molecular dynamics simulations involving SPAK and Cd(2+) showed that Cd(2+) partly blocks the entrance of ATP to the active site, and this result is consistent with the experimental results showing Cd(2+)-induced inactivation of SPAK. These results demonstrate the effect of Cd(2+) on SPAK enzymatic function and unfolding, including aggregation and the protective effects of osmolytes on SPAK folding. This study provides concrete evidence of the toxicity of Cd(2+) in the context of the metabolic enzyme SPAK, and it illustrates the toxic effects of heavy metals and detoxification mechanisms in cuttlefish.

  8. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  9. A glutamate/aspartate switch controls product specificity in a protein arginine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Debler, Erik W.; Jain, Kanishk; Warmack, Rebeccah A.; Feng, You; Clarke, Steven G.; Blobel, Günter; Stavropoulos, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei PRMT7 (TbPRMT7) is a protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) that strictly monomethylates various substrates, thus classifying it as a type III PRMT. However, the molecular basis of its unique product specificity has remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of TbPRMT7 in complex with its cofactor product S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.8 Å resolution and identify a glutamate residue critical for its monomethylation behavior. TbPRMT7 comprises the conserved methyltransferase and β-barrel domains, an N-terminal extension, and a dimerization arm. The active site at the interface of the N-terminal extension, methyltransferase, and β-barrel domains is stabilized by the dimerization arm of the neighboring protomer, providing a structural basis for dimerization as a prerequisite for catalytic activity. Mutagenesis of active-site residues highlights the importance of Glu181, the second of the two invariant glutamate residues of the double E loop that coordinate the target arginine in substrate peptides/proteins and that increase its nucleophilicity. Strikingly, mutation of Glu181 to aspartate converts TbPRMT7 into a type I PRMT, producing asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) using a histone H4 peptide showed that the Glu181Asp mutant has markedly increased affinity for monomethylated peptide with respect to the WT, suggesting that the enlarged active site can favorably accommodate monomethylated peptide and provide sufficient space for ADMA formation. In conclusion, these findings yield valuable insights into the product specificity and the catalytic mechanism of protein arginine methyltransferases and have important implications for the rational (re)design of PRMTs. PMID:26858449

  10. Purification and characterization of moschins, arginine-glutamate-rich proteins with translation-inhibiting activity from brown pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) seeds.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Parkash, A; Tso, W W

    2002-10-01

    From fresh brown pumpkin seeds, two proteins with a molecular mass of 12kDa and an N-terminal sequence rich in arginine and glutamate residues were obtained. The protein designated alpha-moschin closely resembled the fruitfly programmed-cell death gene product and the protein designated beta-moschin demonstrated striking similarity to prepro 2S albumin in N-terminal sequence. alpha- and beta-moschins inhibited translation in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with an IC(50) of 17 microM and 300nM, respectively.

  11. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  12. Arginine kinase from Litopenaeus vannamei: cloning, expression and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cui-Luan; Ji, Pei-Feng; Kong, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2009-03-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is a phosphotransferase that plays a critical role in energy metabolism in invertebrates. In this paper, the full-length cDNA of AK was cloned from shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei by using RT-PCR and RACE PCR. It was 1446 bp encoding 356 amino acids, and belongs to the conserved phosphagen kinase family. The quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed a broad expression of AK with the highest expression in the muscle and the lowest in the skin. The expression of AK after challenge with LPS was tested in hemocytes and muscle, which indicated that the two peak values were 6.2 times (at 3 h) and 10.14 times (at 24 h) in the hemocytes compared with the control values, respectively (P < 0.05), while the highest expression of AK was 41 times (at 24 h) in the muscle compared with the control (P < 0.05). In addition, AK was expressed in Escherichia coli by prokaryotic expression plasmid pGEX-4T-2. The recombinant protein was expressed as glutathione s-transferase (GST) arginine kinase (GST-AK) fusion protein, which was purified by affinity chromatography using Glutathione Sepharose 4B. After cleavage from GST by using a site-specific protease, the recombinant protein was identified by ESI-MS and showed AK activity. After treatment with 10 mM ATP, the enzyme activity significantly increased. However, the enzyme activity was inhibited by 10 mM alpha-ketoglutarate, 50 mM glucose and 200 mM ATP. This research suggested that AK might play an important role in the coupling of energy production and utilization and the immune response in shrimps.

  13. Interleukin-2 and concanavalin A upregulate a cat2 isoform encoding a high affinity L-arginine transporter in feline lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, B R; Tellier, M; Harvey, W; Feldman, D H; Bosworth, J

    2000-01-01

    The immunological responses of activated lymphocytes are associated with increased nitric oxide (NO) biosynthesis. Studies in the literature have primarily approached control of NO by focusing on the regulation of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms. However, the present study approaches the control of NO synthesis by addressing the regulation of L-arginine availability to lymphocytes via regulation of membrane transport. The guanidino nitrogen of L-arginine is the sole biosynthetic precursor of NO. We investigated cytokine and mitogen regulation of membrane L-arginine transporters for the first time in feline cells. Feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with interleukin-2 and concanavalin A, then alternatively spliced isoforms of L-arginine transporters known in other species were probed by RT-PCR, using various oligonucleotide primers that hybridized to several regions in common with the isoforms. Both high affinity and low affinity isoforms are encoded by mRNAs arising from mutually exclusive alternative splicing of the primary transcript. A region of 123 bp was obtained that encoded an extracellular polypeptide loop of 41 amino acids. The sequence of this region represented the high affinity L-arginine substrate binding site of a CAT2 transporter polypeptide isoform, but not the CAT2a isoform low affinity binding site. Neither of the inducible isoforms were constitutively expressed in unstimulated feline cells. This is the first report demonstrating that domestic cats possess the cat2 gene encoding an inducible L-arginine transporter, and, furthermore, that the high affinity isoform transcript is activated by interleukin-2 and concanavalin A in feline lymphocytes. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:10935886

  14. The effect of arginine-428 mutation on modulation of activity of human liver flavin monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) by imipramine and chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Adali, O; Carver, G C; Philpot, R M

    1999-07-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the molecular basis for modulation of recombinant FMO3-catalyzed activity by the tricyclic antidepressants, imipramine and chlorpromazine. A mutant of human liver FMO3 (T428R) was formed by site-directed mutagenesis and characterized along with the native enzyme in order to elucidate a possible structure-function relationship. Functional properties of native and T428R human FMO3s were studied with methimazole as substrate. Both enzymes catalyzed the S-oxidation of methimazole with the same Km value. Imipramine modulated the activities of the native and T428R human FMO3s differently; the activity of the native FMO3 was increased at all concentrations, whereas the activity of the mutant enzyme was inhibited at concentrations above 300 microM. Chlorpromazine activated the native enzyme at all concentrations of methimazole but activated the mutant enzyme only at high substrate concentrations. The direction (activation or inhibition) and extend of modulation of FMO3 activity is not only dependent on the concentration of the modulator, it is also dependent on the substrate concentration. This study confirms our previous findings with FMO1 that position 428 is important in the interaction of the FMO with modulators.

  15. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: implications for inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Slade, Daniel J; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D; Coonrod, Scott A; Lewis, Huw D; Guo, Min; Gross, Michael L; Thompson, Paul R

    2015-04-17

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ions that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.

  16. Protein Arginine Deiminase 2 Binds Calcium in an Ordered Fashion: Implications for Inhibitor Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ions that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs. PMID:25621824

  17. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: Implications for inhibitor design

    DOE PAGES

    Slade, Daniel J.; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J.; ...

    2015-01-26

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ionsmore » that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.« less

  18. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: Implications for inhibitor design

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Daniel J.; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J.; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D.; Coonrod, Scott A.; Lewis, Huw D.; Guo, Min; Gross, Michael L.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2015-01-26

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ions that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.

  19. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  20. Randomized Prospective Double-Blind Studies to Evaluate the Cognitive Effects of Inositol-Stabilized Arginine Silicate in Healthy Physically Active Adults.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Douglas; Harvey, Philip D; Perez Ojalvo, Sara; Komorowski, James

    2016-11-18

    Inositol-stabilized arginine silicate (ASI; Nitrosigine(®)) has been validated to increase levels of arginine, silicon and nitric oxide production. To evaluate potential enhancement of mental focus and clarity, ASI (1500 mg/day) was tested in two double-blind placebo-controlled crossover (DBPC-X) studies using the Trail Making Test (TMT, Parts A and B). In the two studies, healthy males took ASI for 14 and 3 days, respectively. In the first study, after 14 days of dosing, TMT B time decreased significantly from baseline (28% improvement, p = 0.045). In the second study evaluating shorter-term effects, TMT B time decreased significantly compared to placebo (33% improvement, p = 0.024) in a 10-min period. After 3 days of dosing, TMT B time significantly decreased from baseline scores (35% improvement, p < 0.001). These findings show that ASI significantly improved the ability to perform complex cognitive tests requiring mental flexibility, processing speed and executive functioning.

  1. Randomized Prospective Double-Blind Studies to Evaluate the Cognitive Effects of Inositol-Stabilized Arginine Silicate in Healthy Physically Active Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kalman, Douglas; Harvey, Philip D.; Perez Ojalvo, Sara; Komorowski, James

    2016-01-01

    Inositol-stabilized arginine silicate (ASI; Nitrosigine®) has been validated to increase levels of arginine, silicon and nitric oxide production. To evaluate potential enhancement of mental focus and clarity, ASI (1500 mg/day) was tested in two double-blind placebo-controlled crossover (DBPC-X) studies using the Trail Making Test (TMT, Parts A and B). In the two studies, healthy males took ASI for 14 and 3 days, respectively. In the first study, after 14 days of dosing, TMT B time decreased significantly from baseline (28% improvement, p = 0.045). In the second study evaluating shorter-term effects, TMT B time decreased significantly compared to placebo (33% improvement, p = 0.024) in a 10-min period. After 3 days of dosing, TMT B time significantly decreased from baseline scores (35% improvement, p < 0.001). These findings show that ASI significantly improved the ability to perform complex cognitive tests requiring mental flexibility, processing speed and executive functioning. PMID:27869715

  2. An Efficient Method for the Synthesis of Peptoids with Mixed Lysine-type/Arginine-type Monomers and Evaluation of Their Anti-leishmanial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Hannah L.; Denny, Paul W.; Cobb, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the manual solid-phase synthesis of linear peptoids that contain two differently functionalized cationic monomers. In this procedure amino functionalized 'lysine' and guanido functionalized 'arginine' peptoid monomers can be included within the same peptoid sequence. This procedure uses on-resin (N-(1-(4,4-dimethyl-2,6-dioxocyclohexylidene)ethyl) or Dde protection, orthogonal conditions to the Boc protection of lysine monomers. Subsequent deprotection allows an efficient on-resin guanidinylation reaction to form the arginine residues. The procedure is compatible with the commonly used submonomer method of peptoid synthesis, allowing simple peptoids to be made using common laboratory equipment and commercially available reagents. The representative synthesis, purification and characterization of two mixed peptoids is described. The evaluation of these compounds as potential anti-infectives in screening assays against Leishmania mexicana is also described. The protozoan parasite L. mexicana is a causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease that affects up to 12 million people worldwide. PMID:27842365

  3. Regulation of neurotoxin and protease formation in Clostridium botulinum Okra B and Hall A by arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Curtis, S I; Johnson, E A

    1989-01-01

    Supplementation of a minimal medium with high levels of arginine (20 g/liter) markedly decreased neurotoxin titers and protease activities in cultures of Clostridium botulinum Okra B and Hall A. Nitrogenous nutrients that are known to be derived from arginine, including proline, glutamate, and ammonia, also decreased protease and toxin but less so than did arginine. Proteases synthesized during growth were rapidly inactivated after growth stopped in media containing high levels of arginine. Separation of extracellular proteins by electrophoresis and immunoblots with antibodies to toxin showed that the decrease in toxin titers in media containing high levels of arginine was caused by both reduced synthesis of protoxin and impaired proteolytic activation. In contrast, certain other nutritional conditions stimulated protease and toxin formation in C. botulinum and counteracted the repression by arginine. Supplementation of the minimal medium with casein or casein hydrolysates increased protease activities and toxin titers. Casein supplementation of a medium containing high levels of arginine prevented protease inactivation. High levels of glucose (50 g/liter) also delayed the inactivation of proteases in both the minimal medium and a medium containing high levels of arginine. These observations suggest that the availability of nitrogen and energy sources, particularly arginine, affects the production and proteolytic processing of toxins and proteases in C. botulinum. Images PMID:2669631

  4. Role of arginine 226 in the mechanism of tryptophan indole-lyase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, V V; Zakomirdina, L N; Bazhulina, N P; Dementieva, I S; Faleev, N G; Gollnick, P D; Demidkina, T V

    2003-11-01

    In the spatial structure of tryptophanase from Proteus vulgaris the guanidinium group of arginine 226 forms a salt bridge with the 3;-oxygen atom of the coenzyme. The replacement of arginine 226 with alanine using site-directed mutagenesis reduced the affinity of the coenzyme for the protein by one order of magnitude compared to the wild-type enzyme. The catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme in the reaction with L-tryptophan was reduced 10(5)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. The rates of the reactions with some other substrates decreased 10(3)-10(4)-fold. The mutant enzyme catalyzed exchange of the C-alpha-proton in complexes with some inhibitors with rates reduced 10(2)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. Absorption and circular dichroism spectra of the mutant enzyme and the enzyme-inhibitor complexes demonstrate that the replacement of arginine 226 with alanine does not significantly affect the tautomeric equilibrium of the internal aldimine, but it leads to an alteration of the optimal conformation of the coenzyme-substrate intermediates.

  5. A novel peptide-processing activity of insect peptidyl-dipeptidase A (angiotensin I-converting enzyme): the hydrolysis of lysyl-arginine and arginyl-arginine from the C-terminus of an insect prohormone peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R; Schoofs, L; Williams, T A; Veelaert, D; Sajid, M; Corvol, P; Coates, D

    1998-01-01

    Insect peptidyl-dipeptidase A [angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)] is a soluble single-domain peptidyl-dipeptidase that has many properties in common with the C-domain of mammalian somatic ACE and with the single-domain mammalian germinal ACE. Mammalian somatic ACE is important in blood homoeostasis, but the role of ACE in insects is not known. Immunocytochemistry has been used to localize ACE in the neuroendocrine system of the locust, Locusta migratoria. Staining was observed in five groups of neurosecretory cells in the brain and suboesophageal ganglion, in the nervi corpori cardiaci, the storage part of the corpora cardiaca and in the nervi corpori allati. In three groups of neurosecretory cells, ACE co-localized with locustamyotropins, suggesting a possible role for the enzyme in the metabolism of these neuropeptides. We demonstrate in vitro a novel activity of ACE that removes pairs of basic amino acid residues from a locustamyotropin peptide extended at the C-terminus with either Gly-Lys-Arg or Gly-Arg-Arg, corresponding to a consensus recognition sequence for endoproteolysis of prohormone proteins by prohormone convertases. The low Km and high kcat values (Km 7.3 and 5.0 microM, kcat 226 and 207 s-1 for the hydrolysis of Phe-Ser-Pro-Arg-Leu-Gly-Lys-Arg and Phe-Ser-Pro-Arg-Leu-Gly-Arg-Arg, respectively) obtained for the hydrolysis of these two peptides by insect ACE means that these peptides, along with mammalian bradykinin, are the most favoured in vitro ACE substrates so far identified. The discovery of this in vitro prohormone-processing activity of insect ACE provides a possible explanation for the intracellular co-localization of the enzyme with locustamyotropin peptides, and provides evidence for a new role for ACE in the biosynthesis of peptide hormones and transmitters. PMID:9461491

  6. Insight on an Arginine Synthesis Metabolon from the Tetrameric Structure of Yeast Acetylglutamate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    de Cima, Sergio; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Crabeel, Marjolaine; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second, generally controlling, step of arginine biosynthesis. In yeasts, NAGK exists either alone or forming a metabolon with N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS), which catalyzes the first step and exists only within the metabolon. Yeast NAGK (yNAGK) has, in addition to the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain found in other NAGKs, a ∼150-residue C-terminal domain of unclear significance belonging to the DUF619 domain family. We deleted this domain, proving that it stabilizes yNAGK, slows catalysis and modulates feed-back inhibition by arginine. We determined the crystal structures of both the DUF619 domain-lacking yNAGK, ligand-free as well as complexed with acetylglutamate or acetylglutamate and arginine, and of complete mature yNAGK. While all other known arginine-inhibitable NAGKs are doughnut-like hexameric trimers of dimers of AAK domains, yNAGK has as central structure a flat tetramer formed by two dimers of AAK domains. These dimers differ from canonical AAK dimers in the −110° rotation of one subunit with respect to the other. In the hexameric enzymes, an N-terminal extension, found in all arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, forms a protruding helix that interlaces the dimers. In yNAGK, however, it conforms a two-helix platform that mediates interdimeric interactions. Arginine appears to freeze an open inactive AAK domain conformation. In the complete yNAGK structure, two pairs of DUF619 domains flank the AAK domain tetramer, providing a mechanism for the DUF619 domain modulatory functions. The DUF619 domain exhibits the histone acetyltransferase fold, resembling the catalytic domain of bacterial NAGS. However, the putative acetyl CoA site is blocked, explaining the lack of NAGS activity of yNAGK. We conclude that the tetrameric architecture is an adaptation to metabolon formation and propose an organization for this metabolon, suggesting that yNAGK may be a good model also for yeast and human NAGSs. PMID:22529931

  7. Analyzing the catalytic role of active site residues in the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Krzywda, Karoline; Opalka, Veronika; Chan, Hei; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    A strictly conserved active site arginine residue (αR157) and two histidine residues (αH80 and αH81) located near the active site of the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase), were mutated. These mutant enzymes were examined for their ability to bind iron and hydrate acrylonitrile. For the αR157A mutant, the residual activity (k cat = 10 ± 2 s(-1)) accounts for less than 1% of the wild-type activity (k cat = 1100 ± 30 s(-1)) while the K m value is nearly unchanged at 205 ± 10 mM. On the other hand, mutation of the active site pocket αH80 and αH81 residues to alanine resulted in enzymes with k cat values of 220 ± 40 and 77 ± 13 s(-1), respectively, and K m values of 187 ± 11 and 179 ± 18 mM. The double mutant (αH80A/αH81A) was also prepared and provided an enzyme with a k cat value of 132 ± 3 s(-1) and a K m value of 213 ± 61 mM. These data indicate that all three residues are catalytically important, but not essential. X-ray crystal structures of the αH80A/αH81A, αH80W/αH81W, and αR157A mutant CtNHase enzymes were solved to 2.0, 2.8, and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively. In each mutant enzyme, hydrogen-bonding interactions crucial for the catalytic function of the αCys(104)-SOH ligand are disrupted. Disruption of these hydrogen bonding interactions likely alters the nucleophilicity of the sulfenic acid oxygen and the Lewis acidity of the active site Fe(III) ion.

  8. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  9. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  10. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  11. Effects of a chronic l-arginine supplementation on the arginase pathway in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Johnny; Guglielmetti, Anne-Sophie; Tournier-Nappey, Maude; Martin, Hélène; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Marie, Christine; Demougeot, Céline

    2017-04-01

    While ageing is frequently associated with l-arginine deficiency, clinical and experimental studies provided controversial data on the interest of a chronic l-arginine supplementation with beneficial, no or even deleterious effects. It was hypothesized that these discrepancies might relate to a deviation of l-arginine metabolism towards production of l-ornithine rather than nitric oxide as a result of age-induced increase in arginase activity. This study investigated the effect of ageing on arginase activity/expression in target tissues and determined whether l-arginine supplementation modulated the effect of ageing on arginase activity. Arginase activity and expression were measured in the heart, vessel, brain, lung, kidney and liver in young rats (3-months old) and aged Wistar rats (22-24-months-old) with or without l-arginine supplementation (2.25% in drinking water for 6weeks). Plasma levels of l-arginine and l-ornithine were quantified in order to calculate the plasma l-arginine/l-ornithine ratio, considered as a reflection of arginase activity. Cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, heart rate) and aortic vascular reactivity were also studied. Ageing dramatically reduced plasma l-arginine and l-arginine/l-ornithine ratio, decreased liver and kidney arginase activities but did not change activities in other tissues. l-Arginine supplementation normalized plasma l-arginine and l-arginine/l-ornithine ratio, improved endothelial function and decreased systolic blood pressure. These effects were associated with decreased arginase activity in aorta along with no change in the other tissues except in the lung in which activity was increased. A strong mismatch was therefore observed between arginase activity and expression in analyzed tissues. The present study reveals that ageing selectively changes arginase activity in clearance tissues, but does not support a role of the arginase pathway in the potential deleterious effect of the l-arginine supplementation in

  12. A signal sequence suppressor mutant that stabilizes an assembled state of the twin arginine translocase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi; Alcock, Felicity; Kneuper, Holger; Deme, Justin C.; Rollauer, Sarah E.; Berks, Ben C.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-arginine protein translocation (Tat) system mediates transport of folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts. The Tat system of Escherichia coli is made up of TatA, TatB, and TatC components. TatBC comprise the substrate receptor complex, and active Tat translocases are formed by the substrate-induced association of TatA oligomers with this receptor. Proteins are targeted to TatBC by signal peptides containing an essential pair of arginine residues. We isolated substitutions, locating to the transmembrane helix of TatB that restored transport activity to Tat signal peptides with inactivating twin arginine substitutions. A subset of these variants also suppressed inactivating substitutions in the signal peptide binding site on TatC. The suppressors did not function by restoring detectable signal peptide binding to the TatBC complex. Instead, site-specific cross-linking experiments indicate that the suppressor substitutions induce conformational change in the complex and movement of the TatB subunit. The TatB F13Y substitution was associated with the strongest suppressing activity, even allowing transport of a Tat substrate lacking a signal peptide. In vivo analysis using a TatA–YFP fusion showed that the TatB F13Y substitution resulted in signal peptide-independent assembly of the Tat translocase. We conclude that Tat signal peptides play roles in substrate targeting and in triggering assembly of the active translocase. PMID:28223511

  13. Important roles for the arginine family of amino acids in swine nutrition and production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine, glutamine, glutamate, proline, aspartate, asparagine, ornithine, and citrulline are interconvertible via complex interorgan metabolism in most mammals (including the pig). The major sites for their metabolism are the small intestine, kidneys, and liver, with cortisol being a key regulatory...

