Science.gov

Sample records for active site chemistry

  1. The hydrogen chemistry of the FeMo-co active site of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2005-08-10

    The chemical mechanism by which nitrogenase enzymes catalyze the hydrogenation of N(2) (and other multiply bonded substrates) at the N(c)Fe(7)MoS(9)(homocitrate) active site (FeMo-co) is unknown, despite the accumulation of much data on enzyme reactivity and the influences of key amino acids surrounding FeMo-co. The mutual influences of H(2), substrates, and the inhibitor CO on reactivity are key experimental tests for postulated mechanisms. Fundamental to all aspects of mechanism is the accumulation of H atoms (from e(-) + H(+)) on FeMo-co, and the generation and influences of coordinated H(2). Here, I argue that the first introduction of H is via a water chain terminating at water 679 (PDB structure , Azotobacter vinelandii) to one of the mu(3)-S atoms (S3B) of FeMo-co. Next, using validated density functional calculations of a full chemical representation of FeMo-co and its connected residues (alpha-275(Cys), alpha-442(His)), I have characterized more than 80 possibilities for the coordination of up to three H atoms, and H(2), and H + H(2), on the S2A, Fe2, S2B, Fe6, S3B domain of FeMo-co, which is favored by recent targeted mutagenesis results. Included are calculated reaction profiles for movements of H atoms (between S and Fe, and between Fe and Fe), for the generation of Fe-H(2), for association and dissociation of Fe-H(2) at various reduction levels, and for H/H(2) exchange. This is new hydrogen chemistry on an unprecedented coordination frame, with some similarities to established hydrogen coordination chemistry, and with unexpected and unprecedented structures such as Fe(S)(3)(H(2))(2)(H) octahedral coordination. General principles for the hydrogen chemistry of FeMo-co include (1) the stereochemical mobility of H bound to mu(3)-S, (2) the differentiated endo- and exo- positions at Fe for coordination of H and/or H(2), and (3) coordinative allosteric influences in which structural and dynamic aspects of coordination at one Fe atom are affected by

  2. The surface chemistry of heterogeneous catalysis: mechanisms, selectivity, and active sites.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The role of chemical kinetics in defining the requirements for the active sites of heterogeneous catalysts is discussed. A personal view is presented, with specific examples from our laboratory to illustrate the role of the chemical composition, structure, and electronic properties of specific surface sites in determining reaction activity and selectivity. Manipulation of catalytic behavior via the addition of chemical modifiers and by tuning of the reaction conditions is also introduced.

  3. Experimental and computational investigation of acetic acid deoxygenation over oxophilic molybdenum carbide: Surface chemistry and active site identity

    SciTech Connect

    Schaidle, Joshua A.; Blackburn, Jeffrey; Farberow, Carrie A.; Nash, Connor; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Clark, Jared; Robichaud, David J.; Ruddy, Daniel A.

    2016-01-21

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) is a promising route for producing fungible biofuels; however, this process requires bifunctional catalysts that favor C–O bond cleavage, activate hydrogen at near atmospheric pressure and high temperature (350–500 °C), and are stable under high-steam, low hydrogen-to-carbon environments. Recently, early transition-metal carbides have been reported to selectively cleave C–O bonds of alcohols, aldehydes, and oxygenated aromatics, yet there is limited understanding of the metal carbide surface chemistry under reaction conditions and the identity of the active sites for deoxygenation. In this study, we evaluated molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, an abundant component of biomass pyrolysis vapors, under ex situ CFP conditions, and we probed the Mo2C surface chemistry, identity of the active sites, and deoxygenation pathways using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  4. Experimental and computational investigation of acetic acid deoxygenation over oxophilic molybdenum carbide: Surface chemistry and active site identity

    DOE PAGES

    Schaidle, Joshua A.; Blackburn, Jeffrey; Farberow, Carrie A.; ...

    2016-01-21

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) is a promising route for producing fungible biofuels; however, this process requires bifunctional catalysts that favor C–O bond cleavage, activate hydrogen at near atmospheric pressure and high temperature (350–500 °C), and are stable under high-steam, low hydrogen-to-carbon environments. Recently, early transition-metal carbides have been reported to selectively cleave C–O bonds of alcohols, aldehydes, and oxygenated aromatics, yet there is limited understanding of the metal carbide surface chemistry under reaction conditions and the identity of the active sites for deoxygenation. In this study, we evaluated molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, anmore » abundant component of biomass pyrolysis vapors, under ex situ CFP conditions, and we probed the Mo2C surface chemistry, identity of the active sites, and deoxygenation pathways using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.« less

  5. Invited award contribution for ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry. Geometric and electronic structure contributions to function in bioinorganic chemistry: active sites in non-heme iron enzymes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E I

    2001-07-16

    Spectroscopy has played a major role in the definition of structure/function correlations in bioinorganic chemistry. The importance of spectroscopy combined with electronic structure calculations is clearly demonstrated by the non-heme iron enzymes. Many members of this large class of enzymes activate dioxygen using a ferrous active site that has generally been difficult to study with most spectroscopic methods. A new spectroscopic methodology has been developed utilizing variable temperature, variable field magnetic circular dichroism, which enables one to obtain detailed insight into the geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme ferrous active site and probe its reaction mechanism on a molecular level. This spectroscopic methodology is presented and applied to a number of key mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes leading to a general mechanistic strategy for O2 activation. These studies are then extended to consider the new features present in the binuclear non-heme iron enzymes and applied to understand (1) the mechanism of the two electron/coupled proton transfer to dioxygen binding to a single iron center in hemerythrin and (2) structure/function correlations over the oxygen-activating enzymes stearoyl-ACP Delta9-desaturase, ribonucleotide reductase, and methane monooxygenase. Electronic structure/reactivity correlations for O2 activation by non-heme relative to heme iron enzymes will also be developed.

  6. Unique coupling of mono- and dioxygenase chemistries in a single active site promotes heme degradation

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Toshitaka; Nambu, Shusuke; Goulding, Celia W.; Takahashi, Satoshi; Fujii, Hiroshi; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens must acquire host iron for survival and colonization. Because free iron is restricted in the host, numerous pathogens have evolved to overcome this limitation by using a family of monooxygenases that mediate the oxidative cleavage of heme into biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and iron. However, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, accomplishes this task without generating carbon monoxide, which potentially induces its latent state. Here we show that this unusual heme degradation reaction proceeds through sequential mono- and dioxygenation events within the single active center of MhuD, a mechanism unparalleled in enzyme catalysis. A key intermediate of the MhuD reaction is found to be meso-hydroxyheme, which reacts with O2 at an unusual position to completely suppress its monooxygenation but to allow ring cleavage through dioxygenation. This mechanistic change, possibly due to heavy steric deformation of hydroxyheme, rationally explains the unique heme catabolites of MhuD. Coexistence of mechanistically distinct functions is a previously unidentified strategy to expand the physiological outcome of enzymes, and may be applied to engineer unique biocatalysts. PMID:27006503

  7. A ligand field chemistry of oxygen generation by the oxygen-evolving complex and synthetic active sites.

    PubMed

    Betley, Theodore A; Surendranath, Yogesh; Childress, Montana V; Alliger, Glen E; Fu, Ross; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2008-03-27

    Oxygen-oxygen bond formation and O2 generation occur from the S4 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Several mechanistic possibilities have been proposed for water oxidation, depending on the formal oxidation state of the Mn atoms. All fall under two general classifications: the AB mechanism in which nucleophilic oxygen (base, B) attacks electrophilic oxygen (acid, A) of the Mn4Ca cluster or the RC mechanism in which radical-like oxygen species couple within OEC. The critical intermediate in either mechanism involves a metal oxo, though the nature of this oxo for AB and RC mechanisms is disparate. In the case of the AB mechanism, assembly of an even-electron count, high-valent metal-oxo proximate to a hydroxide is needed whereas, in an RC mechanism, two odd-electron count, high-valent metal oxos are required. Thus the two mechanisms give rise to very different design criteria for functional models of the OEC active site. This discussion presents the electron counts and ligand geometries that support metal oxos for AB and RC O-O bond-forming reactions. The construction of architectures that bring two oxygen functionalities together under the purview of the AB and RC scenarios are described.

  8. Chemistry: Experiments, Demonstrations and Other Activities Suggested for Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication is a handbook used in conjunction with the course of study in chemistry developed through the New York State Education Department and The University of the State of New York. It contains experiments, demonstrations, and other activities for a chemistry course. Areas covered include the science of chemistry, the atomic structure of…

  9. Fog chemistry at an urban midwestern site

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, P.S.; Wade, K.A.; Carter, B.H.; Armentano, T.V.; Pribush, R.A.

    1986-12-01

    The Holcomb Research Institute is monitoring fog chemistry in Indianapolis, Indiana and at sites in and near the heavily industrialized Ohio River Valley. Results reported here indicate that fogs in this area can be strongly acidic, and that further studies are warranted. We report 1) the ionic composition of three fog events, samples collected in Indianapolis between December 1985 and February 1986, and 2) the pH of three additional events, samples collected between November 1985 and February 1986. (The volume of fog collected during the latter three events was insufficient for chemical analysis other than pH.) The pH of the fog samples ranged from 2.85 to 4.06; some of this fell within the range known to damage foliage and yield of some plant species. It has been demonstrated that even one exposure to highly acidic mists (pH par. delta 2.5) can damage certain crop species; hence, it is important to document the occurrence of any events having acidity near this level.

  10. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  11. Probing the Binding Site of Abl Tyrosine Kinase Using in Situ Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Modern combinatorial chemistry is used to discover compounds with desired function by an alternative strategy, in which the biological target is directly involved in the choice of ligands assembled from a pool of smaller fragments. Herein, we present the first experimental result where the use of in situ click chemistry has been successfully applied to probe the ligand-binding site of Abl and the ability of this enzyme to form its inhibitor. Docking studies show that Abl is able to allow the in situ click chemistry between specific azide and alkyne fragments by binding to Abl-active sites. This report allows medicinal chemists to use protein-directed in situ click chemistry for exploring the conformational space of a ligand-binding pocket and the ability of the protein to guide its inhibitor. This approach can be a novel, valuable tool to guide drug design synthesis in the field of tyrosine kinases. PMID:24900659

  12. The Chemistry of Fitness. Active Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergandine, David R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The outline for a unit on the chemistry of fitness and nutrition is presented. Topics discussed include the organic basis of life, functional groups, kitchen experiments, micronutrients, energetics, fitness vs. fatness, current topics, and evaluation. This unit reviews the basic concepts of chemical bonding, acid-base chemistry, stoichiometry, and…

  13. Rocky Mountain Snowpack Chemistry at Selected Sites, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Mast, M. Alisa; Nanus, Leora; Manthorne, David J.; Clow, David W.; Handran, Heather M.; Winterringer, Jesse A.; Campbell, Donald H.

    2004-01-01

    During spring 2002, the chemical composition of annual snowpacks in the Rocky Mountain region of the Western United States was analyzed. Snow samples were collected at 75 geographically distributed sites extending from New Mexico to Montana. Near the end of the 2002 snowfall season, the snow-water equivalent (SWE) in annual snowpacks sampled generally was below average in most of the region. Regional patterns in the concentrations of major ions (including ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate), mercury, and stable sulfur isotope ratios are presented. The 2002 snowpack chemistry in the region differed from the previous year. Snowpack ammonium concentrations were higher at 66 percent of sites in Montana compared to concentrations in the 2001 snowpack but were lower at 74 percent of sites in Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. Nitrate was lower at all Montana sites and lower at all but one Wyoming site; nitrate was higher at all but two Colorado sites and higher at all New Mexico sites. Sulfate was lower across the region at 77 percent of sites. The range of mercury concentrations for the region was similar to those of 2001 but showed more variability than ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations. Concentrations of stable sulfur isotope ratios exhibited a strong regional pattern with values increasing northward from southern Colorado to northern Colorado and Wyoming.

  14. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Chemistry & Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of chemistry and physics experiments. Each unit presents an introduction to the unit; objectives; required skills and knowledge; materials; method; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet.…

  15. Rocky Mountain snowpack chemistry at selected sites for 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Mast, M. Alisa; Clow, David W.; Nanus, Leora; Campbell, Donald H.; Handran, Heather

    2003-01-01

    Because regional-scale atmospheric deposition data in the Rocky Mountains are sparse, a program was designed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, and other agencies, to more thoroughly determine the chemical composition of precipitation and to identify sources of atmospherically deposited contaminants in a network of high-elevation sites. Samples of seasonal snowpacks at 57 geographically distributed sites, in a regional network from New Mexico to Montana, were collected and analyzed for major ions (including ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate), alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon during 2001. Sites selected in this report have been sampled annually since 1993, enabling identification of increases or decreases in chemical concentrations from year to year. Spatial patterns in snowpack-chemical data for concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate indicate that concentrations of these acid precursors in less developed areas of the region are lower than concentrations in the heavily developed areas. Results for the 2001 snowpack-chemistry analyses, however, indicate increases in concentrations of ammonium and nitrate in particular at sites where past concentrations typically were lower. Since 1993, concentrations of nitrate and sulfate were highest from snowpack samples in northern Colorado that were collected from sites adjacent to the Denver metropolitan area to the east and the coal-fired powerplants to the west. In 2001, relatively high concentrations of nitrate (12.3 to 23.0 microequivalents per liter (?eq/L) and sulfate (7.7 to 12.5 ?eq/L) were detected in Montana and Wyoming. Ammonium concentrations were highest in north-central Colorado (14.5 to 16.9 ?eq/L) and southwestern Montana (12.8 to 14.2 ?eq/L).

  16. Nighttime chemistry at a high altitude site above Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven S.; Dubé, William P.; Tham, Yee Jun; Zha, Qiaozhi; Xue, Likun; Poon, Steven; Wang, Zhe; Blake, Donald R.; Tsui, Wilson; Parrish, David D.; Wang, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Nighttime reactions of nitrogen oxides influence ozone, volatile organic compounds, and aerosol and are thus important to the understanding of regional air quality. Despite large emissions and rapid recent growth of nitrogen oxide concentrations, there are few studies of nighttime chemistry in China. Here we present measurements of nighttime nitrogen oxides, NO3 and N2O5, from a coastal mountaintop site in Hong Kong adjacent to the megacities of the Pearl River Delta region. This is the first study of nighttime chemistry from a site within the residual layer in China. Key findings include the following. First, highly concentrated urban NOx outflow from the Pearl River Delta region was sampled infrequently at night, with N2O5 mixing ratios up to 8 ppbv (1 min average) or 12 ppbv (1 s average) in nighttime aged air masses. Second, the average N2O5 uptake coefficient was determined from a best fit to the available steady state lifetime data as γ(N2O5) = 0.014 ± 0.007. Although this determination is uncertain due to the difficulty of separating N2O5 losses from those of NO3, this value is in the range of previous residual layer determinations of N2O5 uptake coefficients in polluted air in North America. Third, there was a significant contribution of biogenic hydrocarbons to NO3 loss inferred from canister samples taken during daytime. Finally, daytime N2O5 mixing ratios were in accord with their predicted photochemical steady state. Heterogeneous uptake of N2O5 in fog is determined to be an important production mechanism for soluble nitrate, even during daytime.

  17. Using Art-Based Chemistry Activities to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danipog, Dennis L.; Ferido, Marlene B.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of art-based chemistry activities (ABCA) on high school students' conceptual understanding in chemistry. The study used the pretest-posttest control group design. A total of 64 third-year high school students from two different chemistry classes participated in the study. One class was exposed to art-based…

  18. A review of atmospheric chemistry observations at mountain sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Sachiko; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Located far from anthropogenic emission sources, high-altitude mountain stations are considered to be ideal sites for monitoring climatic and environmentally important baseline changes in free tropospheric trace gases and aerosols. In addition, the observations taken at these stations are often used to study the long-range transport of dust as well as anthropogenic and biomass burning pollutants from source regions and to evaluate the performance of global and regional models. In this paper, we summarize the results from past and ongoing field measurements of atmospheric constituents at high-altitude stations across the globe, with particular emphasis on reactive trace species including tropospheric ozone, along with its precursors such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, total reactive nitrogen, and nonmethane hydrocarbons. Over the past decades, our understanding of the temporal variability and meteorological mechanisms of long-range transport has advanced in tandem with progress in instrumentation and modeling. Finally, the future needs of atmospheric chemistry observations at mountain sites are addressed.

  19. Writing Chemistry Jingles as an Introductory Activity in a High School Chemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Starting the school year in an introductory high school chemistry class can be a challenge. The topic and approach is new to the students; many of the early chapters in the texts can be a bit tedious; and for many students the activities are uninspiring. My goal in the first few weeks of school is to hook the students on chemistry by getting them…

  20. Using Computational Chemistry Activities to Promote Learning and Retention in a Secondary School General Chemistry Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochterski, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of using state-of-the-art, research-quality software as a learning tool in a general chemistry secondary school classroom setting. I present three activities designed to introduce fundamental chemical concepts regarding molecular shape and atomic orbitals to students with little background in chemistry, such as…

  1. Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts: Innovations, Advantages, and Future Potential in Green Chemistry and Sustainable Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Robert; Thomas, John Meurig

    The advantages that flow from the availability of single-site heterogeneous catalysts are many. They facilitate the determination of the kinetics and mechanism of catalytic turnover and render accessible the energetics of various intermediates. More importantly, it is possible to prepare soluble molecular fragments that circumscribe the single site, thus enabling a direct comparison to be made between the catalytic performance of the same active site when functioning as a heterogeneous or a homogeneous catalyst. Our approach adopts the principles and practices of solid-state chemistry, augmented by lessons derived from enzymology, as well as computational chemistry. We have succeeded in designing a range of new catalysts to effect, inter alia, shape-selective, regioselective, bifunctional, and enantioselective catalytic conversions. In particular, large fractions of these catalysts are ideally suited for the era of clean technology in which single-step and/or solvent-free processes abound, and in which benign oxidants such as air or oxygen and inexpensive nanoporous materials are employed.

  2. Active Learning Applications in the History of Chemistry: Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Level of Knowledge and Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendur, Gülten; Polat, Merve; Toku, Abdullah; Kazanci, Coskun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of a History and Philosophy of Chemistry-I course based on active learning applications on the level of knowledge of pre-service chemistry teachers about the history of chemistry. The views of pre-service chemistry teachers about these activities were also investigated. The study was carried out with 38…

  3. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  4. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Neutron activation analysis in archaeological chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has proven to be a convenient way of performing the chemical analysis of archaeologically-excavated artifacts and materials. It is fast and does not require tedious laboratory operations. It is multielement, sensitive, and can be made nondestructive. Neutron activation analysis in its instrumental form, i.e., involving no chemical separation, is ideally suited to automation and conveniently takes the first step in data flow patterns that are appropriate for many taxonomic and statistical operations. The future will doubtless see improvements in the practice of NAA in general, but in connection with archaeological science the greatest change will be the filling, interchange and widespread use of data banks based on compilations of analytical data. Since provenience-oriented data banks deal with materials (obsidian, ceramics, metals, semiprecious stones, building materials and sculptural media) that participated in trade networks, the analytical data is certain to be of interest to a rather broad group of archaeologists. It is to meet the needs of the whole archaeological community that archaeological chemistry must now turn.

  6. Relating groundwater and sediment chemistry to microbial characterization at a BTEX-contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, S.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; McCarthy, J.F.; Gibson, T.

    1996-07-01

    The National Center for Manufacturing Science is investigating bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon at a site in Belleville, Michigan. As part of this study we examined the microbial communities to help elucidate biodegradative processes currently active at the site. We observed high densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers in the less-contaminated sediments. Low densities of iron and sulfate reducers were measured in the same sediments. In contrast, the highly-contaminated sediments showed low densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers and high densities of iron and sulfate reducers. Methanogens were also found in these highly-contaminated sediments. These contaminated sediments also showed a higher biomass, by phospholipid fatty acids, and greater ratios of phospholipid fatty acids which indicate stress within the microbial community. Aquifer chemistry analyses indicated that the more-contaminated area was more reduced and had lower sulfate than the less-contaminated area. These conditions suggest that the subsurface environment at the highly-contaminated area had progressed into sulfate reduction and methanogensis. The less-contaminated area, although less reduced, also appeared to be progressing into primarily iron- and sulfate-reducing microbial communities. The proposed treatment to stimulate bioremediation includes addition of oxygen and nitrate. Groundwater chemistry and microbial analyses revealed significant differences resulted from the injection of dissolved oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface. These differences included increases in pH and Eh and large decreases in BTEX, dissolved iron, and sulfate concentrations at the injection well.

  7. Liaison activities with the Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences: FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Elovich, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences is conducting a program of fundamental and applied research into the chemistry of the actinides and technetium in alkaline media such as are present in the Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. This work is being coordinated and the results disseminated through a technical liaison maintained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The technical liaison is performing laboratory studies on plutonium chemistry in alkaline media. The activities at the Institute of Physical Chemistry and through the liaison are pursued to improve understanding of the chemical behavior of key long-lived radioactive elements under current operating and proposed tank waste processing conditions. Both activities are supported by the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program under the Office of Science and Technology of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Using Microcomputers in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Activation Energy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touvelle, Michele; Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1986-01-01

    Describes a computer program, "Activation Energy," which is designed for use in physical chemistry classes and can be modified for kinetic experiments. Provides suggestions for instruction, sample program listings, and information on the availability of the program package. (ML)

  9. Making Chemistry Activities Meaningful to Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanitski, Conrad L.; Sears, Curtis T.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the use of bio-medically significant materials to teach a self-pacing chemistry laboratory course to nursing majors. Indicates that the student can learn from the course to determine values of body fluid constituents, about their variations among healthy populations, and about difficulties inherent in making such measurements. (CC)

  10. Teaching Chemistry with TOYS. Activities for Grades K-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarquis, Jerry L.; And Others

    This document is a collection of some of the chemistry activities used in the Teaching Science with TOYS professional development program for teachers. The TOYS activities have been compiled into this document as a resource for teachers who want to use toy-based physical science activities in the classroom. The activities do not assume any…

  11. Chemistry of proposed calcination/dissolution processing of Hanford Site tank wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Plans exist to separate radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in south central Washington State into low-level and high-level fractions, and to immobilize the separate fractions in high-integrity vitrified forms for long-term disposal. Calcination with water dissolution has been proposed as a possible treatment for achieving low/high-level separation. Chemistry development activities conducted since 1992 with simulated and genuine tank waste show that calcination/dissolution destroys organic carbon and converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide and benign offgases. The process also dissolves significant quantities of bulk chemicals (aluminum, chromium, and phosphate), allowing their redistribution from the high-level to the low-level fraction. Present studies of the chemistry of calcination/dissolution processing of genuine wastes, conducted in the period October 1993 to September 1994, show the importance of sodium fluoride phosphate double salt in controlling phosphate dissolution. Peptization of waste solids is of concern if extensive washing occurs. Strongly oxidizing conditions imposed by calcination reactions were found to convert transition metals to soluble anions in the order chromate > manganate > > ferrate. In analogy with manganese behavior, plutonium dissolution, presumably by oxidation to more soluble anionic species, also occurs by calcination/dissolution. Methods to remove plutonium from the product low-level solution stream must be developed.

  12. 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship: drug discovery targeting allosteric sites.

    PubMed

    Lindsley, Craig W

    2014-09-25

    The identification of sites on receptors topographically distinct from the orthosteric sites, so-called allosteric sites, has heralded novel approaches and modes of pharmacology for target modulation. Over the past 20 years, our understanding of allosteric modulation has grown significantly, and numerous advantages, as well as caveats (e.g., flat structure-activity relationships, species differences, "molecular switches"), have been identified. For multiple receptors and proteins, numerous examples have been described where unprecedented levels of selectivity are achieved along with improved physiochemical properties. While not a panacea, these novel approaches represent exciting opportunities for tool compound development to probe the pharmacology and therapeutic potential of discrete molecular targets, as well as new medicines. In this Perspective, in commemoration of the 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship ( Lindsley , C. W. Adventures in allosteric drug discovery . Presented at the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Indianapolis, IN, September 10, 2013 ; The 2013 Portoghese Lectureship ), several vignettes of drug discovery campaigns targeting novel allosteric mechanisms will be recounted, along with lessons learned and guidelines that have emerged for successful lead optimization.

  13. Rocky Mountain Snowpack Chemistry at Selected Sites, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Mast, M. Alisa; Nanus, Leora; Handran, Heather H.; Manthorne, David J.; Hultstrand, Douglas M.

    2007-01-01

    During spring 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Park Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service collected and analyzed snowpack samples for 65 sites in the Rocky Mountain region from New Mexico to Montana. Snowpacks were sampled from late February through early April and generally had well-below-average- to near-average snow-water equivalent. Regionally, on April 1, snow-water equivalent ranged from 50 to 89 percent. At most regional sites monitored during 1993-2004, snowpack ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations for 2004 were lower than the 12-year averages. Snowpack ammonium concentrations in the region were lower than average concentrations for the period at 61 percent of sites in the region, but showed a new pattern compared to previous years with three of the four highest 2004 concentrations observed in northern Colorado. Nitrate concentrations in 2004 were lower than the 12-year average for the year at 53 percent of regional sites, and typically occurred at sites in Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana where powerplants and large industrial areas were limited. A regional decrease in sulfate concentrations across most of the Rocky Mountains (with concentrations lower than the 12-year average at 84 percent of snowpack sites) was consistent with other monitoring of atmospheric deposition in the Western United States. Total mercury concentrations, although data are only available for the past 3 years, decreased slightly for the region as a whole in 2004 relative to 2003. Ratios of stable sulfur isotopes indicated a similar regional pattern as observed in recent years with sulfur-34 (d34S) values generally increasing northward from northern New Mexico and southern Colorado to northern Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana.

  14. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2‧-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway.

  15. Pharmacophore screening of the protein data bank for specific binding site chemistry.

    PubMed

    Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Zhao, Yong; Schapira, Matthieu

    2010-03-22

    A simple computational approach was developed to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for putative pockets possessing a specific binding site chemistry and geometry. The method employs two commonly used 3D screening technologies, namely identification of cavities in protein structures and pharmacophore screening of chemical libraries. For each protein structure, a pocket finding algorithm is used to extract potential binding sites containing the correct types of residues, which are then stored in a large SDF-formatted virtual library; pharmacophore filters describing the desired binding site chemistry and geometry are then applied to screen this virtual library and identify pockets matching the specified structural chemistry. As an example, this approach was used to screen all human protein structures in the PDB and identify sites having chemistry similar to that of known methyl-lysine binding domains that recognize chromatin methylation marks. The selected genes include known readers of the histone code as well as novel binding pockets that may be involved in epigenetic signaling. Putative allosteric sites were identified on the structures of TP53BP1, L3MBTL3, CHEK1, KDM4A, and CREBBP.

  16. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  17. Nighttime Chemistry at a High Elevation Site above Hong Kong: Implications for Regional Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, W. P.; Brown, S. S.; Parrish, D. D.; Tham, Y. J.; Wang, T.; Zha, Q.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Poon, S.; Wang, Z.; Wang, X.; Tsui, W.

    2014-12-01

    Nighttime chemical processes of nitrogen oxides, including reactions of the nitrate radical (NO3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5), are important to numerous tropospheric chemical cycles, including the removal of NO­x, the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons, and the heterogeneous activation of halogen species. These cycles influence regional ozone and aerosol pollution but remain uncertain. Although nitrogen oxide levels are highest in urban areas, nighttime chemistry is notoriously difficult to study in these regions due to surface level buildup of NO and consequent titration of O3, which suppress nighttime chemical reactions. Tai Mo Shan (TMS) is a high elevation site (950 m) situated between the cities of Hong Kong and Shenzhen, each of which has a population of approximately 7 million. Both lie within the Pearl River Delta, a regional megacity of population 45 million. TMS is ideally suited for the study of nighttime chemistry within a megacity because it is situated within the residual boundary layer at night and is influenced by regional pollution in the absence of strong local effects. During the fall season, the Pearl River Delta region and Hong Kong experience peak ozone due to meteorological pattern that brings polluted continental outflow over the coastal region of southern China. During November and December 2013, a small-scale field study was conducted at the TMS summit to investigate nighttime chemistry. Chemical instrumentation included cavity ring-down and mass spectrometric instruments for NO3, N2O5 and ClNO2, as well as instrumentation for measurement of NOx, NOy, O3, VOCs, aerosols, other trace gases and meteorological data. Regular late afternoon and evening outflow events from mainland China were observed at this site, including one event with extreme (12 ppbv) levels of N2O5. This presentation will give an overview of the campaign, the atmospheric chemical data and its relationship to meteorological regimes. It will also examine budgets for

  18. Medicinal chemistry of drugs with active metabolites following conjugation.

    PubMed

    Kalász, Huba; Petroianu, Georg; Hosztafi, Sándor; Darvas, Ferenc; Csermely, Tamás; Adeghate, Ernest; Siddiq, Afshan; Tekes, Kornélia

    2013-10-01

    Authorities of Drug Administration in the United States of America approved about 5000 drugs for use in the therapy or management of several diseases. About two hundred of these drugs have active metabolites and the knowledge of their medicinal chemistry is important both in medical practice and pharmaceutical research. This review gives a detailed description of the medicinal chemistry of drugs with active metabolites generated after conjugation. This review focused on glucuronide-, acetyl-, sulphate- and phosphate-conjugation of drugs, converting the drug into an active metabolite. This conversion essentially changed the lipophilicity of the drug.

  19. Female Faculty Members in University Chemistry Departments: Observations and Conclusions Based on Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Sally; Dixon, Felicia F.; Foster, Natalie; Kuck, Valerie J.; McCarthy, Deborah A.; Tooney, Nancy M.; Buckner, Janine P.; Nolan, Susan A.; Marzabadi, Cecilia H.

    2011-01-01

    Oral interviews in focus groups and written surveys were conducted with 877 men and women, including administrators, faculty members, postdoctoral associates, and graduate students, during one-day site visits to chemistry and chemical engineering departments at 28 Ph.D.-granting institutions. This report is a preliminary review of the perceptions…

  20. A General Chemistry Assignment Analyzing Environmental Contamination for the Depue, IL, National Superfund Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saslow Gomez, Sarah A.; Faurie-Wisniewski, Danielle; Parsa, Arlen; Spitz, Jeff; Spitz, Jennifer Amdur; Loeb, Nancy C.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-01-01

    The classroom exercise outlined here is a self-directed assignment that connects students to the environmental contamination problem surrounding the DePue Superfund site. By connecting chemistry knowledge gained in the classroom with a real-world problem, students are encouraged to personally connect with the problem while simultaneously…

  1. Learning Activity Package, Chemistry I, (LAP) Study 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Naomi

    Presented is a Learning Activity Package (LAP) study concerned with carbon and its compounds. This LAP in chemistry includes a rationale for studying the chemical element of carbon, a list of student objectives (stated in behavioral terms), of activities (reading, laboratory experiments, model construction, etc.), a two-page worksheet, a…

  2. Coordination chemistry of phosphinocarbynes: phosphorus vs. carbyne site selectivity.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, Annie L; Hill, Anthony F

    2017-03-13

    The phosphinocarbyne complex [W([triple bond, length as m-dash]CPPh2)(CO)2(Tp*)] (1: Tp* = hydrotris(dimethylpyrazolyl)borate) coordinates transition metal fragments via the phosphine to form bimetallic species [W{[triple bond, length as m-dash]CPPh2RhCl2(Cp*)}(CO)2(Tp*)] (2) and [W([triple bond, length as m-dash]CPPh2AuCl)(CO)2(Tp*)] (3). Appropriately tailored sterics allow for complexation of a second equivalent of AuCl to afford the trimetallic complex [W{η(2)-C(AuCl)PPh2AuCl}(CO)2(Tp*)] (4), containing an Au-W-C dimetallacyclopropene connectivity. Similarly, AuCl binds to the carbyne linkage in [W{[triple bond, length as m-dash]CP([double bond, length as m-dash]S)Ph2}(CO)2(Tp*)], yielding [W{η(2)-C(AuCl)P([double bond, length as m-dash]S)Ph2}(CO)2(Tp*)] (5). In the case of auration of the ditungsten species [W2(μ-C2PPh)(CO)4(Tp*)2] (6), variation in the stoichiometry leads to trimetallic [W2(μ-C2PPhAuCl)(CO)4(Tp*)2] (7) and pentametallic [W2{μ-(η(2)-CAuCl)2PPhAuCl}(CO)4(Tp*)2] (8) complexes, via a proposed tetrametallic intermediate [W2{μ-(η(2)-CAuCl)2PPh}(CO)4(Tp*)2], the site selectivity being dictated by aurophilic interactions.

  3. Snowpack chemistry at selected sites in Colorado and New Mexico during winter 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.

    2000-01-01

    Snowpacks at two high-elevation (> 3,000 m) sampling sites near McPhee and Sanchez Reservoirs in southern Colorado were selected to collect representative samples of atmospheric deposition to the surrounding watersheds during winter 1999-2000. In February 2000, annual snowpacks at two sites were sampled to determine concentrations of nitrate and sulfate; concentrations of the trace elements arsenic, mercury, and selenium; and the sulfur isotope ratios that result from atmospheric deposition to the area. Snowpack chemistry data at the two sites sampled in 1999-2000 are compared to 1993-99 averages at 10 other snow-sampling sites in Colorado and New Mexico that generally are downwind of the Four Corners area of the southwestern United States. Although concentrations of ammonium and nitrate in the 1999-2000 snowpacks were fairly typical compared to averages established at nearby sites in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico, chloride and sulfate concentrations were below the 1993-99 average, while arsenic, mercury, and selenium in snow were much below the 1993-99 average. However, very similar sulfur-isotope ratios (that are not a function of precipitation amounts) deposited in snowpacks at the nearby sites indicate the snowpack chemistries at the new sampling locations near McPhee and Sanchez reservoirs were affected by similar sources of sulfate. Representative samples of coal burned during the 1999-2000 snowfall season at three power plants near Four Corners also were analyzed for sulfur content and trace elements. Results from separate, independent laboratories show similar concentrations and provide an initial baseline that will be used for general comparisons of coal chemistry to snowpack chemistry.

  4. Empowering Girls with Chemistry, Exercise and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Emily D.; Ciccomascolo, Lori E.; Clapham, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that a girl's career interests in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) declines between grades 6 and 8. Similarly, in middle school, there is a decrease in physical activity among girls. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island (URI) conducted a chemistry-based science camp that took place…

  5. Active Learning Strategies in the Analytical Chemistry Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael R.; Fulton, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an analytical chemistry course restructured around the use of cooperative groups to help students become active learners in a non-competitive environment. Five years of experience with the course indicates that the syllabus covers almost exactly the same content as old courses and that test scores compare favorably on the national level.…

  6. Modeling Feedbacks between Biogenic Emissions and Air Chemistry from Site to Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T. M.; Grote, R.

    2014-12-01

    We present the implementation of a new model describing light dependent emission of volatile organic compounds (BVOC) that derives isoprenoid production directly from the electron transport potential and consumption from photosynthesis. Photosynthesis information requirements are designed to be met by many recent land-surface models that apply the Farquhar assimilation scheme, e.g. JULES or CLM. The new approach has the advantages that 1) the commonly observed decrease of (isoprene) emission with increasing CO2 air concentration is considered by the competition on energy between photosynthesis and emission processes, and 2) air pollution impacts may be considered as inducing emissions by activating emission enzymes as well as decreasing substrate supply from photosynthesis, and 3) many environmental drivers of BVOC emissions are implicitly considered in the description of plant photosynthesis and phenology, reducing the demand for species-specific emission parameters. We investigate the parameter sensitivity of the suggested model as well as the sensitivity of emissions to a range of environmental conditions with a particular focus on CO2 responses. We present evaluation at the site level and compare the model with other approaches. Finally, we demonstrate the implementation into a coupled global-air chemistry model and discuss the requirements to appropriately parameterize plant functional types.

  7. Synthetic Methods, Chemistry, and the Anticonvulsant Activity of Thiadiazoles

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhawna; Verma, Amita; Prajapati, Sunil; Sharma, Upendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The chemistry of heterocyclic compounds has been an interesting field of study for a long time. Heterocyclic nucleus 1,3,4-thiadiazole constitutes an important class of compounds for new drug development. The synthesis of novel thiadiazole derivatives and investigation of their chemical and biological behavior have gained more importance in recent decades. The search for antiepileptic compounds with more selective activity and lower toxicity continues to be an active area of intensive investigation in medicinal chemistry. During the recent years, there has been intense investigation of different classes of thiadiazole compounds, many of which possess extensive pharmacological activities, namely, antimicrobial activity, anticonvulsant, antifungal antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antituberculosis activities, and so forth. The resistance towards available drugs is rapidly becoming a major worldwide problem. The need to design new compounds to deal with this resistance has become one of the most important areas of research today. Thiadiazole is a versatile moiety that exhibits a wide variety of biological activities. Thiadiazole moiety acts as “hydrogen binding domain” and “two-electron donor system.” It also acts as a constrained pharmacophore. On the basis of the reported literature, we study here thiadiazole compounds and their synthetic methods chemistry and anticonvulsant activity. PMID:25405032

  8. Geology, hydrology, chemistry, and microbiology of the in situ bioremediation demonstration site

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, D.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Hall, S.H.; Truex, M.J.; Vermeul, V.R.; Engelman, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes characterization information on the geology, hydrology, microbiology, contaminant distribution, and ground-water chemistry to support demonstration of in situ bioremediation at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this information is to provide baseline conditions, including a conceptual model of the aquifer being utilized for in situ bioremediation. Data were collected from sampling and other characterization activities associated with three wells drilled in the upper part of the suprabasalt aquifer. Results of point-dilution tracer tests, conducted in the upper 9 m (30 ft) of the aquifer, showed that most ground-water flow occurs in the upper part of this zone, which is consistent with hydraulic test results and geologic and geophysical data. Other tracer test results indicated that natural ground-water flow velocity is equal to or less than about 0.03 m/d (0.1 ft/d). Laboratory hydraulic conductivity measurements, which represent the local distribution of vertical hydraulic conductivity, varied up to three orders of magnitude. Based on concentration data from both the vadose and saturated zone, it is suggested that most, if not all, of the carbon tetrachloride detected is representative of the aqueous phase. Concentrations of carbon tetrachloride, associated with a contaminant plume in the 200-West Area, ranged from approximately 500 to 3,800 {mu}g/L in the aqueous phase and from approximately 10 to 290 {mu}g/L in the solid phase at the demonstration site. Carbon tetrachloride gas was detected in the vadose zone, suggesting volatilization and subsequent upward migration from the saturated zone.

  9. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  10. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  11. The Chemistry and Biological Activities of Mimosine: A Review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Tawata, Shinkichi

    2016-08-01

    Mimosine [β-[N-(3-hydroxy-4-oxypyridyl)]-α-aminopropionic acid] is a non-protein amino acid found in the members of Mimosoideae family. There are a considerable number of reports available on the chemistry, methods for estimation, biosynthesis, regulation, and degradation of this secondary metabolite. On the other hand, over the past years of active research, mimosine has been found to have various biological activities such as anti-cancer, antiinflammation, anti-fibrosis, anti-influenza, anti-virus, herbicidal and insecticidal activities, and others. Mimosine is a leading compound of interest for use in the development of RAC/CDC42-activated kinase 1 (PAK1)-specific inhibitors for the treatment of various diseases/disorders, because PAK1 is not essential for the growth of normal cells. Interestingly, the new roles of mimosine in malignant glioma treatment, regenerative dentistry, and phytoremediation are being emerged. These identified properties indicate an exciting future for this amino acid. The present review is focused on the chemistry and recognized biological activities of mimosine in an attempt to draw a link between these two characteristics. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Chemistry, biological activity, and uses of formamidine pesticides.

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, R M

    1976-01-01

    The formamidines, a relatively new group of acaricide-insecticides, are novel both in their range of biological activities and in their mode of action, which is presently unknown. This paper is a review of the historical development, properties, structures, uses, and chemistry of this group of pesticides, with particular emphasis on chlordimeform (Galecron or Fundal), N'-4-chloro-o-tolyl-N,N-dimethylformamidine, and amitraz, 1,3=di-(2,4-dimethylphenylimino)-2-methyl-2-azapropane. Their biological activity and uses are defined by their toxicity to spider mites, ticks, and certain insects, and they are particularly effective against juvenile and resistant forms of these organisms. A significant, but poorly understood feature of their field effectiveness is their breadth of toxic action which includes direct lethality, excitant-repellant behavioral effects, and chemosterilization. They are generally of low hazard for nontarget species with the significant exception of predaceous mites. Several aspects of the chemistry of these compounds are considered, including structure--activity relations, synthetic pathways, isomerism and configuration, and their chemical and environmental stability. A significant feature of the metabolism and toxicity of these agents is the possible activation of chlordimeform by N-demethylation in vivo. Strong evidence for this has been presented with the cattle tick, but recent results discussed here suggest that in other species, i.e., mice, German cockroaches or black cutworm eggs, N-demethylation is neither a strong activation nor a detoxication reaction. PMID:789070

  13. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  14. Comparing the Chemistry for the Pathfinder, MER and MSL Martian Landing Sites with APXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellert, R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Clark, B. C.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Squyres, S. W.; Yen, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Alpha-Particle-X-ray Spectrometer is part of the science payload of all recent NASA Mars rover missions. It allows detailed comparison of the chemical composition and overall findings from rocks and soils at 4 landing sites. It can be even extended to the soil measurements performed with XRF on the two Viking landers. Typical soils at all 6 landing sites are very similar in chemical composition as well as mineralogy from instruments like Moessbauer on MER and CHEMIN on MSL. Beside a dominant basaltic composition the soil contains a significant altered and volatile rich component that is characterized by a constant S/Cl ratio in the APXS data. The overall similarity of the soils as well as the finding that soils around the 30 wt % SO3 rich bedrocks at Meridiani are not elevated in S, indicates the presence of a global distributed or at least large scale homogenized component in the Martian soil. This allows extending the SAM and CHEMIN findings in the altered and volatile components in the Gale Rocknest soils to other landing sites. However, in Gusev Crater anomalous subsurface soils were found - silica and hydrated ferric sulfate rich - that could indicate local fumarole and leaching activities. The sulfate rich Meridiani bedrock, called Burns formations, was documented to be remarkably homogeneous over the ~ 15 miles from the landing site at Eagle Crater to the base of the rim at Endurance Crater. Here for the first time a rover entered an area where evidence for clays is given by orbital CRISM data. With Opportunity's mineralogy instruments out of commission, the APXS was used to document the chemistry of the encountered outcrops. Having a composition close to the average Mars, one main characteristic feature of rocks at the rim is the low sulfur content compared to the younger Meridiani bedrock. The outcrops show post depositional cracks and veins filled with Calciumsulfate and Chlorine rich surface alteration rinds. A smaller outcrop called Esperance has

  15. Active-Inductive-Cooperative Learning: An Instructional Model for Chemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Richard M.