  14. Arginine kinase: a potential pharmacological target in trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Claudio A

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids parasites have complex life cycles which involve a wide diversity of milieus with very different physicochemical properties. Arginine kinase is one of the key enzymes, responsible for the parasites' metabolic plasticity, which maintains the cell energy homeostasis during environment changes. Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible phosphorylation between phosphoarginine and ADP. The phosphagen phosphoarginine sustains high levels of cellular activity until metabolic events, such as glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, are switched on. In different unicellular and multicellular organisms including trypanosomatids, it was demonstrated that arginine kinase is an important component in resistance mechanisms to different stress factors, such as reactive oxygen species, trypanocidal drugs, pH and starvation. In addition, few arginine kinase inhibitors were identified during the lasts years, some of them with trypanocidal activity, such as polyphenolic compounds. All these unique features, in addition to the fact that arginine kinase is completely absent in mammals, make this pathway a favorable start point for rational drug design for the treatment of human trypanosomamiases.

  15. Production of l-Arginine by Arginine Hydroxamate-Resistant Mutants of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Kisumi, Masahiko; Kato, Jyoji; Sugiura, Masaki; Chibata, Ichiro

    1971-01-01

    l-Arginine hydroxamate inhibited the growth of various bacteria, and the inhibition was readily reversed by arginine. l-Arginine hydroxamate (10−3m) completely inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis. This inhibitory effect was prevented by 2.5 × 10−4ml-arginine, which was the most effective of all the natural amino acids in reversing the inhibition. l-Arginine hydroxamate-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis were isolated and found to excrete l-arginine in relatively high yields. One of the mutants, strain AHr-5, produced 4.5 mg of l-arginine per ml in shaken culture in 3 days. PMID:5002904

  16. The role of a parasite-specific allosteric site in the distinctive activation behavior of Eimeria tenella cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Salowe, Scott P; Wiltsie, Judyann; Liberator, Paul A; Donald, Robert G K

    2002-04-02

    A cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) was recently identified as an anticoccidial target for the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria tenella [Gurnett, A., Liberator, P. A., Dulski, P., Salowe, S., Donald, R. G. K., Anderson, J., Wiltsie, J., Diaz, C., Harris, G., Chang, B., Darkin-Rattray, S. J., Nare, B., Crumley, T., Blum, P., Misura, A., Tamas, T., Sardana, M., Yuan, J., Biftu, T., and Schmatz, D. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. (in press)]. Unlike the PKGs of higher organisms that have two cGMP binding sites in their regulatory domain, the PKG from Eimeria tenella (Et-PKG) contains three putative cGMP binding sites and has distinctive activation properties, including a very large stimulation by cGMP ( approximately 1000-fold) with significant cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 1.7). During our investigation of Et-PKG activation, we found that 8-substituted cGMP analogues are weak partial activators. For example, 8-NBD-cGMP provides a maximal stimulation of activity of only 20-fold with little evident cooperativity, although cGMP can synergize with the analogue to provide full activation. The results suggest that partial activation is a consequence of restricted binding of 8-NBD-cGMP to a subset of cGMP sites in the enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved arginine and glutamate residues in the parasite-specific third cGMP site confirms that this site is an important functional participant in the allosteric regulation of the kinase and that it exhibits very high selectivity against 8-NBD-cGMP. Since the results are consistent with full activation of Et-PKG requiring cyclic nucleotide binding in all three allosteric sites, one role for the additional cGMP site may be to establish a stricter regulatory mechanism for the kinase activity than is present in the PKGs of higher organisms containing only two allosteric sites.

  17. Effects of dietary L-arginine on the reactivity of canine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Ray, E C; Landis, M E; Miller, V M

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the effects of supplemental dietary L-arginine on the endothelial and smooth muscle function of canine coronary arteries. One group of dogs was fed the standard laboratory chow while another group was supplemented with 250 mg/kg per day L-arginine. All dogs had undergone bilateral reversed interposition saphenous vein grafting and received 325 mg/day oral aspirin. After 5 weeks of arginine feeding, left circumflex coronary arteries were removed, cut into rings, and suspended for the measurement of isometric force in organ chambers. Concentration-response curves were obtained to L-arginine, UK-14,304 (alpha2-adrenergic agonist) and A23187 (calcium ionophore) in the absence and presence of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and tetraethylammonium (TEA) alone or in combination. Serum concentrations of L-arginine increased by about 20% following 2 weeks of arginine feeding and remained elevated throughout the study. In rings with and without endothelium contracted with prostaglandin F2alpha, L-arginine caused concentration-dependent contractions in rings from control animals but no significant change in tension in rings from arginine-fed animals. Contractions to L-arginine in control animals were reduced by either L-NMMA or TEA. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to the alpha2-adrenergic agonist were decreased with arginine feeding while relaxations to the calcium ionophore and the endothelium-derived factor nitric oxide were similar among groups. Relaxations to UK-14,304 were reduced by L-NMMA in both groups but by TEA only in rings from control animals. These results suggest that dietary supplementation with L-arginine modifies reactivity of endothelium and smooth muscle by at least two mechanisms: one associated with activation of potassium channels and the other with receptor-coupled release of nitric oxide.

  18. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  19. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  20. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  1. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  2. The L-arginine/NO pathway, homoarginine, and nitrite-dependent renal carbonic anhydrase activity in young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carmann, Christina; Lilienthal, Eggert; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Schmidt-Choudhury, Anjona; Hörster, Irina; Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Beckmann, Bibiana; Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Lücke, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    High circulating levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and low circulating levels of homoarginine (hArg) are known cardiovascular risk factors in adults. While in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) circulating ADMA is significantly elevated, in children and adolescents the reported ADMA data are contradictory. In 102 children with T1DM and 95 healthy controls (HC) serving as controls, we investigated the L-arginine (Arg)/nitric oxide (NO) pathway. Children with T1DM were divided into two groups, i.e., in children with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus [T1DM-ND; n = 10; age, 8.8 (4.4-11.2) years; HbA1c, 13 (8.9-13.9) %] and in those with long-term treatment [T1DM-T; n = 92; age, 12.5 (10.5-15.4) years; HbA1c, 8.0 (7.2-8.6) %]. The age of the HC was 11.3 (8-13.3) years. Amino acids and NO metabolites of the Arg/NO pathway, creatinine and the oxidative stress biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by GC-MS or GC-MS/MS. Plasma hArg, ADMA and the hArg/ADMA molar ratio did not differ between the T1DM and HC groups. There was a significant difference between T1DM-T and HC with regard to plasma nitrite [0.53 (0.48-0.61) vs 2.05 (0.86-2.36) µM, P < 0.0001] as well as to urinary nitrite [0.09 (0.06-0.17) vs 0.22 (0.13-0.37) μmol/mmol creatinine, P < 0.0001]. Plasma, but not urinary nitrite, differed between T1DM-ND and HC [0.55 (0.50-0.66) vs 2.05 (0.86-2.36) µM, P < 0.0001]. Plasma MDA did not differ between the groups. The urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio (UNOXR), a measure of nitrite-dependent renal carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity, was higher in T1DM-T [1173 (738-1481), P < 0.0001] and T1DM-ND [1341 (1117-1615), P = 0.0007] compared to HC [540 (324-962)], but did not differ between T1DM-T and T1DM-ND (P = 0.272). The lower nitrite excretion in the children with T1DM may indicate enhanced renal CA-dependent nitrite reabsorption compared with healthy children. Yet, lower plasma nitrite concentration in the T1DM patients may have also

  3. Renal cell carcinoma does not express argininosuccinate synthetase and is highly sensitive to arginine deprivation via arginine deiminase.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Cheol-Yong; Shim, Young-Jun; Kim, Eun-Ho; Lee, Ju-Han; Won, Nam-Hee; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Park, In-Sun; Yoon, Duck-Ki; Min, Bon-Hong

    2007-02-15

    Recently, pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI; EC 3.5.3.6) has been used to treat the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or melanoma, in which the level of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) activity is low or undetectable. The efficacy of its antitumor activity largely depends on the level of intracellular ASS, which enables tumor cells to recycle citrulline to arginine. Thus, we examined the expression levels of ASS in various cancer cells and found that it is low in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells, rendering the cells highly sensitive to arginine deprivation by ADI treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that in biopsy specimens from RCC patients (n = 98), the expression of ASS is highly demonstrated in the epithelium of normal proximal tubule but not seen in tumor cells. Furthermore, RCC cells treated with ADI showed remarkable growth retardation in a dose dependent manner. ADI also exerted in vivo antiproliferative effect on the allografted renal cell carcinoma (RENCA) tumor cells and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Histological examination of the tumors revealed that tumor angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were significantly diminished by ADI administration. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of RCC in ways of inhibitions of arginine availability and neovascularization.

  4. Role of Arginine and Lysine in the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Histone-derived Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cutrona, Kara J.; Kaufman, Bethany A.; Figueroa, Dania M.; Elmore, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of cell-penetrating peptides is often promoted by increased content of arginine or other guanidinum groups. However, relatively little research has considered the role of these functional groups on antimicrobial peptide activity. This study compared the activity of three histone-derived antimicrobial peptides—buforin II, DesHDAP1, and parasin— with variants that contain only lysine or arginine cationic residues. These peptides operate via different mechanisms as parasin causes membrane permeabilization while buforin II and DesHDAP1 translocate into bacteria. For all peptides, antibacterial activity increased with increased arginine content. Higher arginine content increased permeabilization for parasin while it improved translocation for buforin II and DesHDAP1. These observations provide insight into the relative importance of arginine and lysine in these antimicrobial peptides. PMID:26555191

  5. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Qian, Kun; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zheng, Y. George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arginine methylation is an abundant posttranslational modification occurring in mammalian cells and catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). Misregulation and aberrant expression of PRMTs are associated with various disease states, notably cancer. PRMTs are prominent therapeutic targets in drug discovery. Areas covered The authors provide an updated review of the research on the development of chemical modulators for PRMTs. Great efforts are seen in screening and designing potent and selective PRMT inhibitors, and a number of micromolar and submicromolar inhibitors have been obtained for key PRMT enzymes such as PRMT1, CARM1, and PRMT5. The authors provide a focus on their chemical structures, mechanism of action, and pharmacological activities. Pros and cons of each type of inhibitors are also discussed. Expert opinion Several key challenging issues exist in PRMT inhibitor discovery. Structural mechanisms of many PRMT inhibitors remain unclear. There lacks consistency in potency data due to divergence of assay methods and conditions. Physiologically relevant cellular assays are warranted. Substantial engagements are needed to investigate pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the new PRMT inhibitors in pertinent disease models. Discovery and evaluation of potent, isoform-selective, cell-permeable and in vivo-active PRMT modulators will continue to be an active arena of research in years ahead. PMID:26789238

  6. Identification of Small-Molecule Enhancers of Arginine Methylation Catalyzed by Coactivator-Associated Arginine Methyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Sabrina; Spannhoff, Astrid; Milite, Ciro; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Cheng, Donghang; Tosco, Alessandra; Viviano, Monica; Yamani, Abdellah; Cianciulli, Agostino; Sala, Marina; Cura, Vincent; Cavarelli, Jean; Novellino, Ettore; Mai, Antonello; Bedford, Mark T.; Sbardella, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common post-translational modification that is crucial in modulating gene expression at multiple critical levels. The arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) are envisaged as promising druggable targets but their role in physiological and pathological pathways is far from being clear, due to the limited number of modulators reported to date. In this effort, enzyme activators can be invaluable tools useful as gain-of-function reagents to interrogate the biological roles in cells and in vivo of PRMTs. Yet the identification of such molecules is rarely pursued. Herein we describe a series of aryl ureido acetamido indole carboxylates (dubbed “uracandolates”), able to increase the methylation of histone- (H3) or non-histone (polyadenylate-binding protein 1, PABP1) substrates induced by coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), both in in vitro and cellular settings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of compounds acting as CARM1 activators. PMID:23095008

  7. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  8. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  9. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  10. Purification and characterization of arginine kinase from the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana).

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashli E; France, Richard M; Grossman, Steven H

    2004-06-01

    The isolation and characterization of homogeneous arginine kinase from the cockroach is reported. The purification protocol produces 6.6 mg of pure enzyme from 6.8 g of whole cockroach. The purified enzyme cross-reacts with a heterologous antibody and monoclonal antibody against arginine kinase from the shrimp. Both antibody preparations also cross-react with extracts from several species known to contain monomeric arginine kinase, but fail to react with extracts from organisms containing dimeric arginine kinase. Cockroach arginine kinase has a molecular mass of approximately 43,000 determined from measurements by gel filtration and gel electrophoresis. Compared with other arginine kinases, the enzyme from the cockroach is relatively thermostable (50% activity retained at 50 degrees C for 10 min) and has a pH optima of 8.5 and 6.5-7.5, for the forward and reverse reactions, respectively. Treatment with 5,5'dithiobis[2-nitrobenzoic acid] indicates that arginine kinase has a single reactive sulfhydryl group and, interestingly, the reaction is biphasic. The Michaelis constants for the phosphagen substrates, arginine: 0.49 mM, phosphoarginine: 0.94 mM, and nucleotide substrates MgATP: 0.14 mM, MgADP: 0.09 mM, are in the range reported for other arginine kinases. A 1% solution of pure enzyme has an absorbance of 7.0 at 280 nm. Calculations based on circular dichroic spectra indicate that arginine kinase from the cockroach has 12% alpha-helical structure. The intrinsic protein fluorescence emission maximum at 340 nm suggests that tryptophan residues are below the surface of the protein and not exposed to solvent. Arginine kinase from the cockroach and shrimp are known to be deleterious immunogens towards humans. The availability of pure protein, its characterization and potential regulation of activity, will be useful in developing agents to control the cockroach population and its destructive role in agriculture and human health.

  11. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  12. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  13. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  14. Arginine substitution of a cysteine in transmembrane helix M8 converts Na+,K+-ATPase to an electroneutral pump similar to H+,K+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Holm, Rikke; Khandelwal, Jaanki; Einholm, Anja P; Andersen, Jens P; Artigas, Pablo; Vilsen, Bente

    2017-01-10

    Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and H(+),K(+)-ATPase are electrogenic and nonelectrogenic ion pumps, respectively. The underlying structural basis for this difference has not been established, and it has not been revealed how the H(+),K(+)-ATPase avoids binding of Na(+) at the site corresponding to the Na(+)-specific site of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (site III). In this study, we addressed these questions by using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with enzymatic, transport, and electrophysiological functional measurements. Replacement of the cysteine C932 in transmembrane helix M8 of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with arginine, present in the H(+),K(+)-ATPase at the corresponding position, converted the normal 3Na(+):2K(+):1ATP stoichiometry of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase to electroneutral 2Na(+):2K(+):1ATP stoichiometry similar to the electroneutral transport mode of the H(+),K(+)-ATPase. The electroneutral C932R mutant of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase retained a wild-type-like enzyme turnover rate for ATP hydrolysis and rate of cellular K(+) uptake. Only a relatively minor reduction of apparent Na(+) affinity for activation of phosphorylation from ATP was observed for C932R, whereas replacement of C932 with leucine or phenylalanine, the latter of a size comparable to arginine, led to spectacular reductions of apparent Na(+) affinity without changing the electrogenicity. From these results, in combination with structural considerations, it appears that the guanidine(+) group of the M8 arginine replaces Na(+) at the third site, thus preventing Na(+) binding there, although allowing Na(+) to bind at the two other sites and become transported. Hence, in the H(+),K(+)-ATPase, the ability of the M8 arginine to donate an internal cation binding at the third site is decisive for the electroneutral transport mode of this pump.

  15. Arginine Decarboxylase Is Localized in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, A.; Culianez-Macia, F. A.; Altabella, T.; Besford, R. T.; Flores, D.; Tiburcio, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Plants, unlike animals, can use either ornithine decarboxylase or arginine decarboxylase (ADC) to produce the polyamine precursor putrescine. Lack of knowledge of the exact cellular and subcellular location of these enzymes has been one of the main obstacles to our understanding of the biological role of polyamines in plants. We have generated polyclonal antibodies to oat (Avena sativa L.) ADC to study the spatial distribution and subcellular localization of ADC protein in different oat tissues. By immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, we show that ADC is organ specific. By cell fractionation and immunoblotting, we show that ADC is localized in chloroplasts associated with the thylakoid membrane. The results also show that increased levels of ADC protein are correlated with high levels of ADC activity and putrescine in osmotically stressed oat leaves. A model of compartmentalization for the arginine pathway and putrescine biosynthesis in active photosynthetic tissues has been proposed. In the context of endosymbiote-driven metabolic evolution in plants, the location of ADC in the chloroplast compartment may have major evolutionary significance, since it explains (a) why plants can use two alternative pathways for putrescine biosynthesis and (b) why animals do not possess ADC. PMID:12228631

  16. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  17. The Inhibitory Effects of Cu(2+) on Exopalaemon carinicauda Arginine Kinase via Inhibition Kinetics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Si, Yue-Xiu; Lee, Jinhyuk; Yin, Shang-Jun; Gu, Xiao-Xu; Park, Yong-Doo; Qian, Guo-Ying

    2015-06-01

    We studied the Cu(2+)-mediated inhibition and aggregation of Exopalaemon carinicauda arginine kinase (ECAK). We found that Cu(2+) significantly inactivated ECAK activity and double-reciprocal kinetics demonstrated that Cu(2+) induced noncompetitive inhibition of arginine and ATP (IC50 = 2.27 ± 0.16 μM; K i for arginine = 13.53 ± 3.76; K i for ATP = 4.02 ± 0.56). Spectrofluorometry results showed that Cu(2+) induced ECAK tertiary structural changes including the exposure of hydrophobic surfaces that directly induced ECAK aggregation. The addition of osmolytes such as glycine and proline successfully blocked ECAK aggregation induced by Cu(2+) and recovered ECAK activity. We built a 3D structure for ECAK using the ECAK ORF gene sequence. Molecular dynamics (MD) and docking simulations between ECAK and Cu(2+) were conducted to elucidate the binding mechanisms. The results showed that Cu(2+) blocked the entrance to the ATP active site; these results are consistent with the experimental result that Cu(2+) induced ECAK inactivation. Since arginine kinase (AK) plays an important role in cellular energy metabolism in invertebrates, our study can provide new information about the effect of Cu(2+) on ECAK enzymatic function and unfolding, including aggregation, and the protective effects of osmolytes on ECAK folding to better understand the role of the invertebrate ECAK metabolic enzyme in marine environments.

  18. Catalytic efficiency of HAP phytases is determined by a key residue in close proximity to the active site.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dawei; Li, Zhongyuan; Huang, Huoqing; Yuan, Tiezheng; Shi, Pengjun; Luo, Huiying; Meng, Kun; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2011-05-01

    The maximum activity of Yersinia enterocolitica phytase (YeAPPA) occurs at pH 5.0 and 45 °C, and notably, its specific activity (3.28 ± 0.24 U mg(-1)) is 800-fold less than that of its Yersinia kristeensenii homolog (YkAPPA; 88% amino acid sequence identity). Sequence alignment and molecular modeling show that the arginine at position 79 (Arg79) in YeAPPA corresponding to Gly in YkAPPA as well as other histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases is the only non-conserved residue near the catalytic site. To characterize the effects of the corresponding residue on the specific activities of HAP phytases, Escherichia coli EcAPPA, a well-characterized phytase with a known crystal structure, was selected for mutagenesis-its Gly73 was replaced with Arg, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr, Leu, or Tyr. The results show that the specific activities of all of the corresponding EcAPPA mutants (17-2,400 U mg(-1)) were less than that of the wild-type phytase (3,524 U mg(-1)), and the activity levels were approximately proportional to the molecular volumes of the substituted residues' side chains. Site-directed replacement of Arg79 in YeAPPA (corresponding to Gly73 of EcAPPA) with Ser, Leu, and Gly largely increased the specific activity, which further verified the key role of the residue at position 79 for determining phytase activity. Thus, a new determinant that influences the catalytic efficiency of HAP phytases has been identified.

  19. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  20. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  1. Transition state structure of arginine kinase: implications for catalysis of bimolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G; Somasundaram, T; Blanc, E; Parthasarathy, G; Ellington, W R; Chapman, M S

    1998-07-21

    Arginine kinase belongs to the family of enzymes, including creatine kinase, that catalyze the buffering of ATP in cells with fluctuating energy requirements and that has been a paradigm for classical enzymological studies. The 1.86-A resolution structure of its transition-state analog complex, reported here, reveals its active site and offers direct evidence for the importance of precise substrate alignment in the catalysis of bimolecular reactions, in contrast to the unimolecular reactions studied previously. In the transition-state analog complex studied here, a nitrate mimics the planar gamma-phosphoryl during associative in-line transfer between ATP and arginine. The active site is unperturbed, and the reactants are not constrained covalently as in a bisubstrate complex, so it is possible to measure how precisely they are pre-aligned by the enzyme. Alignment is exquisite. Entropic effects may contribute to catalysis, but the lone-pair orbitals are also aligned close enough to their optimal trajectories for orbital steering to be a factor during nucleophilic attack. The structure suggests that polarization, strain toward the transition state, and acid-base catalysis also contribute, but, in contrast to unimolecular enzyme reactions, their role appears to be secondary to substrate alignment in this bimolecular reaction.