    1996-09-01

    Five chemical engineering courses were taught to a cohort of students in consecutive semesters using an instructional model based on active, inductive, and cooperative learning and other methods designed to address a broad spectrum of learning styles. The results suggest that the approach enhances understanding and promotes the development of a variety of interpersonal and thinking skills, and that while it may initially provoke resistance from some students, the resistance can be overcome if the methods are implemented with care. With suitable modifications for content differences, the model may be equally effective for chemistry instruction.

  16. Pollution Prevention Plan for the Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization Off-Site Union Valley Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. G.

    2010-03-01

    The Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization (ACO) Off-Site Union Valley Facility (Union Valley Facility) is managed by Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, L.L.C. (B and W Y-12) through the Y-12 National Security Complex organization. Accordingly, the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program encompasses the operations conducted at the Union Valley Facility. The Y-12 Program is designed to fully comply with state, federal and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements concerning waste minimization/pollution prevention as documented in the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program Plan. The Program is formulated to reduce the generation and toxicity of all Y-12 wastes in all media, including those wastes generated by the Union Valley Facility operations. All regulatory and DOE requirements are met by the Y-12 Program Plan.

  17. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  18. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  19. Litter chemistry prevails over litter consumers in mediating effects of past steel industry activities on leaf litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lucisine, Pierre; Lecerf, Antoine; Danger, Michaël; Felten, Vincent; Aran, Delphine; Auclerc, Apolline; Gross, Elisabeth M; Huot, Hermine; Morel, Jean-Louis; Muller, Serge; Nahmani, Johanne; Maunoury-Danger, Florence

    2015-12-15

    Soil pollution has adverse effects on the performance and life history traits of microorganisms, plants, and animals, yet evidence indicates that even the most polluted sites can support structurally-complex and dynamic ecosystems. The present study aims at determining whether and how litter decomposition, one of the most important soil ecological processes leaf, is affected in a highly trace-metal polluted site. We postulated that past steel mill activities resulting in soil pollution and associated changes in soil characteristics would influence the rate of litter decomposition through two non-exclusive pathways: altered litter chemistry and responses of decomposers to lethal and sub-lethal toxic stress. We carried out a litter-bag experiment using Populus tremula L. leaf litter collected at, and allowed to decompose in, a trace metal polluted site and in three unpolluted sites used as controls. We designed a fully-factorial transplant experimental design to assess effects of litter origin and exposure site on the rate of litter decomposition. We further determined initial litter chemistry, fungal biomass, mesofauna abundance in litter bags, and the soil macrofauna community. Irrespective of the site of litter exposure, litter originating from the polluted site had a two-fold faster decomposition than litter from the unpolluted sites. Litter chemistry, notably the lignin content, seemed most important in explaining the degradation rate of the leaf litter. Abundance of meso and macro-detritivores was higher at the polluted site than at the unpolluted sites. However, litter decomposition proceeded at similar rates in polluted and unpolluted sites. Our results show that trace metal pollution and associated soil and litter changes do not necessarily weaken consumer control on litter decomposition through lethal and sub-lethal toxic stress.

  20. Activated Carbon Textile via Chemistry of Metal Extraction for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Lam, Do Van; Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2016-12-27

    Carbothermic reduction in the chemistry of metal extraction (MO(s) + C(s) → M(s) + CO(g)) using carbon as a sacrificial agent has been used to smelt metals from diverse oxide ores since ancient times. Here, we paid attention to another aspect of the carbothermic reduction to prepare an activated carbon textile for high-rate-performance supercapacitors. On the basis of thermodynamic reducibility of metal oxides reported by Ellingham, we employed not carbon, but metal oxide as a sacrificial agent in order to prepare an activated carbon textile. We conformally coated ZnO on a bare cotton textile using atomic layer deposition, followed by pyrolysis at high temperature (C(s) + ZnO(s) → C'(s) + Zn(g) + CO(g)). We figured out that it leads to concurrent carbonization and activation in a chemical as well as mechanical way. Particularly, the combined effects of mechanical buckling and fracture that occurred between ZnO and cotton turned out to play an important role in carbonizing and activating the cotton textile, thereby significantly increasing surface area (nearly 10 times) compared with the cotton textile prepared without ZnO. The carbon textiles prepared by carbothermic reduction showed impressive combination properties of high power and energy densities (over 20-fold increase) together with high cyclic stability.

  1. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  2. Engineering the active site of ascorbate peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Raven, E; Celik, A; Cullis, P M; Sangar, R; Sutcliffe, M J

    2001-05-01

    Understanding the catalytic versatility of haem enzymes, and in particular the relationships that exist between different classes of haem-containing proteins and the mechanisms by which the apo-protein structure controls chemical reactivity, presents a major experimental and theoretical challenge. These issues are discussed in the general context of peroxidase and cytochrome P450 chemistry, and specific issues relating to the catalytic chemistry of ascorbate peroxidase are highlighted.

  3. Mapping of the interaction sites of galanthamine: a quantitative analysis through pairwise potentials and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Galland, Nicolas; Kone, Soleymane; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of the interaction sites of the anti-Alzheimer drug galanthamine with molecular probes (water and benzene molecules) representative of its surroundings in the binding site of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been realized through pairwise potentials calculations and quantum chemistry. This strategy allows a full and accurate exploration of the galanthamine potential energy surface of interaction. Significantly different results are obtained according to the distances of approaches between the various molecular fragments and the conformation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent. The geometry of the most relevant complexes has then been fully optimized through MPWB1K/6-31 + G(d,p) calculations, final energies being recomputed at the LMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) level of theory. Unexpectedly, galanthamine is found to interact mainly from its hydrogen-bond donor groups. Among those, CH groups in the vicinity of the ammonium group are prominent. The trends obtained provide rationales to the predilection of the equatorial orientation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent for binding to AChE. The analysis of the interaction energies pointed out the independence between the various interaction sites and the rigid character of galanthamine. The comparison between the cluster calculations and the crystallographic observations in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals allows the validation of the theoretical methodology. In particular, the positions of several water molecules appearing as strongly conserved in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals are predicted by the calculations. Moreover, the experimental position and orientation of lateral chains of functionally important aminoacid residues are in close agreement with the ones predicted theoretically. Our study provides relevant information for a rational drug design of galanthamine based AChE inhibitors.

  4. Planet Chemistry. Hands-on Activities for Kids from All Planets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Michael, Ed.

    This publication issues a challenge to students to collect data in a nationwide analysis of water hardness. Background information on the chemistry of hard water is presented using a cartoon format, and each of the four activities contains an explanation about the chemistry illustrated in the activity. The effect of hard water on soap, the effect…

  5. Understanding Chemistry Professors' Use of Educational Technologies: An Activity Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahveci, Ajda; Gilmer, Penny J.; Southerland, Sherry A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the influences on chemistry professors' use of educational technology. For this, we use activity theory to focus on two university chemistry professors and the broader activity system in which they work. We analyse their beliefs and past experiences related to teaching, learning, and technology as well as…

  6. Chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of Cinnamomum zeylanicum.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakasha, G K; Rao, L Jagan Mohan

    2011-07-01

    The genus Cinnamomum comprises of several hundreds of species, which are distributed in Asia and Australia. Cinnamomum zeylanicum, the source of cinnamon bark and leaf oils, is an indigenous tree of Sri Lanka, although most oil now comes from cultivated areas. C. zeylanicum is an important spice and aromatic crop having wide applications in flavoring, perfumery, beverages, and medicines. Volatile oils from different parts of cinnamon such as leaves, bark, fruits, root bark, flowers, and buds have been isolated by hydro distillation/steam distillation and supercritical fluid extraction. The chemical compositions of the volatile oils have been identified by GC and GC-MS. More than 80 compounds were identified from different parts of cinnamon. The leaf oil has a major component called eugenol. Cinnamaldehyde and camphor have been reported to be the major components of volatile oils from stem bark and root bark, respectively. Trans-cinnamyl acetate was found to be the major compound in fruits, flowers, and fruit stalks. These volatile oils were found to exhibit antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antidiabetic activities. C. zeylanicum bark and fruits were found to contain proanthocyandins with doubly linked bis-flavan-3-ol units in the molecule. The present review provides a coherent presentation of scattered literature on the chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of cinnamon.

  7. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  8. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  9. Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wang

    2004-11-18

    ''Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry'' focuses on the potential for microbial communities that could be active in repository emplacement drifts to influence the in-drift bulk chemical environment. This report feeds analyses to support the inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), but this work is not expected to generate direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. The purpose was specified by, and the evaluation was performed and is documented in accordance with, ''Technical Work Plan For: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Analyses'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172402], Section 2.1). This report addresses all of the FEPs assigned by the technical work plan (TWP), including the development of exclusion arguments for FEPs that are not carried forward to the TSPA-LA. Except for an editorial correction noted in Section 6.2, there were no other deviations from the TWP. This report documents the completion of all assigned tasks, as follows (BSC 2004 DIRS 172402, Section 1.2.1): (1) Perform analyses to evaluate the potential for microbial activity in the waste emplacement drift under the constraints of anticipated physical and chemical conditions. (2) Evaluate uncertainties associated with these analyses. (3) Determine whether the potential for microbes warrants a feed to TSPA-LA to account for predicted effects on repository performance. (4) Provide information to address the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NUREG-1804) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) and Key Technical Issues and agreements, as appropriate. (5) Develop information for inclusion or exclusion of FEPs.

  10. An Assessment of a Physical Chemistry Online Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamby Towns, Marcy; Kreke, Kelley; Sauder, Deborah; Stout, Roland; Long, George; Zielinski, Theresa Julia

    1998-12-01

    A questionnaire and list server archive were used to investigate the perception of students and faculty who took part in a physical chemistry online project. Students at four universities worked cooperatively in their own classrooms and collaborated as a larger team on the Internet via a list server to determine the best mathematical model to describe the PV behavior of a gas at a specified temperature. The strengths of the project were the interaction among students, the use of Mathcad and modern technology, and the experience of authentic problem-solving. The weaknesses were the problems with the technology, the facilitation of interaction, and the student's ability to ask questions to solve an ill-defined problem. The suggestions for improvements focused on facilitating interuniversity interaction between students, clarifying tasks and goals, and implementation of the online activities. We discuss how our evaluation of the project guided and informed the design of a subsequent online project, and our planning for future projects. In addition, we describe the professional learning community that evolved among faculty who participated in this project.

  11. Elaboration of copper-oxygen mediated C-H activation chemistry in consideration of future fuel and feedstock generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-04-01

    To contribute solutions to current energy concerns, improvements in the efficiency of dioxygen mediated C-H bond cleavage chemistry, for example, selective oxidation of methane to methanol, could minimize losses in natural gas usage or produce feedstocks for fuels. Oxidative C-H activation is also a component of polysaccharide degradation, potentially affording alternative biofuels from abundant biomass. Thus, an understanding of active-site chemistry in copper monooxygenases, those activating strong C-H bonds is briefly reviewed. Then, recent advances in the synthesis-generation and study of various copper-oxygen intermediates are highlighted. Of special interest are cupric-superoxide, Cu-hydroperoxo and Cu-oxy complexes. Such investigations can contribute to an enhanced future application of C-H oxidation or oxygenation processes using air, as concerning societal energy goals.

  12. Elaboration of Copper-Oxygen Mediated C–H Activation Chemistry in Consideration of Future Fuel and Feedstock Generation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    To contribute solutions for current energy concerns, improvements in the efficiency of C-H bond cleavage chemistry, e.g., selective oxidation of methane to methanol, could minimize losses in natural gas usage or produce feedstocks for fuels. Oxidative C-H activation is also a component of polysaccharide degradation, affording alternative biofuels from abundant biomass. Thus, an understanding of active-site chemistry in copper monooxygenases, those activating strong C-H bonds is briefly reviewed. Then, recent advances in the synthesis-generation and study of various copper-oxygen intermediates are highlighted. Of special interest are cupric-superoxide, Cu-hydroperoxo and Cu-oxy complexes. Such investigations can contribute to an enhanced future application of C-H oxidation or oxygenation processes using air, as concerning societal energy goals. PMID:25756327

  13. Characterizing Surface Acidic Sites in Mesoporous-Silica-Supported Tungsten Oxide Catalysts Using Solid State NMR and Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Yong; Hu, Mary Y.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-10-18

    The acidic sites in dispersed tungsten oxide supported on SBA-15 mesoporous silica were investigated using a combination of pyridine titration, both fast-, and slow-MAS {sup 15}N NMR, static {sup 2}H NMR, and quantum chemistry calculations. It is found that the bridged acidic -OH groups in surface adsorbed tungsten dimers (i.e., W-OH-W) are the Broensted acid sites. The unusually strong acidity of these Broensted acid sites is confirmed by quantum chemistry calculations. In contrast, terminal W-OH sites are very stable and only weakly acidic as are terminal Si-OH sites. Furthermore, molecular interactions between pyridine molecules and the dimer Broensted and terminal W-OH sites for dispersed tungsten oxide species is strong. This results in restricted molecular motion for the interacting pyridine molecules even at room temperature, i.e., a reorientation mainly about the molecular 2-fold axis. This restricted reorientation makes it possible to estimate the relative ratio of the Broensted (tungsten dimer) to the weakly acidic terminal W-OH sites in the catalyst using the slow-MAS {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N CP PASS method.

  14. A Receptor-Grounded Approach to Teaching Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drug Chemistry and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe a receptor-based approach to promote learning about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) chemistry, structure-activity relationships, and therapeutic decision-making. Design Three lessons on cyclooxygenase (COX) and NSAID chemistry, and NSAID therapeutic utility, were developed using text-based resources and primary medicinal chemistry and pharmacy practice literature. Learning tools were developed to assist students in content mastery. Assessment Student learning was evaluated via performance on quizzes and examinations that measured understanding of COX and NSAID chemistry, and the application of that knowledge to therapeutic problem solving. Conclusion Student performance on NSAID-focused quizzes and examinations documented the success of this approach. PMID:20221336

  15. Limitations in determining redox chemistry in basalt groundwaters at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.A.; Jones, T.E.; Marcy, A.D.; West, M.H.

    1986-03-01

    The oxidation-reduction (redox) chemistry of the basalt groundwater system will be an important factor governing both the design and performance of a high-level nuclear waste repository in basalt. Although the redox state of the basalt groundwater system is inherently difficult to measure, there are a number of types of measurements that provide valuable information on this subject. These measurements include concentrations of dissolved sulfide, ferrous iron, electrode redox potential, and groundwater reducing capacity. These measurements have been made on a limited basis in a number of different repository test horizons. Taken collectively, the results of these measurements suggest that both sulfide and ferrous iron play an important role in the establishment of the basalt groundwater redox condition. Thermodynamic calculations of redox potential (E/sub h/) based on these measurements are indicative of an E/sub h/ of -0.4 V. Additional measurements are proposed that will provide a more complete understanding of basalt groundwater redox conditions. The proposed measurements include a more in-depth analysis of redox active species as well as quantification of dissolved gas species such as oxygen and methane.

  16. Mixed valency and site-preference chemistry for cerium and its compounds: A predictive density-functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Aftab; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-01

    Cerium and its technologically relevant compounds are examples of anomalous mixed valency, originating from two competing oxidation states—itinerant Ce4+ and localized Ce3+. Under applied stress, anomalous transitions are observed but not well understood. Here we treat mixed valency as an “alloy” problem involving two valences with competing and numerous site-occupancy configurations. We use density-functional theory with Hubbard U (i.e., DFT+U) to evaluate the effective valence and predict properties, including controlling the valence by pseudoternary alloying. For Ce and its compounds, such as (Ce,La)2(Fe,Co)14B permanent magnets, we find a stable mixed-valent α state near the spectroscopic value of νs=3.53. Ce valency in compounds depends on its steric volume and local chemistry. For La doping, Ce valency shifts towards γ-like Ce3+, as expected from steric volume; for Co doping, valency depends on local Ce-site chemistry and steric volume. Our approach captures the key origins of anomalous valency and site-preference chemistry in complex compounds.

  17. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  18. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  19. Recent progress in understanding activity cliffs and their utility in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Hu, Ye; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-01-09

    The activity cliff concept is of high relevance for medicinal chemistry. Recent studies are discussed that have further refined our understanding of activity cliffs and suggested different ways of exploiting activity cliff information. These include alternative approaches to define and classify activity cliffs in two and three dimensions, data mining investigations to systematically detect all possible activity cliffs, the introduction of computational methods to predict activity cliffs, and studies designed to explore activity cliff progression in medicinal chemistry. The discussion of these studies is complemented with new findings revealing the frequency of activity cliff formation when different molecular representations are used and the distribution of activity cliffs across different targets. Taken together, the results have a number of implications for the practice of medicinal chemistry.

  20. Chemistry, physico-chemistry and applications linked to biological activities of β-glucans.

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    β-Glucans is the common name given to a group of chemically heterogeneous polysaccharides. They are long- or short-chain polymers of (1-->3)-β-linked glucose moieties which may be branched, with the branching chains linked to the backbone by a (1-->6)-β linkage. β-(1-->3)-Glucans are widely distributed in bacteria, algae, fungi and plants, where they are involved in cell wall structure and other biological function. β-Glucans have been shown to provide a remarkable range of health benefits, and are especially important against the two most common conventional causes of death in industrialized countries, i.e. cardiovascular diseases (where they promote healthy cholesterol and blood glucose levels) and cancer (where they enhance immune system functions). This Highlight provides a comprehensive and up-to-date commentary on β-glucans, their chemistry, physico-chemistry, functional role in immunological responses, and possible applications as therapeutic tools. In addition, we discuss the mechanism behind their health benefits, which are not yet fully understood.

  1. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  2. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides.

  3. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides. PMID:27704049

  4. Precipitation chemistry and wet deposition in a remote wet savanna site in West Africa: Djougou (Benin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpo, A. B.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Laouali, D.; Delon, C.; Liousse, C.; Adon, M.; Gardrat, E.; Mariscal, A.; Darakpa, C.

    2015-08-01

    , biomass burning and biofuel combustions. The second highest contribution is the calcium ion (13.3 μeq·L-1), characteristic of dust aerosols from terrigenous sources, Calcium contributes up to 46% of the precipitation chemistry in Djougou. Finally, these results are compared to those obtained for other selected African sites representative of other main natural ecosystems: dry savanna and forest. The study of the African ecosystem transect indicates a pH gradient with more acidic pH in the forested ecosystem. Nitrogenous contribution to the chemical composition of rain in Lamto, wet savanna, (24%) is equivalent to the one estimated in Djougou (24%). The last contribution concerns organic acidity, which represents 7% of total ionic content of precipitation at Djougou. The relative particulate contribution PC and the relative gaseous contribution GC are calculated using the mean chemical composition measured in Djougou for the studied period. The comparison with other African sites gives 40% and 43% PC in wet savannas of Lamto (Côte d'Ivoire) and Djougou (Benin) respectively, 20% PC in the equatorial forest of Zoetele (Cameroon) and 80% PC in dry savanna of Banizoumbou (Niger). The results shown here indicate the existence of a North-South gradients of organic, marine, terrigenous and nitrogenous contributions along the transect in West and Central Africa.

  5. Self-Directed Activity-Based Learning and Achievement in High School Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassett, Meighan M.; Martinez, James; Martin, Ellice P.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of student-directed activity-based learning (SDABL) were examined in two high school chemistry classes. Students in the SDABL class were given pretest results, a list of standards to be mastered, and a chart of learning activities categorized by difficulty level. They selected activities to meet their needs and preferences.…

  6. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  7. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  8. A versatile approach for the site-specific modification of recombinant antibodies using a combination of enzyme-mediated bioconjugation and click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alt, Karen; Paterson, Brett M; Westein, Erik; Rudd, Stacey E; Poniger, Stan S; Jagdale, Shweta; Ardipradja, Katie; Connell, Timothy U; Krippner, Guy Y; Nair, Ashish K N; Wang, Xiaowei; Tochon-Danguy, Henri J; Donnelly, Paul S; Peter, Karlheinz; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-06-22

    A unique two-step modular system for site-specific antibody modification and conjugation is reported. The first step of this approach uses enzymatic bioconjugation with the transpeptidase Sortase A for incorporation of strained cyclooctyne functional groups. The second step of this modular approach involves the azide-alkyne cycloaddition click reaction. The versatility of the two-step approach has been exemplified by the selective incorporation of fluorescent dyes and a positron-emitting copper-64 radiotracer for fluorescence and positron-emission tomography imaging of activated platelets, platelet aggregates, and thrombi, respectively. This flexible and versatile approach could be readily adapted to incorporate a large array of tailor-made functional groups using reliable click chemistry whilst preserving the activity of the antibody or other sensitive biological macromolecules.

  9. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  10. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  11. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  12. Chemistry, toxicology, and human health risk of cyanide compounds in soils at former manufactured gas plant sites.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, N S; Beck, B D; Gauthier, T D; Chapnick, S D; Goodman, G

    1996-04-01

    Cyanide-containing wastes are commonly found in soils at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, also known as town gas sites. The complex forms of cyanide are responsible for the blue-stained soils and rocks found at these sites. Most concentrations of cyanide at MGP sites are below 2000 ppm, although concentrations greater than 20,000 ppm have been observed. An understanding of the chemistry of the MGP cyanide-containing compounds, their fate, and transport as well as their toxicology is critical to accurately assessing potential human health risks from these compounds. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that the most prevalent types of cyanide compounds found at former MGP sites are the relatively nontoxic iron-complexed forms, such as ferric ferrocyanide, rather than the highly toxic free cyanide forms. Moreover, the chemical conditions at most former MGP sites limit the extent to which free cyanide may be released into air and water from complex cyanides. Using a screening analysis, the authors estimate potential risks from a multiroute exposure to complex and free cyanides in soil, air, and groundwater at former MGP sites and demonstrate that such risks are likely to be insignificant. Unfortunately, the lack of readily available measurement techniques to characterize cyanides in soil can result in erroneous conclusions about potential risks from cyanide compounds in soils at former MGP sites, particularly if health-based soil criteria for free cyanide (e.g., the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection criterion for free cyanide is 100 ppm (MA. DEP, 1995)) are applied. The authors recommend development of routine methods for field sampling and laboratory testing techniques to demonstrate that cyanides in soil at former MGP sites are predominated by iron-complexed species and that free cyanide is less than levels of concern.

  13. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  14. Antibiotic Spider Silk: Site-Specific Functionalization of Recombinant Spider Silk Using "Click" Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David; Bardelang, Philip; Goodacre, Sara L; Cockayne, Alan; Thomas, Neil R

    2017-03-01

    In a new, versatile approach to fun-ction-alizing recombinant spider silk, L-azidohomoalanine is introduced residue-specifically in the minispidroin protein 4RepCT through expression in an E. coli methionine auxotroph. Both fluorophores and the antibiotic levofloxacin are attached to this bio-orthogonal amino acid using copper-catalyzed click chemistry, either before or after the silk fibers are self-assembled.

  15. Multiple active site residues are important for photochemical efficiency in the light-activated enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR).

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Hardman, Samantha J O; Scrutton, Nigel S; Heyes, Derren J

    2016-08-01

    Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the light-driven reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), an essential, regulatory step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. The unique requirement of the enzyme for light has provided the opportunity to investigate how light energy can be harnessed to power biological catalysis and enzyme dynamics. Excited state interactions between the Pchlide molecule and the protein are known to drive the subsequent reaction chemistry. However, the structural features of POR and active site residues that are important for photochemistry and catalysis are currently unknown, because there is no crystal structure for POR. Here, we have used static and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a number of active site variants to study the role of a number of residues, which are located in the proposed NADPH/Pchlide binding site based on previous homology models, in the reaction mechanism of POR. Our findings, which are interpreted in the context of a new improved structural model, have identified several residues that are predicted to interact with the coenzyme or substrate. Several of the POR variants have a profound effect on the photochemistry, suggesting that multiple residues are important in stabilizing the excited state required for catalysis. Our work offers insight into how the POR active site geometry is finely tuned by multiple active site residues to support enzyme-mediated photochemistry and reduction of Pchlide, both of which are crucial to the existence of life on Earth.

  16. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This

  17. Measurements of aerosol chemistry during new particle formation events at a remote rural mountain site.

    PubMed

    Creamean, Jessie M; Ault, Andrew P; Ten Hoeve, John E; Jacobson, Mark Z; Roberts, Gregory C; Prather, Kimberly A

    2011-10-01

    Determining the major sources of particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) represents a critical step in the development of a more fundamental understanding of aerosol impacts on cloud formation and climate. Reported herein are direct measurements of the CCN activity of newly formed ambient particles, measured at a remote rural site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Northern California. Nucleation events in the winter of 2009 occurred during two pristine periods following precipitation, with higher gas-phase SO(2) concentrations during the second period, when faster particle growth occurred (7-8 nm/h). Amines, as opposed to ammonia, and sulfate were detected in the particle phase throughout new particle formation (NPF) events, increasing in number as the particles grew to larger sizes. Interestingly, long-range transport of SO(2) from Asia appeared to potentially play a role in NPF during faster particle growth. Understanding the propensity of newly formed particles to act as CCN is critical for predicting the effects of NPF on orographic cloud formation during winter storms along the Sierra Nevada Mountain range. The potential impact of newly formed particles in remote regions needs to be compared with that of transported urban aerosols when evaluating the impact of aerosols on clouds and climate.

  18. Using Laboratory Chemicals to Imitate Illicit Drugs in a Forensic Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Shawn; Bromfield-Lee, Deborah; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    This forensic chemistry activity utilizes presumptive forensic testing procedures and laboratory chemicals that produce screening results similar to controlled substances. For obvious reasons, obtaining heavily regulated controlled substances to create an undergraduate student activity is not practical for most educational institutions. We were…

  19. Investigating the Effectiveness of an Analogy Activity in Improving Students' Conceptual Change for Solution Chemistry Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation on the use of an analogy activity and seeks to provide evidence of whether the activity enables students to change alternative conceptions towards views more in accord with scientific views for aspects of solution chemistry. We were also interested in how robust any change was and whether these changes in…

  20. Chemistry For Kids: Pre-Chemistry Acid Rain Activities for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    1985-01-01

    Presents two activities on acid rain for students in intermediate grades. Materials needed and procedures used are included. Also describes "chemical magic" shows performed by high school students for sixth-grade students in seven elementary schools in Altus, Oklahoma. (JN)

  1. Site-Specific Antibody–Drug Conjugates: The Nexus of Bioorthogonal Chemistry, Protein Engineering, and Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) combine the specificity of antibodies with the potency of small molecules to create targeted drugs. Despite the simplicity of this concept, generation of clinically successful ADCs has been very difficult. Over the past several decades, scientists have learned a great deal about the constraints on antibodies, linkers, and drugs as they relate to successful construction of ADCs. Once these components are in hand, most ADCs are prepared by nonspecific modification of antibody lysine or cysteine residues with drug-linker reagents, which results in heterogeneous product mixtures that cannot be further purified. With advances in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering, there is growing interest in producing ADCs by site-specific conjugation to the antibody, yielding more homogeneous products that have demonstrated benefits over their heterogeneous counterparts in vivo. Here, we chronicle the development of a multitude of site-specific conjugation strategies for assembly of ADCs and provide a comprehensive account of key advances and their roots in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering. PMID:25494884

  2. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  3. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  4. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  5. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  6. The impact of acid treatment on soilwater chemistry at the Humex site

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.D.; Ranneklev, S.B.; Mykkelbost, T.C. )

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acid treatment on soil water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and inorganic chemistry are being monitored at the Humic Lake Acidification Experiment (HUMEX) in western Norway. The HUMEX project involves artificial acidification of half of a dystrophic lake and the corresponding drainage basin. Soil water chemistry data were collected from 30 monitoring lysimeters and 130 grid lysimeters. The samples from the monitoring lysimeters were collected before and, for a period of two years, after the onset of acid treatment. Operationally-defined functional fractions of DOC showed that hydrophilic (HPI) and hydrophobic (HPO) acids account for 60% to 90% of the DOC. In soils rich in DOC, the HPO acids were dominant, whereas in mineral soil horizons low in DOC, the HPI acid fractions were highest. The amount of DOC relative to labile aluminum and iron may determine the HPO/HPI acid ratio. The sulphate concentration has increased more in the treated than in the reference side. Coincident decreases in DOC and organically complexes aluminum (Al[sub 0]) concentrations were observed for surface histosol locations. The temporal and spatial variations in c(Al[sub 0]) were mainly explained by variation in c(DOC). 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Textbook Questions in Context-Based and Traditional Chemistry Curricula Analysed from a Content Perspective and a Learning Activities Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2013-11-01

    In this study, questions in context-based and traditional chemistry textbooks were analysed from two perspectives that are at the heart of chemistry curricula reforms: a content perspective and a learning activities perspective. To analyse these textbook questions, we developed an instrument for each perspective. In total, 971 textbook questions were analysed. Textbook questions in context-based and traditional curricula appeared to differ significantly in their orientation on content and in the activation to engage students in certain learning activities. Although traditional curricula included more questions that stress traditional chemistry content and included more reproductive chemistry questions than context-based curricula, they were not always as traditional as we had expected. Context-based chemistry curricula focused more on chemistry content relating to societal/technological issues and chemistry theory development and also more questions were included that activate students to regulate their own learning. However, context-based chemistry curricula still included a considerable amount of traditional chemistry content and did not focus as much on higher order learning as we had expected. The developed instruments might be helpful in chemistry curricula design to gain insights into the content which is stressed and how students are activated by textbook questions to engage in learning.

  8. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  9. STUDIES ON THE CHEMISTRY OF THE TRANSFORMING ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Zamenhof, Stephen; Alexander, Hattie E.; Leidy, Grace

    1953-01-01

    The transforming principles of Hemophilus influenzae have been purified by a new method including fractional extraction. The active molecule behaves in these extractions like the bulk of the DNA preparation. The minimal amount of DNA necessary for transformation appeared to be of the same order of magnitude as the amount of DNA in a single cell. Quantitative study has been made of the resistance of transforming activity to various agents. When subjected to heat, the temperature at which the activity starts to decrease corresponds rather closely to the temperature at which the viscosity of the bulk of the DNA preparations starts to decrease. Similar correspondence was found when the transforming principle was subjected to pH changes. This is further evidence that the behavior of the active molecules is similar to the behavior of the average DNA molecule of the preparation. The activity is reduced by exposure to low ionic strength and by dehydration. Desoxyribonuclease in concentrations less than 10–4 γ/cc. is able to destroy the activity; a lag period during which the activity but not the viscosity decreases has been observed. NaNO2 at pH 5.3, HCHO and 10–5 M Fe++ reduce or destroy the activity; the importance of intact amino groups in the DNA molecule for the activity is discussed. Several protein-denaturing, sterilizing, and mutagenic agents have been found to have no effect on the transforming activity. PMID:13096662

  10. Liaison activities with the Institute of Physical Chemistry/Russian Academy of Science Fiscal Year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    Investigations into the chemistry of alkaline Hanford Site tank waste (TTP RL4-3-20-04) were conducted in Fiscal Year 1995 at Westinghouse Hanford Company under the support of the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (EM-53). The investigation had two main subtasks: liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science and further laboratory testing of the chemistry of thermal reconstitution of Hanford Site tank waste. Progress, which was achieved in the liaison subtask during Fiscal Year 1995, is summarized as follows: (1) A technical dialogue has been established with Institute scientists. (2) Editing was done on a technical literature review on the chemistry of transuranic elements and technetium in alkaline media written by researchers at the Institute. The report was issued in May 1995 as a Westinghouse Hanford Company document. (3) Four tasks from the Institute were selected for support by the U.S. Department of Energy. Work on three tasks commenced on 1 March 1995; the fourth task commenced on 1 April 1995. (4) Technical information describing the composition of Hanford Site tank waste was supplied to the Institute. (5) A program review of the four tasks was conducted at the Institute during a visit 25 August to 1 September, 1995. A lecture on the origin, composition, and proposed treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes was presented during this visit. Eight additional tasks were proposed by Institute scientists for support in Fiscal Year 1996. (6) A paper was presented at the Fifth International Conference on Radioactive Waste Management and Environmental Remediation (ICEM`95) in Berlin, Germany on 3 to 9 September, 1995 on the solubility of actinides in alkaline media.

  11. Eliciting Metacognitive Experiences and Reflection in a Year 11 Chemistry Classroom: An Activity Theory Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gregory P.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

    2013-06-01

    Concerns regarding students' learning and reasoning in chemistry classrooms are well documented. Students' reasoning in chemistry should be characterized by conscious consideration of chemical phenomenon from laboratory work at macroscopic, molecular/sub-micro and symbolic levels. Further, students should develop metacognition in relation to such ways of reasoning about chemistry phenomena. Classroom change eliciting metacognitive experiences and metacognitive reflection is necessary to shift entrenched views of teaching and learning in students. In this study, Activity Theory is used as the framework for interpreting changes to the rules/customs and tools of the activity systems of two different classes of students taught by the same teacher, Frances, who was teaching chemical equilibrium to those classes in consecutive years. An interpretive methodology involving multiple data sources was employed. Frances explicitly changed her pedagogy in the second year to direct students attention to increasingly consider chemical phenomena at the molecular/sub-micro level. Additionally, she asked students not to use the textbook until toward the end of the equilibrium unit and sought to engage them in using their prior knowledge of chemistry to understand their observations from experiments. Frances' changed pedagogy elicited metacognitive experiences and reflection in students and challenged them to reconsider their metacognitive beliefs about learning chemistry and how it might be achieved. While teacher change is essential for science education reform, students are not passive players in change efforts and they need to be convinced of the viability of teacher pedagogical change in the context of their goals, intentions, and beliefs.

  12. Students' Perceptions of Teaching in Context-based and Traditional Chemistry Classrooms: Comparing content, learning activities, and interpersonal perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-07-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms, and whether this teaching differs from traditional chemistry lessons, is scarce. This study aims to develop our understanding of what teaching looks like, according to students, in context-based chemistry classrooms compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. As such, it might also provide a better understanding of whether teachers implement and attain the intentions of curriculum developers. To study teacher behaviour we used three theoretical perspectives deemed to be important for student learning: a content perspective, a learning activities perspective, and an interpersonal perspective. Data were collected from 480 students in 24 secondary chemistry classes in the Netherlands. Our findings suggest that, according to the students, the changes in teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms imply a lessening of the emphasis on fundamental chemistry and the use of a teacher-centred approach, compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. However, teachers in context-based chemistry classrooms seem not to display more 'context-based' teaching behaviour, such as emphasizing the relation between chemistry, technology, and society and using a student-centred approach. Furthermore, students in context-based chemistry classrooms perceive their teachers as having less interpersonal control and showing less affiliation than teachers in traditional chemistry classrooms. Our findings should be interpreted in the context of former and daily experiences of both teachers and students. As only chemistry is reformed in the schools in which context-based chemistry is implemented, it is challenging for both students and teachers to

  13. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  14. Amine oxidative N-dealkylation via cupric hydroperoxide Cu-OOH homolytic cleavage followed by site-specific fenton chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghee; Ginsbach, Jake W; Lee, Jung Yoon; Peterson, Ryan L; Liu, Jeffrey J; Siegler, Maxime A; Sarjeant, Amy A; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-03-04

    Copper(II) hydroperoxide species are significant intermediates in processes such as fuel cells and (bio)chemical oxidations, all involving stepwise reduction of molecular oxygen. We previously reported a Cu(II)-OOH species that performs oxidative N-dealkylation on a dibenzylamino group that is appended to the 6-position of a pyridyl donor of a tripodal tetradentate ligand. To obtain insights into the mechanism of this process, reaction kinetics and products were determined employing ligand substrates with various para-substituent dibenzyl pairs (-H,-H; -H,-Cl; -H,-OMe, and -Cl,-OMe), or with partially or fully deuterated dibenzyl N-(CH2Ph)2 moieties. A series of ligand-copper(II) bis-perchlorate complexes were synthesized, characterized, and the X-ray structures of the -H,-OMe analogue were determined. The corresponding metastable Cu(II)-OOH species were generated by addition of H2O2/base in acetone at -90 °C. These convert (t1/2 ≈ 53 s) to oxidatively N-dealkylated products, producing para-substituted benzaldehydes. Based on the experimental observations and supporting DFT calculations, a reaction mechanism involving dibenzylamine H-atom abstraction or electron-transfer oxidation by the Cu(II)-OOH entity could be ruled out. It is concluded that the chemistry proceeds by rate limiting Cu-O homolytic cleavage of the Cu(II)-(OOH) species, followed by site-specific copper Fenton chemistry. As a process of broad interest in copper as well as iron oxidative (bio)chemistries, a detailed computational analysis was performed, indicating that a Cu(I)OOH species undergoes O-O homolytic cleavage to yield a hydroxyl radical and Cu(II)OH rather than heterolytic cleavage to yield water and a Cu(II)-O(•-) species.

  15. Clay Chemistry's Influence on the Average Carbon Content and Particle Size at the Ninety-Six Historical Site, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintz, L.; Werts, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Ninety-Six National Historic Site is located in Greenwood County, SC. Recent geologic mapping of this area has revealed differences in soil properties over short distances within the park. We studied the chemistry of the clay minerals found within the soils to see if there was a correlation between the amounts of soil organic carbon contained in the soil and particle size in individual soil horizons. Three different vegetation areas, including an old field, a deciduous forest, and a pine forest were selected to see what influence vegetation type had on the clay chemistry and carbon levels as well. Four samples containing the O, A, and B horizons were taken from each location and we studied the carbon and nitrogen content using an elemental analyzer, particle size using a Laser Diffraction Particle Size Analyzer, and clay mineralogy with powder X-ray diffraction of each soil sample. Samples from the old field and pine forest gave an overall negative correlation between carbon content and clay percentage, which is against the normal trend for Southern Piedmont Ultisols. The deciduous forest samples gave no correlation at all between its carbon content and clay percentage. Together, all three locations show the same negative relationship, while once separated into vegetation type and A and B horizons it shows even more abnormal relationships of negative while several show no correlation (R2= 0.007403- 0.56268). Using powder XRD, we ran clay samples from each A and B horizon for the clay mineralogy. All three vegetation areas had the same results of containing quartz, kaolinite, and Fe oxides, therefore, clay chemistry is not a reason behind the abnormal trend of a negative correlation between average carbon content and clay percentage. Considering that all three locations have the same climate, topography, and parent material of metagranite, it could be reasonable to assume these results are a factor of environmental and biological influences rather than clay type.

  16. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Benjamin E. R.; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L.; Hallaert, Simon D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(II), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species—α-Fe(II) and α-O—are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive ‘spectator’ iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(II) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(II) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(IV)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function—producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an ‘entatic’ state—might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts.

  17. Substrate Activity Screening (SAS) and Related Approaches in Medicinal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gladysz, Rafaela; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Van der Veken, Pieter

    2016-03-04

    Substrate activity screening (SAS) was presented a decade ago by Ellman and co-workers as a straightforward methodology for the identification of fragment-sized building blocks for enzyme inhibitors. Ever since, SAS and variations derived from it have been successfully applied to the discovery of inhibitors of various families of enzymatically active drug targets. This review covers key achievements and challenges of SAS and related methodologies, including the modified substrate activity screening (MSAS) approach. Special attention is given to the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of these methodologies, as a thorough understanding thereof is crucial for successfully transforming the identified fragment-sized hits into potent inhibitors.

  18. Fuzzy electron density fragments in macromolecular quantum chemistry, combinatorial quantum chemistry, functional group analysis, and shape-activity relations.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Paul G

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Just as complete molecules have no boundaries and have "fuzzy" electron density clouds approaching zero density exponentially at large distances from the nearest nucleus, a physically justified choice for electron density fragments exhibits similar behavior. Whereas fuzzy electron densities, just as any fuzzy object, such as a thicker cloud on a foggy day, do not lend themselves to easy visualization, one may partially overcome this by using isocontours. Whereas a faithful representation of the complete fuzzy density would need infinitely many such isocontours, nevertheless, by choosing a selected few, one can still obtain a limited pictorial representation. Clearly, such images are of limited value, and one better relies on more complete mathematical representations, using, for example, density matrices of fuzzy fragment densities. A fuzzy density fragmentation can be obtained in an exactly additive way, using the output from any of the common quantum chemical computational techniques, such as Hartree-Fock, MP2, and various density functional approaches. Such "fuzzy" electron density fragments properly represented have proven to be useful in a rather wide range of applications, for example, (a) using them as additive building blocks leading to efficient linear scaling macromolecular quantum chemistry computational techniques, (b) the study of quantum chemical functional groups, (c) using approximate fuzzy fragment information as allowed by the holographic electron density theorem, (d) the study of correlations between local shape and activity, including through-bond and through-space components of interactions between parts of molecules and relations between local molecular shape and substituent effects, (e) using them as tools of density matrix extrapolation in conformational changes, (f) physically valid averaging and statistical distribution of several local electron densities of common stoichiometry, useful in electron density databank mining, for

  19. Learning Activity Package, Chemistry I. LAP Numbers 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Naomi

    As a set of seven Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in chemistry, the units cover the unit system, matter, energy, atomic structures, chemical formulas, physical states of matter, solutions and suspensions, ionization, acids, bases, and salts. Each unit contains a rationale for the material; a list of behavioral…

  20. The Effects of 5E Inquiry Learning Activities on Achievement and Attitude toward Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Senol; Oskay, Ozge Ozyalcin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 5E inquiry learning activities on students' achievement, attitude toward chemistry. A non-equivalent control group design was used to the quasi-experimental research in this study. A total of 34 (8 males and 26 females) undergraduates in Turkey voluntarily participated in the study. The…

  1. Tailoring the surface chemistry of activated carbon cloth by electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Tabti, Zakaria; Ruiz-Rosas, Ramiro; Quijada, César; Cazorla-Amorós, Diego; Morallón, Emilia

    2014-07-23

    This paper presents a systematic study of the effect of the electrochemical treatment (galvanostatic electrolysis in a filter-press electrochemical cell) on the surface chemistry and porous texture of commercial activated carbon cloth. The same treatments have been conducted over a granular activated carbon in order to clarify the effect of morphology. The influence of different electrochemical variables, such as the electrode polarity (anodic or cathodic), the applied current (between 0.2 and 1.0 A) and the type of electrolyte (HNO3 and NaCl) have also been analyzed. The anodic treatment of both activated carbons causes an increase in the amount of surface oxygen groups, whereas the cathodic treatment does not produce any relevant modification of the surface chemistry. The HNO3 electrolyte produced a lower generation of oxygen groups than the NaCl one, but differences in the achieved distribution of surface groups can be benefitial to selectively tune the surface chemistry. The porous texture seems to be unaltered after the electro-oxidation treatment. The validity of this method to introduce surface oxygen groups with a pseudocapacitive behavior has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry. As a conclusion, the electrochemical treatment can be easily implemented to selectively and quantitatively modify the surface chemistry of activated carbons with different shapes and morphologies.