  2. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  3. Dissection of the EntF condensation domain boundary and active site residues in nonribosomal peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roche, Eric D; Walsh, Christopher T

    2003-02-11

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) make many natural products of clinical importance, but a deeper understanding of the protein domains that compose NRPS assembly lines is required before these megasynthetases can be effectively engineered to produce novel drugs. The N-terminal amide bond-forming condensation (C) domain of the enterobactin NRPS EntF was excised from the multidomain synthetase using endpoints determined from sequence alignments and secondary structure predictions. The isolated domain was well-folded when compared by circular dichroism to the vibriobactin NRPS VibH, a naturally free-standing C domain. The EntF domain was also fully functional in an assay based on a synthetic small-molecule substrate, seryl N-acetylcysteamine. Active site mutants of the EntF C domain were surprisingly inactive in vitro as compared to their VibH counterparts, yet maintained the overall domain structure. An in vivo assay was developed in the context of the full-length EntF protein to more sensitively probe the activity level of the C domain mutants, and this supported strong effects for the active site mutations. The crucial role of histidine-138 was confirmed by assay of the full-length protein in vitro. These results suggest a strong resemblance of catalysis by the EntF C domain to chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, including an active site organized by an arginine-aspartate salt bridge, a key histidine acting as a general base, and an asparagine instead of a serine stabilizing the proposed tetrahedral intermediate by hydrogen bonding. The precise definition of a functional C domain excised from a NRPS should aid efforts at swapping NRPS domains between assembly lines.

  4. The influence of a novel pentadecapeptide, BPC 157, on N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester and L-arginine effects on stomach mucosa integrity and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Sikirić, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarević, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagić, V; Turković, B; Rotkvić, I; Mise, S; Zoricić, I; Konjevoda, P; Perović, D; Jurina, L; Separović, J; Hanzevacki, M; Artuković, B; Bratulić, M; Tisljar, M; Gjurasin, M; Miklić, P; Stancić-Rokotov, D; Slobodnjak, Z; Jelovac, N; Marović, A

    1997-07-30

    The known effects of a novel stomach pentadecapeptide BPC157 (10 microg or 10 ng/kg), namely its salutary activity against ethanol (96%, i.g.)-induced gastric lesions (simultaneously applied i.p.) and in blood pressure maintenance (given i.v.), were investigated in rats challenged with a combination of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME) (5 mg/kg i.v.), a competitive inhibitor of endothelium nitric oxide (NO)-generation and NO precursor, L-arginine (200 mg/kg i.v.) (D-arginine was ineffective). In the gastric lesions assay, NO agents were given 5 min before ethanol injury and BPC 157 medication. Given alone, BPC157 had an antiulcer effect, as did L-arginine, but L-NAME had no effect. L-NAME completely abolished the effect of L-arginine, whereas it only attenuated the effect of BPC 157. After application of the combination of L-NAME + L-arginine, the BPC157 effect was additionally impaired. In blood pressure studies, compared with L-arginine, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (without effect on basal normal values) had both a mimicking effect (impaired L-NAME-blood pressure increase, when applied prophylactically and decreased already raised L-NAME values, given at the time of the maximal L-NAME-blood pressure increase (i.e., 10 min after L-NAME)) and preventive activity (L-arginine-induced moderate blood pressure decrease was prevented by BPC 157 pretreatment). When BPC 157 was given 10 min after L-NAME + L-arginine combination, which still led to a blood pressure increase, its previously clear effect (noted in L-NAME treated rats) disappeared. In vitro, in gastric mucosa from rat stomach tissue homogenates, BPC 157, given in the same dose (100 microM) as L-arginine, induced a comparable generation of NO. But, BPC 157 effect could not be inhibited by L-NAME, even when L-NAME was given in a tenfold (100 versus 1000 microM) higher dose than that needed for inhibition of the L-arginine effect. NO synthesis was blunted when the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 and L-arginine

  5. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals the Role of Protein Arginine Phosphorylation in the Bacterial Stress Response*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Andreas; Trentini, Débora Broch; Spiess, Silvia; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Ammerer, Gustav; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging protein modification implicated in the general stress response of Gram-positive bacteria. The modification is mediated by the arginine kinase McsB, which phosphorylates and inactivates the heat shock repressor CtsR. In this study, we developed a mass spectrometric approach accounting for the peculiar chemical properties of phosphoarginine. The improved methodology was used to analyze the dynamic changes in the Bacillus subtilis arginine phosphoproteome in response to different stress situations. Quantitative analysis showed that a B. subtilis mutant lacking the YwlE arginine phosphatase accumulated a strikingly large number of arginine phosphorylations (217 sites in 134 proteins), however only a minor fraction of these sites was increasingly modified during heat shock or oxidative stress. The main targets of McsB-mediated arginine phosphorylation comprise central factors of the stress response system including the CtsR and HrcA heat shock repressors, as well as major components of the protein quality control system such as the ClpCP protease and the GroEL chaperonine. These findings highlight the impact of arginine phosphorylation in orchestrating the bacterial stress response. PMID:24263382

  6. Arginine utilization of citrulline synthesis in arginase II knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthesis of citrulline (Cit) from arginine (Arg) in the small intestine depends on the activity of arginase II (ARG2). To test the hypothesis that Arg is the main dietary precursor for Cit synthesis, despite the lack of ARG2, tracer studies were conducted in WT and ARG2 ko conscious mice. WT mi...

  7. L-arginine enhances cell proliferation and reduces apoptosis in human endometrial RL95-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    L-arginine is considered to be one of the most versatile amino acids due to the fact that it serves as a precursor for many important molecules in cellular physiology. When supplemented in the diet, L-arginine can increase the number of implantation sites in mice and rats, suggesting an effect at th...

  8. General splicing factors SF2 and SC35 have equivalent activities in vitro, and both affect alternative 5' and 3' splice site selection.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, X D; Mayeda, A; Maniatis, T; Krainer, A R

    1992-01-01

    The human pre-mRNA splicing factors SF2 and SC35 have similar electrophoretic mobilities, and both of them contain an N-terminal ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-type RNA-recognition motif and a C-terminal arginine/serine-rich domain. However, the two proteins are encoded by different genes and display only 31% amino acid sequence identity. Here we report a systematic comparison of the splicing activities of recombinant SF2 and SC35. We find that either protein can reconstitute the splicing activity of S100 extracts and of SC35-immunodepleted nuclear extracts. Previous studies revealed that SF2 influences alternative 5' splice site selection in vitro, by favoring proximal over distal 5' splice sites, and that the A1 protein of heterogeneous nuclear RNP counteracts this effect. We now show that SC35 has a similar effect on competing 5' splice sites and is also antagonized by A1 protein. In addition, we report that both SF2 and SC35 also favor the proximal site in a pre-mRNA containing duplicated 3' splice sites, but this effect is not modulated by A1. We conclude that SF2 and SC35 are distinct splicing factors, but they display indistinguishable splicing activities in vitro. Images PMID:1454802

  9. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  10. Rhomboid protease AarA mediates quorum-sensing in Providencia stuartii by activating TatA of the twin-arginine translocase.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Lindsay G; Strisovsky, Kvido; Clemmer, Katy M; Bhatt, Shantanu; Freeman, Matthew; Rather, Philip N

    2007-01-16

    The Providencia stuartii AarA protein is a member of the rhomboid family of intramembrane serine proteases and is required for the production of an unknown quorum-sensing molecule. In a screen to identify rhomboid-encoding genes from Proteus mirabilis, tatA was identified as a multicopy suppressor and restored extracellular signal production as well as complementing all other phenotypes of a Prov. stuartii aarA mutant. TatA is a component of the twin-arginine translocase (Tat) protein secretion pathway and likely forms a secretion pore. By contrast, the native tatA gene of Prov. stuartii in multicopy did not suppress an aarA mutation. We find that TatA in Prov. stuartii has a short N-terminal extension that was atypical of TatA proteins from most other bacteria. This extension was proteolytically removed by AarA both in vivo and in vitro. A Prov. stuartii TatA protein missing the first 7 aa restored the ability to rescue the aarA-dependent phenotypes. To verify that loss of the Tat system was responsible for the various phenotypes exhibited by an aarA mutant, a tatC-null allele was constructed. The tatC mutant exhibited the same phenotypes as an aarA mutant and was epistatic to aarA. These data provide a molecular explanation for the requirement of AarA in quorum-sensing and uncover a function for the Tat protein export system in the production of secreted signaling molecules. Finally, TatA represents a validated natural substrate for a prokaryotic rhomboid protease.

  11. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  12. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  13. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  14. Implications of the role of reactive cystein in arginine kinase: reactivation kinetics of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-modified arginine kinase reactivated by dithiothreitol.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ji-Cheng; Cheng, Yuan; Hui, En-Fu; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2004-04-30

    The reduction of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-modified arginine kinase by dithiothreitol has been investigated using the kinetic theory of the substrate reaction during modification of enzyme activity. The results show that the modified arginine kinase can be fully reactivated by an excess concentration of dithiothreitol in a monophasic kinetic course. The presence of ATP or the transition-state analog markedly slows the apparent reactivation rate constant, while arginine shows no effect. The results of ultraviolet (UV) difference and intrinsic fluorescence spectra indicate that the substrate arginine-ADP-Mg2+ can induce conformational changes of the modified enzyme but adding NO3- cannot induce further changes that occur with the native enzyme. The reactive cysteines' location and role in the catalysis of arginine kinase are discussed. It is suggested that the cysteine may be located in the hinge region of the two domains of arginine kinase. The reactive cysteine of arginine kinase may play an important role not in the binding to the transition-state analog but in the conformational changes caused by the transition-state analog.

  15. Enzymic degradation of plasma arginine using arginine deiminase inhibits nitric oxide production and protects mice from the lethal effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha and endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J Brandon; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Ensor, C Mark; Bomalaski, John S; Clark, Mike A

    2002-01-01

    Septic shock is mediated in part by nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha). NO is synthesized primarily from extracellular arginine. We tested the ability of an arginine-degrading enzyme to inhibit NO production in mice and to protect mice from the hypotension and lethality that occur after the administration of TNFalpha or endotoxin. Treatment of BALB/c mice with arginine deiminase (ADI) formulated with succinimidyl succinimide polyethylene glycol of M(r) 20000 (ADI-SS PEG(20000)) eliminated all measurable plasma arginine (from normal levels of approximately 155 microM arginine to 2 microM). In addition, ADI-SS PEG(20000) also inhibited the production of NO, as quantified by plasma nitrate+nitrite. Treatment of mice with TNFalpha or endotoxin resulted in a dose-dependent increase in NO production and lethality. Pretreatment of mice with ADI-SS PEG(20000) resulted in increased resistance to the lethal effects of TNFalpha and endotoxin. These observations are consistent with NO production resulting, to some extent, from the metabolism of extracellular arginine. The toxic effects of TNFalpha and endotoxin may be partially inhibited by enzymic degradation of plasma arginine by ADI-SS PEG(20000). Interestingly, pretreatment with ADI-SS PEG(20000) did not inhibit the anti-tumour activity of TNFalpha in vitro or in vivo. This treatment may allow greater amounts of TNFalpha, as well as other cytokines, to be administered while abrogating side effects such as hypotension and death. PMID:11964159

  16. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  17. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  18. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  19. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  20. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  1. Studies on the mechanism of hydroxymethylbilane synthase concerning the role of arginine residues in substrate binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lander, M; Pitt, A R; Alefounder, P R; Bardy, D; Abell, C; Battersby, A R

    1991-01-01

    The role of conserved arginine residues in hydroxymethylbilane synthase was investigated by replacing these residues in the enzyme from Escherichia coli with leucine residues by using site-directed mutagenesis. The kinetic parameters for these mutant enzymes and studies on the formation of intermediate enzyme-substrate complexes indicate that several of these arginine residues are involved in binding the carboxylate side chains of the pyrromethane cofactor and the growing oligopyrrole chain. Images Fig. 6. PMID:2025226

  2. Dietary arginine affects energy metabolism through polyamine turnover in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Rønnestad, Ivar; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Espe, Marit

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, quadruplicate groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed plant protein-based diets with increasing arginine inclusions (range 28·8-37·4 g/kg DM) to investigate whether arginine supplementation affects growth and lipid accumulation through an elevated polyamine turnover. Dietary lysine was held at a constant concentration, just below the requirement. All other amino acids were balanced and equal in the diets. Arginine supplementation increased protein and fat accretion, without affecting the hepatosomatic or visceralsomatic indices. Dietary arginine correlated with putrescine in the liver (R 0·78, P= 0·01) and with ornithine in the muscle, liver and plasma (P= 0·0002, 0·003 and 0·0002, respectively). The mRNA of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme producing putrescine, was up-regulated in the white adipose tissue of fish fed the high-arginine inclusion compared with those fed the low-arginine diet. Concomitantly, spermidine/spermine-(N1)-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine turnover that consumes acetyl-CoA, showed an increased activity in the liver of fish fed the arginine-supplemented diets. In addition, lower acetyl-CoA concentrations were observed in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet, while ATP, which is used in the process of synthesising spermidine and spermine, did not show a similar trend. Gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, was up-regulated in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet. Taken together, the data support that increased dietary arginine activates polyamine turnover and β-oxidation in the liver of juvenile Atlantic salmon and may act to improve the metabolic status of the fish.

  3. Physiological implications of arginine metabolism in plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Gudrun; Todd, Christopher D.; Trovato, Maurizio; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting resource for plant growth in most terrestrial habitats since large amounts of nitrogen are needed to synthesize nucleic acids and proteins. Among the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, arginine has the highest nitrogen to carbon ratio, which makes it especially suitable as a storage form of organic nitrogen. Synthesis in chloroplasts via ornithine is apparently the only operational pathway to provide arginine in plants, and the rate of arginine synthesis is tightly regulated by various feedback mechanisms in accordance with the overall nutritional status. While several steps of arginine biosynthesis still remain poorly characterized in plants, much wider attention has been paid to inter- and intracellular arginine transport as well as arginine-derived metabolites. A role of arginine as alternative source besides glutamate for proline biosynthesis is still discussed controversially and may be prevented by differential subcellular localization of enzymes. Apparently, arginine is a precursor for nitric oxide (NO), although the molecular mechanism of NO production from arginine remains unclear in higher plants. In contrast, conversion of arginine to polyamines is well documented, and in several plant species also ornithine can serve as a precursor for polyamines. Both NO and polyamines play crucial roles in regulating developmental processes as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. It is thus conceivable that arginine catabolism serves on the one hand to mobilize nitrogen storages, while on the other hand it may be used to fine-tune development and defense mechanisms against stress. This review summarizes the recent advances in our knowledge about arginine metabolism, with a special focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and pinpoints still unresolved critical questions. PMID:26284079

  4. The oxidation-state-dependent ATP-binding site of cytochrome c. Implication of an essential arginine residue and the effect of occupancy on the oxidation-reduction potential.

    PubMed Central

    Corthésy, B E; Wallace, C J

    1988-01-01

    Arg-91 is not part of the active site of cytochrome c that mediates binding and electron transfer, yet it is absolutely conserved in eukaryotic cytochromes c, indicating a special function. The physicochemical properties of analogues are unaffected by the modification of this residue, so they can be used with confidence to study the role of Arg-91. We have established limiting conditions under which this residue alone is specifically modified by cyclohexane-1,2-dione, and have subsequently shown that ATP, and to a lesser extent ADP or Pi, protects it from the action of the reagent in an oxidation-state-dependent manner. These observations strongly support the idea that this site exerts a controlling influence on cytochrome c activity in the electron transport or other cellular redox systems, and we have commenced a study of how that influence might operate. We find that the redox potentials of both cytochrome c and analogue are little affected by changing ATP or Pi concentrations. PMID:2843168

  5. Functional insights from high resolution structures of mouse protein arginine methyltransferase 6.

    PubMed

    Bonnefond, Luc; Stojko, Johann; Mailliot, Justine; Troffer-Charlier, Nathalie; Cura, Vincent; Wurtz, Jean-Marie; Cianférani, Sarah; Cavarelli, Jean

    2015-08-01

    PRMT6 is a protein arginine methyltransferase involved in transcriptional regulation, human immunodeficiency virus pathogenesis, DNA base excision repair, and cell cycle progression. Like other PRMTs, PRMT6 is overexpressed in several cancer types and is therefore considered as a potential anti-cancer drug target. In the present study, we described six crystal structures of PRMT6 from Mus musculus, solved and refined at 1.34 Å for the highest resolution structure. The crystal structures revealed that the folding of the helix αX is required to stabilize a productive active site before methylation of the bound peptide can occur. In the absence of cofactor, metal cations can be found in the catalytic pocket at the expected position of the guanidinium moiety of the target arginine substrate. Using mass spectrometry under native conditions, we show that PRMT6 dimer binds two cofactor and a single H4 peptide molecules. Finally, we characterized a new site of in vitro automethylation of mouse PRMT6 at position 7.

  6. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  7. Purification and characterization of arginine kinase from locust.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Bai, Ji-Gang

    2006-01-01

    L-Arginine kinase (AK; ATP:L-arginine N-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.3.3) catalyzes the reversible transphosphorylation between N-phospho-L-arginine (PArg) and ATP thus buffering cellular ATP levels. AK was purified from the leg muscle of the locust Migratoria manilensis by Sephacryl S-200 HR gel filtration chromatography and DEAE Sepharose CL-6B fast flow anion exchange chromatography to an apparent homogeneity with a recovery of 80%. The enzyme behaved as monomeric protein with molecular mass of about 40 kD, and had a pH and temperature optimum of 8.6 and 30 degrees C, respectively, and a pI of about 6.3. The Michaelis constants for synthesis of PArg are 0.936 and 1.290 mM for L-arginine and ATP, respectively and k(cat)/K(m)(Arg) 174. The activity of AK required divalent cations such as Mg(2+) and Mn(2+). In the presence of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), AK activity was greatly inhibited. The intrinsic protein fluorescence emission maximum at 330 nm using the excitation wavelength at 295 nm suggested that tryptophan residues are below the surface of the protein and not exposed to solvent.

  8. Artificial phosphorylation sites modulate the activity of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The KvAP potassium channel is representative of a family of voltage-gated ion channels where the membrane potential is sensed by a transmembrane helix containing several positively charged arginines. Previous work by Wang and Zocchi [A. Wang and G. Zocchi, PLoS ONE 6, e18598 (2011), 10.1371/journal.pone.0018598] showed how a negatively charged polyelectrolyte attached in proximity to the voltage sensing element can bias the opening probability of the channel. Here we introduce three phosphorylation sites at the same location and show that the response curve of the channel shifts by about 20 mV upon phosphorylation, while other characteristics such as the single-channel conductance are unaffected. In summary, we construct an artificial phosphorylation site which confers allosteric regulation to the channel.

  9. Engineering an arginine catabolizing bioconjugate: Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of PEGylated derivatives of arginine deiminase from Mycoplasma arthritidis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maoliang; Basu, Amartya; Palm, Thomas; Hua, Jack; Youngster, Stephen; Hwang, Lisa; Liu, Hsien-Ching; Li, Xiguang; Peng, Ping; Zhang, Yue; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Zhihua; Longley, Clifford; Mehlig, Mary; Borowski, Virna; Sai, Prakash; Viswanathan, Manickam; Jang, Eun; Petti, Gerald; Liu, Sam; Yang, Karen; Filpula, David

    2006-01-01

    Arginine is an important metabolite in the normal function of several biological systems, and arginine deprivation has been investigated in animal models and human clinical trials for its effects on inhibition of tumor growth, angiogenesis, or nitric oxide synthesis. In order to design an optimal arginine-catabolizing enzyme bioconjugate, a novel recombinant arginine deiminase (ADI) from Mycoplasma arthritidis was prepared, and multi-PEGylated derivatives were examined for enzymatic and biochemical properties in vitro, as well as pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior in rats and mice. ADI bioconjugates constructed with 12 kDa or 20 kDa monomethoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) polymers with linear succinimidyl carbonate linkers were investigated via intravenous, intramuscular, or subcutaneous administration in rodents. The selected PEG-ADI compounds have 22 +/- 2 PEG strands per protein dimer, providing an additional molecular mass of about 0.2-0.5 x 10(6) Da and prolonging the plasma mean residence time of the enzyme over 30-fold in mice. Prolonged plasma arginine deprivation was demonstrated with each injection route for these bioconjugates. Pharmacokinetic analysis employed parallel measurement of enzyme activity in bioassays and enzyme assays and demonstrated a correlation with the pharmacodynamic analysis of plasma arginine concentrations. Either ADI bioconjugate depressed plasma arginine to undetectable levels for 10 days when administered intravenously at 5 IU per mouse, while the subcutaneous and intramuscular routes exhibited only slightly reduced potency. Both bioconjugates exhibited potent growth inhibition of several cultured tumor lines that are deficient in the anabolic enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase. Investigations of structure-activity optimization for PEGylated ADI compounds revealed a benefit to constraining the PEG size and number of attachments to both conserve catabolic activity and streamline manufacturing of the experimental therapeutics

  10. Arginine deiminase modulates endothelial tip cells via excessive synthesis of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Wei; Song, Xiaomin; Zhou, Hao; Luo, Yongzhang

    2011-10-01

    ADI (arginine deiminase), an enzyme that hydrolyses arginine, has been reported as an anti-angiogenesis agent. However, its molecular mechanism is unclear. We have demonstrated for the first time that ADI modulates the angiogenic activity of endothelial tip cells. By arginine depletion, ADI disturbs actin filament in endothelial tip cells, causing disordered migratory direction and decreased migration ability. Furthermore, ADI induces excessive synthesis of ROS (reactive oxygen species), and activates caspase 8-, but not caspase 9-, dependent apoptosis in endothelial cells. These findings provide a novel mechanism by which ADI inhibits tumour angiogenesis through modulating endothelial tip cells.

  11. Substrate specificity engineering of beta-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase from Pyrococcus by exchange of unique active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kaper, Thijs; van Heusden, Hester H; van Loo, Bert; Vasella, Andrea; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M

    2002-03-26

    A beta-mannosidase gene (PH0501) was identified in the Pyrococcus horikoshii genome and cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purified enzyme (BglB) was most specific for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-mannopyranoside (pNP-Man) (Km: 0.44 mM) with a low turnover rate (kcat: 4.3 s(-1)). The beta-mannosidase has been classified as a member of family 1 of glycoside hydrolases. Sequence alignments and homology modeling showed an apparent conservation of its active site region with, remarkably, two unique active site residues, Gln77 and Asp206. These residues are an arginine and asparagine residue in all other known family 1 enzymes, which interact with the catalytic nucleophile and equatorial C2-hydroxyl group of substrates, respectively. The unique residues of P. horikoshii BglB were introduced in the highly active beta-glucosidase CelB of Pyrococcus furiosus and vice versa, yielding two single and one double mutant for each enzyme. In CelB, both substitutions R77Q and N206D increased the specificity for mannosides and reduced hydrolysis rates 10-fold. In contrast, BglB D206N showed 10-fold increased hydrolysis rates and 35-fold increased affinity for the hydrolysis of glucosides. In combination with inhibitor studies, it was concluded that the substituted residues participate in the ground-state binding of substrates with an equatorial C2-hydroxyl group, but contribute most to transition-state stabilization. The unique activity profile of BglB seems to be caused by an altered interaction between the enzyme and C2-hydroxyl of the substrate and a specifically increased affinity for mannose that results from Asp206.