  2. Applications of organoboron compounds in carbohydrate chemistry and glycobiology: analysis, separation, protection, and activation.

    PubMed

    McClary, Corey A; Taylor, Mark S

    2013-11-15

    The reversible covalent interactions between organoboron compounds and diols have been applied for many years in carbohydrate chemistry. They form the basis of efficient methods for the detection of carbohydrates, and applications in cellular imaging and glycoprotein analysis are beginning to emerge. The interactions are also of widespread utility in carbohydrate synthesis: depending upon the coordination geometry at boron, either protection or activation of a bound diol motif may be achieved. This review article uses recent examples to illustrate the breadth of applications of organoboron compounds in carbohydrate chemistry.

  3. The potential effects of CO2 leakage from CCS sites on soil leachate chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonis, M.; Yoo, G.; Wenmei, H.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring of potential leakages and its effect on the soil environment are essential to ensure long term feasibility of the carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects. When high concentration of CO2 is leaked into the soil system, the soil chemical environment will be changed. We hypothesized that soil pH will decrease sharply in response to the high soil CO2, but we also expect that it would gradually resume because of the buffering capacity of the soil. The mechanisms of the soil's buffering capacity could be dissolution of carbonate minerals and organic matter, which could result in production of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC) in the soil and leachate. In addition, changes in cation exchange capacity (CEC) induced by high CO2 can lead to mobilization of base cations due to replacement by H+, Al3+ and Mn2+. This study aims at investigating changes in soil leachate chemical parameters when the soil was injected with 100% CO2 for four weeks (28 days). Custom made plexiglass pots (30 cm × 20 cm × 20 cm) have been filled with organic rich soil (10 cmm depth) overlaid with mineral soil (15 cm). The pots were injected with 100% CO2 at a flow rate of 400 cm3 min-1. Separate control groups were made with no injection and N2 injection. All the treatments have 9 replicates. The 300 ml of tap water was watered down in the pots three times a week. Leachates collected are analyzed for the soil pH and EC. Leachates are filtered through 0.2 μm membranes for analysis of DOC, DIC, and metal concentrations. After 4 wk of incubation, organic and mineral soils will be destructively sampled and analyzed for total organic and inorganic carbon and CEC. Knowledge of changes in leachate chemistry will allow us to quantify the mobilization of chemical parameters in well-drained soils under the potential influence of high soil CO2. Furthermore, effect on leaching may give indirect information about consequent changes in groundwater chemistry.

  4. Learning about Chemistry Concepts. Superific Science Book VIII. A Good Apple Science Activity Book for Grades 5-8+.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Lorraine

    Based on the idea that active participation stimulates the processes by which learning takes place, this document provides teachers and students with a variety of information and learning activities dealing with chemistry. Basic concepts about chemistry are presented through the use of laboratory experiments, demonstrations, worksheet exercises…

  5. Use of a World Wide Web Site Evaluation Tool in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance of assessment of materials on the World Wide Web that may be freely accessible to both instructors and students. Evaluates web sites that cover the periodic table in terms of content and design. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  6. The synthesis of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) using continuous flow chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary The implementation of continuous flow processing as a key enabling technology has transformed the way we conduct chemistry and has expanded our synthetic capabilities. As a result many new preparative routes have been designed towards commercially relevant drug compounds achieving more efficient and reproducible manufacture. This review article aims to illustrate the holistic systems approach and diverse applications of flow chemistry to the preparation of pharmaceutically active molecules, demonstrating the value of this strategy towards every aspect ranging from synthesis, in-line analysis and purification to final formulation and tableting. Although this review will primarily concentrate on large scale continuous processing, additional selected syntheses using micro or meso-scaled flow reactors will be exemplified for key transformations and process control. It is hoped that the reader will gain an appreciation of the innovative technology and transformational nature that flow chemistry can leverage to an overall process. PMID:26425178

  7. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Irani, Seema; Yogesha, S D; Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families.

  8. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L.; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A.; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families. PMID:26933063

  9. Binding of copper and silver to single-site variants of peptidylglycine monooxygenase reveals the structure and chemistry of the individual metal centers.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Shefali; Kline, Chelsey D; Mayfield, Mary; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2014-02-18

    Peptidylglycine monooxygenase (PHM) catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of amidated peptides that serve as important signaling molecules in numerous endocrine pathways. The catalytic mechanism has attracted much attention because of a number of unique attributes, including the presence of a pair of uncoupled copper centers separated by 11 Å (termed CuH and CuM), an unusual Cu(I)SMet interaction at the oxygen binding M-site, and the postulated Cu(II)-superoxo intermediate. Understanding the mechanism requires determining the catalytic roles of the individual copper centers and how they change during catalysis, a task made more difficult by the overlapping spectral signals from each copper center in the wild-type (WT) protein. To aid in this effort, we constructed and characterized two PHM variants that bound metal at only one site. The H242A variant bound copper at the H-center, while the H107AH108A double mutant bound copper at the M-center; both mutants were devoid of catalytic activity. Oxidized Cu(II) forms showed electron paramagnetic resonance and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra consistent with their previously determined Cu(II)His3O and Cu(II)His2O2 ligand sets for the H- and M-centers, respectively. Cu(I) forms, on the other hand, showed unique chemistry. The M-center bound two histidines and a methionine at all pHs, while the H-center was two-coordinate at neutral pH but coordinated a new methionine S ligand at low pH. Fourier transform infrared studies confirmed and extended previous assignments of CO binding and showed unambiguously that the 2092 cm(-1) absorbing species observed in the WT and many variant forms is an M-site Cu(I)-CO adduct. Silver binding was also investigated. When H107AH108A and M109I (a WT analogue with both sites intact) were incubated with excess AgNO3, each variant bound a single Ag(I) ion, from which it was inferred that Ag(I) binds selectively at the M-center with little or no affinity for the H

  10. Binding of Copper and Silver to Single-Site Variants of Peptidylglycine Monooxygenase Reveals the Structure and Chemistry of the Individual Metal Centers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Peptidylglycine monooxygenase (PHM) catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of amidated peptides that serve as important signaling molecules in numerous endocrine pathways. The catalytic mechanism has attracted much attention because of a number of unique attributes, including the presence of a pair of uncoupled copper centers separated by 11 Å (termed CuH and CuM), an unusual Cu(I)SMet interaction at the oxygen binding M-site, and the postulated Cu(II)–superoxo intermediate. Understanding the mechanism requires determining the catalytic roles of the individual copper centers and how they change during catalysis, a task made more difficult by the overlapping spectral signals from each copper center in the wild-type (WT) protein. To aid in this effort, we constructed and characterized two PHM variants that bound metal at only one site. The H242A variant bound copper at the H-center, while the H107AH108A double mutant bound copper at the M-center; both mutants were devoid of catalytic activity. Oxidized Cu(II) forms showed electron paramagnetic resonance and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra consistent with their previously determined Cu(II)His3O and Cu(II)His2O2 ligand sets for the H- and M-centers, respectively. Cu(I) forms, on the other hand, showed unique chemistry. The M-center bound two histidines and a methionine at all pHs, while the H-center was two-coordinate at neutral pH but coordinated a new methionine S ligand at low pH. Fourier transform infrared studies confirmed and extended previous assignments of CO binding and showed unambiguously that the 2092 cm–1 absorbing species observed in the WT and many variant forms is an M-site Cu(I)–CO adduct. Silver binding was also investigated. When H107AH108A and M109I (a WT analogue with both sites intact) were incubated with excess AgNO3, each variant bound a single Ag(I) ion, from which it was inferred that Ag(I) binds selectively at the M-center with little or no affinity for

  11. Selective targeting of the conserved active site cysteine of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methionine aminopeptidase with electrophilic reagents.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Gumpena, Rajesh; Ganji, Roopa J; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) cleave initiator methionine from ~ 70% of the newly synthesized proteins in every living cell, and specific inhibition or knockdown of this function is detrimental. MetAPs are metalloenzymes, and are broadly classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Bacteria contain only type I MetAPs, and the active site of these enzymes contains a conserved cysteine. By contrast, in type II enzymes the analogous position is occupied by a conserved glycine. Here, we report the reactivity of the active site cysteine in a type I MetAP, MetAP1c, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c) towards highly selective cysteine-specific reagents. The authenticity of selective modification of Cys105 of MtMetAP1c was established by using site-directed mutagenesis and crystal structure determination of covalent and noncovalent complexes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that metal ions in the active site assist in the covalent modification of Cys105 by orienting the reagents appropriately for a successful reaction. These studies establish, for the first time, that the conserved cysteine of type I MetAPs can be targeted for selective inhibition, and we believe that this chemistry can be exploited for further drug discovery efforts regarding microbial MetAPs.

  12. Chemistry and Biological Activities of Flavonoids: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the research on flavonoids from plant sources because of their versatile health benefits reported in various epidemiological studies. Since flavonoids are directly associated with human dietary ingredients and health, there is need to evaluate structure and function relationship. The bioavailability, metabolism, and biological activity of flavonoids depend upon the configuration, total number of hydroxyl groups, and substitution of functional groups about their nuclear structure. Fruits and vegetables are the main dietary sources of flavonoids for humans, along with tea and wine. Most recent researches have focused on the health aspects of flavonoids for humans. Many flavonoids are shown to have antioxidative activity, free radical scavenging capacity, coronary heart disease prevention, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities, while some flavonoids exhibit potential antiviral activities. In plant systems, flavonoids help in combating oxidative stress and act as growth regulators. For pharmaceutical purposes cost-effective bulk production of different types of flavonoids has been made possible with the help of microbial biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of flavonoids, their beneficial roles in human health, and significance in plants as well as their microbial production. PMID:24470791

  13. Combination Chemistry: Structure-Activity Relationships of Novel Psychoactive Cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Marusich, Julie A; Thomas, Brian F

    2016-10-18

    Originally developed as research tools for use in structure-activity relationship studies, synthetic cannabinoids contributed to significant scientific advances in the cannabinoid field. Unfortunately, a subset of these compounds was diverted for recreational use beginning in the early 2000s. As these compounds were banned, they were replaced with additional synthetic cannabinoids with increasingly diverse chemical structures. This chapter focuses on integration of recent results with those covered in previous reviews. Whereas most of the early compounds were derived from the prototypic naphthoylindole JWH-018, currently popular synthetic cannabinoids include tetramethylcyclopropyl ketones and indazole-derived cannabinoids (e.g., AB-PINACA, AB-CHMINACA). Despite their structural differences, psychoactive synthetic cannabinoids bind with high affinity to CB1 receptors in the brain and, when tested, have been shown to activate these receptors and to produce a characteristic profile of effects, including suppression of locomotor activity, antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-like discriminative stimulus effects in mice. When they have been tested, synthetic cannabinoids are often found to be more efficacious at activation of the CB1 receptor and more potent in vivo. Further, their chemical alteration by thermolysis during use and their uncertain stability and purity may result in exposure to degradants that differ from the parent compound contained in the original product. Consequently, while their intoxicant effects may be similar to those of THC, use of synthetic cannabinoids may be accompanied by unpredicted, and sometimes harmful, effects.

  14. Chemistry and biological activities of flavonoids: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashank; Pandey, Abhay K

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the research on flavonoids from plant sources because of their versatile health benefits reported in various epidemiological studies. Since flavonoids are directly associated with human dietary ingredients and health, there is need to evaluate structure and function relationship. The bioavailability, metabolism, and biological activity of flavonoids depend upon the configuration, total number of hydroxyl groups, and substitution of functional groups about their nuclear structure. Fruits and vegetables are the main dietary sources of flavonoids for humans, along with tea and wine. Most recent researches have focused on the health aspects of flavonoids for humans. Many flavonoids are shown to have antioxidative activity, free radical scavenging capacity, coronary heart disease prevention, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities, while some flavonoids exhibit potential antiviral activities. In plant systems, flavonoids help in combating oxidative stress and act as growth regulators. For pharmaceutical purposes cost-effective bulk production of different types of flavonoids has been made possible with the help of microbial biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of flavonoids, their beneficial roles in human health, and significance in plants as well as their microbial production.

  15. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect. PMID:25874251

  16. Insight in the chemistry of laser-activated dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Verheyen, Jeroen; Diachuk, Andrii; Verheyen, Peter; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Keulemans, Filip; De Bruyne, Mieke; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect.

  17. [Research progress of chemistry and anti-cancer activities of natural products from Chinese Garcinia plants].

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Wei; Tan, Hong-Sheng; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2014-02-01

    Garcinia plants are one of the rich sources of natural xanthones and benzophenones which have attracted a great deal of attention from the scientists in the fields of chemistry and pharmacology. Recently, many structurally unique constituents with various bioactivities, especially anti-tumor activity, have been isolated from Garcinia plants. This concise review focused on the anti-cancer activity natural products isolated from Chinese Garcinia plants, and the research finding by authors and collaborators over the past several years were cited.

  18. Weapons in disguise--activating mechanisms and protecting group chemistry in nature.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Jason C; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-11-22

    Bioactive natural products often possess uniquely functionalized structures with unusual modes of action; however, the natural product itself is not always the active species. We discuss molecules that draw on protecting group chemistry or else require activation to unmask reactive centers, illustrating that nature is not only a source of complex structures but also a guide for elegant chemical transformations which provides ingenious chemical solutions for drug delivery.

  19. Site-specific protein labeling with PRIME and chelation-assisted Click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Uttamapinant, Chayasith; Sanchez, Mateo I.; Liu, Daniel S.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; White, Katharine A.; Grecian, Scott; Clarke, Scott; Gee, Kyle R.; Ting, Alice Y.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes an efficient method to site-specifically label cell-surface or purified proteins with chemical probes in two steps: PRobe Incorporation Mediated by Enzymes (PRIME) followed by chelation-assisted copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). In the PRIME step, Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase site-specifically attaches a picolyl azide derivative to a 13-amino acid recognition sequence that has been genetically fused onto the protein of interest. Proteins bearing picolyl azide are chemoselectively derivatized with an alkyne-probe conjugate by chelation-assisted CuAAC in the second step. We describe herein the optimized protocols to synthesize picolyl azide, perform PRIME labeling, and achieve CuAAC derivatization of picolyl azide on live cells, fixed cells, and purified proteins. Reagent preparations, including synthesis of picolyl azide probes and expression of lipoic acid ligase, take 12 d, while the procedure to perform site-specific picolyl azide ligation and CuAAC on cells or on purified proteins takes 40 min-3 h. PMID:23887180

  20. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  1. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  2. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  3. New insights into the chemistry and antioxidant activity of coumarins.

    PubMed

    Torres, Fernando Cidade; Brucker, Natália; Andrade, Saulo Fernandes; Kawano, Daniel Fabio; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Poser, Gilsane Lino von; Eifler-Lima, Vera Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Coumarins are considered to be privileged structures due to their broad range of biological properties, including anticoagulant, anti-neurodegenerative, antioxidant, anticancer and antimicrobial activities. These interesting properties of coumarins can be ascribed to the chemical attributes of the 2H-chromen-2-one core; its aromatic ring can establish a series of hydrophobic, π-π, CH-π and cation-π interactions, and the two oxygen atoms in the lactone ring may hydrogen-bond to a series of amino acid residues in different classes of enzymes and receptors. Additionally, the double bond in the lactone helps to make the entire system planar, allows charge delocalization between the carbonyl group of the lactone and the aromatic ring and confers the characteristic fluorescence of this class of compounds, which can be explained by their preventing the trans-cis transformation of the double bond under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. It is the possibility of radical delocalization in the 2H-chromen-2-one nucleus that makes most of the coumarins good antioxidants by acting as free radical scavengers, although some coumarins (mainly hydroxycoumarins) may also prevent the formation of free radicals by chelating metal ions. In this review, we provide a systematic analysis of the most important aspects surrounding the development of coumarins as antioxidants. Our analysis includes the synthesis of some complex antioxidant coumarins, strategies for structural modification to improve their antioxidant activities, qualitative/ quantitative structure-antioxidant relationships studies and the main in vitro assays used to evaluate their antioxidant properties.

  4. Electrostatic activation of prebiotic chemistry in substellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Diver, D. A.; Rimmer, P. B.

    2014-04-01

    Charged dust grains in the atmospheres of exoplanets may play a key role in the formation of prebiotic molecules, necessary to the origin of life. Dust grains submerged in an atmospheric plasma become negatively charged and attract a flux of ions that are accelerated from the plasma. The energy of the ions upon reaching the grain surface may be sufficient to overcome the activation energy of particular chemical reactions that would be unattainable via ion and neutral bombardment from classical, thermal excitation. As a result, prebiotic molecules or their precursors could be synthesized on the surface of dust grains that form clouds in exoplanetary atmospheres. This paper investigates the energization of the plasma ions, and the dependence on the plasma electron temperature, in the atmospheres of substellar objects such as gas giant planets. Calculations show that modest electron temperatures of ~1 eV (~104 K) are enough to accelerate ions to sufficient energies that exceed the activation energies required for the formation of formaldehyde, ammonia, hydrogen cyanide and the amino acid glycine.

  5. Structure-based drug design: exploring the proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Zürcher, Martina; Diederich, François

    2008-06-20

    The proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites is central for increasing binding activity and selectivity of hits and leads in medicinal chemistry. In our structure-based design approach toward the generation of potent enzyme inhibitors, we encountered a variety of challenges in gaining suitable binding affinity from the occupation of such pockets. We summarize them here for the first time. A fluorine scan of tricyclic thrombin inhibitors led to the discovery of favorable orthogonal dipolar C-F...CO interactions. Efficient cation-pi interactions were established in the S4 pocket of factor Xa, another serine protease from the blood coagulation cascade. Changing from mono- to bisubstrate inhibitors of catechol O-methyltransferase, a target in the L-Dopa-based treatment of Parkinson's disease, enabled the full exploitation of a previously unexplored hydrophobic pocket. Conformational preorganization of a pocket at an enzyme active site is crucial for harvesting binding affinity. This is demonstrated for two enzymes from the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, IspE and IspF, which are pursued as antimalarial targets. Disrupting crystallographically defined water networks on the way into a pocket might cost all of the binding free enthalpy gained from its occupation, as revealed in studies with tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, a target against shigellosis. Investigations of the active site of plasmepsin II, another antimalarial target, showed that principles for proper apolar cavity filling, originally developed for synthetic host-guest systems, are also applicable to enzyme environments.

  6. Trench water-soil chemistry and interactions at the Maxey Flats Site

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, A. J.; Czyscinski, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    This report is part of an overall program designed to provide an understanding of and to monitor the behavior of existing low-level sites. This investigation will provide source term data for radionuclides and other solutes in trench waters and will describe the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the geochemical system that controls radionuclide movement. General conclusions can be made from the data in terms of source term information to be used in modeling efforts, as well as processes which may affect radionuclide migration. Trench waters are complex anoxic chemical systems which require more extensive investigation to assess their role in radionuclide retention and mobilization. No overall systematic changes in the disposal site trenches were observed during the brief sampling interval. However, changes in some radionuclide and cation concentrations were observed in several trenches. Numerous organic compounds were identified in trench waters at Maxey Flats, some of which have the potential for chelation with radionuclides. The presence of radionuclides and organic compounds in wells UB1 and UB1-A and in nearby trenches indicates communication between the wells and trench water leachates by subsurface migration. Radionuclides were also measured in the new experimental trench dug parallel to trench 27. Aerobic, anaerobic, sulfate reducing, denitrifying, and methanogenic bacteria are present in the leachate samples, and are able to grow anaerobically in trench leachates. Experimental results indicate that the observed sorption K/sub d/ is a function of both solid and liquid phase compositional variations as well as contact time. The observation that e lowest K/sub d/ results are observed with anoxic trench waters and ultrasonicated soils points to the need to use site specific materials and experimental conditions which simulate in situ conditions as closely as possible.

  7. Solid-State Chemistry on the Nanoscale: Ion Transport through Interstitial Sites or Vacancies?

    PubMed

    Bothe, Cornelia; Kornowski, Andreas; Tornatzky, Hans; Schmidtke, Christian; Lange, Holger; Maultzsch, Janina; Weller, Horst

    2015-11-16

    How can ion-exchange process occur in nanocrystals without the size and shape changing and why is the ion transport much faster than in classical interdiffusion processes in macrocrystalline solids? We have investigated these processes at the molecular level by means of high-resolution and analytical electron microscopy in temperature-dependent kinetic experiments for several model reactions. The results clearly show a diffusion process that proceeds exclusively through the interstitial lattice positions with a subsequent "kick out" to remove individual ions from lattice sites without the formation of vacancies. This mechanism has not been observed in nanocrystalline systems before.

  8. Amazon acai: chemistry and biological activities: a review.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Klenicy Kazumy de Lima; Pereira, Luiz Felipe Ravazi; Lamarão, Carlos Victor; Lima, Emerson Silva; da Veiga-Junior, Valdir Florêncio

    2015-07-15

    Acai (acai or assai) is one of the Amazon's most popular functional foods and widely used in the world. There are many benefits to its alleged use in the growing market for nutraceuticals. The acai extracts have a range of polyphenolic components with antioxidant properties, some of those present in greater quantity are orientin, isoorientin and vanillic acid, as well as anthocyanins cyanidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside. The presence of these substances is linked mainly to the antioxidant, anti- inflammatory, anti-proliferative and cardioprotective activities. Importantly, there are two main species of the Euterpe genus which produce acai. There are several differences between them but they are still quite unknown, from literature to producers and consumers. In this review are highlighted the chemical composition, botanical aspects, pharmacological, marketing and nutrition of these species based on studies published in the last five years in order to unify the current knowledge and dissimilarities between them.

  9. Soluble salts at the Phoenix Lander site, Mars: A reanalysis of the Wet Chemistry Laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, J. D.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2014-07-01

    The Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) on the Phoenix Mars Scout Lander analyzed soils for soluble ions and found Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, Cl-, SO42-, and ClO4-. The salts that gave rise to these ions can be inferred using aqueous equilibrium models; however, model predictions are sensitive to the initial solution composition. This is problematic because the WCL data is noisy and many different ion compositions are possible within error bounds. To better characterize ion concentrations, we reanalyzed WCL data using improvements to original analyses, including Kalman optimal smoothing and ion-pair corrections. Our results for Rosy Red are generally consistent with previous analyses, except that Ca2+ and Cl- concentrations are lower. In contrast, ion concentrations in Sorceress 1 and Sorceress 2 are significantly different from previous analyses. Using the more robust Rosy Red WCL analysis, we applied equilibrium models to determine salt compositions within the error bounds of the reduced data. Modeling with FREZCHEM predicts that WCL solutions evolve Ca-Mg-ClO4-rich compositions at low temperatures. These unusual compositions are likely influenced by limitations in the experimental data used to parameterize FREZCHEM. As an alternative method to evaluate salt assemblages, we employed a chemical divide model based on the eutectic temperatures of salts. Our chemical divide model predicts that the most probable salts in order of mass abundance are MgSO4·11H2O (meridianiite), MgCO3·nH2O, Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O, NaClO4·2H2O, KClO4, NaCl·2H2O (hydrohalite), and CaCO3 (calcite). If ClO3- is included in the chemical divide model, then NaClO3 precipitates instead of NaClO4·2H2O and Mg(ClO3)2·6H2O precipitates in addition to Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O. These salt assemblages imply that at least 1.3 wt.% H2O is bound in the soil, noting that we cannot account for water in hydrated insoluble salts or deliquescent brines. All WCL solutions within error bounds precipitate Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O and/or Mg

  10. Biotic interactions mediate the influence of bird colonies on vegetation and soil chemistry at aggregation sites.

    PubMed

    Natusch, Daniel James Deans; Lyons, Jessica Ann; Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Colonial-nesting organisms can strongly alter the chemical and biotic conditions around their aggregation sites, with cascading impacts on other components of the ecosystem. In tropical Australia, Metallic Starlings (Aplonis metallica) nest in large colonies far above the forest canopy, in emergent trees. The ground beneath those trees is open, in stark contrast to the dense foliage all around. We surveyed the areas beneath 27 colony trees (and nearby randomly chosen trees lacking bird colonies) to quantify the birds' impacts on soil and vegetation characteristics, and to test alternative hypotheses about the proximate mechanisms responsible for the lack of live vegetation beneath colony trees. Nutrient levels were greatly elevated beneath colony trees (especially, those with larger colonies), potentially reaching levels toxic to older trees. However, seedlings thrived in the soil from beneath colony trees. The primary mechanism generating open areas beneath colony trees is disturbance by scavengers (feral pigs and native Turkeys) that are attracted in vast numbers to these nutrient hotspots. Seedlings flourished within exclosures inaccessible to vertebrate herbivores, but were rapidly consumed if unprotected. Our results contrast with previous studies of colonies of seabirds on remote islands, where a lack of large terrestrial herbivores results in bird colonies encouraging rather than eliminating vegetation in areas close to the nesting site. In our continental study system, scavengers may rapidly dilute the spatial heterogeneity generated by the massive nutrient subsidy from bird colonies.

  11. Site-selective protein-modification chemistry for basic biology and drug development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, Nikolaus; da Cruz, Filipa P.; Boutureira, Omar; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Nature has produced intricate machinery to covalently diversify the structure of proteins after their synthesis in the ribosome. In an attempt to mimic nature, chemists have developed a large set of reactions that enable post-expression modification of proteins at pre-determined sites. These reactions are now used to selectively install particular modifications on proteins for many biological and therapeutic applications. For example, they provide an opportunity to install post-translational modifications on proteins to determine their exact biological roles. Labelling of proteins in live cells with fluorescent dyes allows protein uptake and intracellular trafficking to be tracked and also enables physiological parameters to be measured optically. Through the conjugation of potent cytotoxicants to antibodies, novel anti-cancer drugs with improved efficacy and reduced side effects may be obtained. In this Perspective, we highlight the most exciting current and future applications of chemical site-selective protein modification and consider which hurdles still need to be overcome for more widespread use.

  12. Ciprofloxacin adsorption on graphene and granular activated carbon: kinetics, isotherms, and effects of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuan; Tsang, Daniel C W; Chen, Feng; Li, Shiyu; Yang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly used antibiotic and widely detected in wastewaters and farmlands nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of next-generation adsorbent (graphene) and conventional adsorbent (granular activated carbon, GAC) for CIP removal. Batch experiments and characterization tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium isotherms, thermodynamic properties, and the influences of solution chemistry (pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter (NOM), and water sources). Compared to GAC, graphene showed significantly faster adsorption and reached equilibrium within 3 min, confirming the rapid access of CIP into the macroporous network of high surface area of graphene as revealed by the Brunner-Emmet-Teller measurements analysis. The kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second-order model, suggesting the importance of the initial CIP concentration related to surface site availability of graphene. The adsorption isotherm on graphene followed Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 323 mg/g, which was higher than other reported carbonaceous adsorbents. The CIP adsorption was thermodynamically favourable on graphene and primarily occurred through π - π interaction, according to the FTIR spectroscopy. While the adsorption capacity of graphene decreased with increasing solution pH due to the speciation change of CIP, the adverse effects of ionic strength (0.01-0.5 mol L(-1)), presence of NOM (5 mg L⁻¹), and different water sources (river water or drinking water) were less significant on graphene than GAC. These results indicated that graphene can serve as an alternative adsorbent for CIP removal in commonly encountered field conditions, if proper separation and recovery is available in place.

  13. Computational Chemistry Approach to Interpret the Crystal Violet Adsorption on Golbasi Lignite Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depci, Tolga; Sarikaya, Musa; Prisbrey, Keith A.; Yucel, Aysegul

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, adsorption mechanism of Crystal Violet (CV) dye from the aqueous solution on the activated carbon prepared from Golbasi lignite was explained and interpreted by a computational chemistry approach and experimental studies. Molecular dynamic simulations and Ab initio frontier orbital analysis indicated relatively high energy and electron transfer processes during adsorption, and molecular dynamics simulations showed CV dye molecules moving around on the activated carbon surface after adsorption, facilitating penetration into cracks and pores. The experimental results supported to molecular dynamic simulation and showed that the monolayer coverage occurred on the activated carbon surface and each CV dye ion had equal sorption activation energy.

  14. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  15. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  16. Impact mineralogy and chemistry of the cretaceous-tertiary boundary at DSDP site 576

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostwick, Jennifer A.; Kyte, Frank T.

    1993-01-01

    We have identified the K/T boundary in pelagic clay sediments from cores at DSDP Site 576 in the western North Pacific. Detailed geochemical and trace mineralogical analyses of this boundary section are in progress and initial results indicate similarities and differences relative to the only other clay core investigated in detail; DSDP Site 596, a locality in the western South Pacific. Peak Ir concentrations of 13 ng/g in DSDP Hole 576B are virtually identical with those observed in the South Pacific, but in the North Pacific this peak is much narrower and the integrated Ir fluence of 85 ng cm(exp -2) is 4 times lower (320 in Hole 596). Of the 34 elements measured, only Ir and Cr were found to have anomalous concentrations in K/T boundary samples. Trace mineral residues were obtained by washing away clays and sequential chemical leaches (including HF) to remove typical hydrogenous and biogenous sediment components (e.g., zeolites and radiolarian opal). We attempted to quantitatively recover the entire trace mineral assemblage for grains greater than 30 micrometers in diameter. Our mineral residues were dominated by two phases: quartz and magnesioferrite spinel. Other non-opaque mineral grains we have positively identified were trace K-feldspar, plagioclase, corundum, and muscovite. Of these only K-feldspar exhibited planar deformation features (PDF). We have not found abundant plagioclase, as in the South Pacific suggesting that this phase was either not preserved in the North Pacific, or that in the south, it has a non-impact (i.e., volcanic) source. PDF in quartz were commonly obscured by secondary overgrowths on the surfaces of quartz grains, presumably from diagenetic reprecipitation of silica dissolved from opaline radiolarian tests that are common in these sediments. However, careful examination revealed that most grains had multiple sets of PDF. Of the 133 quartz grains greater than 30 micrometers analyzed, 62 percent showed evidence of shock. The largest

  17. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  18. Vertical dynamics of the aquifer microbial community associated with groundwater chemistry in the artificial recharge site in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hee Sun; Hyun, Sung Pil; Kim, Boa; Shin, Doyun; Ha, Kyoochul

    2014-05-01

    Artificial groundwater recharge offers an opportunity to better manage groundwater resources by storing water in aquifers and increasing the amount of groundwater available for abstraction during high demand periods. It is important to understand the linkage of microbial ecology to groundwater chemistry to assess changes in groundwater quality caused by artificial groundwater recharge. In this study, we investigated how the structure and diversity of this subsurface microbial community correlates with and impacts upon groundwater chemistry. Groundwater samples at two different depths (10 and 33 m) were collected from three monitoring wells (MLW 1, MLW 2 and MLW 3) in the artificial groundwater recharge demonstration site in Changwon, Korea. The groundwater samples were filtered with 0.45 um membrane filters and then used for the anion and cation analysis. A 4L of each groundwater sample was immediately filtered with 0.2 um membrane filters and the filters were used for DNA extraction using Fast DNA Spin Kit for soil (MP Bio, USA). Further molecular work processes including pyrosequencing were carried out at Chunlab, Inc. (Seoul, Korea). Pyrosequencing results showed all major phyla were OD 1, OD3, and OD 11 in shallow groundwater samples while Proteobacteria (β-proteobacteria and δ-proteobacteria) and Bacterioidetes were dominant phyla in deep groundwater. The Shannon diversity index indicated that the microbial community was much more diverse in shallow groundwater than in deep groundwater. Heat map and hierarchical cluster analysis based on the relative abundance of OTUs at genus level showed a clear distinction between shallow and deep groundwater. Differences in the vertical community structure were driven by the major species such as Sufuicurvum sp., Pseudomonas sp., Acidiferrobacter sp., Gallionella sp., and Ferribacterium sp. The results show that several distinct factors such as iron and sulfate concentration control the vertical composition of microbial

  19. Surface chemistry on small ruthenium nanoparticles: evidence for site selective reactions and influence of ligands.

    PubMed

    Novio, Fernando; Monahan, Daniele; Coppel, Yannick; Antorrena, Guillermo; Lecante, Pierre; Philippot, Karine; Chaudret, Bruno

    2014-01-27

    The reactivity of two classes of ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) of small size, either sterically stabilized by a polymer (polyvinylpyrrolidone, PVP) or electronically stabilized by a ligand (bisdiphenylphosphinobutane, dppb) was tested towards standard reactions, namely CO oxidation, CO2 reduction and styrene hydrogenation. The aim of the work was to identify the sites of reactivity on the nanoparticles and to study how the presence of ancillary ligands can influence the course of these catalytic reactions by using NMR and IR spectroscopies. It was found that CO oxidation proceeds at room temperature (RT) on Ru NPs but that the system deactivates rapidly in the absence of ligands because of the formation of RuO2. In the presence of ligands, the reaction involves exclusively the bridging CO groups and no bulk oxidation is observed at RT under catalytic conditions. The reverse reaction, CO2 reduction, is achieved at 120 °C in the presence of H2 and leads to CO, which coordinates exclusively in a bridging mode, hence evidencing the competition between hydrides and CO for coordination on Ru NPs. The effect of ligands localized on the surface is also evidenced in catalytic reactions. Thus, styrene is slowly hydrogenated at RT by the two systems Ru/PVP and Ru/dppb, first into ethylbenzene and then into ethylcyclohexane. Selectively poisoning the nanoparticles with bridging CO groups leads to catalysts that are only able to reduce the vinyl group of styrene whereas a full poisoning with both terminal and bridging CO groups leads to inactive catalysts. These results are interpreted in terms of location of the ligands on the particles surface, and evidence site selectivity for both CO oxidation and arene hydrogenation.

  20. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  1. Water quality, organic chemistry of sediment, and biological conditions of streams near an abandoned wood-preserving plant site at Jackson, Tennessee. Water resources investigations report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradfield, A.D.; Flexner, N.M.; Webster, D.A.

    1993-12-31

    An investigation of the water quality, organic chemistry of sediment, and biological conditions of streams near an abandoned wood-preserving plant site at Jackson, Tennessee, was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey during December 1990. The objectives of the study were to assess the extent of possible contamination of water and adverse affects on biota in the streams resulting from creosote-related discharge originating of this Superfund site.

  2. High-pressure synthesis, crystal chemistry and physics of perovskites with small cations at the A site.

    PubMed

    Belik, Alexei A; Yi, Wei

    2014-04-23

    ABO3 perovskites with small cations at the A site (A = Sc(3+), In(3+) and Mn(2+) and B = Al(3+) and transition metals) are reviewed. They extend the corresponding families of perovskites with A(3+) = Y, La-Lu, and Bi and A(2+) = Cd, Ca, Sr and Ba and exhibit the largest structural distortions. As a result of these large distortions, they show, in many cases, distinct structural and magnetic properties. These are manifested in: B-site-ordered monoclinic structures of ScMnO3 and 'InMnO3'; an unusual superstructure of ScRhO3 and InRhO3; antiferromagnetic ground states and multiferroic properties of Sc2NiMnO6 and In2NiMnO6; two magnetic transitions in ScCrO3 and InCrO3 with very close transition temperatures; a Pnma-to-P-1 structural transition and k = (½, 0, ½) magnetic ordering in ScVO3; and incommensurate magnetic ordering of Mn(2+) spins in metallic MnVO3. A large number of simple ScBO3, InBO3 and MnBO3 perovskites has not been synthesized yet, and the number of experimental and theoretical works on each known ScBO3, InBO3 and MnBO3 perovskites counts to only one or two (except for ScAlO3). The synthesis, crystal chemistry and physics of perovskites with small cations at the A site is an emerging field in perovskite science.

  3. Teaching chemistry concepts using differentiated instruction via tiered labs and activity menus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Betsy C.

    Today's high school classrooms are composed of students with different levels of knowing and ways of understanding. Differentiating the type of work that they are asked to do to achieve the same objective is one way to meet each student's special circumstances on a somewhat equal playing field. By doing so, students are being challenged at their level rather than just blindly going through the same motions that they see others around them doing. Offering students choices to better understand a concept places the student in the driver seat of their educational journey. The purpose of this research project was to design and implement choice activities within the chemistry classroom to more appropriately teach and assess chemistry concepts and assess understanding of those concepts. These choice activities included tiered-laboratory investigations and activity menus. This project was implemented over the course of two trimesters in a high school chemistry classroom. Topics covered included calculating and interpreting density and applying significant figures, calculating and interpreting percent composition with the mole concept, and stoichiometry. The effectiveness of the tiered-labs and activity menus were evaluated using pre and post test comparisons, student surveys, and general in-class observations. Gains in conceptual understanding and student motivation were documented. These findings indicated that allowing choice and leveling of skills to achieve the same conceptual understanding promoted student learning and the overall enjoyment and motivation for learning.

  4. Environmental control technology survey of selected US strip mining sites. Volume 2B. Alabama. Water quality impacts and overburden chemistry of Alabama study site

    SciTech Connect

    Henricks, J D; Bogner, J E; Olsen, R D; Schubert, J P; Sobek, A A; Johnson, D O

    1980-05-01

    As part of a program to examine the ability of existing control technologies to meet federal guidelines for the quality of aqueous effluents from coal mines, an intensive study of water, coal, and overburden chemistry was conducted at a surface coal mine in Alabama from May 1976 through July 1977. Sampling sites included the pit sump, a stream downgrade from the mine, the discharge from the water treatment facility, and a small stream outside the mine drainage. Water samples were collected every two weeks by Argonne subcontractors at the Alabama Geological Survey and analysed for the following parameters: specific conductance, pH, temperature, acidity, bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, sulfate, and 20 metals. Analysis of the coal and overburden shows that no potential acid problem exists at this mine. Water quality is good in both streams sampled, and high levels of dissolved elements are found only in water collected from the pit sump. The mine effluent is in compliance with Office of Surface Mining water quality standards.

  5. S.E.A. Lab. Science Experiments and Activities. Marine Science for High School Students in Chemistry, Biology and Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Kathy, Ed.

    A series of science experiments and activities designed for secondary school students taking biology, chemistry, physics, physical science or marine science courses are outlined. Each of the three major sections--chemistry, biology, and physics--addresses concepts that are generally covered in those courses but incorporates aspects of marine…

  6. Silent and Vocal Students in a Large Active Learning Chemistry Classroom: Comparison of Performance and Motivational Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is becoming more prevalent in large science classrooms, and this study shows the impact on performance of being vocal during Socratic questioning in a General Chemistry course. 800 college students over a two year period were given a pre and post-test using the Chemistry Concept Reasoning Test. The pre-test results showed that…

  7. Textbook Questions in Context-Based and Traditional Chemistry Curricula Analysed from a Content Perspective and a Learning Activities Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    In this study, questions in context-based and traditional chemistry textbooks were analysed from two perspectives that are at the heart of chemistry curricula reforms: a content perspective and a learning activities perspective. To analyse these textbook questions, we developed an instrument for each perspective. In total, 971 textbook questions…

  8. Assessment of water chemistry, habitat, and benthic macroinvertebrates at selected stream-quality monitoring sites in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reif, Andrew G.

    2004-01-01

    Biological, chemical, and habitat data have been collected from a network of sites in Chester County, Pa., from 1970 to 2003 to assess stream quality. Forty sites in 6 major stream basins were sampled between 1998 and 2000. Biological data were used to determine levels of impairment in the benthic-macroinvertebrate community in Chester County streams and relate the impairment, in conjunction with chemical and habitat data, to overall stream quality. Biological data consisted of benthic-macroinvertebrate samples that were collected annually in the fall. Water-chemistry samples were collected and instream habitat was assessed in support of the biological sampling. Most sites in the network were designated as nonimpacted or slightly impacted by human activities or extreme climatic conditions on the basis of biological-metric analysis of benthic-macroinvertebrate data. Impacted sites were affected by factors, such as nutrient enrichment, erosion and sedimentation, point discharges, and droughts and floods. Streams in the Schuylkill River, Delaware River, and East Branch Brandywine Creek Basins in Chester County generally had low nutrient concentrations, except in areas affected by wastewater- treatment discharges, and stream habitat that was affected by erosion. Streams in the West Branch Brandywine, Christina, Big Elk, and Octoraro Creek Basins in Chester County generally had elevated nutrient concentrations and streambottom habitat that was affected by sediment deposition. Macroinvertebrate communities identified in samples from French Creek, Pigeon Creek (Schuylkill River Basin), and East Branch Brandywine Creek at Glenmoore consistently indicate good stream conditions and were the best conditions measured in the network. Macroinvertebrate communities identified in samples from Trout Creek (site 61), West Branch Red Clay Creek (site 55) (Christina River Basin), and Valley Creek near Atglen (site 34) (Octoraro Creek Basin) indicated fair to poor stream conditions and

  9. An Active-Learning Assignment Requiring Pharmacy Students to Write Medicinal Chemistry Examination Questions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To implement and assess the effectiveness of an assignment requiring doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students to write examination questions for the medicinal chemistry sections of a pharmacotherapeutics course. Design. Students were divided into groups of 5-6 and given detailed instructions and grading rubrics for writing multiple-choice examination questions on medicinal chemistry topics. The compiled student-written questions for each examination were provided to the entire class as a study aid. Approximately 5% of the student-written questions were used in course examinations. Assessment. Student appreciation of and performance in the medicinal chemistry portion of the course was significantly better than that of the previous year’s class. Also, students’ responses on a qualitative survey instrument indicated that the assignment provided students’ guidance on which concepts to focus on, helped them retain knowledge better, and fostered personal exploration of the content, which led to better performance on examinations. Conclusion. Adding an active-learning assignment in which students write examination questions for the medicinal chemistry portion of a pharmacotherapeutics course was an effective means of increasing students engagement in the class and knowledge of the course material. PMID:22919088

  10. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  11. Interpreting detailed brine chemistry changes during early periods of in-zone CO2 storage at Cranfield site, Mississippi, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, A. Y.; Islam, A.; Lu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical reactions can play important role on the long-term geological storage of CO2 in sites where the target formations have reactive minerals. Although the use of batch models (experimental or theoretical) is expedient, it leaves questions about how to interpret the results from the context of field scale injection. The goal of this study is to investigate changes in fluid compositions using a detailed reactive transport model. Most published CO2 geochemical studies tend to consider only a small number of components because of expensive calculations and therefore simultaneous mobility of large number of heavy metals is not clearly known. In this study we present results of coupled multiphase, multicomponent reactive transport simulations of Cranfield site, Mississipi, USA at relatively fine scale, which are obtained using the parallel PFLOTRAN code. The geochemical system consists of 22 primary or basis species, in-situ CO2 and O2 gaseous components, and 5 minerals. The number of secondary elements is 37, representing very simple to complex mineralizations occurred simultaneously in saline formation (1.81 molality). The fluid chemical compositions were measured from production fluids and mineral composition of the formation was obtained from XRD analysis of core samples. The results show brine chemistry changes in the reservoir and shed insights on the need to monitor the mobility of heavy metals such as Mg, Ca, Al, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ba, and Cd. The study provides simultaneous potential mobile inventory of these metals in the storage formations and warns possible risk through leakage into overlying zone. From storage point of view we also aim to observe the sensitivity of aforementioned constituents. Our results show pH drop from 6.91 to 3.5 and relatively small changes in HCO3- and Fe concentrations. However aqueous Ca and Al increase by orders of magnitude. The detailed geochemical effect shows trapping efficiency increased by few percent. The brine

  12. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  13. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  14. A review on biological sources, chemistry and pharmacological activities of pinostrobin.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neeraj K; Jaiswal, Gaurav; Bhutani, Kamlesh K

    2016-09-01

    Pinostrobin, a dietary bioflavonoid discovered more than 6 decades ago in the heart-wood of pine (Pinus strobus), has depicted many pharmacological activities including anti-viral, anti-oxidant, anti-leukaemic, anti-inflammatory and anti-aromatase activities. It is an inhibitor of sodium channel and Ca(2+) signalling pathways and also inhibits intestinal smooth muscle contractions. In spite of the fact that pinostrobin has an application as functional foods, till-to-date no comprehensive review on pinostrobin has been carried out. Hence, the present review deals with the biological sources, chemistry and pharmacological activities of pinostrobin.

  15. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-01-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  16. Particulate matter chemistry and dynamics in the Twilight Zone at VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, James K.B.; Wood, T.J.

    2008-03-25

    Understanding particle dynamics in the 'Twilight Zone' is critical to prediction of the ocean's carbon cycle. As part of the VERTIGO (VERtical Transformations In the Global Ocean) project, this rarely sampled regime extending from the base of the euphotic layer to 1000 m, was characterized by double-paired day/night Multiple Unit Large Volume in-situ Filtration System (MULVFS) deployments and by {approx}100 high-frequency CTD/transmissometer/turbidity sensor profiles. VERTIGO studies lasting three weeks, contrasted oligotrophic station ALOHA (22.75{sup o}N 158{sup o}W), sampled in June-July 2004, with a biologically productive location (47{sup o}N 161{sup o}E) near station K2 in the Oyashio, occupied July-August 2005. Profiles of major and minor particulate components (C{sub org}, N, P, Ca, Si, Sr, Ba, Mn) in <1, 1-51, and >51 {micro}m size fractions, in-water optics, neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) fluxes, and zooplankton data were intercompared. MULVFS total C{sub org} and C-Star particle beam attenuation coefficient (C{sub P}) were consistently related at both sites with a 27 {micro}M m{sup -1} conversion factor. 26 At K2, C{sub P} profiles further showed a multitude of transient spikes throughout the water column and spike abundance profiles closely paralleled the double peaked abundance profiles of zooplankton. Also at K2, copepods contributed {approx}40% and 10%, night and day, respectively to >51 {micro}m C{sub org} of MULVFS samples in the mixed layer, but few copepods were collected in deeper waters; however, non-swimming radiolarians were quantitatively sampled. A recent hypothesis regarding POC differences between pumps and bottles is examined in light of these results. Particulate >51 {micro}m C{sub org}, N, and P at both ALOHA and K2 showed strong attenuation with depth at both sites. Notable at ALOHA were unusually high levels of >51 {micro}m Sr (up to 4 nM) in the mixed layer, a reflection of high abundances of SrSO{sub 4} precipitating

  17. Particulate matter chemistry and dynamics in the twilight zone at VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, James K. B.; Wood, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding particle dynamics in the 'Twilight Zone' is critical to prediction of the ocean's carbon cycle. As part of the VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) project, this rarely sampled regime extending from the base of the euphotic layer to 1000 m, was characterized by double-paired day/night Multiple Unit Large Volume in-situ Filtration System (MULVFS) deployments and by ˜100 high-frequency CTD/transmissometer/turbidity sensor profiles. VERTIGO studies lasting 3 weeks, contrasted oligotrophic station ALOHA (22.75°N 158°W), sampled in June-July 2004, with a biologically productive location (47 °N 161°E) near station K2 in the Oyashio, occupied July-August 2005. Profiles of major and minor particulate components (C org, N, P, Ca, Si, Sr, Ba, Mn) in <1, 1-51, and >51 μm size fractions, in-water optics, neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) fluxes, and zooplankton data were intercompared. MULVFS total C org and C-Star particle beam attenuation coefficient ( C P) were consistently related at both sites with a 27 μM m -1 conversion factor. At K2, C P profiles further showed a multitude of transient spikes throughout the water column and spike abundance profiles closely paralleled the double peaked abundance profiles of zooplankton. Also at K2, copepods contributed ˜40% and 10%, night and day, respectively to >51 μm C org of MULVFS samples in the mixed layer, but few copepods were collected in deeper waters; however, non-swimming radiolarians were quantitatively sampled. A recent hypothesis regarding POC differences between pumps and bottles is examined in light of these results. Particulate >51 μm C org, N, and P at both ALOHA and K2 showed strong attenuation with depth at both sites. Notable at ALOHA were unusually high levels of >51 μm Sr (up to 4 nM) in the mixed layer, a reflection of high abundances of SrSO 4 precipitating Acantharia. Notable at K2 were major changes in water column inventories of many particulate components to 700 m

  18. Near-Atomic Three-Dimensional Mapping for Site-Specific Chemistry of 'Superbugs'.

    PubMed

    Adineh, Vahid R; Marceau, Ross K W; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing

    2016-11-09

    Emergence of multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria has caused a global health crisis and last-line class of antibiotics such as polymyxins are increasingly used. The chemical composition at the cell surface plays a key role in antibiotic resistance. Unlike imaging the cellular ultrastructure with well-developed electron microscopy, the acquisition of a high-resolution chemical map of the bacterial surface still remains a technological challenge. In this study, we developed an atom probe tomography (APT) analysis approach to acquire mass spectra in the pulsed-voltage mode and reconstructed the 3D chemical distribution of atoms and molecules in the subcellular domain at the near-atomic scale. Using focused ion beam (FIB) milling together with micromanipulation, site-specific samples were retrieved from a single cell of Acinetobacter baumannii prepared as needle-shaped tips with end radii less than 60 nm, followed by a nanoscale coating of silver in the order of 10 nm. The significantly elevated conductivity provided by the metallic coating enabled successful and routine field evaporation of the biological material, with all the benefits of pulsed-voltage APT. In parallel with conventional cryo-TEM imaging, our novel approach was applied to investigate polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant strains of A. baumannii after treatment of polymyxin B. Acquired atom probe mass spectra from the cell envelope revealed characteristic fragments of phosphocholine from the polymyxin-susceptible strain, but limited signals from this molecule were detected in the polymyxin-resistant strain. This study promises unprecedented capacity for 3D nanoscale imaging and chemical mapping of bacterial cells at the ultimate 3D spatial resolution using APT.

  19. Soil chemistry and pollution study of a closed landfill site at Ampar Tenang, Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd Adnan, Siti Nur Syahirah Binti; Yusoff, Sumiani; Piaw, Chua Yan

    2013-06-01

    A total of 20 landfills are located in State of Selangor, Malaysia. This includes the Ampar Tenang landfill site, which was closed on 26 January 2010. It was reported that the landfill has been upgraded to a level I type of sanitary classification. However, the dumpsite area is not being covered according to the classification. In addition, municipal solid waste was dumped directly on top of the unlined natural alluvium formation. This does not only contaminate surface and subsurface soils, but also initiates the potential risk of groundwater pollution. Based on previous studies, the Ampar Tenang soil has been proven to no longer be capable of preventing pollution migration. In this study, metal concentrations of soil samples up to 30 m depth were analyzed based on statistical analysis. It is very significant because research of this type has not been carried out before. The subsurface soils were significantly polluted by arsenic (As), lead (Pb), iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and aluminium (Al). As and Pb exceeded the safe limit values of 5.90 mg/kg and 31.00 mg/kg, respectively, based on Provincial Sediment Quality Guidelines for Metals and the Interim Sediment Quality Values. Furthermore, only Cu concentrations showed a significantly decreasing trend with increasing depth. Most metals were found on clay-type soils based on the cluster analysis method. Moreover, the analysis also differentiates two clusters: cluster I-Pb, As, zinc, Cu, manganese, calcium, sodium, magnesium, potassium and Fe; cluster II-Al. Different clustering may suggest a different contamination source of metals.

  20. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  1. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  2. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  3. The Active Site of Oligogalacturonate Lyase Provides Unique Insights into Cytoplasmic Oligogalacturonate β-Elimination*

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, D. Wade; Gilbert, Harry J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    Oligogalacturonate lyases (OGLs; now also classified as pectate lyase family 22) are cytoplasmic enzymes found in pectinolytic members of Enterobacteriaceae, such as the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. OGLs utilize a β-elimination mechanism to preferentially catalyze the conversion of saturated and unsaturated digalacturonate into monogalacturonate and the 4,5-unsaturated monogalacturonate-like molecule, 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate. To provide mechanistic insights into the specificity of this enzyme activity, we have characterized the OGL from Y. enterocolitica, YeOGL, on oligogalacturonides and determined its three-dimensional x-ray structure to 1.65 Å. The model contains a Mn2+ atom in the active site, which is coordinated by three histidines, one glutamine, and an acetate ion. The acetate mimics the binding of the uronate group of galactourono-configured substrates. These findings, in combination with enzyme kinetics and metal supplementation assays, provide a framework for modeling the active site architecture of OGL. This enzyme appears to contain a histidine for the abstraction of the α-proton in the −1 subsite, a residue that is highly conserved throughout the OGL family and represents a unique catalytic base among pectic active lyases. In addition, we present a hypothesis for an emerging relationship observed between the cellular distribution of pectate lyase folding and the distinct metal coordination chemistries of pectate lyases. PMID:20851883

  4. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  5. The impacts of anthropogenic emissions on the precipitation chemistry at an elevated site in North-eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Wai, Ka Ming; Gao, Jian; Liu, Xiaohuan; Wang, Tao; Wang, Wenxing

    Ninety precipitation samples were collected from 2004 to 2006 at the summit of the Mt. Tai in order to detect the impacts of regional sources of pollution on precipitation chemistry in the highly polluted North China Plains. The annual volume-weighted pH of the precipitation was found to be 4.7, in contrast to the less-acidic nature (pH>5.6) of precipitation in northern China reported in many past studies. Non-sea-salt (nss)-SO 42- (131.5 μeq L -1), NH 4+ (82.2 μeq L -1) and Ca 2+ (61.4 μeq L -1) were the most abundant species in precipitation. The wide range of the Cl -/Na + ratios (0.2-5.4) in precipitation implied the co-existence of Cl - enrichment and depletion. The nss-SO 42-, NO 3-, NH 4+, Ca 2+ and K + concentrations peaked in spring, but with the lowest acidity. The very strong correlations of Ca 2+ with nss-SO 42- and NO 3- suggested a significant uptake of nss-SO 42- and NO 3- on dust aerosol during spring. Samples with the lowest pH value (4.5) are associated with the stagnant air conditions. The nss-SO 42- and NH 4+ concentrations at Mt. Tai were the highest compared with those at the EANET, NADP and EMEP sites of similar elevations. With relatively high rainfall amount measured at our site, the high wet deposition of the major acidic/alkaline species exerted large loadings to the ecosystem. The associated impacts on agriculture, soil and aquatic systems should be investigated.

  6. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  7. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  8. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  9. Chemistry Is in the News: Taxonomy of authentic news media-based learning activities1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Rainer E.; Carson, Kathleen M.

    2005-09-01

    A brief history is given of approaches that aim at achieving a connectedness of the content of organic chemistry courses to real world issues. Recently, such approaches have relied more and more on online media resources, the tools of the Internet and the World Wide Web. We propose a six-level taxonomy of ‘authentic news media-based learning activities’ to provide a conceptual framework for the description and discussion of such approaches. The Chemistry Is in the News project was designed to allow students to draw explicit connections between the course content and real world issues in ways that engage the students in a full range of cognitive skills. The activities consisted in the study, creation, and peer review of news portfolios by student collaborative groups. A news portfolio consists of an authentic news article taken from the popular press with interpretive comments and questions.

  10. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents. PMID:25792812

  11. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents.

  12. Antiproliferative Activity of Polyether Antibiotic--Cinchona Alkaloid Conjugates Obtained via Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Skiera, Iwona; Antoszczak, Michał; Trynda, Justyna; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Boratyński, Przemysław; Kacprzak, Karol; Huczyński, Adam

    2015-10-01

    A series of eight new conjugates of salinomycin or monensin and Cinchona alkaloids were obtained by the Cu(I)-catalysed 1,3-dipolar Huisgen cycloaddition (click chemistry) of respective N-propargyl amides of salinomycin or monensin with four different Cinchona alkaloid derived azides. In vitro antiproliferative activity of these conjugates evaluated against three cancer cell lines (LoVo, LoVo/DX, HepG2) showed that four of the compounds exhibited high antiproliferative activity (IC50 below 3.00 μm) and appeared to be less toxic and more selective against normal cells than two standard anticancer drugs.

  13. The chemistry and biological activity of heterocycle-fused quinolinone derivatives: A review.

    PubMed

    Shiro, Tomoya; Fukaya, Takayuki; Tobe, Masanori

    2015-06-05

    Among all heterocycles, the heterocycle-fused quinolinone scaffold is one of the privileged structures in drug discovery as heterocycle-fused quinolinone derivatives exhibit various biological activities allowing them to act as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antidiabetic, and antipsychotic agents. This wide spectrum of biological activity has attracted a great deal of attention in the field of medicinal chemistry. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of the biological and pharmacological properties of various heterocycle-fused quinolinone scaffolds and discuss the synthetic methods of some of their derivatives.

  14. The Construction of Metal-Organic Framework with Active Backbones by the Utilization of Reticular Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunwoo

    With the principles of reticular chemistry, metal-organic frameworks with ultra-high porosity, chiral-recognition unit as a chiral stationary phase, metalloporhyrins for enhanced hydrogen adsorption and an intrinsic conductivity to form porous conductors, have been prepared. This dissertation presents how the principles of reticular chemistry were utilized to achieve in the preparations of metal-organic frameworks with a large surface area and active backbones. Through the simple isoreticular (having the same framework topology) expansion from MOF-177 composed with 1,3,5-tris(4'-carboxyphenyl-)benzene (BTB3-) as the strut; MOF-200 was prepared with 4,4',4"-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diy1))tribenzoic acid an extension from BTB3- by a phenylene unit to yield one of the most porous MOFs with a Langmuir surface area of 10,400 m2. and the lowest density of 0.22 cm3.g-1. A successful thermal polymerization reaction at 325 °C inside of the pores of highly porous MOF, MOF-177, was performed and verified the integrity of the MOF structure even after the thermal reaction. 1,4-Diphenylbutadiyne that is known to polymerize upon heating to form a conjugated backbone was impregnated via solution-diffusion into MOF-177 and then subsequently polymerized by heat to form polymer impregnated MOF-177. Characterization was carried out using powder X-ray diffraction and volumetric sorption analyzer. MOF-1020 with a linear quaterphenyl dicarboxylate-based strut was designed to contain a chiral bisbinaphthyl crown-ether moiety for alkyl ammonium resolution was precisely placed into a Zn4O(CO2)6-based cubic MOF structure. Unfortunately, the chiral resolution was not achieved due to the sensitivity and the pore environment of MOF-1020. However, an interesting phenomenon was observed, where the loss of crystallinity occurs upon solvent removal while the crystallites remain shiny and crystalline, but it readily is restored upon re-solvation of the crystallites. This rare

  15. Molybdenum and tungsten oxygen transferases--and functional diversity within a common active site motif.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Cotelesage, Julien J; George, Graham N

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are the only second and third-row transition elements with a known function in living organisms. The molybdenum and tungsten enzymes show common structural features, with the metal being bound by a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor called molybdopterin. They catalyze a variety of oxygen transferase reactions coupled with two-electron redox chemistry in which the metal cycles between the +6 and +4 oxidation states usually with water, either product or substrate, providing the oxygen. The functional roles filled by the molybdenum and tungsten enzymes are diverse; for example, they play essential roles in microbial respiration, in the uptake of nitrogen in green plants, and in human health. Together, the enzymes form a superfamily which is among the most prevalent known, being found in all kingdoms of life. This review discusses what is known of the active site structures and the mechanisms, together with some recent insights into the evolution of these important enzyme systems.

  16. Spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity in an aged creosote-contaminated site

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shinjini; Juottonen, Heli; Siivonen, Pauli; Lloret Quesada, Cosme; Tuomi, Pirjo; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Yrjälä, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of polluted sites via in situ bioremediation relies heavily on the indigenous microbes and their activities. Spatial heterogeneity of microbial populations, contaminants and soil chemical parameters on such sites is a major hurdle in optimizing and implementing an appropriate bioremediation regime. We performed a grid-based sampling of an aged creosote-contaminated site followed by geostatistical modelling to illustrate the spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity and to relate these patterns to the distribution of pollutants. Spatial distribution of bacterial groups unveiled patterns of niche differentiation regulated by patchy distribution of pollutants and an east-to-west pH gradient at the studied site. Proteobacteria clearly dominated in the hot spots of creosote pollution, whereas the abundance of Actinobacteria, TM7 and Planctomycetes was considerably reduced from the hot spots. The pH preferences of proteobacterial groups dominating in pollution could be recognized by examining the order and family-level responses. Acidobacterial classes came across as generalists in hydrocarbon pollution whose spatial distribution seemed to be regulated solely by the pH gradient. Although the community evenness decreased in the heavily polluted zones, basal respiration and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis rates were higher, indicating the adaptation of specific indigenous microbial populations to hydrocarbon pollution. Combining the information from the kriged maps of microbial and soil chemistry data provided a comprehensive understanding of the long-term impacts of creosote pollution on the subsurface microbial communities. This study also highlighted the prospect of interpreting taxa-specific spatial patterns and applying them as indicators or proxies for monitoring polluted sites. PMID:25105905

  17. Chemically active colloids near osmotic-responsive walls with surface-chemistry gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M. N.; Uspal, W. E.; Dietrich, S.

    2017-04-01

    Chemically active colloids move by creating gradients in the composition of the surrounding solution and by exploiting the differences in their interactions with the various molecular species in solution. If such particles move near boundaries, e.g. the walls of the container confining the suspension, gradients in the composition of the solution are also created along the wall. This give rise to chemi-osmosis (via the interactions of the wall with the molecular species forming the solution), which drives flows coupling back to the colloid and thus influences its motility. Employing an approximate ‘point-particle’ analysis, we show analytically that—owing to this kind of induced active response (chemi-osmosis) of the wall—such chemically active colloids can align with, and follow, gradients in the surface chemistry of the wall. In this sense, these artificial ‘swimmers’ exhibit a primitive form of thigmotaxis with the meaning of sensing the proximity of a (not necessarily discontinuous) physical change in the environment. We show that the alignment with the surface-chemistry gradient is generic for chemically active colloids as long as they exhibit motility in an unbounded fluid, i.e. this phenomenon does not depend on the exact details of the propulsion mechanism. The results are discussed in the context of simple models of chemical activity, corresponding to Janus particles with ‘source’ chemical reactions on one half of the surface and either ‘inert’ or ‘sink’ reactions over the other half.

  18. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  19. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  20. Effects of low-level radioactive-waste disposal on water chemistry in the unsaturated zone at a site near Sheffield, Illinois, 1982-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, C.A.; Striegl, R.G.; Mills, P.C.; Healy, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    A 1982-84 field study defined the chemistry of water collected from the unsaturated zone at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Bureau County, Illinois. Chemical data were evaluated to determine the principal naturally occurring geochemical reactions in the unsaturated zone and to evaluate waste-induced effects on pore-water chemistry. Samples of precipitation, unsaturated-zone pore water, and saturated-zone water were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, major cations and anions, dissolved organic carbon, gross alpha and beta radiation, and tritium. Little change in concentration of most major constituents in the unsaturated-zone water was observed with respect to depth or distance from disposal trenches. Tritium and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were, however, dependent on proximity to trenches. The primary reactions, both on- site and off-site, were carbonate and clay dissolution, cation exchange, and the oxidation of pyrite. The major difference between on-site and off-site inorganic water chemistry resulted from the removal of the Roxana Silt and the Radnor Till Member of the Glasford Formation from on-site. Off-site, the Roxana Silt contributed substantial quantities of sodium to solution from montmorillonite dissolution and associated cation-exchange reactions. The Radnor Till Member provided exchange surfaces for magnesium. Precipitation at the site had an ionic composition of calcium zinc sulfate and an average pH of 4.6. Within 0.3 meter of the land surface, infiltrating rain water or snowmelt changed to an ionic canposition of calcium sulfate off-site and calcium bicarbonate on-site and had an average pH of 7.9; below that depth, pH averaged 7.5 and the ionic composition generally was calcium magnesium bicarbonate. Alkalinity and specific conductance differed primarily according to composition of geologic materials. Tritium concentrations ranged from 0.2 (detection limit) to 1,380 nanocuries per liter. The

  1. Effects of low-level radioactive-waste disposal on water chemistry in the unsaturated zone at a site near Sheffield, Illinois, 1982-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, C.A.; Striegl, R.G.; Mills, P.C.; Healy, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    A 1982-84 field study defined the chemistry of water collected from the unsaturated zone at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Bureau County, Ill. Chemical data were evaluated to determine the principal, naturally occurring geochemical reactions in the unsaturated zone and to evaluate waste-induced effects on pore-water chemistry. Samples of precipitation, unsaturated-zone pore water, and saturated-zone water were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, major cations and anions, dissolved organic carbon, gross alpha and beta radiation, and tritium. Little change in concentration of most major constituents in the unsaturated-zone water was observed with respect to depth or distance from disposal trenches. Tritium and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were, however, dependent on proximity to trenches. The primary reactions, both on-site and off-site, were carbonate and clay dissolution, cation exchange, and the oxidation of pyrite. The major difference between on-site and off-site inorganic water chemistry resulted from the removal of the Roxana Silt and the Radnor Till Member of the Glasford Formation from on-site. Off-site, the Roxana Silt contributed substantial quantities of sodium to solution from montmorillonite dissolution and associated cation-exchange reactions. The Radnor Till Member provided exchange surfaces for magnesium. Precipitation at the site had an ionic composition of calcium zinc sulfate and an average pH of 4.6. Within 0.3 meter of the land surface, infiltrating rainwater or snowmelt changed to an ionic composition of calcium sulfate off-site and calcium bicarbonate on-site and had an average pH of 7.9; below that depth, pH averaged 7.5 and the ionic composition generally was calcium magnesium bicarbonate. Alkalinity and specific conductance differed primarily according to composition of geologic materials. Tritium concentrations ranged from 0.2 (detection limit) to 1,380 nanocuries per liter. The

  2. Role of the surface chemistry of activated carbons in dye removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua-lei; Zhen, Wen-juan; Zhu, Qian; Wu, Xiao-bin; Chang, Zhi-dong; Li, Wen-jun

    2015-07-01

    Commercial activated carbons were modified by a series of chemical or physical treatments using H2O2, NH3, and heating under N2 flow without notably changing their pore structures. The resultant carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption and Bohem titration and then used to remove Ponceau 4R, methyl orange and brilliant blue from aqueous solutions. Surface chemistry was found to play a significantly different role in removing these three compounds. The removal of anionic Ponceau 4R increases with increasing carbon surface basicity due to the predominant dispersive interaction mechanism. In contrast, surface chemistry has little effect on the removal of anionic methyl orange, which can be explained by two parallel mechanisms involving electrostatic and dispersive interactions due to the basic amine group in a dye molecule. The influence of surface chemistry on the removal of amphoteric brilliant blue dye can also be ignored due to a weak interaction between the carbons and dye molecules, which is resulted from strong cohesive energy from electrostatic forces inside amphoteric dye molecules.

  3. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  4. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  5. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  6. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  7. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  8. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  9. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  10. Synthesis of camphecene derivatives using click chemistry methodology and study of their antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Artyushin, Oleg I; Sharova, Elena V; Vinogradova, Natalya M; Genkina, Galina K; Moiseeva, Aleksandra A; Klemenkova, Zinaida S; Orshanskaya, Iana R; Shtro, Anna A; Kadyrova, Renata A; Zarubaev, Vladimir V; Yarovaya, Olga I; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F; Brel, Valery K

    2017-03-22

    A series of seventeen tetrazole derivatives of 1,7,7-trimethyl-[2.2.1]bicycloheptane were synthesized using click chemistry methodology and characterized by spectral data. Studies of cytotoxicity and in vitro antiviral activity against influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) in MDCK cells of the compounds obtained were performed. The structure-activity relationship analysis suggests that to possess virus-inhibiting activity, the compounds of this group should bear oxygen atom with a short linker (C2-C4), either as a hydroxyl group (18, 19, 29), keto-group (21) or as a part of a heterocycle (24). These compounds demonstrated low cytotoxicity along with high anti-viral activity.

  11. Hydrogeologic properties and ground-water chemistry of the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed at well 699-25-80 (DB-14) Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Howland, M.D.; Strait, S.R.

    1980-11-01

    Offsite migration studies were conducted to characterize the hydraulic properties and groundwater chemistry of confined aquifer systems within the Hanford Site. These studies support the recommendations in ERDA-1538 to provide input for hydrologic modeling of groundwater flow within the Hanford Site, to afford information concerning possible contamination of underlying confined aquifer systems and to make the results available to the public. This report presents analytical results and aquifer test procedures used in characterizing the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed at well 699-25-80. The overall close association in groundwater chemistries and presence of elevated nitrate levels suggest that the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed may be locally in communication with the overlying unconfined aquifer system. Other physical evidence which indicates a potential local communication with the unconfined aquifer system includes: favorable stratigraphic position; absence of the confining Elephant Mountain basalt in surrounding areas; and intersection of a recharge boundary during aquifer tests of well 699-25-80.

  12. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  13. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  14. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  15. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  16. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  17. Probing intracellular biomarkers and mediators of cell activation using nanosensors and bioorthogonal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Haun, Jered B; Devaraj, Neal K; Marinelli, Brett S; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-04-26

    Nanomaterials offer unique physical properties that make them ideal biosensors for scant cell populations. However, specific targeting of nanoparticles to intracellular proteins has been challenging. Here, we describe a technique to improve intracellular biomarker sensing using nanoparticles that is based on bioorthogonal chemistry. Using trans-cyclooctene-modified affinity ligands that are administered to semipermeabilized cells and revealed by cycloaddition reaction with tetrazine-conjugated nanoparticles, we demonstrate site-specific amplification of nanomaterial binding. We also show that this technique is capable of sensing protein biomarkers and phosho-protein signal mediators, both within the cytosol and nucleus, via magnetic or fluorescent modalities. We expect the described method will have broad applications in nanomaterial-based diagnostics and therapeutics.

  18. Site-specific insertion of nitroxide-spin labels into DNA probes by click chemistry for structural analyses by ELDOR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flaender, M; Sicoli, G; Fontecave, Th; Mathis, G; Saint-Pierre, C; Boulard, Y; Gambarelli, S; Gasparutto, D

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for the insertion of nitroxide spin-labels at specific positions within DNA oligomers. The latter bioconjugaison strategy is based on a click chemistry 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between a spin-labeling reagent, namely the 4-azido-TEMPO, and alkyne modified uridine-containing oligonucleotides. This highly efficient labeling method was applied for site-specific incorporation of two TEMPO units within a set of double-stranded DNA constructs. Then the determination of the inter-nitroxide distances was achieved by using a four-pulses DEER technique that successfully validates the new site-directed spin labeling strategy.

  19. Enhanced ozone loss by active inorganic bromine chemistry in the tropical troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, Michael; Bannan, Thomas J.; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Khan, M. Anwar; Evans, Mathew J.; Lee, James; Lidster, Richard; Andrews, Stephen; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Schmidt, Johan; Jacob, Daniel; Harris, Neil R. P.; Bauguitte, Stephane; Gallagher, Martin; Bacak, Asan; Leather, Kimberley E.; Percival, Carl J.

    2017-04-01

    Bromine chemistry, particularly in the tropics, has been suggested to play an important role in tropospheric ozone loss although a lack of measurements of active bromine species impedes a quantitative understanding of its impacts. Recent modelling and measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO) by Wang et al. (2015) have shown current models under predict BrO concentrations over the Pacific Ocean and allude to a missing source of BrO. Here, we present the first simultaneous aircraft measurements of atmospheric bromine monoxide, BrO (a radical that along with atomic Br catalytically destroys ozone) and the inorganic Br precursor compounds HOBr, BrCl and Br2 over the Western Pacific Ocean from 0.5 to 7 km. The presence of 0.17-1.64 pptv BrO and 3.6-8 pptv total inorganic Br from these four species throughout the troposphere causes 10-20% of total ozone loss, and confirms the importance of bromine chemistry in the tropical troposphere; contributing to a 6 ppb decrease in ozone levels due to halogen chemistry. Observations are compared with a global chemical transport model and find that the observed high levels of BrO, BrCl and HOBr can be reconciled by active multiphase oxidation of halide (Br- and Cl-) by HOBr and ozone in cloud droplets and aerosols. Measurements indicate that 99% of the instantaneous free Br in the troposphere up to 8 km originates from inorganic halogen photolysis rather than from photolysis of organobromine species.

  20. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  1. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  2. Tracing the Physical Conditions in Active Galactic Nuclei with Time-Dependent Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijerink, Rowin; Spaans, Marco; Kamp, Inga; Aresu, Giambattista; Thi, Wing-Fai; Woitke, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We present an extension of the code ProDiMo that allows for a modeling of processes pertinent to active galactic nuclei and to an ambient chemistry that is time dependent. We present a proof-of-concept and focus on a few astrophysically relevant species, e.g., H+, H2+, and H3+; C+ and N+; C and O; CO and H2O; OH+, H2O+, and H3O+; and HCN and HCO+. We find that the freeze-out of water is strongly suppressed and that this affects the bulk of the oxygen and carbon chemistry occurring in the active galactic nucleus (AGN). The commonly used AGN tracer HCN/HCO+ is strongly time-dependent, with ratios that vary over orders of magnitude for times longer than 104 years. Through Atacama large millimeter array observations this ratio can be used to probe how the narrow-line region evolves under large fluctuations in the supermassive black hole accretion rate. Strong evolutionary trends, on time scales of 104-108 years are also found in species such as H3O+, CO, and H2O. These reflect, respectively, time-dependent effects in the ionization balance, the transient nature of the production of molecular gas, and the freeze-out/sublimation of water.

  3. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  4. pH at the Air-Ice Interface: Connections to Halogen Activation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Abbatt, J.; Donaldson, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Halogen activation - the conversion of relatively inert sea-salt derived halides, into reactive halogen species - has significant implications for perturbing the oxidative capacity of the boundary layer, as well as for mercury oxidation. Developing a good, mechanistic understanding of halogen activation chemistry - and particularly its pH dependence - requires knowledge of surface pH. Here we described the development and use of a surface-sensitive spectroscopic approach to investigate pH at frozen surfaces. The approach, which involves glancing-angle laser-induced fluorescence in conjunction with pH-sensitive fluorescent dyes (acridine and harmine), was used to study pH at frozen surfaces following the deposition of gas phase acids or bases. We demonstrate that frozen 'pure water' and frozen 'salt water' surfaces exhibit different responses. The responses are consistent with the presence of a chemically unique, disordered region at the frozen 'pure water' surface and the presence of liquid brine at the frozen 'salt water' surface. Significantly, we show that a frozen sea water surface is resistant to changes in pH, suggesting that some buffering capacity is maintained upon freezing. Finally the pH dependence of bromine and chlorine activation from artificial saline snow is presented. Bromine release is found to depend less strongly on pre-freezing snow pH, but the release of both species is favoured for low pre-freezing pH values. In the context of these pH and halogen activation studies, the potential importance of various frozen sea ice substrates for promoting halogen activation chemistry will be discussed.

  5. Site-Specific Labeling of Protein Kinase CK2: Combining Surface Display and Click Chemistry for Drug Discovery Applications †

    PubMed Central

    Nienberg, Christian; Retterath, Anika; Becher, Kira-Sophie; Saenger, Thorsten; Mootz, Henning D.; Jose, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Human CK2 is a heterotetrameric constitutively active serine/threonine protein kinase and is an emerging target in current anti-cancer drug discovery. The kinase is composed of two catalytic CK2α subunits and two regulatory CK2β subunits. In order to establish an assay to identify protein-protein-interaction inhibitors (PPI) of the CK2α/CK2β interface, a bioorthogonal click reaction was used to modify the protein kinase α-subunit with a fluorophore. By expanding the genetic code, the unnatural amino acid para azidophenylalanine (pAzF) could be incorporated into CK2α. Performing the SPAAC click reaction (Strain-Promoted Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition) by the use of a dibenzylcyclooctyne-fluorophore (DBCO-fluorophore) led to a specifically labeled human protein kinase CK2α. This site-specific labeling does not impair the phosphorylation activity of CK2, which was evaluated by capillary electrophoresis. Furthermore a dissociation constant (KD) of 631 ± 86.2 nM was determined for the substrate αS1-casein towards CK2α. This labeling strategy was also applied to CK2β subunit on Escherichia coli, indicating the site-specific modifications of proteins on the bacterial cell surface when displayed by Autodisplay. PMID:27355959

  6. Site-Specific Labeling of Protein Kinase CK2: Combining Surface Display and Click Chemistry for Drug Discovery Applications.

    PubMed

    Nienberg, Christian; Retterath, Anika; Becher, Kira-Sophie; Saenger, Thorsten; Mootz, Henning D; Jose, Joachim

    2016-06-27

    Human CK2 is a heterotetrameric constitutively active serine/threonine protein kinase and is an emerging target in current anti-cancer drug discovery. The kinase is composed of two catalytic CK2α subunits and two regulatory CK2β subunits. In order to establish an assay to identify protein-protein-interaction inhibitors (PPI) of the CK2α/CK2β interface, a bioorthogonal click reaction was used to modify the protein kinase α-subunit with a fluorophore. By expanding the genetic code, the unnatural amino acid para azidophenylalanine (pAzF) could be incorporated into CK2α. Performing the SPAAC click reaction (Strain-Promoted Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition) by the use of a dibenzylcyclooctyne-fluorophore (DBCO-fluorophore) led to a specifically labeled human protein kinase CK2α. This site-specific labeling does not impair the phosphorylation activity of CK2, which was evaluated by capillary electrophoresis. Furthermore a dissociation constant (KD) of 631 ± 86.2 nM was determined for the substrate αS1-casein towards CK2α. This labeling strategy was also applied to CK2β subunit on Escherichia coli, indicating the site-specific modifications of proteins on the bacterial cell surface when displayed by Autodisplay.

  7. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella

  8. NMR Crystallography of Enzyme Active Sites: Probing Chemically-Detailed, Three-Dimensional Structure in Tryptophan Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus NMR crystallography – the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry – offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically-detailed structure. From its initial role in refining diffraction data of organic and inorganic solids, NMR crystallography is now being developed for application to active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically-rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate that is not achievable when X-ray, NMR, or computational methodologies are applied in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5 to 2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate, but do not directly identify the protonation state of either. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them, only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but rely on chemical details that must be specified. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which models of the active site can be developed using computational chemistry; these models can be distinguished by comparison of their calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at highest resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of NMR

  9. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  10. Mineral Type and Solution Chemistry Affect the Structure and Composition of Actively Growing Bacterial Communities as Revealed by Bromodeoxyuridine Immunocapture and 16S rRNA Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Kelly, L C; Colin, Y; Turpault, M-P; Uroz, S

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how minerals affect bacterial communities and their in situ activities in relation to environmental conditions are central issues in soil microbial ecology, as minerals represent essential reservoirs of inorganic nutrients for the biosphere. To determine the impact of mineral type and solution chemistry on soil bacterial communities, we compared the diversity, composition, and functional abilities of a soil bacterial community incubated in presence/absence of different mineral types (apatite, biotite, obsidian). Microcosms were prepared containing different liquid culture media devoid of particular essential nutrients, the nutrients provided only in the introduced minerals and therefore only available to the microbial community through mineral dissolution by biotic and/or abiotic processes. By combining functional screening of bacterial isolates and community analysis by bromodeoxyuridine DNA immunocapture and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, we demonstrated that bacterial communities were mainly impacted by the solution chemistry at the taxonomic level and by the mineral type at the functional level. Metabolically active bacterial communities varied with solution chemistry and mineral type. Burkholderia were significantly enriched in the obsidian treatment compared to the biotite treatment and were the most effective isolates at solubilizing phosphorous or mobilizing iron, in all the treatments. A detailed analysis revealed that the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the OTUs or isolated strains assigned as Burkholderia in our study showed high homology with effective mineral-weathering bacteria previously recovered from the same experimental site.

  11. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua; Hubbard, Susan S.; Liang, Liyuan; Wu, Yuxin; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Wilson, Cathy; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  12. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, B. D.; Throckmorton, H. M.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Liang, L.; Wu, Y.; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, E. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Wilson, C. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  13. Xanthomicrol: a comprehensive review of its chemistry, distribution, biosynthesis and pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Mohammad; Cusido, Rosa M; Khojasteh, Abbas; Bonfill, Mercedes; Palazon, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Highly methoxylated flavones, which have known potential as cancer chemopreventive agents, accumulate on the leaf surfaces of some plant species and their physiological role is to protect the plant against harmful UV radiation. Xanthomicrol is one of the methoxylated flavones currently attracting most attention from researchers worldwide because of its promising pharmacological activities, including anti-spasmodic, anti-platelet and anti-cancer effects, among others. This review covers the chemistry and biological origin, distribution and pharmacological activity of xanthomicrol. Knowledge of the botanical distribution of this compound will not only encourage the use of plant sources for pharmacological purposes, but will also serve as a reference in the search for this valuable flavonoid in another genus or family. New approaches to xanthomicrol production are also described, including biotechnological attempts to develop xanthomicrol-producing plant cell factories.