  12. Estradiol augments while progesterone inhibits arginine transport in human endothelial cells through modulation of cationic amino acid transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Bentur, Ohad S; Schwartz, Doron; Chernichovski, Tamara; Ingbir, Merav; Weinstein, Talia; Chernin, Gil; Schwartz, Idit F

    2015-08-15

    Decreased generation of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) characterizes endothelial dysfunction (ECD). Delivery of arginine to eNOS by cationic amino acid transporter-1 (CAT-1) was shown to modulate eNOS activity. We found in female rats, but not in males, that CAT-1 activity is preserved with age and in chronic renal failure, two experimental models of ECD. In contrast, during pregnancy CAT-1 is inhibited. We hypothesize that female sex hormones regulate arginine transport. Arginine uptake in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was determined following incubation with either 17β-estradiol (E2) or progesterone. Exposure to E2 (50 and 100 nM) for 30 min resulted in a significant increase in arginine transport and reduction in phosphorylated CAT-1 (the inactive form) protein content. This was coupled with a decrease in phosphorylated MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Progesterone (1 and 100 pM for 30 min) attenuated arginine uptake and increased phosphorylated CAT-1, phosphorylated protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein content. GO-6976 (PKCα inhibitor) prevented the progesterone-induced decrease in arginine transport. Coincubation with both progesterone and estrogen for 30 min resulted in attenuated arginine transport. While estradiol increases arginine transport and CAT-1 activity through modulation of constitutive signaling transduction pathways involving ERK, progesterone inhibits arginine transport and CAT-1 via both PKCα and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, an effect that predominates over estradiol.

  13. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  14. Intracellular L-arginine concentration does not determine NO production in endothelial cells: Implications on the 'L-arginine paradox'

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Soyoung; Mohan, Srinidi; Fung, Ho-Leung

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our findings provide a possible solution to the 'L-arginine paradox'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular L-arginine concentration is the major determinant of NO production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular L-arginine action is limited by cellular ARG transport, not the K{sub m} of NOS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explain how L-arginine supplementation can work to increase endothelial function. -- Abstract: We examined the relative contributory roles of extracellular vs. intracellular L-arginine (ARG) toward cellular activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human endothelial cells. EA.hy926 human endothelial cells were incubated with different concentrations of {sup 15}N{sub 4}-ARG, ARG, or L-arginine ethyl ester (ARG-EE) for 2 h. To modulate ARG transport, siRNA for ARG transporter (CAT-1) vs. sham siRNA were transfected into cells. ARG transport activity was assessed by cellular fluxes of ARG, {sup 15}N{sub 4}-ARG, dimethylarginines, and L-citrulline by an LC-MS/MS assay. eNOS activity was determined by nitrite/nitrate accumulation, either via a fluorometric assay or by{sup 15}N-nitrite or estimated {sup 15}N{sub 3}-citrulline concentrations when {sup 15}N{sub 4}-ARG was used to challenge the cells. We found that ARG-EE incubation increased cellular ARG concentration but no increase in nitrite/nitrate was observed, while ARG incubation increased both cellular ARG concentration and nitrite accumulation. Cellular nitrite/nitrate production did not correlate with cellular total ARG concentration. Reduced {sup 15}N{sub 4}-ARG cellular uptake in CAT-1 siRNA transfected cells vs. control was accompanied by reduced eNOS activity, as determined by {sup 15}N-nitrite, total nitrite and {sup 15}N{sub 3}-citrulline formation. Our data suggest that extracellular ARG, not intracellular ARG, is the major determinant of NO production in endothelial cells. It is likely that once transported inside the cell

  15. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  16. Critical active-site residues identified by site-directed mutagenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase, a new member of the haloacid dehalogenases hydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Otero, Lisandro H; Massimelli, Maria J; Lisa, Angela T; Domenech, Carlos E

    2006-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PChP), the product of the PA5292 gene, is synthesized when the bacteria are grown with choline, betaine, dimethylglycine, or carnitine. In the presence of Mg(2+), PChP catalyzes the hydrolysis of both phosphorylcholine (PCh) and p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP). PCh saturation curve analysis of the enzyme with or without the signal peptide indicated that the peptide was the fundamental factor responsible for decreasing the affinity of the second site of PChP for PCh, either at pH 5.0 or pH 7.4. PChP contained three conserved motifs characteristic of the haloacid dehalogenases superfamily. In the PChP without the signal peptide, motifs I, II, and III correspond to the residues (31)DMDNT(35), (166)SAA(168), and K(242)/(261)GDTPDSD(267), respectively. To determine the catalytic importance of the D31, D33, T35, S166, K242, D262, D265, and D267 on the enzyme activity, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. D31, D33, D262, and D267 were identified as the more important residues for catalysis. D265 and D267 may be involved in the stabilization of motif III, or might contribute to substrate specificity. The substitution of T35 by S35 resulted in an enzyme with a low PChP activity, but conserves the catalytic sites involved in the hydrolysis of PCh (K(m1) 0.03 mM: , K(m2) 0.5 mM: ) or p-NPP (K(m) 2.1 mM: ). Mutating either S166 or K242 revealed that these residues are also important to catalyze the hydrolysis of both substrates. The substitution of lysine by arginine or by glutamine revealed the importance of the positive charged group, either from the amino or guanidinium groups, because K242Q was inactive, whereas K242R was a functional enzyme.

  17. Arginine metabolism in developing soybean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Micallef, B.J.; Shelp, B.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Tracerkinetic experiments were performed using L-(guanidino-{sup 14}C)arginine, L-(U-{sup 14}C)arginine, L-(ureido-{sup 14}C)citrulline, and L-(1-{sup 14}C)ornithine to investigate arginine utilization in developing cotyledons of Gycine max (L.) Merrill. Excised cotyledons were injected with carrier-free {sup 14}C compounds and incubated in sealed vials containing a CO{sub 2} trap. The free and protein amino acids were analyzed using higher performance liquid chromatography and arginine-specific enzyme-linked assays. After 4 hours, 75% and 90% of the {sup 14}C metabolized from (guanidino-{sup 14}C)arginine and (U-{sup 14}C)arginine, respectively, was in protein arginine. The net protein arginine accumulation rate, calculated from the depletion of nitrogenous solutes in the cotyledon during incubation, was 17 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. The data indicated that arginine was also catabolized by the arginase-urease reactions at a rate of 5.5 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. Between 2 and 4 hours {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was also evolved from carbons other than C-6 of arginine at a rate of 11.0 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. It is suggested that this extra {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was evolved during the catabolism of ornithine-derived glutamate; {sup 14}C-ornithine was a product of the arginase reaction. A model for the estimated fluxes associated with arginine utilization in developing soybean cotyledons is presented.

  18. Unique Features of Human Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 9 (PRMT9) and Its Substrate RNA Splicing Factor SF3B2*

    PubMed Central

    Hadjikyriacou, Andrea; Yang, Yanzhong; Espejo, Alexsandra; Bedford, Mark T.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Human protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 9 symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues on splicing factor SF3B2 (SAP145) and has been functionally linked to the regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis studies on this enzyme and its substrate had revealed essential unique residues in the double E loop and the importance of the C-terminal duplicated methyltransferase domain. In contrast to what had been observed with other PRMTs and their physiological substrates, a peptide containing the methylatable Arg-508 of SF3B2 was not recognized by PRMT9 in vitro. Although amino acid substitutions of residues surrounding Arg-508 had no great effect on PRMT9 recognition of SF3B2, moving the arginine residue within this sequence abolished methylation. PRMT9 and PRMT5 are the only known mammalian enzymes capable of forming symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) residues as type II PRMTs. We demonstrate here that the specificity of these enzymes for their substrates is distinct and not redundant. The loss of PRMT5 activity in mouse embryo fibroblasts results in almost complete loss of SDMA, suggesting that PRMT5 is the primary SDMA-forming enzyme in these cells. PRMT9, with its duplicated methyltransferase domain and conserved sequence in the double E loop, appears to have a unique structure and specificity among PRMTs for methylating SF3B2 and potentially other polypeptides. PMID:25979344

  19. Unique Features of Human Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 9 (PRMT9) and Its Substrate RNA Splicing Factor SF3B2.

    PubMed

    Hadjikyriacou, Andrea; Yang, Yanzhong; Espejo, Alexsandra; Bedford, Mark T; Clarke, Steven G

    2015-07-03

    Human protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 9 symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues on splicing factor SF3B2 (SAP145) and has been functionally linked to the regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis studies on this enzyme and its substrate had revealed essential unique residues in the double E loop and the importance of the C-terminal duplicated methyltransferase domain. In contrast to what had been observed with other PRMTs and their physiological substrates, a peptide containing the methylatable Arg-508 of SF3B2 was not recognized by PRMT9 in vitro. Although amino acid substitutions of residues surrounding Arg-508 had no great effect on PRMT9 recognition of SF3B2, moving the arginine residue within this sequence abolished methylation. PRMT9 and PRMT5 are the only known mammalian enzymes capable of forming symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) residues as type II PRMTs. We demonstrate here that the specificity of these enzymes for their substrates is distinct and not redundant. The loss of PRMT5 activity in mouse embryo fibroblasts results in almost complete loss of SDMA, suggesting that PRMT5 is the primary SDMA-forming enzyme in these cells. PRMT9, with its duplicated methyltransferase domain and conserved sequence in the double E loop, appears to have a unique structure and specificity among PRMTs for methylating SF3B2 and potentially other polypeptides.

  20. L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jing; Horky, Laura L.; Friedlich, Avi L.; Shi, Ying; Rogers, Jack T.; Huang, Xudong

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and loss of cognitive and memory functions. Although the exact causes of AD are still unclear, evidence suggests that atherosclerosis, redox stress, inflammation, neurotransmitter dysregulation, and impaired brain energy metabolism may all be associated with AD pathogenesis. Herein, we explore a possible role for L-arginine (L-arg) in AD, taking into consideration known functions for L-arg in atherosclerosis, redox stress and the inflammatory process, regulation of synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, and modulation of glucose metabolism and insulin activity. L-arg, a precursor of nitric oxide and polyamine, exhibits multiple functions in human health and may play a prominent role in age-related degenerative diseases such as AD. PMID:19079617

  1. Arginine feeding modifies cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, L; Thomson, S C; Wead, L M; Brown, M R; Gabbai, F B

    1993-01-01

    Glycine (G) infusion causes renal vasodilation mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Cyclosporine A (CsA) nephrotoxicity is characterized by preglomerular vasoconstriction and decreased efferent arteriolar tone probably related to reduced NO and angiotensin II, respectively. L-Arginine (ARG) is a precursor to NO. To test the hypothesis that chronic CsA decreases renal NO activity, we compared the glomerular hemodynamic response to glycine infusion in rats after 8 d of CsA (30 mg/kg per d s.c.), CsA and ARG (1.6 g/kg per d p.o.) (A/CsA), and in two groups of pair-fed controls (CON, A/CON). Single nephron GFR (SNGFR), single nephron plasma flow (SNPF), glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure gradient (delta P), proximal tubular reabsorption (APR), and kidney tissue angiotensin II (AIIk) were measured before and during G. CsA was associated with baseline decrements in SNGFR, SNPF, delta P, and AIIk, and with a blunted hemodynamic response to G. In CON, ARG did not affect baseline hemodynamics or modify the response to G. In CsA, ARG decreased baseline preglomerular resistance and restored the glomerular hemodynamic response to G. G was associated with a significant increase in AIIk in both CON and CsA. These findings suggest that (a) CsA is associated with decreased AIIk, and (b) CsA may diminish NO activity within the kidney, and that this capacity may be partially restored by arginine feeding. PMID:8408638

  2. Role of pocket flexibility in the modulation of estrogen receptor alpha by key residue arginine 394.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yunsong; Peng, Sufen; Zhang, Aiqian; Wang, Liansheng

    2011-02-01

    Estradiol derivatives, with similar structures as estradiol (E2) or estradiol metabolites, have been recognized to have detrimental health effects on wildlife and humans. However, data at the molecular level about interactions of these compounds with biological targets are still lacking. Herein, a flexible docking approach was used to characterize the molecular interaction of nine estradiol derivatives with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in the ligand-binding domain. All ligands were docked in the buried hydrophobic cavity of the steroid hormone pocket. In addition, the plasticity of an active site was also identified by reversing amino acid arginine 394 for better ligand-receptor binding affinity. Finally, bioassays based on genetically modified yeast strains were used to validate the quality of molecular simulation because of their rapidity and high sensitivity. The experimental findings about logarithm values of the median effective concentration (EC50) value had a linear correlation with computational binding affinity from molecular docking, which described a pattern of interaction between estradiol derivatives and ER. The estrogenic activity of all compounds, although more or less lower than E2, was proved to possess high severe environmental risks. Considering the sidechain flexibility in the ligand binding pocket, 17α-ethylestradiol-3-cyclopentylether was reported to correlate highly significantly with known induced fit conformational changes based upon proof-of-principle calculations on human ERα with the preservation of a strong salt bridge between glutamic acid 353 and arginine 394.

  3. Alteration of splice site selection in the LMNA gene and inhibition of progerin production via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2014-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype and an average life span of 13years. Patients typically exhibit extensive pathophysiological vascular alterations, eventually resulting in death from stroke or myocardial infarction. A silent point mutation at position 1824 (C1824T) of the LMNA gene, generating a truncated form of lamin A (progerin), has been shown to be the cause of most cases of HGPS. Interestingly, this mutation induces the use of an internal 5' cryptic splice site within exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, leading to the generation of progerin via aberrant alternative splicing. The serine-arginine rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1 or ASF/SF2) has been shown to function as an oncoprotein and is upregulated in many cancers and other age-related disorders. Indeed, SRSF1 inhibition results in a splicing ratio in the LMNA pre-mRNA favoring lamin A production over that of progerin. It is our hypothesis that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a master regulator of cellular metabolism, may lead to a reduction in SRSF1 and thus a decrease in the use of the LMNA 5' cryptic splice site in exon 11 through upregulation of p32, a splicing factor-associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone that has been shown to inhibit SRSF1 and enhance mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and oxidative phosphorylation. AMPK activation by currently available compounds such as metformin, resveratrol, and berberine may thus have wide-ranging implications for disorders associated with increased production and accumulation of progerin.

  4. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  5. Ricin uses arginine 235 as an anchor residue to bind to P-proteins of the ribosomal stalk

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yijun; Li, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Brian Y.; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2017-01-01

    Ricin toxin A chain (RTA) binds to stalk P-proteins to reach the α–sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) where it cleaves a conserved adenine. Arginine residues at the RTA/RTB interface are involved in this interaction. To investigate the individual contribution of each arginine, we generated single, double and triple arginine mutations in RTA. The R235A mutation reduced toxicity and depurination activity more than any other single arginine mutation in yeast. Further reduction in toxicity, depurination activity and ribosome binding was observed when R235A was combined with a mutation in a nearby arginine. RTA interacts with the ribosome via a two-step process, which involves slow and fast interactions. Single arginine mutations eliminated the fast interactions with the ribosome, indicating that they increase the binding rate of RTA. Arginine residues form a positively charged patch to bind to negatively charged residues at the C-termini of P-proteins. When electrostatic interactions conferred by the arginines are lost, hydrophobic interactions are also abolished, suggesting that the hydrophobic interactions alone are insufficient to allow binding. We propose that Arg235 serves as an anchor residue and cooperates with nearby arginines and the hydrophobic interactions to provide the binding specificity and strength in ribosome targeting of RTA. PMID:28230053

  6. Arginine Metabolism in Developing Soybean Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Micallef, Barry J.; Shelp, Barry J.

    1989-01-01

    The free and protein amino acid composition of Glycine max (L.) Merrill cotyledons was determined for the entire developmental period using high performance liquid chromatography. Arginine constituted 18% of the total protein nitrogen throughout development, and there was a linear arginine nitrogen accumulation rate of 1212 nanomoles per cotyledon per day between 16 and 58 days after anthesis. Arginine and asparagine were major constituents of the free amino acid pool, constituting 14 to 62% and 2 to 41% of the total free amino acid nitrogen, respectively. The urea cycle intermediates, citrulline, ornithine, and argininosuccinate were also detected in the free pool. A comparison of the amino acid composition of cotyledonary protein and of seedcoat exudate suggested that 72% of the cotyledon's arginine requirement is satisfied by in situ biosynthesis, and that 20% of the transformed nitrogen is incorporated into arginine. Also, [1-14C]glutamate and [U-14C]glutamine were fed to excised cotyledons. After 4 hours, 14C was incorporated into protein and released as 14CO2, but none was incorporated into the C-1 and C-6 positions of free and protein arginine, determined using arginine-specific enzyme-linked assays. It is not currently known whether arginine biosynthesis in the cotyledon involves glutamate delivered from the mother plant or glutamate derived in situ. PMID:16666818

  7. Giardia duodenalis arginine deiminase modulates the phenotype and cytokine secretion of human dendritic cells by depletion of arginine and formation of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Banik, Stefanie; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Seeber, Frank; Klotz, Christian; Ignatius, Ralf; Aebischer, Toni

    2013-07-01

    Depletion of arginine is a recognized strategy that pathogens use to evade immune effector mechanisms. Depletion depends on microbial enzymes such as arginases, which are considered virulence factors. The effect is mostly interpreted as being a consequence of successful competition with host enzymes for the substrate. However, both arginases and arginine deiminases (ADI) have been associated with pathogen virulence. Both deplete arginine, but their reaction products differ. An ADI has been implicated in the virulence of Giardia duodenalis, an intestinal parasite that infects humans and animals, causing significant morbidity. Dendritic cells (DC) play a critical role in host defense and also in a murine G. duodenalis infection model. The functional properties of these innate immune cells depend on the milieu in which they are activated. Here, the dependence of the response of these cells on arginine was studied by using Giardia ADI and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocyte-derived DC. Arginine depletion by ADI significantly increased tumor necrosis factor alpha and decreased interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12p40 secretion. It also reduced the upregulation of surface CD83 and CD86 molecules, which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Arginine depletion also reduced the phosphorylation of S6 kinase in DC, suggesting the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. The changes were due to arginine depletion and the formation of reaction products, in particular, ammonium ions. Comparison of NH(4)(+) and urea revealed distinct immunomodulatory activities of these products of deiminases and arginases, respectively. The data suggest that a better understanding of the role of arginine-depleting pathogen enzymes for immune evasion will have to take enzyme class and reaction products into consideration.

  8. Enzymatic production of l-citrulline by hydrolysis of the guanidinium group of l-arginine with recombinant arginine deiminase.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Sun, Xia; Chen, Xiulai; Liu, Dongxu; Liu, Liming

    2015-08-20

    In this study, a simple, efficient enzymatic production process for the environmentally friendly synthesis of l-citrulline from l-arginine was developed using arginine deiminase (ADI) from Lactococcus lactis. Following overexpression of L. lactis ADI in Escherichia. coli BL21 (DE3) and experimental evolution using error-prone PCR, mutant FMME106 was obtained with a Km for l-arginine of 3.5mM and a specific activity of 195.7U/mg. This mutant exhibited a maximal conversion of 92.6% and achieved a final l-citrulline concentration of 176.9g/L under optimal conditions (190g/L l-arginine, 15g/L whole-cell biocatalyst treated with 2% isopropanol for 30min, 50°C, pH 7.2, 8h). The average l-citrulline synthesis rate of 22.1g/L/h is considerably higher than that reported for other similar biocatalytic approaches, therefore the process developed in the present work has great potential for large-scale production of l-citrulline.

  9. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  10. Development of selectivity of alpha1-antitrypsin variant by mutagenesis in its reactive site loop against proprotein convertase. A crucial role of the P4 arginine in PACE4 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Akihiko; Ikoma, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Emi; Matsuda, Yoshiko

    2002-02-01

    PACE4, furin and PC6 are Ca2+-dependent serine endoproteases that belong to the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (SPC) family. Recent reports have supported the involvement of these enzymes in processing of growth/differentiation factors, viral replication, activation of bacterial toxins and tumorigenesis, indicating that these enzymes are a fascinating target for therapeutic agents. In this work, we evaluated the sensitivity and selectivity of three rat alpha1-antitrypsin variants which contained RVPR352, AVRR352 and RVRR352, respectively, within their reactive site loop using both inhibition of enzyme activity toward a fluorogenic substrate in vitro and formation of a SDS-stable protease/inhibitor complex ex vivo. The RVPR variant showed relatively broad selectivity, whereas the AVRR and RVRR variants were more selective than the RVPR variant. The AVRR variant inhibited furin and PC6 but not PACE4. This selectivity was further confirmed by complex formation and inhibition of pro-complement C3 processing. On the other hand, although the RVRR variant inhibited both PACE4 and furin effectively, it needed a 600-fold higher concentration than the RVPR variant to inhibit PC6 in vitro. These inhibitors will be useful tools in helping us to understand the roles of PACE4, furin and PC6.

  11. Combining pharmacophore search, automated docking, and molecular dynamics simulations as a novel strategy for flexible docking. Proof of concept: docking of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-like compounds into the alphavbeta3 binding site.