  14. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  15. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  16. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  17. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  18. Aerosol and precipitation chemistry measurements in a remote site in Central Amazonia: the role of biogenic contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliquevis, T.; Lara, L. L.; Antunes, M. L.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-06-01

    In this analysis a 3.5 years data set of aerosol and precipitation chemistry, obtained in a remote site in Central Amazonia (Balbina, (1°55' S, 59°29' W, 174 m a.s.l.), about 200 km north of Manaus) is discussed. Aerosols were sampled using stacked filter units (SFU), which separate fine (d < 2.5 μm) and coarse mode (2.5 μm < d < 10.0 μm) aerosol particles. Filters were analyzed for particulate mass (PM), Equivalent Black Carbon (BCE) and elemental composition by Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE). Rainwater samples were collected using a wet-only sampler and samples were analyzed for pH and ionic composition, which was determined using ionic chromatography (IC). Natural sources dominated the aerosol mass during the wet season, when it was predominantly of natural biogenic origin mostly in the coarse mode, which comprised up to 81% of PM10. Biogenic aerosol from both primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol dominates the fine mode in the wet season, with very low concentrations (average 2.2 μg m-3). Soil dust was responsible for a minor fraction of the aerosol mass (less than 17%). Sudden increases in the concentration of elements as Al, Ti and Fe were also observed, both in fine and coarse mode (mostly during the April-may months), which we attribute to episodes of Saharan dust transport. During the dry periods, a significant contribution to the fine aerosols loading was observed, due to the large-scale transport of smoke from biomass burning in other portions of the Amazon basin. This contribution is associated with the enhancement of the concentration of S, K, Zn and BCE. Chlorine, which is commonly associated to sea salt and also to biomass burning emissions, presented higher concentration not only during the dry season but also for the April-June months, due to the establishment of more favorable meteorological conditions to the transport of Atlantic air masses to Central Amazonia. The chemical composition of rainwater was similar to those

  19. Magnesium-Dependent Active-Site Conformational Selection in the Diels-Alderase Ribozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Berezniak, Tomasz; Zahran, Mai; Imhof, Petra; Jaeschke, Andres; Smith, Jeremy C

    2010-10-01

    The Diels-Alderase ribozyme, an in vitro-evolved ribonucleic acid enzyme, accelerates the formation of carbon-carbon bonds between an anthracene diene and a maleimide dienophile in a [4 + 2] cycloaddition, a reaction with broad application in organic chemistry. Here, the Diels-Alderase ribozyme is examined via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in both crystalline and aqueous solution environments. The simulations indicate that the catalytic pocket is highly dynamic. At low Mg(2+) ion concentrations, inactive states with the catalytic pocket closed dominate. Stabilization of the enzymatically active, open state of the catalytic pocket requires a high concentration of Mg(2+) ions (e.g., 54 mM), with cations binding to specific phosphate sites on the backbone of the residues bridging the opposite strands of the pocket. The free energy profile for pocket opening at high Mg(2+) cation concentration exhibits a double minimum, with a barrier to opening of approximately 5.5 kJ/mol and the closed state approximately 3 kJ/mol lower than the open state. Selection of the open state on substrate binding leads to the catalytic activity of the ribozyme. The simulation results explain structurally the experimental observation that full catalytic activity depends on the Mg(2+) ion concentration

  20. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  1. Support chemistry, surface area, and preparation effects on sulfided NiMo catalyst activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Sandoval, R.S.

    1996-06-01

    Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials which contain a homogeneous distribution of ion exchangeable alkali cations that provide charge compensation to the metal-oxygen framework. In terms of the major types of inorganic ion exchangers defined by Clearfield, these amorphous HMO materials are similar to both hydrous oxides and layered oxide ion exchangers (e.g., alkali metal titanates). For catalyst applications, the HMO material serves as an ion exchangeable support which facilitates the uniform incorporation of catalyst precursor species. Following catalyst precursor incorporation, an activation step is required to convert the catalyst precursor to the desired active phase. Considerable process development activities at Sandia National Laboratories related to HMO materials have resulted in bulk hydrous titanium oxide (HTO)- and silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si)-supported NiMo catalysts that are more active in model reactions which simulate direct coal liquefaction (e.g., pyrene hydrogenation) than commercial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported NiMo catalysts. However, a fundamental explanation does not exist for the enhanced activity of these novel catalyst materials; possible reasons include fundamental differences in support chemistry relative to commercial oxides, high surface area, or catalyst preparation effects (ion exchange vs. incipient wetness impregnation techniques). The goals of this paper are to identify the key factors which control sulfided NiMo catalyst activity, including those characteristics of HTO- and HTO:Si-supported NiMo catalysts which uniquely set them apart from conventional oxide supports.

  2. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  3. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  4. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Aldehyde Oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas Reveal a Dithiolene-Based Chemistry for Enzyme Activation and Inhibition by H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Brondino, Carlos D.; Moura, José J. G.; Romão, Maria J.; González, Pablo J.; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes of the xanthine oxidase (XO) family catalyze the oxidative hydroxylation of aldehydes and heterocyclic compounds. The molybdenum active site shows a distorted square-pyramidal geometry in which two ligands, a hydroxyl/water molecule (the catalytic labile site) and a sulfido ligand, have been shown to be essential for catalysis. The XO family member aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (DgAOR) is an exception as presents in its catalytically competent form an equatorial oxo ligand instead of the sulfido ligand. Despite this structural difference, inactive samples of DgAOR can be activated upon incubation with dithionite plus sulfide, a procedure similar to that used for activation of desulfo-XO. The fact that DgAOR does not need a sulfido ligand for catalysis indicates that the process leading to the activation of inactive DgAOR samples is different to that of desulfo-XO. We now report a combined kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study to unveil the enzyme modification responsible for the inactivation and the chemistry that occurs at the Mo site when DgAOR is activated. In contrast to XO, which is activated by resulfuration of the Mo site, DgAOR activation/inactivation is governed by the oxidation state of the dithiolene moiety of the pyranopterin cofactor, which demonstrates the non-innocent behavior of the pyranopterin in enzyme activity. We also showed that DgAOR incubation with dithionite plus sulfide in the presence of dioxygen produces hydrogen peroxide not associated with the enzyme activation. The peroxide molecule coordinates to molybdenum in a η2 fashion inhibiting the enzyme activity. PMID:24391748

  5. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  6. The lunar regolith - Comparative studies of the Apollo and Luna sites. Chemistry of soils from Apollo 17, Luna 16, 20, and 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laul, J. C.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation represents an extension of a comparative regolith study reported by Labotka et al. (1980) to the Apollo 17 site and to the east limb of the moon (Luna 16, 20, and 24 sites). Chemical systematics are considered, taking into account major and minor element characteristics, and large ion-lithophile patterns (K, REE, and Th). Attention is also given to chemical mixing calculations and the significance of the fine fraction. It is found that the chemistries of 1000-90, 90-20, and 20-10 micrometer size fractions are very similar to each other but quite different from the 'less than 10 micrometer' fine fractions. The 'less than 10 micrometer' fine fractions, which comprise about 5 to 20% of the bulk soils, are consistently more feldspathic and enriched in LIL-rich material relative to the coarse fractions in all soils. The KREEP type is different at each site and is largely derived locally.

  7. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  8. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  9. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  10. Osteoinductive activity of insulin-functionalized cell culture surfaces obtained using diazonium chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulska, Anna; Filipowska, Joanna; Osyczka, Anna; Nowakowska, Maria; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof

    2014-12-01

    Polymeric surfaces suitable for cell culture (DR/Pec) were constructed from diazoresin (DR) and pectin (Pec) in a form of ultrathin films using the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The surfaces were functionalized with insulin using diazonium chemistry. Such functionalized surfaces were used to culture human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to assess their suitability for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. The activity of insulin immobilized on the surfaces (DR/Pec/Ins) was compared to that of insulin dissolved in the culture medium. Human MSC grown on insulin-immobilized DR/Pec surfaces displayed increased proliferation and higher osteogenic activity. The latter was determined by means of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, which increases at early stages of osteoblasts differentiation. Insulin dissolved in the culture medium did not stimulate cell proliferation and its osteogenic activity was significantly lower. Addition of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) to the culture medium further increased ALP activity in hMSCs indicating additive osteogenic action of immobilized insulin and rhBMP-2

  11. Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Substrate by an Active Site Thiyl Radical in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. Active E. coli class Ia RNR is an α2β2 complex that undergoes reversible, long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over a pathway of redox active amino acids (β-Y122 → [β-W48] → β-Y356 → α-Y731 → α-Y730 → α-C439) that spans ∼35 Å. To unmask PCET kinetics from rate-limiting conformational changes, we prepared a photochemical RNR containing a [ReI] photooxidant site-specifically incorporated at position 355 ([Re]-β2), adjacent to PCET pathway residue Y356 in β. [Re]-β2 was further modified by replacing Y356 with 2,3,5-trifluorotyrosine to enable photochemical generation and spectroscopic observation of chemically competent tyrosyl radical(s). Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we compare the kinetics of Y· decay in the presence of substrate and wt-α2, Y731F-α2 ,or C439S-α2, as well as with 3′-[2H]-substrate and wt-α2. We find that only in the presence of wt-α2 and the unlabeled substrate do we observe an enhanced rate of radical decay indicative of forward radical propagation. This observation reveals that cleavage of the 3′-C–H bond of substrate by the transiently formed C439· thiyl radical is rate-limiting in forward PCET through α and has allowed calculation of a lower bound for the rate constant associated with this step of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 104 s–1. Prompting radical propagation with light has enabled observation of PCET events heretofore inaccessible, revealing active site chemistry at the heart of RNR catalysis. PMID:25353063

  12. Turbine Chemistry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Many of the engine exhaust species resulting in significant environmental impact exist in trace amounts. Recent research, e.g., conducted at MIT-AM, has pointed to the intra-engine environment as a possible site for important trace chemistry activity. In addition, the key processes affecting the trace species activity occurring downstream in the air passages of the turbine and exhaust nozzle are not well understood. Most recently, an effort has been initiated at NASA Glenn Research Center under the UEET Program to evaluate and further develop CFD-based technology for modeling and simulation of intra-engine trace chemical changes relevant to atmospheric effects of pollutant emissions from aircraft engines. This presentation will describe the current effort conducted at Glenn; some preliminary results relevant to the trace species chemistry in a turbine passage will also be presented to indicate the progress to date.

  13. Nitrogen-Containing Constituents of Black Cohosh: Chemistry, Structure Elucidation, and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Lankin, David C.; Cisowska, Tamara; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    The roots/rhizomes of black cohosh (Actaea racemosa L. syn. Cimicifuga racemosa [L]. Nutt., Ranunculaceae) have been used traditionally by Native Americans to treat colds, rheumatism, and a variety of conditions related to women’s health. In recent years black cohosh preparations have become popular dietary supplements among women seeking alternative treatments for menopausal complaints. The popularity of the plant has led to extensive phytochemical and biological investigations, including several clinical trials. Most of the phytochemical and biological research has focused on two abundant classes of compounds: the triterpene glycosides and phenolic acids. A third group of phytoconstituents that has received far less attention consists of the alkaloids and related compounds that contain nitrogen. This chapter summarizes the current state of knowledge of the chemistry and biological activities associated with this group of constituents and provides some perspective on their significance for future research on this interesting plant. PMID:27795590

  14. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  15. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  16. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  17. Studies on chemistry, spectroscopy and antioxidant activities of chromium(III)-hydrazide complexes.

    PubMed

    Shamshad, Bushra; Jamal, Rifat A; Ashiq, Uzma; Mahrooof-Tahir, Mohammad; Shaikh, Zara; Sultan, Sadaf; Khan, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Acid hydrazides are vital chemical entities due to their biological activities. Upon complexation with certain metal ions, their biological activities are known to be positively enhanced. The present work describes the synthesis of Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes, and their structural, spectroscopic and antioxidant properties to reveal their chemistry and biochemistry. Physical (magnetic moment, conductivity measurements), analytical (C, H, N and Cr analysis) and spectral (EI-Mass, FTIR) techniques are used for the characterization of synthesized compounds. All Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes exhibit octahedral geometry with general formula [Cr(L)2(H2O)2]Cl3. In these complexes, the hydrazide ligands are coordinated via carbonyl oxygen and terminal amino nitrogen in a bidentate fashion. All Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes were screened for in vitro diphenyldipicryl hydrazine (DPPH), superoxide dismutase and nitric oxide radical scavenging activities. Majority of the Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes were found to be more potent scavengers than their uncoordinated hydrazide ligands. This study demonstrates an interesting structure-activity relationship (SAR) which is presented here.

  18. Manganese oxide-induced strategy to high-performance iron/nitrogen/carbon electrocatalysts with highly exposed active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Zhuo, Ou; Jiang, Yufei; Bu, Yongfeng; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the exposed active sites.Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the

  19. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  20. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  1. A proposal for teaching undergraduate chemistry students carbohydrate biochemistry by problem-based learning activities.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Angela C M; Rocha, Joao B T

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching elementary biochemistry to undergraduate students. The activity was based on "the foods we eat." It was used to engage students' curiosity and to initiate learning about a subject that could be used by the future teachers in the high school. The experimental activities (8-12 hours) were related to the questions: (i) what does the Benedict's Reagent detect? and (ii) What is determined by glucose oxidase (GOD)? We also ask the students to compare the results with those obtained with the Lugol reagent, which detects starch. Usually, students inferred that the Benedict reagent detects reducing sugars, while GOD could be used to detect glucose. However, in GOD assay, an open question was left, because the results could be due to contamination of the sugars (particularly galactose) with glucose. Though not stressed, GOD does not oxidize the carbohydrates tested and all the positive results are due to contamination. The activities presented here can be easily done in the high school, because they are simple and non-expensive. Furthermore, in the case of Benedict reaction, it is possible to follow the reduction of Cu (II) "macroscopically" by following the formation of the brick-orange precipitate. The concrete observation of a chemical reaction can motivate and facilitate students understanding about chemistry of life.

  2. Understanding the chemistry behind the antioxidant activities of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT): a review.

    PubMed

    Yehye, Wageeh A; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul; Ariffin, Azhar; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Alhadi, Abeer A; Kadir, Farkaad A; Yaeghoobi, Marzieh

    2015-08-28

    Hindered phenols find a wide variety of applications across many different industry sectors. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a most commonly used antioxidant recognized as safe for use in foods containing fats, pharmaceuticals, petroleum products, rubber and oil industries. In the past two decades, there has been growing interest in finding novel antioxidants to meet the requirements of these industries. To accelerate the antioxidant discovery process, researchers have designed and synthesized a series of BHT derivatives targeting to improve its antioxidant properties to be having a wide range of antioxidant activities markedly enhanced radical scavenging ability and other physical properties. Accordingly, some structure-activity relationships and rational design strategies for antioxidants based on BHT structure have been suggested and applied in practice. We have identified 14 very sensitive parameters, which may play a major role on the antioxidant performance of BHT. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, which is of significance in selecting and designing novel antioxidants using a well-known antioxidant BHT as a building-block molecule. Our strategy involved investigation on understanding the chemistry behind the antioxidant activities of BHT, whether through hydrogen or electron transfer mechanism to enable promising anti-oxidant candidates to be synthesized.

  3. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  4. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  5. Removal of Aromatic Pollutant Surrogate from Water by Recyclable Magnetite-Activated Carbon Nanocomposite: An Experiment for General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlan, Ping Y.; Melcer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment using readily available chemicals is described to introduce college students to an exciting class of nanocomposite materials. In a one-step room temperature synthetic process, magnetite nanoparticles are embedded onto activated carbon matrix. The resultant nanocomposite has been shown to combine the…

  6. Activity Theory as a Tool to Address the Problem of Chemistry's Lack of Relevance in Secondary School Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Aalsvoort, Joke

    2004-01-01

    In a previous article, the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary chemical education was analysed using logical positivism as a tool. This article starts with the hypothesis that the problem can be addressed by means of activity theory, one of the important theories within the sociocultural school. The reason for this expectation is…

  7. Temperature and substrate chemistry as major drivers of interregional variability of leaf microbial decomposition and cellulolytic activity in headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, Encarnación; Casas, J Jesús; Díaz-López, Manuel; Rubio, Juan; Guil-Guerrero, J Luís; Moyano-López, Francisco J

    2016-11-01

    Abiotic factors, substrate chemistry and decomposers community composition are primary drivers of leaf litter decomposition. In soil, much of the variation in litter decomposition is explained by climate and substrate chemistry, but with a significant contribution of the specialisation of decomposer communities to degrade specific substrates (home-field advantage, HFA). In streams, however, HFA effects on litter decomposition have not been explicitly tested. We evaluated responses of microbial decomposition and β-glucosidase activity to abiotic factors, substrate and decomposer assemblages, using a reciprocal litter transplant experiment: 'ecosystem type' (mountain vs lowland streams) × 'litter chemistry' (alder vs reed). Temperature, pH and ionic concentration were higher in lowland streams. Decomposition for both species was faster in lowland streams. Decomposition of reed was more accelerated in lowland compared with mountain streams than that of alder, suggesting higher temperature sensitivity of decomposition in reed. Q10 (5°C-15°C) values of β-glucosidase activity were over 2. The alkaline pH and high ionic concentration of lowland streams depleted enzyme activity. We found similar relationships of decomposition or enzyme activity with abiotic factors for both species, suggesting limited support to the HFA hypothesis. Overall, our results suggest a prime role of temperature interacting with substrate chemistry on litter decomposition.

  8. Learning Activity Package, Chemistry II. LAP Numbers 39A, 39B, 39C, 40, 41, 41A and 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Naomi

    As a set of seven Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in chemistry, the units cover problems in stoichiometry, energy levels, chemical bonding, matter and its forms, electrochemical processes, chemical kinetics and equilibrium, metals, and non-metals. Each unit contains a rationale for the material; a list of…

  9. The Use of Molecular Modeling as "Pseudoexperimental" Data for Teaching VSEPR as a Hands-On General Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Christopher B.; Vandehoef, Crissie; Cook, Allison

    2015-01-01

    A hands-on activity appropriate for first-semester general chemistry students is presented that combines traditional VSEPR methods of predicting molecular geometries with introductory use of molecular modeling. Students analyze a series of previously calculated output files consisting of several molecules each in various geometries. Each structure…

  10. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY METHOD FOR PREDICTING VAPOR PRESSURES AND ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF POLAR ORGANIC OXYGENATES IN PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameterizations of interactions of polar multifunctional organic oxygenates in PM2.5 must be included in aerosol chemistry models for evaluating control strategies for reducing ambient concentrations of PM2.5 compounds. Vapor pressures and activity coefficients of these compo...

  11. Teaching with the Case Study Method to Promote Active Learning in a Small Molecule Crystallography Course for Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Michael G.; Powers, Tamara M.; Zheng, Shao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Implementing the case study method in a practical X-ray crystallography course designed for graduate or upper-level undergraduate chemistry students is described. Compared with a traditional lecture format, assigning small groups of students to examine literature case studies encourages more active engagement with the course material and…

  12. Efficient activation of a visible light-activatable CA4 prodrug through intermolecular photo-unclick chemistry in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bio, Moses; Rajaputra, Pallavi; Lim, Irene; Thapa, Pritam; Tienabeso, Bomaonye; Hurst, Robert E; You, Youngjae

    2017-02-07

    Photo-unclick chemistry mediates visible and near IR-controlled drug release via a singlet oxygen (SO)-cleavable linker. Due to the limited diffusion distance of SO in biological systems, a photosensitizer and the SO-cleavable linker have been conjugated in one molecule or mixed in nano-drug delivery systems. In this communication, we demonstrate a new strategy to activate prodrugs with photo-unclick chemistry in an intermolecular fashion using an SO-cleavable CA4 prodrug and a mitochondria-specific photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX, formed from prodrug hexyl-5-aminolevulinate.

  13. Site-specific albumination of a therapeutic protein with multi-subunit to prolong activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Hahn, Young S.; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-01-01

    Albumin fusion/conjugation (albumination) has been an effective method to prolong in vivo half-life of therapeutic proteins. However, its broader application to proteins with complex folding pathway or multi-subunit is restricted by incorrect folding, poor expression, heterogeneity, and loss of native activity of the proteins linked to albumin. We hypothesized that the site-specific conjugation of albumin to a permissive site of a target protein will expand the utilities of albumin as a therapeutic activity extender to proteins with a complex structure. We show here the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid (NNAA) followed by chemoselective albumin conjugation to prolong therapeutic activity in vivo. Urate oxidase (Uox), a therapeutic enzyme for treatment of hyperuricemia, is a homotetramer with multiple surface lysines, limiting conventional approaches for albumination. Incorporation of p-azido-l-phenylalanine into two predetermined positions of Uox allowed site-specific linkage of dibenzocyclooctyne-derivatized human serum albumin (HSA) through strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The bio-orthogonality of SPAAC resulted in the production of a chemically well-defined conjugate, Uox-HSA, with a retained enzymatic activity. Uox-HSA had a half-life of 8.8 h in mice, while wild-type Uox had a half-life of 1.3 h. The AUC increased 5.5-fold (1657 vs. 303 mU/mL × h). These results clearly demonstrated that site-specific albumination led to the prolonged enzymatic activity of Uox in vivo. Site-specific albumination enabled by NNAA incorporation and orthogonal chemistry demonstrates its promise for the development of long-acting protein therapeutics with high potency and safety. PMID:25862515

  14. Tracing footprints of environmental events in tree ring chemistry using neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Dagistan

    The aim of this study is to identify environmental effects on tree-ring chemistry. It is known that industrial pollution, volcanic eruptions, dust storms, acid rain and similar events can cause substantial changes in soil chemistry. Establishing whether a particular group of trees is sensitive to these changes in soil environment and registers them in the elemental chemistry of contemporary growth rings is the over-riding goal of any Dendrochemistry research. In this study, elemental concentrations were measured in tree-ring samples of absolutely dated eleven modern forest trees, grown in the Mediterranean region, Turkey, collected and dated by the Malcolm and Carolyn Wiener Laboratory for Aegean and Near Eastern Dendrochronology laboratory at Cornell University. Correlations between measured elemental concentrations in the tree-ring samples were analyzed using statistical tests to answer two questions. Does the current concentration of a particular element depend on any other element within the tree? And, are there any elements showing correlated abnormal concentration changes across the majority of the trees? Based on the detailed analysis results, the low mobility of sodium and bromine, positive correlations between calcium, zinc and manganese, positive correlations between trace elements lanthanum, samarium, antimony, and gold within tree-rings were recognized. Moreover, zinc, lanthanum, samarium and bromine showed strong, positive correlations among the trees and were identified as possible environmental signature elements. New Dendrochemistry information found in this study would be also useful in explaining tree physiology and elemental chemistry in Pinus nigra species grown in Turkey. Elemental concentrations in tree-ring samples were measured using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) at the Pennsylvania State University Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC). Through this study, advanced methodologies for methodological, computational and

  15. The mechanistically significant coordination chemistry of dinitrogen at FeMo-co, the catalytic site of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2007-02-07

    Reported here is a comprehensive theoretical investigation of the binding of N(2) to the Fe(7)MoS(9)N(homocitrate)(cysteine)(histidine) active site (FeMo-co) of the enzyme nitrogenase, as a prerequisite to elucidation of the chemical mechanism of the catalyzed reduction to NH(3). The degree and type of hydrogenation of FeMo-co, with H atoms and possibly an H(2) molecule, are key variables, following the Thorneley-Lowe kinetic scheme. Ninety-four local energy minima were located for N(2) coordinated in eta(2) (side) and eta(1) (end) modes at the endo and exo coordination positions of Fe2 and Fe6. The stabilities of 57 representative structures are assessed by calculation of the reaction profiles and activation energies for the association and dissociation of N(2). Barriers to association of N(2) depend mainly on the location of the hydrogenation and the location of N(2) coordination, while dissociation barriers depend primarily on whether N(2) is eta(2)- and eta(1)-coordinated, and secondarily on the location of the hydrogenation. Increased negative charge on FeMo-co increases the barriers, while C in place of N at the center of FeMo-co has little effect. The interactions of the models of ligated FeMo-co with the surrounding protein, including proteins with mutations of key amino acids, are assessed by in silico cofactor transplantations and calculations of protein strain energies. From these results, which identify models involving contacts and interactions with the surrounding residues that have been shown by mutation to affect the N(2) activity of nitrogenase, and from the N(2) coordination profiles, it is concluded that endo-eta(1)-N(2) coordination at Fe6 is most probable. There is strong reason to believe that the mechanism of nitrogenase will involve one or more of the preferred models presented here, and a detailed foundation of structures and principles is now available for postulation and calculation of the profiles of the steps in which H atoms bound to

  16. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; ...

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) formore » analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.« less

  17. Quantitative Secretome Analysis of Activated Jurkat Cells Using Click Chemistry-Based Enrichment of Secreted Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Witzke, Kathrin E; Rosowski, Kristin; Müller, Christian; Ahrens, Maike; Eisenacher, Martin; Megger, Dominik A; Knobloch, Jürgen; Koch, Andrea; Bracht, Thilo; Sitek, Barbara

    2017-01-06

    Quantitative secretome analyses are a high-performance tool for the discovery of physiological and pathophysiological changes in cellular processes. However, serum supplements in cell culture media limit secretome analyses, but serum depletion often leads to cell starvation and consequently biased results. To overcome these limiting factors, we investigated a model of T cell activation (Jurkat cells) and performed an approach for the selective enrichment of secreted proteins from conditioned medium utilizing metabolic marking of newly synthesized glycoproteins. Marked glycoproteins were labeled via bioorthogonal click chemistry and isolated by affinity purification. We assessed two labeling compounds conjugated with either biotin or desthiobiotin and the respective secretome fractions. 356 proteins were quantified using the biotin probe and 463 using desthiobiotin. 59 proteins were found differentially abundant (adjusted p-value ≤0.05, absolute fold change ≥1.5) between inactive and activated T cells using the biotin method and 86 using the desthiobiotin approach, with 31 mutual proteins cross-verified by independent experiments. Moreover, we analyzed the cellular proteome of the same model to demonstrate the benefit of secretome analyses and provide comprehensive data sets of both. 336 proteins (61.3%) were quantified exclusively in the secretome. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004280.

  18. Eliciting Metacognitive Experiences and Reflection in a Year 11 Chemistry Classroom: An Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Gregory P.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns regarding students' learning and reasoning in chemistry classrooms are well documented. Students' reasoning in chemistry should be characterized by conscious consideration of chemical phenomenon from laboratory work at macroscopic, molecular/sub-micro and symbolic levels. Further, students should develop metacognition in relation to such…

  19. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  20. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  1. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  2. Groundwater Chemistry and Hydrogeology of the Upper Saddle Mountains Basalt-Confined Aquifer South and Southeast of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Darrell R. ); Thornton, Edward C. ); Liikala, Terry L. )

    2002-11-20

    This report describes groundwater monitoring within the upper basalt-confined aquifer in areas bordering the Hanford Site to the south and southeast. The purpose of the sample was to demonstrate that constituents analyzed were within the range of background concentrations and to evaluate any potential connection between groundwater on and off the Hanford Site.

  3. Quantum chemistry calculation-aided structural optimization of combretastatin A-4-like tubulin polymerization inhibitors: improved stability and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junhang; Zheng, Canhui; Zhu, Kongkai; Liu, Jia; Sun, Nannan; Wang, Chongqing; Jiang, Hualiang; Zhu, Ju; Luo, Cheng; Zhou, Youjun

    2015-03-12

    A potent combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) like tubulin polymerization inhibitor 22b was found with strong antitumor activity previously. However, it easily undergoes cis-trans isomerization under natural light, and the resulting decrease in activity limits its further applications. In this study, we used quantum chemistry calculations to explore the molecular basis of its instability. Aided by the calculations, two rounds of structural optimization of 22b were conducted. Accelerated quantitative light stability testing confirmed that the stability of these designed compounds was significantly improved as predicted. Among them, compounds 1 and 3b displayed more potent inhibitory activity on tumor cell growth than 22b. In addition, the potent in vivo antitumor activity of compound 1 was confirmed. Quantum chemistry calculations were used in the optimization of stilbene-like molecules, providing new insight into stilbenoid optimization and important implications for the future development of novel CA-4-like tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

  4. Effect of climate change between 1984 and 2007 on precipitation chemistry at a site in northeastern U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Victoria R; Weathers, Kathleen C; Lovett, Gary M; Likens, Gene E

    2009-05-15

    Climate change predictions for the northeastern US call for an increase in tropical storms and a decrease in extra tropical cyclones including continental storms. We ran 24-h back trajectories for each precipitation event that occurred at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in southeastern New York, U.S.A. from 1984 to 2007 and analyzed precipitation chemistry as well as air mass position 24 h prior to the onset of each precipitation event. The results showed an increase in marine precipitation and a slight but statistically insignificant decrease in continental precipitation during the 1984-2007 period. The chemistry of precipitation from the two directions was quite different marine storms were higher in Na4 and Cl- but lower in solutes associated with acid precipitation (H+, SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+). Annual mean concentrations of acid precipitation solutes declined for storms from both directions during the period. We used a simple mixing model based on the current rates of increase and decrease of marine and continental precipitation respectively to show that chemical changes in precipitation resulting from the shift in storm tracks are small compared to chemical changes due to emissions reductions.

  5. The cytochrome ba3 oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus uses a single input channel for proton delivery to the active site and for proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yang; Hemp, James; Chen, Ying; Fee, James A; Gennis, Robert B

    2009-09-22

    The heme-copper oxygen reductases are redox-driven proton pumps that generate a proton motive force in both prokaryotes and mitochondria. These enzymes have been divided into 3 evolutionarily related groups: the A-, B- and C-families. Most experimental work on proton-pumping mechanisms has been performed with members of the A-family. These enzymes require 2 proton input pathways (D- and K-channels) to transfer protons used for oxygen reduction chemistry and for proton pumping, with the D-channel transporting all pumped protons. In this work we use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the ba(3) oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus, a representative of the B-family, does not contain a D-channel. Rather, it utilizes only 1 proton input channel, analogous to that of the A-family K-channel, and it delivers protons to the active site for both O2 chemistry and proton pumping. Comparison of available subunit I sequences reveals that the only structural elements conserved within the oxygen reductase families that could perform these functions are active-site components, namely the covalently linked histidine-tyrosine, the Cu(B) and its ligands, and the active-site heme and its ligands. Therefore, our data suggest that all oxygen reductases perform the same chemical reactions for oxygen reduction and comprise the essential elements of the proton-pumping mechanism (e.g., the proton-loading and kinetic-gating sites). These sites, however, cannot be located within the D-channel. These results along with structural considerations point to the A-propionate region of the active-site heme and surrounding water molecules as the proton-loading site.

  6. Low temperature syntheses and reactivity of Cu2O2 active-site models.

    PubMed

    Citek, Cooper; Herres-Pawlis, Sonja; Stack, T Daniel P

    2015-08-18

    Nature's facility with dioxygen outmatches modern chemistry in the oxidation and oxygenation of materials and substrates for biosynthesis and cellular metabolism. The Earth's most abundant naturally occurring oxidant is-frankly-poorly understood and controlled, and thus underused. Copper-based enzyme metallocofactors are ubiquitous to the efficient consumption of dioxygen by all domains of life. Over the last several decades, we have joined many research groups in the study of copper- and dioxygen-dependent enzymes through close investigation of synthetically derived, small-molecule active-site analogs. Simple copper-dioxygen clusters bearing structural and spectroscopic similarity to dioxygen-activating enzymes can be probed for their fundamental geometrical, electronic, and reactive properties using the tools available to inorganic and synthetic chemistry. Our exploration of the copper-dioxygen arena has sustained product evaluation of the key dynamics and reactivity of binuclear Cu2O2 compounds. Almost exclusively operating at low temperatures, from -78 °C to solution characterization even at -125 °C, we have identified numerous compounds supported by simple and easily accessed, low molecular weight ligands-chiefly families of bidentate diamine chelates. We have found that by stripping away complexity in comparison to extended protein tertiary structures or sophisticated, multinucleating architectures, we can experimentally manipulate activated compounds and open pathways of reactivity toward exogenous substrates that both inform on and extend fundamental mechanisms of oxygenase enzymes. Our recent successes have advanced understanding of the tyrosinase enzyme, and related hemocyanin and NspF, and the copper membrane monooxygenases, specifically particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) and ammonia monooxygenase (AMO). Tyrosinase, ubiquitously distributed throughout life, is fundamental to the copper-based oxidation of phenols and the production of chromophores

  7. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  8. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  9. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}, catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}), Cys{sub 14} (Cys{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}), or both (Ala{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 140}) or Cys{sub 140} (Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Ala{sub 140}) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly{sub 139} with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH{sub 2} redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 14} mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140} protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys{sub 135} and Cys{sub 140} thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate.

  10. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  11. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  12. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  13. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  14. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  15. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  16. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  17. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  18. Take-Home Challenges: Extending Discovery-Based Activities beyond the General Chemistry Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, P. K.; Sarquis, A. M.

    1996-04-01

    In an effort to more effectively integrate the experimental nature of chemistry into our students' experiences, we are developing and implementing discovery-based activities into both the laboratory and lecture components of general chemistry. Below we describe and provide an example of a "take-home challenge" intended to supplement the lecture component of the course. These take-home challenges involve the student in chemistry exploration outside of class and extend the context of content and experimentation into a nontraditional laboratory environment. Over 25 take-home challenges have been developed to date. Preliminary evaluation of the impact of the take-home challenges shows that students reporting themselves as receiving a B or C grade in the course find the challenges very useful in helping them gain a conceptual understanding of the phenomena addressed. Students earning an A grade report little or no impact on their learning. Prepared as one-page handouts, each take-home challenge begins with a scene-setting introduction followed by pertinent background information, a list of materials to be collected, and any appropriate safety precautions. The exploration component of the activity integrates leading questions with the procedural instructions to help guide the students through the discovery process and challenge them to stretch their understanding of the chemistry. After completing a take-home challenge activity, students submit written reports containing responses to the questions posed, observations of data collected, and their responses to the challenge. The accompanying sample take-home challenge activity is provided as a novel adaptation of the belch phenomenon that challenges students to experiment in order to explain the factors that account for the observed behavior. Persons interested in field testing the take-home challenges with their classes should contact the authors. Belch Bottle Challenge: What factors are responsible for the behavior of a

  19. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  20. Inhibitors of VIM-2 by screening pharmacologically active and click-chemistry compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Minond, Dmitriy; Saldanha, S Adrian; Subramaniam, Prem; Spaargaren, Michael; Spicer, Timothy; Fotsing, Joseph R; Weide, Timo; Fokin, Valery V; Sharpless, K Barry; Galleni, Moreno; Bebrone, Carine; Lassaux, Patricia; Hodder, Peter

    2009-07-15

    VIM-2 is an Ambler class B metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) capable of hydrolyzing a broad-spectrum of beta-lactam antibiotics. Although the discovery and development of MBL inhibitors continue to be an area of active research, an array of potent, small molecule inhibitors is yet to be fully characterized for VIM-2. In the presented research, a compound library screening approach was used to identify and characterize VIM-2 inhibitors from a library of pharmacologically active compounds as well as a focused 'click' chemistry library. The four most potent VIM-2 inhibitors resulting from a VIM-2 screen were characterized by kinetic studies in order to determine K(i) and mechanism of enzyme inhibition. As a result, two previously described pharmacologic agents, mitoxantrone (1,4-dihydroxy-5,8-bis([2-([2-hydroxyethyl]amino)ethyl]amino)-9,10-anthracenedione) and 4-chloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMB) were found to be active, the former as a non-competitive inhibitor (K(i)=K(i)(')=1.5+/-0.2microM) and the latter as a slowly reversible or irreversible inhibitor. Additionally, two novel sulfonyl-triazole analogs from the click library were identified as potent, competitive VIM-2 inhibitors: N-((4-((but-3-ynyloxy)methyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)-4-iodobenzenesulfonamide (1, K(i)=0.41+/-0.03microM) and 4-iodo-N-((4-(methoxymethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)benzenesulfonamide (2, K(i)=1.4+/-0.10microM). Mitoxantrone and pCMB were also found to potentiate imipenem efficacy in MIC and synergy assays employing Escherichia coli. Taken together, all four compounds represent useful chemical probes to further investigate mechanisms of VIM-2 inhibition in biochemical and microbiology-based assays.

  1. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  2. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  3. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  4. Active upper-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics from polar circulation reversal on Titan.

    PubMed

    Teanby, Nicholas A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Nixon, Conor A; de Kok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B; Flasar, F Michael

    2012-11-29

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the co-location of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Here we report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  5. Fluorometric method for inorganic pyrophosphatase activity detection and inhibitor screening based on click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kefeng; Chen, Zhonghui; Zhou, Ling; Zheng, Ou; Wu, Xiaoping; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2015-01-06

    A fluorometric method for pyrophosphatase (PPase) activity detection was developed based on click chemistry. Cu(II) can coordinate with pyrophosphate (PPi), the addition of pyrophosphatase (PPase) into the above system can destroy the coordinate compound because PPase catalyzes the hydrolysis of PPi into inorganic phosphate and produces free Cu(II), and free Cu(II) can be reduced by sodium ascorbate (SA) to form Cu(I), which in turn initiates the ligating reaction between nonfluorescent 3-azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes to produce a highly fluorescent triazole complex, based on which, a simple and sensitive turn on fluorometric method for PPase can be developed. The fluorescence intensity of the system has a linear relationship with the logarithm of the PPase concentration in the range of 0.5 and 10 mU with a detection limit down to 0.2 mU (S/N = 3). This method is cost-effective and convenient without any labels or complicated operations. The proposed system was applied to screen the potential PPase inhibitor with high efficiency. The proposed method can be applied to diagnosis of PPase-related diseases.

  6. Active Upper-atmosphere Chemistry and Dynamics from Polar Circulation Reversal on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Nixon, Conor A.; DeKok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B.; Flasar, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the colocation of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Herewe report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  7. Mentha suaveolens Ehrh. (Lamiaceae) Essential Oil and Its Main Constituent Piperitenone Oxide: Biological Activities and Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Božović, Mijat; Pirolli, Adele; Ragno, Rino

    2015-05-13

    Since herbal medicines play an important role in the treatment of a wide range of diseases, there is a growing need for their quality control and standardization. Mentha suaveolens Ehrh. (MS) is an aromatic herb with fruit and a spearmint flavor, used in the Mediterranean areas as a traditional medicine. It has an extensive range of biological activities, including cytotoxic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hypotensive and insecticidal properties, among others. This study aims to review the scientific findings and research reported to date on MS that prove many of the remarkable various biological actions, effects and some uses of this species as a source of bioactive natural compounds. On the other hand, piperitenone oxide (PO), the major chemical constituent of the carvone pathway MS essential oil, has been reported to exhibit numerous bioactivities in cells and animals. Thus, this integrated overview also surveys and interprets the present knowledge of chemistry and analysis of this oxygenated monoterpene, as well as its beneficial bioactivities. Areas for future research are suggested.

  8. Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi and its Main Essential Oil Constituent Pulegone: Biological Activities and Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Božović, Mijat; Ragno, Rino

    2017-02-14

    Medicinal plants play an important role in the treatment of a wide range of diseases, even if their chemical constituents are not always completely recognized. Observations on their use and efficacy significantly contribute to the disclosure of their therapeutic properties. Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi is an aromatic herb with a mint-oregano flavor, used in the Mediterranean areas as a traditional medicine. It has an extensive range of biological activities, including antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory, as well as anti-ulcer and insecticidal properties. This study aims to review the scientific findings and research reported to date on Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi that prove many of the remarkable various biological actions, effects and some uses of this species as a source of bioactive natural compounds. On the other hand, pulegone, the major chemical constituent of Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi essential oil, has been reported to exhibit numerous bioactivities in cells and animals. Thus, this integrated overview also surveys and interprets the present knowledge of chemistry and analysis of this oxygenated monoterpene, as well as its beneficial bioactivities. Areas for future research are suggested.

  9. Non-enzymatic chemistry enables 2-hydroxyglutarate-mediated activation of 2-oxoglutarate oxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Rydzik, Anna M.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Loik, Nikita D.; Chan, Mun Chiang; Kawamura, Akane; McCullagh, James S. O.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Flashman, Emily; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate in cells results from mutations to isocitrate dehydrogenase that correlate with cancer. A recent study reports that (R)-, but not (S)-2-hydroxyglutarate, acts as a co-substrate for the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylases via enzyme-catalysed oxidation to 2-oxoglutarate. Here we investigate the mechanism of 2-hydroxyglutarate-enabled activation of 2-oxoglutarate oxygenases, including prolyl hydroxylase domain 2, the most important human prolyl hydroxylase isoform. We observe that 2-hydroxyglutarate-enabled catalysis by prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 is not enantiomer-specific and is stimulated by ferrous/ferric ion and reducing agents including L-ascorbate. The results reveal that 2-hydroxyglutarate is oxidized to 2-oxoglutarate non-enzymatically, likely via iron-mediated Fenton-chemistry, at levels supporting in vitro catalysis by 2-oxoglutarate oxygenases. Succinic semialdehyde and succinate are also identified as products of 2-hydroxyglutarate oxidation. Overall, the results rationalize the reported effects of 2-hydroxyglutarate on catalysis by prolyl hydroxylases in vitro and suggest that non-enzymatic 2-hydroxyglutarate oxidation may be of biological interest. PMID:24594748

  10. Influence of cigarette circumference on smoke chemistry, biological activity, and smoking behaviour.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Kevin; Eldridge, Alison; Fearon, Ian M; Liu, Chuan; Manson, Andrew; Murphy, James; Porter, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Cigarettes with reduced circumference are increasingly popular in some countries, hence it is important to understand the effects of circumference reduction on their burning behaviour, smoke chemistry and bioactivity. Reducing circumference reduces tobacco mass burn rate, puff count and static burn time, and increases draw resistance and rod length burned during puff and smoulder periods. Smoulder temperature increases with decreasing circumference, but with no discernible effect on cigarette ignition propensity during a standard test. At constant packing density, mainstream (MS) and sidestream (SS) tar and nicotine yields decrease approximately linearly with decreasing circumference, as do the majority of smoke toxicants. However, volatile aldehydes, particularly formaldehyde, show a distinctly non-linear relationship with circumference and increases in the ratios of aldehydes to tar and nicotine have been observed as the circumference decreases. Mutagenic, cytotoxic and tumorigenic specific activities of smoke condensates (i.e. per unit weight of condensate) decrease as circumference decreases. Recent studies suggest that there is no statistical difference in mouth-level exposure to tar and nicotine among smokers of cigarettes with different circumferences. Commercially available slim cigarettes usually have changes in other cigarette design features compared with cigarettes with standard circumference, so it is difficult to isolate the effect of circumference on the properties of commercial products. However, available data shows that changes in cigarette circumference offer no discernible change to the harm associated with smoking.

  11. Global distribution and surface activity of macromolecules in offline simulations of marine organic chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Ogunro, Oluwaseun O.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott; ...

    2015-10-13

    Here, organic macromolecules constitute high percentage components of remote sea spray. They enter the atmosphere through adsorption onto bubbles followed by bursting at the ocean surface, and go on to influence the chemistry of the fine mode aerosol. We present a global estimate of mixed-layer organic macromolecular distributions, driven by offline marine systems model output. The approach permits estimation of oceanic concentrations and bubble film surface coverages for several classes of organic compound. Mixed layer levels are computed from the output of a global ocean biogeochemistry model by relating the macromolecules to standard biogeochemical tracers. Steady state is assumed formore » labile forms, and for longer-lived components we rely on ratios to existing transported variables. Adsorption is then represented through conventional Langmuir isotherms, with equilibria deduced from laboratory analogs. Open water concentrations locally exceed one micromolar carbon for the total of protein, polysaccharide and refractory heteropolycondensate. The shorter-lived lipids remain confined to regions of strong biological activity. Results are evaluated against available measurements for all compound types, and agreement is generally quite reasonable. Global distributions are further estimated for both fractional coverage of bubble films at the air-water interface and the two-dimensional concentration excess. Overall, we show that macromolecular mapping provides a novel tool for the comprehension of oceanic surfactant distributions. Results may prove useful in planning field experiments and assessing the potential response of surface chemical behaviors to global change.« less

  12. Global distribution and surface activity of macromolecules in offline simulations of marine organic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunro, Oluwaseun O.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott; Frossard, Amanda A.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Letscher, Robert T.; Moore, J. Keith; Russell, Lynn M.; Wang, Shanlin; Wingenter, Oliver W.

    2015-10-13

    Here, organic macromolecules constitute high percentage components of remote sea spray. They enter the atmosphere through adsorption onto bubbles followed by bursting at the ocean surface, and go on to influence the chemistry of the fine mode aerosol. We present a global estimate of mixed-layer organic macromolecular distributions, driven by offline marine systems model output. The approach permits estimation of oceanic concentrations and bubble film surface coverages for several classes of organic compound. Mixed layer levels are computed from the output of a global ocean biogeochemistry model by relating the macromolecules to standard biogeochemical tracers. Steady state is assumed for labile forms, and for longer-lived components we rely on ratios to existing transported variables. Adsorption is then represented through conventional Langmuir isotherms, with equilibria deduced from laboratory analogs. Open water concentrations locally exceed one micromolar carbon for the total of protein, polysaccharide and refractory heteropolycondensate. The shorter-lived lipids remain confined to regions of strong biological activity. Results are evaluated against available measurements for all compound types, and agreement is generally quite reasonable. Global distributions are further estimated for both fractional coverage of bubble films at the air-water interface and the two-dimensional concentration excess. Overall, we show that macromolecular mapping provides a novel tool for the comprehension of oceanic surfactant distributions. Results may prove useful in planning field experiments and assessing the potential response of surface chemical behaviors to global change.

  13. Multistep continuous-flow synthesis in medicinal chemistry: discovery and preliminary structure-activity relationships of CCR8 ligands.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Trine P; Mirsharghi, Sahar; Rummel, Pia C; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Ritzén, Andreas; Ulven, Trond

    2013-07-08

    A three-step continuous-flow synthesis system and its application to the assembly of a new series of chemokine receptor ligands directly from commercial building blocks is reported. No scavenger columns or solvent switches are necessary to recover the desired test compounds, which were obtained in overall yields of 49-94%. The system is modular and flexible, and the individual steps of the sequence can be interchanged with similar outcome, extending the scope of the chemistry. Biological evaluation confirmed activity on the chemokine CCR8 receptor and provided initial structure-activity-relationship (SAR) information for this new ligand series, with the most potent member displaying full agonist activity with single-digit nanomolar potency. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first published example of efficient use of multistep flow synthesis combined with biological testing and SAR studies in medicinal chemistry.

  14. An Evaluation of Subsurface Microbial Activity Conditional to Subsurface Temperature, Porosity, and Permeability at North American Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.; Mordensky, S.; Verba, Circe; Rabjohns, K.; Colwell, F.

    2016-06-21

    Several nations, including the United States, recognize global climate change as a force transforming the global ecosphere. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a greenhouse gas that contributes to the evolving climate. Reduction of atmospheric CO2 levels is a goal for many nations and carbon sequestration which traps CO2 in the Earth’s subsurface is one method to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels. Among the variables that must be considered in developing this technology to a national scale is microbial activity. Microbial activity or biomass can change rock permeability, alter artificial seals around boreholes, and play a key role in biogeochemistry and accordingly may determine how CO2 is sequestered underground. Certain physical parameters of a reservoir found in literature (e.g., temperature, porosity, and permeability) may indicate whether a reservoir can host microbial communities. In order to estimate which subsurface formations may host microbes, this report examines the subsurface temperature, porosity, and permeability of underground rock formations that have high potential to be targeted for CO2 sequestration. Of the 268 North American wellbore locations from the National Carbon Sequestration Database (NATCARB; National Energy and Technology Laboratory, 2015) and 35 sites from Nelson and Kibler (2003), 96 sequestration sites contain temperature data. Of these 96 sites, 36 sites have temperatures that would be favorable for microbial survival, 48 sites have mixed conditions for supporting microbial populations, and 11 sites would appear to be unfavorable to support microbial populations. Future studies of microbe viability would benefit from a larger database with more formation parameters (e.g. mineralogy, structure, and groundwater chemistry), which would help to increase understanding of where CO2 sequestration could be most efficiently implemented.

  15. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  16. Driving reactions: Surmounting activation barriers in solid state chemistry using hydroxide melts and RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Todd Lawrence

    1997-11-01

    This thesis explores several techniques for surmounting activation barriers in solid state chemistry. The two major issues addressed are the use of a solution-based molten hydroxide system to increase the rate of reactant diffusion over that in the solid state, and the use of an RF plasma to break bonds in gaseous reactants for subsequent reaction with a solid. Part I describes the use of molten alkali metal hydroxides as a low-temperature solvent system for both electrodeposition and precipitation of high valent copper oxides. Cyclic voltammetry was used to determine the effects of various reaction conditions on copper dissolved in the melts, including copper activity, temperature, and atmosphere composition. The results of this study indicate that copper oxide phases become less soluble at higher copper activities, temperatures, and pHsb2O values. Also, the Cu(II)/Cu(III) redox wave, important for the electrodeposition of cuprate phases with high copper formal oxidation states, is observed below 300sp°C in air and at 350sp°C in dry argon. NaCuOsb2 was electrodeposited under constant current conditions. Iodometric titrations and annealing studies indicate that NaCuOsb2 is oxygen deficient and tends to lose additional oxygen on heating. The hydroxide method was also successful in the deposition of thin films of superconducting EuBasb2Cusb4Osb8 on SrTiOsb3 substrates. The films were found to be superconducting with a Tsbc of 75 K in the absence of annealing. In Part II, the idea of circumventing activation energy barriers is applied to the problem of environmentally harmful perfluorocarbons (PFCs). Mass spectrometry was used to determine the PFC emissions from two semiconductor manufacturing processes: oxide etch and post-CVD chamber clean. Because of radical recombination to thermodynamically stable species, most of the PFCs used in these processes are emitted to the atmosphere. A prototype abatement device which uses an RF plasma to provide the activation energy

  17. Chemistry of Crustal Fluids in Continental Fault Systems: Results From Massive Fluid Production Test at KTB Drill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzinger, J.; Kuempel, H.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    A new series of experiments at Germany's super deep drill site KTB is focusing on transport processes of energy and fluids in crystalline crust. The experiments continue to exploit the scientific potential of the 4.0 km deep pilot hole (VB) and the 9.1 km deep main hole (HB) (distance at surface is 200 m). Targets of particular interest are two major fault systems intersected by the boreholes at 3.9 km (both holes) and 7.2 km depths (HB). The first experimental phase was a long-term pump test in KTB-VB with production of 22,300 m3 of 119° C hot (bottom hole temperature) saline fluids from the metamorphic basement. The fault zone at 4 km depth has a bulk permeability of 2×10^{-15} m2 , at least. From fluid level observation in KTB- HB a weak hydraulic contact with KTB-VB is deduced. Seismic activity, recorded both at the surface and inside KTB-HB at depths down to 3.9 km, appears not to have increased by the pumping. Since the beginning of the pump test, the volume ratio of gas to water (surface conditions) varied between 0.95 and 1.05. The electrical conductivity of the Ca-Na-Cl fluid (63 gl-1 TDS) was rather constant at 86 mScm-1 as were the on-line values for pH (7.5) and Eh (-430 mV). Except forRn, concentrations of gases and dissolved constituents were constant throughout the production period of one year. The major portion of the formation gas phase is composed of nitrogen (66.2%vol) and methane (33%vol); He (0.59%vol), Ar (0.12%vol), and CO2 (0.03%vol) are present in trace quantities only. Furthermore, isotope ratios of helium (3He/4He = 6.2±0.3×10-7, R/RA = 0.47), neon (21Ne/20Ne = 0.0035), argon (40Ar/^{36}Ar = 945), CH4 (δ13C = -50‰), nitrogen (δ15N = +1.5‰), and strontium (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7094) were apparently constant during the pump test. However, ^{222}Rn activity varied between 3800 and 6000 Bqm-3 depending on the production rate. N2 originates most probably from the release of NH4-fixed N2 from paragneisses which have δ15N values of +6

  18. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  19. Identification of the biologically active liquid chemistry induced by a nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Wende, Kristian; Williams, Paul; Dalluge, Joe; Gaens, Wouter Van; Aboubakr, Hamada; Bischof, John; von Woedtke, Thomas; Goyal, Sagar M; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Bogaerts, Annemie; Masur, Kai; Bruggeman, Peter J

    2015-06-06

    The mechanism of interaction of cold nonequilibrium plasma jets with mammalian cells in physiologic liquid is reported. The major biological active species produced by an argon RF plasma jet responsible for cell viability reduction are analyzed by experimental results obtained through physical, biological, and chemical diagnostics. This is complemented with chemical kinetics modeling of the plasma source to assess the dominant reactive gas phase species. Different plasma chemistries are obtained by changing the feed gas composition of the cold argon based RF plasma jet from argon, humidified argon (0.27%), to argon/oxygen (1%) and argon/air (1%) at constant power. A minimal consensus physiologic liquid was used, providing isotonic and isohydric conditions and nutrients but is devoid of scavengers or serum constituents. While argon and humidified argon plasma led to the creation of hydrogen peroxide dominated action on the mammalian cells, argon-oxygen and argon-air plasma created a very different biological action and was characterized by trace amounts of hydrogen peroxide only. In particular, for the argon-oxygen (1%), the authors observed a strong negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation and metabolism. This effect was distance dependent and showed a half life time of 30 min in a scavenger free physiologic buffer. Neither catalase and mannitol nor superoxide dismutase could rescue the cell proliferation rate. The strong distance dependency of the effect as well as the low water solubility rules out a major role for ozone and singlet oxygen but suggests a dominant role of atomic oxygen. Experimental results suggest that O reacts with chloride, yielding Cl2(-) or ClO(-). These chlorine species have a limited lifetime under physiologic conditions and therefore show a strong time dependent biological activity. The outcomes are compared with an argon MHz plasma jet (kinpen) to assess the differences between these (at least seemingly) similar plasma sources.

  20. Water chemistry of lakes related to active and inactive Mexican volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, María Aurora; Vilaclara, Gloria; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ramos, Silvia; Ceniceros, Nora; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor

    2008-12-01

    Water chemistry of crater lakes, maars and water reservoirs linked to some Mexican volcanoes within and outside the Mexican Volcanic Belt has been determined for several years and examined regarding environmental and volcanic factors. All the analyzed lakes are relatively small with a maximum depth of 65 m, and are located in regions with different climates, from semi-arid to very humid, with altitudes ranging from 100 to more than 4000 m a.s.l. Crater lakes in active volcanoes (El Chichón, Popocatépetl) have very low pH, moderate to high temperatures and major ion concentrations varying with the level of volcanic unrest. Lakes in sub-arid and temperate-arid regions (like maars in Puebla and Guanajuato states) show high alkalinity and pH, with bicarbonate/carbonate, chloride, sodium and magnesium as predominant ions. Lakes located in humid climates (Central Michoacán and Veracruz state) have low mineralization and near-neutral pH values. In general, conservative dissolved ions and conductivity appear to be mostly controlled by precipitation/evaporation and by the ionic concentration of groundwater inputs. Calcium, magnesium, sulfate concentrations and pH are strongly influenced by volcanic-rock or volcanic gas interactions with water. The influence of low-level volcanic activity on crater lakes may be obscured by water-rock interactions, and climatic factors. One of the aims of this paper is to define the relative influence of these factors searching for a reference frame to recognize the early volcanic precursors in volcano-related lakes.

  1. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  2. Integration of graph theory and quantum chemistry for structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, K

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this article is to outline both graph-theoretically based and quantum chemically based structural indices of potential use in quantitative structure activity correlations. We consider graph-theoretical indices such as the connectivity index, topological index, Wiener index and molecular ID indices. Several structural and geometry-dependent indices can be derived from semiempirical and ab initio quantum calculations based on the charge densities, overlap matrices, frontier orbitals, molecular hardness, free valence, density matrices, quantum spectral difference indices, quantum spectral indices and bond matrices. Finally, the use of electrostatic potentials and charge densities for the prediction of reactive sites will be discussed.

  3. Surface and Active Layer Pore Water Chemistry from Ice Wedge Polygons, Barrow, Alaska, 2013-2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    David E. Graham; Baohua Gu; Elizabeth M. Herndon; Stan D. Wullschleger; Ziming Yang; Liyuan Liang

    2016-11-10

    This data set reports the results of spatial surveys of aqueous geochemistry conducted at Intensive Site 1 of the Barrow Environmental Observatory in 2013 and 2014 (Herndon et al., 2015). Surface water and soil pore water samples were collected from multiple depths within the tundra active layer of different microtopographic features (troughs, ridges, center) of a low-centered polygon (area A), high-centered polygon (area B), flat-centered polygon (area C), and transitional polygon (area D). Reported analytes include dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, dissolved carbon dioxide and methane, major inorganic anions, and major and minor cations.

  4. Chemistry of runoff and shallow ground water at the Cattlemans Detention basin site, South Lake Tahoe, California, August 2000-November 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prudic, David E.; Sager, Sienna J.; Wood, James L.; Henkelman, Katherine K.; Caskey, Rachel M.

    2005-01-01

    A study at the Cattlemans detention basin site began in November 2000. The site is adjacent to Cold Creek in South Lake Tahoe, California. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effects of the detention basin on ground-water discharge and changes in nutrient loads to Cold Creek, a tributary to Trout Creek and Lake Tahoe. The study is being done in cooperation with the Tahoe Engineering Division of the El Dorado County Department of Transportation. This report summarizes data collected prior to and during construction of the detention basin and includes: (1) nutrient and total suspended solid concentrations of urban runoff; (2) distribution of unconsolidated deposits; (3) direction of ground-water flow; and (4) chemistry of shallow ground water and Cold Creek. Unconsolidated deposits in the area of the detention basin were categorized into three classes: fill material consisting of a red-brown loamy sand with some gravel and an occasional cobble that was placed on top of the meadow; meadow deposits consisting of gray silt and sand with stringers of coarse sand and fine gravel; and a deeper brown to yellow-brown sand and gravel with lenses of silt and sand. Prior to construction of the detention basin, ground water flowed west-northwest across the area of the detention basin toward Cold Creek. The direction of ground-water flow did not change during construction of the detention basin. Median concentrations of dissolved iron and chloride were 500 and 30 times higher, respectively, in ground water from the meadow deposits than dissolved concentrations in Cold Creek. Median concentration of sulfate in ground water from the meadow deposits was 0.4 milligrams per liter and dissolved oxygen was below the detection level of 0.3 milligrams per liter. The relatively high concentrations of iron and the lack of sulfate in the shallow ground water likely are caused by chemical reactions and biological microbial oxidation of organic matter in the unconsolidated deposits

  5. Changes in permeability and fluid chemistry of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush tuff (Nevada Test Site) when held in a temperature gradient: summary of results

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.E.; Morrow, C.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1984-06-01

    The permeability and groundwater chemistry results for the Topopah Spring Member are reported and compared with the results from the previous work on Bullfrog. Permeability measurements made on samples of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff at room-temperature and in a temperature gradient show that the initially high (3-65 {mu}da) permeabilities are little affected by heating to at least 150{sup 0}C. These permeability relationships are favvorable for the disposal of nuclear waste in this stuff in an unsaturated zone at the Nevada Test Site. The fluids discharged from the samples of tuff during the experiments are dilute, nearly neutral solutions that differ only slightly from the starting groundwater composition. 8 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

  6. Operation and research at the Ithaca MAP3S regional precipitation chemistry site. Progress report, 1 December 1984-1 August 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Likens, G.E.; Butler, T.J.

    1985-08-01

    The site continues to operate smoothly as it has since September 1976. Data for 1 June 1984-31 July 1985 show generally average meteorologic conditions and acidic precipitation at the site in terms of event number (88), precipitation amount (90 cm), H/sup +/ concentration (72.4 ..mu..eq/1 or pH 4.14), and H/sup +/ deposition (653 eq/ha). Network related research includes evaluation of differences in mean pH among sites. Ithaca, Penn State, and Virginia have lowest mean pH's (4.17) followed by Oxford and Oak Ridge (4.28). The peripheral sites Whiteface, Illinois, Brookhaven, and Lewes have significantly higher mean pH's, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 pH units (13 to 30 ..mu..eq H/sup +//1) higher than Ithaca. Comparisons of precipitation chemistry data show no negative correlation between H/sup +/ and Ca/sup 2 +/, contrary to what has been suggested in the literature. There are positive correlations between H/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup =/, and H/sup +/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ at all sites. Research on particle mineralogy so far suggests that common crustal minerals (iron oxides, silicon dioxide, muscovite mica and clays) dominate as well as sulphur-rich and calcium species. Calcium sulphate appears to be more abundant than calcium carbonate even though calcium carbonate is more abundant in soils over most of the US. It is proposed that CaSO/sub 4/ aerosol is being formed through the neutralization of CaCO/sub 3/ particles by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ aerosols (CaCO/sub 3/ + H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ + 2 H/sub 2/O ..-->.. CaSO/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/O + CO/sub 2/). 6 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Activity theory as a tool to address the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary school chemical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aalsvoort, Joke

    In a previous article, the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary chemical education was analysed using logical positivism as a tool. This article starts with the hypothesis that the problem can be addressed by means of activity theory, one of the important theories within the sociocultural school. The reason for this expectation is that, while logical positivism creates a divide between science and society, activity theory offers a model of society in which science and society are related. With the use of this model, a new course for grade nine has been constructed. This results in a confirmation of the hypothesis, at least at a theoretical level. A comparison with the Salters' approach is made in order to demonstrate the relative merits of a mediated way of dealing with the problem of the lack of relevance of chemistry in chemical education.

  8. Inorganic ground-water chemistry at an experimental New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in situ gasification site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Branam, T.D.; Comer, J.B.; Shaffer, N.R.; Ennis, M.V.; Carpenter, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental in situ gasification of New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) has been conducted in Clark County. Analyses of ground water sampled from a production well and nine nearby monitoring wells 3 months after a brief in situ gasification period revealed changes in water chemistry associated with the gasification procedure. Dissolved iron, calcium and sulphate in ground water from the production well and wells as much as 2 m away were significantly higher than in ground water from wells over 9 m away. Dissolved components in the more distant wells are in the range of those in regional ground water. Thermal decomposition of pyrite during the gasification process generated the elevated levels of iron and sulphate in solution. High concentrations of calcium indicate buffering by dissolution of carbonate minerals. While iron quickly precipitates, calcium and sulphate remain in the ground water. Trends in the concentration of sulphate show that altered ground water migrated mostly in a south-westerly direction from the production well along natural joints in the New Albany Shale. ?? 1991.

  9. Palladium-triggered deprotection chemistry for protein activation in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Yu, Juntao; Zhao, Jingyi; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Siqi; Lin, Shixian; Chen, Long; Yang, Maiyun; Jia, Shang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Peng R.

    2014-04-01

    Employing small molecules or chemical reagents to modulate the function of an intracellular protein, particularly in a gain-of-function fashion, remains a challenge. In contrast to inhibitor-based loss-of-function approaches, methods based on a gain of function enable specific signalling pathways to be activated inside a cell. Here we report a chemical rescue strategy that uses a palladium-mediated deprotection reaction to activate a protein within living cells. We identify biocompatible and efficient palladium catalysts that cleave the propargyl carbamate group of a protected lysine analogue to generate a free lysine. The lysine analogue can be genetically and site-specifically incorporated into a protein, which enables control over the reaction site. This deprotection strategy is shown to work with a range of different cell lines and proteins. We further applied this biocompatible protection group/catalyst pair for caging and subsequent release of a crucial lysine residue in a bacterial Type III effector protein within host cells, which reveals details of its virulence mechanism.

  10. Spatial, Hysteretic, and Adaptive Host-Guest Chemistry in a Metal-Organic Framework with Open Watson-Crick Sites.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Li, Mian; Lin, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Wei; Chen, Guang-Hui; Huang, Xiao-Chun; Li, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Biological and artificial molecules and assemblies capable of supramolecular recognition, especially those with nucleobase pairing, usually rely on autonomous or collective binding to function. Advanced site-specific recognition takes advantage of cooperative spatial effects, as in local folding in protein-DNA binding. Herein, we report a new nucleobase-tagged metal-organic framework (MOF), namely ZnBTCA (BTC=benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxyl, A=adenine), in which the exposed Watson-Crick faces of adenine residues are immobilized periodically on the interior crystalline surface. Systematic control experiments demonstrated the cooperation of the open Watson-Crick sites and spatial effects within the nanopores, and thermodynamic and kinetic studies revealed a hysteretic host-guest interaction attributed to mild chemisorption. We further exploited this behavior for adenine-thymine binding within the constrained pores, and a globally adaptive response of the MOF host was observed.

  11. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  12. Impact-shocked rocks--insights into Archean and extraterrestrial microbial habitats (and sites for prebiotic chemistry?).

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S

    2004-01-01

    Impact-shocked gneiss shocked to greater than 10 GPa in the Haughton impact structure in the Canadian High Arctic has an approximately 25-times greater pore surface area than unshocked rocks. These pore spaces provide microhabitats for a diversity of heterotrophic microorganisms and in the near-surface environment of the rocks, where light levels are sufficient, cyanobacteria. Shocked rocks provide a moisture retaining, UV protected microenvironment. During the Archean, when impact fluxes were more than two orders of magnitude higher than today, the shocked-rock habitat was one of the most common terrestrial habitats and might have provided a UV-shielded refugium for primitive life. These potential habitats are in high abundance on Mars where impact crater habitats could have existed over geologic time periods of billions of years, suggesting that impact-shocked rocks are important sites to search for biomolecules in extraterrestrial life detection strategies. In addition to being favourable sites for life, during the prebiotic period of planetary history impact-shocked rocks might have acted as a site for the concentration of reactants for prebiotic syntheses.

  13. Site-specific labeling of RNA by combining genetic alphabet expansion transcription and copper-free click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Ando, Ami; Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2015-08-18

    Site-specific labeling of long-chain RNAs with desired molecular probes is an imperative technique to facilitate studies of functional RNA molecules. By genetic alphabet expansion using an artificial third base pair, called an unnatural base pair, we present a post-transcriptional modification method for RNA transcripts containing an incorporated azide-linked unnatural base at specific positions, using a copper-free click reaction. The unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds) and pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (Pa) functions in transcription. Thus, we chemically synthesized a triphosphate substrate of 4-(4-azidopentyl)-pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (N3-PaTP), which can be site-specifically introduced into RNA, opposite Ds in templates by T7 transcription. The N3-Pa incorporated in the transcripts was modified with dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO) derivatives. We demonstrated the transcription of 17-, 76- and 260-mer RNA molecules and their site-specific labeling with Alexa 488, Alexa 594 and biotin. This method will be useful for preparing RNA molecules labeled with any functional groups of interest, toward in vivo experiments.

  14. Gas-phase alkyl amines in urban air; comparison with a boreal forest site and importance for local atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellén, H.; Kieloaho, A.-J.; Hakola, H.

    2014-09-01

    Low-molecular-weight aliphatic amines were measured in the ambient urban background air at the SMEAR III station (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations III) in Helsinki, Finland, from May until late August 2011. The alkyl amines measured were dimethylamine (DMA), ethylamine (EA), trimethylamine (TMA), propylamine (PA), diethylamine (DEA), butylamine (BA) and triethylamine (TEA). Of these amines, DMA + EA and TMA + PA were the most abundant, with average concentrations of 24 and 8 ppt. The ranges of weekly mean concentrations of DMA + EA and TMA + PA were

    site (SMEAR II), indicating the presence at the latter site of some additional sources. Amine lifetimes are short, varying from 2.3 h to 7.6 h against hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The amine concentrations were scaled against OH reactivity and compared with the OH reactivities of aromatic hydrocarbons and terpenes. The results showed that amines strongly influenced the total OH reactivity, especially at the boreal forest site in May, September and October, showing contributions almost as high as those of monoterpenes.

  15. Impact-shocked rocks--insights into Archean and extraterrestrial microbial habitats (and sites for prebiotic chemistry?)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, C. S.

    2004-01-01

    Impact-shocked gneiss shocked to greater than 10 GPa in the Haughton impact structure in the Canadian High Arctic has an approximately 25-times greater pore surface area than unshocked rocks. These pore spaces provide microhabitats for a diversity of heterotrophic microorganisms and in the near-surface environment of the rocks, where light levels are sufficient, cyanobacteria. Shocked rocks provide a moisture retaining, UV protected microenvironment. During the Archean, when impact fluxes were more than two orders of magnitude higher than today, the shocked-rock habitat was one of the most common terrestrial habitats and might have provided a UV-shielded refugium for primitive life. These potential habitats are in high abundance on Mars where impact crater habitats could have existed over geologic time periods of billions of years, suggesting that impact-shocked rocks are important sites to search for biomolecules in extraterrestrial life detection strategies. In addition to being favourable sites for life, during the prebiotic period of planetary history impact-shocked rocks might have acted as a site for the concentration of reactants for prebiotic syntheses. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  17. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  18. Relating stationary and non-stationary hyporheic travel times with hyporheic chemistry at the Steinlach Test Site, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osenbrück, Karsten; Rohrbach, Nina; Lemke, Dennis; Liao, Zijie; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2013-04-01

    Stream-groundwater interaction is believed to significantly contribute to the retention and degradation of pollutants by means of associated biogeochemical processes in the hyporheic zone. The distribution and temporal variability of travel times of water within the hyporheic zone and their relation to hyporheic reactivity are amongst the key parameters for assessing the self-cleaning potential of rivers and hence water quality changes at catchment scale. In this study we used time series of specific electrical conductivity (EC) of water to delineate the flow paths and travel times of water undergoing exchange between a stream and the adjacent riparian aquifer. The main objective was to interrelate hyporheic travel times with transformations of oxygen and nitrate monitored within the hyporheic zone. The study is part of a multi-disciplinary monitoring program at the Steinlach Test Site near Tübingen in Southern Germany. The test site covers an area of about 0.6 ha and consists of a river bend underlain by a sandy gravel aquifer. The site is equipped with more than 30 piezometers, most of them containing automatic water level, temperature, and EC probes and in some cases also oxygen probes. Additional field measurements of dissolved oxygen and pH as well as water samples for the analysis of major ions and DOC were taken from March to December 2012. Travel time distributions and mean travel times were derived using parametric as well as non-parametric (shape-free) deconvolution approaches. In addition to these stationary approaches, we also applied a windowed cross-correlation approach to assess short-term changes in travel time governed by variations in stream discharge. Mean travel times of 0.5 to 8 days were estimated from EC and δ18O data using a dispersion model for groundwater taken from selected piezometers and at the outlet spring. Application of the non-stationary modelling approach revealed a doubling of travel times between high and low flow conditions

  19. Groundwater chemistry and isotope signatures of potential CCS sites in Korea - A baseline study for leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H.; Jeong, T.; Woo, N. C.

    2013-12-01

    This research aimed at drawing a baseline of groundwater chemistry and its stable isotope signatures of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon from the deep groundwater above the CO2 sequestration layer, in which physico-chemical conditions are conceived as temperature over 40 degree Celcius and high total dissolved solids. Samples were collected from hot springs (at surface and from seep wells) and high-carbonate springs. Based on water compositions, three groups were identified as saline, alkali-carbonate and soda spring types. Saline type hot springs at the west coastline area contain -14.5‰ δ13C of CO2. Before and after rainfall events, δ13C value of samples shows no change. Hot springs at Suanbo region, located at the center are of the Korean Peninsular, were collected from deep wells of 750 m in depth, and they show the alkali-carbonate type water having δ13C values (-11.3~-10.9‰) and ECs (364~431μS/cm). Both saline and alkali-carbonate type waters show no significant change in composition, indicating that recharge by precipitation has no effect on these groundwater. All the high-carbonate springs were collected at ground surface, and enriched with Ca, Mg and HCO3., probably caused by the dissolution of CO2, and high EC values of 1,016 μS/cm. Soda springs located in Chungcheongbuk-do region have -6.8~-6.7‰ δ13C of CO2, indicating that the source of CO2 could be the upper mantle affected by the carbonate minerals in the Quaternary sedimentary bedrock. On the contrary, carbonate waters in the Gangwon-do region have -3.9~-3.7‰ δ13C of CO2, clearly indicating the source of CO2 being the upper mantle (Gerlach and Taylor, 1990). More detailed chemical and isotopic signatures of the sampled waters will be discussed in presentation.

  20. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  1. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  2. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  3. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  4. Hydrothermal mineralogy and fluid inclusions chemistry to understand the roots of active geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambefort, I. S.; Dilles, J. H.; Heinrich, C.

    2013-12-01

    An integrated study to link magmatic textures, magmatic mineral compositions, hydrothermal alteration zoning, hydrothermal mineral chemistry, and fluid inclusion compositions has been undertaken to link an intrusive complex and its degassing alteration halo with their surface equivalent in an active geothermal system. Ngatamariki geothermal system, New Zealand, presents a unique feature in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ). Drilling intercepted an intrusive complex with a high temperature alteration halo similarly to what is observed in magmatic-derived ore deposits. Thus it presents the perfect opportunity to study the magmatic-hydrothermal transition of the TVZ by characterizing the nature of the deep magmatic fluids link to the heat source of the world known geothermal fields. The record of magmatic-hydrothermal fluid-rock interactions preserved at Ngatamariki may be analogous of processes presently occurring at depth beneath TVZ geothermal systems. The intrusive complex consists of over 5 km3 of tonalite, diorite, basalt and aplitic dykes. Evidence of undercooling subsolidus magmatic textures such as myrmekite and skeletal overgrowth are commonly observed and often linked to volatile loss. The fluids released during the crystallization of the intrusive complex are interpreted to be at the origin of the surrounding high temperature alteration halo. Advanced argillic to potassic alteration and high temperature acidic assemblage is associated with high-temperature quartz veining at depth and vuggy silica at the paleo-surface. Major element compositions of the white micas associated with the high temperature halo show a transition from, muscovite to phengite, muscovitic illite away from the intrusion, with a transition to pyrophyllite and/ or topaz, and andalusite characteristic of more acidic conditions. Abundant high-density (up to 59 wt% NaCl eq and homogenization temperatures of 550 degree Celsius and above) coexist with low-density vapor fluid inclusions. This

  5. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  6. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  7. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  8. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  9. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  10. Acyl-biotinyl exchange chemistry and mass spectrometry-based analysis of palmitoylation sites of in vitro palmitoylated rat brain tubulin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Hou, Junjie; Xie, Zhensheng; Deng, Jianwei; Wang, Xiaoming; Chen, Danfang; Yang, Fuquan; Gong, Weimin

    2010-11-01

    Research has shown that the palmitoyl group of α-tubulin mediates the hydrophobic interaction between microtubules and intracellular membranes and that palmitoylated tubulin plays a role in signal transduction. There are 20 cysteine residues per α/β tubulin heterodimer. C376 of α-tubulin was reported to be predominantly palmitoylated and C20, C213 and C305 of α-tubulin were palmitoylated at lower levels. The previous method used for the analysis of the palmitoylation sites on α-tubulin was based on ³H-labeling, enzymolysis, purification and sequencing. This approach, although efficient, is laborious. Mass spectrometry (MS), especially tandem MS, has been shown to be a successful method for identification of various post-translational modifications of proteins. We report here a convenient MS-based method to comprehensively analyze the palmitoylation sites of the α/β tubulin heterodimer. Acyl-biotinyl exchange chemistry and streptavidin agarose affinity purification were applied to enrich palmitoylated peptides from tubulin. After nano-LC-MS/MS analysis, database searching and manual analysis of the spectra revealed that 11 cysteine residues of the α/β tubulin heterodimer were palmitoylated.

  11. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  12. Principles of Environmental Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Ruth A.

    2007-07-01

    Roy M. Harrison, Editor RSC Publishing; ISBN 0854043713; × + 363 pp.; 2006; $69.95 Environmental chemistry is an interdisciplinary science that includes chemistry of the air, water, and soil. Although it may be confused with green chemistry, which deals with potential pollution reduction, environmental chemistry is the scientific study of the chemical and biochemical principles that occur in nature. Therefore, it is the study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the air, water, and soil environments, and the effect of human activity on them. Environmental chemistry not only explores each of these environments, but also closely examines the interfaces and boundaries where the environments intersect.

  13. Island Explorations: Discovering Effects of Environmental Research-Based Lab Activities on Analytical Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasik, Janice Hall; LeCaptain, Dale; Murphy, Sarah; Martin, Mary; Knight, Rachel M.; Harke, Maureen A.; Burke, Ryan; Beck, Kara; Acevedo-Polakovich, I. David

    2014-01-01

    Motivating students in analytical chemistry can be challenging, in part because of the complexity and breadth of topics involved. Some methods that help encourage students and convey real-world relevancy of the material include incorporating environmental issues, research-based lab experiments, and service learning projects. In this paper, we…

  14. "JCE" Classroom Activity #110: Artistic Anthocyanins and Acid-Base Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lech, Jenna; Dounin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Art and science are sometimes viewed as opposing subjects, but are united in many ways. With an increased awareness of the benefits of interdisciplinary studies in education, it is desirable to show students how different subjects impact one another. Visual arts are greatly connected to chemistry in several ways. Pigments are usually synthetically…

  15. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: A Discovery-Based Activity for the General Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgsmiller, Karen L.; O'Connell, Dylan J.; Klauenberg, Kathryn M.; Wilson, Peter M.; Stromberg, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    A discovery-based method is described for incorporating the concepts of IR and Raman spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum. Students use three sets of springs to model the properties of single, double, and triple covalent bonds. Then, Gaussian 03W molecular modeling software is used to illustrate the relationship between bond…

  16. "Chemistry Is in the News": Taxonomy of Authentic News Media-Based Learning Activities. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Rainer E.; Carson, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    A brief history is given of approaches that aim at achieving a connectedness of the content of organic chemistry courses to real world issues. Recently, such approaches have relied more and more on online media resources, the tools of the Internet and the World Wide Web. We propose a six-level taxonomy of 'authentic news media-based learning…

  17. Space Resources for Teachers: Chemistry; Including Suggestions for Classroom Activities and Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Richard M.

    This publication is composed of 10 units, each based on an area of space science and technology in which chemistry plays an important role. Each resource unit can be used independently of the others and materials can be selected from within a unit. The materials range in difficulty from the junior high level of understanding to those that will…

  18. Using Low-Tech Interactions in the Chemistry Classroom to Engage Students in Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Two complementary techniques to gauge student understanding and inspire interactive learning in the chemistry classroom are presented. Specifically, this article explores the use of student responses with their thumbs as an alternative to electronic-response systems and complementing these experiences with longer, task-based questions in an…

  19. Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites Edward W. Malin, MD, Chaya M. Galin, BSN, RN... microcurrent in comparison to silver-coated dressing with sham microcurrent on wound-closure time for autogenous skin donor sites. Methods: Four...hundred five patients were screened for treatment of their donor sites using a silver-coated nylon dressing with either sham or active microcurrent

  20. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  1. 76 FR 30696 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  2. 76 FR 24871 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... from eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of...). Title X requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs...

  3. Relationship Between Precipitation Chemistry and Meteorological Parameters at a Urban Site in the North of Queretaro State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Martínez, R.; Hernández, G.; Solis, S.; Torres, M. D.; Padilla, H.; Báez, A.

    2010-12-01

    A total of 50 wet precipitation samples were collected per event at the Juriquilla site from mid-May 2009 to the end of May 2010. The Juriquilla sampling site was located on the roof of the Geoscience Building, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, at the Juriquilla Campus in the city of Querétaro located at 20°41'58"N and 100°27'28" W, at 1920 meters above sea level (masl). Sampling was done in passive collectors that consisted of a high density polyethylene funnel connected to a 2-liter polyethylene bottle, supported by a rod 1.5 m above the roof. One of the collectors was used to take samples for trace metals. The analysis was done in soluble and insoluble fractions. Al, Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a graphite furnace accessory. The other collector was used to measure pH and major ions (SO4-2, Cl-, NO3-, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+ and NH4+) in the soluble fractions, because it was assumed that these ions are completely soluble in rainwater. The major ions SO4-2, Cl-, and NO3-, were analyzed by a Varian Model 2010 ion chromatograph; Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+ were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry and NH4+ by a UV spectrophotometer. In this study, synoptic maps were used to analyze the transport of air masses before rainfall, enabling back trajectories to be used to estimate the source region of pollutants. To understand the variety of synoptic weather conditions, data were associated with the corresponding air mass back trajectories calculated by the NOAA HYSPLIT model (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model). Back trajectory models have very simple advection schemes to calculate the previous position of an air parcel by using estimated wind speed and direction for the time period prior to arrival at the selected site. In this study, the origin of the air mass for an event was evaluated by a three-day back-trajectory before arrival to Queretaro. Mass back

  4. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  5. Characteristic tandem mass spectral features under various collision chemistries for site-specific identification of protein S-glutathionylation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chi-Chi; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Lin, Jason Ching-Yao; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Lin, Chun-Hung; Khoo, Kay-Hooi

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a reversible post-translational modification widely implicated in redox regulated biological functions. Conventional biochemical methods, however, often do not allow such a mixed disulfide modification to be reliably identified on specific cysteine residues or be distinguished from other related oxidized forms. To develop more efficient mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical strategies for this purpose, we first investigated the MS/MS fragmentation pattern of S-glutathionylated peptides under various dissociation modes, including collision-induced dissociation (CID), higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD), and electron transfer dissociation (ETD), using synthetic peptides derived from protein tyrosine phosphatase as models. Our results indicate that a MALDI-based high energy CID MS/MS on a TOF/TOF affords the most distinctive spectral features that would facilitate rapid and unambiguous identification of site-specific S-glutathionylation. For more complex proteomic samples best tackled by LC-MS/MS approach, we demonstrate that HCD performed on an LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid instrument fairs better than trap-based CID and ETD in allowing more protein site-specific S-glutathionylation to be confidently identified by direct database searching of the generated MS/MS dataset using Mascot. Overall, HCD afforded more peptide sequence-informative fragment ions retaining the glutathionyl modification with less neutral losses of side chains to compromise scoring. In conjunction with our recently developed chemo-enzymatic tagging strategy, our nanoLC-HCD-MS/MS approach is sufficiently sensitive to identify endogenous S-glutathionylated peptides prepared from non-stressed cells. It is anticipated that future applications to global scale analysis of protein S-glutathionylation will benefit further from current advances in both speed and mass accuracy afforded by HCD MS/MS mode on the Orbitrap series.

  6. Characteristic Tandem Mass Spectral Features Under Various Collision Chemistries for Site-Specific Identification of Protein S-Glutathionylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chi-Chi; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Lin, Jason Ching-Yao; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Lin, Chun-Hung; Khoo, Kay-Hooi

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a reversible post-translational modification widely implicated in redox regulated biological functions. Conventional biochemical methods, however, often do not allow such a mixed disulfide modification to be reliably identified on specific cysteine residues or be distinguished from other related oxidized forms. To develop more efficient mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical strategies for this purpose, we first investigated the MS/MS fragmentation pattern of S-glutathionylated peptides under various dissociation modes, including collision-induced dissociation (CID), higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD), and electron transfer dissociation (ETD), using synthetic peptides derived from protein tyrosine phosphatase as models. Our results indicate that a MALDI-based high energy CID MS/MS on a TOF/TOF affords the most distinctive spectral features that would facilitate rapid and unambiguous identification of site-specific S-glutathionylation. For more complex proteomic samples best tackled by LC-MS/MS approach, we demonstrate that HCD performed on an LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid instrument fairs better than trap-based CID and ETD in allowing more protein site-specific S-glutathionylation to be confidently identified by direct database searching of the generated MS/MS dataset using Mascot. Overall, HCD afforded more peptide sequence-informative fragment ions retaining the glutathionyl modification with less neutral losses of side chains to compromise scoring. In conjunction with our recently developed chemo-enzymatic tagging strategy, our nanoLC-HCD-MS/MS approach is sufficiently sensitive to identify endogenous S-glutathionylated peptides prepared from non-stressed cells. It is anticipated that future applications to global scale analysis of protein S-glutathionylation will benefit further from current advances in both speed and mass accuracy afforded by HCD MS/MS mode on the Orbitrap series.

  7. Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed β-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70–81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1’s lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1’s lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the kcat for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1’s active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar “gating loop” or a highly buried solvent-excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates. PMID:28026940

  8. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  9. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  10. Single-Site Zeolite-Anchored Organoiridium Carbonyl Complexes: Characterization of Structure and Reactivity by Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Chen, Mingyang; Dixon, David A.; ...