    PubMed

    Moitessier, Nicolas; Henry, Christophe; Maigret, Bernard; Chapleur, Yves

    2004-08-12

    A novel and highly efficient flexible docking approach is presented where the conformations (internal degrees of freedom) and orientations (external degrees of freedom) of the ligands are successively considered. This hybrid method takes advantage of the synergistic effects of structure-based and ligand-based drug design techniques. Preliminary antagonist-derived pharmacophore determination provides the postulated bioactive conformation. Subsequent docking of this pharmacophore to the receptor crystal structure results in a postulated pharmacophore/receptor binding mode. Pharmacophore-oriented docking of antagonists is subsequently achieved by matching ligand interacting groups with pharmacophore points. Molecular dynamics in water refines the proposed complexes. To validate the method, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) containing peptides, pseudopeptides, and RGD-like antagonists were docked to the crystal structure of alphavbeta3 holoprotein and apoprotein. The proposed directed docking was found to be more accurate, faster, and less biased with respect to the protein structure (holo and apoprotein) than DOCK, Autodock, and FlexX docking methods. The successful docking of an antagonist recently cocrystallized with the receptor to both apo and holoprotein is particularly appealing. The results summarized in this report illustrated the efficiency of our light CoMFA/rigid body docking hybrid method.

  12. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  13. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  14. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  15. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  16. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  17. Genetic and biochemical characterization of arginine biosynthesis in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Victor M; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael; Vázquez, Alejandra; Ortíz-Ortíz, Catalina; Díaz, Rafael; Dunn, Michael F

    2015-08-01

    L-Ornithine production in the alfalfa microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti occurs as an intermediate step in arginine biosynthesis. Ornithine is required for effective symbiosis but its synthesis in S. meliloti has been little studied. Unlike most bacteria, S. meliloti 1021 is annotated as encoding two enzymes producing ornithine: N-acetylornithine (NAO) deacetylase (ArgE) hydrolyses NAO to acetate and ornithine, and glutamate N-acetyltransferase (ArgJ) transacetylates l-glutamate with the acetyl group from NAO, forming ornithine and N-acetylglutamate (NAG). NAG is the substrate for the second step of arginine biosynthesis catalysed by NAG kinase (ArgB). Inactivation of argB in strain 1021 resulted in arginine auxotrophy. The activity of purified ArgB was significantly inhibited by arginine but not by ornithine. The purified ArgJ was highly active in NAO deacetylation/glutamate transacetylation and was significantly inhibited by ornithine but not by arginine. The purified ArgE protein (with a 6His-Sumo affinity tag) was also active in deacetylating NAO. argE and argJ single mutants, and an argEJ double mutant, are arginine prototrophs. Extracts of the double mutant contained aminoacylase (Ama) activity that deacetylated NAO to form ornithine. The purified products of three candidate ama genes (smc00682 (hipO1), smc02256 (hipO2) and smb21279) all possessed NAO deacetylase activity. hipO1 and hipO2, but not smb21279, expressed in trans functionally complemented an Escherichia coli ΔargE : : Km mutant. We conclude that Ama activity accounts for the arginine prototrophy of the argEJ mutant. Transcriptional assays of argB, argE and argJ, fused to a promoterless gusA gene, showed that their expression was not significantly affected by exogenous arginine or ornithine.

  18. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  19. Depletion of arginine in yeast cells decreases the resistance to hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kazuki; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru

    2015-07-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HP) inhibits growth and inactivates microorganisms by destabilizing non-covalent molecular interactions. Arginine contributes to stress resistance because it has a guanidine side chain, which assists in the refolding of aggregated proteins. We attempted to analyze the contribution of arginine to high HP stress using a pressure-sensitive mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a metabolomics approach. Our results showed that the content of 136 out of 250 detected metabolites differed in the mutant and parent strains. Decreased metabolites were involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and arginine biosynthesis. The expression of genes contributing to arginine biosynthesis was significantly lower in the mutant strain than in the parent strain. When arginine was supplemented to the medium, the mutant strain showed more tolerance to pressure. These results suggest that yeast cells survived due to the contribution of arginine to high pressure resistance. This indicates that depletion of arginine caused by decreased activity of the biosynthesis pathway confers sensitivity to HP.

  20. The role of L-arginine and neutrophils on incisional wound healing.

    PubMed

    Cantürk, N Z; Vural, B; Cantürk, Z; Esen, N; Vural, S; Solakoglu, S; Kirkal, G

    2001-12-01

    Although arginine plays an important role in many aspects of inflammation and wound healing, the mechanism is not clear. We aimed to evaluate the effect of L-arginine administration on wound healing and neutrophil activity and on the interaction of these effects. Sixteen rats were divided into two groups: control group and L-arginine group. L-arginine was given intraperitoneally. The rats underwent incisional wounding and were killed on the 7th day of wounding. Blood neutrophil counts, neutrophil adhesivity index, tensile strengths and hydroxyproline level of skin were determined, histopathological and electron microscopical evaluation of healing was performed. Wound scores in the control group were significantly lower (p < 0.05). Hydroxyproline and collagen levels of skin were significantly increased in the L-arginine group (p < 0.05). Blood neutrophil counts and neutrophil adhesivity index in the L-arginine group were significantly increased (p < 0.05), as were the inflammatory cells in the skin. L-arginine may be used during the first phase of healing to induce inflammation in high risk patients.

  1. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  2. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  3. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  4. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  5. Enhancement of the anti-inflammatory activity of temporin-1Tl-derived antimicrobial peptides by tryptophan, arginine and lysine substitutions.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Ganesan; Kamalakannan, Radhakrishnan; Shin, Song Yub

    2015-10-01

    Temporin-1Tl (TL) is a 13-residue frog antimicrobial peptide (AMP) exhibiting potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity. To develop novel AMP with improved anti-inflammatory activity and antimicrobial selectivity, we designed and synthesized a series of TL analogs by substituting Trp, Arg and Lys at selected positions. Except for Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis, all TL analogs exhibited retained or increased antimicrobial activity against seven bacterial strains including three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains compared with TL. TL-1 and TL-4 showed a little increase in antimicrobial selectivity, while TL-2 and TL-3 displayed slightly decreased antimicrobial selectivity because of their about twofold increased hemolytic activity. All TL analogs demonstrated greatly increased anti-inflammatory activity, evident by their higher inhibition of the production tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide and the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells, compared with TL. Taken together, the peptide anti-inflammatory activity is as follows: TL-2 ≈ TL-3 ≈ TL-4 > TL-1 > TL. In addition, LPS binding ability of the peptides corresponded with their anti-inflammatory activity. These results apparently suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of TL analogs is associated with the direct binding ability between these peptides and LPS. Collectively, our designed TL analogs possess improved anti-inflammatory activity and retain antimicrobial activity without a significant increase in hemolysis. Therefore, it is evident that our TL analogs constitute promising candidates for the development of peptide therapeutics for gram-negative bacterial infection.

  6. Rate limiting domain and loop motions in arginine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Davulcu, Omar; Skalicky, Jack J.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group between ATP and arginine. It is the arthropod homolog of creatine kinase, buffering cellular ATP levels. Crystal structures of arginine kinase, in substrate-free and substrate-bound forms, have revealed large conformational changes associated with the catalytic cycle. Recent NMR identified movements of the N-terminal domain and a loop comprising residues I182-G209 with conformational exchange rates in the substrate-free enzyme similar to the turnover rate. Here, to understand whether these motions might be rate-limiting, activation barriers for both the intrinsic dynamics and enzyme turnover are determined using measurements over a temperature range of 15 to 30°C. 15N transverse relaxation dispersion yields activation barriers of 46 ± 8 and 34 ± 12 kJ/mol for of the N-terminal domain and I182-G209 loop, respectively. An activation barrier of 34 ± 13 kJ/mol was obtained for enzyme turnover from steady-state kinetics. The similarity between the activation barriers is indeed consistent with turnover being limited by backbone conformational dynamics, and pinpoints the locations of potentially rate limiting motions. PMID:21425868

  7. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  8. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  9. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  10. Structural mechanism for the arginine sensing and regulation of CASTOR1 in the mTORC1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Zhongchao; Wang, Qian; Yang, Can; Wang, Lei; Deng, Wei; Wu, Geng

    2016-01-01

    The mTOR complex I (mTORC1) signaling pathway controls many metabolic processes and is regulated by amino acid signals, especially arginine. CASTOR1 has been identified as the cytosolic arginine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway, but the molecular mechanism of how it senses arginine is elusive. Here, by determining the crystal structure of human CASTOR1 in complex with arginine, we found that an exquisitely tailored pocket, carved between the NTD and the CTD domains of CASTOR1, is employed to recognize arginine. Mutation of critical residues in this pocket abolished or diminished arginine binding. By comparison with structurally similar aspartate kinases, a surface patch of CASTOR1-NTD on the opposite side of the arginine-binding site was identified to mediate direct physical interaction with its downstream effector GATOR2, via GATOR2 subunit Mios. Mutation of this surface patch disrupted CASTOR1’s recognition and inhibition of GATOR2, revealed by in vitro pull-down assay. Normal mode (NM) analysis revealed an ‘open’-to-‘closed’ conformational change for CASTOR1, which is correlated to the switching between the exposing and concealing of its GATOR2-binding residues, and is most likely related to arginine binding. Interestingly, the GATOR2-binding sites on the two protomers of CASTOR1 dimer face the same direction, which prompted us to propose a model for how dimerization of CASTOR1 relieves the inhibition of GATOR1 by GATOR2. Our study thus provides a thorough analysis on how CASTOR1 recognizes arginine, and describes a possible mechanism of how arginine binding induces the inter-domain movement of CASTOR1 to affect its association with GATOR2. PMID:28066558

  11. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  12. Identification and purification of arginine deiminase that originated from Mycoplasma arginini.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, K; Fukuda, S; Wada, Y; Taniai, M; Suzuki, M; Kimura, T; Ohno, T; Yamamoto, K; Azuma, I

    1990-01-01

    A lymphocyte blastogenesis inhibitory factor, (LBIF), was purified from the culture supernatant of human histiocytic lymphoma U937 by fast protein liquid chromatography. In this study, we demonstrated, first, that LBIF originated from a mycoplasma, Mycoplasma arginini, infecting U937 cells, and second, that LBIF bore the arginine deiminase activity. The implication of in vivo immunosuppression induced by arginine-utilizing mycoplasma species is discussed. Images PMID:2370103

  13. Mechanisms for Improved Hygroscopicity of L-Arginine Valproate Revealed by X-Ray Single Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masataka; Nambu, Kaori; Sakon, Aya; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Noguchi, Shuji; Terada, Katsuhide

    2017-03-01

    Valproic acid is widely used as an antiepileptic agent. Valproic acid is in liquid phase while sodium valproate is in solid phase at room temperature. Sodium valproate is hard to manufacture because of its hygroscopic and deliquescent properties. To improve these, cocrystal and salt screening for valproic acid was employed in this study. Two solid salt forms, l-arginine valproate and l-lysine valproate, were obtained and characterized. By using dynamic vapor sorption method, the critical relative humidity of sodium valproate, l-arginine valproate, and l-lysine valproate were measured. Critical relative humidity of sodium valproate was 40%, of l-lysine valproate was 60%, and of l-arginine valproate was 70%. Single-crystal X-ray structure determination of l-arginine valproate was employed. l-Lysine valproate was of low diffraction quality, and l-arginine valproate formed a 1:1 salt. Crystal l-arginine valproate has a disorder in the methylene carbon chain that creates 2 conformations. The carboxylate group of valproic acid is connected to the amino group of l-arginine. Crystalline morphologies were calculated from its crystal structure. Adsorption of water molecules to crystal facets was simulated by Material Studio. When comparing adsorption energy per site of these salts, sodium valproate is more capable of adsorption of water molecule than l-arginine valproate.

  14. Activation of oxytocin receptors, but not arginine-vasopressin V1a receptors, in the ventral tegmental area of male Syrian hamsters is essential for the reward-like properties of social interactions.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhimin; Borland, Johnathan M; Larkin, Tony E; O'Malley, Maureen; Albers, H Elliott

    2016-12-01

    Social reward plays a fundamental role in shaping human and animal behavior. The rewarding nature of many forms of social behavior including sexual behavior, parental behavior, and social play has been revealed using well-established procedures such as the conditioned place preference test. Many motivated social behaviors are regulated by the nonapeptides oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) through their actions in multiple brain structures. Interestingly, there are few data on whether OT or AVP might contribute to the rewarding properties of social interaction by their actions within brain structures that play a key role in reward mechanisms such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The goal of the present study was to investigate the role of OT and AVP in the VTA in regulating the reward-like properties of social interactions. Social interactions between two male hamsters reduced a spontaneous place avoidance in hamsters injected with saline control. Interestingly, however, OT and AVP injected into the VTA induced a significant two-fold reduction in place avoidance for the social interaction chamber when compared to control injections of vehicle. Finally, because OT and AVP can act on each other's receptors to influence social behavior, we also injected highly selective OTR and V1aR agonists and antagonists to determine whether OT or AVP V1a receptors were responsible for mediating the effects of these neuropeptides on social reward. Our results not only demonstrated that OT and AVP activate OTRs and not V1aRs to mediate social reward, they also demonstrated that the activation of OT receptors in the VTA is essential for the expression of the rewarding properties of social interactions.

  15. Capture of Arginine at Low Concentrations by a Marine Psychrophilic Bacterium †

    PubMed Central

    Geesey, Gill G.; Morita, Richard Y.

    1979-01-01

    The cells of the marine bacterium Ant-300 were found to take up arginine when this substrate was at low concentrations. The cells possessed an uptake system(s) that specifically transported l-arginine. The kinetic parameters for uptake appeared to differ when the cells were exposed to nanomolar and micromolar concentrations of the amino acid. Uptake over this concentration range functioned in the absence of an exogenous energy source, even after the cells had been preincubated in unsupplemented artificial seawater. Respiratory activity appeared to be a more important driving force for arginine uptake than adenosine 5′-triphosphate hydrolysis. The cells also exhibited chemotaxis toward l-arginine. The minimum arginine concentration needed to elicit a chemotactic response was between 10−5 and 10−6 M. It is proposed that the capture of arginine by cells of Ant-300 in nutrient-depleted waters, which are typical of the open ocean, proceeds via high-affinity active transport, whereas in substrate-enriched seawater, capture involves chemotaxis and an active transport mechanism with reduced affinity for the substrate. PMID:16345475

  16. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  17. Biocatalytic synthesis, antimicrobial properties and toxicity studies of arginine derivative surfactants.

    PubMed

    Fait, M Elisa; Garrote, Graciela L; Clapés, Pere; Tanco, Sebastian; Lorenzo, Julia; Morcelle, Susana R

    2015-07-01

    Two novel arginine-based cationic surfactants were synthesized using as biocatalyst papain, an endopeptidase from Carica papaya latex, adsorbed onto polyamide. The classical substrate N (α)-benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester hydrochloride for the determination of cysteine and serine proteases activity was used as the arginine donor, whereas decyl- and dodecylamine were used as nucleophiles for the condensation reaction. Yields higher than 90 and 80 % were achieved for the synthesis of N (α)-benzoyl-arginine decyl amide (Bz-Arg-NHC10) and N (α)-benzoyl-arginine dodecyl amide (Bz-Arg-NHC12), respectively. The purification process was developed in order to make it more sustainable, by using water and ethanol as the main separation solvents in a single cationic exchange chromatographic separation step. Bz-Arg-NHC10 and Bz-Arg-NHC12 proved antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, revealing their potential use as effective disinfectants as they reduced 99 % the initial bacterial population after only 1 h of contact. The cytotoxic effect towards different cell types of both arginine derivatives was also measured. Bz-Arg-NHCn demonstrated lower haemolytic activity and were less eye-irritating than the commercial cationic surfactant cetrimide. A similar trend could also be observed when cytotoxicity was tested on hepatocytes and fibroblast cell lines: both arginine derivatives were less toxic than cetrimide. All these properties would make the two novel arginine compounds a promising alternative to commercial cationic surfactants, especially for their use as additives in topical formulations.

  18. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  19. Rational Design of Engineered Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Consisting Exclusively of Arginine and Tryptophan, and Their Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan D.; Craigo, Jodi K.; Doi, Yohei; Mietzner, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens underscores the need for new antimicrobial agents to overcome the resistance mechanisms of these organisms. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) provide a potential source of new antimicrobial therapeutics. We previously characterized a lytic base unit (LBU) series of engineered CAPs (eCAPs) of 12 to 48 residues demonstrating maximum antibacterial selectivity at 24 residues. Further, Trp substitution in LBU sequences increased activity against both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus under challenging conditions (e.g., saline, divalent cations, and serum). Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the optimal length and, therefore, the cost for maximum eCAP activity under physiologically relevant conditions could be significantly reduced using only Arg and Trp arranged to form idealized amphipathic helices. Hence, we developed a novel peptide series, composed only of Arg and Trp, in a sequence predicted and verified by circular dichroism to fold into optimized amphipathic helices. The most effective antimicrobial activity was achieved at 12 residues in length (WR12) against a panel of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical isolates, including extensively drug-resistant strains, in saline and broth culture and at various pH values. The results demonstrate that the rational design of CAPs can lead to a significant reduction in the length and the number of amino acids used in peptide design to achieve optimal potency and selectivity against specific pathogens. PMID:23507278

  20. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  1. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  2. Arginine Vasopressin Alters Both Spontaneous and Phase-Locked Synaptic Inputs to Airway Vagal Preganglionic Neuron via Activation of V1a Receptor: Insights into Stress-Related Airway Vagal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xianxia; Chen, Xingxin; Guo, Yuhong; He, Ding; Chen, Yonghua; Xia, Chunmei; Wang, Jijiang

    2017-01-01

    The airway vagal preganglionic neurons (AVPNs) in the external formation of the nucleus ambiguus (eNA) play a major role in the vagal control of tracheobronchial smooth muscle tone and maintenance of airway resistance. The eNA receives vasopressinergic projection from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), the key node for the genesis of psychological stress. Since airway vagal excitation is reportedly to be associated with the psychological stress-induced/exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatics, arginine vasopressin (AVP) might be involved in stress-related airway vagal excitation. However, this possibility has not been validated. This study aimed to test whether and how AVP regulates AVPNs. In rhythmically active medullary slices of newborn rats, retrogradely labeled AVPNs were identified as inspiratory-activated and inspiratory-inhibited AVPNs (IA- and II-AVPNs) using patch-clamp techniques according to their inspiratory-related firing behavior and synaptic activities. The results show that under current clamp, AVP depolarized both IA- and II-AVPNs, and significantly increased their spontaneous firing rate. Under voltage clamp, AVP elicited a slow inward current, and significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in both types of AVPNs. In addition, AVP significantly enhanced the phase-locked excitatory inspiratory inward current in inspiratory-activated airway vagal preganglionic neurons (IA-AVPNs), but significantly suppressed the phase-locked inhibitory inspiratory outward current in II-AVPNs. In both types AVPNs, AVP significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of pharmacologically isolated spontaneous GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). All of the AVP-induced effects were prevented by SR49059, an antagonist of V1a receptors, but unaffected by SSR149415, an antagonist of V1b receptors. AVP did not cause significant changes in the miniature excitatory

  3. Combined glutamine and arginine decrease proinflammatory cytokine production by biopsies from Crohn's patients in association with changes in nuclear factor-kappaB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecleire, Stéphane; Hassan, Aktham; Marion-Letellier, Rachel; Antonietti, Michel; Savoye, Guillaume; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Lerebours, Eric; Ducrotté, Philippe; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2008-12-01

    Glutamine (Gln) and arginine (Arg) are conditionally essential amino acids with immunomodulatory properties. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of Gln and Arg alone or in combination on cytokine release by cultured colonic biopsies from patients with active Crohn's disease (CD). Ten consecutive patients [mean (range) age 26 (18-39) y] with active colonic CD (mean CD activity index: 383.7 +/- 129.8) were prospectively included in the study. Eight colonic biopsies were obtained via a colonoscopy and incubated during 18 h with low (physiological) or high (pharmacological) doses of Arg (0.1 or 2 mmol/L designated as Arg(low) or Arg(high), respectively) and Gln (0.6 or 10 mmol/L designated as Gln(low) or Gln(high), respectively). The concentrations of cytokines [interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-8, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), IL-1beta, interferon-gamma) were assessed by ELISA, and nitric oxide (NO) production was evaluated by Griess assay. Nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB p65 subunit, inhibitor of NFkappaB-alpha, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were assessed by immunoblotting. Arg(high)/Gln(high) decreased the production of TNFalpha, IL-1beta, IL-8, and IL-6 (each P < 0.01). Arg(low)/Gln(high) decreased IL-6 and IL-8 production (both P < 0.01), whereas Arg(high)/Gln(low) did not affect cytokine and NO production. Arg(low)/Gln(high) and Arg(high)/Gln(high) decreased NF-kappaB p65 subunit expression, whereas p38 MAPK was decreased only by Arg(high)/Gln(high). Combined pharmacological doses of Arg and Gln decreased TNFalpha and the main proinflammatory cytokines release in active colonic CD biopsies via NF-kappaB and p38 MAPK pathways. These results could be the basis of prospective studies evaluating the effects of enteral supply of combined Arg and Gln during active CD.

  4. Improved method for expression and isolation of the Mycoplasma hominis arginine deiminase from the recombinant strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fayura, Lyubov R; Boretsky, Yuriy R; Pynyaha, Yuriy V; Wheatley, Denys N; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2013-09-20

    Arginine deiminase is a promising anticancer drug active against melanoma, hepatocarcinoma and other tumors. Recombinant strains of Escherichia coli that express arginine deiminase from pathogenic bacteria Mycoplasma have been developed. However, production costs of heterologous arginine deiminase are high due to use of an expensive inducer and extraction buffer, as well as using diluted culture for enzyme induction. We report on a new advanced protocol for Mycoplasma hominis arginine deiminase expression, extraction and renaturation. The main improvements include manipulation with dense suspensions of E. coli, use of lactose instead of isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside as an inducer and a cheaper but not less efficient buffer for solubilization of arginine deiminase inclusion bodies. In addition, supplementation of the storage culture medium with glucose and substrate (arginine) significantly stabilized the recombinant arginine deiminase producer. Homogenous preparations of recombinant arginine deiminase were obtained using anion-exchange and hydrophobic chromatography. The purified enzyme retained a specific activity of 30-34 U/mg for 12 months when stored at 4°C in 20 mM sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.2 containing 1 M NaCl.

  5. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depl...