    2015-07-03

    We formed a family of HY zeolite-supported cationic organoiridium carbonyl complexes by reaction of Ir(CO)2(acac) (acac=acetylacetonate) to form supported Ir(CO)2 complexes, which were treated at 298K and 1atm with flowing gas-phase reactants, including C2H4, H2, (CO)-C-12, (CO)-C-13, and D2O. Mass spectrometry was used to identify effluent gases, and infrared and X-ray absorption spectroscopies were used to characterize the supported species, with the results bolstered by DFT calculations. The support is crystalline and presents a nearly uniform array of bonding sites for the iridium species, so these were characterized by a high degree of uniformity, which allowed a precise determination ofmore » the species involved in the replacement, for example, of one CO ligand of each Ir(CO)2 complex with ethylene. The supported species include the following: Ir(CO)2, Ir(CO)(C2H4)2, Ir(CO)(C2H4), Ir(CO)(C2H5), and (tentatively) Ir(CO)(H). The data determine a reaction network involving all of these species.« less

  11. Single-Site Zeolite-Anchored Organoiridium Carbonyl Complexes: Characterization of Structure and Reactivity by Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Chen, Mingyang; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2015-07-03

    We formed a family of HY zeolite-supported cationic organoiridium carbonyl complexes by reaction of Ir(CO)2(acac) (acac=acetylacetonate) to form supported Ir(CO)2 complexes, which were treated at 298K and 1atm with flowing gas-phase reactants, including C2H4, H2, (CO)-C-12, (CO)-C-13, and D2O. Mass spectrometry was used to identify effluent gases, and infrared and X-ray absorption spectroscopies were used to characterize the supported species, with the results bolstered by DFT calculations. The support is crystalline and presents a nearly uniform array of bonding sites for the iridium species, so these were characterized by a high degree of uniformity, which allowed a precise determination of the species involved in the replacement, for example, of one CO ligand of each Ir(CO)2 complex with ethylene. The supported species include the following: Ir(CO)2, Ir(CO)(C2H4)2, Ir(CO)(C2H4), Ir(CO)(C2H5), and (tentatively) Ir(CO)(H). The data determine a reaction network involving all of these species.

  12. Single-Site Zeolite-Anchored Organoiridium Carbonyl Complexes: Characterization of Structure and Reactivity by Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Chen, Mingyang; Dixon, David A; Gates, Bruce C

    2015-08-10

    A family of HY zeolite-supported cationic organoiridium carbonyl complexes was formed by reaction of Ir(CO)2 (acac) (acac=acetylacetonate) to form supported Ir(CO)2 complexes, which were treated at 298 K and 1 atm with flowing gas-phase reactants, including C2 H4 , H2 , (12) CO, (13) CO, and D2 O. Mass spectrometry was used to identify effluent gases, and infrared and X-ray absorption spectroscopies were used to characterize the supported species, with the results bolstered by DFT calculations. Because the support is crystalline and presents a nearly uniform array of bonding sites for the iridium species, these were characterized by a high degree of uniformity, which allowed a precise determination of the species involved in the replacement, for example, of one CO ligand of each Ir(CO)2 complex with ethylene. The supported species include the following: Ir(CO)2 , Ir(CO)(C2 H4)2 , Ir(CO)(C2 H4), Ir(CO)(C2 H5), and (tentatively) Ir(CO)(H). The data determine a reaction network involving all of these species.

  13. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; ...

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5more » s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.« less

  14. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  15. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D. C.

    2011-04-15

    Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry - specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. The broad goal is to produce diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Originally the goal was to prepare shape-selective catalysts that would limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. We are currently awaiting follow-up experiments to determine the attrition strength of these catalysts. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first

  16. Activity and property landscape modeling is at the interface of chemoinformatics and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Medina-Franco, José L; Navarrete-Vázquez, Gabriel; Méndez-Lucio, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Property landscape modeling (PLM) methods are at the interface of experimental sciences and computational chemistry. PLM are becoming a common strategy to describe systematically structure-property relationships of datasets. Thus far, PLM have been used mainly in medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Herein, we survey advances on key topics on PLM with emphasis on questions often raised regarding the outcomes of the property landscape studies. We also emphasize on concepts of PLM that are being extended to other experimental areas beyond drug discovery. Topics discussed in this paper include applications of PLM to further characterize protein-ligand interactions, the utility of PLM as a quantitative and descriptive approach, and the statistical validation of property cliffs.

  17. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  18. An active site mutation increases the polymerase activity of the guinea pig-lethal Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Alexander; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Becker, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes severe, often fatal, disease in humans and transient illness in rodents. Sequential passaging of MARV in guinea pigs resulted in selection of a lethal virus containing 4 aa changes. A D184N mutation in VP40 (VP40D184N), which leads to a species-specific gain of viral fitness, and three mutations in the active site of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which were investigated in the present study for functional significance in human and guinea pig cells. The transcription/replication activity of L mutants was strongly enhanced by a substitution at position 741 (S741C), and inhibited by other substitutions (D758A and A759D) in both species. The polymerase activity of L carrying the S741C substitution was eightfold higher in guinea pig cells than in human cells upon co-expression with VP40D184N, suggesting that the additive effect of the two mutations provides MARV a replicative advantage in the new host.

  19. Geologic, water-chemistry, and hydrologic data from multiple-well monitoring sites and selected water-supply wells in the Santa Clara Valley, California, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhouse, M.W.; Hanson, R.T.; Wentworth, C.M.; Everett, Rhett; Williams, C.F.; Tinsley, J.C.; Noce, T.E.; Carkin, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    To better identify the three-dimensional geohydrologic framework of the Santa Clara Valley, lithologic, geologic, geophysical, geomechanical, hydraulic, and water-chemistry data were collected from eight ground-water multiple-well monitoring sites constructed in Santa Clara County, California, as part of a series of cooperative studies between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Santa Clara Valley Water District. The data are being used to update and improve the three-dimensional geohydrologic framework of the basin and to address issues related to water supply, water chemistry, sequence stratigraphy, geology, and geological hazards. This report represents a compilation of data collected from 1999 to 2003, including location and design of the monitoring sites, cone penetrometer borings, geologic logs, lithologic logs, geophysical logs, core analysis, water-chemistry analysis, ground-water-level measurements, and hydraulic and geomechanical properties from wells and core samples. Exploratory cone penetrometer borings taken in the upper 17 to 130 feet at six of the monitoring sites identified the base of Holocene as no deeper than 75 feet in the central confined area and no deeper than 35 feet in the southern unconfined areas of the valley. Generalized lithologic characterization from the monitoring sites indicates about four to six different aquifer units separated by relatively fine-grained units occur within the alluvial deposits shallower than 860 feet deep. Analysis of geophysical logs indicates that coarse-grained units varied in thickness between 10 and 25 feet in the southeastern unconfined area of the valley and between 50 and 200 feet in the south-central and southwestern areas of the valley. Deviations from temperature-gradient logs indicate that the majority of horizontal ground-water flow occurs above a depth of 775 feet in the south central and above 510 feet in the southeastern areas of the valley. Bulk physical properties from more than 1,150 feet of

  20. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  1. Assessment of the impact of anthropogenic activities on the groundwater hydrology and chemistry in Tarsus coastal plain (Mersin, SE Turkey) using fuzzy clustering, multivariate statistics and GIS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Cüneyt; Kurt, Mehmet Ali; Alpaslan, Musa; Akbulut, Can

    2012-01-01

    SummaryTarsus coastal plain (TCP) is an economically and ecologically important area situated in between the fertile fluvio-deltaic plains of two rivers, Deliçay and Tarsus (Mersin, SE Turkey), where anthropogenic activities (agricultural, industrial, and domestic) are very intense. Twenty-four water quality parameters were surveyed at 193 groundwater and 10 surface water sites during August 2008. The objective was to characterize the physico-chemical properties of groundwaters in TCP, assess the impact of anthropogenic activities on the groundwater hydrology and chemistry, and identify the major hydrogeochemical processes occurring in the area. Groundwater samples were grouped into hydrochemically distinct and spatially continuous four water classes (i.e., C1, C2, C3, and C4) using the fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering method, where membership values were interpolated using the ordinary kriging technique. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to decipher various underlying natural and anthropogenic processes creating these distinct water classes. Four principal components (PCs) were extracted in PCA which explained more than 73% of the total variance in water quality. Major factors responsible for the variations in chemistries of water classes are identified as: (1) water-rock interaction and nitrate contamination; (2) salinization by seawater intrusion and evaporite dissolution; (3) geogenic/anthropogenic Cr, Fe, and Mn; and (4) anthropogenic Zn pollution. Overexploitation of the aquifer is clearly evident, especially at settlements located near the coastal zone, where the water table is lowered 2-5 m below the sea level. Salinization is well known in the area and is attributed not only to seawater intrusion, but also to dissolution of evaporitic series from the Handere formation. Hydrochemical evidence also suggest that in the area subsurface paleo-river channels and the deposits infilling the ancient lagoon area within Quaternary-Recent alluvial deposits

  2. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  3. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  4. Barium ions selectively activate BK channels via the Ca2+-bowl site.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Xu-Hui; Lingle, Christopher J

    2012-07-10

    Activation of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels is increased via binding of micromolar Ca(2+) to two distinct high-affinity sites per BK α-subunit. One site, termed the Ca(2+) bowl, is embedded within the second RCK domain (RCK2; regulator of conductance for potassium) of each α-subunit, while oxygen-containing residues in the first RCK domain (RCK1) have been linked to a separate Ca(2+) ligation site. Although both sites are activated by Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), Cd(2+) selectively favors activation via the RCK1 site. Divalent cations of larger ionic radius than Sr(2+) are thought to be ineffective at activating BK channels. Here we show that Ba(2+), better known as a blocker of K(+) channels, activates BK channels and that this effect arises exclusively from binding at the Ca(2+)-bowl site. Compared with previous estimates for Ca(2+) bowl-mediated activation by Ca(2+), the affinity of Ba(2+) to the Ca(2+) bowl is reduced about fivefold, and coupling of binding to activation is reduced from ∼3.6 for Ca(2+) to about ∼2.8 for Ba(2+). These results support the idea that ionic radius is an important determinant of selectivity differences among different divalent cations observed for each Ca(2+)-binding site.

  5. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  6. Structure and Reactivity of the Phosphotriesterase Active Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    characterize different catalytic conformations for chorismate mutase . Preliminary evidence for water binding in phosphotriesterase suggests that activity in...MD/QM study of the chorismate mutase catalyzed Claisen rearrangement reaction. 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 22.Day, P.N.J., J.H.; Gordon,M.S.; Webb,S.P...Claisen rearrangement of an unusual substrate in chorismate mutase . 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 38.Stevens, W.J., Basch,H., Krauss,M., Compact effective

  7. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Bukowski, Gregory S.; Smith, Kevin A.; Tait, Steven L.

    2015-03-14

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts.

  8. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Bukowski, Gregory S.; Smith, Kevin A.; Tait, Steven L.

    2015-03-01

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts.

  9. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  10. Ion chemistry for atmospheric size-segregated aerosol and depositions at an offshore site of Yangtze River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Wen, Bin; Chen, Kui; Yin, Yan; Li, Li; Li, Qi; Yuan, Liang; Li, Xuxu; Sun, Xia

    2014-10-01

    An intensive sampling campaign was conducted in the autumn of 2012 to study the size distribution of inorganic ions and ion deposition at an offshore site of Yangtze River Delta region (YRD), China. Particles in < 0.43, 0.43-0.65, 0.65-1.1, 1.1-2.1, 2.1-3.3, 3.3-4.7, 4.7-5.8, 5.8-9.0 and 9.0-10.0 μm were collected and analyzed by ion chromatography for NH4+, Na+, Mg2 +, K+, Ca2 +, F-, Cl-, NO3- and SO42 -. The average mass concentrations in the nine particle sizes ranged from 13.1 to 38.7 μg m- 3, accounting for 5.5%-16.8% of the total mass. Concentrations exhibit bi-modal distribution, peaking at 0.65-1.1 μm and 3.3-4.7 μm. PM1.1, PM2.1 and PM2.1-10 account for 41%, 56% and 44% of PM10 implying the dominance of finer particles. Different ions hold different size distribution patterns. The concentrations of NO3-, SO42 -, NH4+, K+ and Ca2 + exhibit the highest values when compared to literature values indicating the serious air pollution situation in YRD. A haze-precipitation-fog transition course is captured. The precipitation can decrease all the particles in the nine sizes by 20%-62% and the fog formation process can promote the particles' accumulation, with their mass concentrations increasing by 26%-232% except for those in 5.8-9.0 μm and 9.0-10 μm. Mass percentages of SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ exhibit decreases during precipitation and increases during fog formation course. The anion to cation ratios are lower than 1.0 indicating the anion deficiency and they exhibit significant negative relationship with the particle diameter. The Cl-dep (%) is higher for particles larger than 0.65 μm, increasing from 1.3% to 61% with size added. Sea salt only accounts for 0.12%-2.1% of PM10. The ratios of nss-SO42 -/NO3- decrease with increasing particle size, from 1.68 to 0.69, and are well fit as linear form (r = - 0.74, p = 0.02). It indicates that stationary sources make more contributions to smaller particles and vehicle emission is more important for larger

  11. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  12. A {sup 13}C NMR study of the condensation chemistry of acetone and acetaldehyde adsorbed at the Bronsted acid sites in H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, A.I.; Sepa, J.; Gorte, R.J.

    1995-02-01

    Several bimolecular, acid-catalyzed condensation reactions of acetone and acetaldehyde have been examined in H-ZSM-5, along with the adsorption complexes formed by the products, using {sup 13}C NMR. For acetone, the hydrogen-bonded adsorption complex is stable at room temperature and coverages below one molecule per Broensted acid site. Reaction to mesityl oxide occurs only at higher coverages or temperatures, which are necessary to induce site exchange. The adsorption complex exhibits reaction chemistry analogous to that observed in solution phase, forming adsorption complexes of chloroacetone upon exposure to Cl{sub 2} and of imines upon exposure to NH{sub 3} or dimethylamine. The reactions of acetaldehyde to crotonaldehyde and imines are similar, although they occur at a faster rate due to the higher mobility of this molecule. The adsorption complexes formed by acetone, acetaldehyde, and their condensation products can all be described as rigid, hydrogen-bonded complexes at low coverages. Complexes formed from imines and enamines exhibit isotropic chemical shifts nearly identical to those observed in magic acids, indicating that proton transfer is nearly complete for these molecules. The extent of proton transfer for the remaining molecules varies with the proton affinity of the molecule, ranging from close to complete proton transfer for mesityl oxide and crotonaldehyde to almost complete absence of proton transfer for the chloroacetones. The differences and similarities between these reactions in the zeolite and in solution phase are discussed, along with the implications for understanding the primary processes responsible for these reactions in zeolites. 34 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Water quality, organic chemistry of sediment, and biological conditions of streams near an abandoned wood-preserving plant site at Jackson, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradfield, A.D.; Flexner, N.M.; Webster, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of water quality, organic sediment chemistry, and biological conditions of streams near an abandoned wood-preserving plant site at Jackson, Tennessee, was conducted during December 1990. The study was designed to assess the extent of possible contamination of water and biota in the streams from creosote-related discharge originating at this Superfund site. Central Creek, adjacent to the plant, had degraded water quality and biological conditions. Water samples from the most downstream station on Central Creek contained 30 micrograms per liter of pentachlorophenol, which exceeds the State's criterion maximum concentrations of 9 micrograms per liter for fish and aquatic life. Bottom-sediment samples from stations on Central Creek contained concentrations of acenaphthene, napthalene, and phenanthrene ranging from 1,400 to 2,500 micrograms per kilogram. Chronic or acute toxicity resulted during laboratory experiments using test organisms exposed to creosote-related contaminants. Sediment elutriate samples from Central Creek caused slightly to highly toxic effects on Ceriodaphnia dubia. Pimephales promelas, and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Fish-tissue samples from this station contained concentrations of naphthalene. dibenzofuran, fluorene, and phenanthrene ranging from 1.5 to 3.9 micrograms per kilogram Blue-green algae at this station represented about 79 percent of the organisms counted, whereas diatoms accounted for only 11 percent. Benthic invertebrate and fish samples from Central Creek had low diversity and density. Sediment samples from a station on the South Fork Forked Deer River downstream from its confluence with Central Creek contained concentrations of acenaphthene, anthracene, chrysene, fluoranthene, fluorene, pyrere, and phenanthrene ranging from 2,800 to 69,000 micrograms per kilogram. Sediment elutriate samples using water as elutriate from this station contained concentrations of extractable organic compounds ranging from an estimated

  14. Effects of surface curvature and surface chemistry on the structure and activity of proteins adsorbed in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Sang, Lung-Ching; Coppens, Marc-Olivier

    2011-04-14

    The interactions of proteins with the surface of cylindrical nanopores are systematically investigated to elucidate how surface curvature and surface chemistry affect the conformation and activity of confined proteins in an aqueous, buffered environment. Two globular proteins, lysozyme and myoglobin, with different catalytic functions, were used as model proteins to analyze structural changes in proteins after adsorption on ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 and propyl-functionalized SBA-15 (C(3)SBA-15) with carefully controlled pore size. Liquid phase ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the amide I and II bands of the adsorbed proteins. The amide I bands showed that the secondary structures of free and adsorbed protein molecules differ, and that the secondary structure of the adsorbed protein is influenced by the local geometry as well as by the surface chemistry of the nanopores. The conformation of the adsorbed proteins inside the nanopores of SBA-15 and C(3)SBA-15 is strongly correlated with the local geometry and the surface properties of the nanoporous materials, which results in different catalytic activities. Adsorption by electrostatic interaction of proteins in nanopores of an optimal size provides a favorably confining and protecting environment, which may lead to considerably enhanced structural stability and catalytic activity.

  15. Maintenance of plastid RNA editing activities independently of their target sites.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Poltnigg, Peter; Kushnir, Sergei; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2006-03-01

    RNA editing in plant organelles is mediated by site-specific, nuclear-encoded factors. Previous data suggested that the maintenance of these factors depends on the presence of their rapidly evolving cognate sites. The surprising ability of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) to edit a foreign site in the chloroplast ndhA messenger RNA was thought to be inherited from its diploid male ancestor, Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Here, we show that the same ndhA editing activity is also present in Nicotiana sylvestris, which is the female diploid progenitor of tobacco and which lacks the ndhA site. Hence, heterologous editing is not simply a result of tobacco's allopolyploid genome organization. Analyses of other editing sites after sexual or somatic transfer between land plants showed that heterologous editing occurs at a surprisingly high frequency. This suggests that the corresponding editing activities are conserved despite the absence of their target sites, potentially because they serve other functions in the plant cell.

  16. A Processive Carbohydrate Polymerase That Mediates Bifunctional Catalysis Using a Single Active Site

    PubMed Central

    May, John F.; Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Brown, Christopher D.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Even in the absence of a template, glycosyltransferases can catalyze the synthesis of carbohydrate polymers of specific sequence. The paradigm has been that one enzyme catalyzes the formation of one type of glycosidic linkage, yet certain glycosyltransferases generate polysaccharide sequences composed of two distinct linkage types. In principle, bifunctional glycosyltransferases can possess separate active sites for each catalytic activity or one active site with dual activities. We encountered the fundamental question of one or two distinct active sites in our investigation of the galactosyltransferase GlfT2. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of mycobacterial galactan, a critical cell-wall polymer composed of galactofuranose residues connected with alternating, regioisomeric linkages. We found that GlfT2 mediates galactan polymerization using only one active site that manifests dual regioselectivity. Structural modeling of the bifunctional glycosyltransferases hyaluronan synthase and cellulose synthase suggests that these enzymes also generate multiple glycosidic linkages using a single active site. These results highlight the versatility of glycosyltransferases for generating polysaccharides of specific sequence. We postulate that a hallmark of processive elongation of a carbohydrate polymer by a bifunctional enzyme is that one active site can give rise to two separate types of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22217153

  17. Study of the role of oxygen vacancies as active sites in reduced graphene oxide-modified TiO2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhui; Dai, Rongying; Hu, Shirong

    2017-03-08

    In recent years, substantial efforts have been devoted to exploring reduced graphene oxide/TiO2 (RGO/TiO2) composite materials; however, there is still a paucity of reports on the construction of reduced graphene oxide/TiO2 with oxygen vacancies (RGO/TiO2-OV) via a facile two-step wet chemistry approach. In this work, we show a proof-of-concept study follow RGO introduced into TiO2 with oxygen vacancies, the role of oxygen vacancies as active sites in reduced graphene oxide-modified TiO2. The photocatalytic performance and related properties of blank-TiO2, blank-TiO2 with oxygen vacancies (blank-TiO2-OV), RGO/TiO2, and RGO/TiO2-OV were comparatively studied. It was found that due to the incorporation of RGO, RGO/TiO2 and RGO/TiO2-OV exhibit a higher photocatalytic performance under simulated solar light irradiation than their counterparts without rGO. More importantly, it was found that blank-TiO2 has a higher photocatalytic activity than blank-TiO2-OV under simulated solar light irradiation. However, RGO/TiO2 shows a lower photocatalytic activity than rGO/TiO2-OV. By a series of combined techniques, we found that the introduction of a component, such as RGO, with the matched energy band to TiO2 could lead to the formation of a long-lived electron-transfer state, thus prolonging the lifetime of the photogenerated charge carriers. Furthermore, during the photocatalytic process, RGO could tune the role of oxygen vacancies in TiO2 from recombination centers to active sites. These findings are of great significance for the design of effective photocatalytic materials in the field of solar energy conversion.

  18. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  19. Supramolecular modeling of mono-copper enzyme active sites with calix[6]arene-based funnel complexes.

    PubMed

    Le Poul, Nicolas; Le Mest, Yves; Jabin, Ivan; Reinaud, Olivia

    2015-07-21

    Supramolecular bioinorganic chemistry is a natural evolution in biomimetic metallic systems since it constitutes a further degree of complexity in modeling. The traditional approach consisting of mimicking the first coordination sphere of metal sites proved to be very efficient, because valuable data are extracted from these examples to gain insight in natural systems mechanisms. But it does not reproduce several specific aspects of enzymes that can be mimicked by the implementation of a cavity embedding the labile active site and thus controlling the properties of the metal ion by noncovalent interactions. This Account reports on a strategy aimed at reproducing some supramolecular aspects encountered in the natural systems. The cavity complexes described herein display a coordination site constructed on a macrocycle. Thanks to a careful design of the cavity-based ligands, complexes orienting their labile site specifically toward the inside of the macrocycle were obtained. The supramolecular systems are based on the flexible calix[6]arene core that surrounds the metal ion labile site, thereby constraining exogenous molecules to pass through the conic funnel to reach the metal center. Such an architecture confers to the metal ion very unusual properties and behaviors, which in many aspects are biologically relevant. Three generations of calix[6]-based ligands are presented and discussed in the context of modeling the monocopper sites encountered in some enzymes. A wide range of phenomena are highlighted such as the impact that the size and shape of the access channel to the metal center have on the selectivity and rate of the binding process, the possible remote control of the electronics through small modifications operated on the cavity edges, induced-fit behavior associated with host-guest association (shoe-tree effect) that affects the redox properties of the metal ion and the electron exchange pathway, consequences of forbidden associative ligand exchange

  20. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  1. 75 FR 71677 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy Policy Act of... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  2. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). (e) For all asbestos-containing waste material received, the owner or operator of the active waste... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  3. Synthesis of amphiphilic aminated inulin via 'click chemistry' and evaluation for its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chunwei; Li, Qing; Ren, Jianming; Wang, Gang; Gu, Guodong; Guo, Zhanyong

    2014-09-15

    Inulins are a group of abundant, water-soluble, renewable polysaccharides, which exhibit attractive bioactivities and natural properties. Improvement such as chemical modification of inulin is often performed prior to further utilization. We hereby presented a method to modify inulin at its primary hydroxyls to synthesize amphiphilic aminated inulin via 'click chemistry' to facilitate its chemical manipulation. Additionally, its antibacterial property against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was also evaluated and the best inhibitory index against S. aureus was 58% at 1mg/mL. As the amphiphilic aminated inulin is easy to prepare and exhibits improved bioactivity, this material may represent as an attractive new platform for chemical modifications of inulin.

  4. Bimolecular reactions of activated species: An analysis of problematic HC(O)C(O) chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Robin J.; Robertson, Struan H.; Blitz, Mark A.; Seakins, Paul W.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated the importance of non-thermal bimolecular association chemistry. Recently a fully reversible method for incorporating any number of such non-thermal reactions into a single master equation has been developed (Green and Robertson, 2014) [10]. Using this methodology experimental results for the system: (1) (CHO)2 + OH → HC(O)C(O) + H2O, (2) HC(O)C(O) → HCO + CO, (3) HC(O)C(O) + O2 → OH + CO + CO2, are modeled, reproducing the temperature and pressure dependence of the OH yield. An issue remains as to how to model energy partition into HC(O)C(O).

  5. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  6. Structure and nuclearity of active sites in Fe-zeolites: comparison with iron sites in enzymes and homogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zecchina, Adriano; Rivallan, Mickaël; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2007-07-21

    Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite zeolites efficiently catalyse several oxidation reactions which find close analogues in the oxidation reactions catalyzed by homogeneous and enzymatic compounds. The iron centres are highly dispersed in the crystalline matrix and on highly diluted samples, mononuclear and dinuclear structures are expected to become predominant. The crystalline and robust character of the MFI framework has allowed to hypothesize that the catalytic sites are located in well defined crystallographic positions. For this reason these catalysts have been considered as the closest and best defined heterogeneous counterparts of heme and non heme iron complexes and of Fenton type Fe(2+) homogeneous counterparts. On this basis, an analogy with the methane monooxygenase has been advanced several times. In this review we have examined the abundant literature on the subject and summarized the most widely accepted views on the structure, nuclearity and catalytic activity of the iron species. By comparing the results obtained with the various characterization techniques, we conclude that Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite are not the ideal samples conceived before and that many types of species are present, some active and some other silent from adsorptive and catalytic point of view. The relative concentration of these species changes with thermal treatments, preparation procedures and loading. Only at lowest loadings the catalytically active species become the dominant fraction of the iron species. On the basis of the spectroscopic titration of the active sites by using NO as a probe, we conclude that the active species on very diluted samples are isolated and highly coordinatively unsaturated Fe(2+) grafted to the crystalline matrix. Indication of the constant presence of a smaller fraction of Fe(2+) presumably located on small clusters is also obtained. The nitrosyl species formed upon dosing NO from the gas phase on activated Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite, have been analyzed

  7. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; Nørskov, Jens K.; Studt, Felix

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidation reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.

  8. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    DOE PAGES

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; ...

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidationmore » reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.« less

  9. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  10. The Lighter Side of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for using photochemistry to merge descriptive chemistry and molecular orbital theory in first-year chemistry courses. Includes procedures and safety information for various activities, demonstrations, and experiments involving photochemical reactions. (DH)

  11. Effects of probiotic supplementation over 5 months on routine haematology and clinical chemistry measures in healthy active adults.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; West, N P; Horn, P L; Lehtinen, M J; Koerbin, G; Pyne, D B; Lahtinen, S J; Fricker, P A; Cripps, A W

    2014-11-01

    Use of probiotic-containing foods and probiotic supplements is increasing; however, few studies document safety and tolerability in conjunction with defined clinical end points. This paper reports the effects of 150 days of supplementation with either a single- (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04) or a double-strain (Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bi-07) probiotic on routine haematology and clinical chemistry measures in healthy active adults. Pre- to post-intervention changes in laboratory measures were determined and compared between supplement and placebo groups. Overall there were few differences in routine haematology and clinical chemistry measures between supplement and placebo groups post-intervention. Exceptions included plasma calcium (P=0.03) and urea (P=0.015); however, observed changes were small and within assay-specific laboratory reference ranges. These data provide evidence supporting the use of these probiotic supplements over a period of 5 months in healthy active adults without obvious safety or tolerability issues.

  12. Effects of lead shot ingestion on delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, hemoglobin concentration, and serum chemistry in bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Pattee, O.H.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Mulhern, B.

    1981-01-01

    Lead shot ingestion by bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is considered to be widespread and has been implicated in the death of eagles in nature. It was recently demonstrated under experimental conditions that ingestion of as few as 10 lead shot resulted in death within 12 to 20 days. In the present study hematological responses to lead toxicity including red blood cell ALAD activity, hemoglobin concentration and 23 different blood serum chemistries were examined in five captive bald eagles that were unsuitable for rehabilitation and release. Eagles were dosed by force-feeding with 10 lead shot; they were redosed if regurgitation occurred. Red blood cell ALAD activity was inhibited by nearly 80% within 24 hours when mean blood lead concentration had increased to 0.8 parts per million (ppm). By the end of 1 week there was a significant decrease (20-25%) in hematocrit and hemoglobin, and the mean blood lead concentration was over 3 ppm. Within as little as 1-2 weeks after dosing, significant elevations in serum creatinine and serum alanine aminotransferase occurred, as well as a significant decrease in the ratio of serum aspartic aminotransferase to serum alanine aminotransferase. The mean blood lead concentration was over 5 ppm by the end of 2 weeks. These changes in serum chemistry may be indicative of kidney and liver alterations.

  13. Liaison activities with the institute of physical chemistry, Russian academy of sciences: FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.

    1996-09-23

    The task ``IPC/RAS Liaison and Tank Waste Testing`` is a program being conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1996 with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, EM-53 Efficient Separations and Processing (ESP) Crosscutting Program, under the technical task plan RLA6C342. The principal investigator is Cal Delegard of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The task involves a technical liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) and their DOE-supported investigations into the fundamental and applied chemistry of the transuranium elements (primarily neptunium, plutonium, and americium) and technetium in alkaline media. The task has three purposes: 1. Providing technical information and technical direction to the IPC/RAS. 2. Disseminating IPC/RAS data and information to the DOE technical community. 3. Verifying IPC/RAS results through laboratory testing and comparison with published data. This report fulfills the milestone ``Provide End-of-Year Report to Focus Area,`` due September 30, 1996.

  14. L483: Warm Carbon-chain Chemistry Source Harboring Hot Corino Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yoko; Sakai, Nami; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Higuchi, Aya E.; Hirota, Tomoya; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Sakai, Takeshi; Aikawa, Yuri; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Lefloch, Bertrand; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Kahane, Claudine; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    The Class 0 protostar, L483, has been observed in various molecular lines in the 1.2 mm band at a subarcsecond resolution with ALMA. An infalling–rotating envelope is traced by the CS line, while a very compact component with a broad velocity width is observed for the CS, SO, HNCO, NH2CHO, and HCOOCH3 lines. Although this source is regarded as the warm carbon-chain chemistry (WCCC) candidate source at a 1000 au scale, complex organic molecules characteristic of hot corinos such as NH2CHO and HCOOCH3 are detected in the vicinity of the protostar. Thus, both hot corino chemistry and WCCC are seen in L483. Although such a mixed chemical character source has been recognized as an intermediate source in previous single-dish observations, we here report the first spatially resolved detection. A kinematic structure of the infalling–rotating envelope is roughly explained by a simple ballistic model with a protostellar mass of 0.1–0.2 {M}ȯ and a radius of the centrifugal barrier (half of the centrifugal radius) of 30–200 au, assuming an inclination angle of 80° (0° for face-on). The broad-line emission observed in the above molecules most likely comes from the disk component inside the centrifugal barrier. Thus, a drastic chemical change is seen around the centrifugal barrier.

  15. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  16. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  17. Thirty years through vanadium chemistry.

    PubMed

    Costa Pessoa, J

    2015-06-01

    The relevance of vanadium in biological systems is known for many years and vanadium-based catalysts have important industrial applications, however, till the beginning of the 80s research on vanadium chemistry and biochemistry did not receive much attention from the scientific community. The understanding of the broad bioinorganic implications resulting from the similarities between phosphate and vanadate(V) and the discovery of vanadium dependent enzymes gave rise to an enormous increase in interest in the chemistry and biological relevance of vanadium. Thereupon the last 30years corresponded to a period of enormous research effort in these fields, as well as in medicinal applications of vanadium and in the development of catalysts for use in fine-chemical synthesis, some of these inspired by enzymatic active sites. Since the 80s my group in collaboration with others made contributions, described throughout this text, namely in the understanding of the speciation of vanadium compounds in aqueous solution and in biological fluids, and to the transport of vanadium compounds in blood plasma and their uptake by cells. Several new types of vanadium compounds were also synthesized and characterized, with applications either as prospective therapeutic drugs or as homogeneous or heterogenized catalysts for the production of fine chemicals. The developments made are described also considering the international context of the evolution of the knowledge in the chemistry and bioinorganic chemistry of vanadium compounds during the last 30years. This article was compiled based on the Vanadis Award presentation at the 9th International Vanadium Symposium.

  18. Project-focused activity and knowledge tracker: a unified data analysis, collaboration, and workflow tool for medicinal chemistry project teams.

    PubMed

    Brodney, Marian D; Brosius, Arthur D; Gregory, Tracy; Heck, Steven D; Klug-McLeod, Jacquelyn L; Poss, Christopher S

    2009-12-01

    Advances in the field of drug discovery have brought an explosion in the quantity of data available to medicinal chemists and other project team members. New strategies and systems are needed to help these scientists to efficiently gather, organize, analyze, annotate, and share data about potential new drug molecules of interest to their project teams. Herein we describe a suite of integrated services and end-user applications that facilitate these activities throughout the medicinal chemistry design cycle. The Automated Data Presentation (ADP) and Virtual Compound Profiler (VCP) processes automate the gathering, organization, and storage of real and virtual molecules, respectively, and associated data. The Project-Focused Activity and Knowledge Tracker (PFAKT) provides a unified data analysis and collaboration environment, enhancing decision-making, improving team communication, and increasing efficiency.

  19. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  20. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  1. Two interacting binding sites for quinacrine derivatives in the active site of trypanothione reductase – a template for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Vickers, Tim J.; Bond, Charles S.; Peterson, Mark R.; Hunter, William N.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanothione reductase is a key enzyme in the trypanothione-based redox metabolism of pathogenic trypanosomes. Since this system is absent in humans, being replaced with glutathione and glutathione reductase, it offers a target for selective inhibition. The rational design of potent inhibitors requires accurate structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, but this is lacking for trypanothione reductase. We therefore used quinacrine mustard, an alkylating derivative of the competitive inhibitor quinacrine, to probe the active site of this dimeric flavoprotein. Quinacrine mustard irreversibly inactivates Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase, but not human glutathione reductase, in a time-dependent manner with a stoichiometry of two inhibitors bound per monomer. The rate of inactivation is dependent upon the oxidation state of trypanothione reductase, with the NADPH-reduced form being inactivated significantly faster than the oxidised form. Inactivation is slowed by clomipramine and a melarsen oxide-trypanothione adduct (both are competitive inhibitors) but accelerated by quinacrine. The structure of the trypanothione reductase-quinacrine mustard adduct was determined to 2.7 Å, revealing two molecules of inhibitor bound in the trypanothione-binding site. The acridine moieties interact with each other through π-stacking effects, and one acridine interacts in a similar fashion with a tryptophan residue. These interactions provide a molecular explanation for the differing effects of clomipramine and quinacrine on inactivation by quinacrine mustard. Synergism with quinacrine occurs as a result of these planar acridines being able to stack together in the active site cleft, thereby gaining an increased number of binding interactions, whereas antagonism occurs with non-planar molecules, such as clomipramine, where stacking is not possible. PMID:15102853

  2. The three Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 isoforms have unique substrates and activities determined by non-active site regions.

    PubMed

    Backus, Keriann M; Dolan, Michael A; Barry, Conor S; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I M; Lowary, Todd L; Davis, Benjamin G; Barry, Clifton E

    2014-09-05

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro(216)-Phe(228) loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors.

  3. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  4. Pre-Tech Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Junior Coll., Jacksonville.

    This course guide is designed to aid chemistry instructors in teaching the skills and knowledge needed by those students planning to take junior college chemistry and is composed of 11 terminal performance objectives, with intermediate performance objectives and sample criterion measures. Suggestions for related laboratory activities are also…

  5. Brushing Up on Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantow, Ashley

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed for use during National Chemistry Week 2002 with the theme "Chemistry Keeps Us Clean". Allows students to discover more about a cleaning product they use everyday. Students make their own toothpaste and compare its properties with those of commercial toothpaste. (MM)

  6. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  7. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; Yu, Yifei; Peterson, David; Zafar, Abdullah; Kumar, Raj; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hunte, Frank; Shannon, Steve; Zhu, Yimei; Yang, Weitao; Cao, Linyou

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5 s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.

  8. Heavy haze episodes in Beijing during January 2013: Inorganic ion chemistry and source analysis using highly time-resolved measurements from an urban site.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Wen; Bai, Zhipeng; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wenjie

    2016-02-15

    The heavy air pollution that occurred in Beijing in January of 2013 attracted intense attention around the world. During this period, we conducted highly time-resolved measurements of inorganic ions associated with PM2.5 at an urban site of Beijing, and investigated ion chemistry and potential sources. Hourly concentrations of Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), Na(+), NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) were measured. Peak concentrations of SO4(2-) and NO3(-) were observed on the 10th-15th, 21st-24th, and the 26th-30th during this monitoring campaign. The percentages of SO4(2-) and NH4(+) in total ion concentration increased with the enhancement of PM2.5 concentrations, indicating that high concentrations of SO4(2-) and NH4(+) may play important roles in the formation of haze episodes. The ratio of [NO3(-)]/[SO4(2-)] was calculated, revealing that the sources of SO4(2-) would contribute more to the formation of PM2.5 than mobile sources. Diurnal variations of SO4(2-), NO3(-), NH4(+) (SNA) exhibited a similar pattern, with high concentrations at night and low levels during the day, revealing that meteorological conditions, such as mixing layer height, relative humidity, were likely to be responsible for high levels of SNA at night. The roles of meteorological conditions were further discussed in the formation of secondary inorganic ions. Relative humidity and temperature played key roles and exhibited positive correlations with secondary inorganic ions. An aerosol inorganics simulation model showed that SNA existed mainly in the aqueous phase during the sampling period. Furthermore, potential sources were identified by applying positive matrix factorization model. Secondary nitrate, secondary sulfate, coal combustion and biomass burning, as well as fugitive dust, were considered to be major contributors to total ions.

  9. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  10. Students' Perceptions of Teaching in Context-Based and Traditional Chemistry Classrooms: Comparing Content, Learning Activities, and Interpersonal Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms,…

  11. Surface chemistry of Au/TiO2: Thermally and photolytically activated reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotov, Dimitar A.; Morris, John R.

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating particle size dependence to the physical, photophysical, and chemical properties of gold has motivated thousands of studies focused on exploring the ability of supported gold nanoparticles to catalyze chemical transformations. In particular, titanium dioxide-supported gold (Au/TiO2) nanoparticles may provide the right combination of electronic structure, structural dynamics, and stability to affect catalysis in important practical applications from environmental remediation to selective hydrogenation to carbon monoxide oxidation. Harnessing the full potential of Au/TiO2 will require a detailed atomic-scale understanding of the thermal and photolytic processes that accompany chemical conversion. This review describes some of the unique properties exhibited by particulate gold before delving into how those properties affect chemistry on titania supports. Particular attention is given first to thermally driven reactions on single crystal system. This review then addresses nanoparticulate samples in an effort begin to bridge the so-called materials gap. Building on the foundation provided by the large body of work in the field of thermal catalysis, the review describes new research into light-driven catalysis on Au/TiO2. Importantly, the reader should bear in mind throughout this review that thermal chemistry and thermal effects typically accompany photochemistry. Distinguishing between thermally-driven stages of a reaction and photo-induced steps remains a significant challenge, but one that experimentalists and theorists are beginning to decipher with new approaches. Finally, a summary of several state-of-the-art studies describes how they are illuminating new frontiers in the quest to exploit Au/TiO2 as an efficient catalyst and low-energy photocatalyst.

  12. Active and widespread halogen chemistry in the tropical and subtropical free troposphere

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siyuan; Schmidt, Johan A.; Baidar, Sunil; Coburn, Sean; Dix, Barbara; Koenig, Theodore K.; Apel, Eric; Bowdalo, Dene; Campos, Teresa L.; Eloranta, Ed; Evans, Mathew J.; DiGangi, Joshua P.; Zondlo, Mark A.; Gao, Ru-Shan; Haggerty, Julie A.; Hall, Samuel R.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Jacob, Daniel; Morley, Bruce; Pierce, Bradley; Reeves, Mike; Romashkin, Pavel; ter Schure, Arnout; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Halogens in the troposphere are increasingly recognized as playing an important role for atmospheric chemistry, and possibly climate. Bromine and iodine react catalytically to destroy ozone (O3), oxidize mercury, and modify oxidative capacity that is relevant for the lifetime of greenhouse gases. Most of the tropospheric O3 and methane (CH4) loss occurs at tropical latitudes. Here we report simultaneous measurements of vertical profiles of bromine oxide (BrO) and iodine oxide (IO) in the tropical and subtropical free troposphere (10°N to 40°S), and show that these halogens are responsible for 34% of the column-integrated loss of tropospheric O3. The observed BrO concentrations increase strongly with altitude (∼3.4 pptv at 13.5 km), and are 2–4 times higher than predicted in the tropical free troposphere. BrO resembles model predictions more closely in stratospheric air. The largest model low bias is observed in the lower tropical transition layer (TTL) over the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean, and may reflect a missing inorganic bromine source supplying an additional 2.5–6.4 pptv total inorganic bromine (Bry), or model overestimated Bry wet scavenging. Our results highlight the importance of heterogeneous chemistry on ice clouds, and imply an additional Bry source from the debromination of sea salt residue in the lower TTL. The observed levels of bromine oxidize mercury up to 3.5 times faster than models predict, possibly increasing mercury deposition to the ocean. The halogen-catalyzed loss of tropospheric O3 needs to be considered when estimating past and future ozone radiative effects. PMID:26124148

  13. Active and widespread halogen chemistry in the tropical and subtropical free troposphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyuan; Schmidt, Johan A; Baidar, Sunil; Coburn, Sean; Dix, Barbara; Koenig, Theodore K; Apel, Eric; Bowdalo, Dene; Campos, Teresa L; Eloranta, Ed; Evans, Mathew J; DiGangi, Joshua P; Zondlo, Mark A; Gao, Ru-Shan; Haggerty, Julie A; Hall, Samuel R; Hornbrook, Rebecca S; Jacob, Daniel; Morley, Bruce; Pierce, Bradley; Reeves, Mike; Romashkin, Pavel; Ter Schure, Arnout; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-07-28

    Halogens in the troposphere are increasingly recognized as playing an important role for atmospheric chemistry, and possibly climate. Bromine and iodine react catalytically to destroy ozone (O3), oxidize mercury, and modify oxidative capacity that is relevant for the lifetime of greenhouse gases. Most of the tropospheric O3 and methane (CH4) loss occurs at tropical latitudes. Here we report simultaneous measurements of vertical profiles of bromine oxide (BrO) and iodine oxide (IO) in the tropical and subtropical free troposphere (10 °N to 40 °S), and show that these halogens are responsible for 34% of the column-integrated loss of tropospheric O3. The observed BrO concentrations increase strongly with altitude (∼ 3.4 pptv at 13.5 km), and are 2-4 times higher than predicted in the tropical free troposphere. BrO resembles model predictions more closely in stratospheric air. The largest model low bias is observed in the lower tropical transition layer (TTL) over the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean, and may reflect a missing inorganic bromine source supplying an additional 2.5-6.4 pptv total inorganic bromine (Bry), or model overestimated Bry wet scavenging. Our results highlight the importance of heterogeneous chemistry on ice clouds, and imply an additional Bry source from the debromination of sea salt residue in the lower TTL. The observed levels of bromine oxidize mercury up to 3.5 times faster than models predict, possibly increasing mercury deposition to the ocean. The halogen-catalyzed loss of tropospheric O3 needs to be considered when estimating past and future ozone radiative effects.