  6. Arginine requirement of starting broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Cuca, M; Jensen, L S

    1990-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted to estimate the arginine requirement of male broiler chicks from 0 to 3 wk of age. The experiments were conducted in battery brooders with wires floors, and the birds received water and feed ad libitum. In the first experiment, chicks were fed a diet based on corn, soybean meal, casein, and corn-gluten meal containing 3,200 kcal ME per kg and either 20 or 23% crude protein. Regression analysis indicated an arginine requirement of 1.22% for maximum growth rate and feed efficiency with the 20% protein diet. For chicks fed the 23% protein diet, neither growth rate nor feed efficiency was significantly different among the diets containing arginine ranging from 1.13 to 1.43%. In the second experiment, a basal diet was used containing 17.5% casein and 22.5% protein with arginine ranging from 1.03 to 1.43%. An arginine requirement of 1.18% for maximum body weight gain was estimated by regression analysis, but no significant response to arginine above the basal level was observed for feed efficiency. Performance of chicks fed the basal diet was somewhat reduced because of a difficulty with adherence of feed to the beaks. In a third experiment, three basal diets containing 21, 22, or 23% protein were formulated from practical ingredients without use of casein. The requirement for maximum growth rate and feed efficiency was estimated to be 1.24 to 1.28% for the three diets. The results of these investigations indicate that the arginine requirement for starting chicks suggested by the National Research Council in 1984 of 1.44% in diets containing 3,200 kcal ME per kg is too high for practical diets. The data presented here support an arginine requirement of 1.25%.

  7. Application of response surface methodology for optimizing arginine deiminase production medium for Enterococcus faecium sp. GR7.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Kaur, Rajinder

    2013-01-01

    Arginine metabolism in Enterococcus faecium sp. GR7 was enhanced via arginine deiminase pathway. Process parameters including fermentation media and environmental conditions were optimized using independent experiments and response surface methodology (central composite design). Fermentation media (EAPM) were optimized using independent experiments which resulted in 4-fold increase in arginine deiminase specific activity as compared to basal medium. To further enhance arginine deiminase activity in E. faecium sp. GR7 and biomass production including a five-level central composite design (CCD) was employed to study the interactive effect of three-process variables. Response surface methodology suggested a quadratic model which was further validated experimentally where it showed approximately 15-fold increase in arginine metabolism (in terms of arginine deiminase specific activity) over basal medium. By solving the regression equation and analyzing the response surface cartons, optimal concentrations of the media components (g/L) were determined as arginine 20.0; tryptone 15.0; lactose 10.0; K2HPO4 3.0; NaCl 1.0, MnSO4 0.6 mM; Tween 80 1%; pH 6.0 for achieving specific arginine deiminase activity of 4.6 IU/mG with concomitant biomass production of 12.1 mg/L. The model is significant as the coefficient of determination (R (2)) was 0.87 to 0.90 for all responses. Enhanced arginine deiminase yield from E. faecium, a GRAS lactic acid bacterial strain, is desirable to explore in vitro therapeutic potential of the arginine metabolizing E. faecium sp. GR7.

  8. Arginine Methylation by PRMT1 Regulates Muscle Stem Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Li, Xing; Yu, Zhenbao; Li, Shawn; Richard, Stéphane

    2017-02-01

    Quiescent muscle stem cells (MSCs) become activated in response to skeletal muscle injury to initiate regeneration. Activated MSCs proliferate and differentiate to repair damaged fibers or self-renew to maintain the pool and ensure future regeneration. The balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation is a tightly regulated process controlled by a genetic cascade involving determinant transcription factors such as Pax7, Myf5, MyoD, and MyoG. Recently, there have been several reports about the role of arginine methylation as a requirement for epigenetically mediated control of muscle regeneration. Here we report that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is expressed in MSCs and that conditional ablation of PRMT1 in MSCs using Pax7(CreERT2) causes impairment of muscle regeneration. Importantly, PRMT1-deficient MSCs have enhanced cell proliferation after injury but are unable to terminate the myogenic differentiation program, leading to regeneration failure. We identify the coactivator of Six1, Eya1, as a substrate of PRMT1. We show that PRMT1 methylates Eya1 in vitro and that loss of PRMT1 function in vivo prevents Eya1 methylation. Moreover, we observe that PRMT1-deficient MSCs have reduced expression of Eya1/Six1 target MyoD due to disruption of Eya1 recruitment at the MyoD promoter and subsequent Eya1-mediated coactivation. These findings suggest that arginine methylation by PRMT1 regulates muscle stem cell fate through the Eya1/Six1/MyoD axis.

  9. Role of arginine 180 and glutamic acid 177 of ricin toxin A chain in enzymatic inactivation of ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, A; Welsh, P; Richardson, J; Robertus, J D

    1990-01-01

    The gene for ricin toxin A chain was modified by site-specific mutagenesis to change arginine 180 to alanine, glutamine, methionine, lysine, or histidine. Separately, glutamic acid 177 was changed to alanine and glutamic acid 208 was changed to aspartic acid. Both the wild-type and mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and, when soluble, purified and tested quantitatively for enzyme activity. A positive charge at position 180 was found necessary for solubility of the protein and for enzyme activity. Similarly, a negative charge with a proper geometry in the vicinity of position 177 was critical for ricin toxin A chain catalysis. When glutamic acid 177 was converted to alanine, nearby glutamic acid 208 could largely substitute for it. This observation provided valuable structural information concerning the nature of second-site mutations. Images PMID:1978925

  10. Structural basis for Sfm1 functioning as a protein arginine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Fengjuan; Zhang, Tianlong; Zhou, Zhen; Gao, Shuaixin; Wong, Catherine CL; Zhou, Jin-Qiu; Ding, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    SPOUT proteins constitute one class of methyltransferases, which so far are found to exert activity mainly towards RNAs. Previously, yeast Sfm1 was predicted to contain a SPOUT domain but can methylate ribosomal protein S3. Here we report the crystal structure of Sfm1, which comprises of a typical SPOUT domain and a small C-terminal domain. The active site is similar to that of protein arginine methyltransferases but different from that of RNA methyltransferases. In addition, Sfm1 exhibits a negatively charged surface surrounding the active site unsuitable for RNA binding. Our biochemical data show that Sfm1 exists as a monomer and has high activity towards ribosomal protein S3 but no activity towards RNA. It can specifically catalyze the methylation of Arg146 of S3 and the C-terminal domain is critical for substrate binding and activity. These results together provide the structural basis for Sfm1 functioning as a PRMT for ribosomal protein S3. PMID:27462434

  11. Effect of arginine on oligomerization and stability of N-acetylglutamate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, N.; Mumo, A.; Brown, P. H.; Tuchman, M.; Morizono, H.; Caldovic, L.

    2016-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS; E.C.2.3.1.1) catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglutamate (NAG) from acetyl coenzyme A and glutamate. In microorganisms and plants, NAG is the first intermediate of the L-arginine biosynthesis; in animals, NAG is an allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I and III. In some bacteria bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase-kinase (NAGS-K) catalyzes the first two steps of L-arginine biosynthesis. L-arginine inhibits NAGS in bacteria, fungi, and plants and activates NAGS in mammals. L-arginine increased thermal stability of the NAGS-K from Maricaulis maris (MmNAGS-K) while it destabilized the NAGS-K from Xanthomonas campestris (XcNAGS-K). Analytical gel chromatography and ultracentrifugation indicated tetrameric structure of the MmMNAGS-K in the presence and absence of L-arginine and a tetramer-octamer equilibrium that shifted towards tetramers upon binding of L-arginine for the XcNAGS-K. Analytical gel chromatography of mouse NAGS (mNAGS) indicated either different oligomerization states that are in moderate to slow exchange with each other or deviation from the spherical shape of the mNAGS protein. The partition coefficient of the mNAGS increased in the presence of L-arginine suggesting smaller hydrodynamic radius due to change in either conformation or oligomerization. Different effects of L-arginine on oligomerization of NAGS may have implications for efforts to determine the three-dimensional structure of mammalian NAGS. PMID:27934952

  12. Characterization of the arginine deiminase of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyongsu

    2006-09-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is an important cause of infectious diseases in horses and rarely humans. Little is known about the virulence factors or protective antigens of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In the present study, I designed original primers based on an alignment of the gene sagp(arcA) from Streptococcus pyogenes encoding streptococcal acid glycoprotein-arginine deiminase (SAGP/AD) to amplify the S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus counterpart sequence by polymerase chain reaction, and I analyzed the sagp(arcA) gene of the organism. Using chromosomal walking steps, I identified a contiguous eight-gene locus involved in SAGP/AD production. Their open reading frames were found to share significant homologies and to correspond closely in molecular mass to previously sequenced arc genes of S. pyogenes, thus they were designated ahrC.2 (arginine repressor), arcR (CRP/FNR transcription regulator), sagp(arcA) (streptococcal acid glycoprotein-arginine deiminase), putative acetyltransferase gene, arcB (ornithine carbamyl transferase), arcD (arginine-ornithine antiporter), arcT (Xaa-His peptidase), and arcC (carbamate kinase). The SAGP homologue of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus (SzSAGP), encoded by arcA gene of the bacteria (arcA(SZ)), was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. When in vitro growth inhibitory activity of the recombinant SzSAGP was tested against MOLT-3 cells, it inhibited the growth of the cells during the 3 days of culture in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by the induction of apoptotic cell death. The recombinant protein also possessed AD activity. By immunoblot analysis using both anti-SzSAGP-SfbI(H8) and anti-SfbI(H8) sera, I was able to demonstrate that the SzSAGP protein is expressed on the streptococcal surface.

  13. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  14. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  15. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  16. Effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine and L-arginine on regional cerebral blood flow in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Kovách, A G; Szabó, C; Benyó, Z; Csáki, C; Greenberg, J H; Reivich, M

    1992-01-01

    1. We studied the effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine (NOLA), a potent inhibitor of the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway, and L-arginine, the precursor of nitric oxide, on regional cerebral blood flow, electrocortical activity and ex vivo cerebrovascular reactivity in the cat. Flow was measured via radiolabelled microspheres, and vascular responses were studied by measuring isometric tension of isolated middle cerebral arterial rings. 2. NOLA (30 mg kg-1 bolus followed by 1 mg kg-1 min-1 infusion) caused an approximately 40 mmHg elevation in the mean arterial blood pressure, a regionally heterogenous increase of the regional cerebrovascular resistance and a decrease in the regional cerebral blood flow 15 and 40 min after the start of its administration. In contrast L-arginine (30 mg kg-1 bolus followed by 10 mg kg-1 min-1 infusion) did not alter blood pressure, cerebrovascular resistance nor regional cerebral blood flow 15 min after the start of its administration. The NOLA-induced changes in tissue flow were the most pronounced in the cerebellum, pituitary and medulla oblongata, whereas there was no decrease in the flow of the cortex and white matter. 3. NOLA caused characteristic changes in total fronto-occipital EEG power and in power spectra which were unlikely to have been due to cerebral ischaemia. In addition, the ex vivo reactivity of the middle cerebral arteries showed signs of impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthesis: there were enhanced noradrenaline-induced contractions and N-ethoxycarbonyl-3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1)-induced relaxations and markedly attenuated acetylcholine- and ATP-induced relaxations after NOLA treatment. 4. The present data indicate that resting cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular resistance are regulated by nitric oxide derived from L-arginine in a regionally heterogenous way and that exogenous L-arginine availability is not a limiting factor in this nitric oxide generation. Possibly, both the vascular endothelium and the

  17. The crystal structure of the Rv0301-Rv0300 VapBC-3 toxin-antitoxin complex from M. tuberculosis reveals a Mg2+ ion in the active site and a putative RNA-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Andrew B; Miallau, Linda; Sawaya, Michael R; Habel, Jeff; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David

    2013-01-10

    VapBC pairs account for 45 out of 88 identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) pairs in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv genome. A working model suggests that under times of stress, antitoxin molecules are degraded, releasing the toxins to slow the metabolism of the cell, which in the case of VapC toxins is via their RNase activity. Otherwise the TA pairs remain bound to their promoters, autoinhibiting transcription. The crystal structure of Rv0301-Rv0300, an Mtb VapBC TA complex determined at 1.49 Å resolution, suggests a mechanism for these three functions: RNase activity, its inhibition by antitoxin, and its ability to bind promoter DNA. The Rv0301 toxin consists of a core of five parallel beta strands flanked by alpha helices. Three proximal aspartates coordinate a Mg2+ ion forming the putative RNase active site. The Rv0300 antitoxin monomer is extended in structure, consisting of an N-terminal beta strand followed by four helices. The last two helices wrap around the toxin and terminate near the putative RNase active site, but with different conformations. In one conformation, the C-terminal arginine interferes with Mg2+ ion coordination, suggesting a mechanism by which the antitoxin can inhibit toxin activity. At the N-terminus of the antitoxin, two pairs of Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motifs are related by crystallographic twofold symmetry. The resulting hetero-octameric complex is similar to the FitAB system, but the two RHH motifs are about 30 Å closer together in the Rv0301-Rv0300 complex, suggesting either a different span of the DNA recognition sequence or a conformational change.

  18. Arginine Relieves the Inflammatory Response and Enhances the Casein Expression in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tianyou; Wang, Chao; Ding, Luoyang; Shen, Yizhao; Cui, Huihui; Wang, Mengzhi; Wang, Hongrong

    2016-01-01

    As one of functional active amino acids, L-arginine holds a key position in immunity. However, the mechanism that arginine modulates cow mammary inflammatory response in ruminant is unclear. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of L-arginine on inflammatory response and casein expression after challenging the bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The cells were divided into four groups, stimulated with or without LPS (10 μg/mL) and treated with or without arginine (100 μg/mL) for 12 h. The concentration of proinflammatory cytokines, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathways as well as the casein was determined. The results showed that arginine reduced the LPS-induced production like IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and iNOS. Though the expression of NF-κB was attenuated and the mTOR signaling pathway was upregulated, arginine had no effect on TLR4 expression. In addition, our results show that the content of β-casein and the total casein were enhanced after arginine was supplemented in LPS-induced BMECs. In conclusion, arginine could relieve the inflammatory reaction induced by LPS and enhance the concentration of β-casein and the total casein in bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:27110069

  19. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  20. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  1. Impacts of arginine nutrition on embryonic and fetal development in mammals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Satterfield, M Carey; Li, Xilong; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Johnson, Gregory A; Burghardt, Robert C; Dai, Zhaolai; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong

    2013-08-01

    Embryonic loss and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are significant problems in humans and other animals. Results from studies involving pigs and sheep have indicated that limited uterine capacity and placental insufficiency are major factors contributing to suboptimal reproduction in mammals. Our discovery of the unusual abundance of the arginine family of amino acids in porcine and ovine allantoic fluids during early gestation led to the novel hypothesis that arginine plays an important role in conceptus (embryo and extra-embryonic membranes) development. Arginine is metabolized to ornithine, proline, and nitric oxide, with each having important physiological functions. Nitric oxide is a vasodilator and angiogenic factor, whereas ornithine and proline are substrates for uterine and placental synthesis of polyamines that are key regulators of gene expression, protein synthesis, and angiogenesis. Additionally, arginine activates the mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin cell signaling pathway to stimulate protein synthesis in the placenta, uterus, and fetus. Thus, dietary supplementation with 0.83 % L-arginine to gilts consuming 2 kg of a typical gestation diet between either days 14 and 28 or between days 30 and 114 of pregnancy increases the number of live-born piglets and litter birth weight. Similar results have been reported for gestating rats and ewes. In sheep, arginine also stimulates development of fetal brown adipose tissue. Furthermore, oral administration of arginine to women with IUGR has been reported to enhance fetal growth. Collectively, enhancement of uterine as well as placental growth and function through dietary arginine supplementation provides an effective solution to improving embryonic and fetal survival and growth.

  2. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  3. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  4. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  5. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  6. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  7. Targeting Arginine-Dependent Cancers with Arginine-Degrading Enzymes: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Melissa M.; Sheaff, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Arginine deprivation is a novel antimetabolite strategy for the treatment of arginine-dependent cancers that exploits differential expression and regulation of key urea cycle enzymes. Several studies have focused on inactivation of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) in a range of malignancies, including melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mesothelial and urological cancers, sarcomas, and lymphomas. Epigenetic silencing has been identified as a key mechanism for loss of the tumor suppressor role of ASS1 leading to tumoral dependence on exogenous arginine. More recently, dysregulation of argininosuccinate lyase has been documented in a subset of arginine auxotrophic glioblastoma multiforme, HCC and in fumarate hydratase-mutant renal cancers. Clinical trials of several arginine depletors are ongoing, including pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20, Polaris Group) and bioengineered forms of human arginase. ADI-PEG20 is furthest along the path of clinical development from combinatorial phase 1 to phase 3 trials and is described in more detail. The challenge will be to identify tumors sensitive to drugs such as ADI-PEG20 and integrate these agents into multimodality drug regimens using imaging and tissue/fluid-based biomarkers as predictors of response. Lastly, resistance pathways to arginine deprivation require further study to optimize arginine-targeted therapies in the oncology clinic. PMID:24453997

  8. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  9. Importance of Host Cell Arginine Uptake in Francisella Phagosomal Escape and Ribosomal Protein Amounts*

    PubMed Central

    Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Chhuon, Cerina; Dupuis, Marion; Rigard, Mélanie; Henry, Thomas; Barel, Monique; Charbit, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Upon entry into mammalian host cells, the pathogenic bacterium Francisella must import host cell arginine to multiply actively in the host cytoplasm. We identified and functionally characterized an arginine transporter (hereafter designated ArgP) whose inactivation considerably delayed bacterial phagosomal escape and intracellular multiplication. Intramacrophagic growth of the ΔargP mutant was fully restored upon supplementation of the growth medium with excess arginine, in both F. tularensis subsp. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS, demonstrating the importance of arginine acquisition in these two subspecies. High-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that arginine limitation reduced the amount of most of the ribosomal proteins in the ΔargP mutant. In response to stresses such as nutritional limitation, repression of ribosomal protein synthesis has been observed in all kingdoms of life. Arginine availability may thus contribute to the sensing of the intracellular stage of the pathogen and to trigger phagosomal egress. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange database with identifier PXD001584 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001584). PMID:25616868

  10. Discovery and mechanistic study of a class of protein arginine methylation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Feng, You; Li, Mingyong; Wang, Binghe; Zheng, Yujun George

    2010-08-26

    Protein arginine methylation regulates multiple biological processes such as chromatin remodeling and RNA splicing. Malfunction of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) is correlated with many human diseases. Thus, small molecule inhibitors of protein arginine methylation are of great potential for therapeutic development. Herein, we report a type of compound that blocks PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation at micromolar potency through a unique mechanism. Most of the discovered compounds bear naphthalene and sulfonate groups and are structurally different from typical PRMT substrates, for example, histone H4 and glycine- and arginine-rich sequences. To elucidate the molecular basis of inhibition, we conducted a variety of kinetic and biophysical assays. The combined data reveal that this type of naphthyl-sulfo (NS) molecule directly targets the substrates but not PRMTs for the observed inhibition. We also found that suramin effectively inhibited PRMT1 activity. These findings about novel PRMT inhibitors and their unique inhibition mechanism provide a new way for chemical regulation of protein arginine methylation.

  11. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  12. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  13. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  14. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  15. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  16. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  17. Arginine Enhances Osteoblastogenesis and Inhibits Adipogenesis through the Regulation of Wnt and NFATc Signaling in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jeong-Eun; Choi, Jun-Young; Shin, Ye-Ok; Park, Dong-Suk; Kang, Jung Won; Nam, Dongwoo; Choi, Do-Young; Lee, Jae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Arginine, an α-amino acid, has been reported to exert beneficial effects that ameliorate health problems and prevent excessive fat deposition. In this study, we investigated whether the activation of cell signaling by arginine can induce osteogenic differentiation and modulate excessive adipogenic differentiation in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Arginine potently induced the expression of type Iα1 collagen, osteocalcin, and ALP in a dose-dependent manner without causing cytotoxicity. Arginine significantly increased the mRNA expression of the osteogenic transcription factors runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), DIx5, and osterix. Furthermore, arginine demonstrated its antiadipogenicity by decreasing adipocyte formation and triglyceride (TG) content in MSCs and inhibiting the mRNA expression of the adipogenic transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), and fatty acid binding protein 4 (Fabp4). This effect was associated with increased expression of Wnt5a, and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATc), and was abrogated by antagonists of Wnt and NFATc, which indicated a role of Wnt and NFATc signaling in the switch from adipogenesis to osteoblastogenesis induced by arginine. In conclusion, this is the first report of the dual action of arginine in promoting osteogenesis and inhibiting adipocyte formation through involving Wnt5a and NFATc signaling pathway. PMID:25054323

  18. Novel metabolic roles of L-arginine in body energy metabolism and possible clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hristina, K; Langerholc, T; Trapecar, M

    2014-01-01

    Although the body can synthesize L-arginine, exogenous supplementation may be sometimes necessary, especially in particular conditions which results in depleted endogenous source. Among diseases and states when exogenous supplementation may be necessary are: burns, severe wounds, infections, insufficient circulation, intensive physical activity or sterility. In recent time, the attention was paid to the use of L-arginine supplementation by athletes during intensive sport activity, to enhance tissue growth and general performance, to potentiate the ergogenic potential and muscle tolerance to high intensive work and gas exchange threshold, to decrease ammonia liberation and recovery performance period and to improve wound healing. High-intensity exercise produces transient hyperammoniemia, presumably due to AMP catabolism. Catabolic pathways of AMP may involve its deamination or dephosphorylation, mainly in order to compensate fall in adenylate enrgy charge (AEC), due to AMP rise. The enzymes of purine metabolism have been documented to be particularly sensitive to the effect of dietary L-arginine supplementation. L-arginine supplementation leads to redirection of AMP deamination on account of increased AMP dephosphorylation and subsequent adenosine production and may increase ATP regeneration via activation of AMP kinase (AMPK) pathway. The central role of AMPK in regulating cellular ATP regeneration, makes this enzyme as a central control point in energy homeostasis. The effects of L-arginine supplementation on energy expenditure were successful independently of age or previous disease, in young sport active, elderly, older population and patients with angina pectoris.

  19. Tumour effect on arginine/ornithine metabolic relationship in hypertrophic mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Manteuffel-Cymborowska, M; Chmurzyńska, W; Peska, M; Grzelakowska-Sztabert, B

    1997-03-01

    The presence of a tumour significantly changes nitrogen metabolism, including that of amino acids and polyamines, in host animals. In this study, we examine whether developing tumours affect the metabolic relationship of arginine and ornithine, precursors of polyamines, in the testosterone-induced hypertrophic mouse kidney model. Androgen-induced changes in the activity of enzymes involved with ornithine biosynthesis (arginase), its consumption (ornithine aminotransferase, OAT and ornithine decarboxylase, ODC) and the hypertrophy of host mouse kidney were not affected by the presence of an ascitic tumour (EAC) and only slightly by a mammary carcinoma (MaCa). The HPLC determined renal level of arginine and ornithine showed a striking homeostasis and was disturbed neither by testosterone nor EAC. The effect of MaCa and testosterone on the levels of both amino acids, although significant, was not very pronounced. Developing tumours, especially ascitic, altered the renal activity of OAT and ODC, but not of arginase, in testosterone-untreated mice. All examined tumours, EAC, L 1210 and MaCa actively metabolized arginine and ornithine. the tumour content of arginine which coincided with the activity of arginase, resulted in a marked increase of the ornithine/arginine ratio in tumours, when compared with kidneys. These results indicate that the androgen-induced anabolic response in mouse kidney is preserved, in spite of tumour requirements for essential metabolites.

  20. Methylated Nω-Hydroxy-L-arginine Analogues as Mechanistic Probes for the Second Step of the Nitric Oxide Synthase-Catalyzed Reaction†

    PubMed Central

    Labby, Kristin Jansen; Li, Huiying; Roman, Linda J.; Martásek, Pavel; Poulos, Thomas L.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline through the intermediate Nω-hydroxy-L-arginine (NHA), producing nitric oxide, an important mammalian signaling molecule. Several disease states are associated with improper regulation of nitric oxide production, making NOS a therapeutic target. The first step of the NOS reaction has been well-characterized and is presumed to proceed through a compound I heme species, analogous to the cytochrome P450 mechanism. The second step, however, is enzymatically unprecedented and is thought to occur via a ferric peroxo heme species. To gain insight into the details of this unique second step, we report here the synthesis of NHA analogues bearing guanidinium-methyl or -ethyl substitutions and their investigation as either inhibitors of or alternate substrates for NOS. Radiolabeling studies reveal that Nω-methoxy-L-arginine, an alternative NOS substrate, produces citrulline, nitric oxide, and methanol. On the basis of these results we propose a mechanism for the second step of NOS catalysis in which a methylated nitric oxide species is released and is further metabolized by NOS. Crystal structures of our NHA analogues bound to nNOS have been solved, revealing the presence of an active site water molecule only in the presence of singly methylated analogues. Bulkier analogues displace this active site water molecule; a different mechanism is proposed in the absence of the water molecule. Our results provide new insight into the steric and stereochemical tolerance of the NOS active site and substrate capabilities of NOS. PMID:23586781

  1. Temperature dependence of the structure of the substrate and active site of the Thermus thermophilus chorismate mutase E x S complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Bruice, Thomas C

    2006-07-18

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Thermus thermophilus chorismate mutase substrate complex (TtCM x S) have been carried out at 298 K, 333 K, and the temperature of optimum activity: 343 K. The enzyme exists as trimeric subunits with active sites shared between two neighboring subunits. Two features distinguish intersubunit linkages of the thermophilic and mesophilic enzyme Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase substrate complex (BsCM x S): (i) electrostatic interactions by intersubunit ion pairs (Arg3-Glu40*/41, Arg76-Glu51* and Arg69*-Asp101, residues labeled with an asterisk are from the neighboring subunit) in the TtCM x S are not present in the structure of the BsCM x S; and (ii) replacement of polar residues with short and nonpolar residues in the interstices of the TtCM x S tighten the intersubunit hydrophobic interactions compared to BsCM x S. Concerning the active site, electrostatic interactions of the critically placed Arg6 and Arg63* with the two carboxylates of chorismate place the latter in a reactive conformation to spontaneously undergo a Claisen rearrangement. The optimum geometry at the active site has the CZ atoms of the two arginines 11 A apart. With a decrease in temperature, Arg63* moves toward Arg6 and the average conformation structure of chorismate moves further away from the reactive ground state conformation. This movement is due to the decrease in distance separating the electrostatic (in the main) and hydrophobic interacting pairs holding the two subunits together.

  2. Serine phosphorylation and arginine methylation at the crossroads to neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Basso, Manuela; Pennuto, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, polyglutamine diseases and motor neuron diseases, are late-onset and progressive disorders characterized by the accumulation of misfolded proteins inside and outside neurons. No effective therapies exist to delay the onset or arrest the progression of these diseases. One novel and promising therapeutic approach consists of targeting disease-causing proteins at the post-translational level. Here we illustrate this concept using the example of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, a neurodegenerative disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Emerging evidence suggests that two key post-translational modifications of polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor, namely serine phosphorylation by protein kinase B/Akt and arginine methylation by protein arginine methyltransferases, occur at the same consensus site, are mutually exclusive, and have opposing effects on neurotoxicity. Because several proteins linked to neurodegenerative diseases have canonical Akt consensus site motifs, these findings may have a broad impact in the field of neurological diseases caused by misfolded proteins.

  3. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Carolyn A; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno E, Bertrand; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2015-01-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The high pKa value also reinforces the observation that arginine side chains are invariably protonated under physiological conditions of near neutral pH. This occurs even when the guanidinium moiety is buried in a hydrophobic micro-environment, such as that inside a protein or a lipid membrane, thought to be incompatible with the presence of a charged group. PMID:25808204

  4. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Carolyn A; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno, Bertrand E; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2015-05-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼ 12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The high pKa value also reinforces the observation that arginine side chains are invariably protonated under physiological conditions of near neutral pH. This occurs even when the guanidinium moiety is buried in a hydrophobic micro-environment, such as that inside a protein or a lipid membrane, thought to be incompatible with the presence of a charged group.

  5. Inversion of allosteric effect of arginine on N-acetylglutamate synthase, a molecular marker for evolution of tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, Nantaporn; Panglao, Maria; Qu, Qiuhao; Majumdar, Himani; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Morizono, Hiroki; Tuchman, Mendel; Caldovic, Ljubica

    2008-01-01

    Background The efficient conversion of ammonia, a potent neurotoxin, into non-toxic metabolites was an essential adaptation that allowed animals to move from the aquatic to terrestrial biosphere. The urea cycle converts ammonia into urea in mammals, amphibians, turtles, snails, worms and many aquatic animals and requires N-acetylglutamate (NAG), an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in mammals and amphibians, and carbamylphosphate synthetase III (CPSIII) in fish and invertebrates. NAG-dependent CPSI and CPSIII catalyze the formation of carbamylphosphate in the first and rate limiting step of ureagenesis. NAG is produced enzymatically by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), which is also found in bacteria and plants as the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of microbial and plant NAGS, and allosteric activator of mammalian NAGS. Results Information from mutagenesis studies of E. coli and P. aeruginosa NAGS was combined with structural information from the related bacterial N-acetylglutamate kinases to identify four residues in mammalian NAGS that interact with arginine. Substitutions of these four residues were engineered in mouse NAGS and into the vertebrate-like N-acetylglutamate synthase-kinase (NAGS-K) of Xanthomonas campestris, which is inhibited by arginine. All mutations resulted in arginine losing the ability to activate mouse NAGS, and inhibit X. campestris NAGS-K. To examine at what point in evolution inversion of arginine effect on NAGS occur, we cloned NAGS from fish and frogs and examined the arginine response of their corresponding proteins. Fish NAGS were partially inhibited by arginine and frog NAGS were activated by arginine. Conclusion Difference in arginine effect on bacterial and mammalian NAGS most likely stems from the difference in the type of conformational change triggered by arginine binding to these proteins. The change from arginine inhibition of NAGS to activation

  6. The impact of arginine-modified chitosan-DNA nanoparticles on the function of macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanxia; Bai, Yuanyuan; Song, Chunni; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Liping; Zhang, Hailing; Dong, Xia; Leng, Xigang

    2010-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan significantly elevates the transgenic efficacy of the chitosan. However, little is known about the impact of arginine-modified chitosan on the function of macrophages, which play a vitally important role in the inflammatory response of the body to foreign substances, especially particulate substances. This study was designed to investigate the impact of arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the function of the murine macrophage through observation of phagocytic activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α). Results showed that both chitosan/DNA nanoparticles and arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles, containing 20 μg/mL DNA, were internalized by almost all the macrophages in contact. This led to no significant changes, compared to the non-exposure group, in production of cytokines and phagocytic activity of the macrophages 24 h post co-incubation, whereas exposure to LPS induced obviously elevated cytokine production and phagocytic activity, suggesting that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan does not have a negative impact on the function of the macrophages.

  7. [L-arginine and male infertility].

    PubMed

    Scibona, M; Meschini, P; Capparelli, S; Pecori, C; Rossi, P; Menchini Fabris, G F

    1994-12-01

    The clinical efficacy and acceptance of L-arginina HCL was tested in 40 infertile men. All of these men had a normal number of spermatozoa (> 20 million/ml), but a decreased motility; this decreased motility was not due to infection or to immunological disorders. The treatment consisted of 80 ml of 10% L-arginine HCL administered daily per os for 6 months. L-arginine HCL showed to be able to improve the motility of spermatozoa without any side-effects.

  8. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  9. Arginine methylation initiates BMP-induced Smad signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Wang, A. Hongjun; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Makhijani, Kalpana; Katsuno, Yoko; Pei, Ming; Yan, Leilei; Zheng, Y. George; Burlingame, Alma; Brückner, Katja; Derynck, Rik

    2014-01-01

    Summary Kinase activation and substrate phosphorylation commonly form the backbone of signaling cascades. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), a subclass of TGF-β family ligands, induce activation of their signaling effectors, the Smads, through C-terminal phosphorylation by transmembrane receptor kinases. However, the slow kinetics of Smad activation in response to BMP suggests a preceding step in the initiation of BMP signaling. We now show that arginine methylation, which is known to regulate gene expression, yet also modifies some signaling mediators, initiates BMP-induced Smad signaling. BMP-induced receptor complex formation promotes interaction of the methyltransferase PRMT1 with the inhibitory Smad6, resulting in Smad6 methylation and relocalization at the receptor, leading to activation of effector Smads through phosphorylation. PRMT1 is required for BMP-induced biological responses across species, as evidenced by the role of its ortholog Dart1 in BMP signaling during Drosophila wing development. Activation of signaling by arginine methylation may also apply to other signaling pathways. PMID:23747011

  10. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  11. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  12. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  13. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  14. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  15. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  16. The ArgR regulatory protein, a helper to the anaerobic regulator ANR during transcriptional activation of the arcD promoter in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lu, C D; Winteler, H; Abdelal, A; Haas, D

    1999-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, when deprived of oxygen, generates ATP from arginine catabolism by enzymes of the arginine deiminase pathway, encoded by the arcDABC operon. Under conditions of low oxygen tension, the transcriptional activator ANR binds to a site centered 41.5 bp upstream of the arcD transcriptional start. ANR-mediated anaerobic induction was enhanced two- to threefold by extracellular arginine. This arginine effect depended, in trans, on the transcriptional regulator ArgR and, in cis, on an ArgR binding site centered at -73.5 bp in the arcD promoter. Binding of purified ArgR protein to this site was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting. This ArgR recognition site contained a sequence, 5'-TGACGC-3', which deviated in only 1 base from the common sequence motif 5'-TGTCGC-3' found in other ArgR binding sites of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, an alignment of all known ArgR binding sites confirmed that they consist of two directly repeated half-sites. In the absence of ANR, arginine did not induce the arc operon, suggesting that ArgR alone does not activate the arcD promoter. According to a model proposed, ArgR makes physical contact with ANR and thereby facilitates initiation of arc transcription.

  17. The bovine mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor. The role of arginine residues in mannose 6-phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Dahms, N M; Rose, P A; Molkentin, J D; Zhang, Y; Brzycki, M A

    1993-03-15

    The extracytoplasmic region of the bovine cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF-II receptor) consists of 15 homologous repeating domains, each of which is approximately 147 residues in length. The receptor contains two high affinity mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) binding sites and our recent studies (Westlund, B., Dahms, N. M., and Kornfeld, S. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 23233-23239) have localized these two binding sites to domains 1-3 and 7-11. To further define the location of the Man-6-P binding sites and to determine the role of specific arginine residues in Man-6-P binding, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create truncated soluble forms of the M6P/IGF-II receptor in conjunction with either conservative (Lys) or nonconservative (Ala) replacement of arginine residues. These mutants were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells and assayed for their ability to bind phosphomannosyl residues by affinity chromatography. Analysis of the ligand binding activity of carboxyl-terminal truncated forms of the receptor's extracytoplasmic region demonstrated that the second Man-6-P binding site is contained within domains 7-9. Substitution of Arg435 in domain 3 of the amino-terminal binding site and Arg1334 in domain 9 of the second binding site results in a dramatic loss of ligand binding activity. However, substitutions at positions 435 and/or 1334 did not affect the secretion, glycosylation, or immunoreactivity of these truncated proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that Arg435 and Arg1334 are essential components of the M6P/IGF-II receptor's high affinity Man-6-P binding sites.

  18. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  19. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  20. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  1. L-arginine pretreatment reduces intestinal mucositis as induced by 5-FU in mice.

    PubMed

    Leocádio, Paola C L; Antunes, Maísa M; Teixeira, Lílian G; Leonel, Alda J; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I; Machado, Denise C C; Generoso, Simone V; Cardoso, Valbert N; Correia, Maria Isabel T D

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of L-arginine on immune responses and bowel function have been reported. Mucositis is a side effect of chemotherapy treatment that affects approximately 40% of patients. This complication is characterized by inflammation that affects the gastrointestinal tract, increasing permeability and causing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, which worsen the patient's nutritional status and increases morbimortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pretreating with 2% L-arginine supplementation in water on mucositis as induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a single dose of 200 mg/kg body weight) in Swiss male mice. The effect of L-arginine on weight, intestinal permeability, morphology, and the histopathological score of the small intestine (from 0 to 12), oxidative stress, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) activities were evaluated. Intestinal length improvement was observed, in addition to the partial recovery of the mucosal architecture. L-arginine attenuated the histopathological score and MPO activity. There was also an improvement in intestinal permeability, despite weight loss after 5-FU administration. In conclusion, L-arginine can positively impact intestinal mucositis by promoting partial mucosal recovery, reducing inflammation and improving intestinal permeability.

  2. Endogenous Inactivators of Arginase, l-Arginine Decarboxylase, and Agmatine Amidinohydrolase in Evernia prunastri Thallus 1

    PubMed Central

    Legaz, María Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    1983-01-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), l-arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and agmatine amidinohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.11) activities spontaneously decay in Evernia prunastri thalli incubated on 40 millimolar l-arginine used as inducer of the three enzymes if dithiothreitol is not added to the media. Lichen thalli accumulate both chloroatranorin and evernic acid in parallel to the loss of activity. These substances behave as inactivators of the enzymes at a range of concentrations between 2 and 20 micromolar, whereas several concentrations of dithiothreitol reverse, to some extent, the in vitro inactivation. PMID:16662821

  3. Endogenous Inactivators of Arginase, l-Arginine Decarboxylase, and Agmatine Amidinohydrolase in Evernia prunastri Thallus.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M E; Vicente, C

    1983-02-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), l-arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and agmatine amidinohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.11) activities spontaneously decay in Evernia prunastri thalli incubated on 40 millimolar l-arginine used as inducer of the three enzymes if dithiothreitol is not added to the media. Lichen thalli accumulate both chloroatranorin and evernic acid in parallel to the loss of activity. These substances behave as inactivators of the enzymes at a range of concentrations between 2 and 20 micromolar, whereas several concentrations of dithiothreitol reverse, to some extent, the in vitro inactivation.

  4. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  5. Metabolism via Arginase or Nitric Oxide Synthase: Two Competing Arginine Pathways in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Meera; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale; Closs, Ellen I.; Munder, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role in the immune system, both as antimicrobial effector cells and as immunoregulatory cells, which induce, suppress or modulate adaptive immune responses. These key aspects of macrophage biology are fundamentally driven by the phenotype of macrophage arginine metabolism that is prevalent in an evolving or ongoing immune response. M1 macrophages express the enzyme nitric oxide synthase, which metabolizes arginine to nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline. NO can be metabolized to further downstream reactive nitrogen species, while citrulline might be reused for efficient NO synthesis via the citrulline–NO cycle. M2 macrophages are characterized by expression of the enzyme arginase, which hydrolyzes arginine to ornithine and urea. The arginase pathway limits arginine availability for NO synthesis and ornithine itself can further feed into the important downstream pathways of polyamine and proline syntheses, which are important for cellular proliferation and tissue repair. M1 versus M2 polarization leads to opposing outcomes of inflammatory reactions, but depending on the context, M1 and M2 macrophages can be both pro- and anti-inflammatory. Notably, M1/M2 macrophage polarization can be driven by microbial infection or innate danger signals without any influence of adaptive immune cells, secondarily driving the T helper (Th)1/Th2 polarization of the evolving adaptive immune response. Since both arginine metabolic pathways cross-inhibit each other on the level of the respective arginine break-down products and Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes can drive or amplify macrophage M1/M2 dichotomy via cytokine activation, this forms the basis of a self-sustaining M1/M2 polarization of the whole immune response. Understanding the arginine metabolism of M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes is therefore central to find new possibilities to manipulate immune responses in infection, autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammatory conditions, and cancer. PMID:25386178

  6. Diabetic nephropathy is resistant to oral l-arginine or l-citrulline supplementation

    PubMed Central

    You, Hanning; Gao, Ting; Cooper, Timothy K.; Morris, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Our recent publication showed that pharmacological blockade of arginases confers kidney protection in diabetic nephropathy via a nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS)3-dependent mechanism. Arginase competes with endothelial NOS (eNOS) for the common substrate l-arginine. Lack of l-arginine results in reduced NO production and eNOS uncoupling, which lead to endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, we hypothesized that l-arginine or l-citrulline supplementation would ameliorate diabetic nephropathy. DBA mice injected with multiple low doses of vehicle or streptozotocin (50 mg/kg ip for 5 days) were provided drinking water with or without l-arginine (1.5%, 6.05 g·kg−1·day−1) or l-citrulline (1.66%, 5.73 g·kg−1·day−1) for 9 wk. Nonsupplemented diabetic mice showed significant increases in albuminuria, blood urea nitrogen, glomerular histopathological changes, kidney macrophage recruitment, kidney TNF-α and fibronectin mRNA expression, kidney arginase activity, kidney arginase-2 protein expression, and urinary oxidative stress along with a significant reduction of nephrin and eNOS protein expression and kidney nitrite + nitrate compared with normal mice after 9 wk of diabetes. Surprisingly, l-arginine or l-citrulline supplementation in diabetic mice did not affect any of these parameters despite greatly increasing kidney and plasma arginine levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic l-arginine or l-citrulline supplementation does not prevent or reduce renal injury in a model of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25320354

  7. Exploration of Cyanine Compounds as Selective Inhibitors of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is involved in many biological activities, such as gene transcription, signal transduction, and RNA processing. Overexpression of PRMT1 is related to cardiovascular diseases, kidney diseases, and cancers; therefore, selective PRMT1 inhibitors serve as chemical probes to investigate the biological function of PRMT1 and drug candidates for disease treatment. Our previous work found trimethine cyanine compounds that effectively inhibit PRMT1 activity. In our present study, we systematically investigated the structure–activity relationship of cyanine structures. A pentamethine compound, E-84 (compound 50), showed inhibition on PRMT1 at the micromolar level and 6- to 25-fold selectivity over CARM1, PRMT5, and PRMT8. The cellular activity suggests that compound 50 permeated the cellular membrane, inhibited cellular PRMT1 activity, and blocked leukemia cell proliferation. Additionally, our molecular docking study suggested compound 50 might act by occupying the cofactor binding site, which provided a roadmap to guide further optimization of this lead compound. PMID:25559100

  8. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  9. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  14. Structural Analysis and Insights into the Oligomeric State of an Arginine-Dependent Transcriptional Regulator from Bacillus halodurans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Woo; Kang, Jina; Yeo, Hyun Ku; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The arginine repressor (ArgR) is an arginine-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the arginine biosynthesis and catabolic pathways. ArgR is a functional homolog of the arginine-dependent repressor/activator AhrC from Bacillus subtilis, and belongs to the ArgR/AhrC family of transcriptional regulators. In this research, we determined the structure of the ArgR (Bh2777) from Bacillus halodurans at 2.41 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The ArgR from B. halodurans appeared to be a trimer in a size exclusion column and in the crystal structure. However, it formed a hexamer in the presence of L-arginine in multi-angle light scattering (MALS) studies, indicating the oligomerization state was dependent on the presence of L-arginine. The trimeric structure showed that the C-terminal domains form the core, which was made by inter-subunit interactions mainly through hydrophobic contacts, while the N-terminal domains containing a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif were arranged around the periphery. The arrangement of trimeric structure in the B. halodurans ArgR was different from those of other ArgR homologs previously reported. We finally showed that the B. halodurans ArgR has an arginine-dependent DNA binding property by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. PMID:27171430

  15. Detection of inflammatory cell function using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Najac, Chloé; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Kohanbash, Gary; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Okada, Hideho; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are highly prevalent inflammatory cells that play a key role in tumor development and are considered therapeutic targets. MDSCs promote tumor growth by blocking T-cell-mediated anti-tumoral immune response through depletion of arginine that is essential for T-cell proliferation. To deplete arginine, MDSCs express high levels of arginase, which catalyzes the breakdown of arginine into urea and ornithine. Here, we developed a new hyperpolarized 13C probe, [6-13C]-arginine, to image arginase activity. We show that [6-13C]-arginine can be hyperpolarized, and hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production from [6-13C]-arginine is linearly correlated with arginase concentration in vitro. Furthermore we show that we can detect a statistically significant increase in hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production in MDSCs when compared to control bone marrow cells. This increase was associated with an increase in intracellular arginase concentration detected using a spectrophotometric assay. Hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine could therefore serve to image tumoral MDSC function and more broadly M2-like macrophages. PMID:27507680

  16. Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites Edward W. Malin, MD, Chaya M. Galin, BSN, RN... microcurrent in comparison to silver-coated dressing with sham microcurrent on wound-closure time for autogenous skin donor sites. Methods: Four...hundred five patients were screened for treatment of their donor sites using a silver-coated nylon dressing with either sham or active microcurrent

  17. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  18. 76 FR 30696 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  19. 76 FR 24871 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... from eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of...). Title X requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs...