  14. Active and Widespread Halogen Chemistry in the Tropical and Subtropical Free Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Siyuan; Schmidt, Johan A.; Baidar, Sunil; Coburn, Sean; Dix, Barbara; Koenig, Theodore K.; Apel, Eric; Bowdalo, Dene; Campos, Teresa; Eloranta, Ed; Evans, Mathew J.; Digangi, Joshua P.; Zondlo, Mark A.; Gao, Ru-shan; Haggerty, Julie A.; Hall, Samuel R.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Jacob, Daniel; Morley, Bruce; Pierce, Bradley; Reeves, Mike; Romashkin, Pavel; Ter Schure, Arnout; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Halogens in the troposphere are increasingly recognized as playing an important role for atmospheric chemistry, and possibly climate. Bromine and iodine react catalytically to destroy ozone (O3), oxidize mercury, and modify oxidative capacity that is relevant for the lifetime of greenhouse gases. Most of the tropospheric O3 and methane (CH4) loss occurs at tropical latitudes. Here we report simultaneous measurements of vertical profiles of bromine oxide (BrO) and iodine oxide (IO) in the tropical and subtropical free troposphere (10degN to 40degS), and show that these halogens are responsible for 34% of the column-integrated loss of tropospheric O3. The observed BrO concentrations increase strongly with altitude (approx.3.4 pptv at 13.5 km), and are 2-4 times higher than predicted in the tropical free troposphere. BrO resembles model predictions more closely in stratospheric air. The largest model low bias is observed in the lower tropical transition layer (TTL) over the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean, and may reflect a missing inorganic bromine source supplying an additional 2.5-6.4 pptv total inorganic bromine (Bry), or model overestimated Bry wet scavenging. Our results highlight the importance of heterogeneous chemistry on ice clouds, and imply an additional Bry source from the debromination of sea salt residue in the lower TTL. The observed levels of bromine oxidize mercury up to 3.5 times faster than models predict, possibly increasing mercury deposition to the ocean. The halogen-catalyzed loss of tropospheric O3 needs to be considered when estimating past and future ozone radiative effects.

  15. Geochemical evaluation of the land use and human activities at a Medieval harbor site, Masuda city, Shimane Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalai, Banzragch; Ishiga, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale harbor and settlement sites from the latter half of the eleventh through sixteenth centuries have recently been discovered in the northern part of Masuda City, Shimane Prefecture, Japan. The sites were constructed at the river mouth delta of the Takatsu and Masuda rivers, facing the Sea of Japan. In former time, the mouths of the two rivers are thought to have formed a shallow lagoon connecting with the Sea of Japan. The harbor was thus well located for ships sailing along the sea coast, especially for conducting trade with the China mainland and the Korean peninsula. Archaeological investigations have identified over 800 construction pits, blacksmith hearths, harbor structures and numerous fragments of ceramic porcelain originating both from within Japan and from Asia (China, Korea, Vietnam and Thailand). It seems that the maritime trade network operated from this Medieval harbor site by the Masuda Clan was on an East Asian scale. Consequently, the harbor site can be expected to have received a considerable amount of ancient anthropogenic matter. Concentrations of 22 elements in 66 soil samples from the Nakazu Higashihara site were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, in order to identify the land use and human impacts on soil chemistry at the harbor site. The results show that significant differences in geochemical compositional exist between the northern and southern parts of the site due to differences in lithology and land use practice. The south area was a production area of this harbor site. Three different activity areas were recognized within this area (fire pit and charcoal area, building pillars, and a blacksmith furnace area), based on geochemical and archaeological information. Cluster analysis shows a strong relationship exists between As, Pb, Cu, Br, TS, MnO and P2O5 in the fire pit and charcoal area. These charcoal materials were likely derived from fuel used in firing and heating. Close relationships occur between Cr, Sr, Sc

  16. Reduction of (68)Ge activity containing liquid waste from (68)Ga PET chemistry in nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy by solidification.

    PubMed

    de Blois, Erik; Chan, Ho Sze; Roy, Kamalika; Krenning, Eric P; Breeman, Wouter A P

    PET with (68)Ga from the TiO2- or SnO2- based (68)Ge/(68)Ga generators is of increasing interest for PET imaging in nuclear medicine. In general, radionuclidic purity ((68)Ge vs. (68)Ga activity) of the eluate of these generators varies between 0.01 and 0.001%. Liquid waste containing low amounts of (68)Ge activity is produced by eluting the (68)Ge/(68)Ga generators and residues from PET chemistry. Since clearance level of (68)Ge activity in waste may not exceed 10 Bq/g, as stated by European Directive 96/29/EURATOM, our purpose was to reduce (68)Ge activity in solution from >10 kBq/g to <10 Bq/g; which implies the solution can be discarded as regular waste. Most efficient method to reduce the (68)Ge activity is by sorption of TiO2 or Fe2O3 and subsequent centrifugation. The required 10 Bq per mL level of (68)Ge activity in waste was reached by Fe2O3 logarithmically, whereas with TiO2 asymptotically. The procedure with Fe2O3 eliminates ≥90% of the (68)Ge activity per treatment. Eventually, to simplify the processing a recirculation system was used to investigate (68)Ge activity sorption on TiO2, Fe2O3 or Zeolite. Zeolite was introduced for its high sorption at low pH, therefore (68)Ge activity containing waste could directly be used without further interventions. (68)Ge activity containing liquid waste at different HCl concentrations (0.05-1.0 M HCl), was recirculated at 1 mL/min. With Zeolite in the recirculation system, (68)Ge activity showed highest sorption.

  17. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  18. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  19. Perspective: pre-chemistry conformational changes in DNA polymerase mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Karunesh; Beard, William A.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2012-01-01

    In recent papers, there has been a lively exchange concerning theories for enzyme catalysis, especially the role of protein dynamics/pre-chemistry conformational changes in the catalytic cycle of enzymes. Of particular interest is the notion that substrate-induced conformational changes that assemble the polymerase active site prior to chemistry are required for DNA synthesis and impact fidelity (i.e., substrate specificity). High-resolution crystal structures of DNA polymerase β representing intermediates of substrate complexes prior to the chemical step are available. These structures indicate that conformational adjustments in both the protein and substrates must occur to achieve the requisite geometry of the reactive participants for catalysis. We discuss computational and kinetic methods to examine possible conformational change pathways that lead from the observed crystal structure intermediates to the final structures poised for chemistry. The results, as well as kinetic data from site-directed mutagenesis studies, are consistent with models requiring pre-chemistry conformational adjustments in order to achieve high fidelity DNA synthesis. Thus, substrate-induced conformational changes that assemble the polymerase active site prior to chemistry contribute to DNA synthesis even when they do not represent actual rate-determining steps for chemistry. PMID:23459563

  20. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  1. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  2. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  3. Enhancement of Polymerase Activity of the Large Fragment in DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus by Site-Directed Mutagenesis at the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Beilei; Wang, Meng; Ou, Yanghui

    2016-01-01

    The large fragment of DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus GIM1.543 (Bst DNA polymerase) with 5′-3′ DNA polymerase activity while in absence of 5′-3′ exonuclease activity possesses high thermal stability and polymerase activity. Bst DNA polymerase was employed in isothermal multiple self-matching initiated amplification (IMSA) which amplified the interest sequence with high selectivity and was widely applied in the rapid detection of human epidemic diseases. However, the detailed information of commercial Bst DNA polymerase is unpublished and well protected by patents, which makes the high price of commercial kits. In this study, wild-type Bst DNA polymerase (WT) and substitution mutations for improving the efficiency of DNA polymerization were expressed and purified in E. coli. Site-directed substitutions of four conserved residues (Gly310, Arg412, Lys416, and Asp540) in the activity site of Bst DNA polymerase influenced efficiency of polymerizing dNTPs. The substitution of residue Gly310 by alanine or leucine and residue Asp540 by glutamic acid increased the efficiency of polymerase activity. All mutants with higher polymerizing efficiency were employed to complete the rapid detection of EV71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) by IMSA approach with relatively shorter period which is suitable for the primary diagnostics setting in rural and underdeveloped areas. PMID:27981047

  4. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds.

  5. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  6. Substrate shuttling between active sites of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is not required to generate coproporphyrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John D.; Warby, Christy A.; Whitby, Frank G.; Kushner, James P.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of the four acetate side chains on the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer with the active site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single chain protein (scURO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposible with wild-type activity and have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of scURO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distribution of reaction intermediates was the same for mutant and wild-type sequences, and was unaltered in a competition experiment using the I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function, and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and create a large active site cleft. PMID:19362562

  7. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  8. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  9. Transcriptional activation by LR1 at the Eµ enhancer and switch region sites

    PubMed Central

    Hanakahi, L. A.; Maizels, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    LR1 is a B cell-specific, sequence-specific duplex DNA binding activity which is induced in B cells carrying out class switch recombination. Here we identify several properties of LR1 which enable it to function in transcriptional regulation. We show that LR1 contributes to transcriptional activation by the Eµ immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer by binding to a site within the enhancer core. We further show that LR1 bends DNA upon binding. In addition, we show that LR1 is itself a bona fide transcriptional activator, as multimerized LR1 sites produce an element which can enhance transcription from a minimal promoter. In order for class switch recombination to occur, an activating signal must be transmitted via the Eµ core, and both S regions targeted for recombination must be actively transcribed. The properties of LR1 that we have identified suggest distinct potential functions of LR1 duplex DNA binding activity in class switch recombination. First, LR1 may contribute to recombinational activation by the Eµ core. Second, there are multiple potential LR1 duplex binding sites in each of the G-rich switch regions, and LR1 bound at contiguous sites may enhance recombination by stimulating transcription of the S regions. PMID:10908319

  10. Biophysical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, Daniel; Pfohl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Biophysical chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, covers the NMR analysis of protein-protein interaction using paramagnetic tags and sophisticated microscopy techniques investigating the dynamics of biological matter.

  11. Chemistry Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  12. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  13. Regulation of Dpp activity by tissue-specific cleavage of an upstream site within the prodomain

    PubMed Central

    Sopory, Shailaja; Kwon, Sunjong; Wehrli, Marcel; Christian, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    BMP4 is synthesized as an inactive precursor that is cleaved at two sites during maturation: initially at a site (S1) adjacent to the ligand domain, and then at an upstream site (S2) within the prodomain. Cleavage at the second site regulates the stability of mature BMP4 and this in turn influences its signaling intensity and range of action. The Drosophila ortholog of BMP4, Dpp, functions as a long- or short-range signaling molecule in the wing disc or embryonic midgut, respectively but mechanisms that differentially regulate its bioactivity in these tissues have not been explored. In the current studies we demonstrate, by dpp mutant rescue, that cleavage at the S2 site of proDpp is required for development of the wing and leg imaginal discs, whereas cleavage at the S1 site is sufficient to rescue Dpp function in the midgut. Both the S1 and S2 site of proDpp are cleaved in the wing disc, and S2-cleavage is essential to generate sufficient ligand to exceed the threshold for pMAD activation at both short- and long-range in most cells. By contrast, proDpp is cleaved at the S1 site alone in the embryonic mesoderm and this generates sufficient ligand to activate physiological target genes in neighboring cells. These studies provide the first biochemical and genetic evidence that that selective cleavage of the S2 site of proDPP provides a tissue-specific mechanism for regulating Dpp activity, and that differential cleavage can contribute to, but is not an absolute determinant of signaling range. PMID:20659445

  14. New nitrofurans amenable by isocyanide multicomponent chemistry are active against multidrug-resistant and poly-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Krasavin, Mikhail; Parchinsky, Vladislav; Kantin, Grigory; Manicheva, Olga; Dogonadze, Marine; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Karge, Bianka; Brönstrup, Mark

    2017-03-15

    A set of structurally diverse N-amino δ-lactams decorated with a 5-nitro-2-furyl moiety was synthesized using isocyanide-based multicomponent chemistry and evaluated for antibacterial activity. Three compounds displayed a selective and potent (MIC 22-33μM) inhibition of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain growth, while other Gram-positive (MRSA and E. faecium) or Gram-negative (E. coli, P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, K. pneumoniae) pathogens were not affected. The compounds also displayed moderate-low cytotoxicity, as demonstrated in cell line viability assays. Several multidrug- and poly-resistant patient-derived M. tuberculosis strains were found to be susceptible to treatment with these compounds. The three most potent compounds share a significant structural similarity which provides a basis for further scaffold-hopping analog design.

  15. A guided inquiry experiment for the measurement of activation energies in the biophysical chemistry laboratory: Decarboxylation of pyrrole-2-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Kelly M; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Mettee, Howard D; Smiley, Jeffrey A

    2005-03-01

    A laboratory experiment for undergraduate biophysical chemistry is described, in which the acid concentration and temperature dependences of the decarboxylation of pyrrole-2-carboxylate are measured using a continuous ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometric assay. Data collection and analysis are structured using principles of guided inquiry. Data leading to the calculation of multiple rate constants at varying temperatures and acid concentrations can be collected within one laboratory period, using inexpensive reagents and standard instrumentation. These experiments permit determination of activation energies that are lower at high acid concentration, indicative of a subtle change in the reaction mechanism with decreasing pH. The reaction is readily observable by students as they collect UV spectrophotometry data, and the decarboxylation reaction is related to biologically relevant enzymatic reactions.

  16. Rosetta/VIRTIS investigation of the chemistry and activity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Drossart, Pierre; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Migliorini, Alessandra; Erard, Stéphane; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Fougere, Nicolas; Leyrat, Cedric; Crovisier, Jacques; Capaccioni, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    The composition of cometary ices inside cometary nuclei provides clues to the chemistry of the protoplanetary disk where they formed, 4.6 Gyr ago. These ices sublimate when the body approches the Sun, so that the coma molecular species give insights on the nucleus surface and sub-surface composition. So far, most investigations of the coma chemical composition were performed from telescopic observations from the ground or space plateforms. Since August 2014, the ESA/Rosetta spacecraft has been investigating the nucleus and inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This talk will present an overview of the results obtained by the Visual and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument onboard Rosetta, focussing on observations of molecular species. VIRTIS is composed of two channels. The VIRTIS-M channel is a spectro-imager covering the 0.27-5.1 microns range, which allowed us to map the spatial distribution of H2O and CO2 (Migliorini et al. 2016, A&A in press). VIRTIS-H is a high-spectral resolution spectrometer covering the 2-5 microns range. Spectra obtained with VIRTIS-H show signatures of H2O, CO2 (both fundamental and hot bands), 13CO2, CH4 and other C-H bearing species (Bockelee-Morvan et al. A&A, 583, A6,2015). VIRTIS is a key instrument to investigate regional, diurnal and seasonal variations of the comet outgassing.

  17. Prebiotic chemistry and atmospheric warming of early Earth by an active young Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, V. S.; Glocer, A.; Gronoff, G.; Hébrard, E.; Danchi, W.

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen is a critical ingredient of complex biological molecules. Molecular nitrogen, however, which was outgassed into the Earth’s early atmosphere, is relatively chemically inert and nitrogen fixation into more chemically reactive compounds requires high temperatures. Possible mechanisms of nitrogen fixation include lightning, atmospheric shock heating by meteorites, and solar ultraviolet radiation. Here we show that nitrogen fixation in the early terrestrial atmosphere can be explained by frequent and powerful coronal mass ejection events from the young Sun--so-called superflares. Using magnetohydrodynamic simulations constrained by Kepler Space Telescope observations, we find that successive superflare ejections produce shocks that accelerate energetic particles, which would have compressed the early Earth’s magnetosphere. The resulting extended polar cap openings provide pathways for energetic particles to penetrate into the atmosphere and, according to our atmospheric chemistry simulations, initiate reactions converting molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide and methane to the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide as well as hydrogen cyanide, an essential compound for life. Furthermore, the destruction of N2, CO2 and CH4 suggests that these greenhouse gases cannot explain the stability of liquid water on the early Earth. Instead, we propose that the efficient formation of nitrous oxide could explain a warm early Earth.

  18. An Electromagnetic Interference Study of Potential Transmitter Sites for the HF Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-19

    heating . The measurements described in this report were conducted at a number of candidate HAARP transmitter sites in the vicinity of Fairbanks...employ the High Power Auroral Stimulation (HIPAS) RF heating facility [1], located in the Chena River valley area near Fairbanks. HAARP will be an...Potential Transmitter Sites for the HF Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) JOSEP11 A. GOLDSTEIN EDWARD 1. KENNEDY ADRIAN S. ELEY 4 IMICHlAEL A. RuPAR C

  19. Probing the catalytic mechanism of bovine CD38/NAD+ glycohydrolase by site directed mutagenesis of key active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Isabelle; Kellenberger, Esther; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis

    2014-07-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD(+) glycohydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose via a stepwise reaction mechanism. Our recent crystallographic study of its Michaelis complex and covalently-trapped intermediates provided insights into the modalities of substrate binding and the molecular mechanism of bCD38. The aim of the present work was to determine the precise role of key conserved active site residues (Trp118, Glu138, Asp147, Trp181 and Glu218) by focusing mainly on the cleavage of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond. We analyzed the kinetic parameters of mutants of these residues which reside within the bCD38 subdomain in the vicinity of the scissile bond of bound NAD(+). To address the reaction mechanism we also performed chemical rescue experiments with neutral (methanol) and ionic (azide, formate) nucleophiles. The crucial role of Glu218, which orients the substrate for cleavage by interacting with the N-ribosyl 2'-OH group of NAD(+), was highlighted. This contribution to catalysis accounts for almost half of the reaction energy barrier. Other contributions can be ascribed notably to Glu138 and Asp147 via ground-state destabilization and desolvation in the vicinity of the scissile bond. Key interactions with Trp118 and Trp181 were also proven to stabilize the ribooxocarbenium ion-like transition state. Altogether we propose that, as an alternative to a covalent acylal reaction intermediate with Glu218, catalysis by bCD38 proceeds through the formation of a discrete and transient ribooxocarbenium intermediate which is stabilized within the active site mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  20. Design, synthesis, and anticancer activity of novel berberine derivatives prepared via CuAAC "click" chemistry as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Yan, Tian-Hua; Yan, Lan; Li, Qian; Wang, Rui-Lian; Hu, Zhen-Lin; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Sun, Qing-Yan; Cao, Yong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel derivatives of phenyl-substituted berberine triazolyls has been designed and synthesized via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry in an attempt to develop antitumor agents. All of the compounds were evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of three human cancer cell lines, including MCF-7 (breast), SW-1990 (pancreatic), and SMMC-7721 (liver) and the noncancerous human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cell lines. The results indicated that most of the compounds displayed notable anticancer activities against the MCF-7 cells compared with berberine. Among these derivatives, compound 16 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the SW-1990 and SMMC-7721 cell lines, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 8.54±1.97 μM and 11.87±1.83 μM, respectively. Compound 36 exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 cell line, with an IC50 value of 12.57±1.96 μM. Compound 16 and compound 36 exhibited low cytotoxicity in the HUVEC cell line, with IC50 values of 25.49±3.24 μM and 30.47±3.47 μM. Furthermore, compounds 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 32, and 36 exhibited much better selectivity than berberine toward the normal cell line HUVEC.

  1. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  2. Kinetics of nucleotide entry into RNA polymerase active site provides mechanism for efficiency and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Sexton, Rachel E; Feig, Michael

    2017-04-01

    During transcription, RNA polymerase II elongates RNA by adding nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) complementary to a DNA template. Structural studies have suggested that NTPs enter and exit the active site via the narrow secondary pore but details have remained unclear. A kinetic model is presented that integrates molecular dynamics simulations with experimental data. Previous simulations of trigger loop dynamics and the dynamics of matched and mismatched NTPs in and near the active site were combined with new simulations describing NTP exit from the active site via the secondary pore. Markov state analysis was applied to identify major states and estimate kinetic rates for transitions between those states. The kinetic model predicts elongation and misincorporation rates in close agreement with experiment and provides mechanistic hypotheses for how NTP entry and exit via the secondary pore is feasible and a key feature for achieving high elongation and low misincorporation rates during RNA elongation.

  3. Gamma exposure rates due to neutron activation of soil: site of Hood detonation, Operation Plumbbob

    SciTech Connect

    Auxier, J.A.; Ohnesorge, W.F.

    1980-06-01

    This paper is the result of some recent discussions of exposure rates within the first few hours of the Hood detonation of the Plumbbob series due to neutron activation of soil. We estimated the exposure rates from 1/2 to 3 h after the detonation from ground zero to 1000 yards from ground zero. The area was assumed to be uncontaminated by fallout. Soil samples from the area of the Nevada Test Site at which the Hood device was detonated were sent to ORNL by Dr. John Malik of Los Alamos and by Mr. Gordon Jacks of the Nevada Test Site. These samples were irradiated at the DOSAR facility and the resulting activity analyzed. Calculations of exposure rates were then made based on the analyzed activity and the measured thermal neutron fluences at DOSAR and at the Hood Site.

  4. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  5. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed.

  6. A mutational analysis of the active site of human type II inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Sintchak, Michael D; Caron, Paul R; Nimmesgern, Elmar; DeCenzo, Maureen T; Livingston, David J; Raybuck, Scott A

    2002-01-31

    The oxidation of IMP to XMP is the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of guanine ribonucleotides. This NAD-dependent reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Based upon the recent structural determination of IMPDH complexed to oxidized IMP (XMP*) and the potent uncompetitive inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA), we have selected active site residues and prepared mutants of human type II IMPDH. The catalytic parameters of these mutants were determined. Mutations G326A, D364A, and the active site nucleophile C331A all abolish enzyme activity to less than 0.1% of wild type. These residues line the IMP binding pocket and are necessary for correct positioning of the substrate, Asp364 serving to anchor the ribose ring of the nucleotide. In the MPA/NAD binding site, significant loss of activity was seen by mutation of any residue of the triad Arg322, Asn303, Asp274 which form a hydrogen bonding network lining one side of this pocket. From a model of NAD bound to the active site consistent with the mutational data, we propose that these resides are important in binding the ribose ring of the nicotinamide substrate. Additionally, mutations in the pair Thr333, Gln441, which lies close to the xanthine ring, cause a significant drop in the catalytic activity of IMPDH. It is proposed that these residues serve to deliver the catalytic water molecule required for hydrolysis of the cysteine-bound XMP* intermediate formed after oxidation by NAD.

  7. Chemistry with a Peel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; Larsen, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Presents experiments that introduce natural product chemistry into high school classrooms. In the laboratory activities, students isolate and analyze the oil in orange peels. Students also perform a steam distillation and learn about terpenes. (DDR)

  8. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  9. More Chemistry in a Soda Bottle: A Conservation of Mass Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Daniel Q.; Shaw, Stephanie A.; Bare, William O.; Goldsby, Kenneth A.

    1995-08-01

    A simple activity designed to illustrate conservation of mass is reported. The activity uses a two-liter soda bottle to contain the products of a gas-evolving reaction. While any number of gas-evolving reactions could be used in this activity, a specific procedure for vinegar and baking soda is given since these materials present nominal hazards and are readily available to K-12 teachers.

  10. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    On-site detection of enzymatic activities has been suggested as a rapid surrogate for microbiological pollution monitoring of water resources (e.g. using glucuronidases, galactosidases, esterases). Due to the possible short measuring intervals enzymatic methods have high potential as near-real time water quality monitoring tools. This presentation describes results from a long termed field test. For twelve months, two ColiMinder devices (Vienna Water Monitoring, Austria) for on-site determination of enzymatic activity were tested for stream water monitoring at the experimental catchment HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory, Center for Water Resource Systems, Vienna University of Technology). The devices were overall able to follow and reflect the diverse hydrological and microbiological conditions of the monitored stream during the test period. Continuous data in high temporal resolution captured the course of enzymatic activity in stream water during diverse rainfall events. The method also proofed sensitive enough to determine diurnal fluctuations of enzymatic activity in stream water during dry periods. The method was able to capture a seasonal trend of enzymatic activity in stream water that matches the results gained from Colilert18 analysis for E. coli and coliform bacteria of monthly grab samples. Furthermore the comparison of ColiMinder data with measurements gained at the same test site with devices using the same method but having different construction design (BACTcontrol, microLAN) showed consistent measuring results. Comparative analysis showed significant differences between measured enzymatic activity (modified fishman units and pmol/min/100ml) and cultivation based analyses (most probable number, colony forming unit). Methods of enzymatic activity measures are capable to detect ideally the enzymatic activity caused by all active target bacteria members, including VBNC (viable but nonculturable) while cultivation based methods cannot detect VBNC

  11. A Variable Active Site Residue Influences the Kinetics of Response Regulator Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-10-04

    Two-component regulatory systems, minimally composed of a sensor kinase and a response regulator protein, are common mediators of signal transduction in microorganisms. All response regulators contain a receiver domain with conserved active site residues that catalyze the signal activating and deactivating phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. We explored the impact of variable active site position T+1 (one residue C-terminal to the conserved Thr/Ser) on reaction kinetics and signaling fidelity, using wild type and mutant Escherichia coli CheY, CheB, and NarL to represent the three major sequence classes observed across response regulators: Ala/Gly, Ser/Thr, and Val/Ile/Met, respectively, at T+1. Biochemical and structural data together suggested that different amino acids at T+1 impacted reaction kinetics by altering access to the active site while not perturbing overall protein structure. A given amino acid at position T+1 had similar effects on autodephosphorylation in each protein background tested, likely by modulating access of the attacking water molecule to the active site. Similarly, rate constants for CheY autophosphorylation with three different small molecule phosphodonors were consistent with the steric constraints on access to the phosphorylation site arising from combination of specific phosphodonors with particular amino acids at T+1. Because other variable active site residues also influence response regulator phosphorylation biochemistry, we began to explore how context (here, the amino acid at T+2) affected the influence of position T+1 on CheY autocatalytic reactions. Finally, position T+1 affected the fidelity and kinetics of phosphotransfer between sensor kinases and response regulators but was not a primary determinant of their interaction.

  12. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  13. Counting Active Sites on Titanium Oxide-Silica Catalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Activation through In Situ Poisoning with Phenylphosphonic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Boston, Andrew M.; Thompson, Anthony B.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2015-06-04

    Quantifying specific active sites in supported catalysts improves our understanding and assists in rational design. Supported oxides can undergo significant structural changes as surface densities increase from site-isolated cations to monolayers and crystallites, which changes the number of kinetically relevant sites. Herein, TiOx domains are titrated on TiOx–SiO2 selectively with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). An ex situ method quantifies all fluid-accessible TiOx, whereas an in situ titration during cis-cyclooctene epoxidation provides previously unavailable values for the number of tetrahedral Ti sites on which H2O2 activation occurs. We use this method to determine the active site densities of 22 different catalysts with different synthesis methods, loadings, and characteristic spectra and find a single intrinsic turnover frequency for cis-cyclooctene epoxidation of (40±7) h-1. This simple method gives molecular-level insight into catalyst structure that is otherwise hidden when bulk techniques are used.

  14. Long-term observation of fog chemistry and estimation of fog water and nitrogen input via fog water deposition at a mountainous site in Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Katata, Genki; Noguchi, Izumi; Sakai, Shigekatsu; Watanabe, Yoko; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Furutani, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate water and nitrogen input via fog deposition, the fog water chemistry and deposition around a crater lake (Lake Mashu) in northern Japan were investigated in the growing seasons of trees (summer to autumn) in 2006-2012. The fog samples were collected using an active fog collector and droplet size distribution was measured with a droplet size spectrometer (FM-100). The visibility (VIS)-liquid water content of fog (LWC) relationship differed between summer and autumn. Large fog droplets decreased in autumn and the calculated LWC from FM-100 measurements (LWCobs) were lower than those in summer at the same VIS. Two empirical curves between LWCobs and VIS were obtained and used for better estimation of fog deposition. Fog deposition was calculated from LWC empirically derived from past VIS data and deposition velocity (Vd) estimated using wind speed and vegetation parameters. The mean pH of fog water was 4.6 and the percentage of samples of pH 4.0 or more was 93%. Compared to previous literature of exposure experiments of acid mist on plants, fog acidity in this study did not seem to injure plant leaves. The water input via fog deposition accumulated for each growing season was estimated at 107-140 mm, corresponding to 18-23% of the precipitation in the same period. Nitrogen deposition via fog deposition in a plant growing season was estimated at 26-30 meq m- 2 (3.6-4.2 kg N ha- 1). As a long-term trend, NO3- concentration in fog water decreased significantly. However, the long-term trends of fog and nitrogen depositions were not clear.

  15. Functional biomimetic models for the active site in the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Collman, James P; Decréau, Richard A

    2008-11-07

    A functional analog of the active site in the respiratory enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reproduces every feature in CcO's active site: a myoglobin-like heme (heme a3), a distal tridentate imidazole copper complex (Cu(B)), a phenol (Tyr244), and a proximal imidazole. When covalently attached to a liquid-crystalline SAM film on an Au electrode, this functional model continuously catalyzes the selective four-electron reduction of dioxygen at physiological potential and pH, under rate-limiting electron flux (as occurs in CcO).

  16. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  17. Forensic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  18. New active site oriented glyoxyl-agarose derivatives of Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Davide A; Serra, Immacolata; Ubiali, Daniela; Terreni, Marco; Albertini, Alessandra M

    2007-01-01

    Background Immobilized Penicillin G Acylase (PGA) derivatives are biocatalysts that are industrially used for the hydrolysis of Penicillin G by fermentation and for the kinetically controlled synthesis of semi-synthetic β-lactam antibiotics. One of the most used supports for immobilization is glyoxyl-activated agarose, which binds the protein by reacting through its superficial Lys residues. Since in E. coli PGA Lys are also present near the active site, an immobilization that occurs through these residues may negatively affect the performance of the biocatalyst due to the difficult diffusion of the substrate into the active site. A preferential orientation of the enzyme with the active site far from the support surface would be desirable to avoid this problem. Results Here we report how it is possible to induce a preferential orientation of the protein during the binding process on aldehyde activated supports. A superficial region of PGA, which is located on the opposite side of the active site, is enriched in its Lys content. The binding of the enzyme onto the support is consequently forced through the Lys rich region, thus leaving the active site fully accessible to the substrate. Different mutants with an increasing number of Lys have been designed and, when active, immobilized onto glyoxyl agarose. The synthetic performances of these new catalysts were compared with those of the immobilized wild-type (wt) PGA. Our results show that, while the synthetic performance of the wt PGA sensitively decreases after immobilization, the Lys enriched mutants have similar performances to the free enzyme even after immobilization. We also report the observations made with other mutants which were unable to undergo a successful maturation process for the production of active enzymes or which resulted toxic for the host cell. Conclusion The desired orientation of immobilized PGA with the active site freely accessible can be obtained by increasing the density of Lys residues

  19. The pH-dependence of the Escherichia coli RNase HII-catalysed reaction suggests that an active site carboxylate group participates directly in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bastock, James A; Webb, Michelle; Grasby, Jane A

    2007-04-27

    RNase HII specifically catalyses the hydrolysis of phosphate diester linkages contained within the RNA portion of DNA/RNA hybrids. The catalytic parameters of the enzyme derived from Escherichia coli BL21 have been measured using 5'-fluorescent oligodeoxynucleotide substrates containing embedded ribonucleotides. The products of the reaction and the chemistry of phosphate diester hydrolysis were assigned unequivocally using mass spectrometry. The pH-dependence of the catalytic parameters was measured under conditions of optimal magnesium ion concentration. The logarithm of the turnover number of the enzyme increases steeply with pH until a pH-independent region is reached close to neutrality. The slope of the pH-dependent region is 2, indicating that the catalytically proficient form of RNase HII is di-anionic. The pH-dependence of log 1/K(M) is a sigmoidal curve reaching a maximal value at higher pH, suggesting deprotonation of a residue stabilises substrate binding. Possible mechanisms for the RNase HII-catalysed reaction consistent with the pH-dependent behaviour of the enzyme are discussed. The active sites of RNase H enzymes contain a cluster of four strictly conserved carboxylate groups. Together, the data suggest a requirement for ionisation of an active site carboxylic acid for metal ion binding or correct positioning of metal ion(s) in the enzyme-substrate complex and a role for a second active site carboxylate in general base catalysis.

  20. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  1. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  2. Human activities in Natura 2000 sites: a highly diversified conservation network.

    PubMed

    Tsiafouli, Maria A; Apostolopoulou, Evangelia; Mazaris, Antonios D; Kallimanis, Athanasios S; Drakou, Evangelia G; Pantis, John D

    2013-05-01

    The Natura 2000 network was established across the European Union's (EU) Member States with the aim to conserve biodiversity, while ensuring the sustainability of human activities. However, to what kind and to what extent Natura 2000 sites are subject to human activities and how this varies across Member States remains unspecified. Here, we analyzed 111,269 human activity records from 14,727 protected sites in 20 Member States. The frequency of occurrence of activities differs among countries, with more than 86 % of all sites being subjected to agriculture or forestry. Activities like hunting, fishing, urbanization, transportation, and tourism are more frequently recorded in south European sites than in northern or eastern ones. The observed variations indicate that Natura 2000 networks are highly heterogeneous among EU Member States. Our analysis highlights the importance of agriculture in European landscapes and indicates possible targets for policy interventions at national, European, or "sub-European" level. The strong human presence in the Natura 2000 network throughout Member States, shows that conservation initiatives could succeed only by combining social and ecological sustainability and by ensuring the integration of policies affecting biodiversity.

  3. Kv3 channel assembly, trafficking and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuanzheng; Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-05-15

    Zinc, a divalent heavy metal ion and an essential mineral for life, regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via ion channels. However, its binding sites and regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we report that Kv3 channel assembly, localization and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites. Local perfusion of zinc reversibly reduced spiking frequency of cultured neurons most likely by suppressing Kv3 channels. Indeed, zinc inhibited Kv3.1 channel activity and slowed activation kinetics, independent of its site in the N-terminal T1 domain. Biochemical assays surprisingly identified a novel zinc-binding site in the Kv3.1 C-terminus, critical for channel activity and axonal targeting, but not for the zinc inhibition. Finally, mutagenesis revealed an important role of the junction between the first transmembrane (TM) segment and the first extracellular loop in sensing zinc. Its mutant enabled fast spiking with relative resistance to the zinc inhibition. Therefore, our studies provide novel mechanistic insights into the multifaceted regulation of Kv3 channel activity and localization by divalent heavy metal ions.

  4. Active-Site Monovalent Cations Revealed in a 1.55 Å Resolution Hammerhead Ribozyme Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael; Schultz, Eric P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a 1.55 Å crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme derived from Schistosoma mansoni in conditions that permit detailed observations of Na+ ion binding in the ribozyme's active site. At least two such Na+ ions are observed. The first Na+ ion binds to the N7 of G10.1 and the adjacent A9 phosphate in a manner identical to that previously observed for divalent cations. A second Na+ ion binds to the Hoogsteen face of G12, the general base in the hammerhead cleavage reaction, thereby potentially dissipating the negative charge of the catalytically active enolate form of the nucleotide base. A potential but more ambiguous third site bridges the A9 and scissile phosphates in a manner consistent with previous predictions. Hammerhead ribozymes have been observed to be active in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations, including Na+, but the mechanism by which monovalent cations substitute for divalent cations in hammerhead catalysis remains unclear. Our results enable us to suggest that Na+ directly and specifically substitutes for divalent cations in the hammerhead active site. The detailed geometry of the pre-catalytic active site complex is also revealed with a new level of precision, thanks to the quality of the electron density maps obtained from what is currently the highest resolution ribozyme structure in the protein data bank. PMID:23711504

  5. Tuned by metals: the TET peptidase activity is controlled by 3 metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Matteo; Girard, Eric; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-02-08

    TET aminopeptidases are dodecameric particles shared in the three life domains involved in various biological processes, from carbon source provider in archaea to eye-pressure regulation in humans. Each subunit contains a dinuclear metal site (M1 and M2) responsible for the enzyme catalytic activity. However, the role of each metal ion is still uncharacterized. Noteworthy, while mesophilic TETs are activated by Mn(2+), hyperthermophilic TETs prefers Co(2+). Here, by means of anomalous x-ray crystallography and enzyme kinetics measurements of the TET3 aminopeptidase from the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTET3), we show that M2 hosts the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while M1 stabilizes the TET3 quaternary structure and controls the active site flexibility in a temperature dependent manner. A new third metal site (M3) was found in the substrate binding pocket, modulating the PfTET3 substrate preferences. These data show that TET activity is tuned by the molecular interplay among three metal sites.

  6. Getting Reactions to Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter S.

    1983-01-01

    "COMETS on Careers" describes science-related careers, introduces activities illustrating a science concept being studied, and encourages use of professional persons as activity leaders. Several COMETS chemistry activities are described. These activities, which can be performed in school or at home, focus on colloids, acid/base…

  7. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  8. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  9. Isolation, biological activity, synthesis, and medicinal chemistry of the pederin/mycalamide family of natural products.

    PubMed

    Mosey, R Adam; Floreancig, Paul E

    2012-09-01

    This review highlights the broad range of science that has arisen from the isolation of pederin, the mycalamides, theopederins, and onnamides, and psymberin. Specific topics include structure determination, biological activity, synthesis, and analog preparation and analysis.

  10. Terpenes from the soft corals of the genus Sarcophyton: chemistry and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lin-Fu; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2013-12-01

    This review covers structural diversity and biological activities of terpenes from soft corals of the genus of Sarcophyton, reported from 1995 to July, 2011. During this period, besides undefined species, 16 species of the genus Sarcophyton, from different geographical areas, had been chemically examined. Two hundred and five terpenes had been isolated from this genus, including eleven sesquiterpenes, 165 diterpenes, 29 biscembranoids, some of which had novel skeletons. They exhibited various biological features, such as antifeedant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antifouling activities.

  11. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  12. Active layer dynamics in three sites with contrasted topography in the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Marc; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-04-01

    Topography exerts a key role on permafrost distribution in areas where mean annual temperatures are slightly negative. This is the case of low-altitude environments in Maritime Antarctica, namely in the South Shetland Islands, where permafrost is marginal to discontinuous until elevations of 20-40 m asl turning to continuous at higher areas. Consequently, the active layer dynamics is also strongly conditioned by the geomorphological setting. In January 2014 we installed three sites for monitoring the active layer dynamics across the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands) in different geomorphological environments at elevations between 60 and 100 m. The purpose was to examine the role of the topography and microclimatic conditions on the active layer dynamics. At each site a set of loggers was set up to monitor: air temperatures, snow thickness, ground temperatures until 80 cm together with the coupling atmosphere-ground temperatures. During the first year of monitoring the mean annual air temperatures show similar values in the three sites, in all cases slightly below freezing. The snowy conditions during this year in this archipelago have resulted in a late melting of snow, which has also conditioned the duration of frozen conditions in the uppermost soil layers. Topography has a strong influence on snow cover duration, which in turn affects frozen ground conditions. The Domo site is located in a higher position with respect to the central plateau of Byers; here, the wind is stronger and snow cover thinner, which has conditioned a longer thawing season than in the other two sites (Cerro Negro, Escondido). These two sites are located in topographically protected areas favouring snow accumulation. The longer persistence of snow conditions a longer duration of negative temperatures in the active layer of the permafrost. This research was financially supported by the HOLOANTAR project (Portuguese Science Foundation) and the AXA Research Fund.

  13. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for Commercial Wind Leasing and...

  14. Organized Agents: Canadian Teacher Unions as Alternative Sites for Social Justice Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rottmann, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Historically teachers' federations have been some of the major organizational sites for social justice leadership in K-12 public education. Despite this history of activism, social justice teacher unionism remains a relatively underdeveloped concept. This article merges four philosophical conceptions of social justice in education: liberal…

  15. Penicillin Use in Meningococcal Disease Management: Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Sites, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Blain, Amy E.; Mandal, Sema; Wu, Henry; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Harrison, Lee H.; Farley, Monica M.; Lynfield, Ruth; Miller, Lisa; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M.; Anderson, Raydel; Harcourt, Brian H.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Cohn, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, in the Active Bacterial Core surveillance sites, penicillin was not commonly used to treat meningococcal disease. This is likely because of inconsistent availability of antimicrobial susceptibility testing and ease of use of third-generation cephalosporins. Consideration of current practices may inform future meningococcal disease management guidelines. PMID:27704009

  16. 77 FR 5830 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... of involving Federal agencies, states, tribes, local governments, offshore wind energy developers, and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind...

  17. Penicillin Use in Meningococcal Disease Management: Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Sites, 2009.

    PubMed

    Blain, Amy E; Mandal, Sema; Wu, Henry; MacNeil, Jessica R; Harrison, Lee H; Farley, Monica M; Lynfield, Ruth; Miller, Lisa; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M; Anderson, Raydel; Harcourt, Brian H; Mayer, Leonard W; Clark, Thomas A; Cohn, Amanda C