  20. Arginine Methylation by PRMT1 Regulates Muscle Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Li, Xing; Yu, Zhenbao; Li, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quiescent muscle stem cells (MSCs) become activated in response to skeletal muscle injury to initiate regeneration. Activated MSCs proliferate and differentiate to repair damaged fibers or self-renew to maintain the pool and ensure future regeneration. The balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation is a tightly regulated process controlled by a genetic cascade involving determinant transcription factors such as Pax7, Myf5, MyoD, and MyoG. Recently, there have been several reports about the role of arginine methylation as a requirement for epigenetically mediated control of muscle regeneration. Here we report that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is expressed in MSCs and that conditional ablation of PRMT1 in MSCs using Pax7CreERT2 causes impairment of muscle regeneration. Importantly, PRMT1-deficient MSCs have enhanced cell proliferation after injury but are unable to terminate the myogenic differentiation program, leading to regeneration failure. We identify the coactivator of Six1, Eya1, as a substrate of PRMT1. We show that PRMT1 methylates Eya1 in vitro and that loss of PRMT1 function in vivo prevents Eya1 methylation. Moreover, we observe that PRMT1-deficient MSCs have reduced expression of Eya1/Six1 target MyoD due to disruption of Eya1 recruitment at the MyoD promoter and subsequent Eya1-mediated coactivation. These findings suggest that arginine methylation by PRMT1 regulates muscle stem cell fate through the Eya1/Six1/MyoD axis. PMID:27849571

  1. Structure of the complex of carboxypeptidase B and N-sulfamoyl-L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Akparov, Valery; Sokolenko, Nikolay; Timofeev, Vladimir; Kuranova, Inna

    2015-10-01

    Porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B (EC 3.4.23.6) was complexed with a stable transition-state analogue, N-sulfamoyl-L-arginine, in which an S atom imitates the sp(3)-hybridized carbon in the scissile-bond surrogate. Crystals were grown in a form belonging to the same space group, P41212, as the uncomplexed enzyme. X-ray data were collected to a resolution of 1.25 Å. The molecule was refined and the positions of non-H atoms of the inhibitor and water molecules were defined using difference Fourier maps. The enzyme-inhibitor complex and 329 water molecules were further refined to a crystallographic R factor of 0.159. The differences in conformation between the complexed and uncomplexed forms of carboxypeptidase B are shown. The inhibitor is bound in a curved conformation in the active-site cleft, and the sulfamide group is bound to the Zn ion in an asymmetric bidentate fashion. The complex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds between the N1/N2 guanidine group of the inhibitor and the Asp255 carboxyl of the enzyme. The side-chain CH2 groups of the inhibitor are in van der Waals contact with Leu203 and Ile247 in the enzyme. This study provides useful clues concerning how the transition state of arginine may bind to carboxypeptidase B and therefore provides an insight into the structural basis of carboxypeptidase B selectivity, which is useful for the rational design of a carboxypeptidase with improved selectivity for industrial recombinant pro-insulin processing.

  2. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  3. Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed β-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70–81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1’s lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1’s lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the kcat for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1’s active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar “gating loop” or a highly buried solvent-excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates. PMID:28026940

  4. A Study on the Effect of Surface Lysine to Arginine Mutagenesis on Protein Stability and Structure Using Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering. PMID:22792305

  5. A study on the effect of surface lysine to arginine mutagenesis on protein stability and structure using green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering.

  6. Dual Role of Arginine Metabolism in Establishing Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Mayuri; Datey, Akshay; Wilson, Keith T; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-01-01

    Arginine is an integral part of host defense when invading pathogens are encountered. The arginine metabolite nitric oxide (NO) confers antimicrobial properties, whereas the metabolite ornithine is utilized for polyamine synthesis. Polyamines are crucial to tissue repair and anti-inflammatory responses. iNOS/arginase balance can determine Th1/Th2 response. Furthermore, the host arginine pool and its metabolites are utilized as energy sources by various pathogens. Apart from its role as an immune modulator, recent studies have also highlighted the therapeutic effects of arginine. This article sheds light upon the roles of arginine metabolism during pathological conditions and its therapeutic potential. PMID:26610300

  7. Dual role of arginine metabolism in establishing pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Mayuri; Datey, Akshay; Wilson, Keith T; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-02-01

    Arginine is an integral part of host defense when invading pathogens are encountered. The arginine metabolite nitric oxide (NO) confers antimicrobial properties, whereas the metabolite ornithine is utilized for polyamine synthesis. Polyamines are crucial to tissue repair and anti-inflammatory responses. iNOS/arginase balance can determine Th1/Th2 response. Furthermore, the host arginine pool and its metabolites are utilized as energy sources by various pathogens. Apart from its role as an immune modulator, recent studies have also highlighted the therapeutic effects of arginine. This article sheds light upon the roles of arginine metabolism during pathological conditions and its therapeutic potential.

  8. Arginine Metabolism in Myeloid Cells Shapes Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Ochoa, Augusto C.; Al-Khami, Amir A.

    2017-01-01

    Arginine metabolism has been a key catabolic and anabolic process throughout the evolution of the immune response. Accruing evidence indicates that arginine-catabolizing enzymes, mainly nitric oxide synthases and arginases, are closely integrated with the control of immune response under physiological and pathological conditions. Myeloid cells are major players that exploit the regulators of arginine metabolism to mediate diverse, although often opposing, immunological and functional consequences. In this article, we focus on the importance of arginine catabolism by myeloid cells in regulating innate and adaptive immunity. Revisiting this matter could result in novel therapeutic approaches by which the immunoregulatory nodes instructed by arginine metabolism can be targeted. PMID:28223985

  9. Arginine metabolising enzymes as therapeutic tools for Alzheimer's disease: peptidyl arginine deiminase catalyses fibrillogenesis of beta-amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Mohlake, Peter; Whiteley, Chris G

    2010-06-01

    The accumulation of arginine in the cerebrospinal fluid and brains of patients suffering from acute neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, point to defects in the metabolic pathways involving this amino acids. The deposits of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques perhaps as a consequence of fibrillogenesis of beta-amyloid peptides has also been shown to be a hallmark in the aetiology of certain neurodegenerative diseases. Peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD II) is an enzyme that uses arginine as a substrate and we now show that PAD II not only binds with the peptides Abeta(1-40), Abeta(22-35), Abeta(17-28), Abeta(25-35) and Abeta(32-35) but assists in the proteolytic degradation of these peptides with the concomitant formation of insoluble fibrils. PAD was purified in 12.5% yield and 137 fold with a specific activity of 59 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) from bovine brain by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sephacel. Characterisation of the enzyme gave a pH and temperature optima of 7.5 degrees C and 68 degrees C, respectively, and the enzyme lost 50% activity within 38 min at this temperature. Michaelis-Menten kinetics established a V(max) and K(m) of 1.57 micromol min(-1) ml(-1) and 1.35 mM, respectively, with N-benzoyl arginine ethyl ester as substrate. Kinetic analysis was used to measure the affinity (K(i)) of the amyloid peptides to PAD with values between 1.4 and 4.6 microM. The formation of Abeta fibrils was rate limiting involving an initial lag time of about 24 h that was dependent on the concentration of the amyloid peptides. Turbidity measurements at 400 nm, Congo Red assay and Thioflavin-T staining fluorescence were used to establish the aggregation kinetics of PAD-induced fibril formation.

  10. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  11. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; ...

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5more » s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.« less

  12. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  13. Molecular characterization of arginine deiminase pathway in Laribacter hongkongensis and unique regulation of arginine catabolism and anabolism by multiple environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lifeng; Teng, Jade L L; Watt, Rory M; Liu, Cuihua; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-11-01

    The betaproteobacterium Laribacter hongkongensis is associated with invasive bacteremic infections and gastroenteritis. Its genome contains two adjacent arc gene cassettes (arc1 and arc2) under independent transcriptional control, which are essential for acid resistance. Laribacter hongkongensis also encodes duplicate copies of the argA and argB genes from the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We show that arginine enhances the transcription of arcA2 but suppresses arcA1 expression. We demonstrate that ArgR acts as a transcriptional regulator of the two arc operons through binding to ARG operator sites (ARG boxes). Upon temperature shift from 20°C to 37°C, arcA1 transcription is upregulated while arcA2, argA2, argB2 and argG are downregulated. The transcription of arcA1 and arcA2 are augmented under anaerobic and acidic conditions. The transcription levels of argA1, argA2, argB1, argB2 and argG are significantly increased under anaerobic and acidic conditions but are repressed by the addition of arginine. Deletion of argR significantly decreases bacterial survival in macrophages, while expression of both arc operons, argR and all five of the anabolic arg genes increases 8 h post-infection. Our results show that arginine catabolism in L. hongkongensis is finely regulated by controlling the transcription of two arc operons, whereas arginine anabolism is controlled by two copies of argA and argB.

  14. L-Arginine promotes protein synthesis and cell growth in brown adipocyte precursor cells via the mTOR signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xi; Han, Meng; Li, Defa; Hu, Shengdi; Gilbreath, Kyler R; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2017-03-04

    L-Arginine has been reported to enhance brown adipose tissue developments in fetal lambs of obese ewes, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that L-arginine stimulates growth and development of brown adipocyte precursor cells (BAPCs) through activation of mammalian target of rapamycin cell signaling. BAPCs isolated from fetal lambs at day 90 of gestation were incubated   for 6 h in arginine-free DMEM, and then cultured in DMEM with concentrations of 50, 100, 200, 500 or 1000 μmol L-arginine/L for 24-96 h. Cell proliferation, protein turnover, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and pre-adipocyte differentiation markers were determined. L-arginine treatment enhanced (P < 0.05) BAPC growth and protein synthesis, while inhibiting proteolysis in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with 50 and 100 μmol/L (the concentrations of arginine in the maternal plasma of obese ewes), 200 μmol L-arginine/L (the concentrations of arginine in the maternal plasma of obese ewes receiving arginine supplementation) increased (P < 0.05) the abundances of phosphorylated mTOR, P70(S6K) and 4EBP1, as well as the abundances of PGC1α, UCP1, BMP7 and PRDM16. These novel findings indicate that increasing extra-cellular arginine concentration from 50 to 200 µmol/L activates mTOR cell signaling in BAPCs and enhances their growth and development in a dose-dependent manner. Our results provide a mechanism for arginine supplementation to enhance the development of brown adipose tissue in fetal lambs.

  15. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  16. An active site mutation increases the polymerase activity of the guinea pig-lethal Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Alexander; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Becker, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes severe, often fatal, disease in humans and transient illness in rodents. Sequential passaging of MARV in guinea pigs resulted in selection of a lethal virus containing 4 aa changes. A D184N mutation in VP40 (VP40D184N), which leads to a species-specific gain of viral fitness, and three mutations in the active site of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which were investigated in the present study for functional significance in human and guinea pig cells. The transcription/replication activity of L mutants was strongly enhanced by a substitution at position 741 (S741C), and inhibited by other substitutions (D758A and A759D) in both species. The polymerase activity of L carrying the S741C substitution was eightfold higher in guinea pig cells than in human cells upon co-expression with VP40D184N, suggesting that the additive effect of the two mutations provides MARV a replicative advantage in the new host.

  17. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  18. Virtual screening and biological characterization of novel histone arginine methyltransferase PRMT1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heinke, Ralf; Spannhoff, Astrid; Meier, Rene; Trojer, Patrick; Bauer, Ingo; Jung, Manfred; Sippl, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Lysine and arginine methyltransferases participate in the posttranslational modification of histones and regulate key cellular functions. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) has been identified as an essential component of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) oncogenic complexes, revealing its potential as a novel therapeutic target in human cancer. The first potent arginine methyltransferase inhibitors were recently discovered by random- and target-based screening approaches. Herein we report virtual and biological screening for novel inhibitors of PRMT1. Structure-based virtual screening (VS) of the Chembridge database composed of 328 000 molecules was performed with a combination of ligand- and target-based in silico approaches. Nine inhibitors were identified from the top-scored docking solutions; these were experimentally tested using human PRMT1 and an antibody-based assay with a time-resolved fluorescence readout. Among several aromatic amines, an aliphatic amine and an amide were also found to be active in the micromolar range.

  19. Expression of arginine decarboxylase in brain regions and neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyo, Abiye H.; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Ordway, Gregory A.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2010-01-01

    After our initial report of a mammalian gene for arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme for the synthesis of agmatine from arginine, we have determined the regional expression of ADC in rat. We have analyzed the expression of ADC in rat brain regions by activity, protein and mRNA levels, and the regulation of expression in neuronal cells by RNA interference. In rat brain, ADC was widely expressed in major brain regions, with a substantial amount in hypothalamus, followed by cortex, and with least amounts in locus coeruleus and medulla. ADC mRNA was detected in primary astrocytes and C6 glioma cells. While no ADC message was detected in fresh neurons (3 days old), significant message appeared in differentiated neurons (3 weeks old). PC12 cells, treated with nerve growth factor, had higher ADC mRNA compared with naive cells. The siRNA mixture directed towards the N-terminal regions of ADC cDNA down-regulated the levels of mRNA and protein in cultured neurons/C6 glioma cells and these cells produced lower agmatine. Thus, this study demonstrates that ADC message is expressed in rat brain regions, that it is regulated in neuronal cells and that the down-regulation of ADC activity by specific siRNA leads to lower agmatine production. PMID:16445852

  20. Computational prediction of methylation types of covalently modified lysine and arginine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wankun; Wang, Yongbo; Ma, Lili; Zhang, Ying; Ullah, Shahid; Xue, Yu

    2016-05-30

    Protein methylation is an essential posttranslational modification (PTM) mostly occurs at lysine and arginine residues, and regulates a variety of cellular processes. Owing to the rapid progresses in the large-scale identification of methylation sites, the available data set was dramatically expanded, and more attention has been paid on the identification of specific methylation types of modification residues. Here, we briefly summarized the current progresses in computational prediction of methylation sites, which provided an accurate, rapid and efficient approach in contrast with labor-intensive experiments. We collected 5421 methyllysines and methylarginines in 2592 proteins from the literature, and classified most of the sites into different types. Data analyses demonstrated that different types of methylated proteins were preferentially involved in different biological processes and pathways, whereas a unique sequence preference was observed for each type of methylation sites. Thus, we developed a predictor of GPS-MSP, which can predict mono-, di- and tri-methylation types for specific lysines, and mono-, symmetric di- and asymmetrical di-methylation types for specific arginines. We critically evaluated the performance of GPS-MSP, and compared it with other existing tools. The satisfying results exhibited that the classification of methylation sites into different types for training can considerably improve the prediction accuracy. Taken together, we anticipate that our study provides a new lead for future computational analysis of protein methylation, and the prediction of methylation types of covalently modified lysine and arginine residues can generate more useful information for further experimental manipulation.

  1. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  2. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  3. Barium ions selectively activate BK channels via the Ca2+-bowl site.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Xu-Hui; Lingle, Christopher J

    2012-07-10

    Activation of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels is increased via binding of micromolar Ca(2+) to two distinct high-affinity sites per BK α-subunit. One site, termed the Ca(2+) bowl, is embedded within the second RCK domain (RCK2; regulator of conductance for potassium) of each α-subunit, while oxygen-containing residues in the first RCK domain (RCK1) have been linked to a separate Ca(2+) ligation site. Although both sites are activated by Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), Cd(2+) selectively favors activation via the RCK1 site. Divalent cations of larger ionic radius than Sr(2+) are thought to be ineffective at activating BK channels. Here we show that Ba(2+), better known as a blocker of K(+) channels, activates BK channels and that this effect arises exclusively from binding at the Ca(2+)-bowl site. Compared with previous estimates for Ca(2+) bowl-mediated activation by Ca(2+), the affinity of Ba(2+) to the Ca(2+) bowl is reduced about fivefold, and coupling of binding to activation is reduced from ∼3.6 for Ca(2+) to about ∼2.8 for Ba(2+). These results support the idea that ionic radius is an important determinant of selectivity differences among different divalent cations observed for each Ca(2+)-binding site.

  4. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  5. Structure and Reactivity of the Phosphotriesterase Active Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    characterize different catalytic conformations for chorismate mutase . Preliminary evidence for water binding in phosphotriesterase suggests that activity in...MD/QM study of the chorismate mutase catalyzed Claisen rearrangement reaction. 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 22.Day, P.N.J., J.H.; Gordon,M.S.; Webb,S.P...Claisen rearrangement of an unusual substrate in chorismate mutase . 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 38.Stevens, W.J., Basch,H., Krauss,M., Compact effective

  6. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  7. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  8. The electrostatic driving force for nucleophilic catalysis in L-arginine deiminase: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Li, Zhimin; Wang, Canhui; Xu, Dingguo; Mariano, Patrick S; Guo, Hua; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra

    2008-04-22

    L-arginine deiminase (ADI) catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine to form L-citrulline and ammonia via two partial reactions. A working model of the ADI catalytic mechanism assumes nucleophilic catalysis by a stringently conserved active site Cys and general acid-general base catalysis by a stringently conserved active site His. Accordingly, in the first partial reaction, the Cys attacks the substrate guanidino C zeta atom to form a tetrahedral covalent adduct, which is protonated by the His at the departing ammonia group to facilitate the formation of the Cys- S-alkylthiouronium intermediate. In the second partial reaction, the His activates a water molecule for nucleophilic addition at the thiouronium C zeta atom to form the second tetrahedral intermediate, which eliminates the Cys in formation of the L-citrulline product. The absence of a basic residue near the Cys thiol suggested that the electrostatic environment of the Cys thiol, in the enzyme-substrate complex, stabilizes the Cys thiolate anion. The studies described in this paper explore the mechanism of stabilization of the Cys thiolate. First, the log(k(cat)/K(m)) and log k(cat) pH rate profiles were measured for several structurally divergent ADIs to establish the pH range for ADI catalysis. All ADIs were optimally active at pH 5, which suggested that the Cys pKa is strongly perturbed by the prevailing electrostatics of the ADI active site. The p K a of the Bacillus cereus ADI (BcADI) was determined by UV-pH titration to be 9.6. In contrast, the pKa determined by iodoacetamide Cys alkylation is 6.9. These results suggest that the negative electrostatic field from the two opposing Asp carboxylates perturbs the Cys pKa upward in the apoenzyme and that the binding of the iodoacetamide (a truncated analogue of the citrulline product) between the Cys thiol and the two Asp carboxylates shields the Cys thiol, thereby reducing its pKa. It is hypothesized that the bound positively charged guanidinium group of the

  9. Maintenance of plastid RNA editing activities independently of their target sites.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Poltnigg, Peter; Kushnir, Sergei; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2006-03-01

    RNA editing in plant organelles is mediated by site-specific, nuclear-encoded factors. Previous data suggested that the maintenance of these factors depends on the presence of their rapidly evolving cognate sites. The surprising ability of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) to edit a foreign site in the chloroplast ndhA messenger RNA was thought to be inherited from its diploid male ancestor, Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Here, we show that the same ndhA editing activity is also present in Nicotiana sylvestris, which is the female diploid progenitor of tobacco and which lacks the ndhA site. Hence, heterologous editing is not simply a result of tobacco's allopolyploid genome organization. Analyses of other editing sites after sexual or somatic transfer between land plants showed that heterologous editing occurs at a surprisingly high frequency. This suggests that the corresponding editing activities are conserved despite the absence of their target sites, potentially because they serve other functions in the plant cell.

  10. A Processive Carbohydrate Polymerase That Mediates Bifunctional Catalysis Using a Single Active Site

    PubMed Central

    May, John F.; Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Brown, Christopher D.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Even in the absence of a template, glycosyltransferases can catalyze the synthesis of carbohydrate polymers of specific sequence. The paradigm has been that one enzyme catalyzes the formation of one type of glycosidic linkage, yet certain glycosyltransferases generate polysaccharide sequences composed of two distinct linkage types. In principle, bifunctional glycosyltransferases can possess separate active sites for each catalytic activity or one active site with dual activities. We encountered the fundamental question of one or two distinct active sites in our investigation of the galactosyltransferase GlfT2. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of mycobacterial galactan, a critical cell-wall polymer composed of galactofuranose residues connected with alternating, regioisomeric linkages. We found that GlfT2 mediates galactan polymerization using only one active site that manifests dual regioselectivity. Structural modeling of the bifunctional glycosyltransferases hyaluronan synthase and cellulose synthase suggests that these enzymes also generate multiple glycosidic linkages using a single active site. These results highlight the versatility of glycosyltransferases for generating polysaccharides of specific sequence. We postulate that a hallmark of processive elongation of a carbohydrate polymer by a bifunctional enzyme is that one active site can give rise to two separate types of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22217153

  11. Interaction of the Small GTPase Cdc42 with Arginine Kinase Restricts White Spot Syndrome Virus in Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji-Dong; Jiang, Hai-Shan; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Ke-Yi; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2017-03-01

    Many types of small GTPases are widely expressed in eukaryotes and have different functions. As a crucial member of the Rho GTPase family, Cdc42 serves a number of functions, such as regulating cell growth, migration, and cell movement. Several RNA viruses employ Cdc42-hijacking tactics in their target cell entry processes. However, the function of Cdc42 in shrimp antiviral immunity is not clear. In this study, we identified a Cdc42 protein in the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) and named it MjCdc42. MjCdc42 was upregulated in shrimp challenged by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The knockdown of MjCdc42 and injection of Cdc42 inhibitors increased the proliferation of WSSV. Further experiments determined that MjCdc42 inter